Science.gov

Sample records for add-on fgd systems

  1. LIME FGD SYSTEMS DATA BOOK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Data Book is intended to aid engineers in understanding the process design features that are unique to lime flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It is intended to supplement, not replace, basic information on engineering design. It is addressed to engineers who must design...

  2. Next generation low cost wet FGD system

    SciTech Connect

    Klingspor, J.S.; Bresowar, G.E.; Gray, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    Limestone based wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) has been the dominating control technology since the introduction of the clean air act and is projected to be the preferred FGD technology for the foreseeable future. Following the introduction of wet FGD systems in the late `60s, the technology quickly reached maturity with only incremental improvements during recent years. However, deregulation, emission trading, and market forces have demanded significant improvements in capital and operating costs, performance, environmental impact, ease of retrofit and cycle time. In response to market demands, ABB has developed a new generation wet FGD system, named LS-2, based on the traditional open spray tower technology. The development of the LS-2 system has progressed methodically within the ABB R&D community within the last three years and is currently being demonstrated at Ohio Edison`s Niles station.

  3. TECHNICAL REVIEW OF DRY FGD SYSTEMS AND ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF SPRAY DRYER FGD SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an extensive study of dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, involving dry injection of absorbents or spray drying. (The study was undertaken because they appear to have both process and economic advantages over wet FGD.) Design concepts (e.g., ty...

  4. Next generation low cost wet FGD system

    SciTech Connect

    Klingspor, J.S.; Bresowar, G.E.

    1995-12-31

    Limestone based wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) has been the dominating control technology since the introduction of the clean air act and is projected to be the preferred FGD technology for the foreseeable future. Following the introduction of wet FGD systems in the late `60s, the technology quickly reached maturity with only incremental improvements during recent years. However, deregulation, emission trading, and market forces have demanded significant improvements in capital and operating costs, performance, environmental impact, ease of retrofit and cycle time. In response to market demands, ABB has developed a new generation wet FGD system, named LS-2, based on the traditional open spray tower technology. The development of the LS-2 system has progressed methodically within the ABB R and D community within the last three years and is currently being demonstrated at Ohio Edison`s Niles station. The LS-2 system features cost savings and performance improvements never before demonstrated in wet FGD systems. The cost level of the LS-2 system will make it a clear alternative to fuel switching when applied in a manner similar to the installation at Niles. The economics of the LS-2 system is discussed in some detail.

  5. Retrofit FGD system price trends and influence factors

    SciTech Connect

    Boward, W.L.; Brinkmann, A.M.S.

    1998-12-31

    Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) is a mature technology. The basic system has been applied to utility boiler systems since the early 1970s. As this technology approaches its 30th birthday, the authors look at recent improvements that should provide both capital cost improvements and operability improvements. The authors expect that continued improvements in lowering FGD system costs will be advantageous to the wider applicability of the technology. In this paper the authors examine the cost history of wet FGD systems over the course of their approximately thee decades of service. Over these 30 years they have seen the costs of FGD systems drop by almost 70%. They also examine new developments in the application of wet FGD systems and the potential reduction in capital and operating costs that result from these improvements. Finally, the authors examine the other factors that enhance the specification, purchase, cost-effective erection, and operation of successful FGD installations.

  6. Utility FGD survey: January--December 1989. Volume 1, Categorical summaries of FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

    1992-03-01

    This is Volume 1 of the Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

  7. Field investigation of FGD system chemistry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Litherland, S.T.; Colley, J.D.; Glover, R.L.; Maller, G.; Behrens, G.P.

    1984-12-01

    Three full-scale wet limestone FGD systems were investigated to gain a better understanding of FGD system operation and chemistry. The three plants which participated in the program were South Mississippi Electric Power Association's R. D. Morrow Station, Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Craig Station, and Central Illinois Light Company's Duck Creek Station. Each FGD system was characterized with respect to SO/sub 2/ removal, liquid and solid phase chemistry, and calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate relative saturation. Mist eliminator chemistry and performance were documented at Morrow and Duck Creek. Solutions to severe mist eliminator scaling and pluggage were demonstrated at Duck Creek. A technical and econ

  8. Sustainable Uses of FGD Gypsum in Agricultural Systems: Introduction.

    PubMed

    Watts, Dexter B; Dick, Warren A

    2014-01-01

    Interest in using gypsum as a management tool to improve crop yields and soil and water quality has recently increased. Abundant supply and availability of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, a by-product of scrubbing sulfur from combustion gases at coal-fired power plants, in major agricultural producing regions within the last two decades has attributed to this interest. Currently, published data on the long-term sustainability of FGD gypsum use in agricultural systems is limited. This has led to organization of the American Society of Agronomy's Community "By-product Gypsum Uses in Agriculture" and a special collection of nine technical research articles on various issues related to FGD gypsum uses in agricultural systems. A brief review of FGD gypsum, rationale for the special collection, overviews of articles, knowledge gaps, and future research directions are presented in this introductory paper. The nine articles are focused in three general areas: (i) mercury and other trace element impacts, (ii) water quality impacts, and (iii) agronomic responses and soil physical changes. While this is not an exhaustive review of the topic, results indicate that FGD gypsum use in sustainable agricultural production systems is promising. The environmental impacts of FGD gypsum are mostly positive, with only a few negative results observed, even when applied at rates representing cumulative 80-year applications. Thus, FGD gypsum, if properly managed, seems to represent an important potential input into agricultural systems. PMID:25602557

  9. 40 CFR Table 1b to Subpart Dddd of... - Add-on Control Systems Compliance Options

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Add-on Control Systems Compliance Options 1B Table 1B to Subpart DDDD of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Products Pt. 63, Subpt. DDDD, Table 1B Table 1B to Subpart DDDD of Part 63—Add-on Control...

  10. 40 CFR Table 1b to Subpart Dddd of... - Add-on Control Systems Compliance Options

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Add-on Control Systems Compliance Options 1B Table 1B to Subpart DDDD of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Products Pt. 63, Subpt. DDDD, Table 1B Table 1B to Subpart DDDD of Part 63—Add-on Control...

  11. 40 CFR Table 1b to Subpart Dddd of... - Add-on Control Systems Compliance Options

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Add-on Control Systems Compliance Options 1B Table 1B to Subpart DDDD of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Products Pt. 63, Subpt. DDDD, Table 1B Table 1B to Subpart DDDD of Part 63—Add-on Control...

  12. Economic evaluation of FGD systems. Volume 3. Appendixes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keeth, R.J.; Miranda, J.E.; Reisdorf, J.B.; Scheck, R.W.

    1983-12-01

    This volume presents the appendices for the study which estimated costs for throw-away and regenerable FGD systems and a coal cleaning process based on December 1982 cost and technology. The appendices enclosed include the detailed lists and costs of equipment utilized in each of the 17 FGD processes evaluated as well as EPRI's Economic Premises used in costing the total levelized busbar costs.

  13. Utility FGD Survey, January--December 1989. Volume 2, Design performance data for operating FGD systems, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

    1992-03-01

    The Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

  14. Utility FGD survey, January--December 1989. Volume 2, Design performance data for operating FGD systems: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

    1992-03-01

    This is Volume 2 part 2, of the Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. This volume particularly contains basic design and performance data.

  15. FGD (flue gas desulfurization) mist eliminator system troubleshooting manual

    SciTech Connect

    Colley, J.D.; Jones, A.F.; Keeth, R.J. . Stearns-Roger Div.)

    1990-10-01

    Problems with the mist elimination system (MES) in the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems have occurred since the application of FGD technology to utility boilers in the late 1960s. Availability studies have found that failure of the MES is the second most common cause of FGD system outages. Moreover, MES problems often result in additional operating and maintenance costs and can cause particulate emission problems. This manual, prepared under sponsorship of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), contains a troubleshooting methodology for systematically identifying and addressing the underlying cause(s) of MES problems. It is based on information collected in an ongoing EPRI program to determine the causes of MES problems and evaluate potential solutions. This program involves the characterization of MES problems and development of potential solutions at various utility FGD systems. Further work at utility FGD systems is planned along with the evaluation of various MES designs at a pilot test facility to continue to improve the ability to troubleshoot mist eliminators. 2 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. FGD systems -- Physical deterioration of the chemical plant facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dille, E.R.; Ridge, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    The Clean Air Act of 1970 established the initial requirements for the control of flue gas emissions from fossil-fuel-fired power plants in the US. Until then, only mechanical collectors and electrostatic precipitators regulated smoke and fly ash emissions from these plants. Now, a new technique for controlling the chemical emissions from a fossil-fuel-fired power plant had to be installed. Since there was practically no time for a research and development program, the power industry had to move quickly to select a compliance system. They chose to modify existing technology from the chemical industry for their specific need. Thus, wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems were born into the power industry and a chemical plant was added between the electrostatic precipitator and the chimney. This paper provides insight on how a program can be implemented to reconcile the materials and corrosion protection techniques available today to the specific areas of an FGD system. This paper focuses on a typical wet limestone FGD process. This type of process constitutes the vast majority of the FGD systems by total megawatt generation in the US. The power industry must learn from its chemical plant experience if it intends to extend the service life of FGD systems to match the design life of the remaining plant power block.

  17. Structural condition assessment and upgrades of FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alsamsam, I.M.; Ridge, J.L.

    1995-09-01

    Since 1990, the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) has mandated emissions control of fossil-fired power plants. Upgrading an existing flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system has proven to be an effective means of reducing emissions to meet the CAAA requirements. It can also be a cost-effective means to reduce emissions beyond the established SO{sub 2} limits. Utilities will be able to capitalize on these situations and possibly generate revenue by trading SO{sub 2} credits. In addition to regulatory requirements, structural upgrades of an FGD system can lower operation and maintenance costs and reduce the risk of unit derates and unplanned outages. In today`s competitive power market, keeping a unit`s FGD system available and online is crucial as the earliest FGD installations approach their twentieth year of service. A structural condition assessment and upgrades program for an FGD island plays a leading role in meeting and exceeding regulatory requirements while achieving other utility goals. This paper draws from the authors` recent experiences to explore such a program and reveals the challenges it presents.

  18. Materials for outlet ducts in wet FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, H.S.; Koch, G.H.; Kistler, C.W.; Beavers, J.A.; Meadows, M.L.; Stewart, D.A.; Dene, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    It was found that the major materials problems are occurring with outlet ducts and stack linings. Outlet ducts and stacks are critical components in that failures may require complete boiler shutdown and loss of generating capacity for lengthy periods due to the lack of standby components or bypass capability. Accordingly, EPRI funded a study by Battelle on the performance of candidate materials in the outlet ducts of FGD systems at two utility plants. Because of the impact of materials failures on FGD system reliability, EPRI is currently funding a study by Battelle on the causes of these failures. This study involves site visits for field evaluations of the failures, laboratory analyses of samples collected in the field, and analysis of the data to establish the causes of the failures. Information on outlet ducts is presented in this paper.

  19. Selenium Speciation and Management in Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Searcy, K; Richardson, M; Blythe, G; Wallschlaeger, D; Chu, P; Dene, C

    2012-02-29

    This report discusses results from bench- and pilot-scale simulation tests conducted to determine the factors that impact selenium speciation and phase partitioning in wet FGD systems. The selenium chemistry in wet FGD systems is highly complex and not completely understood, thus extrapolation and scale-up of these results may be uncertain. Control of operating parameters and application of scrubber additives have successfully demonstrated the avoidance or decrease of selenite oxidation at the bench and pilot scale. Ongoing efforts to improve sample handling methods for selenium speciation measurements are also discussed. Bench-scale scrubber tests explored the impacts of oxidation air rate, trace metals, scrubber additives, and natural limestone on selenium speciation in synthetic and field-generated full-scale FGD liquors. The presence and concentration of redox-active chemical species as well as the oxidation air rate contribute to the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) conditions in FGD scrubbers. Selenite oxidation to the undesirable selenate form increases with increasing ORP conditions, and decreases with decreasing ORP conditions. Solid-phase manganese [Mn(IV)] appeared to be the significant metal impacting the oxidation of selenite to selenate. Scrubber additives were tested for their ability to inhibit selenite oxidation. Although dibasic acid and other scrubber additives showed promise in early clear liquor (sodium based and without calcium solids) bench-scale tests, these additives did not show strong inhibition of selenite oxidation in tests with higher manganese concentrations and with slurries from full-scale wet FGD systems. In bench-tests with field liquors, addition of ferric chloride at a 250:1 iron-to-selenium mass ratio sorbed all incoming selenite to the solid phase, although addition of ferric salts had no impact on native selenate that already existed in the field slurry liquor sample. As ORP increases, selenite may oxidize to selenate more

  20. Space station systems technology study (add-on task). Volume 2: Trade study and technology selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The current Space Station Systems Technology Study add on task was an outgrowth of the Advanced Platform Systems Technology Study (APSTS) that was completed in April 1983 and the subsequent Space Station System Technology Study completed in April 1984. The first APSTS proceeded from the identification of 106 technology topics to the selection of five for detailed trade studies. During the advanced platform study, the technical issues and options were evaluated through detailed trade processes, individual consideration was given to costs and benefits for the technologies identified for advancement, and advancement plans were developed. An approach similar to that was used in the subsequent study, with emphasis on system definition in four specific technology areas to facilitate a more in depth analysis of technology issues.

  1. Electric utility engineer`s FGD manual -- Volume 2: Major mechanical equipment; FGD proposal evaluations; Use of FGDPRISM in FGD system modification, proposal, evaluation, and design; FGD system case study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-04

    Part 2 of this manual provides the electric utility engineer with detailed technical information on some of the major mechanical equipment used in the FGD system. The objectives of Part 2 are the following: to provide the electric utility engineer with information on equipment that may be unfamiliar to him, including ball mills, vacuum filters, and mist eliminators; and to identify the unique technique considerations imposed by an FGD system on more familiar electric utility equipment such as fans, gas dampers, piping, valves, and pumps. Part 3 provides an overview of the recommended procedures for evaluating proposals received from FGD system vendors. The objectives are to provide procedures for evaluating the technical aspects of proposals, and to provide procedures for determining the total costs of proposals considering both initial capital costs and annual operating and maintenance costs. The primary objective of Part 4 of this manual is to provide the utility engineer who has a special interest in the capabilities of FGDPRISM [Flue Gas Desulfurization PRocess Integration and Simulation Model] with more detailed discussions of its uses, requirements, and limitations. Part 5 is a case study in using this manual in the preparation of a purchase specification and in the evaluation of proposals received from vendors. The objectives are to demonstrate how the information contained in Parts 1 and 2 can be used to improve the technical content of an FGD system purchase specification; to demonstrate how the techniques presented in Part 3 can be used to evaluate proposals received in response to the purchase specification; and to illustrate how the FGDPRISM computer program can be used to establish design parameters for the specification and evaluate vendor designs.

  2. EFFECT OF TRACE METALS AND SULFITE OXIDATION OF ADIPIC ACID DEGRADATION IN FGD SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the measurement of the adipic acid degradation rate in a bench-scale flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system, designed to simulate many of the important aspects of full-scale FGD systems. Results show that the adipic acid degradation rate depends on the ...

  3. Mercury emissions control by wet FGD systems: EPRI pilot-scale results

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.R.; Hargrove, O.W. Jr.; Seeger, D.M.

    1995-06-01

    This paper presents results from pilot-scale tests that investigated mercury removal across wet limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The program was conducted at EPRIs Environmental Control Technology Center, located in Barker, NY. The test results showed that mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) was efficiently removed across the FGD system, while elemental mercury was not collected. The practical implication of this study is that although FGD systems efficiently remove some forms of mercury from flue gas, the overall mercury removal efficiency, and therefore the total mercury emissions from a coal-fired power plant equipped with an FGD system, will depend on the chemical form of the mercury in the flue gas. Unfortunately, no validated gas sampling method is available for speciating the different forms of mercury in flue gas. It is, therefore, difficult to predict mercury removal across FGD systems and to interpret any mercury removal data that have been collected.

  4. Utilization of nickel-containing alloys for FGD systems in North America and Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.E.; Mathay, W.L.; Plant, W.H.D.

    1996-08-01

    Factors involved in the selection and application of nickel-containing alloys for FGD systems are discussed. Fabrication and construction considerations with respect to the use of wallpaper lining (sheet linings), roll-bonded clad plate and solid alloys for FGD components are reviewed. North American and European experience in the utilization of these materials is described and projections for future usage are given.

  5. Reduction of Water Use in Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect

    David Rencher

    2008-06-30

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42726 was established in January 2006, and is current through Amendment 2, April 2006. The current reporting period, April 1, 2008 through June 30, 2008, is the eighth progress-reporting period for the project. However, this report will be the final report (instead of a quarterly report) because this project is being terminated. Efforts to bring this project to a close over the past several months focused on internal project discussions, and subsequent communications with NETL, regarding the inherent difficulty with completing this project as originally scoped, and the option of performing an engineering study to accomplish some of the chief project objectives. However, NETL decided that the engineering study did indeed constitute a significant scope deviation from the original concepts, and that pursuit of this option was not recommended. These discussions are summarized in the Results and Discussion, and the Conclusion sections. The objective of this project by a team lead by URS Group was to demonstrate the use of regenerative heat exchange to reduce flue gas temperature and minimize evaporative water consumption in wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intended to demonstrate that regenerative heat exchange to cool flue gas upstream of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and reheat flue gas downstream of the FGD system would result in the following benefits to air pollution control (APC) systems on coal-fired power plants: (1) Improve ESP performance due to reduced gas volume and improved ash resistivity characteristics, (2) Control SO3 emissions through condensation on the fly ash, and (3) Avoid the need to install wet stacks or to provide flue gas reheat. Finally, operation at cooler flue gas temperatures offered the potential benefit of increasing mercury (Hg) removal across the ESP and FGD systems. This project planned to conduct pilot-scale tests of regenerative heat

  6. 40 CFR 63.3174 - What are the requirements for a capture system or add-on control device which is not taken into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... system or add-on control device which is not taken into account when demonstrating compliance with the... system or add-on control device which is not taken into account when demonstrating compliance with the applicable emission limitations? You may have capture systems or add-on control devices which you choose...

  7. 40 CFR 63.3174 - What are the requirements for a capture system or add-on control device which is not taken into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... capture system or add-on control device which is not taken into account when demonstrating compliance with... capture system or add-on control device which is not taken into account when demonstrating compliance with the applicable emission limitations? You may have capture systems or add-on control devices which...

  8. 40 CFR 63.3174 - What are the requirements for a capture system or add-on control device which is not taken into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... capture system or add-on control device which is not taken into account when demonstrating compliance with... capture system or add-on control device which is not taken into account when demonstrating compliance with the applicable emission limitations? You may have capture systems or add-on control devices which...

  9. 40 CFR 63.3546 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? 63.3546 Section 63... the Emission Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.3546 How do I establish the emission capture system... the emission stream for leakage. (d) Carbon adsorbers. If your add-on control device is a...

  10. 40 CFR 63.4767 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? 63.4767 Section 63... capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? During the... efficiency according to § 63.4766. (c) Carbon adsorbers. If your add-on control device is a carbon...

  11. 40 CFR 63.4567 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? 63.4567 Section 63... emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? During the... operating limits for that catalytic oxidizer. (c) Regenerative carbon adsorbers. If your add-on...

  12. 40 CFR 63.3967 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? 63.3967 Section 63... establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test... catalytic oxidizer. (c) Regenerative carbon adsorbers. If your add-on control device is a...

  13. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart IIIi of... - Operating Limits for Capture Systems and Add-On Control Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of appendix M to 40 CFR part 51 i. Collecting the direction of air flow, and either the facial... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Operating Limits for Capture Systems... Subpart IIII of Part 63—Operating Limits for Capture Systems and Add-On Control Devices If you...

  14. 40 CFR 63.4767 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true How do I establish the emission capture... Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4767 How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on...) Carbon adsorbers. If your add-on control device is a carbon adsorber, establish the operating...

  15. Increased inspiratory esophagogastric junction pressure in systemic sclerosis: An add-on to antireflux barrier

    PubMed Central

    Nobre e Souza, Miguel Ângelo; Bezerra, Patrícia Carvalho; Nobre, Rivianny Arrais; Holanda, Esther Studart da Fonseca; dos Santos, Armênio Aguiar

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate crural diaphragm (CD) function in systemic sclerosis (SSc) using high-resolution manometry and standardized inspiratory maneuvers. METHODS: Eight SSc volunteers (average age, 40.1 years; one male) and 13 controls (average age, 32.2 years; six males) participated in the study. A high-resolution manometry/impedance system measured the esophagus and esophagogastric junction (EGJ) pressure profile during swallows and two respiratory maneuvers: sinus arrhythmia maneuver (SAM; the average of six EGJ peak pressures during 5-s deep inhalations) and threshold maneuver (TM; the EGJ peak pressures during forced inhalation under 12 and 24 cmH2O loads). Inspiratory diaphragm lowering (IDL) was taken as the displacement of the EGJ high-pressure zone during the SAM. RESULTS: SSc patients had lower mean lower esophageal sphincter pressure than controls during normal breathing (19.7 ± 2.8 mmHg vs 32.2 ± 2.7 mmHg, P = 0.007). Sinus arrhythmia maneuver pressure was higher in SSc patients than in controls (142.6 ± 9.4 mmHg vs 104.6 ± 13.8 mmHg, P = 0.019). Sinus arrhythmia maneuver pressure normalized to IDL was also higher in SSc patients than in controls (83.8 ± 13.4 mmHg vs 37.5 ± 6.9 mmHg, P = 0.005). Threshold maneuver pressures normalized to IDL were also greater in SSc patients than in controls (TM 12 cmH2O: 85.1 ± 16.4 mmHg vs 43.9 ± 6.3 mmHg, P = 0.039; TM 24 cmH2O: 85.2 ± 16.4 mmHg vs 46.2 ± 6.6 mmHg, P = 0.065). Inspiratory diaphragm lowering in SSc patients was less than in controls (2.1 ± 0.3 cm vs 3 ± 0.2 cm, P = 0.011). CONCLUSION: SSc patients had increased inspiratory EGJ pressure. This is an add-on to EGJ pressure and indicates that the antireflux barrier can be trained. PMID:25717239

  16. FULL-SCALE TESTING OF ENHANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    D.K. McDonald; G.T. Amrhein; G.A. Kudlac; D. Madden Yurchison

    2003-05-07

    Wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems are currently installed on about 25% of the coal-fired utility generating capacity in the U.S., representing about 15% of the number of coal-fired units. Depending on the effect of operating parameters such as mercury content of the coal, form of mercury (elemental or oxidized) in the flue gas, scrubber spray tower configuration, liquid-to-gas ratio, and slurry chemistry, FGD systems can provide cost-effective, near-term mercury emissions control options with a proven history of commercial operation. For boilers already equipped with FGD systems, the incremental cost of any vapor phase mercury removal achieved is minimal. To be widely accepted and implemented, technical approaches that improve mercury removal performance for wet FGD systems should also have low incremental costs and have little or no impact on operation and SO{sub 2} removal performance. The ultimate goal of the Full-scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control for Wet FGD Systems Program was to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The program was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development, and Babcock & Wilcox. Host sites and associated support were provided by Michigan South Central Power Agency (MSCPA) and Cinergy. Field-testing was completed at two commercial coal-fired utilities with wet FGD systems: (1) MSCPA's 55 MW{sub e} Endicott Station and (2) Cinergy's 1300 MW{sub e} Zimmer Station. Testing was conducted at these two locations because of the large differences in size and wet scrubber chemistry. Endicott employs a limestone, forced oxidation (LSFO) wet FGD system, whereas Zimmer uses Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime (magnesium enhanced lime) and ex situ oxidation. Both locations burn Ohio bituminous coal.

  17. Applications and experiences with super duplex stainless steel in wet FGD scrubber systems

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, R.; Byrne, G.; Warburton, G.; Hebdon, S.

    1998-12-31

    The paper presents the properties of the author`s company`s proprietary super duplex stainless steel. Work is presented showing the development of a more realistic laboratory solution representing typical limestone slurries found in real flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The importance of additions of metal ions such as Fe{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+} as well as partially oxidized sulfur species is demonstrated. Results are presented comparing the crevice corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steel in these slurries with other commonly used wrought and cast stainless steels, for both simulated anthracite and lignite type slurries. Data from loop tests on the erosion resistance of a range of alloys in simulated FGD slurries is presented. The results clearly show the superior resistance of super duplex stainless steel to both crevice corrosion and erosion in FGD slurries. Finally the experiences in UK FGD systems with both cast and wrought super duplex stainless steel are presented.

  18. Sustainable uses of FGD gypsum in agricultural systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interest in using gypsum as a management tool to improve crop yields and soil/water quality has recently increased. Abundant supply and availability of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, a by-product of scrubbing sulfur (S) from combustion gases at coal-fired power plants, in major agricultural...

  19. PRELIMINARY ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF A LIME SPRAY DRYER FGD SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a preliminary economic analysis of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes (one dry and one wet) for a new 500-MW power plant burning Western coal having 0.7% sulfur, 9.7% ash, and a heating value of 9700 Btu/lb and meeting current new source perf...

  20. APTB - INVESTIGATION OF MERCURY CONTROL IN WET FGD SCRUBBER SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the high removal efficiency, wide applicability, and ability control emissions at a reasonable cost, wet FGD scrubbers are the method used tin the U.S. to control emissions from high sulfur coals. NOx emission control requirements are becoming increasing stringent and s...

  1. Evaluation of Mercury Emissions from Coal-Fired Facilities with SCR and FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Withum; S. C. Tseng; J. E. Locke

    2006-01-31

    CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP)--wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber--fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercury speciation and removal at 10 coal-fired facilities. The principal purpose of this work is to develop a better understanding of the potential mercury removal ''co-benefits'' achieved by NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} control technologies. It is expected that these data will provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. Ultimately, this insight could help to design and operate SCR and FGD systems to maximize mercury removal. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effect of SCR on mercury capture in the ESP-FGD and SDA-FF combinations at coal-fired power plants, (2) evaluate the effect of SCR catalyst degradation on mercury capture; (3) evaluate the effect of low load operation on mercury capture in an SCR-FGD system, and (4) collect data that could provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. This document, the ninth in a series of topical reports, describes the results and analysis of mercury sampling performed on Unit 1 at Plant 7, a 566 MW unit burning a bituminous coal containing 3.6% sulfur. The unit is equipped with a SCR, ESP, and wet FGD to control NO{sub x}, particulate, and SO{sub 2} emissions

  2. 40 CFR 63.4167 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? 63.4167 Section 63... capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? During the... conduct a new performance test to determine destruction efficiency according to § 63.4166. (c)...

  3. Measurement of quartz in limestone reagent used in gypsum producing FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Luckevich, L.M.; Duffy, K.; Roth, T.

    1995-06-01

    The quartz concentration in limestone used as the reagent in gypsum producing FGD systems contributes to the amount of quartz in the gypsum product. Gypsum from FGD is being used to manufacture gypsum board or plasters and these gypsum based products must comply with legislated limits for respirable quartz. Gypsum from FGD may contain both crystalline silica (usually as quartz) and amorphous silica from coal ash. In addition SiO{sub 2} may be present in other crystalline materials such as clay minerals. The measurement of total SiO{sub 2} in FGD reagent limestone and FGD gypsum will measure SiO{sub 2} from all sources. A preliminary method has been developed to measure the quartz concentration in limestone or gypsum. The method comprises isolation of the acid insoluble residue followed by analysis of the residue by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The energy of the {alpha} to {beta} quartz inversion is measured and used to calculate the quartz content of the sample.

  4. 40 CFR 63.3546 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true How do I establish the emission capture... Emission Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.3546 How do I establish the emission capture system and add... the emission stream for leakage. (d) Carbon adsorbers. If your add-on control device is a...

  5. 40 CFR 63.4567 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true How do I establish the emission capture... Emission Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4567 How do I establish the emission capture system and add... operating limits for that catalytic oxidizer. (c) Regenerative carbon adsorbers. If your add-on...

  6. 40 CFR 63.3556 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? 63.3556 Section 63... the Control Efficiency/outlet Concentration Option § 63.3556 How do I establish the emission capture... the emission stream for leakage. (d) Carbon adsorbers. If your add-on control device is a...

  7. 40 CFR 63.4167 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true How do I establish the emission capture... with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4167 How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control... test to determine destruction efficiency according to § 63.4166. (c) Carbon adsorbers. If your...

  8. 40 CFR 63.3967 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true How do I establish the emission capture... emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? During the... catalytic oxidizer. (c) Regenerative carbon adsorbers. If your add-on control device is a...

  9. 40 CFR 63.4966 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... provisions for the use of an alternative monitoring method as set forth in 40 CFR 63.8(f). ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true How do I establish the emission capture... with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4966 How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on...

  10. 40 CFR 63.4567 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true How do I establish the emission capture... capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? During the... operating limits for that catalytic oxidizer. (c) Regenerative carbon adsorbers. If your add-on...

  11. 40 CFR 63.3967 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true How do I establish the emission capture... capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? During the... catalytic oxidizer. (c) Regenerative carbon adsorbers. If your add-on control device is a...

  12. 40 CFR 63.4966 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provisions for the use of an alternative monitoring method as set forth in 40 CFR 63.8(f). ... capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? 63.4966 Section 63... for the Emission Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4966 How do I establish the emission...

  13. ADIPIC ACID DEGRADATION MECHANISM IN AQUEOUS FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a field and laboratory study of the adipic acid degradation mechanism in aqueous flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. (Adding adipic acid to limestone-based, SO2 wet scrubbers increases SO2 removal and limestone utilization. However, as much as 80% ...

  14. Space station systems technology study (add-on task). Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    System concepts were characterized in order to define cost versus benefits for autonomous functional control and for controls and displays for OMV, OTV, and spacecraft servicing and operation. The attitude control topic focused on characterizing the Space Station attitude control problem through simulation of control system responses to structural disturbances. The first two topics, mentioned above, focused on specific technology items that require advancement in order to support an early 1990s initial launch of a Space Station, while the attitude control study was an exploration of the capability of conventional controller techniques.

  15. Chemical element concentrations in liquids and solids associated with power plants using FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wangen, L.E.; Jones, M.M.

    1981-08-01

    Solid and liquid process steam samples from eight power plants using wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers have been analyzed for the trace elements As, B, Br, Cl, Cd, Co, Cr, F, Ga, I, Mo, Ni, Pb, S, Sb, Se, Th, U, V, W, and Zn as well as several major and minor elements. Four plants burned high-sulfur coals and three burned low-sulfur coals. One plant used a low-sulfur lignite coal. Four FGD systems used limestone, two used lime, and two used alkaline flyash as scrubbing reagent. Elemental concentration data were used to identify chemical elements of concern regarding their potential for causing environmental harm as a result of the disposal of residues associated with FGD systems. Elemental concentrations were evaluated by the Environmental Protection Agency's minimum acute-toxicity-of-effluents criteria. Calcium, Mg, Mn, Ni, Se, and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ were identified as most generally problematic. The elements B, Cd, F, and Mo were judged as potentially problematic in certain situations. Generally FGD liquors from power plants that burned low-sulfur western coals had highest concentrations of most trace elements.

  16. Using sulfur from liquid redox processes as an oxidation inhibitor in wet FGD systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A.J.

    1995-10-01

    In a joint effort, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Gas Research Institute, TU Electric, and Houston Lighting & Power developed a low-cost alternative to commercial ``emulsified`` sulfur. Sulfur is used in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to inhibit oxidation. An alternate sulfur product is produced by liquid redox processes in the gas industry. Sulfur from liquid redox systems is often placed in landfills at considerable expense because the sulfur in the form of filter cake does not meet specifications for other uses, such as for manufacturing sulfuric acid. Pilot-scale tests at EPRI`s Environmental Control Technology Center and a full-scale test at the TU Electric Martin Lake Station demonstrated that this liquid redox byproduct can be used as an oxidation inhibitor in FGD systems. The liquid redox sulfur also did not negatively affect FGD performance or change the composition of the FGD byproduct solids. Using the byproduct sulfur as an oxidation inhibitor reduces costs for the electric utility industry and keeps this material out of landfills. Although the savings will vary case by case, the electric industry could save $1,300,000/yr while making beneficial use of a gas industry byproduct. Similarly, the gas processing industry could save $520,000/yr in avoided landfill costs. The project also demonstrated methods for converting the solid sulfur byproduct into a water-based suspension. Such suspensions simplify handling in wet FGD systems. The ability to create a sulfur suspension also benefits the gas industry, because suspensions allow the byproduct sulfur to be used in other ways as well, including as an agricultural supplement.

  17. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

    2010-12-31

    This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed

  18. Use of hydraulic models to identify and resolve design isssues in FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Strock, T.W.; Gohara, W.F.

    1995-06-01

    The hydraulics within a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber involve several complex two-phase gas/liquid interactions that directly affect the scrubber pressure drop, mist elimination efficiency, and the mass transfer process of SO{sub 2} removal. Current industrial efforts to develop cost effective, high-efficiency wet FGD scrubbers are focusing, in part, on the hydraulics. The development of an experimental approach and test facility for understanding and optimizing wet scrubber flow characteristics has been completed. Hydraulic models simulate full-scale units and allow the designer to view the gas/liquid flow interactions. Modeling procedures for downsizing the wet scrubber for the laboratory have been developed and validated with field data comparisons. A one-eighth scale hydraulic model has been used to study several FGD scrubber design issues. Design changes to reduce capital and operating cost have been developed and tested. Recently, the model was used to design a commercial, uniform flow, high gas velocity absorber for the next generation of FGD systems.

  19. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-01-21

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period October 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future fullscale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fifth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included starting up the pilot unit with three catalysts at the first site, conducting catalyst activity measurements, completing comprehensive flue gas sampling and analyses, and procuring additional catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  20. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-07-17

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period April 1, 2002 through June 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the third full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to constructing the pilot unit and conducting laboratory runs to help size catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these two efforts.

  1. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-10-04

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The coprecipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the fourth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to completing, installing and starting up the pilot unit, completing laboratory runs to size catalysts, and procuring catalysts for the pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  2. EVALUATION OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED FACILITIES WITH SCR AND FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Withum; S.C. Tseng; J.E. Locke

    2005-11-01

    CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP)--wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dryer absorber--fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercury speciation and removal at 10 coal-fired facilities. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effect of SCR on mercury capture in the ESP-FGD and SDA-FF combinations at coal-fired power plants, (2) evaluate the effect of catalyst degradation on mercury capture; (3) evaluate the effect of low load operation on mercury capture in an SCR-FGD system, and (4) collect data that could provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. This document, the seventh in a series of topical reports, describes the results and analysis of mercury sampling performed on a 1,300 MW unit burning a bituminous coal containing three percent sulfur. The unit was equipped with an ESP and a limestone-based wet FGD to control particulate and SO2 emissions, respectively. At the time of sampling an SCR was not installed on this unit. Four sampling tests were performed in September 2003. Flue gas mercury speciation and concentrations were determined at the ESP outlet (FGD inlet), and at the stack (FGD outlet) using the Ontario Hydro method. Process stream samples for a mercury balance were collected to coincide with the flue gas measurements. The results show that the FGD inlet flue gas oxidized:elemental mercury ratio was roughly 2:1, with 66% oxidized mercury and 34% elemental mercury. Mercury removal, on a coal

  3. Evaluation of Mercury Emissions from Coal-Fired Facilities with SCR and FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Withum; J. E. Locke

    2006-02-01

    CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP)--wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber--fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercury speciation and removal at 10 coal-fired facilities. The principal purpose of this work is to develop a better understanding of the potential mercury removal ''co-benefits'' achieved by NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} control technologies. It is expected that this data will provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. Ultimately, this insight could help to design and operate SCR and FGD systems to maximize mercury removal. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effect of SCR on mercury capture in the ESP-FGD and SDA-FF combinations at coal-fired power plants, (2) evaluate the effect of SCR catalyst degradation on mercury capture; (3) evaluate the effect of low load operation on mercury capture in an SCR-FGD system, and (4) collect data that could provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. This document, the tenth in a series of topical reports, describes the results and analysis of mercury sampling performed on two 468 MW units burning bituminous coal containing 1.3-1.7% sulfur. Unit 2 is equipped with an SCR, ESP, and wet FGD to control NO{sub x}, particulate, and SO{sub 2} emissions, respectively. Unit 1

  4. Design and startup of a high efficiency, dilute phase lime FGD system

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, M.; Cirillo, A.J.

    1995-06-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments mandated large reductions in SO{sub 2} emissions from utility coal-fired boilers. For the operating companies of the Allegheny Power System (APS), this presented numerous challenges due to the system`s dependence on coal fuel. Although the Clean Air Act Amendments mandated approximately 50% reduction in SO{sub 2} at eleven (11) generating units within the Allegheny system, economic studies revealed that high efficiency scrubbers, placed on the largest units, would provide the most cost effective method to reduce SO{sub 2} emissions. Accordingly, the three units at Harrison Power Station, with a total generating capacity of 1,920 MW, were targeted for wet, magnesium enhanced, lime scrubbing. The scrubbing of the Harrison Power Station represented the cornerstone of Allegheny`s Phase I Clean Air Act compliance strategy for SO{sub 2} only. At the heart of the Flue Gas Desulfurization System (FGD) are high efficiency absorber towers utilizing magnesium-enhanced lime as the reagent. Use of a single, large absorber tower on each of Harrison`s three 640 MW units will result in guaranteed SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies of 98% with only three recycle pumps operating. In addition to discussing the overall FGD system`s design, this paper will address the following items: (1) Reliability of Large Single Tower Scrubbing (European experience and use of an absorber tower scale model for gas and liquid flow distribution); (2) Absorber Process Chemistry and Dilute Phase FGD System Startup and Operation. In conjunction with the aforementioned process design features of the Harrison Power Station FGD System, the startup and operational aspects of the scrubber system will be reviewed. Specifically, the simplified startup and operation of these wet scrubbers, owing to the minimization of the quantity of components required to be installed, tested and maintained compared to multiple absorber modules per boiler unit, will be addressed.

  5. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-31

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems'', during the time-period January 1 through March 31, 2006. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, and the use of a wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system downstream to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project is being co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory, EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Generation Company LP, the Southern Company, and Duke Energy. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified catalyst materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months or longer at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests are being conducted periodically at each site to confirm the ability to scrub the catalytically oxidized mercury at high efficiency. This is the ninth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts primarily consisted of operating the catalyst pilot units at the TXU Generation Company LP's Monticello Steam Electric Station and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates. Two catalyst activity measurement trips were made to Plant Yates during the quarter. This Technical Progress Report presents catalyst activity results from the oxidation catalyst pilot unit at Plant Yates and

  6. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-05-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time period January 1, 2003 through March 31, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the sixth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the pilot unit with three catalysts, conducting catalyst activity measurements, and procuring the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek pilot unit site. Laboratory efforts were also conducted to support catalyst selection for the second pilot unit site, at CPS' Spruce Plant. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  7. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-07-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period April 1, 2003 through June 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the seventh full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit, conducting catalyst activity measurements, installing sonic horns for on-line catalyst cleaning, and installing the fourth catalyst, all for the GRE Coal Creek site. CPS began installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter. Laboratory efforts were conducted to support catalyst selection for that second pilot unit. This technical progress report provides an update on these efforts.

  8. Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

    2010-06-30

    This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the demonstration early, during

  9. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-02-22

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the first full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to project initiation and planning. There is no significant technical progress to report for the current period.

  10. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-04-26

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems, during the time period January 1, 2002 through March 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury catalytic oxidation process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates in a stable form with the byproducts from the FGD system. The co-precipitated mercury does not appear to adversely affect the disposal or reuse properties of the FGD byproduct. The current project will test previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, so as to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for up to 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the second full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, most of the project efforts were related to pilot unit design and conducting laboratory runs to help select candidate catalysts. This technical progress report provides an update on these two efforts. A Test Plan for the upcoming pilot-scale evaluations was also prepared and submitted to NETL for review and comment. Since this document was already submitted under separate cover, this

  11. EVALUATION OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED FACILITIES WITH SCR AND FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    J. A. Withum; S.C. Tseng; J. E. Locke

    2004-10-31

    CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) - wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber--fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercury speciation and removal at 10 coal-fired facilities. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effect of SCR on mercury capture in the ESP-FGD and SDA-FF combinations at coal-fired power plants, (2) evaluate the effect of catalyst degradation on mercury capture; (3) evaluate the effect of low load operation on mercury capture in an SCR-FGD system, and (4) collect data that could provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on Hg speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for Hg capture. This document, the second in a series of topical reports, describes the results and analysis of mercury sampling performed on a 330 MW unit burning a bituminous coal containing 1.0% sulfur. The unit is equipped with a SCR system for NOx control and a spray dryer absorber for SO{sub 2} control followed by a baghouse unit for particulate emissions control. Four sampling tests were performed in March 2003. Flue gas mercury speciation and concentrations were determined at the SCR inlet, air heater outlet (ESP inlet), and at the stack (FGD outlet) using the Ontario Hydro method. Process stream samples for a mercury balance were collected to coincide with the flue gas measurements. Due to mechanical problems with the boiler feed water pumps, the actual gross output was between 195 and 221 MW during the tests. The results showed that the SCR/air heater combination oxidized nearly 95% of the elemental mercury. Mercury removal, on a

  12. 40 CFR 63.3556 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true How do I establish the emission capture... Control Efficiency/outlet Concentration Option § 63.3556 How do I establish the emission capture system... the emission stream for leakage. (d) Carbon adsorbers. If your add-on control device is a...

  13. 40 CFR 63.4966 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... provisions for the use of an alternative monitoring method as set forth in 40 CFR 63.8(f). ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true How do I establish the emission capture... Emission Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4966 How do I establish the emission capture system and...

  14. 40 CFR 63.4167 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true How do I establish the emission capture... Emission Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4167 How do I establish the emission capture system and add... test to determine destruction efficiency according to § 63.4166. (c) Carbon adsorbers. If your...

  15. PILOT TESTING OF MERCURY OXIDATION CATALYSTS FOR UPSTREAM OF WET FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-10-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185, ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,'' during the time-period July 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. The project is being funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), and City Public Service (CPS) of San Antonio are project cofunders. URS Group is the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses catalyst materials applied to honeycomb substrates to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Oxidized mercury is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and co-precipitates with the byproducts from the FGD system. The current project is testing previously identified, effective catalyst materials at a larger, pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. The pilot-scale tests will continue for approximately 14 months at each of two sites to provide longer-term catalyst life data. This is the eighth full reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, project efforts included continued operation of the first pilot unit at the GRE Coal Creek site with all four catalysts in service and sonic horns installed for on-line catalyst cleaning. During the quarter, a catalyst activity measurement trip and mercury SCEM relative accuracy tests were completed, and catalyst pressure drop was closely monitored with the sonic horns in operation. CPS completed the installation of the second mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit at their Spruce Plant during the quarter, and the four

  16. FGD system retrofit of the Dalhousie Station Units 1&2, an Orimulsion conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Legere, M.; Rich, T.J.; Nischt, W.

    1995-06-01

    The Dalhousie Thermal Station is an electric generating station owned and operated by New Brunswick Power. The station consists of two boiler units, Unit 1 having a capacity of 100 MW and Unit 2 having a capacity of 215 MW. Both units were converted to burn Orimulsion{trademark} due to the economics of the fuel. Unit 1 returned to service in August, 1994, while Unit 2 returned to service in September, 1994 burning the new fuel. In order to comply with Canadian National Government through Environment Canada emissions standards, New Brunswick Power decided to install a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system consisting of a single 315 MW absorber module utilizing limestone forced oxidation (LSFO) technology. The unit is designed to generate a marketable grade gypsum product. This paper describes Orimulsion{trademark} and the modifications required to convert the Dalhousie station to Orimulsion{trademark} firing. The FGD system is described and the philosophy used to ensure high reliability in the system is discussed. Commissioning and operational performance results are also presented.

  17. COMPUTERIZED FGD BYPRODUCT PRODUCTION AND MARKETING SYSTEM: USERS MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The users manual describes a computerized system--consisting of a number of integrated programs, models, and data bases--that has been developed to compare the costs of power plant strategies designed to meet clean air regulations. It describes the data bases, programs, and proce...

  18. Evaluation of mist eliminator carryover measurement methods for full-scale FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lundeen, J.E.; Jones, A.F.; Rhudy, R.G.

    1995-06-01

    The performance of three mist eliminator carryover measurement methods was evaluated at EPRI`s Air-Water Test Facility and the Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). This program was part of EPRI`s continued research in the mist eliminator area. The ability to accurately measure carryover is needed to evaluate guarantees offered by FGD and mist eliminator system (MES) vendors and also to troubleshoot MES problems. This paper presents the highlights of the measurement method tests, including a description of the test facilities, the tests performed, the measurement methods, and the test results. The results of the three methods (phase dopier particle analyzer, AIMS hot-wire anemometer, and the MgO/treated paper) focus on the accuracy of each method and the suitability of each method for use in a full-scale FGD system. Cost for testing with each method is also presented. The most accurate measurement method tested was the phase dopler particle analyzer (PDPA), but typical test costs are more than $35,000. The MgO/treated paper method was the next most accurate, followed by the AIMS. A combination using the AIMS and MgO/treated paper methods was better than either method individually. The approximate test costs of the AIMS and the MgO/treated paper method are $17,000 and $18,500, respectively. The cost of testing the combination of the two is $28,000.

  19. FGD system capital and operating cost reductions based on improved thiosorbic scrubber system design and latest process innovations

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Tseng, S.; Babu, M.

    1994-12-31

    Dravo Lime Company has operated the Miami Fort wet scrubber FGD pilot test unit since late 1989 and has continued in-house R&D to improve the economics of the magnesium-enhanced scrubbing process. Areas investigated include the scrubber configuration, flue gas velocity, spray nozzle type, droplet size, mist eliminator design, additives to inhibit oxidation, improved solids dewatering, etc. Also tested was the forced oxidation Thioclear process. The data gathered from the pilot plant and in-house programs were used to evaluate the capital and operating costs for the improved systems. These evaluations were made with eye towards the choices electric utilities will need to make in the near future to meet the Phase II emission limits mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. Some of the process modifications investigated, for example, the dewatering improvements apply to potential beneficial retrofit of existing FGD systems today.

  20. High-efficiency SO{sub 2} removal in utility FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.L.; Gray, S.; Dekraker, D.

    1995-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have contracted with Radian Corporation to conduct full-scale testing, process modeling, and economic evaluations of six existing utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project objective is to evaluate low capital cost upgrades for achieving up to 98% sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal efficiency in a variety of FGD system types. The systems include dual-loop, packed absorbers at Tampa Electric Company`s Big Bend Station; cocurrent, packed absorbers at Hoosier Energy`s Merom Station; dual-loop absorbers with perforated-plate trays at Southwestern Electric Power Company`s Pirkey Station; horizontal spray absorbers at PSI Energy`s Gibson Station; venturi scrubbers at Duquesne Light`s Elrama Station; and open stray absorbers at New york State Electric and Gas Corporations`s (NYSEG`s) Kintigh Station. All operate in an inhibited-oxidation mode except the system at Big Bend (forced oxidation), and all use limestone reagent except the Elrama system (Mg-lime). The program was conducted to demonstrate that upgrades such as performance additives and/or mechanical modifications can increase system SO{sub 2} removal at low cost. The cost effectiveness of each upgrade has been evaluated on the basis of test results and/or process model predictions for upgraded performance and utility-specific operating and maintenance costs. Results from this upgraded performance and utility-specific operating and maintenance costs. Results from this program may lead some utilities to use SO{sub 2} removal upgrades as an approach for compliance with phase 2 of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. This paper summarizes the results of testing, modeling, and economic evaluations that have been completed since July, 1994.

  1. Utility FGD survey, January--December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. )

    1991-09-01

    The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show systems in operation, systems under construction, and systems planned. The current total FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 67,091 MW.

  2. Utility FGD survey, January--December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. )

    1991-09-01

    The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, systems designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show systems in operation, systems under construction, and systems planned. The current total FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 67,091 MW.

  3. Utility FGD survey, Janurary--December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. )

    1991-09-01

    The Utility FGD Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company. Simplified process flow diagrams of FGD systems, definitions, and a glossary of terms are attached to the report. Current data for domestic FGD systems show systems in operation, systems under construction, and systems planned. The current total FGD-controlled capacity in the United States is 67,091 MW. 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  4. Design of a 4 x 550 MW wet FGD systems for Taiwan Power Company`s Taichung Units 5-8

    SciTech Connect

    Polster, M.; Lindberg, D.S.

    1995-06-01

    Because of the interlude between Phase I and Phase II implementation of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, coupled with uncertainty regarding the future market for SO{sub 2} allowances, FGD activity in the U.S. has slowed considerably. As a result, many current developments in FGD design can best be seen in international projects. Due to recent legislation in Taiwan, Taiwan Power Company (TPC) must install FGD systems on many of its coal fired plants including four new 550 MW units at the Taichung Plant in central Taiwan. These systems will produce wallboard grade gypsum and incorporate gas-gas reheat and a complete waste water treatment system. This paper will summarize the design of the Taichung FGD system with emphasis on differences in approach between the TPC design and common designs in the U.S. The paper will also focus on measures used to optimize costs to meet TPC`s aggressive budget constraints.

  5. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart IIIi of... - Operating Limits for Capture Systems and Add-On Control Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of appendix M to 40 CFR part 51 i. Collecting the direction of air flow, and either the facial... annual catalyst activity checks, records of monthly inspections of the oxidizer system, and records of... average temperature at or above the temperature limit. 6. Emission capture system that is a PTE a....

  6. Effect of trace metals and sulfite oxidation of adipic acid degradation in FGD systems. Final report Dec 81-May 82

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, J.B.; Terry, J.C.; Schubert, S.A.; Utley, B.L.

    1982-12-01

    The report gives results of the measurement of the adipic acid degradation rate in a bench-scale flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system, designed to simulate many of the important aspects of full-scale FGD systems. Results show that the adipic acid degradation rate depends on the sulfite oxidation rate, the adipic acid concentration, the presence of manganese in solution, and temperature. The degradation rate is also affected by pH, but only when manganese is present. Adipic acid degradation products identified in the liquid phase include valeric, butyric, propionic, succinic, and glutaric acids. When manganese was present, the predominant degradation products were succinic and glutaric acids. Analysis of solids from the bench scale tests shows large concentrations of coprecipitated adipic acid in low oxidation sulfite solids. By contrast, low quantities of coprecipitated adipic acid were found in high oxidation gypsum solids.

  7. Elemental mercury removals observed in a laboratory-scale wet FGD scrubber system

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.H.; Wu, J.; Huang, H.; Livengood, C.D.

    1994-08-01

    Published data are limited regarding gaseous mercury removal in wet scrubber flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The data that do exist show a wide variation in reported mercury removals, from about 5 to 95%. We have performed tests for the removal of gaseous elemental mercury in a well-controlled laboratory environment by using both conventional and modified configurations of an aqueous scrubber system. Results from these tests strongly suggest that the removal of elemental mercury in a wet scrubber system is controlled by liquid-film resistance. Our results have also led us to hypothesize that the mercury-containing species in a flue-gas stream consist of only two types: elemental mercury and oxidized mercury compounds. We further assert that the differences observed in mercury removal reflect different proportions of each of these two types of mercury-containing species. We suggest that the total mercury removal will be high when the actual, but unmeasured, proportion of oxidized mercury compounds is high.

  8. A Reconstruction Method Based on AL0FGD for Compressed Sensing in Border Monitoring WSN System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Wu, Xi; Li, Wenzao; Zhang, Yi; Li, Zhi; Zhou, Jiliu

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, to monitor the border in real-time with high efficiency and accuracy, we applied the compressed sensing (CS) technology on the border monitoring wireless sensor network (WSN) system and proposed a reconstruction method based on approximately l0 norm and fast gradient descent (AL0FGD) for CS. In the frontend of the system, the measurement matrix was used to sense the border information in a compressed manner, and then the proposed reconstruction method was applied to recover the border information at the monitoring terminal. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, the helicopter sound signal was used as an example in the experimental simulation, and three other typical reconstruction algorithms 1)split Bregman algorithm, 2)iterative shrinkage algorithm, and 3)smoothed approximate l0 norm (SL0), were employed for comparison. The experimental results showed that the proposed method has a better performance in recovering the helicopter sound signal in most cases, which could be used as a basis for further study of the border monitoring WSN system. PMID:25461759

  9. EVALUATION OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED FACILITIES WITH SCR AND FGD SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Withum

    2006-03-07

    CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), evaluated the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP)-wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber-fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL determined mercury speciation and removal at 10 bituminous coal-fired facilities; at four of these facilities, additional tests were performed on units without SCR, or with the existing SCR bypassed. This project final report summarizes the results and discusses the findings of the body of work as a whole. Eleven Topical Reports were issued (prior to this report) that describe in great detail the sampling results at each of the ten power plants individually. The results showed that the SCR-FGD combination removed a substantial fraction of mercury from flue gas. The coal-to-stack mercury removals ranged from 65% to 97% for the units with SCR and from 53% to 87% for the units without SCR. There was no indication that any type of FGD system was more effective at mercury removal than others. The coal-to-stack mercury removal and the removal in the wet scrubber were both negatively correlated with the elemental mercury content of the flue gas and positively correlated with the scrubber liquid chloride concentration. The coal chlorine content was not a statistically significant factor in either case. Mercury removal in the ESP was positively correlated with the fly ash carbon content and negatively correlated with the flue gas temperature. At most of the units, a substantial fraction (>35%) of the flue gas mercury was in the elemental form at the boiler economizer outlet. After passing through the SCR-air heater combination very little of the total mercury (<10%) remained in the elemental form in

  10. 40 CFR 63.4767 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true How do I establish the emission capture... for the Emission Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4767 How do I establish the emission capture...) Carbon adsorbers. If your add-on control device is a carbon adsorber, establish the operating...

  11. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Rhudy

    2006-06-30

    This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon-based catalyst began with almost 98

  12. Utility FGD Survey, January--December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. )

    1992-03-01

    The Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

  13. Utility FGD survey, January--December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. )

    1992-03-01

    This is Volume 2 part 2, of the Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. This volume particularly contains basic design and performance data.

  14. Desulfurization characteristics of rapidly hydrated sorbents with various adhesive carrier particles for a semidry CFB-FGD system.

    PubMed

    You, Changfu; Li, Yuan

    2013-03-19

    Semidry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) experiments were conducted using rapidly hydrated sorbents with four different adhesive carrier particles: circulation ash from a circulating fluidized bed boiler (CFBB circulation ash), fly ash from the first electrical field of the electrostatic precipitator of a circulating fluidized bed boiler (CFBB ESP ash), fly ash from a chain boiler (chain boiler ash), and river sand smaller than 1 mm. The influences of various adhesive carrier particles and operating conditions on the desulfurization characteristics of the sorbents were investigated, including sprayed water, reaction temperature, and the ratio of calcium to sulfur (Ca/S). The experimental results indicated that the rapidly hydrated sorbents had better desulfurization characteristics by using adhesive carrier particles which possessed better pore, adhesion, and fluidization characteristics. The desulfurization efficiency of the system increased as the reaction temperature decreased, it improved from 35% to 90% as the mass flow rate of the sprayed water increased from 0 to 10 kg/h, and it increased from 65.6% to 82.7% as Ca/S increased from 1.0 to 2.0. Based on these findings, a new semidry circulating fluidized bed (CFB)-FGD system using rapidly hydrated sorbent was developed. Using the rapidly hydrated sorbent, this system uses a cyclone separator instead of an ESP or a bag filter to recycle the sorbent particles, thereby decreasing the system flow resistance, saving investment and operating costs of the solids collection equipment. PMID:23398211

  15. Targeting Accuracy, Procedure Times and User Experience of 240 Experimental MRI Biopsies Guided by a Clinical Add-On Navigation System

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Harald; Riedel, Tim; Garnov, Nikita; Thörmer, Gregor; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives MRI is of great clinical utility for the guidance of special diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. The majority of such procedures are performed iteratively ("in-and-out") in standard, closed-bore MRI systems with control imaging inside the bore and needle adjustments outside the bore. The fundamental limitations of such an approach have led to the development of various assistance techniques, from simple guidance tools to advanced navigation systems. The purpose of this work was to thoroughly assess the targeting accuracy, workflow and usability of a clinical add-on navigation solution on 240 simulated biopsies by different medical operators. Methods Navigation relied on a virtual 3D MRI scene with real-time overlay of the optically tracked biopsy needle. Smart reference markers on a freely adjustable arm ensured proper registration. Twenty-four operators – attending (AR) and resident radiologists (RR) as well as medical students (MS) – performed well-controlled biopsies of 10 embedded model targets (mean diameter: 8.5 mm, insertion depths: 17-76 mm). Targeting accuracy, procedure times and 13 Likert scores on system performance were determined (strong agreement: 5.0). Results Differences in diagnostic success rates (AR: 93%, RR: 88%, MS: 81%) were not significant. In contrast, between-group differences in biopsy times (AR: 4:15, RR: 4:40, MS: 5:06 min:sec) differed significantly (p<0.01). Mean overall rating was 4.2. The average operator would use the system again (4.8) and stated that the outcome justifies the extra effort (4.4). Lowest agreement was reported for the robustness against external perturbations (2.8). Conclusions The described combination of optical tracking technology with an automatic MRI registration appears to be sufficiently accurate for instrument guidance in a standard (closed-bore) MRI environment. High targeting accuracy and usability was demonstrated on a relatively large number of procedures and operators. Between

  16. Electric utility engineer`s FGD manual -- Volume 1: FGD process design. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-04

    Part 1 of the Electric Utility Engineer`s Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Manual emphasizes the chemical and physical processes that form the basis for design and operation of lime- and limestone-based FGD systems applied to coal- or oil-fired steam electric generating stations. The objectives of Part 1 are: to provide a description of the chemical and physical design basis for lime- and limestone-based wet FGD systems; to identify and discuss the various process design parameters and process options that must be considered in developing a specification for a new FGD system; and to provide utility engineers with process knowledge useful for operating and optimizing a lime- or limestone-based wet FGD system.

  17. Inhaled and systemic corticosteroid response in severe asthma assessed by alveolar nitric oxide: a randomized crossover pilot study of add-on therapy

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Peter A; Short, Philip M; Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Lipworth, Brian J

    2013-01-01

    AIMS Alveolar nitric oxide (CANO) is a potential biomarker of small airway inflammation. We investigated effects on CANO of the addition of coarse and fine particle inhaled corticosteroids to standard therapy in severe asthma. METHODS Severe asthmatics taking ≥1600 µg day−1 budesonide or equivalent performed a randomized open-label crossover study. Subjects with FEV1 < 80%, gas trapping and CANO≥2 ppb entered a 6 week dose-ramp run-in of fluticasone/salmeterol(FPSM) 250/50 µg twice daily for 3 weeks, then 500/50 µg twice daily for 3 weeks. Patients then received additional HFA-beclomethasone diproprionate (BDP) 200 µg twice daily or FP 250 µg twice daily for 3 weeks in a crossover. Participants then received prednisolone(PRED) 25 mg day−1 for 1 week. Nitric oxide, lung function, mannitol challenge, systemic inflammatory markers and urinary cortisol were measured. RESULTS Fifteen completed per protocol: mean (SD) age 51 (12) years, FEV1 58 (13)% predicted, residual volume 193 (100)% predicted and mannitolPD10 177 (2.8) µg. There was no significant difference between FPSM and add-on therapy for CANO. FPSM/BDP and FPSM/PRED suppressed broncial flux (JawNO) and FENO compared with FPSM alone, but there was no significant difference between FPSM/BDP and FPSM/FP. ECP, e-selectin and ICAM-1 were suppressed by FPSM/PRED compared with FPSM and FPSM/FP but not FPSM/BDP. Plasma cortisol was significantly suppressed by FPSM/PRED. CONCLUSION In severe asthma, CANO is insensitive to changes in dose and delivery of inhaled corticosteroids and is not suppressed by systemic corticosteroids. Additional inhaled HFA-BDP reduced FENO and JawNO without adrenal suppression. There was a trend to reduction in FENO and JawNO with additional FP but this did not reach statistical significance. PRED reduced FENO and JawNO with suppression of systemic inflammatory markers and urinary cortisol. PMID:22568828

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) EVALUATION OF WATER PLANT LIME SLUDGE IN AN INDUSTRIAL BOILER FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) SYSTEM AT RICKENBACKER AFB

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a September 1978-February 1979 test program to evaluate lime water softening waste sludge as an alternate reagent for a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system on an industrial boiler at Rickenbacker Air Force Base, Ohio. The study also included assessin...

  19. Energy-Saving Effect of the Add-on Energy Recovery System for Electric Motor Drive Systems in the Injection Molding Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Keisuke; Hiraki, Eiji; Tanaka, Toshihiko

    The regenerative energy from the motor drive systems used in the injection molding is consumed by resistors connected to the DC bus of the inverters. Recently the recovery systems of the regenerative energy with a bi-directional DC-DC converter and capacitors have been developed. In this paper a new control strategy of the EDLC based energy recovery system is proposed. The basic principle of the proposed control strategy and the power losses consumed in the energy recovery system are discussed in detail. The validity and practicability are confirmed by digital computer simulation.

  20. Utility FGD survey: January--December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

    1992-03-01

    This is Volume 1 of the Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.

  1. Firefox add-ons for medical reference.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2010-07-01

    Firefox is a Web browser created by the Mozilla project, an open-source software group. Features of the browser include automated updates, advanced security and standards compliance, and the ability to add functionality through add-ons and extensions. First introduced in 2004, Firefox now accounts for roughly 30% of the browser market. This article will focus primarily on add-ons and extensions available for the browser that are useful to medical researchers. PMID:20677067

  2. LARGE-SCALE MECURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGY TESTING FOR LIGNITE-FIRED UTILITIES-OXIDATION SYSTEMS FOR WET FGD

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Holmes; Steven A. Benson; Jeffrey S. Thompson

    2004-03-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is conducting a consortium-based effort directed toward resolving the mercury (Hg) control issues facing the lignite industry. Specifically, the EERC team--the EERC, EPRI, URS, ADA-ES, Babcock & Wilcox, the North Dakota Industrial Commission, SaskPower, and the Mercury Task Force, which includes Basin Electric Power Cooperative, Otter Tail Power Company, Great River Energy, Texas Utilities (TXU), Montana-Dakota Utilities Co., Minnkota Power Cooperative, BNI Coal Ltd., Dakota Westmoreland Corporation, and the North American Coal Company--has undertaken a project to significantly and cost-effectively oxidize elemental mercury in lignite combustion gases, followed by capture in a wet scrubber. This approach will be applicable to virtually every lignite utility in the United States and Canada and potentially impact subbituminous utilities. The oxidation process is proven at the pilot-scale and in short-term full-scale tests. Additional optimization is continuing on oxidation technologies, and this project focuses on longer-term full-scale testing. The lignite industry has been proactive in advancing the understanding of and identifying control options for Hg in lignite combustion flue gases. Approximately 1 year ago, the EERC and EPRI began a series of Hg-related discussions with the Mercury Task Force as well as utilities firing Texas and Saskatchewan lignites. This project is one of three being undertaken by the consortium to perform large-scale Hg control technology testing to address the specific needs and challenges to be met in controlling Hg from lignite-fired power plants. This project involves Hg oxidation upstream of a system equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD). The team involved in conducting the technical aspects of the project includes the EERC, Babcock & Wilcox, URS, and ADA-ES. The host sites include Minnkota Power Cooperative Milton R. Young

  3. EPA INDUSTRIAL BOILER FGD SURVEY: FOURTH QUARTER 1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives detailed technical information concerning application of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to industrial boilers. Design and operation data is presented for 172 FGD control systems (132 of them operational), designed to control SO2 emissions from 206 industr...

  4. EPA INDUSTRIAL BOILER FGD SURVEY: FIRST QUARTER 1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives detailed technical information concerning application of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to industrial boilers. Design and operation data is presented for 164 FGD control systems (125 of them operational), designed to control SO2 emissions from 304 industr...

  5. ACID RAIN MITIGATION STUDY. VOLUME II. FGD COST ESTIMATES (APPENDICES)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of work to provide a consistent set of capital investment and operating costs for flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems retrofitted to existing industrial boilers. The investigation of wet limestone scrubbers and lime spray drying FGD systems included: (...

  6. ACID RAIN MITIGATION STUDY. VOLUME I: FGD COST ESTIMATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of work to provide a consistent set of capital investment and operating costs for flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems retrofitted to existing industrial boilers. The investigation of wet limestone scrubbers and lime spray drying FGD systems included: (...

  7. Utility FGD survey, January--December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. )

    1992-03-01

    The FGD survey report is prepared annually by International Technology (IT) Corporation (formerly PEI Associates, Inc.) for the US Department of Energy. The current issue (and preceding issues from 1974 to 1981 and October 1984 to the present) of the utility FGD survey are available only through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS). Preceding issues covering January 1982 through September 1984 may be purchased from the Research Reports Center of the Electric Power Research institute (EPRI). The information in this report is generated by a computerized data base system known as the Flue Gas Desulfurization Information System (FGDIS). The design information contained in the FGDIS encompasses the entire emission control system and the power generating unit to which it is applied. Performance data for operational FGD systems include monthly dependability parameters, service time, and descriptions of operational problems and solutions.

  8. ERDA's portfolio: solar add-on device construction manuals

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, J.J.; Cole, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (ERDA) has developed a portfolio of eight (8) instructional manuals for the construction of the following solar add-on devices: thermosiphoning hot water system; standard domestic hot water system; bread box type hot water system; add-on greenhouse space heating system (with mass); add-on sunspace space heating system (without mass); thermosiphoning air panel space heating system; fan assisted air panel space heating system; Trombe wall space heating system. In addition to step-by-step instructions and illustrations of device construction, each manual contains a list of materials and specifications (including estimated costs in 1980 dollars and sources of supply), guidelines for appropriate siting and installation, and energy performance estimates under optimal and non-optimal conditions. This portfolio of solar add-on devices is directed toward the do-it-yourself homeowner, builders and home improvement contractors, and weatherization organizations. Each instruction manual is a complete, self-contained module suitable for distribution separately or as part of the portfolio. Each manual also has an educational module associated with it including color slides, which is designed for use by community colleges, industrial high schools and adult educational programs. An outline is presented of the content of the design packages,as well as a description of ERDA's plans for distribution of the designs and educating the public on their use, and information on how to obtain individual construction manuals or the entire portfolio.

  9. FGD betterment: Asset preservation and revenue generation

    SciTech Connect

    Boward, W.L. Jr.; Gaikwad, R.P.

    1996-10-01

    As a response to Phase 2 and beyond of the CAAAs of 1990, one of the key strategies that have been employed by many utilities is the use of existing FGD facilities to scrub the SO{sub 2} and generate more allowances to eliminate further need for compliance. Many of these units were built in 1970s. To keep these units operating in a very good condition through the year 2000 and beyond will require major capital improvements. Some of these units are not in good condition and are inviting major failures in the near future. Such failure would result in a major loss of revenue for the utility. For the units built in the 1970s, it is time to assess the condition of their FGD systems and to embark on capital improvement projects. These improvements can be categorized as high priority to low priority, and most work can be performed during scheduled outages. The condition assessment can be performed within 1 to 3 months. S and L`s experience in the last 2 years, with various plants and FGD technologies, could help other utility clients assess their FGD system and help them get ready for long-term SO{sub 2} compliance. The existing system can also be evaluated for its potential to lower maintenance costs and to generate additional SO{sub 2} allowances as a source of income. The maintenance cost can be reduced by identifying the key components in the FGD system that would result in improved efficiency of the equipment, thereby lowering auxiliary power needs. With careful planning, the potential exists to protect the sunk cost of the existing FGD systems and potentially to create a revenue stream related to the reduction in cost and the increased potential to produce SO{sub 2} allowances.

  10. Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Testing for Lignite-Fired Utilities - Oxidation Systems for Wet FGD

    SciTech Connect

    Steven A. Benson; Michael J. Holmes; Donald P. McCollor; Jill M. Mackenzie; Charlene R. Crocker; Lingbu Kong; Kevin C. Galbreath

    2007-03-31

    Mercury (Hg) control technologies were evaluated at Minnkota Power Cooperative's Milton R. Young (MRY) Station Unit 2, a 450-MW lignite-fired cyclone unit near Center, North Dakota, and TXU Energy's Monticello Steam Electric Station (MoSES) Unit 3, a 793-MW lignite--Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal-fired unit near Mt. Pleasant, Texas. A cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber are used at MRY and MoSES for controlling particulate and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions, respectively. Several approaches for significantly and cost-effectively oxidizing elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in lignite combustion flue gases, followed by capture in an ESP and/or FGD scrubber were evaluated. The project team involved in performing the technical aspects of the project included Babcock & Wilcox, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and URS Corporation. Calcium bromide (CaBr{sub 2}), calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), magnesium chloride (MgCl{sub 2}), and a proprietary sorbent enhancement additive (SEA), hereafter referred to as SEA2, were added to the lignite feeds to enhance Hg capture in the ESP and/or wet FGD. In addition, powdered activated carbon (PAC) was injected upstream of the ESP at MRY Unit 2. The work involved establishing Hg concentrations and removal rates across existing ESP and FGD units, determining costs associated with a given Hg removal efficiency, quantifying the balance-of-plant impacts of the control technologies, and facilitating technology commercialization. The primary project goal was to achieve ESP-FGD Hg removal efficiencies of {ge}55% at MRY and MoSES for about a month.

  11. Behavior of a steel-liner-and-bolts system under very high thermal and mechanical loading: The CONVEX Liner Add-On to DIAMOND FORTUNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuze, F. E.; Swift, R. P.; Hill, L. R.; Barrett, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    This work involved the response of a liner-bolt system installed on the wall of the DIAMOND FORTUNE cavity, a 22-m diameter nearly semi-spherical chamber in tuff, at the Nevada Test Site. DIAMOND FORTUNE is a low-yield nuclear test of the Defense Nuclear Agency which was performed in April, 1992. A 1.4-m square, 2.5-cm thick steel plate was anchored by 9-m long bolts: four 2.5-cm diameter bolts at the comers and a 5-cm diameter bolt at the center. The bolt ends daylighted in a tunnel surrounding the cavity, and were tensioned from there. The system was aped with 20 data channels for strain, acceleration, contact pressure, and temperature. We relate the thermal analyses and the 3-dimensional dynamic analyses performed for this project, and we present the test results which indicated the excellent response of this system to the high dynamic loads and temperatures.

  12. 40 CFR 63.3174 - What are the requirements for a capture system or add-on control device which is not taken into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Automobiles and Light-Duty Trucks Compliance Requirements for the Combined Primer-Surfacer, Topcoat, Final Repair, Glass Bonding Primer, and Glass Bonding Adhesive Emission Limitations and the Separate Electrodeposition Primer Emission Limitations § 63.3174 What are the requirements for a capture system or...

  13. 40 CFR 63.3174 - What are the requirements for a capture system or add-on control device which is not taken into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Automobiles and Light-Duty Trucks Compliance Requirements for the Combined Primer-Surfacer, Topcoat, Final Repair, Glass Bonding Primer, and Glass Bonding Adhesive Emission Limitations and the Separate Electrodeposition Primer Emission Limitations § 63.3174 What are the requirements for a capture system or...

  14. Horizon 2020 in Diabetic Kidney Disease: The Clinical Trial Pipeline for Add-On Therapies on Top of Renin Angiotensin System Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Gomez, Maria Vanessa; Sanchez-Niño, Maria Dolores; Sanz, Ana Belen; Martín-Cleary, Catalina; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Navarro-González, Juan F.; Ortiz, Alberto; Fernandez-Fernandez, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease is the most frequent cause of end-stage renal disease. This implies failure of current therapeutic approaches based on renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockade. Recent phase 3 clinical trials of paricalcitol in early diabetic kidney disease and bardoxolone methyl in advanced diabetic kidney disease failed to meet the primary endpoint or terminated on safety concerns, respectively. However, various novel strategies are undergoing phase 2 and 3 randomized controlled trials targeting inflammation, fibrosis and signaling pathways. Among agents currently undergoing trials that may modify the clinical practice on top of RAS blockade in a 5-year horizon, anti-inflammatory agents currently hold the most promise while anti-fibrotic agents have so far disappointed. Pentoxifylline, an anti-inflammatory agent already in clinical use, was recently reported to delay estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) loss in chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3–4 diabetic kidney disease when associated with RAS blockade and promising phase 2 data are available for the pentoxifylline derivative CTP-499. Among agents targeting chemokines or chemokine receptors, the oral small molecule C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) inhibitor CCX140 decreased albuminuria and eGFR loss in phase 2 trials. A dose-finding trial of the anti-IL-1β antibody gevokizumab in diabetic kidney disease will start in 2015. However, clinical development is most advanced for the endothelin receptor A blocker atrasentan, which is undergoing a phase 3 trial with a primary outcome of preserving eGFR. The potential for success of these approaches and other pipeline agents is discussed in detail. PMID:26239562

  15. Key issues for low-cost FGD installations

    SciTech Connect

    DePriest, W.; Mazurek, J.M.

    1995-12-01

    This paper will discuss various methods for installing low-cost FGD systems. The paper will include a discussion of various types of FGD systems available, both wet and dry, and will compare the relative cost of each type. Important design issues, such as use of spare equipment, materials of construction, etc. will be presented. An overview of various low-cost construction techniques (i.e., modularization) will be included. This paper will draw heavily from Sargent & Lundy`s database of past and current FGD projects together with information we gathered for several Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studies on the subject.

  16. Cost effective management of gypsum by-products from FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Armour, D.W.

    1996-11-01

    Of the 100 facilities impacted by Phase 1 of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), 14 elected to install flue gas desulfurization systems. Ten of these plants chose wet limestone, forced oxidation (LSFO) processes creating a gypsum by-product. One major benefit to the limestone forced oxidation system is the relative ease of gypsum management. Significant cost savings are available by utilizing the gypsum by-product for commercial applications, or by using a relatively new method of disposal, gypsum stacking. This paper presents a general discussion of gypsum stacking and a case history example of the design, construction and operation of a gypsum stack at a Phase 1 utility.

  17. Stereovision Imaging in Smart Mobile Phone Using Add on Prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Magen Numhauser, Jonathan; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-03-01

    In this work we present the use of a prism-based add on component installed on top of a smart phone to achieve stereovision capabilities using iPhone mobile operating system. Through these components and the combination of the appropriate application programming interface and mathematical algorithms the obtained results will permit the analysis of possible enhancements for new uses to such system, in a variety of areas including medicine and communications.

  18. FGD systems: What utilities chose in phase 1 and what they might choose in phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A.

    1995-07-01

    Title IV (acid rain) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 is imposing new limitations on the emission of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) from electric power plants. The Act requires utilities to develop compliance plans to reduce these emissions, and indications are that these plans will dramatically alter traditional operating procedures. A key provision of the SO{sub 2} control program defined in Title IV is the creation of a system of emission allowances, with utilities having, the option of complying by adjusting system emissions and allowance holdings. The central focus of this paper is the identification of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) control options being implemented by the electric utility industry, current compliance trends, synergistic control issues and a discussion of the implications of Phase I decisions for Phase II.

  19. LIMESTONE FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) SCRUBBERS: USER'S HANDBOOK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The handbook, intended for use of utility project managers and project engineers, provides guidance in selection, installation, and operation of a limestone FGD system, covering all phases from inception of the project through design, procurement, operation, and maintenance of th...

  20. 'Bugs' used to treat FGD wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Blankinship, S.

    2009-09-15

    Tough regulation of heavy metals may justify a bioreactor approach in addition to chemical treatment of FGD wastewater. Two of Duke Energy' coal-fired plants, Belews Creek and Allen (in North Carolina) have installed new biological reactor systems to increase selenium removal to levels not achievable by existing scrubber waste water systems. The ABMet system removes nitrate and selenium in a single step. Progress Energy has installed the system at Roxboro and Mayo Stations, also in North Carolina. 1 fig., 2 photos.

  1. Add-on unidirectional elastic metamaterial plate cloak

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Kyung; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterial cloaks control the propagation of waves to make an object invisible or insensible. To manipulate elastic waves in space, a metamaterial cloak is typically embedded in a base system that includes or surrounds a target object. The embedding is undesirable because it structurally weakens or permanently alters the base system. In this study, we propose a new add-on metamaterial elastic cloak that can be placed over and mechanically coupled with a base structure without embedding. We designed an add-on type annular metamaterial plate cloak through conformal mapping, fabricated it and performed cloaking experiments in a thin-plate with a hole. Experiments were performed in a thin plate by using the lowest symmetric Lamb wave centered at 100 kHz. As a means to check the cloaking performance of the add-on elastic plate cloak, possibly as a temporary stress reliever or a so-called “stress bandage”, the degree of stress concentration mitigation and the recovery from the perturbed wave field due to a hole were investigated. PMID:26860896

  2. Add-on unidirectional elastic metamaterial plate cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min Kyung; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-02-01

    Metamaterial cloaks control the propagation of waves to make an object invisible or insensible. To manipulate elastic waves in space, a metamaterial cloak is typically embedded in a base system that includes or surrounds a target object. The embedding is undesirable because it structurally weakens or permanently alters the base system. In this study, we propose a new add-on metamaterial elastic cloak that can be placed over and mechanically coupled with a base structure without embedding. We designed an add-on type annular metamaterial plate cloak through conformal mapping, fabricated it and performed cloaking experiments in a thin-plate with a hole. Experiments were performed in a thin plate by using the lowest symmetric Lamb wave centered at 100 kHz. As a means to check the cloaking performance of the add-on elastic plate cloak, possibly as a temporary stress reliever or a so-called “stress bandage”, the degree of stress concentration mitigation and the recovery from the perturbed wave field due to a hole were investigated.

  3. Add-on unidirectional elastic metamaterial plate cloak.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Kyung; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterial cloaks control the propagation of waves to make an object invisible or insensible. To manipulate elastic waves in space, a metamaterial cloak is typically embedded in a base system that includes or surrounds a target object. The embedding is undesirable because it structurally weakens or permanently alters the base system. In this study, we propose a new add-on metamaterial elastic cloak that can be placed over and mechanically coupled with a base structure without embedding. We designed an add-on type annular metamaterial plate cloak through conformal mapping, fabricated it and performed cloaking experiments in a thin-plate with a hole. Experiments were performed in a thin plate by using the lowest symmetric Lamb wave centered at 100 kHz. As a means to check the cloaking performance of the add-on elastic plate cloak, possibly as a temporary stress reliever or a so-called "stress bandage", the degree of stress concentration mitigation and the recovery from the perturbed wave field due to a hole were investigated. PMID:26860896

  4. FGD markets & business in an age of retail wheeling

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.C.; Dalton, S.M.

    1995-06-01

    This paper discusses (1) the market and technology outlook for flue gas desulfurization ({open_quotes}FGD{close_quotes}) systems, with particular emphasis on wet systems in North America and the implications of retail wheeling of electricity and emission allowances for the utility industry, and (2) implications for the utility industry of architect/engineering ({open_quotes}A/E{close_quotes}) firm tendencies to reduce greatly the FGD vendor`s scope of award. The paper concludes that (1) the FGD market will be modest domestically and robust offshore over the forecast period (5-10 years), although the utility industry`s response to federal and state air toxics rules and retail wheeling may eventually grow the FGD market domestically beyond that created by compliance with Phase II of the Clean Air Act`s Title IV acid rain program alone, (2) new designs are likely to follow trends established in the past few years, but will likely include advanced processes that use higher velocity and smaller space, and possibly multi-pollutant control to remain competitive, and (3) shrinking of the FGD vendor`s scope may have adverse implications for the utility end-user, while retail wheeling may increase third-party ownership of FGD technology

  5. The future of FGD gypsum

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E.C.

    2005-09-30

    According to ACAA's 'Coal combustion production and user survey' covering 2003, FGD gypsum utilization in the USA has risen to 70% but with 12 m tons being produced annually there is great opportunity to expand its use in producing wallboard (its primary use) and also in cement and concrete products and agriculture. In 2003 less than 1 mt of FGD gypsum was sold into these latter markets. Although nearly all the 12 newest wallboard plants announced since 1995 have been designed to use this material, only 27% of total gypsum wallboard production in the USA utilizes FGD gypsum. 1 ref., 2 figs., 2 photos.

  6. Bench-scale Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe; John Currie; David DeBerry

    2008-03-31

    This document is the final report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42314, 'Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors'. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory and EPRI. The objective of the project has been to determine the mechanisms and kinetics of the aqueous reactions of mercury absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, and develop a kinetics model to predict mercury reactions in wet FGD systems. The model may be used to determine optimum wet FGD design and operating conditions to maximize mercury capture in wet FGD systems. Initially, a series of bench-top, liquid-phase reactor tests were conducted and mercury species concentrations were measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy to determine reactant and byproduct concentrations over time. Other measurement methods, such as atomic absorption, were used to measure concentrations of vapor-phase elemental mercury, that cannot be measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy. Next, a series of bench-scale wet FGD simulation tests were conducted. Because of the significant effects of sulfite concentration on mercury re-emission rates, new methods were developed for operating and controlling the bench-scale FGD experiments. Approximately 140 bench-scale wet FGD tests were conducted and several unusual and pertinent effects of process chemistry on mercury re-emissions were identified and characterized. These data have been used to develop an empirically adjusted, theoretically based kinetics model to predict mercury species reactions in wet FGD systems. The model has been verified in tests conducted with the bench-scale wet FGD system, where both gas-phase and liquid-phase mercury concentrations were measured to determine if the model accurately predicts the tendency for mercury re-emissions. This report presents and discusses results from the initial laboratory kinetics measurements, the bench-scale wet FGD tests, and the kinetics modeling efforts.

  7. Utility FGD survey, January--December 1989. Project summary

    SciTech Connect

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M.

    1992-03-01

    The FGD survey report is prepared annually by International Technology (IT) Corporation (formerly PEI Associates, Inc.) for the US Department of Energy. The current issue (and preceding issues from 1974 to 1981 and October 1984 to the present) of the utility FGD survey are available only through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS). Preceding issues covering January 1982 through September 1984 may be purchased from the Research Reports Center of the Electric Power Research institute (EPRI). The information in this report is generated by a computerized data base system known as the Flue Gas Desulfurization Information System (FGDIS). The design information contained in the FGDIS encompasses the entire emission control system and the power generating unit to which it is applied. Performance data for operational FGD systems include monthly dependability parameters, service time, and descriptions of operational problems and solutions.

  8. Evaluation of FGD-gypsum to improve forage production and reduce phosphorus lossed from Piedmont soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGD-gypsum), a byproduct from coal fired electricity generators, has the potential for beneficial use in agricultural systems as a soil amendment. Similar to mined gypsum it can improve soil chemical and physical properties and increase crop productivity. FGD-gypsum ...

  9. Comparison of Mined Gypsum Pellets and FGD Gypsum on Plant Productivity and Nutrient Uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to compare differences between gypsum application from mined sources and FGD gypsum (FGD) on several environmental parameters. The studies objective was to address the fate of Hg and other RCRA metals in a common agricultural system and access its mobility in shallow groundwate...

  10. Update on major commercial advancement by ammonia FGD

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, W.

    1999-07-01

    Extensive use of wet scrubbing processes since the 1970s has presented challenging problems, particularly in high-sulfur coal applications, a service most common in the US, eastern Europe and parts of Asia. For thirty years plant Owners have sought commercial availability and introduction of FGD processes that minimize operating and maintenance costs, complications and compromises. This continues, internationally, to be an important goal for the electric power industry. Moreover, markets for usable, high quality gypsum from commonly applied, wet lime/limestone FGD operation have become saturated in major areas by this rapidly growing, powerplant-byproduct output. Important system design and operational progress, particularly via German firms in the early 1990s, has made a major success of lime-using dry scrubbers of the circulating-fluid-bed type. However, lacking a sulfurous byproduct that is commercially salable in major markets, this process design may not be broadly applicable in large, worldwide powerplants. This paper describes the technical and environmental aspects of ammonia FGD; economics; wet ammonia FGD; dry ammonia FGD; the role of a substantially growing ammonium sulfate supply in worldwide agriculture; and extent of worldwide byproduct market.

  11. Retrofit FGD cost-estimating guidelines. Final report. [6 processes

    SciTech Connect

    Shattuck, D.M.; Ireland, P.A.; Keeth, R.J.; Mora, R.R.; Scheck, R.W.; Archambeault, J.A.; Rathbun, G.R.

    1984-10-01

    This report presents a method to estimate specific plant FGD retrofit costs. The basis of the estimate is a new plant's FGD system cost, as provided in EPRI's Economic Evaluation of FGD Systems CS-3342, or any other generalized cost estimate. The methodology adjusts the capital cost for the sulfur content of the coal, sulfur removal required, unit size, geographic location variables, and retrofit considerations. The methodology also allows the user to calculate first year operating and maintenance (O and M) costs based on site-specific variables. Finally, the report provides a means to adjust for remaining unit life in determining the levelized busbar cost. Levelized cost is presented in mills/kWh and $/t SO/sub 2/ removed.

  12. Rituximab add-on therapy for breakthrough relapsing multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Naismith, R.T.; Piccio, L.; Lyons, J.A.; Lauber, J.; Tutlam, N.T.; Parks, B.J.; Trinkaus, K.; Song, S.K.; Cross, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: B cells and the humoral immune system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). This study sought to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of add-on therapy with rituximab, a monoclonal antibody that depletes circulating B cells, in subjects with relapsing MS with breakthrough disease defined by clinical and MRI activity (Class III evidence). Methods: Thirty subjects with a relapse within the past 18 months despite use of an injectable disease-modifying agent, and with at least 1 gadolinium-enhancing (GdE) lesion on any of 3 pretreatment MRIs, received rituximab administered at 375 mg/m2 weekly × 4 doses. Three monthly posttreatment brain MRI scans were obtained beginning 12 weeks after the first infusion. Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC) and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) were obtained at baseline and throughout the posttreatment follow-up. Results: GdE lesions were reduced after treatment with rituximab, with 74% of posttreatment MRI scans being free of GdE activity compared with 26% free of GdE activity at baseline (p < 0.0001). Median GdE lesions were reduced from 1.0 to 0, and mean number was reduced from 2.81 per month to 0.33 after treatment (88% reduction). MSFC improved as well (p = 0.02). EDSS remained stable. Conclusion: Rituximab add-on therapy was effective based upon blinded radiologic endpoints in this phase II study. In combination with standard injectable therapies, rituximab was well-tolerated with no serious adverse events. B-cell–modulating therapy remains a potential option for treatment of patients with relapsing MS with an inadequate response to standard injectable therapies. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that add-on rituximab reduces gadolinium-enhancing brain lesions in multiple sclerosis. GLOSSARY DMT = disease-modifying therapy; EDSS = Expanded Disability Status Scale; FOV = field of view; GdE = gadolinium-enhancing; HACA = human

  13. FGD liner experiments with wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsch, W.J.; Ahn, C.; Wolfe, W.E.

    1999-07-01

    The construction of artificial wetlands for wastewater treatment often requires impermeable liners not only to protect groundwater resources but also to ensure that there is adequate water in the wetland to support appropriate aquatic life, particularly wetland vegetation. Liners or relatively impervious site soils are very important to the success of constructed treatment wetlands in areas where ground water levels are typically close to the ground surface. This study, carried out at the Olentangy River Wetland Research Park, investigated the use of FGD material from sulfur scrubbers as a possible liner material for constructed wetlands. While several studies have investigated the use of FGD material to line ponds, no studies have investigated the use of this material as a liner for constructed wetlands. They used experimental mesocosms to see the effect of FGD liner materials in constructed wetlands on water quality and on wetland plant growth. This paper presents the results of nutrient analyses and physicochemical investigation of leachate and surface outflow water samples collected from the mesocosms. Plant growth and biomass of wetland vegetation are also included in this paper. First two year results are reported by Ahn et al. (1998, 1999). The overall goal of this study is the identification of advantages and disadvantages of using FGD by-product as an artificial liner in constructed wetlands.

  14. Electronic transfers save time and money for FGD project

    SciTech Connect

    Kindig, R.A. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that in order to support the numerous construction projects that PSI Energy is currently engaged in, particularly the FGD (Flue Gas Desulfurization) Project at Gibson, it was decided to establish hardware, software, and procedures that would help shorten the project completion time. This would be accomplished by reducing the review times at PSI Energy for drawings and specifications received from the architect/engineer. The FGD Project, which uses Chicago-based Sargent and Lundy (S and L) as the primary architect/engineer and which involves construction at the Gibson Generating Station, was to be the pilot project for putting this system in place.

  15. EPA UTILITY FGD SURVEY: FEBRUARY-MARCH 1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is the second in a series of four generated by a new computerized data base system. The report differs from the previous series in that the scope of design data for operating FGD systems is vastly expanded, section formats are revised, and a new section includes operat...

  16. Retrofit costs for lime/limestone FGD and lime spray drying at coal-fired utility boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Emmel, T.E.; Jones, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    The paper gives results of a research program the objective of which was to significantly improve engineering cost estimates currently being used to evaluate the economic effects of applying SO2 controls to existing coal-fired utility boilers. The costs of retrofitting conventional lime/limestone wet flue gas desulfurization (L/LS FGD) and lime spray drying (LSD) FGD at 100-200 coal-fired power plants are being estimated under this program. The retrofit capital cost estimating procedures used for L/LS FGD and LSD FGD make two cost adjustments to current procedures used to estimate FGD costs: cost adders (for items not normally included in FGD system costs; e.g., demolition and relocation of existing facilities) and cost multipliers (to adjust capital costs for site access, congestion, and underground obstructions).

  17. EPA UTILITY FGD SURVEY: FEBRUARY-MARCH 1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is an updated supplement to PB-279 011 and should be used in conjunction with it. It presents a survey of utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems in the U.S., summarizing information contributed by the utility industry, process suppliers, regulatory agencies, an...

  18. EPA UTILITY FGD SURVEY: JUNE-JULY 1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is an updated supplement to PB-279 011 and should be used in conjunction with it. It presents a survey of utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems in the U.S., summarizing information contributed by the utility industry, process suppliers, regulatory agencies, an...

  19. EPA UTILITY FGD SURVEY: APRIL-MAY 1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is an updated supplement to EPA-600/78-051a (PB-279 011) and should be used in conjunction with it. It presens a survey of utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems in the U.S., summarizing information contributed by the utility industry, process suppliers, regula...

  20. EPA UTILITY FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION): AUGUST-SEPTEMBER, 1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is an updated supplement to EPA-600/7-78-051a and should be used in conjunction with it. It presents a survey of utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems in the U.S., summarizing information contributed by the utility industry, process suppliers, regulatory agenc...

  1. EPA UTILITY FGD SURVEY: OCTOBER-NOVEMBER 1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is an updated supplement to EPA-600/7-78-051a and should be used in conjunction with it. It presents a survey of utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems in the U.S., summarizing information contributed by the utility industry, process suppliers, regulatory agenc...

  2. EPA UTILITY FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) SURVEY: DECEMBER 1977 - JANUARY 1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents a survey of utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems in the U.S. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, process suppliers, regulatory agencies, and consulting engineering firms. Systems are tabulated alphabetically, by development...

  3. Differential partitioning and speciation of Hg in wet FGD facilities of two Spanish PCC power plants.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-González, R; Córdoba, P; Díaz-Somoano, M; Font, O; López-Antón, M A; Leiva, C; Martínez-Tarazona, M R; Querol, X; Pereira, C Fernández; Tomás, A; Gómez, P; Mesado, P

    2011-10-01

    This paper evaluates the speciation and partitioning of mercury in two Spanish pulverised coal combustion power plants (PP1 and PP2), equipped with wet limestone-based flue gas desulphurisation facilities (FGD) operating with forced oxidation and re-circulation of FGD water streams. These plants are fed with coal (PP1) and coal/pet-coke blends (PP2) with different mercury contents. The behaviour, partitioning and speciation of Hg were found to be similar during the combustion processes but different in the FGD systems of the two power plants. A high proportion (86-88%) of Hg escaped the electrostatic precipitator in gaseous form, Hg2+ being the predominant mercury species (68-86%) to enter the FGD. At this point, a relatively high total Hg retention (72% and 65%) was achieved in the PP1 and PP2 (2007) FGD facilities respectively. However, during the second sampling campaign for PP2 (2008), the mercury removal achieved by the FGD was much lower (26%). Lab-scale tests point to liquid/gas ratio as the main parameter affecting oxidised mercury capture in the scrubber. The partitioning of the gaseous mercury reaching the FGD system in the wastes and by-products differed. In the low mercury input power plant (PP1) most of the mercury (67%) was associated with the FGD gypsum. Moreover in PP2 a significant proportion of the gaseous mercury reaching the FGD system remained in the aqueous phase (45%) in the 2007 sampling campaign while most of it escaped in 2008 (74%). This may be attributed to the scrubber operating conditions and the different composition and chemistry of the scrubber solution probably due to the use of an additive. PMID:21764100

  4. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gary M. Blythe

    2006-03-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: ADD-ON NOX CONTROLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the environmental technology verification (ETV) of add-on nitrogen oxide (NOx) controls. Research Triangle Institute (RTI) is EPA's cooperating partner for the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) Program, one of a dozen ETV pilot programs. Verification of ...

  6. FGD gypsum issues

    SciTech Connect

    Buecker, B.

    2007-11-15

    The article first explains how gypsum by-product is produced in flue gas desulfurization systems in coal-fired power plants. It goes on to talk about the main markets for gypsum - wallboard manufacture (Plaster of Paris), cement production and soil stabilization. In the USA in 2006 41.6 million tons of gypsum was used by manufacturers of wallboard and plaster products, 3.0 mt for cement production and 1.1 mt for agricultural purposes. A method of determining the by-product gypsum content by thermogravimetric analysis is outlined. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Use of FGD as an impervious liner

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, W.E.; Butalia, T.S.

    1998-07-01

    Increasing generation of coal combustion products (CCPs), particularly flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material, has led utilities to look for beneficial uses of these products. This paper presents one such utilization application of CCPs, i.e., the use of FGD material as an impervious liner for ponds and lagoons. The construction of a full scale lagoon using compacted FGD as a liner is presented. The project was undertaken primarily to address two critical questions, (1) what is the quality of water that permeates through an FGD liner and (2) what is the quantity of water permeating through a field compacted FGD fill of known thickness? The effects of construction processes on the behavior of compacted FGD are evaluated. The monitoring of the performance of the lagoon liner is discussed. Preliminary results indicate that the permeability of the field compacted FGD liner is reducing with time and is approaching the EPA recommended value of 1 x 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec for waste containment facilities.

  8. Use of FGD as an impervious liner

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, W.E.; Butalia, T.S.

    1998-04-01

    Increasing generation of coal combustion products (CCPs), particularly flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material, has led utilities to look for beneficial uses of these products. This paper presents one such utilization application of CCPs, i.e., the use of FGD material as an impervious liner for ponds and lagoons. The construction of a full scale lagoon using compacted FGD as a liner is presented. The project was undertaken primarily to address two critical questions, (1) what is the quality of water that permeates through an FGD liner and (2) what is the quantity of water permeating through a field compacted FGD fill of known thickness? The effects of construction processes on the behavior of compacted FGD are evaluated. The monitoring of the performance of the lagoon liner is discussed. Preliminary results indicate that the permeability of the field compacted FGD liner is reducing with time and is approaching the EPA recommended value of 1x10{sup -7} cm/sec for waste containment facilities.

  9. Looking for a good scrubbing: today's FGD technology

    SciTech Connect

    Blankship, S.

    2005-09-01

    Today's FGD provides better performance and broader flexibility than ever before and delivers it in a smaller, more dependable package. The article describes the systems available to meet US regulations. The pros and cons of wet or dry (or semidry) systems are discussed, along with their ability to remove mercury, particulates and sulfur trioxide. The uses of coal utilization by-products are mentioned. 1 fig., 3 photos.

  10. Randomized Controlled Trials of Add-On Antidepressants in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Grigori; Stenberg, Jan-Henry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite adequate treatment with antipsychotics, a substantial number of patients with schizophrenia demonstrate only suboptimal clinical outcome. To overcome this challenge, various psychopharmacological combination strategies have been used, including antidepressants added to antipsychotics. Methods: To analyze the efficacy of add-on antidepressants for the treatment of negative, positive, cognitive, depressive, and antipsychotic-induced extrapyramidal symptoms in schizophrenia, published randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of adjunctive antidepressants in schizophrenia were reviewed using the following parameters: baseline clinical characteristics and number of patients, their on-going antipsychotic treatment, dosage of the add-on antidepressants, duration of the trial, efficacy measures, and outcomes. Results: There were 36 randomized controlled trials reported in 41 journal publications (n=1582). The antidepressants used were the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, duloxetine, imipramine, mianserin, mirtazapine, nefazodone, reboxetin, trazodone, and bupropion. Mirtazapine and mianserin showed somewhat consistent efficacy for negative symptoms and both seemed to enhance neurocognition. Trazodone and nefazodone appeared to improve the antipsychotics-induced extrapyramidal symptoms. Imipramine and duloxetine tended to improve depressive symptoms. No clear evidence supporting selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors’ efficacy on any clinical domain of schizophrenia was found. Add-on antidepressants did not worsen psychosis. Conclusions: Despite a substantial number of randomized controlled trials, the overall efficacy of add-on antidepressants in schizophrenia remains uncertain mainly due to methodological issues. Some differences in efficacy on several schizophrenia domains seem, however, to exist and to vary by the antidepressant subgroups—plausibly due to differences in the mechanisms of action. Antidepressants may not worsen

  11. FGD gypsum's place in American agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, C.

    2007-07-01

    Surface cracks and soil clumps form when saline-sodic, high-clay soil dries out. Treatment with FGD gypsum and irrigation water flowing into these cracks leaches salts until the aggregates swell and the cracks close up. The article describes research projects to develop agricultural uses of FGD gypsum from coal-fired power plants that have been conducted by university researchers and USDA-Agricultural Research Service scientists.

  12. TRACE ORGANICS VARIATION ACROSS THE WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEM OF A CLASS-B REFINERY AND ESTIMATE OF REMOVAL OF REFRACTORY ORGANICS BY ADD-ON MIXED-MEDIA FILTRATION AND GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON AT PILOT SCALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of research to evaluate the efficiency of pilot-scale granular activated carbon for the removal of organic compounds refractory to the activated-sludge treatment system of a Class B petroleum refinery that met BPT ('best practicable technology') i...

  13. FGD betterment: Asset preservation and revenue generation

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.A.; Boward, W.L. Jr.; Gaikwad, R.P.

    1996-12-31

    Phase I of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 is complete. A mix of technologies and compliance strategies were used by the subject utilities to meet their obligations at the lowest evaluated cost. Phase II of the CAAA, which begins in the year 2000, will require utilities to bring their systems into compliance while reducing their overall SO{sub 2} emissions by 4.4 million tons nationwide. However, considering some of the utilities` overcompliance in Phase I, the overall reduction that needs to be achieved in Phase II could be as low as 2 million tons. The economic and business factors that influenced the compliance technology decisions in Phase I are similar to the economic and business factors that will influence both Phase II decisions and asset preservation on existing systems. While there was a mixture of technologies used in Phase I compliance, the uncertainty over allowance pricing and the overall economic climate favored low capital intensive solutions. Most Utilities chose to fuel switch. Many fewer utilities chose to install flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems than was previously projected. Phase II of the CAAA is likely to continue to favor low capital invenstive solutions since allowance uncertainty continues to be a factor and electric utility restructuring promises continued business uncertainty.

  14. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 3 Full-scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe

    2007-05-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB cofired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. IPL, an AES company, provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program as cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing

  15. FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS: DESIGN AND OPERATING CONSIDERATIONS. VOLUME II. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ;Contents: FGD processes--(FGD technology summary, and SO2 removal mechanisms); Selected FGD process descriptions and critical system operating parameters--(Lime/limestone scrubbing, sodium carbonate scrubbing, double alkali (soda lime) scrubbing, magnesium oxide scrubbing, and s...

  16. FGD Additives to Segregate and Sequester Mercury in Solid Byproducts - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Searcy, K; Bltyhe, G M; Steen, W A

    2012-02-28

    Many mercury control strategies for U.S. coal-fired power generating plants involve co-benefit capture of oxidized mercury from flue gases treated by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. For these processes to be effective at overall mercury control, the captured mercury must not be re-emitted to the atmosphere or into surface or ground water. The project sought to identify scrubber additives and FGD operating conditions under which mercury re-emissions would decrease and mercury would remain in the liquor and be blown down from the system in the chloride purge stream. After exiting the FGD system, mercury would react with precipitating agents to form stable solid byproducts and would be removed in a dewatering step. The FGD gypsum solids, free of most of the mercury, could then be disposed or processed for reuse as wallboard or in other beneficial reuse. The project comprised extensive bench-scale FGD scrubber tests in Phases I and II. During Phase II, the approaches developed at the bench scale were tested at the pilot scale. Laboratory wastewater treatment tests measured the performance of precipitating agents in removing mercury from the chloride purge stream. Finally, the economic viability of the approaches tested was evaluated.

  17. A subsurface add-on for standard atomic force microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Verbiest, G. J.; Zalm, D. J. van der; Oosterkamp, T. H.; Rost, M. J.

    2015-03-15

    The application of ultrasound in an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) gives access to subsurface information. However, no commercially AFM exists that is equipped with this technique. The main problems are the electronic crosstalk in the AFM setup and the insufficiently strong excitation of the cantilever at ultrasonic (MHz) frequencies. In this paper, we describe the development of an add-on that provides a solution to these problems by using a special piezo element with a lowest resonance frequency of 2.5 MHz and by separating the electronic connection for this high frequency piezo element from all other connections. In this sense, we support researches with the possibility to perform subsurface measurements with their existing AFMs and hopefully pave also the way for the development of a commercial AFM that is capable of imaging subsurface features with nanometer resolution.

  18. Innovative wet FGD design features at Kentucky Utilities` Ghent Generating Station, Unit 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ruppert, M.A.; Mitchell, D.

    1995-06-01

    To meet Phase I requirements of the 1990 Federal Clean Air Act Amendments, Kentucky Utilities (KU) elected to retrofit a wet limestone, forced oxidized flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system on their Ghent Generating Station, Unit 1 (500 MW). This FGD system has been designed with several innovative features to enhance SO{sub 2} removal and reduce overall project cost. Organic acids have been incorporated to increase SO{sub 2} removal from 90% to 95%. Also, this Phase I project is designed to accommodate a second FGD to be built at the same site. This will allow both units to share common spare equipment, including a common spare absorber. A wet gypsum stack-out pond is being used in lieu of dewatering equipment. This paper discusses these innovative features from both a performance and an economic standpoint.

  19. Enhanced control of mercury and other HAPs by innovative modifications to wet FGD processes. First quarter 1996 technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, T.R.; Hargrove, O.W.

    1996-06-03

    The overall objective of this project is to learn more about controlling emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from coal- fired power plants that are equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. This project focuses on three research areas: (1) catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury, (2) enhanced particulate-phase HAPs removal by electrostatic charging of liquid droplets, and (3) enhanced mercury removal by additional of additives to FGD process liquor.

  20. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-31

    This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved

  1. FULL-SCALE DUAL ALKALI FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) DEMONSTRATION AT LOUISVILLE GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the 1-year demonstration of the full-scale dual-alkali flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system at Louisville Gas and Electric Co.'s (LG/E's) Cane Run Unit 6. Systems performance is described in terms of performance guarantees and other parameters that were mon...

  2. Detailed information on the FGD retrofit project in Jaenschwalde and the FGD facility in Schwarze Pumpe

    SciTech Connect

    Friede, H.; Nass, K.H.; Breuer, H.

    1995-06-01

    VEAG, the newly founded company for supraregional power generation and distribution in eastern Germany, is retrofitting certain power plants with flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) facilities. Lignite is used almost exclusively as fuel in these power plants. Following German unification, the pollution control regulations in force in the Federal Republic of Germany also apply to the power plants operated by VEAG. The decision was made in principle to only build FGDs which are based on the proven limestone scrubbing process and produce recyclable gypsum as the end product. Experience accumulated with FGDs in lignite-fired power plants resulted in a new concept, which elaborated in cooperation with the commissioned consultants (including Siemens/KWU). This paper will present using the example of a new power plant project with FGD - the 2 x 800-MW power plant Schwarze Pumpe - and an FGD retrofit - the 3 x 1000-MW power plant Janschwalde - the salient features of these facilities (full-metal scrubbers, slurry-carrying pipework and treated-flue-gas ducts made of FRP, flue-gas heat recovery, fine-grained solids separation to improve gypsum quality, use of FGD wastewater for ash moistening and gypsum recycling), an overview of the design as well as construction progress and scheduling. The two FGD facilities are being supplied by KRC/Noell and operate on a two-circuit principle.

  3. GERMAN FGD/DE-NOX (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION/DENITRIFICATION) EXPERIENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives updated details of major flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and denitrification (de-NOx) installations in West Germany for coal-fired boilers. The paper provides an understanding of the principal types of control system designs that have been applied, outlines technol...

  4. Construction and startup experience for Milliken FGD Retrofit Project

    SciTech Connect

    Harvilla, J.; Mahlmeister, M.; Buchanan, T.; Jackson, C.; Watts, J.

    1996-12-01

    Under Round 4 of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology program, New York State Electric & Gas Corp. (NYSEG), in partnership with Saarbereg-Stebbins Engineering and Manufacturing Company, has retrofitted a formic acid enhanced forced oxidation wet limestone scrubber on Units 1 & 2 at the Milliken Steam Electric Station. Units 1 & 2 are 1950`s vintage Combustion Engineering tangentially fired pulverized coal units which are rated at nominal 150 MW each and operate in balanced draft mode. The FGD system for Unit 2 was placed into operation in January 1995 and the Unit 1 system in June, 1995. The project incorporates several unique aspects including low pH operation, a ceramic tile-lined cocurrent/countercurrent, split module absorber, a wet stack supported on the roof of the FGD building, and closed loop, zero liquid discharge operation producing commercial grade gypsum, and calcium chloride brine. The project objectives include 98% SO{sub 2} removal efficiency while burning high sulfur coal, the production of marketable byproducts to minimize solid waste disposal, zero wastewater discharge and space-saving design. The paper provides a brief overview of the project design, discusses construction and startup issues and presents early operating results. Process capital cost and economics of this design, procure and construct approach are reviewed relative to competing technologies.

  5. Construction and startup experience for the Milliken FGD retrofit project

    SciTech Connect

    Harvilla, J.; Mahlmeister, M.; Buchanan, T.; Jackson, C.; Watts, J.

    1996-10-01

    Under Round 4 of the US Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology program, NYSEG, in partnership with Saarberg-Holter-Umwelttechnik, Consolidation Coal Company and Stebbins Engineering and Manufacturing Company, has retrofitted a formic acid enhanced forced oxidation wet limestone scrubber on Units 1 and 2 at the Milliken Steam Electric Station. Units 1 and 2 are 1950`s vintage Combustion Engineering tangentially fired pulverized coal units which are rated at nominal 150 MW each and operate in balanced draft mode. The FGD system for Unit 2 was placed into operation in January 1995 and the Unit 1 system in June, 1995. The project incorporates several unique aspects including low pH operation, a ceramic tile-lined cocurrent/countercurrent, split module absorber, a wet stack supported on the roof of the FGD building, and closed loop, zero liquid discharge operation producing commercial grade gypsum, and calcium chloride brine. The project objectives include 98% SO{sub 2} removal efficiency while burning high sulfur coal, the production of marketable byproducts to minimize solid waste disposal, zero wastewater discharge and space-saving design. The paper provides a brief overview of the project design, discusses construction and startup issues and presents early operating results. Process capital cost and economics of this design, procure and construct approach are reviewed relative to competing technologies.

  6. How add-on solutions can extend the life of static OADMs and protect carrier investment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queller, Abe; Kronenthal, Guy

    2004-10-01

    While most OADM systems deployed today are static, carriers offering new wavelength services, are looking for ways to migrate towards reconfigurable OADM and dynamically reconfigurable OADM. ROADMs allow carriers to automate service provisioning, wavelength management and failsafe mechanisms, thereby eliminating slow, costly and error-prone manual network configuration. And although next-generation systems offer this flexibility as an integral part of their architecture, carriers must protect their existing investment, extending the life of their existing networks. This article examines the use of add-on optical switching systems, as a cost- and time-effective means for upgrading legacy networks. Two examples are given. In the first, a static OADM is upgraded into a reconfigurable system. The second example shows how existing OADM systems can be upgraded to support dynamic reconfigurability. The article examines also particular advantages of Planar Lightwave Circuits (PLC) for these applications.

  7. Cost effective materials for flue gas desulfurization (FGD)

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, D.H.; Brady, B.

    1996-10-01

    Wet Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) is an effective way to remove sulfur dioxide from coal combustion processes and reduce the potential for acid rain. However, wet FGD processes often require highly corrosion resistant construction materials such as high alloys for adequate service life. An excellent material for wet FGD applications at about one half the cost of high alloys is fiberglass-reinforced plastic (FRP) based on epoxy vinyl ester resin. This paper discusses the background and improvements that have led to the use of some of the world`s largest composite structures in FGD service.

  8. Elemental sulfur from regenerable FGD and IGCC processes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.G.; Oehlberg, R.J.; Cianciolo, B.C.

    1998-07-01

    Gas streams containing concentrated levels of SO{sub 2} are common in many regenerable flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, in gas-treatment systems associated with coal gasification processes, and in hydrocarbon treatment processes. Generally, the most desirable sulfur by-product is elemental sulfur. In the past, a modified Claus process was usually the method employed to convert SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur. The Claus process, however, involves multiple reactors in series, is relatively expensive, consumes significant energy, and does not go to completion, which means that a tail gas treatment plant and other facilities are required. For over five years, Sorbent Technologies corporation has been developing and scaling up a simpler, less-costly process for converting SO{sub 2}-rich gases directly to elemental sulfur. The process is based on a new SO{sub 2}-to-elemental sulfur catalyst. The simple technology operates at typical coal gasification temperatures and can use natural gas (reformed methane) or other typical process gases for SO{sub 2} reduction. This new direct-to-sulfur process was recently tested at the Federal Energy Technology Center's advanced Copper Oxide Process FGD pilot plant in Pittsburgh, A skid-mounted test unit was placed after the copper oxide regenerator, where it turned the high-concentration SO{sub 2} off-gas directly into elemental sulfur. This paper discusses the chemistry involved in the new technology, traces its development, and presents the results achieved in various pilot plant tests.

  9. Gantry and isocenter displacements of a linear accelerator caused by an add-on micromultileaf collimator

    SciTech Connect

    Riis, Hans L.; Zimmermann, Sune J.; Hjelm-Hansen, Mogens

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The delivery of high quality stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) treatments to the patient requires knowledge of the position of the isocenter to submillimeter accuracy. To meet the requirements the deviation between the radiation and mechanical isocenters must be less than 1 mm. The use of add-on micromultileaf collimators ({mu}MLCs) in SRS and SRT is an additional challenge to the anticipated high-level geometric and dosimetric accuracy of the treatment. The aim of this work was to quantify the gantry excursions during rotation with and without an add-on {mu}MLC attached to the gantry head. In addition, the shift in the position of the isocenter and its correlation to the kV beam center of the cone-beam CT system was included in the study. Methods: The quantification of the gantry rotational performance was done using a pointer supported by an in-house made rigid holder attached to the gantry head of the accelerator. The pointer positions were measured using a digital theodolite. To quantify the effect of an {mu}MLC of 50 kg, the measurements were repeated with the {mu}MLC attached to the gantry head. The displacement of the isocenter due to an add-on {mu}MLC of 50 kg was also investigated. In case of the pointer measurement the {mu}MLC was simulated by weights attached to the gantry head. A method of least squares was applied to determine the position and displacement of the mechanical isocenter. Additionally, the displacement of the radiation isocenter was measured using a ball-bearing phantom and the electronic portal image device system. These measurements were based on 8 MV photon beams irradiated onto the ball from the four cardinal angles and two opposed collimator angles. The measurements and analysis of the data were carried out automatically using software delivered by the manufacturer. Results: The displacement of the mechanical isocenter caused by a 50 kg heavy {mu}MLC was found to be (-0.01 {+-} 0.05, -0

  10. Manufacture of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD-gypsum. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Rostam-Abadi, Ml; Lytle, J.M.; Bruinius, J.A.; Li, Y.C.; Hoeft, R.; Dewey, S.; Achorn, F.

    1995-12-31

    Goal is to assess technical and economic feasibility for producing fertilizer-grade ammonium sulfate from gypsum produced in limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD). This is the 1st year of a 2-year program among Illinois State Geological Survey, University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign), Allied-Signal, Marketing Chem. Process Inc., Henry Fertilizer, Illinois Power Co., and Central Illinois Public Services. In previous quarter, chemistry and process conditions were reviewed and a reactor system set up and used to conduct laboratory tests. FGD-gypsum from Abbott power plant was used. The scrubber, a Chiyoda Thoroughbred 121 FGD, produced a filter cake (98.36% gypsum and < 0.01% CaSO{sub 3}). Conversion of FGD- gypsum to ammonium sulfate was tested at 60-70{degree}C for 5-6 hr. Yield up to 82% and purity up to 95% were achieved for the ammonium sulfate production. During this quarter, more bench-scale experiments including a mass balance analysis were conducted; a yield up to 83% and up to 99% purity were achieved. A literature survey was completed and a preliminary process flow sheet was developed. Economics of the process is being estimated.

  11. Monitoring the fixed FGD sludge landfill, Conesville, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hupe, D.W.

    1984-10-01

    The full-scale disposal by landfilling of FGD sludge which has been fixed according to the system developed by Conversion Systems, Inc. (CSI (formerly IU Conversion Systems, Inc.)) has been monitored over a period of roughly four years beginning in early 1979. The investigations have been conducted at the Conesville Power Station of Columbus and Southern Ohio Electric Company where the system was first applied on a full-scale basis starting January, 1977. Principal project objectives (Research Project 1406-2) were to evaluate if full-scale application of the CSI Poz-O-Tec System (1) reflects laboratory and pilot scale projections, (2) causes operating problems, and (3) provides an environmentally acceptable disposal alternative. This report is the final summary document (four total) prepared by Michael Baker, Jr., Inc., for this project. It contains specific data and observations for the last year's (Phase II, Third Interim) activities, summarizes all past water quality and sludge physical testing data, and presents an evaluation of the success of the system with respect to projected results and general environmental acceptability. The subject system for sludge management has generally been determined to be environmentally and operationally sound. Although the fixed sludge permeabilities are slightly higher than desirable, leachate as a result of landfill permeation, if any, has not been detected. The system provides sufficient additional measures other than reduction of sludge permeability to prevent the formation of leachate by permeation. Shear strength of the fixed FGD sludge is significantly improved as compared to that of unfixed sludge. As a result, the landfill area has many potential uses after closure.

  12. The CONVEX Liner Add-On to the DIAMOND-FORTUNE event

    SciTech Connect

    Heuze, F.E.; Swift, R.P.; Hill, L.R.; Barrett, W.H.

    1993-11-15

    This report describes the execution of the CONVEX Liner Add-On to the DIAMOND FORTUNE low-yield cavity test of the Defense Nuclear Agency. CONVEX stands for COntained Nuclear Vessel EXperiment. It concerns the design of underground chambers where repeated low-yield nuclear explosions could be conducted. The approach proposed by the first author in the early 1980`s was to engineer a steel-lined rock cavern where the steel liner would be prestressed against the rock by tendons and/or bolts. These would daylight in tunnels surrounding the main cavity. From there, they could be initially tensioned and retensioned, if needed, after each test. The CONVEX Liner Add-On to DIAMOND FORTUNE consisted of anchoring a 1.4-m square, 2.5-cm thick steel plate to the wall of the cavity, using a 5-cm diameter center bolt, and four 2.5-cm diameter comer bolts. The bolts daylighted in a drift surrounding the gallery, and separated from it by a 9-m thick rock pillar. The liner plate, the bolts, and the rock pillar were equipped with 23 gages to describe the thermal and mechanical response of the system during pretensioning, during the dynamic loading phase, and post-test. Particular emphasis was given to obtaining the response both upon loading and during the rebound of the system, in order to determine whether the plate ever separated from the rock. So, the main operational objectives of this project were to acquire response data of the system under nuclear loading and to ascertain the status of contact between the steel plate and the rock, as shown by toadstool data and bolt tension data. The instrumentation and data acquisition system performed extremely well. Data were recorded during the dynamic phase; plate temperature was monitored for several hours after the test; and the remaining tension was obtained for several bolts more than three months after the test, upon re-entry in the runaround drift.

  13. Beneficial reuse of FGD material in the construction of low permeability liners: Impacts on inorganic water quality constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.M.; Tu, W.; Zand, B.; Butalia, T.; Wolfe, W.; Walker, H.

    2007-05-15

    In this paper, we examine the water quality impacts associated with the reuse of fixated flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material as a low permeability liner for agricultural applications. A 0.457-m-thick layer of fixated FGD material from a coal-fired power plant was utilized to create a 708 m{sup 2} swine manure pond at the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center Western Branch in South Charleston, Ohio. To assess the effects of the fixated FGD material liner, water quality samples were collected over a period of 5 years from the pond surface water and a sump collection system beneath the liner. Water samples collected from the sump and pond surface water met all Ohio nontoxic criteria, and in fact, generally met all national primary and secondary drinking water standards. Furthermore it was found that hazardous constituents (i.e., As, B, Cr, Cu, and Zn) and agricultural pollutants (i.e., phosphate and ammonia) were effectively retained by the FGD liner system. The retention of As, B, Cr, Cu, Zn, and ammonia was likely due to sorption to mineral components of the FGD liner, while Ca, Fe, and P retention were a result of both sorption and precipitation of Fe- and Ca-containing phosphate solids.

  14. Improved FGD dewatering process cuts solid wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Moer, C.; Fernandez, J.; Carraro, B.

    2009-08-15

    In 2007, Duke Energy's W.H. Zimmer Station set out to advance the overall performance of its flue gas desulfurization (FGD) dewatering process. The plant implemented a variety of measures, including upgrading water-solids separation, improving polymer program effectiveness and reliability, optimizing treatment costs, reducing solid waste sent to the landfill, decreasing labor requirements, and maintaining septic-free conditions in clarifiers. The changes succeeded in greatly reducing solid waste generation and achieving total annual savings of over half a million dollars per year. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Substitution: An FGD vision reaches fruition

    SciTech Connect

    Feeney, S.

    1995-06-01

    Through Substitution, Phase I affected utilities can meet their Phase I SO{sub 2} allowance requirements by reductions made at a Phase II source. The thinking is that it might be more cost-effective for certain Phase II affected sources to make these SO{sub 2} reductions. This paper will discuss several examples of FGD-equipped, Phase II affected sources who decided to Substitute. Included will be the economics of two particular utilities, one who decided to participate in Substitution, and one who found it uneconomical.

  16. Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Task 5 Full-Scale Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

    2007-12-01

    This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate whether the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project is conducting pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and cost sharing. Southern Company has provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company is providing the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies are also supplying technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management

  17. Design and initial operation of the Spray Dry FGD system at the Marquette Michigan Board of Light and Power Shiras number 3 plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, T.F.; Arello, J.; Fortune, O.; Puska, E.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses the design issues, design decisions, start-up, and early operation of a Spray Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization (SDFGD) system which went into operation at the Marquette Michigan Board of Light and Power Shiras number 3 in May 1983. This fortyfour (44) megawatt unit consisting of a rotary atomizer reactor, reverse air fabric filter, lime preparation, and reagent recycle system was engineered in the 1980-82 time period utilizing pilot plant and prototype industrial system results as a design basis. Initial operation has been uneventful with performance results in the expected ranges.

  18. Elemental sulfur from regenerable FGD and IGCC processes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.G.; Oehlberg, R.J.; Cianciolo, B.C.

    1998-04-01

    Gas streams containing concentrated levels of SO{sub 2} are common in many regenerable flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, in gas-treatment systems associated with coal gasification processes, and in hydrocarbon treatment processes. Generally, the most desirable sulfur by-product is elemental sulfur. In the past, a modified Claus process was usually the method employed to convert SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur. The Claus process, however, involves multiple reactors in series, is relatively expensive, consumes significant energy, and does not go to completion, which means that a tail gas treatment plant and other facilities are required. For over five years, Sorbent Technologies Corporation has been developing and scaling up a simpler, less-costly process for converting SO{sub 2}-rich gases directly to elemental sulfur. The process is based on a new SO{sub 2}-to-elemental sulfur catalyst. The simple technology operates at typical coal gasification temperatures and can use natural gas (reformed methane) or other typical process gases for SO{sub 2} reduction. This new direct-to-sulfur process was recently tested at the Federal Energy Technology Center`s advanced Copper Oxide Process FGD pilot plant in Pittsburgh. A skid-mounted test unit was placed after the copper oxide regenerator, where it turned the high-concentration SO{sub 2} off-gas directly into elemental sulfur. This paper discusses the chemistry involved in the new technology, traces its development, and presents the results achieved in various pilot plant tests.

  19. Use of wet FGD material for revegetation of an abandoned acidic coal refuse pile

    SciTech Connect

    Mafi, S.; Stehouwer, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    Wet FGD material has a neutralizing potential of 15% CaCO{sub 3}. These properties may make it a beneficial amendment for revegetation of hyper-acidic coal refuse. In greenhouse and field experiments, coal refuse (pH = 2.5) was amended with wet FGD (300, 500, and 700 tons/acre). Amendment with FGD was as effective as agricultural lime (AL) in increasing refuse pH and decreasing soluble Al and Fe. Addition of compost to the FGD further increased pH and decreased soluble Al and Fe. Downward transport of Ca was greater with FGD than AL, but FGD did not increase leachate concentrations of S. Amendment with FGD increased refuse, leachate and plant tissue concentrations of B. Other trace elements were not increased by FGD. In the greenhouse, plant growth was similar with AL and FGD except during the first three months when AL produced more growth than FGD. The initial growth suppression by FGD was likely due to high soluble salts, and possibly by high B concentrations. During the first year of the field experiment plant growth was greater with FGD than with AL. In both the field and greenhouse experiments compost increased plant growth when combined with FGD. These experiments show revegetation of toxic coal refuse and improvement in drainage water quality is possible by amendment with FGD. Revegetation success will be improved by combined amendment with FGD and compost.

  20. Myelin is dependent on the Charcot-Marie-Tooth Type 4H disease culprit protein FRABIN/FGD4 in Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Horn, Michael; Baumann, Reto; Pereira, Jorge A; Sidiropoulos, Páris N M; Somandin, Christian; Welzl, Hans; Stendel, Claudia; Lühmann, Tessa; Wessig, Carsten; Toyka, Klaus V; Relvas, João B; Senderek, Jan; Suter, Ueli

    2012-12-01

    Studying the function and malfunction of genes and proteins associated with inherited forms of peripheral neuropathies has provided multiple clues to our understanding of myelinated nerves in health and disease. Here, we have generated a mouse model for the peripheral neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4H by constitutively disrupting the mouse orthologue of the suspected culprit gene FGD4 that encodes the small RhoGTPase Cdc42-guanine nucleotide exchange factor Frabin. Lack of Frabin/Fgd4 causes dysmyelination in mice in early peripheral nerve development, followed by profound myelin abnormalities and demyelination at later stages. At the age of 60 weeks, this was accompanied by electrophysiological deficits. By crossing mice carrying alleles of Frabin/Fgd4 flanked by loxP sequences with animals expressing Cre recombinase in a cell type-specific manner, we show that Schwann cell-autonomous Frabin/Fgd4 function is essential for proper myelination without detectable primary contributions from neurons. Deletion of Frabin/Fgd4 in Schwann cells of fully myelinated nerve fibres revealed that this protein is not only required for correct nerve development but also for accurate myelin maintenance. Moreover, we established that correct activation of Cdc42 is dependent on Frabin/Fgd4 function in healthy peripheral nerves. Genetic disruption of Cdc42 in Schwann cells of adult myelinated nerves resulted in myelin alterations similar to those observed in Frabin/Fgd4-deficient mice, indicating that Cdc42 and the Frabin/Fgd4-Cdc42 axis are critical for myelin homeostasis. In line with known regulatory roles of Cdc42, we found that Frabin/Fgd4 regulates Schwann cell endocytosis, a process that is increasingly recognized as a relevant mechanism in peripheral nerve pathophysiology. Taken together, our results indicate that regulation of Cdc42 by Frabin/Fgd4 in Schwann cells is critical for the structure and function of the peripheral nervous system. In particular, this

  1. Myelin is dependent on the Charcot–Marie–Tooth Type 4H disease culprit protein FRABIN/FGD4 in Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Michael; Baumann, Reto; Pereira, Jorge A.; Sidiropoulos, Páris N. M.; Somandin, Christian; Welzl, Hans; Stendel, Claudia; Lühmann, Tessa; Wessig, Carsten; Toyka, Klaus V.; Relvas, João B.; Senderek, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Studying the function and malfunction of genes and proteins associated with inherited forms of peripheral neuropathies has provided multiple clues to our understanding of myelinated nerves in health and disease. Here, we have generated a mouse model for the peripheral neuropathy Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 4H by constitutively disrupting the mouse orthologue of the suspected culprit gene FGD4 that encodes the small RhoGTPase Cdc42-guanine nucleotide exchange factor Frabin. Lack of Frabin/Fgd4 causes dysmyelination in mice in early peripheral nerve development, followed by profound myelin abnormalities and demyelination at later stages. At the age of 60 weeks, this was accompanied by electrophysiological deficits. By crossing mice carrying alleles of Frabin/Fgd4 flanked by loxP sequences with animals expressing Cre recombinase in a cell type-specific manner, we show that Schwann cell-autonomous Frabin/Fgd4 function is essential for proper myelination without detectable primary contributions from neurons. Deletion of Frabin/Fgd4 in Schwann cells of fully myelinated nerve fibres revealed that this protein is not only required for correct nerve development but also for accurate myelin maintenance. Moreover, we established that correct activation of Cdc42 is dependent on Frabin/Fgd4 function in healthy peripheral nerves. Genetic disruption of Cdc42 in Schwann cells of adult myelinated nerves resulted in myelin alterations similar to those observed in Frabin/Fgd4-deficient mice, indicating that Cdc42 and the Frabin/Fgd4–Cdc42 axis are critical for myelin homeostasis. In line with known regulatory roles of Cdc42, we found that Frabin/Fgd4 regulates Schwann cell endocytosis, a process that is increasingly recognized as a relevant mechanism in peripheral nerve pathophysiology. Taken together, our results indicate that regulation of Cdc42 by Frabin/Fgd4 in Schwann cells is critical for the structure and function of the peripheral nervous system. In particular

  2. Effect and Potential Mechanism of Electroacupuncture Add-On Treatment in Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Sun, Li; Zhang, Xiao-Zhe; Jia, Jun; Liu, Zhuo; Huang, Xi-Yan; Yu, Shu-Yang; Zuo, Li-Jun; Cao, Chen-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Min; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To explore effectiveness and mechanisms of electroacupuncture (EA) add-on treatment in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Methods. Fifty PD patients were randomly assigned to drug plus EA (D + EA) group and drug alone (D) group. Subjects in D + EA group received stimulation in points of bilateral fengfu, fengchi, hegu, and central dazhui. Participants were evaluated by scales for motor and nonmotor symptoms. Levels of neuroinflammatory factors and neurotransmitters in serum were detected. Results. EA add-on treatment remarkably reduced scores of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) III and its subitems of tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia and conspicuously decreased UPDRS III scores in patients with bradykinesia-rigidity and mixed types and mild severity. Depression and sleep disturbances were eased, which were reflected by decreased scores of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and elevated noradrenaline level. Effects of EA add-on treatment on motor symptoms and sleep disturbances were superior to drug alone treatment, markedly improving life quality of PD patients. EA add-on treatment decreased nitric oxide level in serum. Conclusions. EA add-on treatment is effective on most motor symptoms and some nonmotor symptoms and is particularly efficacious in PD patients at early stage. Antineuroinflammation may be a mechanism of EA add-on treatment. PMID:26351515

  3. Leaching of FGD Byproducts Using a CSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Kairies, C.L.; Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.

    2005-09-01

    Leaching studies of coal utilization byproducts (CUB) are often performed to determine the compatibility of the material in a particular end-use or disposal environment. Typically, these studies are conducted using either a batch or a fixed-bed column technique. Fixed-bed columns offer the advantage of a continuous flow of effluent that provides elution profiles with changing elution volume and pH. Unfortunately, clogs can form in fixed-bed leaching columns, either because of cementitious properties of the material itself, such as is seen for fluidized bed combustion (FBC) fly ash, or because of precipitate formation, such as can occur when a high-calcium ash is subjected to sulfate-containing leachates. Also, very fine-grained materials, such as gypsum, do not provide sufficient permeability for study in a fixed-bed column. A continuous, stirred-tank extractor (CSTX) is being used as an alternative technique that can provide the elution profile of column leaching but without the low permeability problems. The CSTX has been successfully employed in the leaching of flue gas desulfurization products that would not be sufficiently permeable under traditional column leaching conditions. The results indicate that the leaching behavior depends on a number of factors, including (but not limited to) solubility and neutralization capacity of the mineral phases present, sorption properties of these phases, behavior of the solubilized material in the tank, and the type of species in solution. In addition, leaching to near-exhaustion of a wallboard produced from FGD gypsum has allowed the isolation of a highly adsorptive phase. This phase appears to be present in at least some FGD gypsums and accounts for the immobilization of trace metals such as arsenic, cobalt, lead, and mercury.

  4. FGD metals and design technology: Past problems/solution, present status and future outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.C.; Ford, M.

    1998-12-31

    Unscheduled downtime of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) systems in the late 1970`s and early 1980`s was often traced to corrosion of the material components. A concerted effort by the FGD industry (A/E firms, EPRI, alloy producers, lining suppliers, research institutions, et al) was mounted to define the problems and provide cost effective solutions. The industry today has a much better (if not total) understanding of the complexity of the corrosive environments of wet scrubber systems and this knowledge was gained only after years of investment in research and development programs. The results of these programs have led to improved alloy metallurgy, non-metallic coatings, process designs and fabrication/inspection techniques. The benefits of this effort are that today the industry is fully enjoying the reliability in performance in FGD systems with minimal interruption, a phenomenon which was almost non existent about 20 years ago. This paper briefly describes the chronology of the various factors leading to where the industry is today regarding alloy trends, case histories, and some corrosion data. Also discussed are the future trends, prospects and challenges this industry will be facing in the 21st century.

  5. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. ); Haefner, R. . Water Resources Div.)

    1993-04-01

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  6. Manufacture of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD-gypsum

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Bruinius, J.A.; Li, Y.C.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of this study is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing marketable products, namely fertilizer-grade ammonium sulfate and calcium carbonate, from gypsum produced as part of lime/limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. Millions of tons of FGD-gypsum by-product will be produced in this decade. In this study, a literature review and bench-scale experiments were conducted to obtain process data for the production of marketable products from FGD-gypsum and to help evaluate technical and economic feasibility of the process. FGD-gypsum produced at the Abbott power plant in Champaign, IL was used as a raw material. The scrubber, a Chiyoda Thoroughbred 121 FGD, produced a filter cake product contains 98.36% gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O), and less than 0.01% calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 3}). Conversion of FGD-gypsum to ammonium sulfate were tested at temperatures between 60 to 70{degrees}C for a duration of five to six hours. The results of a literature review and preliminary bench-scale experiments are presented in this paper.

  7. Production of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD-gypsum

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Li, Y.C.

    1995-12-31

    The overall goal of this study is to assess the technical and economic feasibilities for producing marketable products including fertilizer-grade ammonium sulfate from gypsum produced as part of lime/limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. Millions of tone of FGD-gypsum by-product may be produced in this decade as a result of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. In this research, bench-scale experiments were conducted to obtain process data for the production of ammonium sulfate from FGD-gypsum and to help evaluate technical and economic feasibilities of the process. The FGD-gypsum sample produced from a Chiyoda Thoroughbred 121-FGD process installed on the Abbott power plant in Champaign, EL which was composed of 98.36% gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{sm_bullet}2H{sub 2}O) and less than 0.01% calcium sulfite (CaSO) was used. The preliminary results of bench-scale experiments to evaluate the influence of reaction conditions to produce ammonium sulfate from FGD-gypsum are presented in this paper.

  8. Thioredoxin Reductase 2 (TXNRD2) Mutation Associated With Familial Glucocorticoid Deficiency (FGD)

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rathi; Chan, Li F.; Hughes, Claire R.; Kaski, Juan P.; Kowalczyk, Julia C.; Savage, Martin O.; Peters, Catherine J.; Nathwani, Nisha; Clark, Adrian J. L.; Metherell, Louise A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Classic ACTH resistance, due to disruption of ACTH signaling, accounts for the majority of cases of familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD). Recently FGD cases caused by mutations in the mitochondrial antioxidant, nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase, have highlighted the importance of redox regulation in steroidogenesis. Objective: We hypothesized that other components of mitochondrial antioxidant systems would be good candidates in the etiology of FGD. Design: Whole-exome sequencing was performed on three related patients, and segregation of putative causal variants confirmed by Sanger sequencing of all family members. A TXNRD2-knockdown H295R cell line was created to investigate redox homeostasis. Setting: The study was conducted on patients from three pediatric centers in the United Kingdom. Patients: Seven individuals from a consanguineous Kashmiri kindred, six of whom presented with FGD between 0.1 and 10.8 years, participated in the study. Interventions: There were no interventions. Main Outcome Measure: Identification and functional interrogation of a novel homozygous mutation segregating with the disease trait were measured. Results: A stop gain mutation, p.Y447X in TXNRD2, encoding the mitochondrial selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase 2 (TXNRD2) was identified and segregated with disease in this extended kindred. RT-PCR and Western blotting revealed complete absence of TXNRD2 in patients homozygous for the mutation. TXNRD2 deficiency leads to impaired redox homeostasis in a human adrenocortical cell line. Conclusion: In contrast to the Txnrd2-knockout mouse model, in which embryonic lethality as a consequence of hematopoietic and cardiac defects is described, absence of TXNRD2 in humans leads to glucocorticoid deficiency. This is the first report of a homozygous mutation in any component of the thioredoxin antioxidant system leading to inherited disease in humans. PMID:24601690

  9. Resistance welded clad plate for ductwork. Chimney liners and absorbers in FGD units

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.A.

    1998-12-31

    Resistance welded clad plate offers a reliable, cost effective solution to severe corrosion problems encountered in wet Flue Gas Desulfurization systems for either new or retro-fit construction, Resistance welded clad plate weld-bonds thin gauge, .020 inches to .080 inches (.50 mm to 2.0 mm) thick, corrosion resistant materials to relatively thick, .63 inches to 3.0 inches (1.6 mm to 76 mm), significantly less expensive carbon steel, Resistance welded clad plate batten bar design and resistance welded clad plate overlap panel design, have been extensively used in FGD systems since 1984 with over 1,000,000 s.f. (93,000 m{sup 2}) used in outlet ductwork, chimney liners and absorbers. In addition resistance welded clad plate has been used and proven successful in hundreds of demanding applications in the chemical process industry (that in general have more severe corrosive environments than FGD applications, with up to fill vacuum conditions) since 1970. This paper discusses the resistance welding clad plate manufacturing process, provides a detailed list of users and installations, and presents fabrication techniques for both new and retrofit FGD construction with typical costs using various clad composites.

  10. ATOM - an OMERO add-on for automated import of image data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Modern microscope platforms are able to generate multiple gigabytes of image data in a single experimental session. In a routine research laboratory workflow, these data are initially stored on the local acquisition computer from which files need to be transferred to the experimenter's (remote) image repository (e.g., DVDs, portable hard discs or server-based storage) because of limited local data storage. Although manual solutions for this migration, such as OMERO - a client-server software for visualising and managing large amounts of image data - exist, this import process may be a time-consuming and tedious task. Findings We have developed ATOM, a Java-based and thus platform-independent add-on for OMERO enabling automated transfer of image data from a wide variety of acquisition software packages into OMERO. ATOM provides a graphical user interface and allows pre-organisation of experimental data for the transfer. Conclusions ATOM is a convenient extension of the OMERO software system. An automated interface to OMERO will be a useful tool for scientists working with file formats supported by the Bio-Formats file format library, a platform-independent library for reading the most common file formats of microscope images. PMID:21978452

  11. Long-acting muscarinic antagonists: a potential add-on therapy in the treatment of asthma?

    PubMed

    Busse, William W; Dahl, Ronald; Jenkins, Christine; Cruz, Alvaro A

    2016-03-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways that is a major global burden on both individuals and healthcare systems. Despite guideline-directed treatment, a significant proportion of patients with asthma do not achieve control. This review focuses on the potential use of long-acting anticholinergics as bronchodilators in the treatment of asthma, with results published from clinical trials of glycopyrrolate, umeclidinium and tiotropium. The tiotropium clinical trial programme is the most advanced, with data available from a number of phase II and III studies of tiotropium as an add-on to inhaled corticosteroid maintenance therapy, with or without a long-acting β2-agonist, in patients across asthma severities. Recent studies using the Respimat Soft Mist inhaler have identified 5 µg once daily as the preferred dosing regimen, which has shown promising results in adults, adolescents and children with asthma. Tiotropium Respimat has recently been incorporated into the Global Initiative for Asthma 2015 treatment strategy as a recommended alternative therapy at steps 4 and 5 in adult patients with a history of exacerbations. The increasing availability of evidence from ongoing and future clinical trials will be beneficial in determining where long-acting anticholinergic agents fit in future treatment guidelines across a variety of patient populations and disease severities. PMID:26929422

  12. Sensitivity analysis of add-on price estimate for select silicon wafering technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mokashi, A. R.

    1982-01-01

    The cost of producing wafers from silicon ingots is a major component of the add-on price of silicon sheet. Economic analyses of the add-on price estimates and their sensitivity internal-diameter (ID) sawing, multiblade slurry (MBS) sawing and fixed-abrasive slicing technique (FAST) are presented. Interim price estimation guidelines (IPEG) are used for estimating a process add-on price. Sensitivity analysis of price is performed with respect to cost parameters such as equipment, space, direct labor, materials (blade life) and utilities, and the production parameters such as slicing rate, slices per centimeter and process yield, using a computer program specifically developed to do sensitivity analysis with IPEG. The results aid in identifying the important cost parameters and assist in deciding the direction of technology development efforts.

  13. Improving the Laboratory Add-On Process and Increasing Housestaff Satisfaction with an EMR Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Shahnazarian, Vahe; Mehta, Parag

    2016-01-01

    At a community hospital in Brooklyn, New York, the process for ordering add-on testing to drawn blood tubes involved filling out a paper sheet, then faxing and bulleting that sheet to the lab. It was a very inefficient, cumbersome, and unsatisfactory way of completing the process. In light of this, an EMR intervention was implemented in which the add-on order was placed as an EMR order. The study spanned over almost five years, over a year of which was post-intervention. There was a statistically significant increase in the number of add-on orders being placed as a result of the intervention. This has greatly improved housestaff satisfaction with the overall process. In conclusion, the project was a great success and met its goals of simplifying a difficult and cumbersome process while increasing user satisfaction. PMID:27239309

  14. Elemental sulfur from regenerable FGD processes

    SciTech Connect

    Little, R.C.; Nelson, S.G.

    1995-12-31

    Sorbent Technologies Corporation (Sorbtech) engineers recently discovered a new catalyst that effectively reduces sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in concentrated SO{sub 2} streams directly to elemental sulfur as a one-step process. The discovery was made during Sorbtech`s development work with the Magsorbent Process, a new regenerable Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) process. In laboratory studies, the catalyst demonstrated good SO{sub 2}-to-elemental sulfur yields. Yields of 95% or more were observed. The process, which is carried out at atmospheric pressure, employs reformed methane and the catalyst, which is heated, to reduce SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur. The new catalyst process should be of interest to anyone who currently has an SO{sub 2} stream containing high concentrations of SO{sub 2}, and wishes to convert it into a useful product. The process is expected to be a low-cost alternative to a modified Claus plant. This paper describes laboratory tests that were conducted to examine the effects of gas composition, sulfur dioxide concentration, and long-term use on the performance of the catalyst. It also describes the scale up of the new technology to a size suitable for treating the total SO{sub 2}-rich regenerator off-gas stream at DOE`s new Copper Oxide Process flue-gas desulfurization pilot facility, located at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center.

  15. 24 CFR 990.190 - Other formula expenses (add-ons).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Other formula expenses (add-ons). 990.190 Section 990.190 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING TO HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONTINUED) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT THE PUBLIC...

  16. Linagliptin as add-on therapy to insulin for patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    von Websky, Karoline; Reichetzeder, Christoph; Hocher, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a highly prevalent, progressive disease that often is poorly controlled. The combination of an incretin-based therapy and insulin is a promising approach to optimize the management of glycemic control without hypoglycemia and weight gain. Linagliptin, a recently approved oral dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, has a unique pharmacological profile. The convenient, once-daily dosing does not need adjustment in patients with hepatic and/or renal impairment. In clinical studies linagliptin shows an important reduction of blood glucose with an overall safety profile similar to that of placebo. So far, the combination of linagliptin and insulin has been tested in three major clinical studies in different populations. It has been shown that linagliptin is an effective and safe add-on therapy to insulin in patients with T2DM. The efficacy and safety of this combination was also shown in vulnerable, elderly T2DM patients and in patients with T2DM and renal impairment. Favorable effects regarding the counteraction of hypoglycemia make linagliptin especially interesting as an add-on therapy to insulin. This review aims to present the existing clinical studies on the efficacy and safety of linagliptin as add-on therapy to insulin in patients with T2DM in the context of current literature. Additionally, the possible advantages of linagliptin as an add-on therapy to insulin in relation to cardiovascular safety, patient-centered therapy and the prevention of hypoglycemia, are discussed. PMID:24204157

  17. 40 CFR 75.34 - Units with add-on emission controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... assurance/quality control program for the unit, required by section 1 in appendix B of this part. To provide... parametric data to verify the proper operation of the SO2 or NOX add-on emission controls during each hour, as described in paragraph (d) of this section. For any missing data hour(s) in which such...

  18. 40 CFR 75.34 - Units with add-on emission controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... assurance/quality control program for the unit, required by section 1 in appendix B of this part. To provide... parametric data to verify the proper operation of the SO2 or NOX add-on emission controls during each hour, as described in paragraph (d) of this section. For any missing data hour(s) in which such...

  19. 40 CFR 75.34 - Units with add-on emission controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... assurance/quality control program for the unit, required by section 1 in appendix B of this part. To provide... parametric data to verify the proper operation of the SO2 or NOX add-on emission controls during each hour, as described in paragraph (d) of this section. For any missing data hour(s) in which such...

  20. 40 CFR 75.34 - Units with add-on emission controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... assurance/quality control program for the unit, required by section 1 in appendix B of this part. To provide... parametric data to verify the proper operation of the SO2 or NOX add-on emission controls during each hour, as described in paragraph (d) of this section. For any missing data hour(s) in which such...

  1. Civic Engagement and Global Citizenship in a University Context: Core Business or Desirable Add-On?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munck, Ronaldo

    2010-01-01

    Can civic engagement become a "core business" of the contemporary university, or is it an attractive "add-on" that is not affordable in the current economic climate? Contemporary universities often play an important role in local community development and, as such, have the opportunity to develop civic engagement strategies to sit alongside…

  2. High volume--high value usage of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines. Phase 1: Laboratory Investigations. Quarterly report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1997-01-01

    The principal focus of the project during the quarter was the location of a suitable mine site for the field demonstration. The Ivy Creek Mine operated by the Costain Coal Co. was chosen for the study. The mine, located in Floyd County, Kentucky has an extensive body of environmentally relevant background information. Most importantly, it also has suitable strata of previously augered coal, as well as a mine plane which will allow access to emplaced FGD fill at a later date. A finite element analysis of the fill scenario for highwall mine adits, was also conducted to analyze the variation of stresses and displacements for this system due to backfilling of FGD materials. The engineering properties of the rock and the optimum mix proportioning of the FGD material (12% prehydrated FGD mix with 31 % water) were obtained from laboratory tests. The supporting effects of backfilled FGD mixtures appear after FGD mixtures get some stiffness, and the surrounding rocks deform sufficiently and squeeze into the backfilled highwall mine adits. The analyses show that for the case in question, after removal of the coal web, the displacement increases from 2.86 cm before backfilling to 3.31 cm. This slight increase in the roof displacement is within a reasonable range. According to the maximal principal failure criteria, the safety level of backfilled FGD mixture is evaluated by comparing the strength of FGD mixtures with the maximum compressive stress. The factor of safety calculated is much greater than 1.0 and it is concluded that, after backfilling, the coal pillar could be removed. Although original design guidance suggested 1000 psi unconfined compressive strength was required for the FGD material, it appears that much lower strength is acceptable. However, significant deformations are found to occur, and it would appear that material stiffness is the important parameter.

  3. Add-on fluvoxamine treatment for schizophrenia: an updated meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Taro; Hirota, Tomoya; Iwata, Nakao

    2013-12-01

    We performed an updated meta-analysis of fluvoxamine add-on therapy in patients with schizophrenia treated with antipsychotics based on two previous meta-analyses (Sepehry et al., in J Clin Psychiatry 68:604-610, 2007 and Singh et al., in Br J Psychiatry J Mental Sci 197:174-179, 2010). We searched PubMed, the Cochrane Library database, and PsycINFO up to January 2013. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual patient data from randomized controlled trials comparing fluvoxamine add-on therapy with placebo. The risk ratio (RR), 95 % confidence intervals (CI), and standardized mean difference (SMD) were calculated. Seven studies (total n = 272) were identified. These included two clozapine studies, one olanzapine study, one second-generation antipsychotic (SGA) monotherapy study, and three first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs) monotherapy studies. There were significant effect of fluvoxamine add-on therapy on overall (SMD = -0.46, CI = -0.75 to -0.16, p = 0.003, I (2) = 0 %, 5 studies, n = 180) and negative symptoms (SMD = -0.44, CI = -0.74 to -0.14, p = 0.004, I (2) = 0 %, 5 studies, n = 180). However, fluvoxamine add-on therapy showed no significant effects on positive symptoms, depressive symptoms, and discontinuations from any cause or adverse events. Fluvoxamine add-on therapy in patients primarily treated with SGAs improved overall (p = 0.02) but not negative symptoms (p = 0.31). On the other hand, fluvoxamine add-on therapy in patients primarily treated with FGAs improved both overall (p = 0.04) and negative symptoms (p = 0.004) compared with control groups. Our results suggest that fluvoxamine add-on therapy is more beneficial on the psychopathology (especially negative symptoms) than controls in patients with schizophrenia who are primarily treated with FGAs. Given that a small number of studies were included in this meta-analysis, the results should be treated with caution. PMID:23605347

  4. Establishing a Near Term Lunar Farside Gravity Model via Inexpensive Add-on Navigation Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Mesarch, Michael; Miller, Ronald; Bell, David; Jedrey, Tom; Butman, Stanley; Asmar, Sami

    2007-01-01

    The Space Communications and Navigation, Constellation Integration Project (SCIP) is tasked with defining, developing, deploying and operating an evolving multi-decade communications and navigation (C/N) infrastructure including services and subsystems that will support both robotic and human exploration activities at the Moon. This paper discusses an early far side gravitational mapping service and related telecom subsystem that uses an existing spacecraft (WIND) and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to collect data that would address several needs of the SCIP. An important aspect of such an endeavor is to vastly improve the current lunar gravity model while demonstrating the navigation and stationkeeping of a relay spacecraft. We describe a gravity data acquisition activity and the trajectory design of the relay orbit in an Earth-Moon L2 co-linear libration orbit. Several phases of the transfer from an Earth-Sun to the Earth-Moon region are discussed along with transfers within the Earth-Moon system. We describe a proposed, but not integrated, add-on to LRO scheduled to be launched in October of 2008. LRO provided a real host spacecraft against which we designed the science payload and mission activities. From a strategic standpoint, LRO was a very exciting first flight opportunity for gravity science data collection. Gravity Science data collection requires the use of one or more low altitude lunar polar orbiters. Variations in the lunar gravity field will cause measurable variations in the orbit of a low altitude lunar orbiter. The primary means to capture these induced motions is to monitor the Doppler shift of a radio signal to or from the low altitude spacecraft, given that the signal is referenced to a stable frequency reference. For the lunar far side, a secondary orbiting radio signal platform is required. We provide an in-depth look at link margins, trajectory design, and hardware implications. Our approach posed minimum risk to a host mission while

  5. FGD wastewater treatment still has a way to go

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, T.; Givens, S.; Sandy, T.

    2008-01-15

    The power industry should jointly address questions about FGD water treatment and share the lessons it has learned so far. The article describes a scheme developed by CH2M Hill to treat FGD wastewater and remove heavy metals. The process desaturates the waste water of sulfates and removes the bulk of the insoluble suspended solids prior to tertiary treatment of heavy metals using a chemical/physical treatment process. Additional treatment could be provided (for example, anoxic biological treatment) for selenium, nitrates and organics. 2 figs.

  6. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 3, Product development of gypsum, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kevin; Beeghly, Joel H.

    2000-11-30

    In the way of background information about 30 electric utility units with a combined total of 15,000 MW utilize magnesium enhanced lime flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The first generation process begun in 1973, called the Thiosorbic® Process, was a technical breakthrough that offered significantly improved operating and performance characteristics compared with competing FGD technologies. The process is described as Flow Diagram "A" in Figure 1. A disadvantage of this and other inhibited or natural oxidation wet FGD systems is the capital and operating cost associated with landfill disposal of the calcium sulfite based solids. Fixation to stabilize the sludge solids for compunction in a landfill also consumes fly ash that otherwise may be marketable.

  7. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 2, Product development of magnesium hydroxide, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kevin; Beeghly, Joel H.

    2000-11-30

    In the way of background information about 30 electric utility units with a combined total of 15,000 MW utilize magnesium enhanced lime flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The first generation process begun in 1973, called the Thiosorbic® Process, was a technical breakthrough that offered significantly improved operating and performance characteristics compared with competing FGD technologies. The process is described as Flow Diagram "A" in figure 1. A disadvantage of this and other inhibited or natural oxidation wet FGD systems is the capital and operating cost associated with landfill disposal of the calcium sulfite based solids. Fixation to stabilize the sludge solids for compaction in a landfill also consumes fly ash that otherwise may be marketable.

  8. Add on testosterone therapy in negative symptoms of schizophrenia with gonadal trauma: Hitting the bull's eye.

    PubMed

    Jha, Shailesh; Garg, Amit

    2016-06-30

    The coincidence or causal incidence of hormonal dysregulation leading to psychotic manifestation had been a point of debate. The interplay of these hormones in pathogenesis of psychotic symptom domains is still inconclusive along with some symptom domains which worsen with antipsychotics. Early detection and treatment with liaison approach is of great help to such patients. We report a case of schizophrenia with primary hypogonadism that responded dramatically to add on testosterone supplement. PMID:27138816

  9. RECOVERY OF CALCIUM CARBONATE AND SULFUR FROM FGD SCRUBBER WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a demonstration of key process steps in the proprietary Kel-S process for recovering calcium carbonate and sulfur from lime/limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber waste. The steps are: reduction of the waste to calcium sulfide (using coal as...

  10. FGD gypsum filters remove soluble phosphorus from agricultural drainage waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Decades of chicken litter applications has led to phosphorus (P) levels up to ten times the agronomic optimum in soils of the Delmarva Peninsula. This legacy P is a major source of P entering drainage ditches that eventually empty into the Chesapeake Bay. A Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) gypsum ditc...

  11. THE ADVANTAGE OF ILLINOIS COAL FOR FGD REMOVAL OF MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an investigation conducted to characterize and modify mercury (Hg) speciation in Illinois coal combustion flue gas so that a Hg control strategy can be implemented in conventional flue gas desulfurization (FGD) units. Hg, in trace concentration in coal,...

  12. Agricultural applications of FGD gypsum in soil and water management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gypsum is a naturally occuring mineral that has unique properties and many uses. The purity of natural deposits vary widely due to the nature of the deposional processes. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is generally of a higher purity and has a consistent fine particle size making it a prefe...

  13. The potential for FGD gypsum use in Alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential for land application of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum on agricultural lands in the South has been promoted for several years. Some on-farm research has shown consistent yield benefits from its use. Recent experiments on hybrid bermudagrass hayfields and with cotton on Coastal...

  14. Utilization of FGD gypsum in agriculture for environmental benefits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper will discuss the utilization of FGD gypsum in agriculture for environmental benefits. Gypsum (CaSO4 .2H2O) has been used as an agricultural soil amendment for over 250 years. It is a soluble source of calcium and sulfur for crops and has been shown to improve soil physical and chemical pr...

  15. Enhanced Control of Mercury and other HAP by Innovative Modifications to Wet FGD Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hargrove, O. W.; Carey, T. R.; Richardson, C. F.; Skarupa, R. C.; Meserole, F. B.; Rhudy, R. G.; Brown, Thomas D.

    1997-07-01

    The overall objective of this project was to learn more about controlling emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from coal-fired power plants that are equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project was included by FETC as a Phase I project in its Mega-PRDA program. Phase I of this project focused on three research areas. These areas in order of priority were: (1) Catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury; (2) Enhanced particulate-phase HAPs removal by electrostatic charging of liquid droplets; and (3) Enhanced mercury removal by addition of additives to FGD process liquor. Mercury can exist in two forms in utility flue gas--as elemental mercury and as oxidized mercury (predominant form believed to be HgCl{sub 2}). Previous test results have shown that wet scrubbers effectively remove the oxidized mercury from the gas but are ineffective in removing elemental mercury. Recent improvements in mercury speciation techniques confirm this finding. Catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury is of interest in cases where a wet scrubber exists or is planned for SO{sub 2} control. If a low-cost process could be developed to oxidize all of the elemental mercury in the flue gas, then the maximum achievable mercury removal across the existing or planned wet scrubber would increase. Other approaches for improving control of HAPs included a method for improving particulate removal across the FGD process and the use of additives to increase mercury solubility. This paper discusses results related only to catalytic oxidation of elemental mercury.

  16. Manufacture of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD-gypsum. Quarterly report, 1 December 1994--28 February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lytle, J.M.; Bruinius, J.A.; Hoeft, R.; Dewey, S.; Achorn, F.

    1995-12-31

    The overall goal of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility for producing feasibility-grade ammonium sulfate from gypsum produced as part of limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. This is a cooperative effort among the ISGS, the UIUC, AlliedSignal, SE-ME, Henry Fertilizer, Illinois Power Co. (IP), and Central Illinois Public Services (CIPS). Bench-scale experiments will be conducted to obtain process engineering data for the manufacture of ammonium sulfate from FGD-gypsum and to help evaluate technical and economic feasibility of the process. Controlled greenhouse experiments will be conducted at UIUC to evaluate the chemical impact of coal-derived impurities in ammonium sulfate produced from FGD-gypsum on soil properties. A process flow sheet will be proposed and market demand for the products will be established. An engineering team at IP will provide an independent review of the economics of the process. AlliedSignal will be involved in testing and quality evaluation of ammonium sulfate samples and is interested in an agreement to market the finished product. CIPS will provide technical assistance and samples of FGD -gypsum for the project. In this quarter, with an exception of the neutron activation analysis, analyses of FGD-gypsum samples that were generated by two power stations were completed. The high quality FGD-gypsum sample produced from the Abbott power plant in Champaign, IL was 98.36% gypsum, CaSO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, and less than 0.01% calcium`` sulfite, CaSO{sub 3}. The low quality sample from CIPS`s Newton Power Plant at Jasper, Illinois, was only 7.36% of gypsum. It was 87.54% calcium sulfite. A literature search provided the information to set up a batch, bench-scale reactor system. Reactions were conducted at 70{degrees}C for a range of times which resulted in 82% conversion of calcium sulfate to ammonium sulfate.

  17. What’s next after metformin? focus on sulphonylurea: add-on or combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Phei C.; Chong, Chee P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) mainly focused on insulin resistance and insulin deficiency over the past decades. Currently, the pathophysiologies expanded to ominous octet and guidelines were updated with newer generation of antidiabetic drug classes. However, many patients had yet to achieve their target glycaemic control. Although all the guidelines suggested metformin as first line, there was no definite consensus on the second line drug agents as variety of drug classes were recommended. Objectives: The aim of this review was to evaluate the drug class after metformin especially sulphonylurea and issues around add-on or fixed dose combination therapy. Methods: Extensive literature search for English language articles, clinical practice guidelines and references was performed using electronic databases. Results: Adding sulphonylurea to metformin targeted both insulin resistance and insulin deficiency. Sulphonylurea was efficacious and cheaper than thiazolidinedione, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, glucagon-like peptide 1 analogue and insulin. The main side effect of sulphonylurea was hypoglycaemia but there was no effect on the body weight when combining with metformin. Fixed dose sulphonylurea/metformin was more efficacious at lower dose and reported to have fewer side effects with better adherence. Furthermore, fixed dose combination was cheaper than add-on therapy. In conclusion, sulphonylurea was feasible as the second line agent after metformin as the combination targeted on two pathways, efficacious, cost-effective and had long safety history. Fixed dose combination tablet could improve patient’s adherence and offered an inexpensive and more efficacious option regardless of original or generic product as compared to add-on therapy. PMID:26445623

  18. Health and environmental impacts of increased generation of coal ash and FGD sludges. Report to the Committee on Health and Ecological Effects of Increased Coal Utilization.

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, C J; Lunt, R R; Johnson, S L; Cooper, C B; Thayer, P S; Jones, J W

    1979-01-01

    This paper focuses on the incremental impacts of coal ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastes associated with increased coal usage by utilities and industry under the National Energy Plan (NEP). In the paper, 1985 and 2000 are the assessment points using the baseline data taken from the Annual Environmental Analysis Report (AEAR, September 1977). In each EPA region, the potential mix of disposal options has been broadly estimated and impacts assessed therefrom. In addition, future use of advanced combustion techniques has been taken into account. The quantities of coal ash and FGD wastes depend on ash and sulfur content of the coal, emission regulations, the types of ash collection and FGD systems, and operating conditions of the systems and boiler. The disposal of these wastes is (or will be) subject to Federal and State regulations. The one key legal framework concerning environmental impact on land is the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RCRA and related Federal and State laws provide a sufficient statutory basis for preventing significant adverse health and environmental impacts from coal ash and FGD waste disposal. However, much of the development and implementation of specific regulations lie ahead. FGD wastes and coal ash and FGD wastes are currently disposed of exclusively on land. The most common land disposal methods are inpoundments (ponds) and landfills, although some mine disposal is also practiced. The potential environmental impacts of this disposal are dependent on the characteristics of the disposal site, characteristics of the coal ash and FGD wastes, control method and the degree of control employed. In general, the major potential impacts are ground and surface water contamination and the "degradation" of large quantities of land. However, assuming land is available for disposal of these wastes, control technology exists for environmentally sound disposal. Because of existing increases in coal use, the possibility of

  19. Health and environmental impacts of increased generation of coal ash and FGD sludges. Report to the Committee on Health and Ecological Effects of Increased Coal Utilization.

    PubMed

    Santhanam, C J; Lunt, R R; Johnson, S L; Cooper, C B; Thayer, P S; Jones, J W

    1979-12-01

    This paper focuses on the incremental impacts of coal ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastes associated with increased coal usage by utilities and industry under the National Energy Plan (NEP). In the paper, 1985 and 2000 are the assessment points using the baseline data taken from the Annual Environmental Analysis Report (AEAR, September 1977). In each EPA region, the potential mix of disposal options has been broadly estimated and impacts assessed therefrom. In addition, future use of advanced combustion techniques has been taken into account. The quantities of coal ash and FGD wastes depend on ash and sulfur content of the coal, emission regulations, the types of ash collection and FGD systems, and operating conditions of the systems and boiler. The disposal of these wastes is (or will be) subject to Federal and State regulations. The one key legal framework concerning environmental impact on land is the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RCRA and related Federal and State laws provide a sufficient statutory basis for preventing significant adverse health and environmental impacts from coal ash and FGD waste disposal. However, much of the development and implementation of specific regulations lie ahead. FGD wastes and coal ash and FGD wastes are currently disposed of exclusively on land. The most common land disposal methods are inpoundments (ponds) and landfills, although some mine disposal is also practiced. The potential environmental impacts of this disposal are dependent on the characteristics of the disposal site, characteristics of the coal ash and FGD wastes, control method and the degree of control employed. In general, the major potential impacts are ground and surface water contamination and the "degradation" of large quantities of land. However, assuming land is available for disposal of these wastes, control technology exists for environmentally sound disposal. Because of existing increases in coal use, the possibility of

  20. Sensitivity analysis of the add-on price estimate for the silicon web growth process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mokashi, A. R.

    1981-01-01

    The web growth process, a silicon-sheet technology option, developed for the flat plate solar array (FSA) project, was examined. Base case data for the technical and cost parameters for the technical and commercial readiness phase of the FSA project are projected. The process add on price, using the base case data for cost parameters such as equipment, space, direct labor, materials and utilities, and the production parameters such as growth rate and run length, using a computer program developed specifically to do the sensitivity analysis with improved price estimation are analyzed. Silicon price, sheet thickness and cell efficiency are also discussed.

  1. SURVEY OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS: CANE RUN STATION, LOUISVILLE GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a survey of operational flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired utility boilers in the U.S. The FGD systems installed on Units 4, 5, and 6 at the Cane Run Station are described in terms of design and performance. The Cane Run No. 4 FGD sys...

  2. Treatment of infectious waste: development and testing of an add-on set for used gravity displacement autoclaves.

    PubMed

    Stolze, René; Kühling, Jan-Gerd

    2009-06-01

    The safe management of potentially infectious healthcare waste is gaining increasing worldwide importance. In developing countries, simple incinerators are used for the treatment of this type of waste stream. However, as these incinerators produce high emissions and represent the main generators of dioxin and furans in these countries, alternative and cost-effective solutions are needed. As steam treatment systems do not produce persistent organic pollutants, the use of existing (older) medical autoclaves could represent a solution for the treatment of infectious waste. ETLog Health EnviroTech & Logistics, the German-based consulting and engineering company carried out the first research into whether gravity air displacement autoclaves can be used for the safe decontamination of infectious waste. The research showed that it is not possible to decontaminate waste using this type of autoclave. A subsequent research and development phase might, however, make it possible to develop a new process cycle. Tests carried out on the basis of international standards and norms showed that by applying this process cycle and using an add-on set, it is possible to treat healthcare waste using the existing stock of older medical autoclaves. The process cycle and the add-on set developed were tested under existing conditions in Hanoi, Vietnam using the treatment cycle developed for a 13-year-old autoclave. All the parameters for infectious waste decontamination were reached. As modified autoclaves prevent the emission of toxic substances, this approach presents an interim solution, which avoids the impacts on human health and the environment caused by the incineration of healthcare waste. PMID:19470532

  3. Adding power to PowerPoint. Add-ons and plug-ins.

    PubMed

    Giannavola, S

    2001-01-01

    Microsoft's PowerPoint (PPT) has been around for about ten years. It works on both the Macintosh and Windows platforms. Many users have a Macintosh at home and a Windows PC in the office and files can be easily transferred. Presentations magazine estimated that 85 percent of all presentations given in the U.S. last year used PPT. These presentations can be done as 35 mm slides, black and white or color overhead transparencies, electronic lectures or the software can be used to produce pages for Web sites. PPT has become the "Swiss Army Knife" for presenters and can be found everywhere. Since PPT has such a large share of the marketplace, a secondary market has developed to cater to PPT users who need something that didn't come in the box. These products are referred to as add-ons or plug-ins. They are available as commercial products, shareware or even directly from Microsoft. This article will look at several of these add-ons and discuss their possible use in a health care media production environment. PMID:11447780

  4. radEq Add-On Module for CFD Solver Loci-CHEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCloud, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Loci-CHEM to be applied to flow velocities where surface radiation due to heating from compression and friction becomes significant. The module adds a radiation equilibrium boundary condition to the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to produce accurate results. The module expanded the upper limit for accurate CFD solutions of Loci-CHEM from Mach 4 to Mach 10 based on Space Shuttle Orbiter Re-Entry trajectories. Loci-CHEM already has a very promising architecture and performance, but absence of radiation equilibrium boundary condition limited the application of Loci-CHEM to below Mach 4. The immediate advantage of the add-on module is that it allows Loci-CHEM to work with supersonic flows up to Mach 10. This transformed Loci-CHEM from a rocket engine- heritage CFD code with general subsonic and low-supersonic applications, to an aeroheating code with hypersonic applications. The follow-on advantage of the module is that it is a building block for additional add-on modules that will solve for the heating generated at Mach numbers higher than 10.

  5. Mechanisms controlling the leaching kinetics of fixated flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material under neutral and acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chin-Min; Walker, Harold W; Bigham, Jerry M

    2007-01-01

    A number of agricultural and engineering uses for fixated flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material exist; however, the potential for leaching of hazardous elements has limited widespread application and the processes controlling the leaching of this material are poorly understood. In this study, a flow-through rotating-disk system was applied to elucidate the relative importance of bulk diffusion, pore diffusion, and surface chemical reaction in controlling the leaching of fixated FGD material under pH conditions ranging from 2.2 to 6.8. Changing the hydrodynamics in the rotating disk system did not affect the leaching kinetics at both pH 2.2 and 6.8, indicating that bulk diffusion was not the kinetic-limiting step. Application of the shrinking core model (SCM) to the data suggested a surface reaction-controlled mechanism, rather than a pore diffusion mechanism. The leaching of fixated FGD material increased with decreasing pH, suggesting it can be described by a combination of an intrinsic hydration reaction and a proton-promoted dissolution reaction. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and elemental composition analyses before and after leaching suggests that for most elements a number of solid phases controlled the leaching process. PMID:17485719

  6. Use of FGD gypsum in fire resistant panels

    SciTech Connect

    Leiva, C.; Garcia Arenas, C.; Vilches, L.F.; Vale, J.; Gimenez, A.; Ballesteros, J.C.

    2010-06-15

    Gypsum from power plant flue gas desulphurization units (FGD gypsum) is a combustion by-product produced in high quantities. In this paper, gypsum panels composed of 100% FGD gypsum from two power plants have been subjected to different physico-chemical (density, pH, humidity), mechanical (flexural and compressive strength, surface hardness, impact resistance), fire resistance and environmental tests (leaching and radioactivity). The results obtained have been compared with the requirements established in some European standards for commercial gypsum and other standards for similar products. In addition, the panels manufactured have been compared with commercial gypsum panels in order to determine the recycling possibilities of this kind of material in this application.

  7. Experimental re-evaluation of flunarizine as add-on antiepileptic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Anamika; Sahai, A. K.; Thakur, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Experimental studies have found several calcium channel blockers with anticonvulsant property. Flunarizine is one of the most potent calcium channel blockers, which has shown anticonvulsant effect against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) and maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizures. However, further experimental and clinical trials have shown varied results. We conducted a PTZ model experimental study to re-evaluate the potential of flunarizine for add-on therapy in the management of refractory epilepsy. Materials and Methods: Experiments were conducted in PTZ model involving Swiss strain mice. Doses producing seizures in 50% and 99% mice, i.e. CD50 and CD99 values of PTZ were obtained from the dose-response study. Animals received graded, single dose of sodium valproate (100–300 mg/kg), lamotrigine (3–12 mg/kg) and flunarizine (5–20 mg/kg), and then each group of mice was injected with CD99 dose of PTZ (65mg/kg i.p.). Another group of mice received single ED50 dose (dose producing seizure protection in 50% mice) of sodium valproate and flunarizine separately in left and right side of abdomen. Results were analysed by Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA on Ranks test. Results: As compared to control, sodium valproate at 250 mg/kg and 300 mg/kg produced statistical significant seizure protection. At none of the pre-treatment dose levels of lamotrigine, the seizure score with PTZ differed significantly from that observed in the vehicle-treated group. Pre-treatment with flunarizine demonstrated dose-dependent decrease in the seizure score to PTZ administration. As compared to control group, flunarizine at 20 mg/kg produced statistical significant seizure protection. Conclusion: As combined use of sodium valproate and flunarizine has shown significant seizure protection in PTZ model, flunarizine has a potential for add-on therapy in refractory cases of partial seizures. It is therefore, we conclude that further experimental studies and multicenter clinical trials

  8. JV Task-123 Determination of Trace Element Concentrations at an Eastern Bituminous Coal Plant Employing an SCR and Wet FGD

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Laudal

    2008-05-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) and with funding from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), conducting tests to prove that a high level of mercury control (>90%) can be achieved at a power plant burning a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. With funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), DOE, and Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates Program, the EERC completed an additional sampling project to provide data as to the behavior of a number of trace elements across the various pollution control devices, with a special emphasis on the wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Results showed that the concentrations of almost all the elements of interest leaving the stack were very low, and a high percentage of the trace elements were captured in the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) (for most, >80%). Although, with a few exceptions, the overall mass balances were generally quite good, the mass balances across the wet FGD were more variable. This is most likely a result of some of the concentrations being very low and also the uncertainties in determining flows within a wet FGD.

  9. Celecoxib Adjunctive Treatment to Antipsychotics in Schizophrenia: A Review of Randomized Clinical Add-On Trials.

    PubMed

    Marini, Stefano; De Berardis, Domenico; Vellante, Federica; Santacroce, Rita; Orsolini, Laura; Valchera, Alessandro; Girinelli, Gabriella; Carano, Alessandro; Fornaro, Michele; Gambi, Francesco; Martinotti, Giovanni; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe, chronic and debilitating mental disorder. Past literature has reported various hypotheses about the psychopathology of schizophrenia. Recently, a growing literature has been trying to explain the role of inflammation in the etiopathogenesis of schizophrenia. In the past, numerous immune modulation and anti-inflammatory treatment options have been proposed for schizophrenia, but sometimes the results were inconsistent. Electronic search was carried out in November 2015. PubMed and Scopus databases have been used to find studies to introduce in this review. Only randomized-placebo-controlled add-on trials were taken into account. In this way, six articles were obtained for the discussion. Celecoxib showed beneficial effects mostly in early stages of schizophrenia. In chronic schizophrenia, the data are controversial, possibly in part for methodological reasons. PMID:27524864

  10. Celecoxib Adjunctive Treatment to Antipsychotics in Schizophrenia: A Review of Randomized Clinical Add-On Trials

    PubMed Central

    De Berardis, Domenico; Vellante, Federica; Santacroce, Rita; Orsolini, Laura; Valchera, Alessandro; Girinelli, Gabriella; Carano, Alessandro; Fornaro, Michele; Gambi, Francesco; Martinotti, Giovanni; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe, chronic and debilitating mental disorder. Past literature has reported various hypotheses about the psychopathology of schizophrenia. Recently, a growing literature has been trying to explain the role of inflammation in the etiopathogenesis of schizophrenia. In the past, numerous immune modulation and anti-inflammatory treatment options have been proposed for schizophrenia, but sometimes the results were inconsistent. Electronic search was carried out in November 2015. PubMed and Scopus databases have been used to find studies to introduce in this review. Only randomized-placebo-controlled add-on trials were taken into account. In this way, six articles were obtained for the discussion. Celecoxib showed beneficial effects mostly in early stages of schizophrenia. In chronic schizophrenia, the data are controversial, possibly in part for methodological reasons. PMID:27524864

  11. Flunarizine as add-on therapy in epilepsy. Crossover study vs placebo.

    PubMed

    Moglia, A; Bergamasco, B; Di Perri, R; Mancia, D

    1986-01-01

    The anticonvulsive effect of flunarizine was studied in a multicenter trial, by means of a randomized, double-blind, single crossover design. The subjects who entered the study were 51 males and 39 females, aged 15 to 73 years. They were epileptic patients who suffered from at least two generalized seizures per month or more than 4 partial seizures per month. The patients were already being treated with major antiepileptic drugs. Flunarizine was administered in a single evening dose of 10 mg/die in patients who weighed less than 70 kg and of 15 mg/die in patients who weighed more 70 kg. Our results show that flunarizine, given as add-on therapy, produced a slight but significant decrease in the number of monthly seizures at the end of a 3-month period, while placebo did not significantly change the seizures frequency. PMID:3301560

  12. Addiction surplus: the add-on margin that makes addictive consumptions difficult to contain.

    PubMed

    Adams, Peter J; Livingstone, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Addictive consumptions generate financial surpluses over-and-above non-addictive consumptions because of the excessive consumption of addicted consumers. This add-on margin or 'addiction surplus' provides a powerful incentive for beneficiaries to protect their income by ensuring addicted consumers keep consuming. Not only that, addiction surplus provides the financial base that enables producers to sponsor activities which aim to prevent public health initiatives from reducing consumption. This paper examines the potency of addiction surplus to engage industry, governments and communities in an on-going reliance on addiction surplus. It then explores how neo-liberal constructions of a rational consumer disguise the ethical and exploitative dynamics of addiction surplus by examining ways in which addictive consumptions fail to conform to notions of autonomy and rationality. Four measures are identified to contain the distorting effects of addiction surplus. PMID:25175598

  13. 40 CFR 63.9323 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I determine the add-on control... the add-on control device simultaneously, using either Method 25 or 25A of appendix A to 40 CFR part... than 50 parts per million at the control device outlet. (2) Use Method 25A of appendix A to 40 CFR...

  14. 40 CFR 63.9323 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the add-on control device simultaneously, using either Method 25 or 25A of appendix A to 40 CFR part... both the inlet and outlet measurements. (1) Use Method 25 of appendix A to 40 CFR part 60 if the add-on.... (1) Use Method 1 or 1A of appendix A to 40 CFR part 60, as appropriate, to select sampling sites...

  15. 40 CFR 63.9323 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the add-on control device simultaneously, using either Method 25 or 25A of appendix A to 40 CFR part... both the inlet and outlet measurements. (1) Use Method 25 of appendix A to 40 CFR part 60 if the add-on.... (1) Use Method 1 or 1A of appendix A to 40 CFR part 60, as appropriate, to select sampling sites...

  16. 40 CFR 63.9323 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the add-on control device simultaneously, using either Method 25 or 25A of appendix A to 40 CFR part... both the inlet and outlet measurements. (1) Use Method 25 of appendix A to 40 CFR part 60 if the add-on.... (1) Use Method 1 or 1A of appendix A to 40 CFR part 60, as appropriate, to select sampling sites...

  17. Space station systems technology study (add-on task). Volume 3: Technology advancement program plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Program plans are given for an integrating controller for space station autonomy as well as for controls and displays. The technical approach, facility requirements and candidate facilities, development schedules, and resource requirements estimates are given.

  18. Manned geosynchronous mission requirements and systems analysis study add-on

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, S. W.; Johnson, W. T.; Schoen, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    An MOTV mission model was constructed in order to establish the baseline condition for SOC basing. A mission model to reflect satellite servicing was extended. Yearly traffic was projected. Driver missions were categorized. Cost trades and sensitivity to traffic rates were performed and service equipment needs were identified.

  19. 40 CFR Table 1b to Subpart Dddd of... - Add-on Control Systems Compliance Options

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... dryer zones one and two (at new affected sources) (1) Reduce emissions of total HAP, measured as THC (as carbon) a, by 90 percent; or(2) Limit emissions of total HAP, measured as THC (as carbon) a, to 20 ppmvd... are greater than or equal to 10 ppmvd. a You may choose to subtract methane from THC as...

  20. 40 CFR Table 1b to Subpart Dddd of... - Add-on Control Systems Compliance Options

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dryer zones one and two (at new affected sources) (1) Reduce emissions of total HAP, measured as THC (as carbon) a, by 90 percent; or(2) Limit emissions of total HAP, measured as THC (as carbon) a, to 20 ppmvd... are greater than or equal to 10 ppmvd. a You may choose to subtract methane from THC as...

  1. Effects of FGD-gypsum, used-wallboard and calcium sulfate on corn and soybean root growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD)-gypsum production has increased 44 percent from 2007 to 2008. The major use of FGD-gypsum today is in the wallboard industry. Reduction in the construction, however, reduces the demand for wallboard. Agriculture could become the second largest user of FGD-gypsum. F...

  2. PILOT FIELD STUDIES OF FGD WASTE DISPOSAL AT LOUISVILLE GAS AND ELECTRIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of pilot field studies of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) waste disposal at Louisville Gas and Electric Co. The studies showed that properly prepared landfill from FGD sludge/fly ash mixtures can prevent trace element contamination of underlying groundwate...

  3. Use of FGD gypsum on a bermudagrass pasture in the Appalachian Plateau Region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Addition of industrial by-products from coal fired power plants (FGD gypsum and FGD gypsum + fly ash) are thought to increase plant production. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate the effects of industrial by-products as a soil amendment on bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.) yield. The study was...

  4. ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF A SODIUM/LIMESTONE DOUBLE-ALKALI FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a comparison of results from a recent forced-oxidation limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process evaluation and those from a conceptual design and economic evaluation of a sodium/limestone double-alkali FGD process, based on recent EPA-sponsored...

  5. A missense variant in FGD6 confers increased risk of polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lulin; Zhang, Houbin; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Wen, Feng; Tam, Pancy O S; Zhao, Peiquan; Chen, Haoyu; Li, Zheng; Chen, Lijia; Tai, Zhengfu; Yamashiro, Kenji; Deng, Shaoping; Zhu, Xianjun; Chen, Weiqi; Cai, Li; Lu, Fang; Li, Yuanfeng; Cheung, Chui-Ming G; Shi, Yi; Miyake, Masahiro; Lin, Yin; Gong, Bo; Liu, Xiaoqi; Sim, Kar-Seng; Yang, Jiyun; Mori, Keisuke; Zhang, Xiongzhe; Cackett, Peter D; Tsujikawa, Motokazu; Nishida, Kohji; Hao, Fang; Ma, Shi; Lin, He; Cheng, Jing; Fei, Ping; Lai, Timothy Y Y; Tang, Sibo; Laude, Augustinus; Inoue, Satoshi; Yeo, Ian Y; Sakurada, Yoichi; Zhou, Yu; Iijima, Hiroyuki; Honda, Shigeru; Lei, Chuntao; Zhang, Lin; Zheng, Hong; Jiang, Dan; Zhu, Xiong; Wong, Tien-Ying; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Pang, Chi-Pui; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Yang, Zhenglin

    2016-06-01

    Polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy (PCV), a subtype of 'wet' age-related macular degeneration (AMD), constitutes up to 55% of cases of wet AMD in Asian patients. In contrast to the choroidal neovascularization (CNV) subtype, the genetic risk factors for PCV are relatively unknown. Exome sequencing analysis of a Han Chinese cohort followed by replication in four independent cohorts identified a rare c.986A>G (p.Lys329Arg) variant in the FGD6 gene as significantly associated with PCV (P = 2.19 × 10(-16), odds ratio (OR) = 2.12) but not with CNV (P = 0.26, OR = 1.13). The intracellular localization of FGD6-Arg329 is distinct from that of FGD6-Lys329. In vitro, FGD6 could regulate proangiogenic activity, and oxidized phospholipids increased expression of FGD6. FGD6-Arg329 promoted more abnormal vessel development in the mouse retina than FGD6-Lys329. Collectively, our data suggest that oxidized phospholipids and FGD6-Arg329 might act synergistically to increase susceptibility to PCV. PMID:27089177

  6. Benefits of evaporating FGD purge water

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, W.A.

    2008-03-15

    In the US and the European Union, scrubbers are installed on all new coal-fired power plants because their technology is considered the best available for removing SO{sub 2}. A zero liquid discharge (ZLD) system is the best technology for treating wet scrubber wastewate. With the future promising stricter limits on power plants' water use, ZLD systems that concentrate scrubber purge streams are sure to become as common as ZLD cooling tower blowdonw systems. 7 figs.

  7. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect

    Stehouwer, R.; Dick, W.; Bigham, J.

    1996-03-01

    A study was initiated in December 1990 to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products. A Phase 1 report provided results of an extensive characterization of chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of 58 dry FGD by-product samples. The Phase 1 report concluded that high volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics related to their ability to substitute for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mine lands). Phase 2 objectives were (1) to conduct laboratory and greenhouse studies of FGD and soil (spoil) mixtures for agronomic and engineering applications, (2) to initiate field studies related to high volume agronomic and engineering uses, and (3) to develop the basic methodological framework for estimation of the financial and economic costs and benefits to society of several FGD reuse options and to make some preliminary runs of economic models. High volume beneficial reuses of dry FGD by-products have been successfully demonstrated. Adverse environmental impacts have been negligible. Although few sources of dry FGD by-products currently exist in Ohio and the United States there is potential for smaller coal-fired facilities to adopt S0{sub 2} scrubbing technologies that produce dry FGD material. Also much of what we have learned from studies on dry FGD by-products is applicable to the more prevalent wet FGD by-products. The adaptation of the technologies demonstrated in this project seem to be not only limited by economic constraints, but even more so, by the need to create awareness of the market potential of using these FGD by-products.

  8. The importance of postprandial glycemic control: optimizing add-on therapy to basal insulin.

    PubMed

    Shaefer, Charles F; Anderson, John

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes, mainly type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is associated with a growing clinical and economic burden in the United States, which is expected to increase in association with an aging population. Sufficient glycemic control in patients with T2DM, in order to reduce the risk of micro- and macrovascular complications associated with diabetes, is mediated by lifestyle modifications and a regimen of increasingly intensive antidiabetes drugs. Several treatments and strategies are available for primary care physicians to select from when choosing the most appropriate therapy for their individual patients with T2DM, but, ultimately, due to the progressive nature of the disease, most of these patients will require insulin therapy to maintain glycemic control. Regimens containing basal and postprandial insulins are widely used, but there is still widespread reluctance to initiate insulin treatment due to fear of weight gain and hypoglycemia. Furthermore, as patients approach recommended glycated hemoglobin targets, postprandial hyperglycemia becomes the main contributor to hyperglycemic exposure, necessitating the timely initiation of prandial treatment. Finally, insulin treatment can be limited by factors like the number of injections, mealtime restrictions, complex titration algorithms and patient adherence. Recent developments in antidiabetes drug research have brought more convenient basal and postprandial regimens closer. Clinical evaluation of the efficacy and safety of basal insulins plus add-on glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1 RAs) has yielded promising results. Primary care physicians are continually challenged to optimize insulin treatment strategies to maximize patient outcomes. Emerging strategies such as long-acting basal insulin analogs and short-acting GLP-1 RAs are particularly appealing to address this challenge. PMID:26548422

  9. Mozart K.448 acts as a potential add-on therapy in children with refractory epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lung-Chang; Lee, Wei-Te; Wang, Chien-Hua; Chen, Hsiu-Lin; Wu, Hui-Chuan; Tsai, Chin-Lin; Wei, Ruey-Chang; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Weng, Chia-Fen; Lee, Mei-Wen; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2011-03-01

    Mozart's Sonata for two pianos in D major, K.448 (Mozart K.448), has been shown to improve mental function, leading to what is known as the Mozart effect. Our previous work revealed that epileptiform discharges in children with epilepsy decreased during and immediately after listening to Mozart K.448. In this study, we evaluated the long-term effects of Mozart K.448 on children with refractory epilepsy. Eleven children with refractory epilepsy were enrolled. All of the patients were diagnosed as having had refractory epilepsy for more than 1 year (range =1 year to 6 years 4 months, mean =3 years 11 months) and had been receiving at least two antiepileptic drugs (AED). During the study period, they listened to Mozart K.448 once a day before bedtime for 6 months. Seizure frequencies were recorded 6 months before they started listening to this music and monthly during the study period. All of the patients remained on the same AEDs during the 6-month study period. Frequencies of seizures were compared before and after listening to Mozart K.448. Eight of eleven patients were seizure free (N=2) or had very good responses (N=6) after 6 months of listening to Mozart K.448. The remaining three (27.3%) showed minimal or no effect (effectiveness <50%; unmodified or worsened seizure frequency). The average seizure reduction was 53.6 ± 62.0%. There were no significant differences in seizure reduction with IQ, etiology, or gender. We conclude that Mozart K.448 should be further studied as a potential add-on therapy in the treatment of children with refractory epilepsy. PMID:21292560

  10. Aromatase inhibitors as add-on treatment for men with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Harden, Cynthia; MacLusky, Neil J

    2005-01-01

    Manipulation of neurosteroids to treat epilepsy has been an area of active research. The effect of testosterone on brain excitability and seizure threshold has been mixed; the estradiol metabolite of testosterone increases brain excitability, while the reduced metabolite of testosterone, 3alpha-androstanediol, decreases brain excitability, likely through an action at the gamma-amino butyric acid A receptor. Therefore, the metabolites of testosterone produce opposite effects on brain excitability in seizure models. Aromatase is the enzyme for the conversion of testosterone to 17beta-estradiol. Aromatase inhibitors could decrease brain excitability by decreasing local estradiol levels and therefore, could be beneficial for the treatment of epilepsy. Aromatase inhibitors are US Food and Drug Administration-approved and have a long history of safe use in menopausal women with breast cancer. This review presents the results of using anastrazole in an open-label, add-on manner in a small group of men with epilepsy in order to improve seizures. The results suggested some effect on reduction of seizures and no side effects. Testosterone levels did increase, but not to above the normal range. Letrozole used in a single case was also beneficial for seizures. It was concluded that aromatase inhibitors may be a useful adjunct to the treatment of epilepsy, but habituation to the treatment may be limiting. Many men with epilepsy have low testosterone, and aromatase inhibition may be helpful in restoring levels to normal. Modulation of reproductive hormones by aromatase inhibition as well as enhancement of the 3alpha-androstanediol pathway may be an avenue of epilepsy treatment that would not produce sedative side effects, which is often a limiting factor with standard antiseizure medications. A further interesting result is that elevated follicle stimulating hormone and luteal stimulating hormone levels were associated with seizure reduction, suggesting that they may be a

  11. Aerodynamic drag reduction tests on a full-scale tractor-trailer combination with several add-on devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, L. C.; Steers, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    Aerodynamic drag tests were performed on a conventional cab-over-engine tractor with a 45-foot trailer and five commercially available or potentially available add-on devices using the coast-down method. The tests ranged in velocity from approximately 30 miles per hour to 65 miles per hour and included some flow visualization. A smooth, level runway at Edwards Air Force Base was used for the tests, and deceleration measurements were taken with both accelerometers and stopwatches. An evaluation of the drag reduction results obtained with each of the five add-on devices is presented.

  12. No effect of switching to high-dose rosuvastatin, add-on nicotinic acid, or add-on fenofibrate on serum vitamin D levels in patients with mixed dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Makariou, E S; Elisaf, M; Kei, A; Challa, A; DiNicolantonio, J J; Liberopoulos, E

    2015-01-01

    Background Low 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)VitD] levels may represent a novel cardiovascular disease risk factor. Several statins may increase 25(OH)VitD concentration. The effect of other lipid-lowering drugs is unknown. Aim To investigate whether switching to high-dose rosuvastatin, add-on-statin nicotinic acid or add-on-statin fenofibrate would alter 25(OH)VitD levels in patients with mixed dyslipidemia who are already on a conventional statin dose. Methods This is a prespecified analysis of a previously published study. Forty-four patients with mixed dyslipidemia not at treatment goal despite treatment with simvastatin 10-40 mg or atorvastatin 10-20 mg or rosuvastatin 5-10 mg were randomly allocated to switch to rosuvastatin 40 mg (n=17), add-on-statin extended release nicotinic acid (ER-NA)/laropiprant (LRPT) (1000/20 mg first four weeks and 2000/40 mg thereafter) (n=14), or add-on-statin micronized fenofibrate (200 mg) for three months. The endpoint for this analysis was between-group difference in changes in 25(OH)VitD levels. Results Serum 25(OH)VitD levels did not significantly change in any group. In the switch to the highest dose of rosuvastatin group and the add-on-statin ER-NA/LRPT group there was an insignificant decrease in 25(OH)VitD levels {-4.7% [from 16.8 (3.2-37) to 16.0 (7.9-51.6)] and -14.8% [from 12.8 (2.0-54.8) to 10.9 (2.4-34)], respectively]}, while in the add-on-statin fenofibrate group there was an insignificant increase [+13% (from 14.5 (1.0-42) to 16.4 (4.4-30.4) ng/mL)]. No significant difference between groups was found. Conclusion In patients already on a conventional statin dose, neither switching to high-dose rosuvastatin (40 mg) nor add-on-statin ER-NA/LRPT or fenofibrate were associated with significant changes in 25(OH)VitD serum levels. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (2):136-140. PMID:27418762

  13. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products, Phase 1 report

    SciTech Connect

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.

    1993-04-01

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. It is highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. The results indicated the chemical composition of the FGD by-product materials were dominated by Ca, S, Al, and Si. Many of the elements regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency reside primarily in the fly ash. Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD by-product materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  14. Solubilization of Trace Metals from FGD Gypsum Using a Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kairies, C.L.; Schroeder, K.T.; Thompson, R.L.; Cardone, C.R.; Rohar, P.C.

    2007-07-01

    A continuous, stirred-tank extractor (CSTX) is an effective technique for evaluating the leachability of contaminants from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) products and other materials with low permeability or cementitious properties and allows the chemistry of the leaching process to be studied at a level unachievable through more traditional batch and column techniques. In this study, metal release patterns were examined in detail over a range of pH values extending from the material’s natural, slightly alkaline pH to acidic pH conditions. Understanding the fundamental mechanisms operating during the leaching process provides a basis for evaluating the safety of FGD byproducts and ensuring these materials are used and disposed of appropriately. The results indicate that the leaching behavior of individual elements depends on several factors including, but not limited to, the solubility of the mineral phases present, sorption properties of the remaining phases, behavior of the solubilized material in the tank, the type of species in solution and the neutralization capacity of the minerals. Bulk gypsum is moderately soluble; dissolution is controlled by its solubility product and hydration reactions rather than pH. Elution and pH profiles indicate the presence of alkaline material(s) that buffer the system during the initial leaching. Iron and aluminum are not leached until the buffering capacity is exhausted. Any elements bound to these phases can be mobilized during this dissolution. Arsenic, lead and mercury are not released during the leaching of most samples and become concentrated in a minor, insoluble residue remaining at the end of each experiment

  15. Loxapine Add-on for Adolescents and Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Irritability

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Gregory; Cain, Sharon E.; Zhou, Xinghua; Barth, Francis X.; Aman, Michael G.; Palaguachi, Gladys I.; Mikhnev, Dmytro; Teng, Rujia; Andridge, Rebecca; Logan, Marilyn; Butler, Merlin G.; Han, Joan C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Our clinical experience with low dose loxapine (5–15 mg/day) suggests promising efficacy and safety for irritability in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). We studied low dose loxapine prospectively in adolescents and adults with ASD and irritability. Additionally, we measured loxapine and metabolite concentrations, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as a biomarker of neuromodulation. Methods: We performed a 12 week open trial of add-on loxapine in subjects, ages 13–65 years, diagnosed with ASD, and Aberrant Behavior Checklist-Irritability (ABC-I) subscale scores >14. Loxapine was dosed flexibly up to 15 mg daily, starting with 5 mg on alternate days. From weeks 1 to 6, other psychoactive medications were tapered if possible; from weeks 6 to 12, all medication doses were held stable. The primary outcome was the Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement subscale (CGI-I), ratings of Much Improved or Very Much Improved. Secondary outcomes were the ABC-I, Repetitive Behavior Scale-Revised, and Schalock Quality of Life scale. Serum BDNF and loxapine and metabolite concentrations were assayed. BDNF rs6265 was genotyped. Results: Sixteen subjects were enrolled; 12 completed all visits. Median age was 18 years (range 13–39). Median final loxapine dose was 7.5 mg/day (2.5–15). All 14 subjects (100%) with data at week 12 were rated as Much Improved on CGI-I at 12 weeks. Mean change on ABC-I at 12 weeks was −31%, p=0.01. Mean body mass index (BMI)-Z decreased between weeks 6 and 12, p=0.03. Side effects were minimal, and prolactin elevation occurred in only one subject. BDNF concentrations measured in 11 subjects increased significantly (p=0.04). Subjects with AG genotype for BDNF rs6265 required a lower dose of loxapine at study end, but had similar behavioral and BDNF concentration changes as the GG genotype. Conclusions: Low dose loxapine shows promise as a repurposed drug for irritability in ASD. Loxapine effects on BDNF warrant

  16. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Third quarterly report, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to create beneficial reuse standards for coal ash and clean coal technology by-products. One of the highlights of the report is the benefits of FGD by-products for agriculture. Alfalfa growth and yields have been better this year than any other year. The report provides a brief information on study of FGD benefits for neutralizing acid mine spoil or coal refuse. Chemical Speciation models were conducted to improve our understanding of the impact of FGD on soil, water and plant quality.

  17. A cost-effective add-on-value card-assisted firewall over Taiwan's NHI VPN framework.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jyh-Win; Hou, Ting-Wei

    2007-06-01

    Besides the overall budget for building the infrastructure of a healthcare-service-based virtual private network (VPN) in Taiwan, two issues were considered critical for its acceptance by the country's 17,000 plus medical institutions. One was who was to pay for the network (ADSL or modem) connection fee; the other was who was to pay for the firewall/anti-virus software. This paper addresses the second issue by proposing an efficient freeware firewall, named card-assisted firewall (CAF), for NHI VPN edge-hosts, which is also an add-on-value application of the National Healthcare IC card that every insurant and medical professional has. The innovative concept is that any NHI VPN site (edge-host) can establish diversified secure-authenticated connections with other sites only by an authentication mechanism, which requires a NHI Java card state machine and the Access Control List of the host. It is different from two-factor authentication cards in four ways: (1) a PIN code is not a must; (2) it requires authentication with the remote IC card Data Centre; (3) the NHI cards are already available, no modification is needed, and there is no further cost for the deployment of the cards; (4) although the cards are in the reader, the communication cannot start unless the cards are in the corresponding states; i.e. the states allow communication. An implementation, on a Microsoft Windows XP platform, demonstrated the system's feasibility over an emulation of the NHI VPN framework. It maintained a high line speed, the driver took up 39 KB of disk space, installation was simple, not requiring any extra hardware or software, and the average packet processing time of the CAF driver measured was 0.3084 ms. The average overhead in comparing the Access Control List predefined routing in card, in an FTP testing experiment, was 5.7 micros (receiving) and 8 micros (sending). PMID:17541860

  18. High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by- products in underground mines: Phase 1, Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, April--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The kinetics study which is investigating hydration reactions of the ADM by-product (Subtask 2.2) was continued this quarter. This study further aided in gaining information on mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions during hydration of the ADM materials. The information is of importance for a comprehensive understanding of the factors that control strength and long-term stability during aging of FGD materials. The decision was made by Addington, Inc., DOE, and the University of Kentucky that the originally selected mine site for the emplacement demonstration must be changed, mainly for safety reasons. Mine selection will be a priority for the next quarter (Jul--Sep, 1995). Another activity during this reporting period was related to Subtask 4.3, the selection and testing of the transport system for the FGD material. A laboratory-scale pneumatic emplacement test unit (ETU) for dry FGD materials was built at the CAER to generate data so that a final selection of the field demonstration technology can be made. A dry pneumatic system was chosen for laboratory testing because the equipment and expertise available at the CAER matched this sort of technology best. While the design of the laboratory system was based on shotcrete technology, the physical properties of the emplaced FGD material is expected to be similar for other transport techniques, either pneumatic or hydraulic. In other words, the selection of a dry pneumatic transport system for laboratory testing does not necessarily imply that a scaled-up version will be used for the field demonstration. The ETU is a convenient means of producing samples for subsequent chemical and physical testing by a representative emplacement technology. Ultimately, the field demonstration technology will be chosen based on the laboratory data and the suitability of locally available equipment.

  19. Characterization of an add-on multileaf collimator for electron beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauer, T.; Sokoll, J.; Cremers, F.; Harmansa, R.; Luzzara, M.; Schmidt, R.

    2008-02-01

    An add-on multileaf collimator for electrons (eMLC) has been developed that provides computer-controlled beam collimation and isocentric dose delivery. The design parameters result from the design study by Gauer et al (2006 Phys. Med. Biol. 51 5987-6003) and were configured such that a compact and light-weight eMLC with motorized leaves can be industrially manufactured and stably mounted on a conventional linear accelerator. In the present study, the efficiency of an initial computer-controlled prototype was examined according to the design goals and the performance of energy- and intensity-modulated treatment techniques. This study concentrates on the attachment and gantry stability as well as the dosimetric characteristics of central-axis and off-axis dose, field size dependence, collimator scatter, field abutment, radiation leakage and the setting of the accelerator jaws. To provide isocentric irradiation, the eMLC can be placed either 16 or 28 cm above the isocentre through interchangeable holders. The mechanical implementation of this feature results in a maximum field displacement of less than 0.6 mm at 90° and 270° gantry angles. Compared to a 10 × 10 cm applicator at 6-14 MeV, the beam penumbra of the eMLC at a 16 cm collimator-to-isocentre distance is 0.8-0.4 cm greater and the depth-dose curves show a larger build-up effect. Due to the loss in energy dependence of the therapeutic range and the much lower dose output at small beam sizes, a minimum beam size of 3 × 3 cm is necessary to avoid suboptimal dose delivery. Dose output and beam symmetry are not affected by collimator scatter when the central axis is blocked. As a consequence of the broader beam penumbra, uniform dose distributions were measured in the junction region of adjacent beams at perpendicular and oblique beam incidence. However, adjacent beams with a high difference in a beam energy of 6 to 14 MeV generate cold and hot spots of approximately 15% in the abutting region. In order to

  20. DEFINITIVE SOX CONTROL PROCESS EVALUATIONS: LIMESTONE, DOUBLE ALKALI, AND CITRATE FGD PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a detailed comparative technical and economic evaluation of limestone slurry, generic double alkali, and citrate flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, assuming proven technology and using representative power plant, process design, and economic pre...

  1. Properties of mortars made by uncalcined FGD gypsum-fly ash-ground granulated blast furnace slag composite binder

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Shiyun; Ni Kun; Li Jinmei

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum has suitable workability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The strength of mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum is higher than that of mortar without uncalcined FGD gypsum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dry shrinkage of mortar with uncalcined FGD gypsum is lower than that of mortar without uncalcined FGD gypsum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The leaching of sulfate ion of mortar is studied. - Abstract: A series of novel mortars were developed from composite binder of uncalcined FGD gypsum, fly ash (FA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) for the good utilization of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum. At a fixed ratio (20%) of GGBFS to the composite binder, keeping consistency of the mortar between 9.5 and 10.0 cm, the properties of the composite mortar were studied. The results show that higher water/binder (W/B) is required to keep the consistency when increasing the percentage of FGD gypsum. No obvious influences of the W/B and content of FGD gypsum on the bleeding of paste were observed which keeps lower than 2% under all experimental conditions tried. The highest compressive and flexural strengths (ratio is 20% FGD gypsum, 20% GGBFS and 60% FA) are 22.6 and 4.3 MPa at 28 days, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that massive ettringite crystals and C-S-H gels exist in the hydration products. At 90 days the mortars with FGD gypsum is dramatically smaller drying shrinkage (563-938 micro strain) than that without FGD gypsum (about 2250 micro strain). The release of the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} from the mortar was analyzed, indicating that the dissolution of sulfate increases with FGD gypsum. The concentration of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} releasing from the mortar with 10% FGD gypsum is almost equal to that obtained from the mortar without FGD gypsum. The release of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} from the mortar with 20% FGD gypsum is 9200 mg

  2. 40 CFR 63.4566 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... appendix A to 40 CFR part 60. (1) Use Method 25 if the add-on control device is an oxidizer and you expect... paragraphs (a)(1) through (5) of this section. (1) Use Method 1 or 1A of appendix A to 40 CFR part 60, as... appendix A to 40 CFR part 60, as appropriate, to measure gas volumetric flow rate. (3) Use Method 3, 3A,...

  3. 40 CFR 63.4566 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... appendix A to 40 CFR part 60. (1) Use Method 25 if the add-on control device is an oxidizer and you expect... paragraphs (a)(1) through (5) of this section. (1) Use Method 1 or 1A of appendix A to 40 CFR part 60, as... appendix A to 40 CFR part 60, as appropriate, to measure gas volumetric flow rate. (3) Use Method 3, 3A,...

  4. 40 CFR 63.4566 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... outlet of the add-on control device simultaneously, using either Method 25 or 25A of appendix A to 40 CFR...) through (5) of this section. (1) Use Method 1 or 1A of appendix A to 40 CFR part 60, as appropriate, to... to 40 CFR part 60, as appropriate, to measure gas volumetric flow rate. (3) Use Method 3, 3A, or...

  5. 40 CFR 63.4566 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... appendix A to 40 CFR part 60. (1) Use Method 25 if the add-on control device is an oxidizer and you expect... paragraphs (a)(1) through (5) of this section. (1) Use Method 1 or 1A of appendix A to 40 CFR part 60, as... appendix A to 40 CFR part 60, as appropriate, to measure gas volumetric flow rate. (3) Use Method 3, 3A,...

  6. Efficacy and safety of muscarinic antagonists as add-on therapy for male lower urinary tract symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinhong; Shi, Qingquan; Bai, Yunjin; Pu, Chunxiao; Tang, Yin; Yuan, Haichao; Wu, Yunjian; Wei, Qiang; Han, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-adrenoceptor antagonists (alpha-blockers) are widely prescribed to treat lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in men but fail to ameliorate LUTS sufficiently, especially the storage symptoms related to frequency, urgency and nocturia. We performed a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing an alpha-blocker plus muscarinic antagonist with an alpha-blocker alone in male LUTS patients who were treated with alpha-blocker prior to randomisation. The review contained six randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that included a total of 2,208 male patients who were randomised to receive alpha-blocker plus muscarinic antagonist or alpha-blocker alone. The add-on group experienced significantly greater improvement in both total IPSS (International Prostate Symptom Score) and storage IPSS. Adverse events (AEs) were commonly experienced by both groups (41.6 vs. 33.3%) though they were not severe. Our meta-analysis indicated that muscarinic antagonists as add-on therapy alleviate LUTS, especially storage symptoms. The add-on therapy demonstrated safety and tolerability comparable with alpha-blocker monotherapy in male with LUTS. PMID:24492830

  7. Properties of mortars made by uncalcined FGD gypsum-fly ash-ground granulated blast furnace slag composite binder.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shiyun; Ni, Kun; Li, Jinmei

    2012-07-01

    A series of novel mortars were developed from composite binder of uncalcined FGD gypsum, fly ash (FA) and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) for the good utilization of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum. At a fixed ratio (20%) of GGBFS to the composite binder, keeping consistency of the mortar between 9.5 and 10.0 cm, the properties of the composite mortar were studied. The results show that higher water/binder (W/B) is required to keep the consistency when increasing the percentage of FGD gypsum. No obvious influences of the W/B and content of FGD gypsum on the bleeding of paste were observed which keeps lower than 2% under all experimental conditions tried. The highest compressive and flexural strengths (ratio is 20% FGD gypsum, 20% GGBFS and 60% FA) are 22.6 and 4.3 MPa at 28 days, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that massive ettringite crystals and C-S-H gels exist in the hydration products. At 90 days the mortars with FGD gypsum is dramatically smaller drying shrinkage (563-938 micro strain) than that without FGD gypsum (about 2250 micro strain). The release of the SO(4)(2-) from the mortar was analyzed, indicating that the dissolution of sulfate increases with FGD gypsum. The concentration of SO(4)(2-) releasing from the mortar with 10% FGD gypsum is almost equal to that obtained from the mortar without FGD gypsum. The release of SO(4)(2-) from the mortar with 20% FGD gypsum is 9200 mg·m(-2), which is lower than that from the mortar with 95% cement clinker and 5% FGD gypsum. PMID:22440404

  8. Treatment of FGD plant wastewater by enhancing microfiltration fluxes. Final report, September 1, 1992--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Ilias, S.

    1994-03-24

    In coal-fired boilers, the wet limestone-gypsum based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) plants produce large volumes of wastewater containing dissolved salts and heavy metals. Before discharging these wastes to the environment, the heavy metals must be removed. One of the preferred methods for removal of heavy metals is by co-precipitation of hydroxides and sulfides of heavy metals, followed by coagulation and flocculation techniques. As a post-treatment of the resulting wastewater stream, crossflow microfiltration is being considered as a cost effective and environmentally acceptable method. However, membrane `fouling` and `concentration polarization` in such applications remain serious problems and result in flux decline of product during filtration. In this exploratory research, we investigated a novel concept: flow oscillation as a means of controlling fouling and concentration polarization. The treatment of FGD plants wastewater (simulated) by enhancing microfiltration fluxes was studied here as an example to demonstrate the oscillatory flow system in combating concentration polarization and membrane fouling in crossflow filtration. Microfiltration experiments were conducted in a tubular membrane module. From limited experimental data, it was found that flow oscillation increases the transmembrane flux when compared with the non-oscillatory flow condition. A mathematical model has been developed to evaluate the performance of a tubular membrane module under oscillatory flow condition. Results are presented for both hydrodynamics and transmembrane fluxes for such factors as amplitudes and frequencies of oscillatory flow, membrane permeability, and operating transmembrane pressure.

  9. Alirocumab as Add-On to Atorvastatin Versus Other Lipid Treatment Strategies: ODYSSEY OPTIONS I Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gaudet, Daniel; Weiss, Robert; Ruiz, Juan Lima; Watts, Gerald F.; Gouni-Berthold, Ioanna; Robinson, Jennifer; Zhao, Jian; Hanotin, Corinne; Donahue, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Context: Despite current standard of care, many patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) still have elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Alirocumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody inhibitor of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the LDL-C-lowering efficacy of adding alirocumab vs other common lipid-lowering strategies. Design, Patients, and Interventions: Patients (n = 355) with very high CVD risk and LDL-C levels of 70 mg/dL or greater or high CVD risk and LDL-C of 100 mg/dL or greater on baseline atorvastatin 20 or 40 mg were randomized to one of the following: 1) add-on alirocumab 75 mg every 2 weeks (Q2W) sc; 2) add-on ezetimibe 10 mg/d; 3) double atorvastatin dose; or 4) for atorvastatin 40 mg regimen only, switch to rosuvastatin 40 mg. For patients not achieving protocol-defined LDL-C goals, the alirocumab dose was increased (blinded) at week 12 to 150 mg Q2W. Main Outcome Measure: The primary end point was percentage change in calculated LDL-C from baseline to 24 weeks (intent to treat). Results: Among atorvastatin 20 and 40 mg regimens, respectively, add-on alirocumab reduced LDL-C levels by 44.1% and 54.0% (P < .001 vs all comparators); add-on ezetimibe, 20.5% and 22.6%; doubling of atorvastatin dose, 5.0% and 4.8%; and switching atorvastatin 40 mg to rosuvastatin 40 mg, 21.4%. Most alirocumab-treated patients (87.2% and 84.6%) achieved their LDL-C goals. Most alirocumab-treated patients (86%) maintained their 75-mg Q2W regimen. Treatment-emergent adverse events occurred in 65.4% of alirocumab patients vs 64.4% ezetimibe and 63.8% double atorvastatin/switch to rosuvastatin (data were pooled). Conclusions: Adding alirocumab to atorvastatin provided significantly greater LDL-C reductions vs adding ezetimibe, doubling atorvastatin dose, or switching to rosuvastatin and enabled greater LDL-C goal achievement. PMID:26030325

  10. Technical and economic assessment on coal-fired power generation FGD in China

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yongqi; Hao Jiming

    1997-12-31

    Serious pollution of SO{sub 2} and acid deposition have emerged in China in the latest decade due to the stagnant growth of coal use. As a large consumer of energy, thermal power generation takes up about 30% of the total coal consumption and will remain an increasing demand for coal over a long period. In the paper, the pollution status, trend and a series of related policy measures made by the government were presented to give the great significance to the control of SO{sub 2} emissions from power generation. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is widely adopted over the world to control SO{sub 2} emissions. In China, the research and development of power plant FGD technology were initiated in the mid 70`s. Especially since the 7th and 8th Five-Year plan, more efforts have been made on FGD development and introduction. The authors carried out a systematic review on the FGD technical status in China, placing an emphasis on the processes pilot tested, demonstrated, introduced and applied, such as limestone(lime)-gypsum process, lime spray drying, phosphate ammoniate compound fertilizer process, simplified wet limestone process, furnace calcium injection/post-furnace humidification and simplified combined dust/SO{sub 2} removal. The test and operation were described in details and the main technical indices were listed for the various processes. Following the technical assessment, the authors set up a methodology to gave a comparable economic evaluation on the FGD processes. Based on the methodology, unified setting of economic parameters such as discount, inflation and price of materials, the estimation was made for the FGD capital, operation cost and levelized cost. In addition, the sensitivity of main parameters such as generation installing capacity and sulfur content of coal was analyzed on the cost of SO{sub 2} removal. The results showed that the rise of power generation cost would be 0.02-0.03 Yuan/kWh and 0.01-0.02 Yuan/kWh for wet and dry FGD installations

  11. Using Wet-FGD systems for mercury removal.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Somoano, Mercedes; Unterberger, Sven; Hein, Klaus R G

    2005-09-01

    A plan to control mercury emissions to the atmosphere and to establish mercury emission limits has recently been elaborated by the European Commission, making it necessary to devise an efficient and cost effective mercury removal technology. Towards this end wet flue gas desulfurization units appear as a promising option for multi-pollutant control. However, more investigation on mercury removal and a greater mercury removal efficiency are required to achieve this objective. In the present work scrubber chemistry and the application of various solid additives to enhance mercury removal in wet scrubbers is evaluated. The results obtained show a significant correlation between mercury removal efficiency and the pH of the scrubber slurry and SO2 concentration. A weaker correlation was observed between oxygen or slurry concentration and removal efficiency. Finally several solid oxides were found to be effective additives for enhancing mercury capture in wet scrubbers. PMID:16121271

  12. Control of acid mist emissions from FGD systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, R S; Brown, T D

    1991-01-01

    Improved control of acid mist emissions can be achieved by replacing or augmenting the conventional mist eliminators with a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP). This paper describes a two-phased study performed to determine the degree of control that can be achieved with this approach. Phase I was a study of the electrical operation of a lab-scale WESP collecting an acid mist from a coal combustion pilot plant equipped with a spray chamber. The results of this study were used to develop and validate a computer model of the WESP. In Phase II, measurements were made at two utility scrubber installations to determine the loadings of acid mist, fly ash, and scrubber carryover. These measurements were used as input to the model to project the performance of a retrofitted WESP.

  13. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 1, Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Kevin; Beeghly, Joel H.

    2000-11-30

    About 30 electric utility units with a combined total of 15,000 MW utilize magnesium enhanced lime flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. A disadvantage of this and other inhibited or natural oxidation wet FGD systems is the capital and operating cost associated with landfill disposal of the calcium sulfite based solids. Fixation to stabilize the solids for compaction in a landfill also consumes fly ash that otherwise may be marketable. This Executive Summary describes efforts to dewater the magnesium hydroxide and gypsum slurries and then process the solids into a more user friendly and higher value form. To eliminate the cost of solids disposal in its first generation Thiosorbic® system, the Dravo Lime Company developed the ThioClear® process that utilizes a magnesium based absorber liquor to remove S02 with minimal suspended solids. Magnesium enhanced lime is added to an oxidized bleed stream of thickener overflow (TOF) to produce magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] and gypsum (CaS04 • 2H20), as by-products. This process was demonstrated at the 3 to 5 MW closed loop FGD system pilot plant at the Miami Fort Station of Cinergy, near Cincinnati, Ohio with the help of OCDO Grant Agreement CDO/D-91-6. A similar process strictly for'recovery and reuse of Mg(OH)2 began operation at the Zimmer Station of Cinergy in late 1994 that can produce 900 pounds of Mg(OH)2 per hour and 2,600 pounds of gypsum per hour. This by-product plant, called the Zimmer Slipstream Magnesium Hydroxide Recovery Project Demonstration, was conducted with the help of OCDO Grant Agreement CDO/D-921-004. Full scale ThioClear® plants began operating in 1997 at the 130 MW Applied Energy Services plant, in Monaca, PA, and in year 2000 at the 1,330 MW Allegheny Energy Pleasants Station at St. Marys, WV.

  14. Xiaoqinglong Granules as Add-On Therapy for Asthma: Latent Class Analysis of Symptom Predictors of Response

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Qinglin; Lin, Seqi; Zhang, Chi; Chang, Christopher; Xue, Hanrong; Lu, Cheng; Jiang, Miao; Liu, Yan; Xiao, Zuke; Liu, Weiyou; Shang, Yunfei; Chen, Jianjian; Wen, Minyong; Lu, Aiping

    2013-01-01

    Xiaoqinglong granules (XQLG) has been shown to be an effective therapy in asthma animal models. We reviewed the literature and conducted this study to assess the impact of XQLG as an add-on therapy to treatment with fluticasone/salmeterol (seretide) in adult patients with mild-to-moderate, persistent asthma. A total of 178 patients were randomly assigned to receive XQLG and seretide or seretide plus placebo for 90 days. Asthma control was assessed by asthma control test (ACT), symptoms scores, FEV1, and PEF. Baseline patient-reported Chinese medicine (CM)-specific symptoms were analyzed to determine whether the symptoms may be possible indicators of treatment response by conducting latent class analysis (LCA). There was no statistically significant difference in ACT score between two groups. In the subset of 70 patients with symptoms defined by CM criteria, XQLG add-on therapy was found to significantly increase the levels of asthma control according to global initiative for asthma (GINA) guidelines (P = 0.0329). There was no significant difference in another subset of 100 patients with relatively low levels of the above-mentioned symptoms (P = 0.1291). Results of LCA suggest that patients with the six typical symptoms defined in CM may benefit from XQLG. PMID:23431348

  15. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 6, Field study conducted in fulfillment of Phase 3 titled. Use of FGD by-product gypsum enriched with magnesium hydroxide as a soil amendment

    SciTech Connect

    Bigham, J. M.; Soto, U. I.; Stehouwer, R. C.; Yibirin, H.

    1999-04-30

    A variety of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies have been developed to meet environmental restrictions imposed by the federal Clean Air Act and its amendments. These technologies include wet scrubber systems that dramatically reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions. Although such systems are effective, they also produce large volumes of sludge that must be dewatered, stabilized, and disposed of in landfills. Disposal is an expensive and environmentally questionable process for which suitable alternatives are needed. Wet scrubbing of flue gases with magnesium (Mg)-enhanced lime has the potential to become a leading FGD technology. When combined with aforced oxidation system, the wet sludges resulting from this process can be modified and refined to produce gypsum (CaS04∙2H2O) and magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] of sufficient purity for beneficial re-use in the construction (wallboard) and pharmaceutical industries. The pilot plant at the CINERGY Zimmer Station near Cincinnati can also produce gypsum by-products formulated to contain varying amounts of Mg(OH)2- Such materials may have value to the agriculture, forestry, and lawn-care industries as soil "conditioners", liming agents, and nutritional supplements capable of supplying calcium (Ca), Mg, and sulfur (S) for plant growth. This report describes three field studies designed to evaluate by-product gypsum and Mg-gypsum from the Zimmer Station power plant as amendments for improving the quality of mine spoils and agricultural soils that were unproductive because of phytotoxic levels of dissolved aluminum (Al) and low pH. The technical literature suggests that gypsum may be more effective than agricultural limestone for ameliorating Al toxicity below the immediate zone of application. Such considerations are important for deep-rooted plant species that attempt to utilize water and nutrients occurring at depth in the spoil/soil.

  16. Globes from global data: Charting international research networks with the GRASS GIS r.out.polycones add-on module.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löwe, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Many Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) tools have been created for the various application fields within geoscience. While FOSS allows re-implementation of functionalities in new environments by access to the original codebase, the easiest approach to build new software solutions for new problems is the combination or merging of existing software tools. Such mash-ups are implemented by embedding and encapsulating FOSS tools within each another, effectively focusing the use of the embedded software to the specific role it needs to perform in the given scenario, while ignoring all its other capabilities. GRASS GIS is a powerful and established FOSS GIS for raster, vector and volume data processing while the Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) are a suite of powerful Open Source mapping tools, which exceed the mapping capabilities of GRASS GIS. This poster reports on the new GRASS GIS add-on module r.out.polycones. It enables users to utilize non-continuous projections for map production within the GRASS production environment. This is implemented on the software level by encapsulating a subset of GMT mapping capabilities into a GRASS GIS (Version 6.x) add-on module. The module was developed at the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB) to provide custom global maps of scientific collaboration networks, such as the DataCite consortium, the registration agency for Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) for research data. The GRASS GIS add-on module can be used for global mapping of raster data into a variety of non continuous sinosoidal projections, allowing the creation of printable biangles (gores) to be used for globe making. Due to the well structured modular nature of GRASS modules, technical follow-up work will focus on API-level Python-based integration in GRASS 7 [1]. Based on this, GMT based mapping capabilities in GRASS will be extended beyond non-continuous sinosoidal maps and advanced from raster-layers to content GRASS display monitors. References

  17. COMMERCIAL UTILITY FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses the current status of commercial flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes applied to coal-fired utility boilers in the U.S. Major objectives of the work were to examine the impacts of the 1979 New Source Performance Standards on FGD system design and operati...

  18. Laboratory tests on an aircraft fuselage to determine the insertion loss of various acoustic add-on treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heitman, K. E.; Mixson, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory study of add-on acoustic treatments for a propeller-driven light aircraft fuselage. The treatments included: no treatment (i.e., baseline fuselage); a production-type double-wall interior; and various amounts of high density fiberglass added to the baseline fuselage. The sound source was a pneumatic-driver with attached exponential horn, supplied with a broadband signal. Data were acquired at the approximate head positions of the six passenger seats. The results were analyzed on space-averaged narrowband, one-third octave band and overall insertion loss basis. In addition, insertion loss results for the different configurations at specific frequencies representing propeller tone spectra are presented. The propeller tone data includes not only the space-averaged insertion loss, but also the variation of insertion loss at these particular frequencies across the six microphone positions.

  19. Efficacy of Add-on Montelukast in Nonasthmatic Eosinophilic Bronchitis: The Additive Effect on Airway Inflammation, Cough and Life Quality

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Wuping; Liu, Ping; Qiu, Zhongmin; Yu, Li; Hang, Jingqing; Gao, Xiaohua; Zhou, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of montelukast (MONT), a cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist, in nonasthmatic eosinophilic bronchitis (NAEB), especially its influence on cough associated life quality is still indefinite. We evaluated the efficacy of MONT combined with budesonide (BUD) as compared to BUD monotherapy in improving life quality, suppressing airway eosinophilia and cough remission in NAEB. Methods: A prospective, open-labeled, multicenter, randomized controlled trial was conducted. Patients with NAEB (aged 18-75 years) were randomized to inhaled BUD (200 μg, bid) or BUD plus oral MONT (10 μg, qn) for 4 weeks. Leicester cough questionnaire (LCQ) life quality scores, cough visual analog scale (CVAS) scores, eosinophil differential ratio (Eos), and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) in induced sputum were monitored and compared. Results: The control and MONT groups contained 33 and 32 patients, respectively, with similar baseline characteristics. Significant with-in group improvement in CVAS, LCQ scores, Eos, and ECP was observed in both groups during treatment. After 2-week treatment, add-on treatment of MONT was significantly more effective than BUD monotherapy for CVAS decrease and LCQ scores improvement (both P < 0.05). Similar results were seen at 4-week assessment (both P < 0.05). 4-week add-on therapy of MONT also resulted in a higher percentage of patients with normal sputum Eos (<2.5%) and greater decrease of ECP (both P < 0.05). Conclusions: MONT combined with BUD was demonstrated cooperative effects in improvement of life quality, suppression of eosinophilic inflammation, and cough remission in patients with NAEB. PMID:25563311

  20. A novel FGD1 mutation in a family with Aarskog–Scott syndrome and predominant features of congenital joint contractures

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Laurie Beth; Farley, Frances A.; Antonellis, Anthony; Keegan, Catherine E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in FGD1 cause Aarskog–Scott syndrome (AAS), an X-linked condition characterized by abnormal facial, skeletal, and genital development due to abnormal embryonic morphogenesis and skeletal formation. Here we report a novel FGD1 mutation in a family with atypical features of AAS, specifically bilateral upper and lower limb congenital joint contractures and cardiac abnormalities. The male proband and his affected maternal uncle are hemizygous for the novel FGD1 mutation p.Arg921X. This variant is the most carboxy-terminal FGD1 mutation identified in a family with AAS and is predicted to truncate the FGD1 protein at the second to last amino acid of the carboxy-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. Our study emphasizes the importance of the 3′ peptide sequence in the structure and/or function of the FGD1 protein and further demonstrates the need to screen patients with X-linked congenital joint contractures for FGD1 mutations. PMID:27551683

  1. PROCEEDINGS: EPA'S INDUSTRY BRIEFING ON THE ADIPIC ACID ENHANCED LIMESTONE FGD PROCESS (JULY 1981)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document presentations made during an EPA-sponsored industry briefing, July 15, 1981, in Springfield, MO. The briefing dealt with the status of EPA's research activities on the adipic-acid-enhanced limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process. Subjects covered...

  2. Framework of risk assessment in relation to FGD-gypsum use as agricultural amendment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the concerns by EPA of air pollution from coal fired power plants, the industry are building and retrofitting existing facilities to remove more impurities from the environment. Industry has introduced removal of fly ash contaminates before SO2 removal, allowing generation of FGD-gypsum with...

  3. Animal waste and FGD gypsum effects on bermudagrass and soil leachate nutrient contents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In previous experiments on newly relcaimed coal mine soils in northeastern Mississippi, applying poultry litter at 22.4 Mg ha-1 yr-1 enhanced bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon L.) biomass and selected soil quality parameters. Additionally, co-application of 11.2 Mg ha-1 FGD gypsum and litter reduced so...

  4. Comparison of soil applied flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and agricultural gypsum on soil physical properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gypsum can come from different sources. Agricultural gypsum is typically mined and used to supply calcium to crops. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a by-product of coal power plants. Although their chemical formulas are the same, different trace elements and materials are present in them....

  5. Manufacture of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD-gypsum. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, M.I.M.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lytle, J.M.; Hoeft, R.; Blevins, F.Z.; Achron, F.

    1994-12-31

    The overall goal of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility for producing commercial-grade ammonium sulfate fertilizer from gypsum produced as part of limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. This is a cooperative effort among the ISGS, the UIUC, AlliedSignal, SE-ME, Henry Fertilizer, Illinois Power Co. (IP), and Central Illinois Public Services (CIPS). Bench-scale experiments will be conducted to obtain process engineering data for manufacture of ammonium sulfate from FGD-gypsum and to help evaluate technical and economical feasibility of the process. Controlled greenhouse experiments will be conducted at UIUC to evaluate the chemical impact of the produced ammonium sulfate on soil properties. A process flow sheet will be proposed and market demand for the products will be established. An engineering team at IP will provide an independent review of the economics of the process. AlliedSignal will be involved in testing and quality evaluation of ammonium sulfate samples and is interested in an agreement to market the finished product. CIPS will provide technical assistance and samples of FGD-gypsum for the project. In this quarter, a literature study that should give detailed insight into the chemistry, process schemes, and costs of producing ammonium sulfate from gypsum is in progress at the ISGS. Acquisition of a high quality FGD-gypsum sample was completed. Collecting of the other lower grade sample was scheduled to be conducted in December. Characterization of these feed materials is in progress.

  6. Using FGD gypsum to remove soluble phosphorus from agricultural drainage waters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    After several decades of applying chicken litter to meet crop demands for nitrogen, high levels of legacy phosphorus (P) in soils of the Delmarva Peninsula are a major source of soluble P entering drainage ditches that empty to the Chesapeake Bay. In April, 2007, Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) gypsu...

  7. Tetrahymena functional genomics database (TetraFGD): an integrated resource for Tetrahymena functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jie; Lu, Yuming; Feng, Jinmei; Yuan, Dongxia; Tian, Miao; Chang, Yue; Fu, Chengjie; Wang, Guangying; Zeng, Honghui; Miao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila is a useful unicellular model organism for studies of eukaryotic cellular and molecular biology. Researches on T. thermophila have contributed to a series of remarkable basic biological principles. After the macronuclear genome was sequenced, substantial progress has been made in functional genomics research on T. thermophila, including genome-wide microarray analysis of the T. thermophila life cycle, a T. thermophila gene network analysis based on the microarray data and transcriptome analysis by deep RNA sequencing. To meet the growing demands for the Tetrahymena research community, we integrated these data to provide a public access database: Tetrahymena functional genomics database (TetraFGD). TetraFGD contains three major resources, including the RNA-Seq transcriptome, microarray and gene networks. The RNA-Seq data define gene structures and transcriptome, with special emphasis on exon-intron boundaries; the microarray data describe gene expression of 20 time points during three major stages of the T. thermophila life cycle; the gene network data identify potential gene-gene interactions of 15 049 genes. The TetraFGD provides user-friendly search functions that assist researchers in accessing gene models, transcripts, gene expression data and gene-gene relationships. In conclusion, the TetraFGD is an important functional genomic resource for researchers who focus on the Tetrahymena or other ciliates. Database URL: http://tfgd.ihb.ac.cn/ PMID:23482072

  8. EFFECT OF DISSOLVED SOLIDS ON LIMESTONE FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) SCRUBBING CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of experiments in a 0.1 MW pilot plant to determine the effects of high concentrations of chloride ions and dissolved salts on flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing chemistry, both in the natural and forced oxidation modes of operation. (Note: The tight...

  9. PROCEEDINGS: FIRST COMBINED FGD AND DRY SO2 CONTROL SYMPOSIUM. VOLUME 2. SESSIONS 5 AND 6

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document presentations at the First Combined FGD and Dry SO2 Control Symposium, in St. Louis, MO, October 25-28, 1988. The symposium, jointly sponsored by EPA and EPRI, had as its objective the exchange of technical and regulatory information on sulfur oxide contr...

  10. PROCEEDINGS: FIRST COMBINED FGD AND DRY SO2 CONTROL SYMPOSIUM. VOLUME 3. SESSIONS 7 AND 8

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document presentations at the First Combined FGD and Dry SO2 Control Symposium, in St. Louis, MO, October 25-28, 1988. The symposium, jointly sponsored by EPA and EPRI, had as its objective the exchange of technical and regulatory information on sulfur oxide contr...

  11. Impact of FGD gypsum soil amendment applications on soil and environmental quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper will discuss the utilization of FGD gypsum in agriculture for improving soil quality and other environmental benefits. Gypsum (CaSO4 .2H2O) has been used as an agricultural soil amendment for over 250 years. It is a soluble source of calcium and sulfur- for crops and has been shown to i...

  12. Use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Gypsum as a Heavy Metal Stabilizer in Contaminated Soils

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is a synthetic by-product generated from the flue gas desulfurization process in coal power plants. It has several beneficial applications such as an ingredient in cement production, wallboard production and in agricultural practice as a soil...

  13. Effect of surface application of FGD gypsum on infiltration rates in a Coastal Plain soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The poorly drained cultivated soils on the Lower Eastern Shore of Maryland are often subject to excessive runoff. Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, a by-product of a process used by utility companies to prevent SO**2 release into the atmosphere, is expected to be in large supply as increasing ...

  14. Soil test and bermudagrass forage yield responses to animal waste and FGD gypsum ammendments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of soil and plant responses to animal or industrial byproducts is needed for effective use of these potential amendments on reclaimed mine soil. This study compared seven treatments of 11.2 Mg ha-1 flue gas desulfurized (FGD) gypsum (control), 896 kg ha-1 NPK fertilizer (13-13-13), 22.4 M...

  15. DISPOSAL OF SPENT SORBENT FROM DRY FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of sintering and leaching mechanisms of fly ash/spent sodium sorbent mixtures from a dry injection flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process. It includes an estimate of the economics of pelletizing and sintering to handle the fly ash and spent sor...

  16. DEMONSTRATION OF WELLMAN-LORD/ALLIED CHEMICAL FGD TECHNOLOGY: ACCEPTANCE TEST RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of acceptance tests of Wellman-Lord/Allied Chemical flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology. Process performance guarantees were met or exceeded. During the 12-day Design Load test, the plant was operated at the design condition of a boiler flue gas out...

  17. DEMONSTRATION OF WELLMAN-LORD/ALLIED CHEMICAL FGD TECHNOLOGY: DEMONSTRATION TEST SECOND YEAR RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the performance (over a 2-year period) of a full-scale flue gas desulfurization (FGD) unit to demonstrate the Wellman-Lord/Allied Chemical process. The process is regenerable, employing sodium sulfite wet scrubbing, thermal regeneratio...

  18. Hydrologic transport of fecal bacteria attenuated by flu gas desulfurized (FGD) gypsum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Flue gas desulfurized (FGD) gypsum is a byproduct of coal-fired power plants. As a soil amendment for crop production it has the potential of improving soil water infiltration, soil conservation, and decreasing nutrient losses from broiler litter applications. Because broiler litter is a ...

  19. Association of FGD1 polymorphisms with early-onset breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Sarah; Buckhaults, Phillip J.; Pedigo, Nancy G.; Farrell, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent cancer studies have suggested that the faciogenital dysplasia 1 (FGD1) gene may play a role in the development of tumor cells. Somatic alterations in the FGD1 gene and increased Fgd1 protein expression have been observed in many breast tumor cases. The present study sequenced the FGD1 gene in tumor DNA from 46 breast cancer patients using Ion Torrent sequencing. Three synonymous polymorphisms and one missense polymorphism were detected with next-generation sequencing; however, no somatic mutations were observed. The Thr697 variant was identified in 18 patients with an average age at diagnosis of 55 years, which was a lower average age than patients without the polymorphism. In addition, a higher frequency of Thr697 was observed in African-American patients. The Pro712 was observed in 15 breast cancer patients with an average age of 58 years, and was observed as a haplotype with the Thr697 variant in 28% of the breast cancer patients studied. The missense polymorphism (Ala226Thr) was identified in a 40-year-old female patient who had a recurrence of cancer. These polymorphisms (Ala226Thr, Thr697 and Pro712) may be associated with an earlier onset of breast cancer. PMID:27602141

  20. DEFINITIVE SOX CONTROL PROCESS EVALUATIONS: LIMESTONE, LIME, AND MAGNESIA FGD PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives economic and ground-to-ground energy evaluations of limestone slurry, lime slurry, and magnesia (producing sulfuric acid) flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. The lime slurry process, using purchased lime and lime calcined onsite, remains lower in capital in...

  1. Land application uses of dry FGD by-products. [Quarterly] report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, W.A.; Beeghly, J.H.

    1993-12-31

    Reclamation of mine-sites with acid overburden requires the use of alkaline amendments and represents a potential high-volume use of alkaline dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by products. In a greenhouse study, 25-cm columns of acid mine spoil were amended with two FGD by-products; lime injection multistage burners (LIMB) fly ash or pressurized fluidized bed (PFBC) fly ash at rates of 0, 4, 8, 16, and 32% by weight (0, 40, 80, 160, and 320 tons/acre). Amended spoil was covered with 20 cm of acid topsoil amended with the corresponding FGD by-product to pH 7. Column leachate pH increased with FGD amendment rate while leachate Fe, Mn, and Zn decreased, Leachate Ca, S, and Mg decreased with LIMB amendment rate and increased with PFBC amendment. Leachate concentrations of regulated metals were decreased or unaffected by FGD amendment except for Se which was increased by PFBC. Spoil pH was increased up to 8.9 by PFBC, and up to 9.2 by LIMB amendment. Spoil pH also increased with depth with FGD amendments of 16 and 32%, Yield of fescue was increased by FGD amendment of 4 to 8%. Plant tissue content of most elements was unaffected by FGD amendment rate, and no toxicity symptoms were observed. Plant Ca and Mg were increased by LIMB and PFBC respectively, while plant S, Mn and Sr were decreased. Plant Ca and B was increased by LIMB, and plant Mg and S by PFBC amendment. These results indicate dry FGD by-products are effective in ameliorating acid, spoils and have a low potential for creating adverse environmental impacts.

  2. Lithium as add-on to quetiapine XR in adult patients with acute mania: a 6-week, multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Bourin, Michel S; Severus, Emanuel; Schronen, Juan P; Gass, Peter; Szamosi, Johan; Eriksson, Hans; Chandrashekar, Hongally

    2014-01-01

    Quetiapine extended release (XR) and lithium are treatments with proven efficacy in acute mania. This randomized study evaluated the efficacy and safety of lithium or placebo as add-on to quetiapine XR in adult patients with manic or mixed symptoms of bipolar I disorder. In this 6-week, double-blind study (Trial D144AC00003), adult patients with DSM-IV-TR-diagnosed bipolar I disorder (current episode manic or mixed), a Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) total score ≥20, and score ≥4 on two of four core YMRS items were administered quetiapine XR (400 to 800 mg/day) and randomly assigned to receive add-on lithium (600 to 1,800 mg/day) or placebo. The primary efficacy end point was change in the YMRS total score from baseline to day 43, analyzed using a mixed-model for repeated measures (MMRM) approach. Secondary efficacy and safety end points were also measured. Rating scales were administered by trained staff. Three hundred fifty-six patients treated with quetiapine XR were randomized to add-on lithium (n = 173) or placebo (n = 183). Two hundred ninety-one patients (81.7%) completed the study. At day 43, least squares mean change in YMRS total score was -22.8 for add-on lithium and -20.1 for add-on placebo, a statistically significant treatment group difference of -2.69 (p < 0.001). On secondary measures, add-on lithium was associated with significant improvements in response, remission, illness severity, and overall illness versus add-on placebo (p < 0.05). The number needed to treat was 9.1 for response and 7.9 for remission for add-on lithium compared with add-on placebo. Lithium in combination with quetiapine XR was generally well tolerated, with a similar profile to quetiapine XR in combination with placebo. The addition of lithium to quetiapine XR therapy was associated with significantly greater efficacy than placebo as add-on and was generally well tolerated in patients with acute bipolar I mania. This study was registered under Clinicaltrials

  3. Use of FGD gypsum and bottom ash in roadway and building construction

    SciTech Connect

    Saylak, D.; Sorensen, G.; Gadalla, A.

    1994-07-01

    A 24-month three-phase program was undertaken to exploit the beneficial use of FGD (Flue gas desulfurization) by-products and bottom ash for roadway and building construction applications. This report discusses the results generated during the first year of this study. In Phase I, a 2-lane, 300-foot long experimental test section was constructed utilizing a 7 percent cement-stabilized blend of FGD by-product gypsum and two types of bottom ash generated at the ALCOA facility in Rockdale, Texas. The aggregate for this mixture was a 50/50 blend of gypsum and ash. The ash fraction was comprised of a 75/25 blend of a wet bottom ash (boiler slag) and a dry bottom ash. The results of an on-going 18 month post-construction evaluation of the test section are presented. The field evaluations involve Falling Weight Deflectometer measurements of the modulus and deformation of the base and in-situ deformations under traffic loads using state-of-the-art Multidepth Deformation devices. Ground water seepage is being measured for environmental impact analysis of the by-product in the roadbase. Phase II utilizes FGD calcium sulfate by-product for the production of unfired brick, cinderblock and masonry components for building construction. All components were tested for compliance with ASTM specifications for commercial grade bricks. All products are currently undergoing an 18-month evaluation under exposure to the elements. Phase III was designed to study the oxidation of an FGD calcium sulfite (Gypsite) currently being produced in TU-Electric`s FGD scrubber operations. Useless in its by-product form, the Gypsite was subjected to a series of processes to convert it to the more useable dihydrate (Gypsum) or hemihydrate (Plaster of Paris) form. Along with the Electric Power Research Institute this program was co-sponsored by TU-Electric of Dallas, Texas and ALCOA, Rockdale, Texas.

  4. Effects of add-on montelukast on airway hyperresponsiveness in patients with well-controlled asthma – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kononowa, Nina; Michel, Sandra; Miedinger, David; Pichler, Christiane E.; Chhajed, Prashant N.; Helbling, Arthur; Leuppi, Jörg D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Control of airway inflammation is the cornerstone of asthma management. The aim of the present pilot study was to assess the effects of a leukotriene receptor antagonist (LTRA) added to a basic treatment of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and long-acting beta-agonist (LABA) on airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and quality of life in well-controlled patients with asthma. Research design and methods Seventeen patients (age 18–65, 11 women) with well-controlled asthma presenting airway hyperresponsiveness to mannitol and methacholine challenge were given add-on montelukast on a stable ICS + LABA for 4 weeks. Quality of life and selected parameters of airway inflammation were measured at baseline and at study end. (ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01725360)). Results Adding montelukast to ICS + LABA resulted in an increase in mean FEV1 (+4.5%, p = 0.057), cumulated higher dose of mannitol (+32.5%, p = 0.023) and methacholine (+17.2%, 0.237) in the provocation test, lower airway reactivity with mannitol and methacholine (response dose ratio (RDR) –50.0%, p = 0.024 and –44.3%, p = 0.006, respectively), and improved airway sensitivity to mannitol and methacholine (+12.1%, p = 0.590 and +48.0%, p = 0.129 for PD15 and PD20 FEV1, respectively). Changes in inflammation parameters (blood eosinophil count, serum eosinophil cationic protein, and exhaled nitric oxide) were consistent with these findings. Asthma-related quality of life improved significantly in all domains and overall (from 5.3 at baseline to 6.1 at the final visit, p < 0.001). The main limitation was the absence of a control group. Conclusion The consistency of the changes in airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation as well as in quality of life observed with an add-on therapy with montelukast in well-controlled asthma patients during 4 weeks suggests that residual inflammation may represent an area for further improvement of asthma control to be explored in

  5. Sonication cultures of explanted components as an add-on test to routinely conducted microbiological diagnostics improve pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Holinka, Johannes; Bauer, Leonhard; Hirschl, Alexander M; Graninger, Wolfgang; Windhager, Reinhard; Presterl, Elisabeth

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the pathogen detection in prosthetic joint infections, particularly to evaluate the feasibility of the sonication culture method in the clinical routine. Explanted components of all patients with presumptive prosthetic or implant infection were sonicated separately in sterile containers to dislodge the adherent bacteria from the surfaces and cultured. The results of sonication culture were compared to the conventional tissue culture. We investigated 60 consecutive patients with loosening of the prostheses or implants Forty patients had septic and 20 aseptic loosening (24 knee prostheses, 21 hip prostheses, 6 mega-prostheses, 2 shoulder prostheses, 6 osteosynthesis, 1 spinal instrumentation). The sensitivity of sonication fluid culture was 83.3%, of single positive tissue culture was 72.2% and 61.1% when two or more cultures yielded the same microorganism. In patients receiving antibiotic therapy the sensitivity was 65.9%, 57.5%, and 42.5%, respectively. Pathogens detected in a single tissue culture as well as in sonication culture yielded a significantly higher rate of prosthetic infection than conventional tissue culture alone (p = 0.008), even in patients receiving continuous antibiotic therapy before explantation (p = 0.016). The sonication method represents an essential add-on in pathogen detection compared to conventional tissue culture. PMID:21337398

  6. Prospective open-label study of add-on and monotherapy topiramate in civilians with chronic nonhallucinatory posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Berlant, Jeffrey L

    2004-01-01

    Background In order to confirm therapeutic effects of topiramate on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) observed in a prior study, a new prospective, open-label study was conducted to examine acute responses in chronic, nonhallucinatory PTSD. Methods Thirty-three consecutive newly recruited civilian adult outpatients (mean age 46 years, 85% female) with DSM-IV-diagnosed chronic PTSD, excluding those with concurrent auditory or visual hallucinations, received topiramate either as monotherapy (n = 5) or augmentation (n = 28). The primary measure was a change in the PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C) score from baseline to 4 weeks, with response defined as a ≥ 30% reduction of PTSD symptoms. Results For those taking the PCL-C at both baseline and week 4 (n = 30), total symptoms declined by 49% at week 4 (paired t-test, P < 0.001) with similar subscale reductions for reexperiencing, avoidance/numbing, and hyperarousal symptoms. The response rate at week 4 was 77%. Age, sex, bipolar comorbidity, age at onset of PTSD, duration of symptoms, severity of baseline PCL-C score, and monotherapy versus add-on medication administration did not predict reduction in PTSD symptoms. Median time to full response was 9 days and median dosage was 50 mg/day. Conclusions Promising open-label findings in a new sample converge with findings of a previous study. The use of topiramate for treatment of chronic PTSD, at least in civilians, warrants controlled clinical trials. PMID:15315714

  7. Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors as add-on therapy to insulin: rationale and evidences.

    PubMed

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT-2I) are recently approved class of anti-hyperglycaemic agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). SGLT-2I inhibits renal glucose reabsorption, thereby ensuing urinary glucose excretion in a dose-dependent manner. This caloric loss and osmotic diuresis, secondary to increased urinary glucose excretion, has a unique potential to counter insulin induced weight gain and fluid retention, with little potential of hypoglycemic exacerbation. Also, as these agents act independently of insulin secretion or action, they are effective even in long-standing diabetes with depleted β-cell reserve. Improvement in insulin sensitivity, as observed with SGLT-2I can also facilitate insulin action. Furthermore, significant reduction in total daily insulin dosage and reduction of body weight as observed during combination therapy renders SGLT-2I, a near-ideal partner to insulin. This review aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of currently used SGLT-2I as an add-on to insulin therapy in the treatment of T2DM. PMID:26732230

  8. Can intermittent theta burst stimulation as add-on to psychotherapy improve nicotine abstinence? Results from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dieler, Alica C; Dresler, Thomas; Joachim, Kathrin; Deckert, Jürgen; Herrmann, Martin J; Fallgatter, Andreas J

    2014-01-01

    Smoking is among the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Discontinuing smoking can increase life expectancy to the presmoking level. Unaided attempts are often ineffective, strengthening the necessity of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), nicotine replacement or pharmacotherapy. Still, relapse rates are high. Recently, a modulation of nicotine craving, which predicts relapse, through transcranial magnetic stimulation to the prefrontal cortex was shown. In a pilot study, we investigated whether 4 sessions of intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) as add-on treatment to CBT reduces nicotine craving and improves long-term abstinence (at 3, 6 and 12 months). Smokers were randomly assigned to a treatment (n = 38) or a sham group (n = 36). Although we did not find reduced craving, we could show higher abstinence rates in the treatment group at 3 months. At 6 and 12 months abstinence rates did not differ significantly. Results at 12 months, however, have to be interpreted cautiously due to significant differences in the dropout rates between the two groups at this time point. We provide first evidence for a beneficial effect of additional iTBS on intermediate nicotine abstinence; however, the low number of iTBS sessions might have prevented longer effects. More lasting effects might be achieved by iTBS maintenance sessions in analogy to the treatment of depression. PMID:24924851

  9. CURRENT STATUS OF COMMERCIAL UTILITY FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the current status of commercial flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes applied to coal-fired utility boilers in the U.S. Major objectives of the work were to examine the impacts of the 1979 New Source Performance Standards on FGD system design and operatio...

  10. Comparison of the Effects of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion and Add-On Therapy with Sitagliptin in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wan, Heng; Zhao, Defu; Shen, Jie; Lu, Lu; Zhang, Tong; Chen, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    To identify a new regimen to optimize treatment for patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2DM) by short-term continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) alone. Methods. 60 patients with newly diagnosed T2DM were randomized into two groups (n = 30 each) and treated for 2 weeks with CSII alone (CSII group) or with CSII plus sitagliptin (CSII + Sig group). The glycemic variability of the patients was measured using a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) for the last 72 hours. A standard meal test was performed before and after the interventions, and the levels of glycated albumin, fasting glucose, fasting C-peptide, postprandial 2 h blood glucose, and postprandial 2 h C-peptide were examined. Results. Compared with the CSII group, the indicators of glycemic variability, such as the mean amplitude of glycemic excursion (MAGE) and the standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG), were decreased significantly in the CSII + Sig group. The changes before and after treatment in the C-peptide reactivity index (ΔCPI) and the secretory unit of islet in transplantation index (ΔSUIT) indicated a significant improvement in the CSII + Sig group. Conclusions. Add-on therapy with sitagliptin may be an optimized treatment for patients with newly diagnosed T2DM compared with short-term CSII alone. PMID:26798658

  11. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart IIIi of... - Operating Limits for Capture Systems and Add-On Control Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of appendix M to 40 CFR part 51 i. Collecting the direction of air flow, and either the facial... Pollutants: Surface Coating of Automobiles and Light-Duty Trucks Pt. 63, Subpt. IIII, Table 1 Table 1...

  12. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart IIIi of... - Operating Limits for Capture Systems and Add-On Control Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of appendix M to 40 CFR part 51 i. Collecting the direction of air flow, and either the facial... Pollutants: Surface Coating of Automobiles and Light-Duty Trucks Pt. 63, Subpt. IIII, Table 1 Table 1...

  13. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart IIIi of... - Operating Limits for Capture Systems and Add-On Control Devices

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each carbon bed regeneration cycle must not fall below... of appendix M to 40 CFR part 51 i. Collecting the direction of air flow, and either the facial.... Measuring the total regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each...

  14. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Ssss of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-on Control Devices and Capture System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the catalyst bed in any 3-hour period must not fall below the limit established according to § 63.5160... catalyst bed at or above the temperature limit. b. ensure that the average temperature difference across the catalyst bed in any 3-hour period does not fall below the temperature difference limit...

  15. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Oooo of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the catalyst bed in any 3-hour block period must not fall below the limit established according to... data to 3-hour block averages; and iii. maintaining the 3-hour block average catalyst bed inlet... catalyst bed in any 3-hour block period does not fall below the temperature difference limit...

  16. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Oooo of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the catalyst bed in any 3-hour block period must not fall below the limit established according to... data to 3-hour block averages; and iii. maintaining the 3-hour block average catalyst bed inlet... catalyst bed in any 3-hour block period does not fall below the temperature difference limit...

  17. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjjj of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... catalyst bed in any 3-hour period must not fall below the combustion temperature limit established according to § 63.3360(e)(3)(ii) i. Collecting the catalyst bed inlet temperature data according to § 63... catalyst bed inlet temperature at or above the temperature limit. b. The temperature rise across...

  18. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjjj of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Catalytic oxidizer a. The average temperature at the inlet to the catalyst bed in any 3-hour period must not... the catalyst bed inlet temperature data according to § 63.3350(e)(9);ii. Reducing the data to 3-hour block averages; and iii. Maintain the 3-hour average catalyst bed inlet temperature at or above...

  19. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Ssss of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-on Control Devices and Capture System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... before the catalyst bed in any 3-hour period must not fall below the limit established according to § 63... catalyst bed at or above the temperature limit. b. ensure that the average temperature difference across the catalyst bed in any 3-hour period does not fall below the temperature difference limit...

  20. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjjj of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... catalyst bed in any 3-hour period must not fall below the combustion temperature limit established according to § 63.3360(e)(3)(ii) i. Collecting the catalyst bed inlet temperature data according to § 63... catalyst bed inlet temperature at or above the temperature limit. b. The temperature rise across...

  1. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Oooo of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the catalyst bed in any 3-hour block period must not fall below the limit established according to... data to 3-hour block averages; and iii. maintaining the 3-hour block average catalyst bed inlet... catalyst bed in any 3-hour block period does not fall below the temperature difference limit...

  2. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Oooo of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the catalyst bed in any 3-hour block period must not fall below the limit established according to... data to 3-hour block averages; and iii. maintaining the 3-hour block average catalyst bed inlet... catalyst bed in any 3-hour block period does not fall below the temperature difference limit...

  3. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjjj of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Catalytic oxidizer a. The average temperature at the inlet to the catalyst bed in any 3-hour period must not... the catalyst bed inlet temperature data according to § 63.3350(e)(9);ii. Reducing the data to 3-hour block averages; and iii. Maintain the 3-hour average catalyst bed inlet temperature at or above...

  4. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjjj of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... catalyst bed in any 3-hour period must not fall below the combustion temperature limit established according to § 63.3360(e)(3)(ii) i. Collecting the catalyst bed inlet temperature data according to § 63... catalyst bed inlet temperature at or above the temperature limit. b. The temperature rise across...

  5. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Ssss of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-on Control Devices and Capture System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... before the catalyst bed in any 3-hour period must not fall below the limit established according to § 63... catalyst bed at or above the temperature limit. b. ensure that the average temperature difference across the catalyst bed in any 3-hour period does not fall below the temperature difference limit...

  6. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Oooo of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the catalyst bed in any 3-hour block period must not fall below the limit established according to... data to 3-hour block averages; and iii. maintaining the 3-hour block average catalyst bed inlet... catalyst bed in any 3-hour block period does not fall below the temperature difference limit...

  7. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Ssss of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-on Control Devices and Capture System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the catalyst bed in any 3-hour period must not fall below the limit established according to § 63.5160... catalyst bed at or above the temperature limit. b. ensure that the average temperature difference across the catalyst bed in any 3-hour period does not fall below the temperature difference limit...

  8. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Ssss of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-on Control Devices and Capture System

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... before the catalyst bed in any 3-hour period must not fall below the limit established according to § 63... catalyst bed at or above the temperature limit. b. ensure that the average temperature difference across the catalyst bed in any 3-hour period does not fall below the temperature difference limit...

  9. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Phase 1, [Annual report], December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.; Haefner, R.

    1993-04-01

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  10. SURVEY OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS: ST. CLAIR STATION, DETROIT EDISON CO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a survey of the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system retrofitted on Unit 6 of Detroit Edison Co.'s St. Clair Station. The experimental FGD system, which operated through a 2-month (October 1976-January 1977) demonstration program, utilized a limestone...

  11. SURVEY OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS: DUCK CREEK STATION, CENTRAL ILLINOIS LIGHT CO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the results of a survey of operational flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired utility boilers in the United States. The FGD system installed on Unit 1 at the Duck Creek Station of Central Illinois Light Company is described in terms of design and...

  12. SURVEY OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS: LAWRENCE ENERGY CENTER, KANSAS POWER AND LIGHT CO

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the results of a survey of operational flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems on coal-fired utility boilers in the United States. The FGD systems installed on Units 4 and 5 at the Lawrence Energy Center of the Kansas Power and Light Company is described in t...

  13. SURVEY OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS: GREEN RIVER STATION, KENTUCKY UTILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a survey of the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system retrofitted to Boilers 1, 2, and 3 at the Green River Station of Kentucky Utilities. The FGD system consists of one wet lime scrubber module designed to handle a maximum of 170 cu m/sec (360,000 afc...

  14. SURVEY OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS: LA CYGNE STATION, KANSAS CITY POWER AND LIGHT CO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a second survey of the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system on Unit 1 of Kansas City Power and Light Co.'s La Cygne Station. The FGD system, first started up in February 1973 and commercially available in June 1973, uses a limestone slurry in eight sc...

  15. FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEM CAPABILITIES FOR COAL-FIRED STEAM GENERATORS. VOLUME II. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the availability of technology for reducing SO2 emissions from coal-fired steam generators using flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Foreign and domestic lime, limestone, double alkali, magnesium slurry, and Wellman-Lord FGD systems are described, and the...

  16. FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEM CAPABILITIES FOR COAL-FIRED STEAM GENERATORS. VOLUME I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the availability of technology for reducing SO2 emissions from coal-fired steam generators using flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Foreign and domestic lime, limestone, double alkali, magnesium slurry, and Wellman-Lord FGD systems are described, and the...

  17. Effects of gliclazide add on metformin on serum omentin-1 levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Al-Gareeb, Ali I.; Alrubai, Haidar F.; Suliaman, Sammar M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Omentin is a newly identified adipokine that has beneficial influence against cardiovascular disorders. Hence, considering the impact of anti-diabetic drug on omentin levels may provide an adjuvant strategy to protect diabetic patients against valuable clinical hazards. Aim of the Study: To investigate the influence of metformin alone or in combination with gliclazide on the level of serum omentin among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Patients and Methods: A total of 70 newly diagnosed patients with T2DM were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind prospective study, and divided into two equal groups based on treatment regimen in which Group 1 treated with metformin (1000 mg) and Group 2 treated with metformin (1000 mg) plus gliclazide (80 mg). Blood glucose levels, HbA1C, insulin levels, and serum omentin-1 were measured at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment. Result: Use of gliclazide as an add-on therapy to metformin in patients with T2DM result in better glycemic control evidenced by significant reductions in the levels of blood glucose levels and HbA1C and much more improvement in insulin sensitivity evidenced by significant decreased in insulin resistance index, whereas it has adverse impact on serum omentin-1 levels evidenced by significant decrement in omentin-1 level in comparison to their pretreatment levels among Group 2 patients. Conclusions: Adding of gliclazide to metformin in treatment of patients with T2DM might extend the therapeutic action of metformin in regarding much better controlling of glycemic indices, but, at the same time, it might attenuate the cardioprotective effects of metformin by its adverse influence on serum omentin-1 levels. PMID:27042415

  18. Peginterferon add-on results in more HBsAg decline compared to monotherapy in HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B patients.

    PubMed

    Brouwer, W P; Sonneveld, M J; Xie, Q; Guo, S; Zhang, N; Zeuzem, S; Tabak, F; Zhang, Q; Simon, K; Akarca, U S; Streinu-Cercel, A; Hansen, B E; Janssen, H L A

    2016-06-01

    It is unknown whether peginterferon (PEG-IFN) add-on to entecavir (ETV) leads to more HBsAg decline compared to PEG-IFN monotherapy or combination therapy, and whether ETV therapy may prevent HBsAg increase after PEG-IFN cessation. We performed a post hoc analysis of 396 HBeAg-positive patients treated for 72 weeks with ETV + 24 weeks PEG-IFN add-on from week 24 to 48 (add-on, n = 85), 72 weeks with ETV monotherapy (n = 90), 52 weeks with PEG-IFN monotherapy (n = 111) and 52 weeks PEG-IFN + lamivudine (combination, n = 110) within 2 randomized trials. HBsAg decline was assessed at the end of PEG-IFN (EOP) and 6 months after PEG-IFN (EOF) discontinuation. Differences in baseline characteristics were accounted for using inversed probability of treatment weights. At EOP, a HBsAg reduction of ≥1log10 IU/mL was more frequently achieved for patients in the add-on or combination therapy arms (both 36%), compared to PEG-IFN mono (20%) or ETV (8%) (add-on vs PEG-IFN mono P = 0.050). At EOF, the HBsAg reduction ≥1log10 IU/mL was only sustained in patients treated with ETV consolidation (add-on vs combination and PEG-IFN mono: 40% vs 23% and 18%, P = 0.029 and P = 0.003, respectively). For add-on, combination, PEG-IFN mono and ETV, the mean HBsAg-level change at EOF was -0.84, -0.81, -0.68 and -0.33 log10 IU/mL, respectively (P > 0.05 for PEG-IFN arms). HBeAg loss at EOF was 36%, 31%, 33% and 20%, respectively (P > 0.05). PEG-IFN add-on for 24 weeks results in more on-treatment HBsAg decline than does 52 weeks of PEG-IFN monotherapy. ETV therapy may maintain the HBsAg reduction achieved with PEG-IFN. PMID:26403919

  19. Environmental impact of the use of fly ash and FGD residues in earthworks. Research notes

    SciTech Connect

    Eskola, P.; Mroueh, U.M.

    1998-12-31

    The goal of this project was to assess the environmental impact of using fly ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) residues (produced by pulverized coal-fired power plants which employ semi dry scrubbing technology) in earthworks. The use of fly ash and FGD residues was compared with the use of natural minerals (sand, gravel and macadam) in road construction and clay stabilization. The assessment includes the following environmental effects caused by extraction, production and transportation of raw materials and the road construction process: energy and fuel consumption, consumption of raw materials, emissions into air, leaching of impurities, noise, dust emissions, land use and accident risks. The environmental impacts were assessed for a 1 km long road over a period of 50 years.

  20. [Structure and fluidization of an internally circulating fluidized bed for FGD process].

    PubMed

    Yang, Liuchun; Yang, Wenqi; Tong, Zhiquan

    2003-09-01

    A new internally circulating fluidized bed for FGD process was developed, and different types of top and bottom structures were employed in the experiment to find out the best fluidized bed structure. Fluidizing status, the axial distribution of solid hold-up and the fluid mechanics under cold conditions were investigated. The results indicate that the unit can realize internally circulating of a large number of solid particles which presents an core-annulus structure when the velocity of fluidizing gas was at the range of 2.5 to 5 m/s, and that the solid density in the bed is higher than that in traditional equal diameter fluidized bed, which provide the equipment with potential for application in FGD process. PMID:14719258

  1. Rapid response to methylphenidate as an add-on therapy to mirtazapine in the treatment of major depressive disorder in terminally ill cancer patients: a four-week, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chong Guan; Boks, Marco P M; Roes, Kit C B; Zainal, Nor Zuraida; Sulaiman, Ahmad Hatim; Tan, Seng Beng; de Wit, Niek J

    2014-04-01

    This is a 4 week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to examine the effects of methylphenidate as add-on therapy to mirtazapine compared to placebo for treatment of depression in terminally ill cancer patients. It involved 88 terminally ill cancer patients from University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. They were randomized and treated with either methylphenidate or placebo as add on to mirtazapine. The change in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score from baseline to day 3 was analyzed by linear regression. Changes of MADRS and Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI-S) over 28 days were analyzed using mixed model repeated measures (MMRM). Secondary analysis of MADRS response rates, defined as 50% or more reduction from baseline score. A significantly larger reduction of Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score in the methylphenidate group was observed from day 3 (B=4.14; 95% CI=1.83-6.45). Response rate (defined as 50% or more reduction from baseline MADRS score) in the methylphenidate treated group was superior from day 14. Improvement in Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI-S) was greater in the methylphenidate treated group from day 3 until day 28. The drop-out rates were 52.3% in the methylphenidate group and 59.1% in the placebo group (relative risk=0.86, 95%CI=0.54-1.37) due to cancer progression. Nervous system adverse events were more common in methylphenidate treated subjects (20.5% vs 9.1%, p=0.13). In conclusions, methylphenidate as add on therapy to mirtazapine demonstrated an earlier antidepressant response in terminally ill cancer patients, although at an increased risk of the nervous system side effects. PMID:24503279

  2. Value-Added Products from FGD Sulfite-Rich Scrubber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vivak Malhotra

    2010-01-31

    According to the American Coal Ash Association, about 29.25 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts were produced in the USA in 2003. Out of 29.25 million tons, 17.35 million tons were sulfite-rich scrubber materials. At present, unlike its cousin FGD gypsum, the prospect for effective utilization of sulfite-rich scrubber materials is not bright. In fact, almost 16.9 million tons are leftover every year. In our pursuit to mitigate the liability of sulfite-rich FGD scrubber materials' disposal, we are attempting to develop value-added products that can commercially compete. More specifically, for this Innovative Concept Phase I project, we have the following objectives: to characterize the sulfite-rich scrubber material for toxic metals; to optimize the co-blending and processing of scrubber material and natural byproducts; to formulate and develop structural composites from sulfite-rich scrubber material; and to evaluate the composites' mechanical properties and compare them with current products on the market. After successfully demonstrating the viability of our research, a more comprehensive approach will be proposed to take these value-added materials to fruition.

  3. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Operating Limits if Using an Add-on Control Device for Open Molding Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Operating Limits if Using an Add-on Control Device for Open Molding Operations 4 Table 4 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE...

  4. N-Acetylcysteine in the Treatment of Pediatric Trichotillomania: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Add-On Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloch, Michael H.; Panza, Kaitlyn E.; Grant, Jon E.; Pittenger, Christopher; Leckman, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) for the treatment of pediatric trichotillomania (TTM) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, add-on study. Method: A total of 39 children and adolescents aged 8 to 17 years with pediatric trichotillomania were randomly assigned to receive NAC or matching placebo for 12 weeks. Our primary…

  5. Semi-individualised Chinese medicine treatment as an adjuvant management for diabetic nephropathy: a pilot add-on, randomised, controlled, multicentre, open-label pragmatic clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kam Wa; Ip, Tai Pang; Kwong, Alfred Siu Kei; Lui, Sing Leung; Chan, Gary Chi Wang; Cowling, Benjamin John; Yiu, Wai Han; Wong, Dickson Wai Leong; Liu, Yang; Feng, Yibin; Tan, Kathryn Choon Beng; Chan, Loretta Yuk Yee; Leung, Joseph Chi Kam; Lai, Kar Neng; Tang, Sydney Chi Wai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes mellitus and diabetic nephropathy (DN) are prevalent and costly to manage. DN is the leading cause of end-stage kidney disease. Conventional therapy blocking the renin–angiotensin system has only achieved limited effect in preserving renal function. Recent observational data show that the use of Chinese medicine (CM), a major form of traditional medicine used extensively in Asia, could reduce the risk of end-stage kidney disease. However, existing clinical practice guidelines are weakly evidence-based and the effect of CM remains unclear. This trial explores the effect of an existing integrative Chinese–Western medicine protocol for the management of DN. Objective To optimise parameters and assess the feasibility for a subsequent phase III randomised controlled trial through preliminary evaluation on the effect of an adjuvant semi-individualised CM treatment protocol on patients with type 2 diabetes with stages 2–3 chronic kidney disease and macroalbuminuria. Methods and analysis This is an assessor-blind, add-on, randomised, controlled, parallel, multicentre, open-label pilot pragmatic clinical trial. 148 patients diagnosed with DN will be recruited and randomised 1:1 to a 48-week additional semi-individualised CM treatment programme or standard medical care. Primary end points are the changes in estimated glomerular filtration rate and spot urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio between baseline and treatment end point. Secondary end points include fasting blood glucose, glycated haemoglobin, brain natriuretic peptide, fasting insulin, C peptide, fibroblast growth factor 23, urinary monocyte chemotactic protein-1, cystatin C, nephrin, transforming growth factor-β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor. Adverse events are monitored through self-completed questionnaire and clinical visits. Outcomes will be analysed by regression models. Enrolment started in July 2015. Ethics and registration This protocol is approved by the Institutional

  6. EVALUATION OF A BENCH-SCALE DRY FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEM FOR SCREENING POTENTIAL REAGENTS AND OPERATING CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses two series of bench-scale dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) laboratory tests, the primary objective of which was to evaluate the ability of a bench-scale dry FGD system to screen potential reagents and operating conditions in support of testing at larger pilo...

  7. Microbial communities associated with wet flue gas desulfurization systems

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Bryan P.; Brown, Shannon R.; Senko, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems are employed to remove SOx gasses that are produced by the combustion of coal for electric power generation, and consequently limit acid rain associated with these activities. Wet FGDs represent a physicochemically extreme environment due to the high operating temperatures and total dissolved solids (TDS) of fluids in the interior of the FGD units. Despite the potential importance of microbial activities in the performance and operation of FGD systems, the microbial communities associated with them have not been evaluated. Microbial communities associated with distinct process points of FGD systems at several coal-fired electricity generation facilities were evaluated using culture-dependent and -independent approaches. Due to the high solute concentrations and temperatures in the FGD absorber units, culturable halothermophilic/tolerant bacteria were more abundant in samples collected from within the absorber units than in samples collected from the makeup waters that are used to replenish fluids inside the absorber units. Evaluation of bacterial 16S rRNA genes recovered from scale deposits on the walls of absorber units revealed that the microbial communities associated with these deposits are primarily composed of thermophilic bacterial lineages. These findings suggest that unique microbial communities develop in FGD systems in response to physicochemical characteristics of the different process points within the systems. The activities of the thermophilic microbial communities that develop within scale deposits could play a role in the corrosion of steel structures in FGD systems. PMID:23226147

  8. Microbial communities associated with wet flue gas desulfurization systems.

    PubMed

    Brown, Bryan P; Brown, Shannon R; Senko, John M

    2012-01-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems are employed to remove SO(x) gasses that are produced by the combustion of coal for electric power generation, and consequently limit acid rain associated with these activities. Wet FGDs represent a physicochemically extreme environment due to the high operating temperatures and total dissolved solids (TDS) of fluids in the interior of the FGD units. Despite the potential importance of microbial activities in the performance and operation of FGD systems, the microbial communities associated with them have not been evaluated. Microbial communities associated with distinct process points of FGD systems at several coal-fired electricity generation facilities were evaluated using culture-dependent and -independent approaches. Due to the high solute concentrations and temperatures in the FGD absorber units, culturable halothermophilic/tolerant bacteria were more abundant in samples collected from within the absorber units than in samples collected from the makeup waters that are used to replenish fluids inside the absorber units. Evaluation of bacterial 16S rRNA genes recovered from scale deposits on the walls of absorber units revealed that the microbial communities associated with these deposits are primarily composed of thermophilic bacterial lineages. These findings suggest that unique microbial communities develop in FGD systems in response to physicochemical characteristics of the different process points within the systems. The activities of the thermophilic microbial communities that develop within scale deposits could play a role in the corrosion of steel structures in FGD systems. PMID:23226147

  9. Evaluating the fate of mercury and other metals across the life-cycle stages from the use of FGD gypsum for wallboard production

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2007, 12.3 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum was produced due to air emission controls at coal-fired power plants. With increasing use of wet scrubbers in response to more stringent air pollution control requirements, FGD gypsum production is expected to in...

  10. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Operating Limits if Using an Add-on Control Device for Open Molding Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... be at least 0.007 inch H2O, as established in Method 204 of appendix M to 40 CFR part 51 i... Control Device for Open Molding Operations 4 Table 4 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Limits if Using an Add-on Control Device for Open Molding Operations As specified in §§ 63.5715(a) and...

  11. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Operating Limits if Using an Add-on Control Device for Open Molding Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... be at least 0.007 inch H2O, as established in Method 204 of appendix M to 40 CFR part 51 i... Control Device for Open Molding Operations 4 Table 4 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Limits if Using an Add-on Control Device for Open Molding Operations As specified in §§ 63.5715(a) and...

  12. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Operating Limits if Using an Add-on Control Device for Open Molding Operations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... be at least 0.007 inch H2O, as established in Method 204 of appendix M to 40 CFR part 51 i... Control Device for Open Molding Operations 4 Table 4 to Subpart VVVV of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Limits if Using an Add-on Control Device for Open Molding Operations As specified in §§ 63.5715(a) and...

  13. Add-on mirtazapine improves depressive symptoms in schizophrenia: a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study with an open-label extension phase.

    PubMed

    Terevnikov, Viacheslav; Stenberg, Jan-Henry; Tiihonen, Jari; Joffe, Marina; Burkin, Mark; Tchoukhine, Evgueni; Joffe, Grigori

    2011-04-01

    Depression is common in schizophrenia and worsens its course. The role of antidepressants for schizophrenic depression remains unclear. In this study, the efficacy of add-on mirtazapine on depression in schizophrenia was explored in a subsidiary arm of a recent randomized controlled trial. Patients (n = 41) with chronic but stable schizophrenia and inadequate response to stable doses of different first-generation antipsychotics were treated with add-on mirtazapine 30 mg or placebo during a 6-week double-blind phase and with open-label add-on mirtazapine during a 6-week extension phase. Efficacy measures were the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS) and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale depression item. During the double-blind phase, both measures' scores decreased significantly in the mirtazapine group but not in the placebo group (for the CDSS, 52.0% vs 19.6%, respectively). During the open‐label phase, both groups demonstrated significant improvements. In between‐group comparison, a trend favoring mirtazapine did not reach statistical significance. The changes in the CDSS correlated positively with those in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale negative, positive and total (sub)scales for mirtazapine‐treated patients during the double‐blind phase. Depressed patients with schizophrenia may benefit from mirtazapine–first‐generation antipsychotics combination, with no increased risk for psychosis. However, more studies are needed. PMID:21469215

  14. Recycling flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum for removal of Pb(II) and Cd(II) from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yubo; Li, Qiao; Sun, Xiuyun; Ren, Zhiyuan; He, Fei; Wang, Yalun; Wang, Lianjun

    2015-11-01

    The present study aims to verify the feasibility of directly reusing the flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum generated from coal-fired power plants to adsorptively remove Pb(II) and Cd(II) from wastewater. The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test was conducted to evaluate the leachability of toxic heavy metals from FGD gypsum. The adsorption behaviors of FGD gypsum for Pb(II) and Cd(II) such as pH impact, sorption kinetics, sorption isotherms and sorption thermodynamics were studied in a series of batch experiments. The pH studies indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cd(II) had their best adsorption amounts both at the pH values from 5.0 to 7.0. The kinetic analysis displayed that the adsorption processes both followed the pseudo-second order model well, and the FGD gypsum provided a higher sorption rate for Pb(II). Equilibrium studies showed that the adsorption of Pb(II) and Cd(II) could be properly described by Langmuir isotherms model, and the predicted maximum adsorption capacities were even greater than some specially prepared adsorbents. The thermodynamic investigation confirmed that the removal of Pb(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous medium could carry out spontaneously, and the higher temperature favored the processes. The instrument analysis techniques were also employed to deeply understand the mechanism involved in Pb(II) and Cd(II) removal by FGD gypsum. Overall, good sorption performance together with cost-effective characteristic makes FGD gypsum potentially attractive material for the Pb(II) and Cd(II) removal in industrial wastewater. PMID:26162902

  15. Innovative Clean Coal Technologies (ICCT): Demonstration of innovative applications of technology for cost reductions to the CT-121 FGD process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-15

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate on a commercial scale several innovative applications of cost-reducing technology to the Chiyoda Thoroughbred-121 (CT-121) process. CT-121 is a second generation flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process which is considered by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Southern Company Services (SCS) to be one of the most reliable and lowest cost FGD options for high-sulfur coal-fired utility boiler applications. Demonstrations of the innovative design approaches will further reduce the cost and provide a clear advantage to CT121 relative to competing technology.

  16. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of innovative applications of technology for cost reductions to the CT-121 FGD process

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-15

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate on a commercial scale several innovative applications of cost-reducing technology to the Chiyoda Thoroughbred-121 (CT-121) process. CT-121 is a second generation flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process which is considered by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Southern Company Services (SCS) to be one of the most reliable and lowest cost FGD options for high-sulfur coal-fired utility boiler applications. Demonstrations of the innovative design approaches will further reduce the cost and provide a clear advantage to CT121 relative to competing technology.

  17. [Wet FGD process on rotating-stream-tray tower with magnesium-enhanced lime].

    PubMed

    Sun, W; Wu, Z; Tan, T

    2001-05-01

    Wet flue gas desulfurization(FGD) process with magnesium-enhanced lime slurry was conducted on a rotating-stream-tray tower. Changes of SO2 removal efficiency and slurry pH with time were experimentally determined. Effects of magnesium sulfate concentration were investigated and the lime utilization was calculated according to experimental data. In comparison with lime FGD process, adding magnesium sulfate could effectively enhance SO2 removal efficiency; when the adequate magnesium sulfate concentration was 0.2 mol/L, the removal efficiency was more than 60% with two rotating-stream-trays, while the removal efficiency of lime process was only 45%. To achieve higher SO2 removal efficiency, the slurry pH should be controlled between 6.0 and 7.5. Magnesium sulfate could also promote lime dissolution, slow down descent of slurry pH and increase lime utilization; when magnesium sulfate concentration was 0.2 mol/L, lime utilization could be increased by more than 5 percentage point under adequate conditions. PMID:11507892

  18. Clinical Characteristics and Metabolic Predictors of Rapid Responders to Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitor as an Add-on Therapy to Sulfonylurea and Metformin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ye An; Yoo, Won Sang; Hong, Eun Shil; Ku, Eu Jeong; Park, Kyeong Seon; Lim, Soo; Cho, Young Min; Park, Kyong Soo; Jang, Hak Chul

    2015-01-01

    Background Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor add-on therapy is a new option for patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes who are taking combined metformin and sulfonylurea (SU). We evaluated the efficacy and safety of this triple therapy and the characteristics of rapid responders and hypoglycemia-prone patients. Methods We included 807 patients with type 2 diabetes who were prescribed a newly added DPP-4 inhibitor to ongoing metformin and SU in 2009 to 2011. Glycemia and other metabolic parameters at baseline, 12, 24, and 52 weeks, as well as episodes of hypoglycemia were analyzed. Rapid responders were defined as patients with ≥25% reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) within 12 weeks. Results At baseline, while on the submaximal metformin and SU combination, the mean HbA1c level was 8.4%. Twelve weeks after initiation of DPP-4 inhibitor add-on, 269 patients (34.4%) achieved an HbA1c level ≤7%. Sixty-six patients (8.2%, 47 men) were rapid responders. The duration of diabetes was shorter in rapid responders, and their baseline fasting plasma glucose (FPG), HbA1c, C-peptide, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance were significantly higher. Patients who experienced hypoglycemia after taking DPP-4 inhibitor add-on were more likely to be female, to have a lower body weight and lower triglyceride and FPG levels, and to have higher homeostasis model assessment of β-cells. Conclusion An oral hypoglycemic triple agent combination including a DPP-4 inhibitor was effective in patients with uncontrolled diabetes. Proactive dose reduction of SU should be considered when a DPP-4 inhibitor is added for rapid responders and hypoglycemia-prone patients. PMID:26616595

  19. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors or sodium glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors as an add-on to insulin therapy: A comparative review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    The gradual decline in β-cell function is inevitable in type 2 diabetes mellitus and therefore, substantial proportions of patients require insulin subsequently, in order to achieve optimal glucose control. While weight gain, hypoglycemia, and fluid retention especially during dose intensification is a known limitation to insulin therapy, these adverse effects also reduce patient satisfaction and treatment adherence. It is also possible that the benefits of intensive control achieved by insulin therapy, perhaps get nullified by the weight gain and hypoglycemia. In addition, improvement in plasma glucose or glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) itself is associated with weight gain. Notably, studies have already suggested that reduction in body weight by ~3–5%, may allow a significantly better glycemic control. Thus, a class of drugs, which can reduce HbA1c effectively, yet are weight neutral or preferably reduce body weight, could be the most sought out strategy as an add-on therapy to insulin. While sulfonylureas (SUs) are associated with weight gain and hypoglycemia, pioglitazone increases body weight and fluid retention. Moreover, SUs are not recommended once premix or prandial insulin is commenced. The addition of newer agents, such as glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist to insulin certainly appears to be an effective tool in reducing both HbA1c and body weight as is evident across the studies; however, this approach incurs an additional injection as well as cost. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4I) and sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT-2I) are other exciting options, as an add-on to insulin therapy primarily because these are oral drugs and do not possess any intrinsic potential of hypoglycemia. Furthermore, these are either weight neutral or induce significant weight loss. This review article aims to comparatively analyze the safety and efficacy of DPP-4I and SGLT-2I, as an add-on therapy to insulin. PMID:26904466

  20. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors or sodium glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors as an add-on to insulin therapy: A comparative review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Awadhesh Kumar; Singh, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    The gradual decline in β-cell function is inevitable in type 2 diabetes mellitus and therefore, substantial proportions of patients require insulin subsequently, in order to achieve optimal glucose control. While weight gain, hypoglycemia, and fluid retention especially during dose intensification is a known limitation to insulin therapy, these adverse effects also reduce patient satisfaction and treatment adherence. It is also possible that the benefits of intensive control achieved by insulin therapy, perhaps get nullified by the weight gain and hypoglycemia. In addition, improvement in plasma glucose or glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) itself is associated with weight gain. Notably, studies have already suggested that reduction in body weight by ~3-5%, may allow a significantly better glycemic control. Thus, a class of drugs, which can reduce HbA1c effectively, yet are weight neutral or preferably reduce body weight, could be the most sought out strategy as an add-on therapy to insulin. While sulfonylureas (SUs) are associated with weight gain and hypoglycemia, pioglitazone increases body weight and fluid retention. Moreover, SUs are not recommended once premix or prandial insulin is commenced. The addition of newer agents, such as glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist to insulin certainly appears to be an effective tool in reducing both HbA1c and body weight as is evident across the studies; however, this approach incurs an additional injection as well as cost. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4I) and sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT-2I) are other exciting options, as an add-on to insulin therapy primarily because these are oral drugs and do not possess any intrinsic potential of hypoglycemia. Furthermore, these are either weight neutral or induce significant weight loss. This review article aims to comparatively analyze the safety and efficacy of DPP-4I and SGLT-2I, as an add-on therapy to insulin. PMID:26904466

  1. Effects of biosolids and FGD-gypsum amended soil on metal uptake by lettuce and Edamame soybean and nodules development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biosolids and flue gas desulfurization (FGD)-gypsum amended soils are a rich nutrient source for plant growth and could reduce soil contamination by synthetic fertilizers. According to previous studies, these soil amendments have also enhanced some rhizobacteria (Bradyrhizobium japonicum) in the rh...

  2. POTENTIAL PRODUCTION AND MARKETING OF FGD BYPRODUCT SULFUR AND SULFURIC ACID IN THE U.S. (1983 PROJECTION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report updates to 1983 a 1978-base, computerized marketing evaluation of sulfur and H2SO4 as flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts from U.S. coal-burning power plants. Least-costs of compliance were calculated using comparisons of clean fuel with 50 cents and 70 cents/mil...

  3. PROCEEDINGS: FIRST COMBINED FGD AND DRY SO2 CONTROL SYMPOSIUM. VOLUME 1. SESSIONS 1, 2, 3, AND 4

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document presentations at the First Combined FGD and Dry SO2 Control Symposium, in St. Louis, MO, October 25-28, 1988. The symposium, jointly sponsored by EPA and EPRI, had as its objective the exchange of technical and regulatory information on sulfur oxide contr...

  4. Effects of recycled FGD liner material on water quality and macrophytes of constructed wetlands: a mesocosm experiment.

    PubMed

    Ahn, C; Mitsch, W J; Wolfe, W E

    2001-03-01

    We investigated the use of flue-gas-desulfurization (FGD) by-products from electric power plant wet scrubbers as liners in wetlands constructed to improve water quality. Mesocosm experiments were conducted over two consecutive growing seasons with different phosphorus loadings. Wetland mesocosms using FGD liners retained more total and soluble reactive phosphorus, with lower concentrations in the leachate (first year) and higher concentrations in the surface water (second year). Leachate was higher in conductivity (second year) and pH (both years) in lined mesocosms. Surface outflow did not reveal any significant difference in physicochemical characteristics between lined and unlined mesocosms. There was no significant difference in total biomass production of wetland plants between lined and unlined mesocosms although lower average stem lengths and fewer stems bearing flowers were observed in mesocosms with FGD liners. Potentially phytotoxic boron was significantly higher in the belowground biomass of plants grown in lined mesocosms with low phosphorus loading. A larger-scale, long-term wetland experiment close to full scale is recommended from this two-year mesocosm study to better predict the potentially positive and negative effects of using FGD by-products in constructed wetlands. PMID:11228959

  5. A Single-blind, Placebo-controlled, Dose-ranging Trial of Oral Hepatic-directed Vesicle Insulin Add-on to Oral Antidiabetic Treatment in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Len N.; Schwartz, Sherwyn L.; Lau, John R.; Gana, Theophilus J.

    2014-01-01

    The dose response of postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) to add-on, premeal oral hepatic-directed vesicle-insulin (HDV-I), an investigational lipid bio-nanoparticle hepatocyte-targeted insulin delivery system, was evaluated in a 3-test-meal/day model in type 2 diabetes patients. The single-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalating trial enrolled 6 patients with HbA1c 8.6 ± 2.0% (70.0 ± 21.9 mmol/mol) and on stable metformin therapy. Patients received oral HDV-I capsules daily 30 minutes before breakfast, lunch, and dinner as follows: placebo capsules, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 U/kg on days 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. Outcome measures were PPG and incremental PPG area under the concentration-time curve (AUC). All 4 doses of oral HDV-I statistically significantly lowered mean PPG (P ≤ .0110 each) and incremental PPG (P ≤ .0352 each) AUC compared to placebo. A linear dose response was not observed. The 0.05 U/kg dose was the minimum effective dose in the dosage range studied. Three adverse events unrelated to treatment were observed. Add-on oral HDV-I 0.05-0.4 U/kg significantly lowered PPG excursions and the dose response curve was flat. These results are consistent with the lack of a linear dose response between portal and systemic plasma insulin concentrations in previous animal and human studies. Oral HDV-I was safe and well tolerated. PMID:24876619

  6. Short-term add-on therapy with angiotensin receptor blocker for end-stage inotrope-dependent heart failure patients: B-type natriuretic peptide reduction in a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Marcelo E; Brancalhão, Euler C O; Puig, Raphael S. N.; Vieira, Kelly R N; Cardoso, Juliano N; de Oliveira-Jr, Múcio Tavares; Barretto, Antonio C P

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate angiotensin receptor blocker add-on therapy in patients with low cardiac output during decompensated heart failure. METHODS: We selected patients with decompensated heart failure, low cardiac output, dobutamine dependence, and an ejection fraction <0.45 who were receiving an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. The patients were randomized to losartan or placebo and underwent invasive hemodynamic and B-type natriuretic peptide measurements at baseline and on the seventh day after intervention. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01857999. RESULTS: We studied 10 patients in the losartan group and 11 patients in the placebo group. The patient characteristics were as follows: age 52.7 years, ejection fraction 21.3%, dobutamine infusion 8.5 mcg/kg.min, indexed systemic vascular resistance 1918.0 dynes.sec/cm5.m2, cardiac index 2.8 L/min.m2, and B-type natriuretic peptide 1,403 pg/mL. After 7 days of intervention, there was a 37.4% reduction in the B-type natriuretic peptide levels in the losartan group compared with an 11.9% increase in the placebo group (mean difference, -49.1%; 95% confidence interval: -88.1 to -9.8%, p = 0.018). No significant difference was observed in the hemodynamic measurements. CONCLUSION: Short-term add-on therapy with losartan reduced B-type natriuretic peptide levels in patients hospitalized for decompensated severe heart failure and low cardiac output with inotrope dependence. PMID:24838894

  7. Preparation of pure calcium carbonate by mineral carbonation using industrial byproduct FGD gypsum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, K.; Kim, W.; Bang, J. H.; Park, S.; Jeon, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral carbonation is one of the geological approaches for the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 gas. Its concept is based on the natural weathering processes in which silicate minerals containing divalent cations such as Ca or Mg are carbonated to CaCO3 or MgCO3 in the reaction with CO2gas. Raw materials for the mineral carbonation have been extended to various industrial solid wastes such as steel slag, ashes, or FGD (flue gas desulfurization) gypsum which are rich in divalent cations. These materials have economic advantages when they are produced in CO2 emission sites. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum is such a byproduct obtained in at coal-fired power plants. Recently, we carried out a research on the direct mineral carbonation of FGD gypsum for CO2sequestration. It showed high carbonation reactivity under ambient conditions and the process can be described as follows: CaSO4·2H2O + CO2(g) + 2NH4OH(aq) → CaCO3(s) + (NH4)2SO4(aq) (1) At the early stage of the process, calcium carbonate (CaCO3) exists as a dissolved ion pair during the induction period. High-purity CaCO3 could be precipitated from dissolved calcium carbonate solution extracted during the induction period. The effect of experimental parameters on pure CaCO3 was evaluated: CO2 flow rate (1-3 L/min), ammonia content (4-12%), and solid-to-liquid (S/L) ratio (5-300 g/L). FE-SEM (field-emission scanning electron microscopy) and XRD (X-ray diffraction) study revealed that the precipitated CaCO3 was round-shaped vaterite crystals. The induction time was inversely proportional to the CO2 flow rate and the yield for pure CaCO3 increased with the ammonia content. The formation efficiency for pure CaCO3 decreased with S/L (solid/liquid) ratio. It was 90% (mol/mol) when the S/L ratio was 5 g/L. However, S/L ratio didn't affect the maximum solubility limit of dissolved CaCO3.

  8. Add-on rosiglitazone therapy improves plasminogen activity and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mustaffa, Nazri; Ibrahim, Suhairi; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah; Yusof, Zurkurnai

    2011-09-01

    Rosiglitazone is an oral hypoglycaemic agent of the thiazolidinedione group. This study aimed to assess changes in the diabetic prothrombotic state via plasminogen activity and changes in surrogate markers of atherosclerotic burden via ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) measurements after rosiglitazone was added to a pre-existing type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment regime. A nonblinded interventional study was designed. Fifty-nine patients were enrolled. Rosiglitazone-naïve patients were prescribed oral rosiglitazone 4 mg daily for 10 weeks. ABPI, plasminogen activity, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting lipid profile were measured pretreatment and post-treatment. Forty-eight patients completed the study. At the end of this study, mean plasminogen activity improvement was nearly 16% (P<0.05), mean ABPI improvement was 0.01 (P=0.439), mean HbA1c reduction was 0.51% (P<0.05), mean total cholesterol (TC) increase was 0.36 mmol/l (P<0.05), mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) increase was 0.15 mmol/l (P<0.05) and mean low-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased by 0.19 mmol/l (P=0.098). Rosiglitazone significantly improved plasminogen activity. There was also significant HbA1c reduction, and rise in both TC and HDL-C. Thus, rosiglitazone potentially improves the atherosclerotic burden and prothrombotic state. In future, more studies are needed to confirm the relationship between rosiglitazone, fibrinolytic system and atheromatous reduction in type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:21537159

  9. Value-Added Products From FGD Sulfite-Rich Scrubber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Vivak M. Malhotra

    2006-09-30

    Massive quantities of sulfite-rich flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber materials are produced every year in the USA. In fact, at present, the production of wet sulfite-rich scrubber cake outstrips the production of wet sulfate-rich scrubber cake by about 6 million tons per year. However, most of the utilization focus has centered on FGD gypsum. Therefore, we have recently initiated research on developing new strategies for the economical, but environmentally-sound, utilization of sulfite-rich scrubber material. In this exploratory project (Phase I), we attempted to ascertain whether it is feasible to develop reconstituted wood replacement products from sulfite-rich scrubber material. In pursuit of this goal, we characterized two different wet sulfite-rich scrubber materials, obtained from two power plants burning Midwestern coal, for their suitability for the development of value-added products. The overall strategy adopted was to fabricate composites where the largest ingredient was scrubber material with additional crop materials as additives. Our results suggested that it may be feasible to develop composites with flexural strength as high as 40 MPa (5800 psi) without the addition of external polymers. We also attempted to develop load-bearing composites from scrubber material, natural fibers, and phenolic polymer. The polymer-to-solid ratio was limited to {le} 0.4. The formulated composites showed flexural strengths as high as 73 MPa (10,585 psi). We plan to harness the research outcomes from Phase I to develop parameters required to upscale our value-added products in Phase II.

  10. A heuristic model linking yoga philosophy and self-reflection to examine underlying mechanisms of add-on yoga treatment in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rao, Naren; Menon, Sangeetha

    2016-06-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests efficacy of yoga as add-on treatment for schizophrenia, but the underlying mechanism by which yoga improves the symptoms of schizophrenia is not completely understood. Yoga improves self-reflection in healthy individuals, and self-reflection abnormalities are typically seen in schizophrenia. However, whether yoga treatment improves impairments in self-reflection typically seen in patients with schizophrenia is not examined. This paper discusses the potential mechanism of yoga in the treatment of schizophrenia and proposes a testable hypothesis for further empirical studies. It is proposed that self-reflection abnormalities in schizophrenia improve with yoga and the neurobiological changes associated with this can be examined using empirical behavioural measures and neuroimaging measures such as magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:27310309

  11. Clozapine-associated development of second-onset obsessive compulsive symptoms in schizophrenia: impact of clozapine serum levels and fluvoxamine add-on.

    PubMed

    Gahr, M; Rehbaum, K; Connemann, B J

    2014-05-01

    Among antiserotonergic second generation antipsychotics (SGA), particularly treatment with clozapine (CLZ) is associated with the development of second-onset obsessive compulsive symptoms (OCS) in schizophrenia. However, less is known regarding the factors that increase the individual susceptibility for the development of SGA-associated second-onset OCS in schizophrenia. Here we present the case of a 29-year-old female patient with disorganized schizophrenia who exhibited OCS due to fluvoxamine-induced elevation of CLZ serum levels via inhibition of CYP 1A2 und 2C19. The severity of the observed OCS featured an association with CLZ serum levels. The case illustrates the interaction between fluvoxamine add-on and CLZ serum levels on the development of OCS in schizophrenia and emphasizes the need of regular therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:24846087

  12. Comparative behavioral and neurochemical analysis of phenytoin and valproate treatment on epilepsy induced learning and memory deficit: Search for add on therapy.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Awanish; Goel, Rajesh Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Our previous work demonstrated, chronic epilepsy affects learning and memory of rodents along with peculiar neurochemical changes in discrete brain parts. Most commonly used antiepileptic drugs (phenytoin and sodium valproate) also worsen learning and memory in the patients with epilepsy. Therefore this study was designed to carry out comparison of behavioral and neurochemical changes with phenytoin and sodium valproate treatment in pentylenetetrazole-kindling induced learning and memory deficit to devise add on therapy for this menace. For the experimental epilepsy, animals were kindled using PTZ (35 mg/kg; i.p., at 48 ± 2 h intervals) and successful kindled animals were involved in the study. These kindled animals were treated with saline, phenytoin (30 mg/kg/day, i.p.) and sodium valproate (300 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for 20 days. These animals were challenged with PTZ challenging dose (35 mg/kg) on day 5, 10, 15 and 20 to evaluate the effect on seizure severity score on different days. Effect on learning and memory was evaluated using elevated plus maze and passive shock avoidance paradigm. On day 20, after behavioral evaluations, animals were sacrificed to analyze glutamate, GABA, norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, total nitrite level and acetylcholinesterase level in cortex and hippocampus. Behavioral evaluations suggested that phenytoin and sodium valproate treatment significantly reduced seizure severity in the kindled animals, while sodium valproate treatment controls seizures with least memory deficit in comparison to phenytoin. Neurochemical findings revealed that elevated cortical acetylcholinesterase level could be one of the responsible factors leading to memory deficit in phenytoin treated animals. However sodium valproate treatment reduced cortical acetylcholinesterase level and had least debilitating consequences on memory deficit. Therefore, attenuation of elevated AChE activity can be one of add-on approach for management of memory deficit

  13. Effect of imatinib as add-on therapy on echocardiographic measures of right ventricular function in patients with significant pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Amil M.; Campbell, Patricia; Rocha, Gabriela Querejeta; Peacock, Andrew; Barst, Robyn J.; Quinn, Debbie; Solomon, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Imatinib mesylate, as add-on therapy in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) who remain inadequately treated despite receiving at least two PAH-specific drugs, improves exercise capacity and haemodynamics. We evaluated whether 24 weeks of add-on therapy with imatinib compared with placebo also improves right ventricular (RV) function assessed by echocardiography. Methods and results Echocardiograms were obtained at baseline, 12 weeks, and 24 weeks in 74 patients randomized to imatinib or placebo in the Imatinib in Pulmonary arterial hypertension, a Randomized Efficacy Study (IMPRES) trial. Right ventricular function was assessed by tissue Doppler tricuspid annular peak systolic velocity (TA S′), tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), RV Tei index, and RV fractional area change. Between-treatment-group differences in the changes from baseline to week-24 were assessed using an ANCOVA with the last observation carried forward. At week-24 patients randomized to imatinib demonstrated greater improvements in TA S′ (1.6 ± 2.3 imatinib vs. 0.5 ± 2.4 cm/s placebo, P = 0.007) and RV Tei index (−0.11 ± 0.18 imatinib vs. 0.05 ± 0.18 placebo, P = 0.005) compared with placebo, but not in TAPSE (0.07 ± 0.44 imatinib vs. 0.03 ± 0.32 cm placebo, P = 0.08). Imatinib therapy was also associated with significant reduction in peak tricuspid regurgitation velocity, increase in LV size, and improvement in LV early diastolic relaxation velocity. Conclusions Among patients with advanced PAH who remain symptomatic on at least two PAH-specific drugs, treatment with imatinib compared with placebo is associated with significant improvements in echocardiographic measures of RV function, in addition to LV size and LV early diastolic relaxation. Clinical trial registration NCT00902174 (Clinicaltrials.gov). PMID:24566799

  14. A win/win solution for FGD-gypsum: researches discover beneficial applications for by-product in agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsier, C.; Norton, D.

    2006-07-01

    Research at the Ohio State University and the USDA-ARS National Soil Erosion Research Lab at Purdue University has uncovered some viable new reasons for using FGD-gypsum as a regular part of production agriculture. Work has centered on FGD gypsum or calcium sulfite and to a much lesser extent on fly ash. Researchers have found three agronomically valuable functions of these materials. First, and most obvious, is the fertilizer value of these materials. Gypsum applications to the soil surface provide the rainfall with an alternative source of electrolyte which prevents soil crushing, thus keeping the soil open and permeable to rainwater and air. Gypsum is more effective than liming materials atremediation of sub-soil acidity by detoxifying the excess exchangeable aluminium, which causes low pH. One proven way to sequester carbon is to fix it as organic matter in soil. 90% of the carbon in roots is converted to soil organic matter, whereas 90% of surface residue is oxide and the carbon returned to the atmosphere. Therefore, more carbon is sequestered by increasing root growth. Improved soil water management also reduces nitrous oxide emissions from soils. The utility's world is improved since the highest quality and lowest cost material is generated by an emission control scrubber as FGD-gypsum. There are more than 175 million crop acres in the US alone. Each acre would require 0.5 ton per year to prevent surface sealing. This means that the potential for FGD-gypsum use is more than 80 million tons per year. 4 photos.

  15. 40 CFR 63.3557 - What are the requirements for continuous parameter monitoring system installation, operation, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... capture system and add-on control device operation. (3) You must record the results of each inspection... emission capture system and add-on control device parameter data at all times that a controlled coating... adjustments). (6) You must not use emission capture system or add-on control device parameter data...

  16. 40 CFR 63.3557 - What are the requirements for continuous parameter monitoring system installation, operation, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... capture system and add-on control device operation. (3) You must record the results of each inspection... emission capture system and add-on control device parameter data at all times that a controlled coating... adjustments). (6) You must not use emission capture system or add-on control device parameter data...

  17. Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-wet FGD

    SciTech Connect

    Katherine Dombrowski

    2009-12-31

    This report presents the results of a multi-year test program conducted as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42779, 'Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-wet FGD.' The objective of this program was to determine the level of mercury removal achievable using sorbent injection for a plant firing Texas lignite fuel and equipped with an ESP and wet FGD. The project was primarily funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. EPRI, NRG Texas, Luminant (formerly TXU), and AEP were project co-funders. URS Group was the prime contractor, and Apogee Scientific and ADA-ES were subcontractors. The host site for this program was NRG Texas Limestone Electric Generating Station (LMS) Units 1 and 2, located in Jewett, Texas. The plant fires a blend of Texas lignite and Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Full-scale tests were conducted to evaluate the mercury removal performance of powdered sorbents injected into the flue gas upstream of the ESP (traditional configuration), upstream of the air preheater, and/or between electric fields within the ESP (Toxecon{trademark} II configuration). Phases I through III of the test program, conducted on Unit 1 in 2006-2007, consisted of three short-term parametric test phases followed by a 60-day continuous operation test. Selected mercury sorbents were injected to treat one quarter of the flue gas (e.g., approximately 225 MW equivalence) produced by Limestone Unit 1. Six sorbents and three injection configurations were evaluated and results were used to select the best combination of sorbent (Norit Americas DARCO Hg-LH at 2 lb/Macf) and injection location (upstream of the ESP) for a two-month performance evaluation. A mercury removal rate of 50-70% was targeted for the long-term test. During this continuous-injection test, mercury removal performance and variability were evaluated as the plant operated under normal conditions. Additional evaluations were made to determine any balance

  18. The potential leaching and mobilization of trace elements from FGD-gypsum of a coal-fired power plant under water re-circulation conditions.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Patricia; Castro, Iria; Maroto-Valer, Mercedes; Querol, Xavier

    2015-06-01

    Experimental and geochemical modelling studies were carried out to identify mineral and solid phases containing major, minor, and trace elements and the mechanism of the retention of these elements in Flue Gas Desulphurisation (FGD)-gypsum samples from a coal-fired power plant under filtered water recirculation to the scrubber and forced oxidation conditions. The role of the pH and related environmental factors on the mobility of Li, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Mo, and U from FGD-gypsums for a comprehensive assessment of element leaching behaviour were also carried out. Results show that the extraction rate of the studied elements generally increases with decreasing the pH value of the FGD-gypsum leachates. The increase of the mobility of elements such as U, Se, and As in the FGD-gypsum entails the modification of their aqueous speciation in the leachates; UO2SO4, H2Se, and HAsO2 are the aqueous complexes with the highest activities under acidic conditions. The speciation of Zn, Li, and Ni is not affected in spite of pH changes; these elements occur as free cations and associated to SO4(2) in the FGD-gypsum leachates. The mobility of Cu and Mo decreases by decreasing the pH of the FGD-gypsum leachates, which might be associated to the precipitation of CuSe2 and MoSe2, respectively. Time-of-Flight mass spectrometry of the solid phase combined with geochemical modelling of the aqueous phase has proved useful in understanding the mobility and geochemical behaviour of elements and their partitioning into FGD-gypsum samples. PMID:26040733

  19. Comparative effects of telmisartan and valsartan as add-on agents for hypertensive patients with morning blood pressure insufficiently controlled by amlodipine monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hideaki; Akasaka, Hiroshi; Saitoh, Shigeyuki; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Miura, Tetsuji

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacies of valsartan and telmisartan as add-on agents for the control of morning blood pressure (BP) in patients already on amlodipine monotherapy. A total of 414 hypertensive patients were prospectively enrolled in a 4-week run-in period when they were treated with amlodipine (5 mg/day), and home BP was measured in the morning and evening. Patients with home systolic BP (SBP) being 135-159 mm Hg in the morning at the end of the run-in period were randomized to additional treatment with valsartan (80 mg/day) or with telmisartan (40 mg/day) for 8 weeks. The primary endpoint was the change in morning home BP, and secondary endpoints included variability of morning home BP. Of the 282 patients randomized, 262 patients (n=131, in each treatment) completed the protocols. Demographic parameters and baseline morning SBP/diastolic BP (DBP) (146.3±7.1/84.8±9.3 vs. 146.0±7.1/84.2±9.1 mm Hg) were comparable in the valsartan group and telmisartan group, and changes in SBP/DBP after 8-week treatment were not significantly different between the two groups (-7.4±10.6/-3.9±6.1 vs. -8.3±9.9/-5.0±5.9 mm Hg). Valsartan significantly increased individual standard deviation and variation coefficient of morning SBP, but telmisartan did not change either of these indices of SBP variation. In subgroups with baseline SBP being above the median (145.2 mm Hg), change in DBP was significantly larger by telmisartan than by valsartan (-6.3±5.6 vs. -3.9±6.7 mm Hg, P<0.05). These results suggest that telmisartan is more useful than valsartan as an add-on agent for reducing the level and variability of morning BP in patients on amlodipine monotherapy. PMID:24108237

  20. Objective and subjective sleep quality: Melatonin versus placebo add-on treatment in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder withdrawing from long-term benzodiazepine use.

    PubMed

    Baandrup, Lone; Glenthøj, Birte Yding; Jennum, Poul Jørgen

    2016-06-30

    Benzodiazepines are frequently long-term prescribed for the treatment of patients with severe mental illness. This prescribing practice is problematic because of well-described side effects including risk of dependence. We examined the efficacy of prolonged-release melatonin on objective and subjective sleep quality during benzodiazepine discontinuation and whether sleep variables were associated with benzodiazepine withdrawal. Eligible patients included adults with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or bipolar disorder and long-term use of benzodiazepines in combination with antipsychotics. All participants gradually tapered the use of benzodiazepines after randomization to add-on treatment with melatonin versus placebo. Here we report a subsample of 23 patients undergoing sleep recordings (one-night polysomnography) and 55 patients participating in subjective sleep quality ratings. Melatonin had no effect on objective sleep efficiency, but significantly improved self-reported sleep quality. Reduced benzodiazepine dosage at the 24-week follow-up was associated with a significantly decreased proportion of stage 2 sleep. These results indicate that prolonged-release melatonin has some efficacy for self-reported sleep quality after gradual benzodiazepine dose reduction, and that benzodiazepine discontinuation is not associated with rebound insomnia in medicated patients with severe mental illness. However, these findings were limited by a small sample size and a low retention rate. PMID:27107670

  1. Efficacy of Zinc Sulfate as an Add-on Therapy to Risperidone Versus Risperidone Alone in Patients With Schizophrenia: A Double-Blind Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Mehran; Farzin, Davood; Zarhghami, Mehran; Hosseini, Seyed Hamzeh; Mansoori, Parisa; Nateghi, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Zinc can modulate fast-excitatory transmission, facilitate the release of amino butyric acid and potentiate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. There are also emerging evidences discussing the implication of these neurotransmitters in pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Zn sulfate as an add-on therapy in the treatment of schizophrenia in a 6-week, double-blind and placebo-controlled trial. Patients and Methods: Eligible participants were 30 inpatients with schizophrenia according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria. Patients were randomly allocated into two equal groups; one group of patients received risperidone 6 mg/day plus capsules of Zn sulfate (each containing 50 mg elemental Zn) three times a day and another group received risperidone 6 mg/day plus placebo. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was applied to assess the psychotic symptoms and aggression risk at baseline, week 2, 4, and 6 of the study. Results: The results of this study showed that both protocols significantly decreased the scores on all subscales of the PANSS and supplemental aggression risk subscale as well as PANSS total score over the study. However, this improvement was significantly higher in Zn sulfate receiving group compared to the placebo group. No major clinical side-effects were detected. Conclusions: It may be concluded that Zn is an effective adjuvant agent in the management of patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26576178

  2. Selenium Partitioning and Removal Across a Wet FGD Scrubber at a Coal-Fired Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Senior, Constance L; Tyree, Corey A; Meeks, Noah D; Acharya, Chethan; McCain, Joseph D; Cushing, Kenneth M

    2015-12-15

    Selenium has unique fate and transport through a coal-fired power plant because of high vapor pressures of oxide (SeO2) in flue gas. This study was done at full-scale on a 900 MW coal-fired power plant with electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber. The first objective was to quantify the partitioning of selenium between gas and condensed phases at the scrubber inlet and outlet. The second objective was to determine the effect of scrubber operation conditions (pH, mass transfer, SO2 removal) on Se removal in both particulate and vapor phases. During part of the testing, hydrated lime (calcium hydroxide) was injected upstream of the scrubber. Gas-phase selenium and particulate-bound selenium were measured as a function of particle size at the inlet and outlet of the scrubber. The total (both phases) removal of Se across the scrubber averaged 61%, and was enhanced when hydrated lime sorbent was injected. There was evidence of gas-to-particle conversion of selenium across the scrubber, based on the dependence of selenium concentration on particle diameter downstream of the scrubber and on thermodynamic calculations. PMID:26554426

  3. [Sodium-enhanced limestone wet FGD in rotating-stream tray scrubber].

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenshou; Wu, Zhongbiao; Li, Yue; Tan, Tianen

    2002-09-01

    Adding sodium sulfate to limestone slurry can increase SO2 removal efficiency. In this paper, sodium-enhanced limestone flue gas desulfurization(FGD) tests were conducted in rotating-stream tray scrubber. Changes of SO2 removal efficiency and pH value with time were experimentally studied and, at different pH range, the dissolution rates of limestone etc. were analyzed. The effects of plate number on SO2 removal efficiency and pressure drop were investigated at temperature approximated to industrial operating value. The average plate efficiencies were calculated. According to the experimental results, increasing plate number could increase SO2 removal efficiency, but the average plate efficiency decreased. Under the experimental conditions, when the plate number was increased from 1 to 4, the removal efficiency was increased from 25.5% to 48.6% at the liquid-to-gas ratio of 4 L/m3, but the average plate efficiency was decreased from 25.5% to 15.3%. The equation of the relation between the average plate efficiency and plate number was obtained. PMID:12533938

  4. Comparison of vildagliptin as an add-on therapy and sulfonylurea dose-increasing therapy in patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes using metformin and sulfonylurea (VISUAL study): A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Hong, A Ram; Lee, Jeun; Ku, Eu Jeong; Hwangbo, Yul; Kim, Kyoung Min; Moon, Jae Hoon; Choi, Sung Hee; Jang, Hak Chul; Lim, Soo

    2015-07-01

    The aim of present study is to compare the efficacy and safety of adding vildagliptin with sulfonylurea dose-increasing as an active comparator in patients who had inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using metformin plus sulfonylurea in real clinical practice. Patients using metformin plus sulfonylurea were assigned to either vildagliptin add-on (50 mg twice a day, n=172) or sulfonylurea dose-increasing by 50% (n=172) treatment groups. The primary endpoint was a change in HbA(1c) after 24 weeks. The secondary endpoints were patients achieving HbA(1c)≤7.0% (53 mmol/mol) and changes in the fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h postprandial glucose (2pp), lipid profiles, and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Body weight and hypoglycemia were also investigated. The mean HbA(1c) at baseline was 8.6% (70 mmol/mol) in both groups. At week 24, the adjusted mean HbA(1c) levels decreased by -1.19% (-13.09 mmol/mol) with vildagliptin add-on and -0.46% (-5.06 mmol/mol) with sulfonylurea (P<0.001). Significantly more vildagliptin add-on patients achieved HbA(1c)≤7.0% (53 mmol/mol) than did sulfonylurea patients (40.1% vs. 7.9%; P<0.001). Greater reductions in FPG and 2pp were observed with vildagliptin add-on than with sulfonylurea (P<0.001). The vildagliptin add-on group exhibited no clinically relevant weight gain and had a lower incidence of hypoglycemia compared with the sulfonylurea group. Vildagliptin add-on therapy might be a suitable option for patients with T2DM that is controlled inadequately by metformin and sulfonylurea, based on its greater glucose control and better safety profile (ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT01099137). PMID:26003889

  5. The efficacy and safety of add-on 0.1% brimonidine tartrate preserved with sodium chlorite in on-treatment Japanese normal-tension glaucoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsumura, Toyoaki; Yoshikawa, Keiji; Kimura, Tairo; Suzumura, Hirotaka; Kawashima, Miwako; Nanno, Mami; Ishijima, Kiyotaka; Takeda, Ryuji

    2014-01-01

    Background To evaluate the efficacy and safety of newly formulated brimonidine (0.1% brimonidine tartrate preserved with sodium chlorite: brimonidine) as add-on therapy in on-treatment Japanese normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) patients. Methods Brimonidine was added to on-treatment NTG patients with intraocular pressures (IOP) of between 13 mmHg and 16 mmHg after three consecutive IOP measurements. The time courses of IOP, conjunctival hyperemia, superficial punctate keratitis, and adverse events were examined at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after brimonidine instillation. Results Though 75 of 83 patients (31 males and 52 females; mean age: 63.4±11.6 years) completed the study, six patients discontinued because of side effects and two patients withdrew. The mean IOP after brimonidine addition at week 4 (12.6±1.8 mmHg, P<0.001), week 8 (12.4±1.7 mmHg, P<0.001), and week 12 (12.6±1.8 mmHg, P<0.001) was significantly decreased compared with that before the addition of brimonidine (13.9±1.2 mmHg). No significant changes in superficial punctate keratitis or conjunctival hyperemia scores were observed throughout the study. Dizziness, sleepiness, eye pain, and itching (mild to moderate) were noted in five, four, three, and three patients, respectively. Conclusions The addition of newly formulated brimonidine to on-treatment Japanese NTG patients with IOP of 13–16 mmHg further reduced the levels of IOP with minimal side effects and adverse events. PMID:25214761

  6. N-Acetylcysteine in the Treatment of Pediatric Trichotillomania: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Add-On Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bloch, Michael H.; Panza, Kaitlyn E.; Grant, Jon E.; Pittenger, Christopher; Leckman, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) for the treatment of pediatric trichotillomania (TTM) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, add-on study. Method A total of 39 children and adolescents aged 8 to 17 years with pediatric trichotillomania were randomly assigned to receive NAC or matching placebo for 12 weeks. Our primary outcome was change in severity of hairpulling as measured by the Massachusetts General Hospital–Hairpulling Scale (MGH-HPS). Secondary measures assessed hairpulling severity, automatic versus focused pulling, clinician-rated improvement, and comorbid anxiety and depression. Outcomes were examined using linear mixed models to test the treatment × time interaction in an intention-to-treat population. Results No significant difference between N-acetylcysteine and placebo was found on any of the primary or secondary outcome measures. On several measures of hairpulling, subjects significantly improved with time regardless of treatment assignment. In the NAC group, 25% of subjects were judged as treatment responders, compared to 21% in the placebo group. Conclusions We observed no benefit of NAC for the treatment of children with trichotillomania. Our findings stand in contrast to a previous, similarly designed trial in adults with TTM, which demonstrated a very large, statistically significant benefit of NAC. Based on the differing results of NAC in pediatric and adult TTM populations, the assumption that pharmacological interventions demonstrated to be effective in adults with TTM will be as effective in children, may be inaccurate. This trial highlights the importance of referring children with TTM to appropriate behavioral therapy before initiating pharmacological interventions, as behavioral therapy has demonstrated efficacy in both children and adults with trichotillomania. PMID:23452680

  7. The effect of add-on memantine on global function and quality of life in schizophrenia: A randomized, double-blind, controlled, clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Omranifard, Victoria; Rajabi, Fatemeh; Mohammadian-Sichani, Maryam; Maracy, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Schizophrenia severely influences function and quality of life. The benefit of newer antipsychotics in improving the quality of life in schizophrenia still remains controversial. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effect of memantine on global function and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial on inpatient cases of schizophrenia in Noor University Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. A number of 64 patients were selected through sequential sampling; patients were randomly allocated in intervention and placebo groups. The intervention group was treated with memantine plus previously administered, stabled-dose, atypical antipsychotic, while the control group received placebo plus previously administered, stabled-dose, atypical antipsychotic. Memantine administration was initiated at 5 mg daily; the dosage was increased at weekly intervals by 5 mg and finally up-titrated to 20 mg daily within 4 weeks. All patients were assessed by means of Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) and quality of life scale (QLS) initially and every four weeks to the end of the 12th week. Results: Analysis of baseline GAF and QLS scores showed no significant differences between the two groups (P = 0.081 and P = 0.225, respectively). GAF and QLS scores increased in both groups; but it was higher in the intervention group. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant. (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively) memantine was well tolerated, with no significant side effects. Conclusion: Add-on memantine was significantly effective in improving the global function of patients as well as their quality of life. PMID:26605240

  8. Compact fixed wavelength femtosecond oscillators as an add-on for tunable Ti:sapphire lasers extend the range of applications towards multimodal imaging and optogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakulinen, T.; Klein, J.

    2016-03-01

    Two-photon (2P) microscopy based on tunable Ti:sapphire lasers has become a widespread tool for 3D imaging with sub-cellular resolution in living tissues. In recent years multi-photon microscopy with simpler fixed-wavelength femtosecond oscillators using Yb-doped tungstenates as gain material has raised increasing interest in life-sciences, because these lasers offer one order of magnitude more average power than Ti:sapphire lasers in the wavelength range around 1040 nm: Two-photon (2P) excitation of mainly red or yellow fluorescent dyes and proteins (e.g. YFP, mFruit series) simultaneously has been proven with a single IR laser wavelength. A new approach is to extend the usability of existing tunable Titanium sapphire lasers by adding a fixed IR wavelength with an Yb femtosecond oscillator. By that means a multitude of applications for multimodal imaging and optogenetics can be supported. Furthermore fs Yb-lasers are available with a repetition rate of typically 10 MHz and an average power of typically 5 W resulting in pulse energy of typically 500 nJ, which is comparably high for fs-oscillators. This makes them an ideal tool for two-photon spinning disk laser scanning microscopy and holographic patterning for simultaneous photoactivation of large cell populations. With this work we demonstrate that economical, small-footprint Yb fixed-wavelength lasers can present an interesting add-on to tunable lasers that are commonly used in multiphoton microscopy. The Yb fs-lasers hereby offer higher power for imaging of red fluorescent dyes and proteins, are ideally enhancing existing Ti:sapphire lasers with more power in the IR, and are supporting pulse energy and power hungry applications such as spinning disk microscopy and holographic patterning.

  9. Add-on montelukast in inadequately controlled asthma patients in a 6-month open-label study: the MONtelukast In Chronic Asthma (MONICA) study.

    PubMed

    Virchow, J Christian; Mehta, Anish; Ljungblad, Li; Mitfessel, Harald

    2010-05-01

    Bronchial asthma often remains uncontrolled despite treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), long-acting beta(2)-agonists (LABA) or both, necessitating additional treatment. Patients >or=18 years (n=1681) with mild-to-moderate asthma received oral montelukast 10mg added to ICS or ICS+LABAs, and were followed for 6 months in a prospective, open-label observational study. The primary endpoint was change in Asthma Control Test (ACT) score. Secondary endpoints included mini-Asthma Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (mini-AQLQ) and FEV(1)/PEF. Mean ACT scores improved from 14.6+/-4.6 (baseline) to 19.4+/-4.4 (month 6; p<0.0001). Using ACT score categories, the percentage of patients with uncontrolled (57.5%) or poorly controlled (25.0%) asthma at baseline decreased at month 6 (17.6 and 21.7%, respectively); the percentage of patients with well controlled (13.9%) or completely controlled (1.2%) asthma at baseline increased at month 6 (47.5 and 11.4%, respectively). The mini-AQLQ score (mean+/-SD) improved from 4.0+/-1.1 to 5.3+/-1.1 (p<0.0001); FEV(1) increased from 2.46+/-0.89 to 2.60+/-0.92L (p<0.0001). Treatment with montelukast was generally well tolerated. In patients insufficiently controlled with ICS or ICS+LABAs, daily add-on montelukast improved both asthma control and asthma-related quality of life. Clinicaltrials.gov registry number NCT00802789. PMID:20031382

  10. Utilization of AFBC waste by-product as a FGD sorbent for circulating dry scrubbing

    SciTech Connect

    Neathery, J.K.; Schaefer, J.L.; Stencel, J.M.; Burnett, T.A.; Westmoreland, R.; Norwood, V.M.

    1995-12-31

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is currently interested in finding applications for the spent bed sorbent by-product generated at their 160 MW AFBC facility. Calcium utilization in this by-product is relatively low, having an available alkalinity from 20 to 40 wt%, as Ca(OH){sub 2}, thus, creating a potential disposal problem. It is possible that this byproduct material could be used as a supplemental sorbent in the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) reactor located at the TVA`s Center for Emissions Research in Paducah, Kentucky. GSA technology is a semi-dry, lime based, FGD process that utilizes a circulating bed arrangement for contacting sorbent with SO{sub 2}-laden flue gas under coolside conditions. A pilot-scale fluid bed reactor was modified to simulate a generic circulating dry scrubber (CDS) process similar to the GSA technology.The purpose of this program was to investigate the feasibility of using AFBC waste in conjunction with hydrated lime as a sorbent for the CDS process. An AFBC by-product from the 160 MW plant was pulverized to liberate CaO and slaked along with a fresh lime feedstock. CDS sulfur capture was evaluated with and without chloride addition to the sorbent slurry. Control tests using lime-only feeds were also conducted. In general, the sulfur capture reactivity of the sorbent which included slaked lime/AFBC material was found to be equivalent to or greater than that containing only fresh lime. With a nominal Ca/S ratio of 1.3 (1.0 with fresh lime, 0.3 slaked by-product), the reactor sulfur capture varied between 65 and 90% depending on the specific test conditions. An effective fuel chloride of 0.2 wt% was found to enhance the sulfur capture by as much as 8 to 12%.

  11. 40 CFR 63.4966 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... total regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each regeneration cycle, and the carbon bed temperature after each carbon bed regeneration and cooling cycle, for the regeneration... provisions for the use of an alternative monitoring method as set forth in 40 CFR 63.8(f)....

  12. 40 CFR 63.4767 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each regeneration cycle, and the carbon bed temperature after each carbon bed regeneration and cooling cycle for the regeneration cycle either immediately... are the minimum total desorbing gas mass flow recorded during the regeneration cycle, and the...

  13. 40 CFR 63.3967 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (1) You must monitor and record the total regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each regeneration cycle, and the carbon bed temperature after each carbon bed regeneration and cooling cycle for the regeneration cycle either immediately preceding or immediately following...

  14. 40 CFR 63.3967 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... (1) You must monitor and record the total regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each regeneration cycle, and the carbon bed temperature after each carbon bed regeneration and cooling cycle for the regeneration cycle either immediately preceding or immediately following...

  15. 40 CFR 63.3556 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... must monitor and record the total regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each regeneration cycle, and the carbon bed temperature after each carbon bed regeneration and cooling cycle for the regeneration cycle either immediately preceding or immediately following the...

  16. 40 CFR 63.4567 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each regeneration cycle, and the carbon bed temperature after each carbon bed regeneration and cooling cycle for the regeneration cycle either immediately preceding or... the minimum total desorbing gas mass flow recorded during the regeneration cycle and the...

  17. 40 CFR 63.4167 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each regeneration cycle and the carbon bed temperature after each carbon bed regeneration and cooling cycle for the regeneration cycle either immediately... are the minimum total desorbing gas mass flow recorded during the regeneration cycle and the...

  18. 40 CFR 63.4567 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each regeneration cycle, and the carbon bed temperature after each carbon bed regeneration and cooling cycle for the regeneration cycle either immediately preceding or... the minimum total desorbing gas mass flow recorded during the regeneration cycle and the...

  19. 40 CFR 63.3556 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... must monitor and record the total regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each regeneration cycle, and the carbon bed temperature after each carbon bed regeneration and cooling cycle for the regeneration cycle either immediately preceding or immediately following the...

  20. 40 CFR 63.4167 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... nitrogen) mass flow for each regeneration cycle and the carbon bed temperature after each carbon bed regeneration and cooling cycle for the regeneration cycle either immediately preceding or immediately following... desorbing gas mass flow recorded during the regeneration cycle and the maximum carbon bed...

  1. 40 CFR 63.4767 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and record the total regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each regeneration cycle, and the carbon bed temperature after each carbon bed regeneration and cooling cycle for the regeneration cycle either immediately preceding or immediately following the performance test. (2)...

  2. 40 CFR 63.3546 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... must monitor and record the total regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each regeneration cycle, and the carbon bed temperature after each carbon bed regeneration and cooling cycle for the regeneration cycle either immediately preceding or immediately following the...

  3. 40 CFR 63.3546 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each regeneration cycle, and the carbon bed temperature after each carbon bed regeneration and cooling cycle for the regeneration cycle either immediately... are the minimum total desorbing gas mass flow recorded during the regeneration cycle, and the...

  4. 40 CFR 63.4966 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... total regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each regeneration cycle, and the carbon bed temperature after each carbon bed regeneration and cooling cycle, for the regeneration... provisions for the use of an alternative monitoring method as set forth in 40 CFR 63.8(f)....

  5. 40 CFR 63.3169 - What are the requirements for a capture system or add-on control device which is not taken into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Primer, Primer-Surfacer, Topcoat, Final Repair, Glass Bonding Primer, and Glass Bonding Adhesive Emission... Primer, and Glass Bonding Adhesive Emission Limitations and the Separate Electrodeposition...

  6. 40 CFR 63.3169 - What are the requirements for a capture system or add-on control device which is not taken into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Electrodeposition Primer, Primer-Surfacer, Topcoat, Final Repair, Glass Bonding Primer, and Glass Bonding Adhesive... Primer, and Glass Bonding Adhesive Emission Limitations and the Separate Electrodeposition...

  7. 40 CFR 63.3169 - What are the requirements for a capture system or add-on control device which is not taken into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Electrodeposition Primer, Primer-Surfacer, Topcoat, Final Repair, Glass Bonding Primer, and Glass Bonding Adhesive... Primer, and Glass Bonding Adhesive Emission Limitations and the Separate Electrodeposition...

  8. 40 CFR 63.9324 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... performance test, you must monitor and record the temperature just before the catalyst bed and the temperature difference across the catalyst bed at least once every 15 minutes during each of the three test runs. (2) Use... before the catalyst bed and the average temperature difference across the catalyst bed maintained...

  9. 40 CFR 63.9324 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... performance test, you must monitor and record the temperature just before the catalyst bed and the temperature difference across the catalyst bed at least once every 15 minutes during each of the three test runs. (2) Use... before the catalyst bed and the average temperature difference across the catalyst bed maintained...

  10. 40 CFR 63.9324 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... performance test, you must monitor and record the temperature just before the catalyst bed and the temperature difference across the catalyst bed at least once every 15 minutes during each of the three test runs. (2) Use... before the catalyst bed and the average temperature difference across the catalyst bed maintained...

  11. 40 CFR 63.9324 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... performance test, you must monitor and record the temperature just before the catalyst bed and the temperature difference across the catalyst bed at least once every 15 minutes during each of the three test runs. (2) Use... before the catalyst bed and the average temperature difference across the catalyst bed maintained...

  12. 40 CFR 63.3546 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the performance test, you must monitor and record the combustion temperature at least once every 15 minutes during each of the three test runs. You must monitor the temperature in the firebox of the thermal...) and (4) of this section. (1) During the performance test, you must monitor and record the...

  13. 40 CFR 63.3556 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... this section. (1) During the performance test, you must monitor and record the combustion temperature at least once every 15 minutes during each of the three test runs. You must monitor the temperature...)(1) and (2) or paragraphs (b)(3) and (4) of this section. (1) During the performance test, you...

  14. 40 CFR 63.9324 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and record the combustion temperature at least once every 15 minutes during each of the three test... performance test to calculate and record the average combustion temperature maintained during the performance test. This average combustion temperature is the minimum operating limit for your thermal oxidizer....

  15. 40 CFR 63.3169 - What are the requirements for a capture system or add-on control device which is not taken into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-Surfacer, Topcoat, Final Repair, Glass Bonding Primer, and Glass Bonding Adhesive Emission Limitations § 63... Primer, and Glass Bonding Adhesive Emission Limitations and the Separate Electrodeposition...

  16. 40 CFR 63.3169 - What are the requirements for a capture system or add-on control device which is not taken into...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-Surfacer, Topcoat, Final Repair, Glass Bonding Primer, and Glass Bonding Adhesive Emission Limitations § 63... Primer, and Glass Bonding Adhesive Emission Limitations and the Separate Electrodeposition...

  17. Innovative Clean Coal Technologies (ICCT): Demonstration of innovative applications of technology for cost reductions to the CT-121 FGD process. Quarterly report No. 8, January--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-15

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate on a commercial scale several innovative applications of cost-reducing technology to the Chiyoda Thoroughbred-121 (CT-121) process. CT-121 is a second generation flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process which is considered by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Southern Company Services (SCS) to be one of the most reliable and lowest cost FGD options for high-sulfur coal-fired utility boiler applications. Demonstrations of the innovative design approaches will further reduce the cost and provide a clear advantage to CT121 relative to competing technology.

  18. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of innovative applications of technology for cost reductions to the CT-121 FGD process. Quarterly report No. 7, October--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-15

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate on a commercial scale several innovative applications of cost-reducing technology to the Chiyoda Thoroughbred-121 (CT-121) process. CT-121 is a second generation flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process which is considered by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Southern Company Services (SCS) to be one of the most reliable and lowest cost FGD options for high-sulfur coal-fired utility boiler applications. Demonstrations of the innovative design approaches will further reduce the cost and provide a clear advantage to CT121 relative to competing technology.

  19. Ephedrine as add-on therapy for patients with myasthenia gravis: protocol for a series of randomised, placebo-controlled n-of-1 trials

    PubMed Central

    Vrinten, Charlotte; Lipka, Alexander F; van Zwet, Erik W; Schimmel, Kirsten J M; Cornel, Martina C; Kuijpers, Marja R; Hekster, Yechiel A; Weinreich, Stephanie S; Verschuuren, Jan J G M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Myasthenia gravis (MG), a rare neuromuscular disease, is often initially treated using acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Patients who do not respond adequately depend on the use of corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive medication, but these may have serious side effects. Clinical observations suggest that ephedrine can diminish, postpone or even prevent the need for immunosuppressive therapy when added to acetylcholinesterase inhibitors or low-dose prednisone. In the Netherlands, ephedrine is not licensed for MG nor is reimbursement guaranteed. MG is a rare condition, and ephedrine might be indicated only in a subset of patients. Thus, randomised controlled trials comparing large groups are difficult to conduct. We, therefore, aim to aggregate data from a small series of n-of-1 trials (also known as single patient trials) to assess the effect of ephedrine as add-on treatment for MG. Methods and analysis Single-centre, placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomised, multiple crossover n-of-1 studies in 4 adult patients with generalised MG who show inadequate improvement on pyridostigmine and/or immunosuppressive drugs. Each n-of-1 trial has 3 cycles of two 5-day intervention periods. Treatment: 25 mg ephedrine or placebo, twice daily. Main outcome measure: Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis (QMG) test. Statistical analysis: fixed effects linear model for QMG for all patients combined. Secondary outcome measures: Clinical: effects on MG-Composite and MG-Activities of Daily Living (MG-ADL) scales; QMG at individual level; adverse events. Acceptability of trial design: number of patients eligible and enrolled; number of treatment cycles completed; patients’ and caregivers’ experiences. Ethics and dissemination This study was approved by the Medical Ethics Committee of Leiden University Medical Center, No. P14.108. Results of the trial will be reported in a peer-reviewed publication. Regulatory stakeholders will comment on the suitability of the trial

  20. Correlation between total vitamin D levels and psychotic psychopathology in patients with schizophrenia: therapeutic implications for add-on vitamin D augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Altunsoy, Neslihan; Tikir, Baise; Cingi Külük, Merve; Unal, Kubranur; Goka, Sema; Aydemir, Cigdem; Goka, Erol

    2014-01-01

    episode, significantly different from those in remission. Is vitamin D deficiency the result or the cause of an acute episode? Our results contribute to the idea that vitamin D deficiency and schizophrenia may have interactions with an unknown pathway. Present data points out a possible influence at a genomic level. Future trials may investigate this association with longer follow up. We recommend that, serum vitamin D levels should be measured in patients with schizophrenia especially in long term care. Appropriate further treatment with add-on vitamin D supplements and diets that are rich in vitamin D should be considered. PMID:25489478

  1. The Efficacy of Add-on Telbivudine Versus Switching to Pegylated Interferon Alfa-2a in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients With Poor Responses to Adefovir

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xin; Fan, Chao; Zhou, Yun; Kang, Wenzhen; Wang, Jiuping; Sun, Li; Wang, Linxu; Peng, Meijuan; Lian, Jianqi; Jia, Zhansheng; Hao, Chunqiu

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are limited options for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients who have poor responses to adefovir (ADV). Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of adding on telbivudine (LdT) or switching to pegylated interferon alfa-2a (PEG-IFN-α2a) as alternative rescue therapies for patients with poor responses to the initial ADV treatments. Patients and Methods: Ninety-seven CHB patients with HBV DNA > 2 log10 copies/mL 48 weeks after ADV monotherapy were included in this study. Fifty-nine of these patients were treated with a combination of LdT plus ADV (LdT + ADV) daily, while thirty-eight patients were switched to PEG-IFN-α2a subcutaneous injections weekly for 48 weeks. Results: Both rescue strategies were proven to be safe and the majority of patients tolerated the therapies well. LdT + ADV led to more rapid reductions in viral loads than PEG-IFN-α2a monotherapy, with 2.14 (LdT + ADV) and 0.98 (PEG-IFN-α2a) log10 copies/mL decreases 48 weeks after rescue treatments, respectively (P < 0.00001). The rates corresponding to virological and biochemical responses were also elevated in patients who received the LdT + ADV combination therapy at the end of the observation period (88.1 vs. 68.4% for virological response, P = 0.017; 83.3 vs. 47.2%, P = 0.00045). However, the decline in the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was more pronounced in PEG-IFN-α2a treated patients. Moreover, the cumulative rates of serological responses were higher in patients who switched to the PEG-IFN-α2a therapy. Conclusions: Both add-on LdT and switching to PEG-IFN-α2a were satisfactory and optimal treatments for CHB patients with poor responses to ADV. Both rescue strategies resulted in significant reductions in serum viral load and ALT levels, and were associated with high rate of serological outcomes in our hospital. PMID:27110255

  2. Acarbose improves glycemic control as add-on or monotherapy in Indian type-2 diabetes: Findings from the GlucoVIP multinational observational study

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Elizabeth; Sundaram, Meenakshi L.; Das, Rupam; Chauhan, Sushil Kumar; Deshpande, Sandeep; Ambhore, Sanjay; Rathod, Rahul; Manjrekar, Pravin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the efficacy and tolerability of the anti-diabetic agent acarbose (Glucobay®) as add-on or monotherapy in a range of patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), including those with cardiovascular morbidities in India. Materials and Methods: This was a part of a prospective, non-interventional, non-controlled, multicentre, multinational, observational study. The study included patients of either gender if they were aged at least 18 years and had untreated or pre-treated type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or impaired glucose tolerance and no acarbose treatment within the 3 months before study inclusion. Results: In total, 1996 Indian patients were included in the effectiveness and 2010 in the safety analysis. Patients received acarbose (25-150 mg/day). The mean age of the patients was 50.1 years and the mean BMI was 27.2 kg/m2. Mean 2-h post-prandial plasma glucose (PPG) value and fasting blood glucose (FBG) decreased from 243.9 to 169.5 mg/dl and 158.3 to 120.4 mg/dl, respectively after the last follow-up of 12.4 weeks. The mean HbA1c value at initial visit was 8.4% and was 7.4% at the last follow-up visit. FBG, PPG and HbA1c deceased in 90.6%, 94.4% and 52.4% patients respectively, by the last follow-up visit. The mean decrease in weight and waist circumference was 1.4 kg and 1.6 cm, respectively by the last follow-up visit. Physicians assessed the efficacy of drug as positive response in “very good to good” in 91.08%, “sufficient” in 7.92% and “insufficient” in 0.90% of patients. Also, continuation of Acarbose was reported in 97.09% of patients. Adverse events were reported in 2.74% and drug-related adverse events were reported in 2.19% of patients. Majority of them were gastrointestinal adverse events but were not serious. Conclusion: Acarbose is effective and safe in Indian patients with T2DM. Further, it helps in weight reduction and has very good compliance in patients with T2DM. PMID:24910836

  3. TALEN/CRISPR-mediated eGFP knock-in add-on at the OCT4 locus does not impact differentiation of human embryonic stem cells towards endoderm.

    PubMed

    Krentz, Nicole A J; Nian, Cuilan; Lynn, Francis C

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have great promise as a source of unlimited transplantable cells for regenerative medicine. However, current progress on producing the desired cell type for disease treatment has been limited due to an insufficient understanding of the developmental processes that govern their differentiation, as well as a paucity of tools to systematically study differentiation in the lab. In order to overcome these limitations, cell-type reporter hESC lines will be required. Here we outline two strategies using Transcription Activator Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-Associated protein (Cas) to create OCT4-eGFP knock-in add-on hESC lines. Thirty-one and forty-seven percent of clones were correctly modified using the TALEN and CRISPR-Cas9 systems, respectively. Further analysis of three correctly targeted clones demonstrated that the insertion of eGFP in-frame with OCT4 neither significantly impacted expression from the wild type allele nor did the fusion protein have a dramatically different biological stability. Importantly, the OCT4-eGFP fusion was easily detected using microscopy, flow cytometry and western blotting. The OCT4 reporter lines remained equally competent at producing CXCR4+ definitive endoderm that expressed a panel of endodermal genes. Moreover, the genomic modification did not impact the formation of NKX6.1+/SOX9+ pancreatic progenitor cells following directed differentiation. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate for the first time that CRISPR-Cas9 can be used to modify OCT4 and highlight the feasibility of creating cell-type specific reporter hESC lines utilizing genome-editing tools that facilitate homologous recombination. PMID:25474420

  4. Effect of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product on water quality at an underground coal mine.

    PubMed

    Lamminen, M; Wood, J; Walker, H; Chin, Y P; He, Y; Traina, S J

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a field study was carried out to examine the effect of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product on water quality at an underground coal mine in central-eastern Ohio. Flue gas desulfurizalion by-product was injected into the down-dip portions of the Robert-Dawson mine in an attempt to seal major seeps exiting the mine and to coat exposed pyritic surfaces. Immediately following grout injection, significant increases in acidity, iron, aluminum, sulfur, and calcium were observed at most surface and ground water locations near where grouting was carried out. Following this initial flush of elements, concentrations of most constituents have decreased to near pre-grouting levels. Data from the site and geochemical modeling suggest that an increase in water level or rerouting of drainage flow resulted in the dissolution of iron and aluminum sulfate salts and ferrihydrite. Dissolution of the FGD grout material resulted in increases in calcium and sulfate concentrations in the drainage waters. Water within the mine voids was saturated with respect to calcium sulfate and gypsum immediately following grout injection. Based on an analysis of core samples obtained from the site, acid mine drainage (AMD) was in contact with at least some portions of the grout and this resulted in grout weathering. Subsequent transport of calcium and sulfate to the underclay, perhaps by fracture flow, has resulted in the deposition of gypsum and calcium sulfate solids. PMID:11476516

  5. Failure mode analysis for lime/limestone FGD systems. Volume 3. Plant profiles. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, S.M.; Rosenberg, H.S.; Nilsson, L.I.O.; Oxley, J.H.

    1984-08-01

    Plant profiles are given for the following plants: Tombigbee 2, 3; Apache 2, 3; Cholla 1, 2; Four Corners 1, 2, 3; Laramie River 1; Green 1, 2; Duck Creek 1; Craig 1, 2; Conesville 5, 6; Coal Creek 1, 2; Elrama 1, 2, 3, 4; and Phillips 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. (DLC)

  6. Characterizing mercury emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing a venturi wet FGD system

    SciTech Connect

    Vann Bush, P.; Dismukes, E.B.; Fowler, W.K.

    1995-11-01

    Southern Research Institute (SRI) conducted a test program at a coal-fired utility plant from October 24 to October 29, 1994. The test schedule was chosen to permit us to collect samples during a period of consecutive days with a constant coal source. SRI collected the samples required to measured concentrations of anions and trace elements around two scrubber modules and in the stack. Anions of interest were CI{sup -}, F{sup -}, and SO{sub 4}{sup =}. We analyzed samples for five major elements (Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, and Ti) and 16 trace elements (As, B, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and V). SRI made measurements across two scrubber modules, each treating nominally 20% of the total effluent from the boiler. Across one module we examined the effects of changes in the liquid-to-gas ratio (L/G) on the efficiency with which the scrubber removes trace elements and anions from the flue gas. Across another module we examined the effects of slurry pH on the removal of trace elements and anions from the flue gas. Measurements in the stack quantified emissions rates of anions and trace elements.

  7. PROCEEDINGS: EPA'S (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCIES) INDUSTRY BRIEFING ON THE ORGANIC-ACID-ENHANCED LIMESTONE FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) PROCESS HELD AT SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS ON JULY 19, 1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document presentations made during an EPA-sponsored industry briefing, July 19, 1984, in San Antonio, TX. The briefing dealt with the status of EPA's research activities on the organic-acid-enhanced limestone flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process. Subjects covere...

  8. High volume - high value usage of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The amount of dry FGD materials produced in the U.S. has not been increasing at the high rate originally anticipated. This has been due to a number of economic factors affecting the utility industry. Technologies for the disposal of large amounts of materials are not going to be implemented in the near term. In light of this development the target application for this project is being changed from highwall adit filling to the filling of auger holes to allow for highwall mining. This application focuses on using the dry FGD material to recover coal isolated by excessive augering. It produces 10 or more times the amount of coal per ton of dry FGD utilized than the originally proposed methodology. It also does not require extensive equipment development and, if applied to abandoned mine lands, may have substantially more significant environmental benefit. We also propose to use a spray dryer material for the demonstration instead of the fluidized bed material originally proposed. The spray dryer material is already slacked eliminating problems associated with heat generation at the mine site. Auger hole grouting with FGD material is also best performed by hydraulic emplacement methods.

  9. Elucidation of the mechanism of reaction between S2O8(2-), Selenite and Mn2+ in aqueous solution and limestone-gypsum FGD liquor.

    PubMed

    Akiho, Hiroyuki; Ito, Shigeo; Matsuda, Hiromitsu; Yoshioka, Toshiaki

    2013-10-01

    The mechanism of reaction between peroxodisulfate ion (S2O8(2-)), selenite (Se(IV)O3(2-)) and Mn(2+) as an inhibitor of selenite oxidation was studied using aqueous solutions composed of commercial reagents, as well as limestone-gypsum flue gas desulfurization (FGD) liquors sampled from coal fired power plants. The oxidation of selenite to selenate (Se(VI)O4(2-)) is promoted by the sulfate ion radical (SO4(-)) which results from decomposition of S2O8(2-). In the presence of Mn(2+), selenite oxidation was prevented due to the difference in rates of reaction with SO4(-). The ratio of the oxidation rate constants of selenite and Mn(2+) with SO4(-) was determined over a temperature range of 40-60 °C, and was found to be little influenced by the various coexisting components in FGD liquors. PMID:24015970

  10. High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines - Phase I: Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This project proposes to use pneumatically or hydraulically emplaced dry-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products to backfill the adits left by highwall mining. Backfilling highwall mine adits with dry-FGD materials is technically attractive. The use of an active highwall mine would allow the dry-FGD material to be brought in using the same transportation network used to move the coal out, eliminating the need to recreated the transportation infrastructure, thereby saving costs. Activities during the period included the negotiations leading to the final cooperative agreement for the project and the implementation of the necessary instruments at the University of Kentucky to administer the project. Early in the negotiations, a final agreement on a task structure was reached and a milestone plan was filed. A review was initiated of the original laboratory plan as presented in the proposal, and tentative modifications were developed. Selection of a mine site was made early; the Pleasant Valley mine in Greenup County was chosen. Several visits were made to the mine site to begin work on the hydrologic monitoring plan. The investigation of the types of permits needed to conduct the project was initiated. Considerations concerning the acceptance and implementation of technologies led to the choice of circulating fluidized bed ash as the primary material for the study. Finally, the membership of a Technical Advisory Committee for the study was assembled.

  11. Non-synonymous FGD3 Variant as Positional Candidate for Disproportional Tall Stature Accounting for a Carcass Weight QTL (CW-3) and Skeletal Dysplasia in Japanese Black Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Takasuga, Akiko; Sato, Kunio; Nakamura, Ryouichi; Saito, Yosuke; Sasaki, Shinji; Tsuji, Takehito; Suzuki, Akio; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Matsuhashi, Tamako; Setoguchi, Koji; Okabe, Hiroshi; Ootsubo, Toshitake; Tabuchi, Ichiro; Fujita, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Naoto; Hirano, Takashi; Nishimura, Shota; Watanabe, Toshio; Hayakawa, Makio; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Kojima, Takatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Recessive skeletal dysplasia, characterized by joint- and/or hip bone-enlargement, was mapped within the critical region for a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) influencing carcass weight; previously named CW-3 in Japanese Black cattle. The risk allele was on the same chromosome as the Q allele that increases carcass weight. Phenotypic characterization revealed that the risk allele causes disproportional tall stature and bone size that increases carcass weight in heterozygous individuals but causes disproportionately narrow chest width in homozygotes. A non-synonymous variant of FGD3 was identified as a positional candidate quantitative trait nucleotide (QTN) and the corresponding mutant protein showed reduced activity as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42. FGD3 is expressed in the growth plate cartilage of femurs from bovine and mouse. Thus, loss of FDG3 activity may lead to subsequent loss of Cdc42 function. This would be consistent with the columnar disorganization of proliferating chondrocytes in chondrocyte-specific inactivated Cdc42 mutant mice. This is the first report showing association of FGD3 with skeletal dysplasia. PMID:26306008

  12. NID dry desulfurization system -- An update

    SciTech Connect

    Ahman, S.; Bengtsson, S.

    1998-07-01

    The development of ABB's low cost flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system has been reported in various papers during 1997. The system combines low cost and simple operation with very good performance and is targeted especially for the emerging markets in Asia and East Europe. This method is capable of achieving 90+% SO{sub 2} removal, irrespective of sulphur content in the fuel. The system is further easy to retrofit at existing sites; it has a minimum space requirement. An important feature of the dry FGD technology, sometimes not highlighted enough, is the fact that particulate collection of fly ash is facilitated by the FGD system at no extra capital charge. The flue gas temperature after a DFGD system also often allows the flue gas to be passed on to an existing stack without reheat. ``NID'' is an acronym for ``Novel Integrated Desulfurization'', indicative of the innovative nature of this FGD technology enabled by the integration of several subfunctionalities into one unit. The first two commercial plants were installed by the Polish power company Elektrownia Laziska. These full scale units were commissioned during 1996. A third unit at a diesel power station in Finland is at the time of writing in the commissioning stage.

  13. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Operating Limits if Using the Emission Rate With Add-On Controls Option

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each carbon bed regeneration cycle must not... appendix M to 40 CFR part 51 i. See items 6.a.i and 6.a.ii. 7. Emission capture system that is not a PTE...); and i. Measuring the total regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for...

  14. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Pppp of... - Operating Limits if Using the Emission Rate With Add-On Controls Option

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each carbon bed regeneration cycle must not... Method 204 of appendix M to 40 CFR part 51. i. See items 6.a.i and 6.a.ii. 7. Emission capture system...); and i. Measuring the total regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for...

  15. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Operating Limits if Using the Emission Rate With Add-On Controls Option

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each carbon bed regeneration cycle must not... appendix M to 40 CFR part 51 i. See items 6.a.i and 6.a.ii. 7. Emission capture system that is not a PTE...); and i. Measuring the total regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for...

  16. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Pppp of... - Operating Limits if Using the Emission Rate With Add-On Controls Option

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each carbon bed regeneration cycle must not... Method 204 of appendix M to 40 CFR part 51. i. See items 6.a.i and 6.a.ii. 7. Emission capture system...); and i. Measuring the total regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for...

  17. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Pppp of... - Operating Limits if Using the Emission Rate With Add-On Controls Option

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each carbon bed regeneration cycle must not... Method 204 of appendix M to 40 CFR part 51. i. See items 6.a.i and 6.a.ii. 7. Emission capture system...); and i. Measuring the total regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for...

  18. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Pppp of... - Operating Limits if Using the Emission Rate With Add-On Controls Option

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each carbon bed regeneration cycle must not... Method 204 of appendix M to 40 CFR part 51. i. See items 6.a.i and 6.a.ii. 7. Emission capture system...); and i. Measuring the total regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for...

  19. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Pppp of... - Operating Limits if Using the Emission Rate With Add-On Controls Option

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Method 204 of appendix M to 40 CFR part 51. i. See items 6.a.i and 6.a.ii. 7. Emission capture system... practicable consistent with the manufacturer's recommendations. 3. Regenerative carbon adsorber a. The total regeneration desorbing gas (e.g., steam or nitrogen) mass flow for each carbon bed regeneration cycle must...

  20. SURVEY OF DRY SO2 CONTROL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an assessment of the status of dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes in the U.S. for both industrial and utility applications. The assessment is based on reviews of past and current research, development, and commercial activities. Systems cover...

  1. Characteristics of fly ash from the dry flue gas desulfurization system for iron ore sintering plants.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Guanghong; Huang, Peng; Mou, Yaqin; Zhou, Chenhui

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of fly ash from the flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system are important for its reuse and are mainly depend on the desulfurization process. The physical and chemical properties of DSF ash, which refers to fly ash from the dry FGD system for the iron ore sintering process, were investigated. Its mineralogical contents were determined by X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetry analysis, and its micro-morphology was studied by scanning electric micrograph analysis. The results show that DSF ash has a higher CaO and SO3 content, and the main sulfur form is sulfite, with only a part of it oxidized to sulfate. The major minerals present in DSF ash are hannebachite, anhydrite, calcite and portlandite; a minor constituent is calcium chloride. The particles of DSF ash are irregular, fragmentary and small, and hannebachite grows on their surfaces. Particle size is affected by the FGD process, and the ash size from the maximized emission reduction of the sintering-FGD process is lower than that from the circulating fluidized bed-FGD process. The particle size distribution of DSF ash follows the Rosin--Rammler-Bennet equation. PMID:22720407

  2. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 4, A laboratory study conducted in fulfillment of Phase 2, Objective 1 titled. Inhibition of acid production in coal refuse amended with calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate - containing FGD solids

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y. L.; Dick, W. A.; Stehouwer, R. C.; Bigham, J. M.

    1998-06-30

    Control of S02 emission from coal combustion requires desulfurization of coal before its combustion to produce coal refuse. Alternatively, gaseous emissions from coal combustion may be scrubbed to yield flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products that include calcium sulfite (CaSO3∙0.5H2O or simply CaS03). Acid production in coal refuse due to pyrite oxidation and disposal of large amounts of FGD can cause environmental degradation. Addition of CaS03 and CaS03-containing FGD to coal refuse may reduce the amounts of oxygen and ferric ion available to oxidize pyrite because the sulfite moiety in CaS03 is a strong reductant and thus may mitigate acid production in coal refuse. In Chapter 1, it was shown that CaS03 efficiently scavenged dissolved oxygen and ferric ion in water under the conditions commonly encountered in a coal refuse disposal environment. In the presence ofCaS03, the concentration of dissolved oxygen in water exposed to the atmosphere declined to below 0.01 mg L"1 at pH <8.0. In Chapter 2, it was demonstrated that CaS03 prevented a pH drop in coal refuse slurry when 0.2 gCaS03 was added to a 2% fresh coal refuse slurry every three days. Calcium sulfite also inhibited acid leaching from fresh coal refuse in bench-scale columns under controlled conditions. During the initial 13 weeks of leaching, the total amounts of titratable acidity, soluble H\\ Fe, and Al from CaS03-treated refuse (6.4 gin 50 g fresh coal refuse) were only 26%,10%, 32%, and 39% of those of the control columns, respectively. A combination of CaS03 with CaC03 or fly ash enhanced the inhibitory effect of CaS03 on acid leaching. Calcium sulfite-containing FGD which combined CaS03, CaC03, fly ash, and gypsum showed a much stronger inhibitory effect on acid leaching than CaS03 alone. This

  3. Low-dose add-on memantine treatment may improve cognitive performance and self-reported health conditions in opioid-dependent patients undergoing methadone-maintenance-therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Po See; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, I. Hui; Chen, Kao Chin; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2015-01-01

    An important interaction between opioid and dopamine systems has been indicated, and using opioids may negatively affect cognitive functioning. Memantine, a medication for Alzheimer's disease, increasingly is being used for several disorders and maybe important for cognitive improvement. Opioid-dependent patients undergoing methadone-maintenance-therapy (MMT) and healthy controls (HCs) were recruited. Patients randomly assigned to the experimental (5 mg/day memantine (MMT+M) or placebo (MMT+P) group: 57 in MMT+M, 77 in MMT+P. Those completed the cognitive tasks at the baseline and after the 12-week treatment were analyzed. Thirty-seven age- and gender-matched HCs, and 42 MMT+P and 39 MMT+M patients were compared. The dropout rates were 49.4% in the MMT+P and 26.3% in the MMT+M. Both patient groups' cognitive performances were significantly worse than that of the HCs. After the treatment, both patient groups showed improved cognitive performance. We also found an interaction between the patient groups and time which indicated that the MMT+M group's post-treatment improvement was better than that of the MMT+P group. Memantine, previously reported as neuroprotective may attenuate chronic opioid-dependence-induced cognitive decline. Using such low dose of memantine as adjuvant treatment for improving cognitive performance in opioid dependents; the dose of memantine might be a worthy topic in future studies. PMID:25989606

  4. Lactic acid FGD additives from sugar beet wastewater. Semi-annual report, January 1--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1997-12-31

    Organic buffers maintain the pH of the scrubber slurry in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) as the SO{sub 2} dissolves at the air-liquid interface. Inexpensive acids with an appropriate pKa are required for this application. The pKa of lactic acid (3.86) is between that of the interface and the recirculating slurry and will make soluble calcium ion available in large amounts. Currently, lactic acid is somewhat expensive for this use, but the proposed work will develop a new source of inexpensive lactate. The project objective is to evaluate two novel methods for recovering and processing the lactic and other volatile acid by-products produced during the processing of sugar beets. These methods are (1) freeze crystallization concentration of lactic acid and (2) ion exchange of lactate with recovery as the ester. In the first quarter, bench-scale testing of the freeze crystallization concept will be performed at B.C. Technologies using its freeze-thaw simulation method, and analysis of the recovered fractions will be performed at the EERC. B.C. Technologies has a low-cost technology utilizing ambient winter conditions. The goal of this effort is to increase the concentration of lactic acid or the calcium salt from 1--10% or higher in the brine or concentrate fraction.

  5. 12-Week, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Add-on Riluzole in the Treatment of Childhood-Onset Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Paul J; Joseph, Lisa A; Farmer, Cristan A; Luckenbaugh, David A; Lougee, Lorraine C; Zarate, Carlos A; Swedo, Susan E

    2014-01-01

    Many children with childhood-onset obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) fail to respond adequately to standard therapies. Evidence from preclinical and clinical studies suggests that the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system might be an alternative treatment target. This study examined the efficacy of riluzole, a glutamatergic modulator, as an adjunctive therapy for children with treatment-resistant OCD. In a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 60 treatment-resistant children and adolescents (mean age=14.5±2.4 years), with moderate to severe OCD (mean Children's Yale-Brown Obsessive–Compulsive Scale (CY-BOCS)=28.2±3.7), 17 of whom also had concomitant autism spectrum disorder, were randomized to receive riluzole (final dose of 100 mg/day) or placebo in addition to the existing treatment regimen. Fifty-nine subjects completed the randomized trial. Primary outcome measures were changes on the CY-BOCS, the Clinical Global Impressions Scale, and the Children's Global Assessment Scale. Riluzole was fairly well tolerated, although it was associated with one case of pancreatitis and five instances of slight increases in transaminases. All subjects showed significant reductions in CY-BOCS scores during treatment; however, there was no significant difference between placebo and riluzole on any of the primary or secondary outcome measures. The study failed to demonstrate superiority of riluzole over placebo as an adjunctive treatment for children with childhood-onset OCD. However, future studies may show benefits for less treatment-refractory children with fewer concomitant medications. PMID:24356715

  6. FIELD EVALUATION OF A UTILITY DRY SCRUBBING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the first independent evaluation of a full-scale utility spray-dryer/baghouse dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. The system treats flue gas from a nominal 100 MW of coal-fired power generation. The test program, conducted during July-October 19...

  7. Add-On Shielding for Unshielded Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, J. C.; Billitti, J. W.; Tallon, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Fabrication sequence used to produce compact shields slipped into place from free ends of wires already soldered into connectors at other ends. Single shields are formed into harnesses by connecting grounding jumpers. Technique is especially useful for small diameter wire attached to microminiature connectors.

  8. Investigation of transport process involved in FGD. Final technical report for the third year, September 1992--August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kadambi, J.R.; Kadaba, V.; Yurteri, C.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the work done in the third year of the project {open_quotes}Investigation of Transport Processes Involved in FGD{close_quotes}. The objectives of this five year plan of study is to experimentally obtain a basic understanding of (1) turbulent flow structure of the mixing zone and its influence on particle dispersion, (2) the effect of particle loading on turbulent properties and mixing, (3) the effect of jet entrainment, (4) water spray-sorbent interaction, sorbent wetting and mixing, (5) investigate the flow field where certain ratios of jet velocity to flue gas velocity result in regions of negative flow and define onset of negative flow (6) sorbent reactivity in mixing zone and (7) effect of particle agglomeration. In the first two years of the project a sorbent injection facility which can simulate the conditions encountered in COOLSIDE set up was designed and built. Non-intrusive laser based diagnostic tools PDA/LDA was used for flow characterization of particle laden jet in cocurrent flows. All tasks for third year were addressed. The accomplishments for the third year include the following. For the investigation of Lime Laden Jet Flow, since no existing technique was capable of providing the simultaneous measurement of irregular shaped particle size and velocity, a new technique, TTLDV which utilizes the transit time in LDV measurement volume and the LDV velocity measurements to obtain simultaneous particle size and velocity measurements was developed. Better Sorbent Injection Methods and Optimized Injection Schemse were investigated. Progress was made in the development of Technique to Study Particulate Droplet Interactions, the task was not completed because of difficulties encountered due to differences in the refractive index of glass beads and water droplets. The investigations of flow reversal resulting from spray jet cocurrent flow interactions was completed.

  9. Evaluation of pitting corrosion resistance of high-alloyed stainless steels welds for FGD plants in Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, K.K.; Sung, H.J.; Im, C.S.; Hong, I.P.; Kim, D.K.

    1998-12-31

    For successful application of high-alloyed stainless steels for Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) plants, pitting corrosion resistance of arc welds of N-added 6%Mo austenitic stainless steels (UNS N 08367) and super duplex stainless steels (UNS S 32550) made with various filler metals were evaluated using the Green Death solution. For Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) and Gas Metal Arc (GMA) welds of N 08367, Critical Pitting Temperature (CPT) of base metal was 65--70 C, whereas weld made by ERNiCrMo-3 filler metal yielded CPT of 50 C. Welds made by ERNiCrMo-10 or ERNiCrMo-4 filler metals showed CPT of 60--65 C and 65--70C, respectively. For GTA and GMA welds of S 32550, CPT of welds made by ERNiCrMo-3 was 45--50 C, indicating that the filler metal can provide pitting corrosion resistance matching the S 32550 alloy. Thus, a proper pitting corrosion resistance of weldments of high-alloy stainless steels can be achieved by selecting filler metals having at least +10 higher Pitting Resistance Equivalent Number (PRE{sub N}) value than the base metal regardless of the type of arc welding process. The over-alloyed filler metals would compensate preferential segregation of Cr, MO along the dendrite boundary, which made the dendrite core more susceptible to pitting. Nitrogen addition to the GTA welds of N 08367 made with ERNiCrMo-3 failed to improve pitting corrosion resistance, which was attributed to the precipitation of nitrogen in the weld metal in the form of Nb-nitride.

  10. Industry-Government-University Cooperative Research Program for the Development of Structural Materials from Sulfate-Rich FGD Scrubber Sludge

    SciTech Connect

    V. M. Malhotra; Y. P. Chugh

    2003-08-31

    The main aim of our project was to develop technology, which converts flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sulfate-rich scrubber sludge into value-added decorative materials. Specifically, we were to establish technology for fabricating cost effective but marketable materials, like countertops and decorative tiles from the sludge. In addition, we were to explore the feasibility of forming siding material from the sludge. At the end of the project, we were to establish the potential of our products by generating 64 countertop pieces and 64 tiles of various colors. In pursuit of our above-mentioned goals, we conducted Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements of the binders and co-processed binders to identify their curing behavior. Using our 6-inch x 6-inch and 4-inch x 4-inch high pressure and high temperature hardened stainless steel dies, we developed procedures to fabricate countertop and decorative tile materials. The composites, fabricated from sulfate-rich scrubber sludge, were subjected to mechanical tests using a three-point bending machine and a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA). We compared our material's mechanical performance against commercially obtained countertops. We successfully established the procedures for the development of countertop and tile composites from scrubber sludge by mounting our materials on commercial boards. We fabricated more than 64 pieces of countertop material in at least 11 different colors having different patterns. In addition, more than 100 tiles in six different colors were fabricated. We also developed procedures by which the fabrication waste, up to 30-weight %, could be recycled in the manufacturing of our countertops and decorative tiles. Our experimental results indicated that our countertops had mechanical strength, which was comparable to high-end commercial countertop materials and contained substantially larger inorganic content than the commercial products. Our moisture

  11. Production of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from FGD waste liquors. Quarterly technical report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, A.D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Unrau, E.

    1994-12-31

    During this quarterly period, an experimental investigation was performed to study the precipitation kinetics and hydrolysis characteristics of calcium imido disulfonate crystals (CaADS). The CaADS crystals were precipitated by a metathetical reaction of lime, supplied by Dravo Lime Co., with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber waste liquor. Before approaching for the continuous Double Draw-Off (DDO) crystallization studies, the influence of a Dravo lime slurry on the precipitation characteristics of N-S compounds will be established. A series of N-S compound batch crystallization studies were completed in a wide range of pH (7.0--9.0), and the influence of pH on the amount of lime required, as well as the amount of precipitate obtained, was investigated. Although the amount of precipitate increased with increase in solution pH, the safe or optimum pH for the precipitation of CaADS lies in the vicinity of 8.2 to 8.3. For studying the crystallization characteristics of CaADS crystals, a bench scale 7.0 liter DDO crystallizer was built. DDO crystallizer is found to be superior compared to Mixed Suspension Mixed Product Removal (MSMPR) crystallizer. The precipitated crystals were analyzed for elemental composition by chemical analysis. The crystals were also examined under optical microscope for their morphological features. The present studies confirmed our prediction that N-S compounds in the waste liquor can be precipitated by a reaction with lime slurry. The precipitated crystals were mostly calcium imido disulfonate.

  12. FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION INFORMATION SYSTEM (FGDIS) DATA BASE USER'S MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is a user's manual and reference book/primer for Flue Gas Desulfurization Information System (FGDIS) users and recipients of the quarterly Utility FGD Survey. Part I, interactive computer procedures for the FGDIS, addresses the use of and terminology related to the u...

  13. SECOND SURVEY OF DRY SO2 CONTROL SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is an updated assessment of dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems that reviews current and recently completed research, development, and commercial activities in the U.S. since October 1979, including: (1) spray dryers with a fabric filter or an electrostatic prec...

  14. 40 CFR 63.3168 - What are the requirements for continuous parameter monitoring system installation, operation, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the emission capture system and add-on control device operation. (3) You must record the results of... operate the CPMS and collect emission capture system and add-on control device parameter data at all times... checks and required zero and span adjustments). (6) You must not use emission capture system or...

  15. 40 CFR 63.3557 - What are the requirements for continuous parameter monitoring system installation, operation, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the average of all recorded readings for each successive 3-hour period of the emission capture system... emission capture system and add-on control device parameter data at all times that a controlled coating... adjustments). (6) You must not use emission capture system or add-on control device parameter data...

  16. 40 CFR 63.3547 - What are the requirements for continuous parameter monitoring system installation, operation, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the average of all recorded readings for each successive 3-hour period of the emission capture system... emission capture system and add-on control device parameter data at all times that a controlled coating... adjustments). (6) You must not use emission capture system or add-on control device parameter data...

  17. 40 CFR 63.3547 - What are the requirements for continuous parameter monitoring system installation, operation, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the average of all recorded readings for each successive 3-hour period of the emission capture system... emission capture system and add-on control device parameter data at all times that a controlled coating... adjustments). (6) You must not use emission capture system or add-on control device parameter data...

  18. THE USE OF PH AND CHLORIDE ELECTRODES FOR THE AUTOMATIC CONTROL OF FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to determine the applicability of chloride and pH electrodes in automated control systems. It included a survey of chloride and pH electrodes in different flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems and an evaluation of an industrial pH electrode sy...

  19. EVALUATION OF DRY SORBENTS AND FABRIC FILTRATION FOR FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to assess the use of baghouses (fabric filtration) to control air pollutant emissions (particularly SOx) from large utility combustion sources. The assessment included sorbent costs, and system capital, operating, and disposal costs. SO2 would ...

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A MATHEMATICAL BASIS FOR RELATING SLUDGE PROPERTIES TO FGD-SCRUBBER OPERATING VARIABLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of research to investigate prospects for increasing the size of calcium sulfite sludge particles in flue gas desulfurization systems. The approach included four work packages: a literature survey and development of a mathematical basis for predicting calc...

  1. Effects of fluidized gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum on non-target freshwater and sediment dwelling organims

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fluidized gas desulfurization gypsum is a popular agricultural soil amendment used to increase calcium and sulfur contents, and reduce aluminum toxicity. Due to its surface application in conservation tillage systems and high solubility, the soluble components of gypsum may be transferred with agri...

  2. EPA UTILITY FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) SURVEY: DECEMBER 1978-JANUARY 1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is the first in a series generated by a new computerized data base system and the first full compilation (not a supplement) since the December 1977-January 1978 report. Because the next three reports are to be supplements, this issue should be retained for reference th...

  3. EPA UTILITY FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) SURVEY: APRIL-JUNE 1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is the third in a series of four issues generated by a new computerized data base system. This is an updated supplement to the December 1978-January 1979 report (EPA-600/7-79-022c) and should be used in conjunction with it. This report differs from those of the previo...

  4. Add-on prolonged-release melatonin for cognitive function and sleep in mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease: a 6-month, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Alan G; Farmer, Mildred; Harari, Gil; Fund, Naama; Laudon, Moshe; Nir, Tali; Frydman-Marom, Anat; Zisapel, Nava

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A link between poor sleep quality and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has recently been suggested. Since endogenous melatonin levels are already reduced at preclinical AD stages, it is important to ask whether replenishing the missing hormone would be beneficial in AD and whether any such effects would be related to the presence of sleep disorder in patients. Patients and methods The effects of add-on prolonged-release melatonin (PRM) (2 mg) to standard therapy on cognitive functioning and sleep were investigated in 80 patients (men [50.7%], women [49.3%], average age 75.3 years [range, 52–85 years]) diagnosed with mild to moderate AD, with and without insomnia comorbidity, and receiving standard therapy (acetylcholinesterase inhibitors with or without memantine). In this randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study, patients were treated for 2 weeks with placebo and then randomized (1:1) to receive 2 mg of PRM or placebo nightly for 24 weeks, followed by 2 weeks placebo. The AD Assessment Scale–Cognition (ADAS-Cog), Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL), Mini–Mental State Examination (MMSE), sleep, as assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and a daily sleep diary, and safety parameters were measured. Results Patients treated with PRM (24 weeks) had significantly better cognitive performance than those treated with placebo, as measured by the IADL (P=0.004) and MMSE (P=0.044). Mean ADAS-Cog did not differ between the groups. Sleep efficiency, as measured by the PSQI, component 4, was also better with PRM (P=0.017). In the comorbid insomnia (PSQI ≥6) subgroup, PRM treatment resulted in significant and clinically meaningful effects versus the placebo, in mean IADL (P=0.032), MMSE score (+1.5 versus −3 points) (P=0.0177), and sleep efficiency (P=0.04). Median ADAS-Cog values (−3.5 versus +3 points) (P=0.045) were significantly better with PRM. Differences were more significant at longer treatment duration. PRM was well

  5. Task 2.0 - Air Quality Assessment, Control, and Analytical Methods Subtask 2.11 - Lactic Acid FGD Additives From Sugar Beet Wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Edwin S

    1998-02-01

    Organic buffers maintain the pH of the scrubber slurry in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) as the SO2 dissolves at the air-liquid interface. Inexpensive acids with an appropriate pKa are required for this application. The pKa of lactic acid (3.86) is between that of the interface and the recirculating slurry and will make soluble calcium ion available in large amounts. Currently lactic acid is somewhat expensive for this use, but this project will develop a new source of inexpensive lactate. Microbial action during the storage and processing of sugar beets forms lactic acid in concentrations as high 14 g/L in the processing water. The concentrations are lower than those occurring in conventional fermentation production of lactic acids, but since a considerable amount of water is involved in the processing of sugar beets in the Red River Valley (1 million gallons/day), a substantial amount of lactic acid or calcium lactate could be recovered as a by- product for use in FGD and other applications.

  6. Cleaning and inspection of stainless steels and nickel alloys for FGD service

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, R.E.; Mathay, W.L.

    2006-09-15

    Stainless steels and nickel alloys of the C-family are major materials of construction for flue gas desulfurization systems. Both types of materials depend upon the presence of thin, passive, chromium-rich, surface-oxide films to provide the desired corrosion resistance. Corrosion resistance is optimized by proper cleaning before and after fabrication. The paper gives some guidelines for keeping those materials clean.

  7. Production development and utilization of Zimmer Station wet FGD by-products. Final report. Volume 5, A laboratory greenhouse study conducted in fulfillment of Phase 2, Objective 2 titled. Use of FGD by-product gypsum enriched with magnesium hydroxide as a soil amendment

    SciTech Connect

    Yibirin, H.; Stehouwer, R. C.; Bigham, J. M.; Soto, U. I.

    1997-01-31

    The Clean Air Act, as revised in 1992, has spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies that have resulted in large volumes of wet scrubber sludges. In general, these sludges must be dewatered, chemically treated, and disposed of in landfills. Disposal is an expensive and environmentally questionable process for which suitable alternatives must be found. Wet scrubbing with magnesium (Mg)-enhanced lime has emerged as an efficient, cost effective technology for SO2 removal. When combined with an appropriate oxidation system, the wet scrubber sludge can be used to produce gypsum (CaSO4-2H2O) and magnesium hydroxide [Mg(OH)2] of sufficient purity for beneficial re-use. Product value generally increases with purity of the by-product(s). The pilot plant at the CINERGY Zimmer Station near Cincinnati produces gypsum by products that can be formulated to contain varying amounts of Mg(OH)2. Such materials may have agricultural value as soil conditioners, liming agents and sources of plant nutrients (Ca, Mg, S). This report describes a greenhouse study designed to evaluate by-product gypsum and Mg gypsum from the Zimmer Station pilot plant as amendments for improving the quality of agricultural soils and mine spoils that are currently unproductive because of phytotoxic conditions related to acidity and high levels of toxic dissolved aluminum (Al). In particular, the technical literature contains evidence to suggest that gypsum may be more effective than agricultural limestone in modifying soil chemical conditions below the immediate zone of application. Representative samples of by-product gypsum and Mg(OH)2 from the Zimmer Station were initially characterized. The gypsum was of high chemical purity and consisted of well crystalline, lath-shaped particles of low specific surface area. By contrast, the by-product Mg(OH)2 was a high surface area material (50 m2 g

  8. Role of mag-enhanced lime scrubbing in the FGD industry

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, M.; College, J.; Smith, K.; Stowe, D.H.

    1997-12-31

    The mag-enhanced lime scrubbing process has been in commercial use in the US since the early 1970`s. At present over 14,000 MW of coal-fired utility plants in the US burning high sulfur coal (2.5--4.0% S) utilize this process with an excellent emission compliance and cost performance record to date. Dravo Lime Company (DLC) being the largest supplier of lime to this industry continues to conduct extensive R and D in this area and provides technical support service to these users. The success of the mag-enhanced lime process is largely attributed to the dual alkali effect of the Mg-Ca ions with a very distinct role for the highly soluble Mg ion in the scrubber liquor. It is well known that the high solubility of the magnesium ions provides alkalinities in the scrubbing liquor far in excess of the limestone systems. As a result of this high alkalinity liquor the mag-lime scrubbers need a much lower liquid to gas ratio, have lower scrubber pressure drop, consume lower parasitic load, are able to handle very high inlet SO{sub 2} concentrations, show little scaling tendency, etc. The scrubbers, recirculation pumps, piping, etc., are much smaller and the systems have lower capital and operating costs over comparable limestone systems. This system typically has a high availability and the process is less severe mechanically on the scrubber, pumps, nozzles, piping than comparable limestone processes. DLC`s patented ThioClear{reg_sign} process is an improvement over the conventional Thiosorbic process in use today. The ThioClear process while providing all of the advantages of the Thiosorbic process uses a nearly clear liquor to scrub and can use an innovative Horizontal Scrubber at gas velocities of up to 7.62--9.14 m/s (25--30 FPS). This process produces an excellent quality gypsum for wall board, cement or other applications and can also produce valuable Mg(OH){sub 2} as by-product. This paper discusses the merits of Thiosorbic/ThioClear processes, innovations with

  9. Safety and efficacy of an add-on therapy with curcumin phytosome and piperine and/or lipoic acid in subjects with a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy treated with dexibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Settembre, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    We conducted an 8-week, open, randomized controlled clinical trial on 141 subjects affected by neuropathic pain to investigate the role of an adjunctive therapy added to the administration of dexibuprofen (400 mg twice a day) and based on a multi-ingredient formula (Lipicur), consisting of lipoic acid plus curcumin phytosome and piperine, in patients with a diagnosis of lumbar sciatica, lumbar disk herniation, and/or lumbar canal stenosis (96 subjects), or with carpal tunnel syndrome (45 subjects). A total of 135 participants completed the study. Treatment with the multi-ingredient formula (Lipicur) reduced neuropathic pain by more than 66% in both conditions (subjects with lumbar sciatica and with carpal tunnel syndrome), and these reductions were statistically significant. Moreover, the treatment reduced dexibuprofen use by about 40%. An add-on therapy with only lipoic acid has not shown any significant results. On the basis of its safety and efficacy, Lipicur could be considered an effective complementary therapy to be added to conventional treatments to achieve better efficacy in reducing neuropathic pain. PMID:23861596

  10. Safety and efficacy of an add-on therapy with curcumin phytosome and piperine and/or lipoic acid in subjects with a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy treated with dexibuprofen

    PubMed Central

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Settembre, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    We conducted an 8-week, open, randomized controlled clinical trial on 141 subjects affected by neuropathic pain to investigate the role of an adjunctive therapy added to the administration of dexibuprofen (400 mg twice a day) and based on a multi-ingredient formula (Lipicur), consisting of lipoic acid plus curcumin phytosome and piperine, in patients with a diagnosis of lumbar sciatica, lumbar disk herniation, and/or lumbar canal stenosis (96 subjects), or with carpal tunnel syndrome (45 subjects). A total of 135 participants completed the study. Treatment with the multi-ingredient formula (Lipicur) reduced neuropathic pain by more than 66% in both conditions (subjects with lumbar sciatica and with carpal tunnel syndrome), and these reductions were statistically significant. Moreover, the treatment reduced dexibuprofen use by about 40%. An add-on therapy with only lipoic acid has not shown any significant results. On the basis of its safety and efficacy, Lipicur could be considered an effective complementary therapy to be added to conventional treatments to achieve better efficacy in reducing neuropathic pain. PMID:23861596

  11. Design and test of an exhaust gas clean-up system for power plants using high sulphur content fuels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.N.

    1980-10-10

    This experimental program, initially designated to study an exhaust gas cleanup and water recovery system for a Cheng Cycle Dual-Fluid (CCDF) turbine power plant using sulfur rich fuels, has shown the potential of a general Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system applicable to utility and industrial boilers as well. The process was studied both theoretically and experimentaly. Experiments were performed using a bench scale (25k equivalent) apparatus and a pilot scale (1Mw equivalent) apparatus. Data obtained indicated the IPT process potentially can out-perform the conventional FGD process with significant cost savings.

  12. 40 CFR 63.4168 - What are the requirements for continuous parameter monitoring system installation, operation, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... determine the average of all recorded readings for each successive 3-hour period of the emission capture... monitoring equipment. (5) You must operate the CPMS and collect emission capture system and add-on control... emission capture system or add-on control device parameter data recorded during monitoring...

  13. 40 CFR 63.4768 - What are the requirements for continuous parameter monitoring system installation, operation, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... determine the average of all recorded readings for each successive 3-hour period of the emission capture... emission capture system and add-on control device parameter data at all times that a controlled coating... adjustments). (6) You must not use emission capture system or add-on control device parameter data...

  14. 40 CFR 63.4768 - What are the requirements for continuous parameter monitoring system installation, operation, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... determine the average of all recorded readings for each successive 3-hour period of the emission capture... emission capture system and add-on control device parameter data at all times that a controlled coating... adjustments). (6) You must not use emission capture system or add-on control device parameter data...

  15. 40 CFR 63.4168 - What are the requirements for continuous parameter monitoring system installation, operation, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... determine the average of all recorded readings for each successive 3-hour period of the emission capture... monitoring equipment. (5) You must operate the CPMS and collect emission capture system and add-on control... emission capture system or add-on control device parameter data recorded during monitoring...

  16. Failure mode analysis for lime/limestone FGD system. Volume III. Plant profiles. Part 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, S.M.; Rosenberg, H.S.; Nilsson, L.I.O.; Oxley, J.H.

    1984-08-01

    This volume contains plant profiles for: Petersburg 3; Hawthorn 3, 4; La Cygne 1; Jeffry 1, 2; Lawrence 4, 5; Green River 1-3; Cane Run 4, 5; Mill Creek 1, 3; Paddy's Run 6; Clay Boswell 4; Milton R. Young 2; Pleasants 1, 2; and Colstrip 1, 2. (DLC)

  17. DISPOSAL OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM NONREGENERABLE FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a 4-year study to determine environmentally sound methods for disposing of wastes from nonregenerable flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. Data presented incorporates results obtained during the fourth year with material from report EPA-600/7-77-052...

  18. High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines: Phase 1, Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    Research under Subtask 2.2, Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization, included further refinement of mineralogical transformation and the initiation of a kinetic study. The expansion of the FGD materials during moisturizing is attributable to three reactions: the hydration of portlandite to slaked lime; the formation of ettringite from fly ash and anhydrite, and; the formation of gypsum from anhydrite. The sequence of these reactions are being examined in a kinetic study. Completion of the first 15 days of study finds the steady decrease in anhydrite with concomitant formation of ettringite (on fly ash surfaces) and gypsum (pore and crack in-fillings). Geotechnical characterization (Subtask 2.3) focused on swell experiments which will model in situ emplacement. Specimens of FGD material have been stored in 3-inch diameter pipe and, after 39 days, 0.5% of axial swell has been recorded with material strengths of 600 to 1,000 psi. Experiments to determine the amount of moisture loss due to the heat of hydration indicate about 9 to 10% of the water is lost. Confined swell tests are also underway with pressures of 15 to 20 psi recorded at 25 days. Work performed under Task 4 (Background for Phase II) included determination of the compressive strengths for the experimental mine roof rock. Values in the 5,000 to 7,500 psi range were found, which is typical for this type of strata in the region. Work on the hydrologic monitoring program (Subtask 4.2) included completion of the hydraulic conductivity assessment of the strata, as well as completion of the monitoring well plan. The highest hydraulic conductivity was found for the Princess No. 3 coal seam with values of 1{times}10{sup {minus}3} feet/min. The weathered sandstone over the coal had conductivities in the 10{sup {minus}4} to 10{sup {minus}5} feet/min. range.

  19. High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October--December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    Research under Subtask 2.2, Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization, included further refinement of mineralogical transformation and the initiation of a kinetic study. The expansion of the FGD materials during moisturizing is attributable to three reactions: the hydration of portlandite to slaked lime; the formation of ettringite from fly ash and anhydrite, and; the formation of gypsum from anhydrite. The sequence of these reactions are being examined in a kinetic study. Completion of the first 15 days of study finds the steady decrease in anhydrite with concomitant formation of ettringite (on fly ash surfaces) and gypsum (pore and crack in-fillings). Geotechnical characterization (Subtask 2.3) focused on swell experiments which will model in situ emplacement. Specimens of FGD material have been stored in 3-inch diameter pipe and, after 39 days, 0.5% of axial swell has been recorded with material strengths of 600 to 1,000 psi. Experiments to determine the amount of moisture loss due to the heat of hydration indicate about 9 to 10% of the water is lost. Confined swell tests are also underway with pressures of 15 to 20 psi recorded at 25 days. Work performed under Task 4 (Background for Phase 11) included determination of the compressive strengths for the experimental mine roof rock. Values in the 5,000 to 7,500 psi range were found, which is typical for this type of strata in the region. Work on the hydrologic monitoring program (Subtask 4.2) included completion of the hydraulic conductivity assessment of the strata, as well as completion of the monitoring well plan. The highest hydraulic conductivity was found for the Princes No. 3 coal seam with values of 1x10{sup -3} feet/min. The weathered sandstone over the coal had conductivities in the 10{sup -4} to 10{sup -5} feet/min range.

  20. Partitioning of mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride in a full-scale coal combustion process equipped with selective catalytic reduction, electrostatic precipitation, and flue gas desulfurization systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chin-Min Cheng; Pauline Hack; Paul Chu; Yung-Nan Chang; Ting-Yu Lin; Chih-Sheng Ko; Po-Han Chiang; Cheng-Chun He; Yuan-Min Lai; Wei-Ping Pan

    2009-09-15

    A full-scale field study was carried out at a 795 MWe coal-fired power plant equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR), an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems to investigate the distribution of selected trace elements (i.e., mercury, arsenic, selenium, boron, and chloride) from coal, FGD reagent slurry, makeup water to flue gas, solid byproduct, and wastewater streams. Flue gases were collected from the SCR outlet, ESP inlet, FGD inlet, and stack. Concurrent with flue gas sampling, coal, bottom ash, economizer ash, and samples from the FGD process were also collected for elemental analysis. By combining plant operation parameters, the overall material balances of selected elements were established. The removal efficiencies of As, Se, Hg, and B by the ESP unit were 88, 56, 17, and 8%, respectively. Only about 2.5% of Cl was condensed and removed from flue gas by fly ash. The FGD process removed over 90% of Cl, 77% of B, 76% of Hg, 30% of Se, and 5% of As. About 90% and 99% of the FGD-removed Hg and Se were associated with gypsum. For B and Cl, over 99% were discharged from the coal combustion process with the wastewater. Mineral trona (trisodium hydrogendicarbonate dehydrate, Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O) was injected before the ESP unit to control the emission of sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}). By comparing the trace elements compositions in the fly ash samples collected from the locations before and after the trona injection, the injection of trona did not show an observable effect on the partitioning behaviors of selenium and arsenic, but it significantly increased the adsorption of mercury onto fly ash. The stack emissions of mercury, boron, selenium, and chloride were for the most part in the gas phase. 47 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

  1. Corrosion studies on Mo- and Cr-bearing alloys for flue gas desulfurization systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maiya, P.S.

    1983-01-01

    Critical components of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, especially those in downstream locations (e.g., stack linings, ducts, bypass-duct junctions, and reheaters), are subjected to environments in which the pH can vary from as low as 0.5 to about 4.0. Hence, proper selection of materials of construction through an appropriate research and development plan can be expected to have great economic impact on current FGD technology. Also to facilitate a mechanistic understanding of the corrosion process in FGD environments, a quantitative description of the effects of pertinent variables such as pH, alloy composition, and chloride ion concentration on corrosion rates is required. In the present study, the corrosion rates of several alloys of interest to FGD systems (viz., 316L, 317LX, 317LM, 904L, A1-4X, A1-6X, Hastelloys G and C-276, Incoloy 825, Inconel 625, and 29-4-2) have been evaluated in sulfuric acid containing 0.03-5.0 wt% Cl/sup -/ at different pH levels (0.5-3.0) and at a temperature of 85/sup 0/C.

  2. State-of-the-art review of materials-related problems in flue gas desulfurization systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maiya, P. S.

    1980-10-01

    This report characterizes the chemical and mechanical environments to which the structural components used in flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) are exposed. It summarizes the necessary background information pertinent to various FGD processes currently in use, with particular emphasis on lime/limestone scrubbing technology, so that the materials problems and processing variables encountered in FGD systems can be better defined and appreciated. The report also describes the materials currently used and their performance to date in existing wet scrubbers. There is little doubt that with more extensive use of coal and flue-gas scrubbers by utilities and other segments of private industry, a better understanding of the material failure mechanisms, performance limitations, and potential problem areas is required for the design of more reliable and cost-effective FGD systems. To meet the above objectives, a materials evaluation program is proposed. The important experimental variables and the number of tests required to evaluate a given material are discussed. 55 references, 9 figures, 6 tables.

  3. The Efficacy and Safety of Chinese Herbal Medicine Jinlida as Add-On Medication in Type 2 Diabetes Patients Ineffectively Managed by Metformin Monotherapy: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Fengmei; Tian, Jiaxing; Chen, Xinyan; Li, Zhibin; Piao, Chunli; Guo, Junjie; Ma, Licheng; Zhao, Lijuan; Xia, Chengdong; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yuan, Chun-Su; Tong, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Background Metformin plays an important role in diabetes treatment. Studies have shown that the combined use of oral hypoglycemic medications is more effective than metformin monotherapy. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial, we evaluated whether Jinlida, a Chinese herbal medicine, enhances the glycemic control of metformin in type 2 diabetes patients whose HbA1c was ineffectively controlled with metformin alone. Methods A total of 186 diabetes patients were enrolled in this double-Blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial. Subjects were randomly allocated to receive either Jinlida (9 g) or the placebo TID for 12 consecutive weeks. All subjects in both groups also continuously received their metformin without any dose change. During this 12-week period, the HbA1c, FPG, 2h PG, body weight, BMI were assessed. HOMA insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and β-cell function (HOMA- β) were also evaluated. Results At week 12, compared to the HbA1c level from week 0, the level of the Jinlida group was reduced by 0.92 ± 1.09% and that of the placebo group was reduced by 0.53 ± 0.94%. The 95% CI was 0.69 - 1.14 for the Jinlida group vs. 0.34 - 0.72 for the placebo group. There was a very significant HbA1c reduction between the two groups after 12 weeks (p < 0.01). Both FG and 2h PG levels of the Jinlida group and placebo group were reduced from week 0. There were a very significant FG and 2h PG level reductions between the two groups after 12 weeks (both p < 0.01). The Jinlida group also showed improved β-cell function with a HOMA-β increase (p < 0.05). No statistical significance was observed in the body weight and BMI changes. No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusion Jinlida significantly enhanced the hypoglycemic action of metformin when the drug was used alone. This Chinese herbal medicine may have a clinical value as an add-on medication to metformin monotherapy. Trial Registration Chinese Clinical Trial Register

  4. Effect of pH on the Preparation of {alpha}-Calcium Sulfate Hemihydrate from FGD Gypsum with the Hydrothermal Method

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, B.H.; Shen, Z.X.; Wu, Z.B.; Yang, L.C.; Ma, X.F.

    2008-12-15

    pH is one of the most important parameters that determine the crystallization process, but it is always neglected in the preparation of {alpha}-calcium sulfate hemihydrate ({alpha}-HH) from calcium sulfate dihydrate (DH) with the hydrothermal method. Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum, which is mainly composed of DH, was used as raw material to obtain {alpha}-HH through dehydration in a Ca-Mg-K-Cl-solution medium at 95{sup o}C under atmospheric pressure. The initial pH values of the suspensions were adjusted from 1.2 to 8.0 to explore the influence of pH on the dehydration process and the product characteristics. The results showed that {alpha}-HH crystal was the only dehydration product with the pH ranging from 1.2 to 8.0. With the increase of initial pH, the dehydration rate decreased and the formed {alpha}-HH crystal had a larger particle size. The length/width ratio decreased markedly from 4.8 to 2.9 as the initial pH increased from 1.2 to 7.3. pH had a profound influence on the dehydration of DH and the morphology of alpha-HH via its effect on the supersaturation and perhaps also the precipitation of Ca(OH){sub 2} in an alkaline environment.

  5. Task 2.0 -- Air quality assessment, control, and analytical methods: Subtask 2.11 -- Lactic acid FGD additives from sugar beet wastewater. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, E.S.

    1998-06-01

    Organic buffers maintain the pH of the scrubber slurry in flue gas desulfurization as the SO{sub 2} dissolves at the air-liquid interface. Inexpensive acids with an appropriate pKa are required for this application. The pKa of lactic acid (3.86) is between that of the interface and the recirculating slurry and will make soluble calcium ions available in large amounts. Currently lactic acid is somewhat expensive for this, but the project work will lead to development of a new source of inexpensive lactate. Microbial action during the storage and processing of sugar beets forms lactic acid in concentrations as high as 14 g/L in the processing water. The concentrations are lower than those occurring in conventional fermentation production of lactic acids, but since a considerable amount of water is involved in the processing of sugar beets in the Red River Valley, a substantial amount of lactic acid or calcium lactate could be recovered as a byproduct for use in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and other applications. The feasibility of two novel lactate recovery schemes applicable to dilute streams was evaluated in the project.

  6. ENHANCED CONTROL OF MERCURY BY WET FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    G. Blythe; B. Marsh; S. Miller; C. Richardson; M. Richardson

    2001-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and EPRI have co-funded this project to improve the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project investigated catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury to a form that is more effectively captured in wet FGD systems. If successfully developed, the process could be applicable to over 90,000 MW of utility generating capacity with existing FGD systems and to future FGD installations. Field tests have been conducted to determine whether candidate catalyst materials remain active towards mercury oxidation after extended flue gas exposure. Catalyst life will have a large impact on the cost effectiveness of this potential process. A mobile catalyst test unit has been used to test the activity of four different catalyst materials for a period of up to six months at each of three utility sites. Catalyst testing was completed at the first site, which fires Texas lignite, in December 1998 and at the second test site, which fires a Powder River Basin subbituminous coal in the fall of 1999. Testing at the third site, which fires a medium- to high-sulfur bituminous coal, began in June 2000 and was completed at the end of January 2001. This Topical Reports includes results from Site 3; results from Sites 1 and 2 were reported previously. At Site 3, catalysts were tested in two forms, including powders dispersed in sand bed reactors and in a commercially available form as a coated honeycomb structure. Field testing has been supported by laboratory tests to screen catalysts for activity at specific flue gas compositions, to investigate catalyst deactivation mechanisms and methods for regenerating spent catalysts. Laboratory results related to the Site 3 field effort are also included and discussed in this Topical Report.

  7. ENHANCED CONTROL OF MERCURY BY WET FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and EPRI co-funded this project to improve the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project has investigated catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury to a form that is more effectively captured in wet FGD systems. If successfully developed, the process could be applicable to over 90,000 MW of utility generating capacity with existing FGD systems, and to future FGD installations. Field tests were conducted to determine whether candidate catalyst materials remain active towards mercury oxidation after extended flue gas exposure. Catalyst life will have a large impact on the cost effectiveness of this potential process. A mobile catalyst test unit was used to test the activity of four different catalyst materials for a period of up to six months each at three utility sites. Catalyst testing was completed at the first site, which fires Texas lignite, in December 1998; at the second test site, which fires a Powder River Basin subbituminous coal, in November 1999; and at the third site, which fires a medium- to high-sulfur bituminous coal, in January 2001. Results of testing at each of the three sites were reported in previous technical notes. At Site 1, catalysts were tested only as powders dispersed in sand bed reactors. At Sites 2 and 3, catalysts were tested in two forms, including powders dispersed in sand and in commercially available forms such as extruded pellets and coated honeycomb structures. This final report summarizes and presents results from all three sites, for the various catalyst forms tested. Field testing was supported by laboratory tests to screen catalysts for activity at specific flue gas compositions, to investigate catalyst deactivation mechanisms and methods for regenerating spent catalysts. Laboratory results are also summarized and discussed in this report.

  8. High-volume, high-value usage of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines. Phase 1 -- Laboratory Investigations. Quarterly report, January 1995--March 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The study of the kinetics of the mineral transformations which take place after the FGD materials are hydrated was continued this quarter (Task 2, Subtask 2.2). Based on X-ray diffraction data, the anhydrite was found to have essentially disappeared by the fifth day of the study, while gypsum was found to maximize in the first 14 days of the study. The relative abundance of ettringite increased throughout the period of observation (40 days). Ettringite was found to nucleate primarily on or near fly ash particles, while gypsum was found to be more mobile, readily filling in cracks and fractures. A second kinetic study was initiated during the period with an experimental setup which is similar to the current effort. The focus of this study will be to determine the effect of moisture conditions on the rate and types of mineralogical reactions which occur. Column leaching studies (Task 2, Subtask 2.4) on the ADM material were initiated during the quarter. Two columns were packed with fly ash and one with bottom ash. One of the columns was blanketed with CO{sub 2} (2.5%) to model the effects of soil gas on the leachate. The samples are being moisturized to model field conditions. Leachate analysis will be available during the next quarter. Work on the field site (Task 6) to establish background data for the demonstration continued. The proposed demonstration site at the Pleasant Valley mine was found to be displaying the effects of severe weathering. An alternate mine site will be explored.

  9. Efficacy and Safety of Alirocumab as Add-on Therapy in High–Cardiovascular-Risk Patients With Hypercholesterolemia Not Adequately Controlled With Atorvastatin (20 or 40 mg) or Rosuvastatin (10 or 20 mg): Design and Rationale of the ODYSSEY OPTIONS Studies

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jennifer G; Colhoun, Helen M; Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Du, Yunling; Hanotin, Corinne; Donahue, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The phase 3 ODYSSEY OPTIONS studies (OPTIONS I, NCT01730040; OPTIONS II, NCT01730053) are multicenter, multinational, randomized, double-blind, active-comparator, 24-week studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of alirocumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody targeting proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, as add-on therapy in ∼ 650 high-cardiovascular (CV)-risk patients whose low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels are ≥100 mg/dL or ≥70 mg/dL according to the CV-risk category, high and very high CV risk, respectively, with atorvastatin (20–40 mg/d) or rosuvastatin (10–20 mg/d). Patients are randomized to receive alirocumab 75 mg via a single, subcutaneous, 1-mL injection by prefilled pen every 2 weeks (Q2W) as add-on therapy to atorvastatin (20–40 mg) or rosuvastatin (10–20 mg); or to receive ezetimibe 10 mg/d as add-on therapy to statin; or to receive statin up-titration; or to switch from atorvastatin to rosuvastatin (OPTIONS I only). At week 12, based on week 8 LDL-C levels, the alirocumab dose may be increased from 75 mg to 150 mg Q2W if LDL-C levels remain ≥100 mg/dL or ≥70 mg/dL in patients with high or very high CV risk, respectively. The primary efficacy endpoint in both studies is difference in percent change in calculated LDL-C from baseline to week 24 in the alirocumab vs control arms. The studies may provide guidance to inform clinical decision-making when patients with CV risk require additional lipid-lowering therapy to further reduce LDL-C levels. The flexibility of the alirocumab dosing regimen allows for individualized therapy based on the degree of LDL-C reduction required to achieve the desired LDL-C level. PMID:25269777

  10. Wet flue gas desulfurization systems; State-of-the-art designs for the 1990s

    SciTech Connect

    Boward, W.L. Jr.; Guletsky, P.W. )

    1992-01-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 are based on a free market approach to sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) compliance. This legislation has already had a significant effect on utility units governed by Phase I of the CAAA emission reductions which will take effect on January 1, 1995. The subtle ripples from this legislation will continue to provide an ever widening circle of changes and challenges for utility owners, architect-engineers (AE), and equipment suppliers. The philosophy of specifying, evaluating, designing, building, and operating flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems has already changed and this change can be seen in Phase I facilities. This paper will illustrate how the ramifications of this free market approach have influenced critical design decision for Phase I FGD systems and how Phase II facilities and beyond may be affected.

  11. Crystal Structures of An F420-Dependent Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Fgd1 Involved in the Activation of the Anti-Tb Drug Candidate Pa-824 Reveal the Basis of Coenzyme And Substrate Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Bashiri, G.; Squire, C.J.; Moreland, N.J.; Baker, E.N.

    2009-05-11

    The modified flavin coenzyme F{sub 420} is found in a restricted number of microorganisms. It is widely distributed in mycobacteria, however, where it is important in energy metabolism, and in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is implicated in redox processes related to non-replicating persistence. In Mtb, the F{sub 420}-dependent glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase FGD1 provides reduced F{sub 420} for the in vivo activation of the nitroimidazopyran prodrug PA-824, currently being developed for anti-tuberculosis therapy against both replicating and persistent bacteria. The structure of M. tuberculosis FGD1 has been determined by x-ray crystallography both in its apo state and in complex with F{sub 420} and citrate at resolutions of 1.90 and 1.95{angstrom}, respectively. The structure reveals a highly specific F{sub 420} binding mode, which is shared with several other F{sub 420}-dependent enzymes. Citrate occupies the substrate binding pocket adjacent to F{sub 420} and is shown to be a competitive inhibitor (IC{sub 50} 43 {micro}m). Modeling of the binding of the glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) substrate identifies a positively charged phosphate binding pocket and shows that G6P, like citrate, packs against the isoalloxazine moiety of F{sub 420} and helps promote a butterfly bend conformation that facilitates F{sub 420} reduction and catalysis.

  12. The Systems Librarian: Re-Integrating the "Integrated" Library System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breeding, Marshall

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the current environment of the ILS (Integrated Library System) plus add-ons tailored for electronic content and its future. It suggests that while the ILS may be mature, the supplemental products are not and the linkages among them are even less so. On the technical front, the recent interest in Web services gives reason to…

  13. Regeneration of FGD waste liquors: Production of ammonium and potassium sulfate mixed fertilizer. Quarterly technical report, October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, A.D.

    1993-12-31

    In the 2nd quarterly report, we discussed the lime/limestone process which precipitates N-S containing compounds by adding lime/limestone in a narrow pH range, and which can be an alternative to the K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} process. In this report, we focused on investigations of the lime/limestone process. First, we established an overall flow diagram for the lime/limestone process. Based on the diagram, we performed preliminary experimental investigations to outline practical process conditions. Out major investigations concerned about effects of pH on precipitation of the N-S compounds and precipitation characteristics of N-S compounds in a continuous crystallization system. We also performed an experimental investigation to study crystallization characteristic of the ammonium sulfate in the hydrolysis liquor. In studying effects of pH, we performed batch precipitation of the N-S compounds in a broad range of pH and investigated the effects of pH on the amount of required lime, the amount of the precipitate, and the fraction of N-S compounds precipitated. The result revealed the optimum range for precipitation of N-S compounds to be pH = 7.6--8.6. In studying continuous crystallization characteristics of the N-S compounds, a bench scale 4-liter continuous crystallization system was built to compare a typical Mixed-Suspension-Mixed-Product-Removal (MSMPR) crystallizer and Double-Draw-Off (DDO) crystallizer. In a preliminary test, the DDO was shown to be superior by increasing the average size of the precipitated crystals of N-S compounds from 97 {mu}m to 142 {mu}m and thus enhancing the filterability. In order to obtain information for a practical design of the lime/limestone process, we also set up a material balance for a 300 MWe power plant facility. A preliminary calculation showed that a process on the scale could produce approximately 56 tons ammonium sulfate fertilizer per day.

  14. Add-on therapy in epilepsy with calcium entry blockers.

    PubMed

    Overweg, J; Ashton, D; de Beukelaar, F; Binnie, C D; Wauquier, A; van Wieringen, A

    1986-01-01

    In view of the known role of Ca2+ in the paroxysmal depolarization shifts of epileptic neurones, the possibility arises that certain Ca2+ entry blockers possess antiepileptic activity. The only drug of the class which readily passes the blood-brain barrier is flunarizine. This is effective in experimental models of epilepsy and produced significant seizure reduction in two therapeutic trials in therapy-resistant patients. It has few and mild side effects at therapeutic blood levels. PMID:3530778

  15. Camera add-on records time of exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, E. C.; Kassel, P. C., Jr.; Knight, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    Time photograph is taken and is permanently recorded on edge of exposure by compact electronics module that attaches to camera case. Single-chip timing circuit drives LED display, which is imaged on film plane. Normally blanked display is unblanked when shutter switch is activated.

  16. Flue gas desulfurization information system (FGDIS) data base user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.

    1981-03-01

    This manual is intended to provide a guide to the use of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Information System (FGDIS) data base which is a collection of data files consisting of information pertaining to the design and performance of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The files are stored at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency National Computer Center (NCC), Research Triangle Park, NC. Access to these files and manipulation of the data therein is accomplished via System 2000, general data base management system developed by INTEL Corp. and supported by the NCC Univac 1100 hardware.

  17. Purification of FGD gypsum product

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, K.J.; Owens, F.C. II.

    1993-06-01

    A method of purifying a gypsum slurry resulting from an upstream flue gas desulfurization process is described comprising the steps of: (a) delivering the gypsum slurry to a primary dewatering device; (b) separating this gypsum slurry in said primary dewatering device into a coarse solids stream and a fine solids stream, said coarse solids stream primarily containing coarse particle sizes therein and said fine solids stream primarily containing fine particle sizes therein; (c) selectively returning all or a portion of said fine solids stream back to the upstream flue gas desulfurization process or delivering all or a portion of said fine solids stream to downstream separation means for further separation into a thickened fines stream and a process water stream, said process water stream thereafter being selectively delivered, as desired, to the upstream flue gas desulfurization process; (d) delivering said coarse solids stream to a surge/mix tank where it is selectively mixed with a portion of said thickened fines stream prior to being delivered to a secondary dewatering device; and, (e) collecting a purified gypsum product from said secondary dewatering device.

  18. Wastefree in-duct FGD

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    The first generation of easily-retrofitable duct-injection technologies experienced problems with modest performance, particulate non-compliance, and difficult waste disposal. A new sorbent concept, called Fluesorbent, has been developed specifically to address these problems. Based on a new lime sorbent material, the technology results in 80+% SO{sub 2} removal, net particulate reductions, and a valuable agricultural by-product instead of wastes. A 6,500 acfm, 2-MWe Fluesorbent pilot plant was recently constructed at Ohio Edison`s R.E. Burger station. This paper describes the technology and the Burger demonstration project.

  19. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/wet FGD system. Final report, Volume 2 of 2 - appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This volume contains the appendices for a coal-fired power plant toxic emissions study. Included are Process data log sheets from Coal Creek, Auditing information, Sampling protocol, Field sampling data sheets, Quality assurance/quality control, Analytical protocol, and Uncertainty analyses.

  20. A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/Wet FGD system. Volume 1, Sampling, results, and special topics: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE-PETC in 1993 as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. It is organized into 2 volumes; Volume 1 describes the sampling effort, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations. The study involved solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at Coal Creek Station Unit No. 1, Underwood, North Dakota (1100 MW mine-mouth plant burning lignite from the Falkirk mine located adjacent to the plant). This plant had an electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber flue gas desulfurization unit. Measurements were conducted on June 21--24, 26, and 27, 1993; chemicals measured were 6 major and 16 trace elements (including Hg, Cr, Cd, Pb, Se, As, Be, Ni), acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate), ammonia and cyanide, elemental C, radionuclides, VOCs, semivolatiles (incl. PAH, polychlorinated dioxins, furans), and aldehydes. Volume 2: Appendices includes process data log sheets, field sampling data sheets, uncertainty calculations, and quality assurance results.