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Sample records for added electron donor

  1. Added Value in Electronic Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bothma, Theo J. D.

    Electronic publications are flooding the market. Some of these publications are created specifically for the electronic environment, but many are conversions of existing material to electronic format. It is not worth the time and effort merely to publish existing material in electronic format if no value is added in the conversion process. The…

  2. Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2002-08-16

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions was held at Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, 8/11-16/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  3. Polymerization Initiated by Organic Electron Donors.

    PubMed

    Broggi, Julie; Rollet, Marion; Clément, Jean-Louis; Canard, Gabriel; Terme, Thierry; Gigmes, Didier; Vanelle, Patrice

    2016-05-10

    Polymerization reactions with organic electron donors (OED) as initiators are presented herein. The metal-free polymerization of various activated alkene and cyclic ester monomers was performed in short reaction times, under mild conditions, with small amounts of organic reducing agents, and without the need for co-initiators or activation by photochemical, electrochemical, or other methods. Hence, OED initiators enabled the development of an efficient, rapid, room-temperature process that meets the technical standards expected for industrial processes, such as energy savings, cost-effectiveness and safety. Mechanistic investigations support an electron-transfer initiation pathway that leads to the reduction of the monomer. PMID:27061743

  4. Comparison of alternative electron donors to sustain PCE anaerobic reductive dechlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Fennell, D.E.; Zinder, S.H.; Gossett, J.M.; Stover, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    Anaerobic reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethane (PCE) to ethene (ETH) appears to use hydrogen as the direct electron donor. Hydrogen addition may be problematic for large-scale treatment systems. Adding an electron donor which is fermented to hydrogen may be more practical. Competition for substrate or reduction equivalents by methanogens should be minimized. Studies were performed with methanol, ethanol, lactic acid, and butyric acid to determine their suitability for maintaining reductive dechlorination by an anaerobic mixed culture. Electron donors were examined in semicontinuously operated serum bottles with a nominal PCE concentration of 110 {micro}mol/L and a 2:1 ratio of electron donor to PCE on an equivalent basis. The patterns of electron donor degradation, hydrogen formation, dechlorination, and methanogenesis were determined for each substrate. Dechlorination was sustained better with butyric acid, lactic acid, or ethanol than with methanol.

  5. The role of electron donors generated from UV photolysis for accelerating pyridine biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yingxia; Zhang, Yongming; Yan, Ning; Liu, Rui; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2015-09-01

    Employing an internal circulation baffled biofilm reactor (ICBBR), we evaluated the mechanisms by which photolysis accelerated the biodegradation and mineralization of pyridine (C5 H5 N), a nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compound. We tested the hypothesis that pyridine oxidation is accelerated because a key photolysis intermediate, succinate, is as electron donor that promotes the initial mono-oxygenation of pyridine. Experimentally, longer photolysis time generated more electron-donor products (succinate), which stimulated faster pyridine biodegradation. This pattern was confirmed by directly adding succinate, and the stimulation effect occurred similarly with addition of the same equivalents of acetate and formate. Succinate, whether generated by UV photolysis or added directly, also accelerated mono-oxygenation of the first biodegradation intermediate, 2-hydroxyl pyridine (2HP). 2HP and pyridine were mutually inhibitory in that their mono-oxygenations competed for internal electron donor; thus, the addition of any readily biodegradable donor accelerated both mono-oxygenation steps, as well as mineralization. PMID:25854706

  6. The roles of methanogens and acetogens in dechlorination of trichloroethene using different electron donors.

    PubMed

    Wen, Li-Lian; Zhang, Yin; Pan, Ya-Wei; Wu, Wen-Qi; Meng, Shao-Hua; Zhou, Chen; Tang, Youneng; Zheng, Ping; Zhao, He-Ping

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the effects of methanogens and acetogens on the function and structure of microbial communities doing reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) by adding four distinct electron donors: lactate, a fermentable organic; acetate, a non-fermentable organic; methanol, a fermentable 1-C (carbon) organic; and hydrogen gas (H2), the direct electron donor for reductive dechlorination by Dehalococcoides. The fermentable electron donors had faster dechlorination rates, more complete dechlorination, and higher bacterial abundances than the non-fermentable electron donors during short-term tests. Phylotypes of Dehalococcoides were relatively abundant (≥9%) for the cultures fed with fermentable electron donors but accounted for only ~1-2% of the reads for the cultures fed by the non-fermentable electron donors. Routing electrons to methanogenesis and a low ratio of Dehalococcoides/methanogenesis (Dhc/mcrA) were associated with slow and incomplete reductive dechlorination with methanol and H2. When fermentable substrates were applied as electron donors, a Dhc/mcrA ratio ≥6.4 was essential to achieve fast and complete dechlorination of TCE to ethene. When methanogenesis was suppressed using 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES), achieving complete dechlorination of TCE to ethane required a minimum abundance of the mcrA gene. Methanobacterium appeared to be important for maintaining a high dechlorination rate, probably by providing Dehalococcoides with cofactors other than vitamin B12. Furthermore, the presence of homoacetogens also was important to maintain a high dechlorination rate, because they provided acetate as Dehalococcoides's obligatory carbon source and possibly cofactors.

  7. Tailored donor-acceptor polymers with an A-D1-A-D2 structure: controlling intermolecular interactions to enable enhanced polymer photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Qin, Tianshi; Zajaczkowski, Wojciech; Pisula, Wojciech; Baumgarten, Martin; Chen, Ming; Gao, Mei; Wilson, Gerry; Easton, Christopher D; Müllen, Klaus; Watkins, Scott E

    2014-04-23

    Extensive efforts have been made to develop novel conjugated polymers that give improved performance in organic photovoltaic devices. The use of polymers based on alternating electron-donating and electron-accepting units not only allows the frontier molecular orbitals to be tuned to maximize the open-circuit voltage of the devices but also controls the optical band gap to increase the number of photons absorbed and thus modifies the other critical device parameter-the short circuit current. In fact, varying the nonchromophoric components of a polymer is often secondary to the efforts to adjust the intermolecular aggregates and improve the charge-carrier mobility. Here, we introduce an approach to polymer synthesis that facilitates simultaneous control over both the structural and electronic properties of the polymers. Through the use of a tailored multicomponent acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) intermediate, polymers with the unique structure A-D1-A-D2 can be prepared. This approach enables variations in the donor fragment substituents such that control over both the polymer regiochemistry and solubility is possible. This control results in improved intermolecular π-stacking interactions and therefore enhanced charge-carrier mobility. Solar cells using the A-D1-A-D2 structural polymer show short-circuit current densities that are twice that of the simple, random analogue while still maintaining an identical open-circuit voltage. The key finding of this work is that polymers with an A-D1-A-D2 structure offer significant performance benefits over both regioregular and random A-D polymers. The chemical synthesis approach that enables the preparation of A-D1-A-D2 polymers therefore represents a promising new route to materials for high-efficiency organic photovoltaic devices.

  8. Electron Transfer Rate Maxima at Large Donor-Acceptor Distances.

    PubMed

    Kuss-Petermann, Martin; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-02-01

    Because of their low mass, electrons can transfer rapidly over long (>15 Å) distances, but usually reaction rates decrease with increasing donor-acceptor distance. We report here on electron transfer rate maxima at donor-acceptor separations of 30.6 Å, observed for thermal electron transfer between an anthraquinone radical anion and a triarylamine radical cation in three homologous series of rigid-rod-like donor-photosensitizer-acceptor triads with p-xylene bridges. Our experimental observations can be explained by a weak distance dependence of electronic donor-acceptor coupling combined with a strong increase of the (outer-sphere) reorganization energy with increasing distance, as predicted by electron transfer theory more than 30 years ago. The observed effect has important consequences for light-to-chemical energy conversion. PMID:26800279

  9. Shuttling electrons on and off As donor atoms in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyryshkin, A. M.; Lyon, S. A.; Lo, C. C.; Lo Nardo, R.; Morton, J. J. L.; Simmons, S.; Weis, C. D.; Schenkel, T.; Bokor, J.; Meijer, J.; Rogalla, D.

    2013-03-01

    Hybrid quantum devices where electron spins are used for state initialization, fast manipulation, long range entanglement and detection, while nuclear spins are used for long term storage promise revolutionary advantages. Here we report our first experiments using a silicon-based device that utilizes electron and nuclear spins of arsenic donors. The device is a large-area, parallel-plate capacitor fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer where the SOI layer is implanted with arsenic donors, and a back gate is formed in the silicon below the buried oxide by a high-energy boron implantation. The electrons can be controllably stripped from the donors and then reintroduced to the ionized donors by applying appropriate gate voltages. We use ensemble ESR experiments (X-band, magnetic field of 0.35 T) to track the occupancy of the donors during these operations. Pulsed ESR is used to characterize the spin state of the donor electrons and the effect of applied electric fields below the ionization threshold. The spin state of the arsenic nuclei, and the effect of electron removal and reintroduction on the nuclear state is expected to be observable in pulsed ENDOR experiments. The work is funded by LPS and NSF-MWN.

  10. Electron Donor Potential of Eastern North Dakota Shale Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas Klapperich, R. J.; Korom, S. F.

    2007-12-01

    We have a network of 16 in situ mesocosms (ISMs) used to study aquifer denitrification at 9 sites in North Dakota and Minnesota. The site in the Elk Valley aquifer in northeastern North Dakota has the highest denitrification rates and the greatest concentration of electron donors (organic carbon ~0.4%, pyrite as S ~0.4%, and ferrous iron ~0.3%) in the sediments. In contrast, denitrification rates at our other ISM sites are lower (or even below detection), as are the electron donor concentrations in the sediments. Knowing that the sediments at all of our ISM sites were placed as outwash during the last Wisconsinan glaciation (~12ka), we wonder what caused the variation in electron donor supplies in our aquifers. It has been suggested that variations is the electron donor concentrations in the various Late Cretaceous shale strata exposed during glaciation may help explain the variation in electron donor concentrations in overlying aquifers formed nearby. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the amount of electron donors available in these bedrock units. Bedrock samples (n = 39) from 20 sites in eastern North Dakota were obtained by drilling during the summer of 2006 in conjunction with the North Dakota State Water Commission. Samples were frozen before analysis for bulk mineralogical content by X-ray diffraction, organic carbon, pyrite as inorganic S, and ferrous iron contents. It was hypothesized that the Pierre Shale would have the highest donor concentration, but it appears that other formations, such as the Carlile and Greenhorn contain higher concentrations of electron donors. Organic carbon concentrations in the Pierre (< 0.01% to 1.0%) are relatively low while concentrations in the Carlile (3.5% - 6.5%) and Greenhorn (~8.5%) are significantly higher. Pyrite as inorganic S concentrations in the Pierre (< 0.01% to 0.2%), Carlile (0.3% - 0.5%), and Greenhorn (~0.5%) are similarly distributed. In the future, it may be possible to create a qualitative index

  11. Selenate and Nitrate Bioreductions Using Methane as the Electron Donor in a Membrane Biofilm Reactor.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chun-Yu; Wen, Li-Lian; Shi, Ling-Dong; Zhao, Kan-Kan; Wang, Yi-Qi; Yang, Xiaoe; Rittmann, Bruce E; Zhou, Chen; Tang, Youneng; Zheng, Ping; Zhao, He-Ping

    2016-09-20

    Selenate (SeO4(2-)) bioreduction is possible with oxidation of a range of organic or inorganic electron donors, but it never has been reported with methane gas (CH4) as the electron donor. In this study, we achieved complete SeO4(2-) bioreduction in a membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) using CH4 as the sole added electron donor. The introduction of nitrate (NO3(-)) slightly inhibited SeO4(2-) reduction, but the two oxyanions were simultaneously reduced, even when the supply rate of CH4 was limited. The main SeO4(2-)-reduction product was nanospherical Se(0), which was identified by scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDS). Community analysis provided evidence for two mechanisms for SeO4(2-) bioreduction in the CH4-based MBfR: a single methanotrophic genus, such as Methylomonas, performed CH4 oxidation directly coupled to SeO4(2-) reduction, and a methanotroph oxidized CH4 to form organic metabolites that were electron donors for a synergistic SeO4(2-)-reducing bacterium. PMID:27562531

  12. Electron donor preference of a reductive dechlorinating consortium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, M.M.; Majcher, E.; Jones, E.; Driedger, G.; Dworatzek, S.; Graves, D.

    2005-01-01

    A wetland sediment-derived microbial consortium was developed by the USGS and propagated in vitro to large quantities by SiREM Laboratory for use in bioaugmentation applications. The consortium had the capacity to completely dechlorinate 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethene, tetrachloroethylene, trichloroethylene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, cis- and trans-1,2-dichoroethylene, 1.1-dichloroethylene, 1,2-dichloroethane, vinyl chloride, carbon tetrachloride and chloroform. A suite of electron donors with characteristics useful for bioaugmentation applications was tested. The electron donors included lactate (the donor used during WBC-2 development), ethanol, chitin (Chitorem???), hydrogen releasing compound (HRC???), emulsified vegetable oil (Newman Zone???), and hydrogen gas. Ethanol, lactate, and chitin were particularly effective with respect to stimulating, supporting, and sustaining reductive dechlorination of the broad suite of chemicals that WBC-2 biodegraded. Chitorem??? was the most effective "slow release" electron donor tested. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the Proceedings of the 8th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, MD 6/6-9/2005).

  13. Fullerene derivatives as electron donor for organic photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Taojun; Wang, Xiao-Feng E-mail: ziruo@yz.yamagata-u.ac.jp; Sano, Takeshi; Kido, Junji; Hong, Ziruo E-mail: ziruo@yz.yamagata-u.ac.jp; Yang, Yang

    2013-11-11

    We demonstrated the performance of unconventional, all-fullerene-based, planar heterojunction (PHJ) organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells using fullerene derivatives indene-C{sub 60} bisadduct (ICBA) and phenyl C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester as the electron donors with fullerene C{sub 70} as the electron acceptor. Two different charge generation processes, including charge generation in the fullerene bulk and exciton dissociation at the donor-acceptor interface, have been found to exist in such all-fullerene-based PHJ cells and the contribution to the total photocurrent from each process is strongly dependent on the thickness of fullerene donor. The optimized 5 nm ICBA/40 nm C{sub 70} PHJ cell gives clear external quantum efficiency responses for the long-wavelength photons corresponding to the dissociation of strongly bound Frenkel excitons, which is hardly observed in fullerene-based single layer reference devices. This approach using fullerene as a donor material provides further possibilities for developing high performance OPV cells.

  14. 2012 ELECTRON DONOR-ACCEPTOR INTERACTIONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 5-10, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    McCusker, James

    2012-08-10

    The upcoming incarnation of the Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions will feature sessions on classic topics including proton-coupled electron transfer, dye-sensitized solar cells, and biological electron transfer, as well as emerging areas such as quantum coherence effects in donor-acceptor interactions, spintronics, and the application of donor-acceptor interactions in chemical synthesis.

  15. Organic electron donors as powerful single-electron reducing agents in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Broggi, Julie; Terme, Thierry; Vanelle, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    One-electron reduction is commonly used in organic chemistry for the formation of radicals by the stepwise transfer of one or two electrons from a donor to an organic substrate. Besides metallic reagents, single-electron reducers based on neutral organic molecules have emerged as an attractive novel source of reducing electrons. The past 20 years have seen the blossoming of a particular class of organic reducing agents, the electron-rich olefins, and their application in organic synthesis. This Review gives an overview of the different types of organic donors and their specific characteristics in organic transformations.

  16. Electronic structure of acceptor-donor complexes in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atoro, E.; Ohama, Y.; Hayafuji, Y.

    2003-10-01

    The electronic structure of trimer acceptor-donor complexes in silicon Si clusters is studied using the ab initio discrete variational-Xα molecular-orbital (MO) method. The trimer complexes In2D (D=phosphorus P, arsenic As, antimony Sb, or bismuth Bi) consist of two indium In acceptor elements and a centered donor element D from the group V elements. Calculations are performed under the assumption that the three atoms are arranged in the nearest neighbor substitutional trimer configuration. Results indicate that the trimer complexes act as shallower acceptors having smaller ionization activation energies than In acceptor. The potential of In2D as an acceptor in Si is then discussed and In2D is proposed as a promising acceptor for the formation of channels and source/drains in ultralarge scaled integration.

  17. Cofactor recycling mechanism in asymmetric biocatalytic reduction of carbonyl compounds mediated by yeast: which is the efficient electron donor?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ben-Li; Pionnier, Sébastien

    2003-08-01

    In asymmetric reduction of carbonyl compounds mediated by microorganisms, the cofactors that transfer hydride should be regenerated by using a recycling system. In most cases, this recycling system consists of carbohydrate molecules, especially glucose or sucrose. Other molecules such as ethanol and acetate have been used as electron donors too. The reduction can even be conducted without added electron donors. To improve biocatalytic synthesis, it is important to understand the cofactor recycling mechanism. In this work, the hydride-transfer mechanism in cofactor regeneration, which takes place in bioreduction mediated by yeast, was studied by means of an isotope tracing technique. The results show that, when glucose was used, the NADH involved in the glycolysis was consumed directly in the formation of ethanol and was not used in the bioreduction. Hence, the regeneration of cofactors in the reduction is not coupled with glycolysis. Nevertheless, glucose is an efficient electron donor that transfers hydride through the hexose monophosphate (HMP) pathway in which the main hydrogen source is C-1 and C-3 hydrogen of glucose. Ethanol is not a good electron donor, since, when it was used, only a small quantity of hydrogen was transferred from this molecule, and the main hydrogen source was water. Therefore, the ethanol oxidation pathway may not be efficient. In the absence of added auxiliary substrates, the yeast cells may use electron donors stored in its cellules. However, in this case we observed that the main hydrogen source for cofactor recycling was water, while only very few hydrogen atoms were from unexchangeable sites. This is similar to the case in which ethanol is used, and is in contradiction with the HMP pathway if stored glucose was the electron donor. The question that remains to be investigated is "what is the efficient electron donor recycling mechanism in the yeast cellules?" PMID:12898687

  18. Ultrafast photoinduced charge transport in Pt(II) donor-acceptor assembly bearing naphthalimide electron acceptor and phenothiazine electron donor.

    PubMed

    Sazanovich, Igor V; Best, Jonathan; Scattergood, Paul A; Towrie, Michael; Tikhomirov, Sergei A; Bouganov, Oleg V; Meijer, Anthony J H M; Weinstein, Julia A

    2014-12-21

    Visible light-induced charge transfer dynamics were investigated in a novel transition metal triad acceptor-chromophore-donor, (NDI-phen)Pt(II)(-C≡C-Ph-CH2-PTZ)2 (1), designed for photoinduced charge separation using a combination of time-resolved infrared (TRIR) and femtosecond electronic transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. In 1, the electron acceptor is 1,4,5,8-naphthalene diimide (NDI), and the electron donor is phenothiazine (PTZ), and [(phen)Pt(-C≡C-Ph-)], where phen is 1,10-phenanthroline, represents the chromophoric core. The first excited state observed in 1 is a (3)MLCT/LL'CT, with {Pt(II)-acetylide}-to-phen character. Following that, charge transfer from the phen-anion onto the NDI subunit to form NDI(-)-phen-[Pt-(C≡C)2](+)-PTZ2 occurs with a time constant of 2.3 ps. This transition is characterised by appearance of the prominent NDI-anion features in both TRIR and TA spectra. The final step of the charge separation in 1 proceeds with a time constant of ∼15 ps during which the hole migrates from the [Pt-(C≡C)2] subunit to one of the PTZ groups. Charge recombination in 1 then occurs with two distinct time constants of 36 ns and 107 ns, corresponding to the back electron transfer to each of the two donor groups; a rather rare occurrence which manifests that the hole in the final charge-separated state is localised on one of the two donor PTZ groups. The assignment of the nature of the excited states and dynamics in 1 was assisted by TRIR investigations of the analogous previously reported ((COOEt)2bpy)Pt(C≡C-Ph-CH2-PTZ)2 (2), (J. E. McGarrah and R. Eisenberg, Inorg. Chem., 2003, 42, 4355; J. E. McGarrah, J. T. Hupp and S. N. Smirnov, J. Phys. Chem. A, 2009, 113, 6430) as well as (bpy)Pt(C≡C-Ph-C7H15)2, which represent the acceptor-free dyad, and the chromophoric core, respectively. Thus, the step-wise formation of the full charge-separated state on the picosecond time scale and charge recombination via tunnelling have been established; and

  19. Evaluation of sustainable electron donors for nitrate removal in different water media.

    PubMed

    Fowdar, Harsha S; Hatt, Belinda E; Breen, Peter; Cook, Perran L M; Deletic, Ana

    2015-11-15

    An external electron donor is usually included in wastewater and groundwater treatment systems to enhance nitrate removal through denitrification. The choice of electron donor is critical for both satisfactory denitrification rates and sustainable long-term performance. Electron donors that are waste products are preferred to pure organic chemicals. Different electron donors have been used to treat different water types and little is known as to whether there are any electron donors that are suitable for multiple applications. Seven different carbon rich waste products, including liquid and solid electron donors, were studied in comparison to pure acetate. Batch-scale tests were used to measure their ability to reduce nitrate concentrations in a pure nutrient solution, light greywater, secondary-treated wastewater and tertiary-treated wastewater. The tested electron donors removed oxidised nitrogen (NOx) at varying rates, ranging from 48 mg N/L/d (acetate) to 0.3 mg N/L/d (hardwood). The concentrations of transient nitrite accumulation also varied across the electron donors. The different water types had an influence on NOx removal rates, the extent of which was dependent on the type of electron donor. Overall, the highest rates were recorded in light greywater, followed by the pure nutrient solution and the two partially treated wastewaters. Cotton wool and rice hulls were found to be promising electron donors with good NOx removal rates, lower leachable nutrients and had the least variation in performance across water types.

  20. Comparison between acetate and hydrogen as electron donors and implications for the reductive dehalogenation of PCE and TCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Il-Su; Bae, Jae-Ho; McCarty, Perry L.

    2007-10-01

    Bioremediation by reductive dehalogenation of groundwater contaminated with tetrachloroethene (PCE) or trichloroethene (TCE) is generally carried out through the addition of a fermentable electron donor such as lactate, benzoate, carbohydrates or vegetable oil. These fermentable donors are converted by fermenting organisms into acetate and hydrogen, either of which might be used by dehalogenating microorganisms. Comparisons were made between H 2 and acetate on the rate and extent of reductive dehalogenation of PCE. PCE dehalogenation with H 2 alone was complete to ethene, but with acetate alone it generally proceeded only about half as fast and only to cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE). Additionally, acetate was not used as an electron donor in the presence of H 2. These findings suggest the fermentable electron donor requirement for PCE dehalogenation to ethene can be reduced up to 50% by separating PCE dehalogenation into two stages, the first of which uses acetate for the conversion of PCE to cDCE, and the second uses H 2 for the conversion of cDCE to ethene. This can be implemented with a recycle system in which the fermentable substrate is added down-gradient, where the hydrogen being produced by fermentation effects cDCE conversion into ethene. The acetate produced is recycled up-gradient to achieve PCE conversion into cDCE. With the lower electron donor usage required, potential problems of aquifer clogging, excess methane production, and high groundwater chemical oxygen demand (COD) can be greatly reduced.

  1. [KEEPING THE ELECTRON-DONOR PROPERTIES OF DRINKING WATER].

    PubMed

    Gibert, K K; Stekhin, A A; Iakovleva, G V; Sul'ina, Iu S

    2015-01-01

    In a study there was performed the experimental evaluation of long-term structural--physical changes of the phase of associated water in drinking water treated in hypomagnetic conditions according to the the technology providing the retention of of ortho/para isomers of water in the presence of a catalyst--triplet oxygen. According to the results of measurements ofparameters of nano-associates formed in the water there was found a series ofconsistencies, allowing to determine the mechanisms of the impact of hypomagnetic treatment on the catalytic properties ofwater and long-term stability of its activated state, that provides the long-term maintenance of high biological activity of drinking water. In particular, under hypomagnetic conditions of the treatment there is formed denser packing of amorphous ice--VI in the composition of associates peroxide, serving as a kind of "reservoir" of atmospheric gases. In such a "reservoir" there realized higher pressure, compared with normal geophysical conditions, that stimulates the gas-phase reactions with the formation of dimers and trimers of oxygen existing in the 2-electron--active configurations with binding energies of 0.3 eVand ~0.2 eV providing phase modulation, resulting in condensation of environment additional electrons on paramagnetic oxygen, which provides the long-term maintenance of the electron--donor ability of water and electrically non-equilibrium state.

  2. Activation of Electron-Deficient Quinones through Hydrogen-Bond-Donor-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Turek, Amanda K; Hardee, David J; Ullman, Andrew M; Nocera, Daniel G; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2016-01-11

    Quinones are important organic oxidants in a variety of synthetic and biological contexts, and they are susceptible to activation towards electron transfer through hydrogen bonding. Whereas this effect of hydrogen bond donors (HBDs) has been observed for Lewis basic, weakly oxidizing quinones, comparable activation is not readily achieved when more reactive and synthetically useful electron-deficient quinones are used. We have successfully employed HBD-coupled electron transfer as a strategy to activate electron-deficient quinones. A systematic investigation of HBDs has led to the discovery that certain dicationic HBDs have an exceptionally large effect on the rate and thermodynamics of electron transfer. We further demonstrate that these HBDs can be used as catalysts in a quinone-mediated model synthetic transformation.

  3. Monitoring electron donor metabolism under variable electron acceptor conditions using 13C-labeled lactate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bill, M.; Conrad, M. E.; Yang, L.; Beller, H. R.; Brodie, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Three sets of flow-through columns constructed with aquifer sediment from Hanford (WA) were used to study reduction of Cr(VI) to poorly soluble Cr(III) under denitrifying, sulfate-reducing/fermentative, and iron-reducing conditions with lactate as the electron donor. In order to understand the relationship between electron donors and biomarkers, and to determine the differences in carbon isotope fractionation resulting from different microbial metabolic processes, we monitored the variation in carbon isotopes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), in total organic carbon (TOC), and in lactate, acetate and propionate. The greatest enrichment in 13C in columns was observed under denitrifying conditions. The δ13C of DIC increased by ~1750 to ~2000‰ fifteen days after supplementation of natural abundance lactate with a 13C-labeled lactate tracer (for an influent δ13C of ~2250‰ for the lactate) indicating almost complete oxidation of the electron donor. The denitrifying columns were among the most active columns and had the highest cell counts and the denitrification rate was highly correlated with Cr(VI) reduction rate. δ13C values of DIC ranged from ~540 to ~1170‰ for iron-reducing conditions. The lower enrichment in iron columns was related to the lower biological activity observed with lower yields of RNA and cell numbers in the column effluents. The carbon isotope shift in the sulfate-reducing ~198 to ~1960‰ for sulfate-reducing conditions reflecting the lower levels of the lactate in these columns. Additionally, in two of the sulfate columns, almost complete fermentation of the lactate occurred, producing acetate and propionate with the labeled carbon signature, but relatively smaller amounts of inorganic carbon. For all electron-accepting conditions, TOC yielded similar δ13C values as lactate stock solutions. Differences in C use efficiency, metabolic rate or metabolic pathway contributed to the differing TOC δ13C to DIC δ13C ratios between treatments

  4. Temperature and donor concentration dependence of the conduction electron Lande g-factor in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Konakov, Anton A.; Ezhevskii, Alexander A.; Soukhorukov, Andrey V.; Guseinov, Davud V.; Popkov, Sergey A.; Burdov, Vladimir A.

    2013-12-04

    Temperature and donor concentration dependence of the conduction electron g-factor in silicon has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. We performed electron spin resonance experiments on Si samples doped with different densities of phosphorus and lithium. Theoretical consideration is based on the renormalization of the electron energy in a weak magnetic field by the interaction with possible perturbing agents, such as phonons and impurity centers. In the second-order perturbation theory interaction of the electron subsystem with the lattice vibrations as well as ionized donors results in decreasing the conduction electron g-factor, which becomes almost linear function both of temperature and impurity concentration.

  5. Dynamics of nonequilibrium electrons on neutral center states of interstitial magnesium donors in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, S. G.; Deßmann, N.; Pohl, A.; Shuman, V. B.; Portsel, L. M.; Lodygin, A. N.; Astrov, Yu. A.; Winnerl, S.; Schneider, H.; Stavrias, N.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Tsyplenkov, V. V.; Kovalevsky, K. A.; Zhukavin, R. Kh.; Shastin, V. N.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Hübers, H.-W.

    2016-08-01

    Subnanosecond dynamics of optically excited electrons bound to excited states of neutral magnesium donor centers in silicon has been investigated. Lifetimes of nonequilibrium electrons have been derived from the decay of the differential transmission at photon energies matching the intracenter and the impurity-to-conduction band transitions. In contrast to hydrogenlike shallow donors in silicon, significantly longer lifetimes have been observed. This indicates weaker two-phonon and off-resonant interactions dominate the relaxation processes in contrast to the single-intervalley-phonon-assisted impurity-phonon interactions in the case of shallow donors in silicon.

  6. Stimulation of KatG catalase activity by peroxidatic electron donors.

    PubMed

    Ndontsa, Elizabeth N; Moore, Robert L; Goodwin, Douglas C

    2012-09-15

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) use a peroxidase scaffold to support robust catalase activity, an ability no other member of its superfamily possesses. Because catalase turnover requires H(2)O(2) oxidation, whereas peroxidase turnover requires oxidation of an exogenous electron donor, it has been anticipated that the latter should inhibit catalase activity. To the contrary, we report peroxidatic electron donors stimulated catalase activity up to 14-fold, particularly under conditions favorable to peroxidase activity (i.e., acidic pH and low H(2)O(2) concentrations). We observed a "low-" and "high-K(M)" component for catalase activity at pH 5.0. Electron donors increased the apparent k(cat) for the "low-K(M)" component. During stimulated catalase activity, less than 0.008 equivalents of oxidized donor accumulated for every H(2)O(2) consumed. Several classical peroxidatic electron donors were effective stimulators of catalase activity, but pyrogallol and ascorbate showed little effect. Stopped-flow evaluation showed that a Fe(III)-O(2)(·-)-like intermediate dominated during donor-stimulated catalatic turnover, and this intermediate converted directly to the ferric state upon depletion of H(2)O(2). In this respect, the Fe(III)-O(2)(·-) -like species was more prominent and persistent than in the absence of the donor. These results point toward a much more central role for peroxidase substrates in the unusual catalase mechanism of KatG.

  7. Time dependence of donor-acceptor electron transfer and back transfer in solid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Dorfman, R. C.; Fayer, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    Electron transfer from an optically excited donor to randomly distributed acceptors followed by electron back transfer is treated theoretically for donors and acceptors in a rigid solution. The forward electron transfer process is described in terms of the excited state population probabilityPex(t) of the donor molecules, while the electron back transfer from the radical anion to the radical cation is characterized by Pct(t), the donor cation state population probability. Exact expressions for the ensemble averages and are derived. Numerical calulations are presented for the cation probabilities, the average cation-anion separation distance , and the average cation existence time <τ(R)>, using parameters which characterize the forward and back transfer distance dependent rates. Relationships among , and the intermolecular interaction parameters provide detailed insights into the distance and time dependence of the flow of electron probability in an ensemble of donors and acceptors. The theoretical expressions can be used to calculate experimental observables. In particular, picosecond transient grating experiments are analyzed, and it is shown that by combining grating experiments (or other ground state recovery experiments) with fluorescence experiments it is possible to obtain the intermolecular interaction parameters for both forward and back transfer and a detailed description of the dynamics. The calculations presented here for rigid solutions are the precursor to the inclusion of diffusive motion of donors and acceptors to describe the dynamics of coupled electron transfer and back transfer in liquid solutions.

  8. Organic photovoltaic cells based on unconventional electron donor fullerene and electron acceptor copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. L.; Sullivan, P.; Schumann, S.; Hancox, I.; Jones, T. S.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate organic discrete heterojunction photovoltaic cells based on fullerene (C60) and copper hexadecafluorophthalocyanine (F16CuPc), in which the C60 and F16CuPc act as the electron donor and the electron acceptor, respectively. The C60/F16CuPc cells fabricated with conventional and inverted architectures both exhibit comparable power conversion efficiencies. Furthermore, we show that the photocurrent in both cells is generated by a conventional exciton dissociation mechanism rather than the exciton recombination mechanism recently proposed for a similar C60/F16ZnPc system [Song et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 4554 (2010)]. These results demonstrate that new unconventional material systems are a potential way to fabricate organic photovoltaic cells with inverted as well as conventional architectures.

  9. The impacts of electronic state hybridization on the binding energy of single phosphorus donor electrons in extremely downscaled silicon nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    The Anh, Le Manoharan, Muruganathan; Moraru, Daniel; Tabe, Michiharu; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2014-08-14

    We present the density functional theory calculations of the binding energy of the Phosphorus (P) donor electrons in extremely downscaled single P-doped Silicon (Si) nanorods. In past studies, the binding energy of donor electrons was evaluated for the Si nanostructures as the difference between the ionization energy for the single P-doped Si nanostructures and the electron affinity for the un-doped Si nanostructures. This definition does not take into account the strong interaction of donor electron states and Si electron states explicitly at the conductive states and results in a monotonous increase in the binding energy by reducing the nanostructure's dimensions. In this paper, we introduce a new approach to evaluate the binding energy of donor electrons by combining the projected density of states (PDOS) analysis and three-dimensional analysis of associated electron wavefunctions. This enables us to clarify a gradual change of the spatial distribution of the 3D electron wavefunctions (3DWFs) from the donor electron ground state, which is fully localized around the P donor site to the first conductive state, which spreads over the outer Si nanorods contributing to current conduction. We found that the energy of the first conductive state is capped near the top of the atomistic effective potential at the donor site with respect to the surrounding Si atoms in nanorods smaller than about 27 a{sub 0}. This results in the binding energy of approximately 1.5 eV, which is virtually independent on the nanorod's dimensions. This fact signifies a good tolerance of the binding energy, which governs the operating temperature of the single dopant-based transistors in practice. We also conducted the computationally heavy transmission calculations of the single P-doped Si nanorods connected to the source and drain electrodes. The calculated transmission spectra are discussed in comparison with the atomistic effective potential distributions and the PDOS-3DWFs method.

  10. The impacts of electronic state hybridization on the binding energy of single phosphorus donor electrons in extremely downscaled silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Anh, Le; Moraru, Daniel; Manoharan, Muruganathan; Tabe, Michiharu; Mizuta, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    We present the density functional theory calculations of the binding energy of the Phosphorus (P) donor electrons in extremely downscaled single P-doped Silicon (Si) nanorods. In past studies, the binding energy of donor electrons was evaluated for the Si nanostructures as the difference between the ionization energy for the single P-doped Si nanostructures and the electron affinity for the un-doped Si nanostructures. This definition does not take into account the strong interaction of donor electron states and Si electron states explicitly at the conductive states and results in a monotonous increase in the binding energy by reducing the nanostructure's dimensions. In this paper, we introduce a new approach to evaluate the binding energy of donor electrons by combining the projected density of states (PDOS) analysis and three-dimensional analysis of associated electron wavefunctions. This enables us to clarify a gradual change of the spatial distribution of the 3D electron wavefunctions (3DWFs) from the donor electron ground state, which is fully localized around the P donor site to the first conductive state, which spreads over the outer Si nanorods contributing to current conduction. We found that the energy of the first conductive state is capped near the top of the atomistic effective potential at the donor site with respect to the surrounding Si atoms in nanorods smaller than about 27 a0. This results in the binding energy of approximately 1.5 eV, which is virtually independent on the nanorod's dimensions. This fact signifies a good tolerance of the binding energy, which governs the operating temperature of the single dopant-based transistors in practice. We also conducted the computationally heavy transmission calculations of the single P-doped Si nanorods connected to the source and drain electrodes. The calculated transmission spectra are discussed in comparison with the atomistic effective potential distributions and the PDOS-3DWFs method.

  11. Double Deprotonation of Pyridinols Generates Potent Organic Electron-Donor Initiators for Haloarene-Arene Coupling.

    PubMed

    Barham, Joshua P; Coulthard, Graeme; Kane, Ryan G; Delgado, Nathan; John, Matthew P; Murphy, John A

    2016-03-24

    Transition metal-free couplings of haloarenes with arenes, triggered by the use of alkali metal alkoxides in the presence of an organic additive, are receiving significant attention in the literature. Most of the known organic additives effect coupling of iodoarenes, but not bromoarenes, to arenes. Recently it was reported that 2-pyridinecarbinol (11) extends the reaction to aryl bromides. This paper investigates the mechanism, and reports evidence for dianions derived from 11 as electron donors to initiate the reaction. It also proposes routes by which electron-poor benzoyl derivatives can be transformed into electron donors to initiate these reactions. PMID:26938924

  12. On the cascade capture of electrons at donors in GaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Aleshkin, V. Ya.

    2015-09-15

    The impact parameter for the cascade capture of electrons at a charged donor in a GaAs quantum well is calculated. A simple approximate analytical expression for the impact parameter is suggested. The temperature dependence of the impact parameter for the case of electron scattering by the piezoelectric potential of acoustic phonons is determined.

  13. ESR Experiments on a Single Donor Electron in Isotopically Enriched Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Lisa; Luhman, Dwight; Carr, Stephen; Borchardt, John; Bishop, Nathaniel; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Pluym, Tammy; Wendt, Joel; Witzel, Wayne; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Nielsen, Erik; Lilly, Michael; Carroll, Malcolm

    In this talk we will discuss electron spin resonance experiments in single donor silicon qubit devices fabricated at Sandia National Labs. A self-aligned device structure consisting of a polysilicon gate SET located adjacent to the donor is used for donor electron spin readout. Using a cryogenic HEMT amplifier next to the silicon device, we demonstrate spin readout at 100 kHz bandwidth and Rabi oscillations with 0.96 visibility. Electron spin resonance measurements on these devices show a linewidth of 30 kHz and coherence times T2* = 10 us and T2 = 0.3 ms. We also discuss estimates of the fidelity of our donor electron spin qubit measurements using gate set tomography. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. ESR Experiments on a Single Donor Electron in Isotopically Enriched Silicon.

  14. Carbon Monoxide as an Electron Donor for the Biological Reduction of Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Parshina, Sofiya N.; Sipma, Jan; Henstra, Anne Meint; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Several strains of Gram-negative and Gram-positive sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are able to use carbon monoxide (CO) as a carbon source and electron donor for biological sulphate reduction. These strains exhibit variable resistance to CO toxicity. The most resistant SRB can grow and use CO as an electron donor at concentrations up to 100%, whereas others are already severely inhibited at CO concentrations as low as 1-2%. Here, the utilization, inhibition characteristics, and enzymology of CO metabolism as well as the current state of genomics of CO-oxidizing SRB are reviewed. Carboxydotrophic sulphate-reducing bacteria can be applied for biological sulphate reduction with synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) as an electron donor. PMID:20628586

  15. Spin relaxation via exchange with donor impurity-bound electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian

    In the Bir-Aronov-Pikus depolarization process affecting conduction electrons in p-type cubic semiconductors, spin relaxation is driven by exchange with short-lived valence band hole states. We have identified an analogous spin relaxation mechanism in nominally undoped silicon at low temperatures, when many electrons are bound to dilute dopant ion potentials. Inelastic scattering with externally injected conduction electrons accelerated by electric fields can excite transitions into highly spin-orbit-mixed bound excited states, driving strong spin relaxation of the conduction electrons via exchange interaction. We reveal the consequences of this spin depolarization mechanism both below and above the impact ionization threshold, where conventional charge and spin transport are restored. Based upon: Lan Qing, Jing Li, Ian Appelbaum, and Hanan Dery, Phys Rev. B 91, 241405(R) (2015). We acknowledge support from NSF, DTRA, and ONR.

  16. Stereochemical Properties of Multidentate Nitrogen Donor Ligands and Their Copper Complexes by Electronic CD and DFT.

    PubMed

    Poopari, Mohammad Reza; Dezhahang, Zahra; Xu, Yunjie

    2016-07-01

    UV-Vis and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectroscopy, complemented with Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, were used to elucidate the structural diversities of three multidentate nitrogen donor ligands and two associated copper complexes in solution directly. The three chiral salen ligands all consist of trans-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine as a chiral scaffold and also of pyridine rings as chromophores, differing only in the linking groups between the two functional groups mentioned above. Very different ECD intensities and somewhat different ECD patterns were observed for these ligands and satisfactorily interpreted theoretically. For the geometry optimization and spectral simulation of the open-shell metal complexes, the LANL2DZ basis set with effective core potential for the Cu and Cl atoms and pure cc-pVTZ for the rest of the atoms was utilized. The performance of the same calculations with the polarization functions (f,g) from the cc-pVTZ basis added to the LANL2DZ basis was compared. While the three ligands exhibit different conformational flexibility, the associated copper complexes show great rigidity imposed by the metal-ligand coordination, taking on a single structure in each case. In addition, dispersion interactions were shown to change the conformational stability ordering of the ligands noticeably and to exert considerable influence on the simulated UV-Vis and ECD spectra. Chirality 28:545-555, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27349956

  17. Stereochemical Properties of Multidentate Nitrogen Donor Ligands and Their Copper Complexes by Electronic CD and DFT.

    PubMed

    Poopari, Mohammad Reza; Dezhahang, Zahra; Xu, Yunjie

    2016-07-01

    UV-Vis and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectroscopy, complemented with Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, were used to elucidate the structural diversities of three multidentate nitrogen donor ligands and two associated copper complexes in solution directly. The three chiral salen ligands all consist of trans-cyclohexane-1,2-diamine as a chiral scaffold and also of pyridine rings as chromophores, differing only in the linking groups between the two functional groups mentioned above. Very different ECD intensities and somewhat different ECD patterns were observed for these ligands and satisfactorily interpreted theoretically. For the geometry optimization and spectral simulation of the open-shell metal complexes, the LANL2DZ basis set with effective core potential for the Cu and Cl atoms and pure cc-pVTZ for the rest of the atoms was utilized. The performance of the same calculations with the polarization functions (f,g) from the cc-pVTZ basis added to the LANL2DZ basis was compared. While the three ligands exhibit different conformational flexibility, the associated copper complexes show great rigidity imposed by the metal-ligand coordination, taking on a single structure in each case. In addition, dispersion interactions were shown to change the conformational stability ordering of the ligands noticeably and to exert considerable influence on the simulated UV-Vis and ECD spectra. Chirality 28:545-555, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Single donor electronics and quantum functionalities with advanced CMOS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehl, Xavier; Niquet, Yann-Michel; Sanquer, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Recent progresses in quantum dots technology allow fundamental studies of single donors in various semiconductor nanostructures. For the prospect of applications figures of merits such as scalability, tunability, and operation at relatively large temperature are of prime importance. Beyond the case of actual dopant atoms in a host crystal, similar arguments hold for small enough quantum dots which behave as artificial atoms, for instance for single spin control and manipulation. In this context, this experimental review focuses on the silicon-on-insulator devices produced within microelectronics facilities with only very minor modifications to the current industrial CMOS process and tools. This is required for scalability and enabled by shallow trench or mesa isolation. It also paves the way for real integration with conventional circuits, as illustrated by a nanoscale device coupled to a CMOS circuit producing a radio-frequency drive on-chip. At the device level we emphasize the central role of electrostatics in etched silicon nanowire transistors, which allows to understand the characteristics in the full range from zero to room temperature.

  19. Photocurrent generation through electron-exciton interaction at the organic semiconductor donor/acceptor interface.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijia; Zhang, Qiaoming; Lei, Yanlian; Zhu, Furong; Wu, Bo; Zhang, Ting; Niu, Guoxi; Xiong, Zuhong; Song, Qunliang

    2013-10-21

    In this work, we report our effort to understand the photocurrent generation that is contributed via electron-exciton interaction at the donor/acceptor interface in organic solar cells (OSCs). Donor/acceptor bi-layer heterojunction OSCs, of the indium tin oxide/copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene (C60)/molybdenum oxide/Al type, were employed to study the mechanism of photocurrent generation due to the electron-exciton interaction, where CuPc and C60 are the donor and the acceptor, respectively. It is shown that the electron-exciton interaction and the exciton dissociation processes co-exist at the CuPc/C60 interface in OSCs. Compared to conventional donor/acceptor bi-layer OSCs, the cells with the above configuration enable holes to be extracted at the C60 side while electrons can be collected at the CuPc side, resulting in a photocurrent in the reverse direction. The photocurrent thus observed is contributed to primarily by the charge carriers that are generated by the electron-exciton interaction at the CuPc/C60 interface, while charges derived from the exciton dissociation process also exist at the same interface. The mechanism of photocurrent generation due to electron-exciton interaction in the OSCs is further investigated, and it is manifested by the transient photovoltage characteristics and the external quantum efficiency measurements. PMID:24002235

  20. Diarylindenotetracenes via a selective cross-coupling/C-H functionalization: electron donors for organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xingxian; Luhman, Wade A; Yagodkin, Elisey; Holmes, Russell J; Douglas, Christopher J

    2012-03-16

    A direct synthesis of new donor materials for organic photovoltaic cells is reported. Diaryindenotetracenes were synthesized utilizing a Kumada-Tamao-Corriu cross-coupling of peri-substituted tetrachlorotetracene with spontaneous indene annulation via C-H activation. Vacuum deposited planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells incorporating these molecules as electron donors exhibit power conversion efficiencies exceeding 1.5% with open-circuit voltages ranging from 0.7 to 1.1 V when coupled with C(60) as an electron acceptor.

  1. Autotrophic antimonate bio-reduction using hydrogen as the electron donor.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chun-Yu; Wen, Li-Lian; Zhang, Yin; Luo, Shan-Shan; Wang, Qing-Ying; Luo, Yi-Hao; Chen, Ran; Yang, Xiaoe; Rittmann, Bruce E; Zhao, He-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Antimony (Sb), a toxic metalloid, is soluble as antimonate (Sb(V)). While bio-reduction of Sb(V) is an effective Sb-removal approach, its bio-reduction has been coupled to oxidation of only organic electron donors. In this study, we demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of autotrophic microbial Sb(V) reduction using hydrogen gas (H2) as the electron donor without extra organic carbon source. SEM and EDS analysis confirmed the production of the mineral precipitate Sb2O3. When H2 was utilized as the electron donor, the consortium was able to fully reduce 650 μM of Sb(V) to Sb(III) in 10 days, a rate comparable to the culture using lactate as the electron donor. The H2-fed culture directed a much larger fraction of it donor electrons to Sb(V) reduction than did the lactate-fed culture. While 98% of the electrons from H2 were used to reduce Sb(V) by the H2-fed culture, only 12% of the electrons from lactate was used to reduce Sb(V) by the lactate-fed culture. The rest of the electrons from lactate went to acetate and propionate through fermentation, to methane through methanogenesis, and to biomass synthesis. High-throughput sequencing confirmed that the microbial community for the lactate-fed culture was much more diverse than that for the H2-fed culture, which was dominated by a short rod-shaped phylotype of Rhizobium (α-Protobacteria) that may have been active in Sb(V) reduction.

  2. Spectral probes of the holographic Fermi ground state: Dialing between the electron star and AdS Dirac hair

    SciTech Connect

    Cubrovic, Mihailo; Liu Yan; Schalm, Koenraad; Sun Yawen; Zaanen, Jan

    2011-10-15

    We argue that the electron star and the anti-de Sitter (AdS) Dirac hair solution are two limits of the free charged Fermi gas in AdS. Spectral functions of holographic duals to probe fermions in the background of electron stars have a free parameter that quantifies the number of constituent fermions that make up the charge and energy density characterizing the electron star solution. The strict electron star limit takes this number to be infinite. The Dirac hair solution is the limit where this number is unity. This is evident in the behavior of the distribution of holographically dual Fermi surfaces. As we decrease the number of constituents in a fixed electron star background the number of Fermi surfaces also decreases. An improved holographic Fermi ground state should be a configuration that shares the qualitative properties of both limits.

  3. Photoinduced electron transfer between donors and acceptors on micelle surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidemaier, Kristin; Tavernier, H. L.; Chu, K. T.; Fayer, M. D.

    1997-09-01

    Fluorescence time-dependence and fluorescence yield data are used to examine photoinduced electron transfer between N,N-dimethylaniline and octadecylrhodamine B on the surfaces of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and Triton X-100 micelles. The data are analyzed with a detailed theory that includes diffusion of the chromophores over the micelle surface and models the reaction rate by a distance-dependent Marcus form. Good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained for reasonable choices of the transfer parameters for DTAB. However, for Triton X-100, there is reasonable agreement between theory and experiment only for values of the parameters that verge on unphysical. Possible explanations are discussed.

  4. Expanding the Diet for DIET: Electron Donors Supporting Direct Interspecies Electron Transfer (DIET) in Defined Co-Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Ying; Nevin, Kelly P.; Woodard, Trevor L.; Mu, Bo-Zhong; Lovley, Derek R.

    2016-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) has been recognized as an alternative to interspecies H2 transfer as a mechanism for syntrophic growth, but previous studies on DIET with defined co-cultures have only documented DIET with ethanol as the electron donor in the absence of conductive materials. Co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens metabolized propanol, butanol, propionate, and butyrate with the reduction of fumarate to succinate. G. metallireducens utilized each of these substrates whereas only electrons available from DIET supported G. sulfurreducens respiration. A co-culture of G. metallireducens and a strain of G. sulfurreducens that could not metabolize acetate oxidized acetate with fumarate as the electron acceptor, demonstrating that acetate can also be syntrophically metabolized via DIET. A co-culture of G. metallireducens and Methanosaeta harundinacea previously shown to syntrophically convert ethanol to methane via DIET metabolized propanol or butanol as the sole electron donor, but not propionate or butyrate. The stoichiometric accumulation of propionate or butyrate in the propanol- or butanol-fed cultures demonstrated that M. harundinaceae could conserve energy to support growth solely from electrons derived from DIET. Co-cultures of G. metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri could also incompletely metabolize propanol and butanol and did not metabolize propionate or butyrate as sole electron donors. These results expand the range of substrates that are known to be syntrophically metabolized through DIET, but suggest that claims of propionate and butyrate metabolism via DIET in mixed microbial communities warrant further validation. PMID:26973614

  5. Expanding the Diet for DIET: Electron Donors Supporting Direct Interspecies Electron Transfer (DIET) in Defined Co-Cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ying; Nevin, Kelly P; Woodard, Trevor L; Mu, Bo-Zhong; Lovley, Derek R

    2016-01-01

    Direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) has been recognized as an alternative to interspecies H2 transfer as a mechanism for syntrophic growth, but previous studies on DIET with defined co-cultures have only documented DIET with ethanol as the electron donor in the absence of conductive materials. Co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens metabolized propanol, butanol, propionate, and butyrate with the reduction of fumarate to succinate. G. metallireducens utilized each of these substrates whereas only electrons available from DIET supported G. sulfurreducens respiration. A co-culture of G. metallireducens and a strain of G. sulfurreducens that could not metabolize acetate oxidized acetate with fumarate as the electron acceptor, demonstrating that acetate can also be syntrophically metabolized via DIET. A co-culture of G. metallireducens and Methanosaeta harundinacea previously shown to syntrophically convert ethanol to methane via DIET metabolized propanol or butanol as the sole electron donor, but not propionate or butyrate. The stoichiometric accumulation of propionate or butyrate in the propanol- or butanol-fed cultures demonstrated that M. harundinaceae could conserve energy to support growth solely from electrons derived from DIET. Co-cultures of G. metallireducens and Methanosarcina barkeri could also incompletely metabolize propanol and butanol and did not metabolize propionate or butyrate as sole electron donors. These results expand the range of substrates that are known to be syntrophically metabolized through DIET, but suggest that claims of propionate and butyrate metabolism via DIET in mixed microbial communities warrant further validation. PMID:26973614

  6. Influence of electron donor on the minimum sulfate concentration required for sulfate reduction in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    Fluctuations in the availability of electron donor (petroleum hydrocarbons) affected the competition between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and methanogenic bacteria (MB) for control of electron flow in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. The data suggest that abundant electron donor availability allowed MB to sequester a portion of the electron flow even when sulfate was present in sufficient concentrations to support sulfate reduction. For example, in an area of abundant electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to be unable to sequester the electron flow from MB in the presence of 1.4 mg/L sulfate. The data also suggest that when electron-donor availability was limited, SRB outcompeted MB for available substrate at a lower concentration of sulfate than when electron donor was plentiful. For example, in an area of limited electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to maintain dominance of electron flow at sulfate concentrations less than 1 mg/L. The presence of abundant electron donor and a limited amount of sulfate reduced competition for available substrate, allowing both SRB and MB to metabolize available substrates concurrently.

  7. Influence of electron donor on the minimum sulfate concentration required for sulfate reduction in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1996-04-01

    Fluctuations in the availability of electron donor (petroleum hydrocarbons) affected the competition between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and methanogenic bacteria (MB) for control of electron flow in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. The data suggest that abundant electron donor availability allowed MB to sequester a portion of the electron flow even when sulfate was present in sufficient concentrations to support sulfate reduction. For example, in an area of abundant electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to be unable to sequester the electron flow from MB in the presence of 1.4 mg/L sulfate. The data also suggest that when electron-donor availability was limited, SRB outcompeted MB for available substrate at a lower concentration of sulfate than when electron donor was plentiful. For example, in an area of limited electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to maintain dominance of electron flow at sulfate concentrations less than 1 mg/L. The presence of abundant electron donor and a limited amount of sulfate reduced competition for available substrate, allowing both SRB and MB to metabolize available substrates concurrently. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Donor acceptor electronic couplings in π-stacks: How many states must be accounted for?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2006-04-01

    Two-state model is commonly used to estimate the donor-acceptor electronic coupling Vda for electron transfer. However, in some important cases, e.g. for DNA π-stacks, this scheme fails to provide accurate values of Vda because of multistate effects. The Generalized Mulliken-Hush method enables a multistate treatment of Vda. In this Letter, we analyze the dependence of calculated electronic couplings on the number of the adiabatic states included in the model. We suggest a simple scheme to determine this number. The superexchange correction of the two-state approximation is shown to provide good estimates of the electronic coupling.

  9. Nuclear-driven electron spin rotations in a coupled silicon quantum dot and single donor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Jacobson, Noah Tobias; Rudolph, Martin; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Wendt, Joel R.; Pluym, Tammy; Lilly, Michael P.; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    Single donors in silicon are very good qubits. However, a central challenge is to couple them to one another. To achieve this, many proposals rely on using a nearby quantum dot (QD) to mediate an interaction. In this work, we demonstrate the coherent coupling of electron spins between a single 31P donor and an enriched 28Si metal-oxide-semiconductor few-electron QD. We show that the electron-nuclear spin interaction can drive coherent rotations between singlet and triplet electron spin states. Moreover, we are able to tune electrically the exchange interaction between the QD and donor electrons. The combination of single-nucleus-driven rotations and voltage-tunable exchange provides all elements for future all-electrical control of a spin qubit, and requires only a single dot and no additional magnetic field gradients. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer between an incarcerated donor and a free acceptor in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Porel, Mintu; Chuang, Chi-Hung; Burda, Clemens; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan

    2012-09-12

    Supramolecular photoinduced electron transfer dynamics between coumarin 153 (C153) and 4,4'-dimethyl viologen dichloride (MV(2+)) across the molecular barrier of a host molecule, octa acid (OA), has been investigated with femtosecond time resolution. The ultrafast electron transfer from C153 to MV(2+) followed excitation with 150 fs laser pulses at a wavelength of 390 nm despite the fact that C153 was incarcerated within an OA(2) capsule. As a result, the photoexcited coumarin did not show any of the typical relaxation dynamics that is usually observed in free solution. Instead, the excited electron was transferred across the molecular wall of the capsuleplex within 20 ps. Likewise, the lifetime of the charge transfer state was short (724 ps), and electron back-transfer reestablished the ground state of the system within 1 ns, showing strong electronic coupling among the excited electron donor, host, and acceptor. When the donor was encapsulated into the host molecule, the electron transfer process showed significantly accelerated dynamics and essentially no solvent relaxation compared with that in free solution. The study was also extended to N-methylpyridinium iodide as the acceptor with similar results. PMID:22931120

  11. Gradient ascent pulse engineering approach to CNOT gates in donor electron spin quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, D.-B.; Goan, H.-S.

    2008-11-07

    In this paper, we demonstrate how gradient ascent pulse engineering (GRAPE) optimal control methods can be implemented on donor electron spin qubits in semiconductors with an architecture complementary to the original Kane's proposal. We focus on the high fidelity controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate and we explicitly find the digitized control sequences for a controlled-NOT gate by optimizing its fidelity using the effective, reduced donor electron spin Hamiltonian with external controls over the hyperfine A and exchange J interactions. We then simulate the CNOT-gate sequence with the full spin Hamiltonian and find that it has an error of 10{sup -6} that is below the error threshold of 10{sup -4} required for fault-tolerant quantum computation. Also the CNOT gate operation time of 100 ns is 3 times faster than 297 ns of the proposed global control scheme.

  12. Implanted bismuth donors in 28-Si: Process development and electron spin resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, C. D.; Lo, C. C.; Lang, V.; George, R. E.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Bokor, J.; Lyon, S. A.; Morton, J. J. L.; Schenkel, T.

    2012-02-01

    Spins of donor atoms in silicon are excellent qubit candidates. Isotope engineered substrates provide a nuclear spin free host environment, resulting in long spin coherence times [1,2]. The capability of swapping quantum information between electron and nuclear spins can enable quantum communication and gate operation via the electron spin and quantum memory via the nuclear spin [2]. Spin properties of donor qubit candidates in silicon have been studied mostly for phosphorous and antimony [1-3]. Bismuth donors in silicon exhibit a zero field splitting of 7.4 GHz and have attracted attention as potential nuclear spin memory and spin qubit candidates [4,5] that could be coupled to superconducting resonators [4,6]. We report on progress in the formation of bismuth doped 28-Si epi layers by ion implantation, electrical dopant activation and their study via pulsed electron spin resonance measurements showing narrow linewidths and good coherence times. [4pt] [1] A. M. Tyryshkin, et al. arXiv: 1105.3772 [2] J. J. L. Morton, et al. Nature (2008) [3] T. Schenkel, et al APL 2006; F. R. Bradbury, et al. PRL (2006) [4] R. E. George, et al. PRL (2010) [5] G. W. Morley, et al. Nat Mat (2010) [6] M. Hatridge, et al. PRB (2011), R. Vijay, et al. APL (2010) This work was supported by NSA (100000080295) and DOE (DE-AC02-05CH11231).

  13. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-01

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry.

  14. Algae as an electron donor promoting sulfate reduction for the bioremediation of acid rock drainage.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Parra, Pedro; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-01

    This study assessed bioremediation of acid rock drainage in simulated permeable reactive barriers (PRB) using algae, Chlorella sorokiniana, as the sole electron donor for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Lipid extracted algae (LEA), the residues of biodiesel production, were compared with whole cell algae (WCA) as an electron donor to promote sulfate-reducing activity. Inoculated columns containing anaerobic granular sludge were fed a synthetic medium containing H2SO4 and Cu(2+). Sulfate, sulfide, Cu(2+) and pH were monitored throughout the experiment of 123d. Cu recovered in the column packing at the end of the experiment was evaluated using sequential extraction. Both WCA and LEA promoted 80% of sulfate removal (12.7mg SO4(2-) d(-1)) enabling near complete Cu removal (>99.5%) and alkalinity generation raising the effluent pH to 6.5. No noteworthy sulfate reduction, alkalinity formation and Cu(2+) removal were observed in the endogenous control. In algae amended-columns, Cu(2+) was precipitated with biogenic H2S produced by sulfate reduction. Formation of CuS was evidenced by sequential extraction and X-ray diffraction. LEA and WCA provided similar levels of electron donor based on the COD balance. The results demonstrate an innovative passive remediation system using residual algae biomass from the biodiesel industry. PMID:27318730

  15. Donor-acceptor graphene-based hybrid materials facilitating photo-induced electron-transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Stergiou, Anastasios; Pagona, Georgia; Tagmatarchis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    Graphene research and in particular the topic of chemical functionalization of graphene has exploded in the last decade. The main aim is to increase the solubility and thereby enhance the processability of the material, which is otherwise insoluble and inapplicable for technological applications when stacked in the form of graphite. To this end, initially, graphite was oxidized under harsh conditions to yield exfoliated graphene oxide sheets that are soluble in aqueous media and amenable to chemical modifications due to the presence of carboxylic acid groups at the edges of the lattice. However, it was obvious that the high-defect framework of graphene oxide cannot be readily utilized in applications that are governed by charge-transfer processes, for example, in solar cells. Alternatively, exfoliated graphene has been applied toward the realization of some donor-acceptor hybrid materials with photo- and/or electro-active components. The main body of research regarding obtaining donor-acceptor hybrid materials based on graphene to facilitate charge-transfer phenomena, which is reviewed here, concerns the incorporation of porphyrins and phthalocyanines onto graphene sheets. Through illustrative schemes, the preparation and most importantly the photophysical properties of such graphene-based ensembles will be described. Important parameters, such as the generation of the charge-separated state upon photoexcitation of the organic electron donor, the lifetimes of the charge-separation and charge-recombination as well as the incident-photon-to-current efficiency value for some donor-acceptor graphene-based hybrids, will be discussed.

  16. Photoinduced electron transfer in rigidly linked dimethoxynapthalene-N-methylpyridinium donor-acceptor molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Andrew H. A.; Ghiggino, Kenneth P.; Wilson, Gerard J.; Keyte, Peter J.; Paddon-Row, Michael N.

    1992-07-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer (ET) is studied in a series of novel molecules containing a dimethoxynaphthalene (DMN) donor and either a pyridine (P) or N-methylpyridinium (P-Me +) acceptor covalently linked via a rigid nonbornalogous bridge ( n sigma bonds in length). ET rates of the order of 10 10 s -1 were measured for the DMN- n-P-Me + series ( n = 4, 6), while no appreciable ET was observed for the DMN- n-P compounds. Electronic and nuclear factors are discussed and the results rationalized in terms of Marcus—Hush and non-adiabatic ET theories.

  17. Ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of silicon nanocrystals doped with shallow donors (Li, P)

    SciTech Connect

    Kurova, N. V. Burdov, V. A.

    2013-12-15

    The results of ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of Si nanocrystals doped with shallow donors (Li, P) are reported. It is shown that phosphorus introduces much more significant distortions into the electronic structure of the nanocrystal than lithium, which is due to the stronger central cell potential of the phosphorus ion. It is found that the Li-induced splitting of the ground state in the conduction band of the nanocrystal into the singlet, doublet, and triplet retains its inverse structure typical for bulk silicon.

  18. Short-lived electron transfer in donor-bridge-acceptor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psiachos, D.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate time-dependent electron transfer (ET) in benchmark donor-bridge-acceptor systems. For the small bridge sizes studied, we obtain results far different from the perturbation theory which underlies scattering-based approaches, notably a lack of destructive interference in the ET for certain arrangements of bridge molecules. We also calculate wavepacket transmission in the non-steady-state regime, finding a featureless spectrum, while for the current we find two types of transmission: sequential and direct, where in the latter, the current transmission increases as a function of the energy of the transferred electron, a regime inaccessible by conventional scattering theory.

  19. Impact of Electron Donor selection on In-situ Biosequestration of Uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei, S.; Zhong, H.; Abel, E. J.; Field, J.; Brusseau, M. L. L.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ biosequestration, wherein electron-donating substrates are injected to promote microbial-associated sequestration of contaminants, is one promising enhanced-attenuation technique for remediation of groundwater containing arsenic, uranium, selenium, and similar constituents. A pilot-scale test of in-situ biosequestration for uranium in groundwater is in process at a former uranium mining site in Monument Valley, Arizona. Complementary bench experiments were conducted to examine the impact of different electron donors on the effectiveness of biosequestration. Aqueous and sediment samples were collected before and after the injection for monitoring changes in sediment properties, mineral geochemical composition, microbial community composition, and microbial activity.

  20. Solid phase electron donors control denitrification in groundwater at agricultural sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, C. T.; Liao, L.; Bekins, B. A.; Bohlke, J. K.

    2011-12-01

    Increased concentrations of nitrate in groundwater caused by agricultural use of chemical and organic fertilizers are a concern because of possible risks to environmental and human health. At many sites, these problems are mitigated by natural attenuation of nitrate as a result of microbially mediated denitrification of nitrate to nitrogen gas. Recent studies have clarified the factors affecting the rates and extents of denitrification in groundwater in agricultural areas. Intensive studies were conducted by the US Geological Survey to study agricultural chemicals in California, Nebraska, Washington, and Maryland using laboratory analyses, field measurements, and flow and transport modeling for monitoring well transects (0.5 to 2.5 km in length) and vertical profiles (0 to 50 m in depth). Groundwater analyses included major ion chemistry, dissolved gases, nitrogen and oxygen stable isotopes, and atmospheric age-tracers. Sediments were analyzed for concentrations of potential electron donors for denitrification, including reduced iron and sulfur, and organic carbon. Geochemical data and mass balance calculations indicated that solid-phase electron donors were an important factor controlling denitrification at these sites. To examine the generality of this result, a mathematical model of vertical flux of water, oxygen, and nitrate was developed and applied at these study sites along with 2 new study sites in Iowa and Mississippi and 8 additional sites from previous studies in Nebraska, Texas, Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Maryland (2 sites), and New York. Model results confirmed the importance of solid phase electron donors. The normalized reaction rates on an electron flux basis tended to increase with depth from the shallow oxygen reduction zone to the underlying nitrate reduction zone. The pattern of higher rates at depth is consistent with a reaction rate controlled by solid phase donors that are depleted under oxidizing conditions near the surface and in

  1. Role of 3,5-dimethyl anisole (DMA) as an electron donor in photoinduced electron transfer (ET) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, S.; De, R.; Ganguly, T.

    1997-01-01

    The present investigation was carried out to reveal the nature of photoinduced bimolecular quenching reactions, e.g. electron transfer (ET) and energy transfer processes within the donor DMA and acceptor 2-nitrofluorene (2NF) molecules in polar acetonitrile (ACN) fluid solution at the ambient temperature. From the observed large negative values of ΔG (the energy gap between the locally excited, LE and radical ion pair or RIP states) when one of the chromorphores was excited along with large R0 ( ˜27 Å), Förster critical transfer distance between the donor and acceptor measured from the considerable overlapping region of donor DMA emission with acceptor absorption and nearly 100% theoretical transfer efficiency ( T) value of the Förster type energy transfer the concurrent occurrences of the two processes, photoinduced ET and excitational energy transfer, were inferred. Moreover it was suggested that ET reaction within the present donor and acceptor systems is of outersphere type as evidenced from the large negative value of ΔG (˜ -2.3 eV).

  2. Experimental investigation of donor-acceptor electron transfer and back transfer in solid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, R.C.; Lin, Y.; Fayer, M.D. )

    1989-08-24

    Electron transfer from an optically excited donor (rubrene) to randomly distributed acceptors (duroquinone) followed by electron back transfer in a rigid solution (sucrose octaacetate) has been studied experimentally. The forward electron-transfer process was observed by time-dependent fluorescence quenching measurements, while the electron back transfer from the radical anion to the radical cation was monitored by use of the picosecond transient grating technique. A statistical mechanics theory is used to describe the time-dependent dynamics of the system and to extract the forward- and back-transfer parameters from the data. The theory includes donor-acceptor and acceptor-acceptor excluded volume. It is found that the inclusion of excluded volume is necessary to obtain accurate transfer parameters. These parameters enable a detailed description of the electron transfer and recombination dynamics to be given. The agreement between theory and experiment is excellent. A variety of time-dependent properties of the system are calculated. These include the time-dependent ion populations and the probability that the ith acceptor is an ion as a function of time and distance. In addition, (R(t)) and ({tau}(t)), which are the average ion separation as a function of time and the average ion existence time as a function of ion separation, respectively, are calculated.

  3. Collapse of electrons to a donor cluster in SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Han; Reich, Konstantin; Shklovskii, Boris

    It is known that when a nucleus has charge Ze where Z > 137 , electrons collapse onto the nucleus resulting in a net charge Zn < Z . This effect is due to the relativistic dispersion law. Here a similar effect is found for a donor cluster in SrTiO3 (STO), but with a different origin (see Phys. Rev. B 92, 035204 (2015)). At low temperatures, STO has an enormously large dielectric constant and the nonlinear dielectric response becomes dominant when the electric field is still small. This leads to the collapse of electrons into a charged spherical donor cluster with radius R when its total charge number Z exceeds a critical value Zc ~= R / a where a is the lattice constant. The net charge Zn e grows with Z until Z exceeds Z* ~=(R / a) 9 / 7 . After this point, the charge of the compact core Zn remains ~=Z* , while the rest Z* electrons form a sparse Thomas-Fermi electron atmosphere around it. We show that the thermal ionization of such two-scale atoms easily strips the outer atmosphere while the inner core remains preserved. We extend our results to the case of long cylindrical clusters. We discuss how our predictions can be tested by measuring conductivity of chain of discs of charge on the STO surface.

  4. Electron-donor dopant, method of improving conductivity of polymers by doping therewith, and a polymer so treated

    DOEpatents

    Liepins, R.; Aldissi, M.

    1984-07-27

    Polymers with conjugated backbones, both polyacetylene and polyaromatic heterocyclic types, are doped with electron-donor agents to increase their electrical conductivity. The electron-donor agents are either electride dopants made in the presence of lithium or dopants derived from alkalides made in the presence of lithium. The dopants also contain a metal such as cesium and a trapping agent such as a crown ether.

  5. Electron-donor dopant, method of improving conductivity of polymers by doping therewith, and a polymer so treated

    DOEpatents

    Liepins, Raimond; Aldissi, Mahmoud

    1988-01-01

    Polymers with conjugated backbones, both polyacetylene and polyaromatic heterocyclic types, are doped with electron-donor agents to increase their electrical conductivity. The electron-donor agents are either electride dopants made in the presence of lithium or dopants derived from alkalides made in the presence of lithium. The dopants also contain a metal such as cesium and a trapping agent such as a crown ether.

  6. Dissimilatory arsenate reduction with sulfide as electron donor: Experiments with Mono Lake water and isolation of strain MLMS-1, a chemoautotrophic arsenate respirer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoeft, S.E.; Kulp, T.R.; Stolz, J.F.; Hollibaugh, J.T.; Oremland, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    Anoxic bottom water from Mono Lake, California, can biologically reduce added arsenate without any addition of electron donors. Of the possible in situ inorganic electron donors present, only sulfide was sufficiently abundant to drive this reaction. We tested the ability of sulfide to serve as an electron donor for arsenate reduction in experiments with lake water. Reduction of arsenate to arsenite occurred simultaneously with the removal of sulfide. No loss of sulfide occurred in controls without arsenate or in sterilized samples containing both arsenate and sulfide. The rate of arsenate reduction in lake water was dependent on the amount of available arsenate. We enriched for a bacterium that could achieve growth with sulfide and arsenate in a defined, mineral medium and purified it by serial dilution. The isolate, strain MLMS-1, is a gram-negative, motile curved rod that grows by oxidizing sulfide to sulfate while reducing arsenate to arsenite. Chemoautotrophy was confirmed by the incorporation of H14CO3- into dark-incubated cells, but preliminary gene probing tests with primers for ribulose-1,5-biphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase did not yield PCR-amplified products. Alignment of 16S rRNA sequences indicated that strain MLMS-1 was in the ??-Proteobacteria, located near sulfate reducers like Desulfobulbus sp. (88 to 90% similarity) but more closely related (97%) to unidentified sequences amplified previously from Mono Lake. However, strain MLMS-1 does not grow with sulfate as its electron acceptor.

  7. Triazole bridges as versatile linkers in electron donor-acceptor conjugates

    PubMed Central

    de Miguel, Gustavo; Wielopolski, Mateusz; Schuster, David I.; Fazio, Michael A; Lee, Olivia P.; Haley, Christopher K.; Ortiz, Angy L.; Echegoyen, Luis; Clark, Timothy; Guldi, Dirk M.

    2011-01-01

    Aromatic triazoles have been frequently used as π-conjugated linkers in intramolecular electron transfer processes. To gain a deeper understanding of the electron mediating function of triazoles, we have synthesized a family of new triazole-based electron donor-acceptor conjugates. We have connected porphyrins and fullerenes through a central triazole moiety – (ZnP-Tri-C60) – each with a single change in their connection through the linker. An extensive photophysical and computational investigation reveals that the electron transfer dynamics – charge separation and charge recombination – in the different ZnP-Tri-C60 conjugates reflect a significant influence of the connectivity at the triazole linker. Except for m4m-ZnP-Tri-C60 17, the conjugates exhibit through-bond electron transfer with varying rate constants. Since the through-bond distance is nearly equal in the ZnP-Tri-C60 conjugates, the variation in charge separation and charge recombination dynamics is mainly associated with the electronic properties of the conjugates, including orbital energies, electron affinity, and the energies of the excited states. The changes of the electronic couplings are, in turn, a consequence of the different connectivity patterns at the triazole moieties. PMID:21702513

  8. Femtosecond transient grating studies of electron transfer in porphyrin and chlorophyll donor-acceptor molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Wiederrecht, G.P.; Svec, W.A.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1994-04-01

    Transient grating studies of electron transfer in artificial photosynthetic systems are described. These systems include simple donor-acceptor molecules where the donor, a chlorophyll or porphyrin, is rigidly attached to an easily reduced species such as napthoquinone or benzoquinone. We have previously synthesized acceptor molecules which have well defined absorption bands upon reduction and are well removed from the excited and cationic states of porphyrins and chlorophylls. They also possess large molar extinction coefficients that dominate the spectra and have well defined polarization characteristics. These traits are ideal for polarization sensitive transient grating experiments which enable accurate determination of the angle of the transition dipole between the initial excitation and the acceptor probe, dynamic solvation effects on the charge separated species, and any time dependent rotation of the chromophores relative to each other. An example of the type of molecule utilized for these experiments is a free base porphyrin (HP) donor and a pyromellitic diimide (PI) acceptor directly bonded to the porphyrin ring.

  9. The coordination chemistry of organo-hydride donors: new prospects for efficient multi-electron reduction.

    PubMed

    McSkimming, Alex; Colbran, Stephen B

    2013-06-21

    In biological reduction processes the dihydronicotinamides NAD(P)H often transfer hydride to an unsaturated substrate bound within an enzyme active site. In many cases, metal ions in the active site bind, polarize and thereby activate the substrate to direct attack by hydride from NAD(P)H cofactor. This review looks more widely at the metal coordination chemistry of organic donors of hydride ion--organo-hydrides--such as dihydronicotinamides, other dihydropyridines including Hantzsch's ester and dihydroacridine derivatives, those derived from five-membered heterocycles including the benzimidazolines and benzoxazolines, and all-aliphatic hydride donors such as hexadiene and hexadienyl anion derivatives. The hydride donor properties--hydricities--of organo-hydrides and how these are affected by metal ions are discussed. The coordination chemistry of organo-hydrides is critically surveyed and the use of metal-organo-hydride systems in electrochemically-, photochemically- and chemically-driven reductions of unsaturated organic and inorganic (e.g. carbon dioxide) substrates is highlighted. The sustainable electrocatalytic, photochemical or chemical regeneration of organo-hydrides such as NAD(P)H, including for driving enzyme-catalysed reactions, is summarised and opportunities for development are indicated. Finally, new prospects are identified for metal-organo-hydride systems as catalysts for organic transformations involving 'hydride-borrowing' and for sustainable multi-electron reductions of unsaturated organic and inorganic substrates directly driven by electricity or light or by renewable reductants such as formate/formic acid. PMID:23507957

  10. Denitrification and patterns of electron donors and acceptors in 8 riparian zones with contrasting hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidon, P.; Hill, A.

    2004-12-01

    A better understanding of nitrate removal mechanisms is important for managing the water quality function of stream riparian zones. We examined the linkages between hydrologic flow paths, patterns of electron donors and acceptors and the importance of denitrification as a nitrate removal mechanism in 8 riparian zones on glacial till and outwash landscapes in southern Ontario, Canada. Nitrate-N concentrations in shallow groundwater from adjacent cropland declined from levels that were often 10-30 mg L-1 near the field-riparian edge to <1 mg L-1 in the riparian zones throughout the year. Chloride data suggest that dilution cannot account for most of this nitrate decline. Despite contrasting hydrogeologic settings, these riparian zones displayed a well-organized pattern of electron donors and acceptors that resulted from the transport of oxic nitrate-rich groundwater to portions of the riparian zones where low DO concentrations and an increase in DOC concentrations were encountered. The natural abundances of d15N and in situ acetylene injection to piezometers indicate that denitrification is the primary mechanism of nitrate removal in all of the riparian zones. Our data indicate that effective nitrate removal by denitrification occurs in riparian zones with hydric soils as well as in non-hydric riparian zones and that a shallow water table is not always necessary for efficient nitrate removal by denitrification. The location of "hot spots" of denitrification within riparian areas can be explained by the influence of key landscape variables such as slope, sediment texture and depth of confining layers on hydrologic pathways that link supplies of electron donors and acceptors.

  11. Influence of Bicarbonate, Sulfate, and Electron Donors on Biological reduction of Uranium and Microbial Community Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Wensui; Zhou, Jizhong; Wu, Weimin; Yan, Tingfen; Criddle, Craig; Jardine, Philip M; Gu, Baohua

    2007-01-01

    A microcosm study was performed to investigate the effect of ethanol and acetate on uranium(VI) biological reduction and microbial community changes under various geochemical conditions. Each microcosm contained an uranium-contaminated sediment (up to 2.8 g U/kg) suspended in buffer with bicarbonate at concentrations of either 1 mM or 40 mM and sulfate at either 1.1 or 3.2 mM. Ethanol or acetate was used as an electron donor. Results indicate that ethanol yielded in significantly higher U(VI) reduction rates than acetate. A low bicarbonate concentration (1 mM) was favored for U(VI) bioreduction to occur in sediments, but high concentrations of bicarbonate (40 mM) and sulfate (3.2 mM) decreased the reduction rates of U(VI). Microbial communities were dominated by species from the Geothrix genus and Proteobacteria phylum in all microcosms. However, species in the Geobacteraceae family capable of reducing U(VI) were significantly enriched by ethanol and acetate in low bicarbonate buffer. Ethanol increased the population of unclassified Desulfuromonales, while acetate increased the population of Desulfovibrio. Additionally, species in the Geobacteraceae family were not enriched in high bicarbonate buffer, but the Geothrix and the unclassified Betaproteobacteria species were enriched. This study concludes that ethanol could be a better electron donor than acetate for reducing U(VI) under given experimental conditions, and electron donor and geoundwater geochemistry alter microbial communities responsible for U(VI) reduction.

  12. Electron donors and co-contaminants affect microbial community composition and activity in perchlorate degradation.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiangyu; Xie, Yuxuan; Wang, Jinfeng; Wang, Jing; Liu, Fei

    2015-04-01

    Although microbial reduction of perchlorate (ClO4(-)) is a promising and effective method, our knowledge on the changes in microbial communities during ClO4(-) degradation is limited, especially when different electron donors are supplied and/or other contaminants are present. Here, we examined the effects of acetate and hydrogen as electron donors and nitrate and ammonium as co-contaminants on ClO4(-) degradation by anaerobic microcosms using six treatments. The process of degradation was divided into the lag stage (SI) and the accelerated stage (SII). Quantitative PCR was used to quantify four genes: pcrA (encoding perchlorate reductase), cld (encoding chlorite dismutase), nirS (encoding copper and cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase), and 16S rRNA. While the degradation of ClO4(-) with acetate, nitrate, and ammonia system (PNA) was the fastest with the highest abundance of the four genes, it was the slowest in the autotrophic system (HYP). The pcrA gene accumulated in SI and played a key role in initiating the accelerated degradation of ClO4(-) when its abundance reached a peak. Degradation in SII was primarily maintained by the cld gene. Acetate inhibited the growth of perchlorate-reducing bacteria (PRB), but its effect was weakened by nitrate (NO3(-)), which promoted the growth of PRB in SI, and therefore, accelerated the ClO4(-) degradation rate. In addition, ammonia (NH4(+)), as nitrogen sources, accelerated the growth of PRB. The bacterial communities' structure and diversity were significantly affected by electron donors and co-contaminants. Under heterotrophic conditions, both ammonia and nitrate promoted Azospira as the most dominant genera, a fact that might significantly influence the rate of ClO4(-) natural attenuation by degradation.

  13. Electron Spin Coherence of Shallow Donors in Natural and Isotopically Enriched Germanium.

    PubMed

    Sigillito, A J; Jock, R M; Tyryshkin, A M; Beeman, J W; Haller, E E; Itoh, K M; Lyon, S A

    2015-12-11

    Germanium is a widely used material for electronic and optoelectronic devices and recently it has become an important material for spintronics and quantum computing applications. Donor spins in silicon have been shown to support very long coherence times (T_{2}) when the host material is isotopically enriched to remove any magnetic nuclei. Germanium also has nonmagnetic isotopes so it is expected to support long T_{2}'s while offering some new properties. Compared to Si, Ge has a strong spin-orbit coupling, large electron wave function, high mobility, and highly anisotropic conduction band valleys which will all give rise to new physics. In this Letter, the first pulsed electron spin resonance measurements of T_{2} and the spin-lattice relaxation (T_{1}) times for ^{75}As and ^{31}P donors in natural and isotopically enriched germanium are presented. We compare samples with various levels of isotopic enrichment and find that spectral diffusion due to ^{73}Ge nuclear spins limits the coherence in samples with significant amounts of ^{73}Ge. For the most highly enriched samples, we find that T_{1} limits T_{2} to T_{2}=2T_{1}. We report an anisotropy in T_{1} and the ensemble linewidths for magnetic fields oriented along different crystal axes but do not resolve any angular dependence to the spectral-diffusion-limited T_{2} in samples with ^{73}Ge. PMID:26705654

  14. Epitaxial composite layers of electron donors and acceptors from very large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Samorí, Paolo; Severin, Nikolai; Simpson, Christopher D; Müllen, Klaus; Rabe, Jürgen P

    2002-08-14

    Large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be considered as nanographenes, whose electron donating or accepting properties are controlled by their size and shape as well as functionalities in their periphery. Epitaxial thin films of them are targets for optoelectronic applications; however, large PAHs are increasingly difficult to process. Here we show that epitaxial layers of very large unsubstituted PAHs (C(42)H(18) and C(132)H(34)), as well as a mixed layer of C(42)H(18) with an electron acceptor, can be obtained by self-assembly from solution. The C(132)H(34) is by far the largest nanographene that up to now has been processed into ordered thin films; due to its size it cannot be sublimed in a vacuum. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies reveal that the interaction with the substrate induces a strong perturbation of the electronic structure of the pure donor in the first epitaxial monolayer. In a second epitaxial layer with a donor acceptor stoichiometry of 2:1 the molecules are unperturbed.

  15. Electron Spin Coherence of Shallow Donors in Natural and Isotopically Enriched Germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigillito, A. J.; Jock, R. M.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Itoh, K. M.; Lyon, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Germanium is a widely used material for electronic and optoelectronic devices and recently it has become an important material for spintronics and quantum computing applications. Donor spins in silicon have been shown to support very long coherence times (T2 ) when the host material is isotopically enriched to remove any magnetic nuclei. Germanium also has nonmagnetic isotopes so it is expected to support long T2's while offering some new properties. Compared to Si, Ge has a strong spin-orbit coupling, large electron wave function, high mobility, and highly anisotropic conduction band valleys which will all give rise to new physics. In this Letter, the first pulsed electron spin resonance measurements of T2 and the spin-lattice relaxation (T1) times for 75As and 31P donors in natural and isotopically enriched germanium are presented. We compare samples with various levels of isotopic enrichment and find that spectral diffusion due to 73Ge nuclear spins limits the coherence in samples with significant amounts of 73Ge. For the most highly enriched samples, we find that T1 limits T2 to T2=2 T1. We report an anisotropy in T1 and the ensemble linewidths for magnetic fields oriented along different crystal axes but do not resolve any angular dependence to the spectral-diffusion-limited T2 in samples with 73Ge.

  16. Influence of different electron donors and acceptors on dehalorespiration of tetrachloroethene by Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1

    SciTech Connect

    Gerritse, J.; Drzyzga, O.; Kloetstra, G.; Keijmel, M.; Wiersum, L.P.; Hutson, R.; Collins, M.D.; Gottschal, J.C.

    1999-12-01

    Strain TCE1, a strictly anaerobic bacterium that can grow by reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethane (TCE), was isolated by selective enrichment from a PCE-dechlorinating chemostat mixed culture. Strain TCE1 is a gram-positive, motile, curved rod-shaped organism that is 2 to 4 by 0.6 to 0.8 {micro}m and has approximately six lateral flagella. The pH and temperature optima for growth are 7.2 and 35 C, respectively. On the basis of a comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis, this bacterium was identified as a new strain of Desulfitobacterium frappieri, because it exhibited 99.7% relatedness to the D. frappieri type strain, strain PCP-1. Growth with H{sub 2}, format, L-lactate, butyrate, crotonate, or ethanol as the electron donor depends on the availability of an external electron acceptor. Pyruvate and serine can also be used fermentatively. Electron donors (except format and H{sub 2}) are oxidized to acetate and CO{sub 2}. when L-lactate is the growth substrate, strain TCE1 can use the following electron acceptors: PCE and TCE (to produce cis-1,2-dichloroethene), sulfite and thiosulfate (to produce sulfide), nitrate (to produce nitrite), and fumarate (to produce succinate). Strain TCE1 is not able to reductively dechlorinate 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetate. The growth yields of the newly isolated bacterium when PCE is the electron acceptor are similar to those obtained for other dehalorespiring anaerobes (e.g., Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PCE1 and Desulfitobacterium hafniense) and the maximum specific reductive dechlorination rates are 4 to 16 times higher. Dechlorination of PCE and TCE is an inducible process. In PCE-limited chemostat cultures of strain TCE1, dechlorination is strongly inhibited by sulfite but not by other alternative electron acceptors, such as fumate or nitrate.

  17. Influence of Different Electron Donors and Acceptors on Dehalorespiration of Tetrachloroethene by Desulfitobacterium frappieri TCE1

    PubMed Central

    Gerritse, Jan; Drzyzga, Oliver; Kloetstra, Geert; Keijmel, Mischa; Wiersum, Luit P.; Hutson, Roger; Collins, Matthew D.; Gottschal, Jan C.

    1999-01-01

    Strain TCE1, a strictly anaerobic bacterium that can grow by reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE), was isolated by selective enrichment from a PCE-dechlorinating chemostat mixed culture. Strain TCE1 is a gram-positive, motile, curved rod-shaped organism that is 2 to 4 by 0.6 to 0.8 μm and has approximately six lateral flagella. The pH and temperature optima for growth are 7.2 and 35°C, respectively. On the basis of a comparative 16S rRNA sequence analysis, this bacterium was identified as a new strain of Desulfitobacterium frappieri, because it exhibited 99.7% relatedness to the D. frappieri type strain, strain PCP-1. Growth with H2, formate, l-lactate, butyrate, crotonate, or ethanol as the electron donor depends on the availability of an external electron acceptor. Pyruvate and serine can also be used fermentatively. Electron donors (except formate and H2) are oxidized to acetate and CO2. When l-lactate is the growth substrate, strain TCE1 can use the following electron acceptors: PCE and TCE (to produce cis-1,2-dichloroethene), sulfite and thiosulfate (to produce sulfide), nitrate (to produce nitrite), and fumarate (to produce succinate). Strain TCE1 is not able to reductively dechlorinate 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenylacetate. The growth yields of the newly isolated bacterium when PCE is the electron acceptor are similar to those obtained for other dehalorespiring anaerobes (e.g., Desulfitobacterium sp. strain PCE1 and Desulfitobacterium hafniense) and the maximum specific reductive dechlorination rates are 4 to 16 times higher (up to 1.4 μmol of chloride released · min−1 · mg of protein−1). Dechlorination of PCE and TCE is an inducible process. In PCE-limited chemostat cultures of strain TCE1, dechlorination is strongly inhibited by sulfite but not by other alternative electron acceptors, such as fumarate or nitrate. PMID:10583967

  18. Enhanced photoproduction of hydrogen peroxide by humic substances in the presence of phenol electron donors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Simon, Kelli A; Andrew, Andrea A; Del Vecchio, Rossana; Blough, Neil V

    2014-11-01

    Addition of a series of phenol electron donors to solutions of humic substances (HS) enhanced substantially the initial rates of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) photoproduction (RH2O2), with enhancement factors (EF) ranging from a low of ∼3 for 2,4,6-trimethylphenol (TMP) to a high of ∼15 for 3,4-dimethoxyphenol (DMOP). The substantial inhibition of the enhanced RH2O2 following borohydride reduction of the HS, as well as the dependence of RH2O2 on phenol and dioxygen concentrations are consistent with a mechanism in which the phenols react with the triplet excited states of (aromatic) ketones within the HS to form initially a phenoxy and ketyl radical. The ketyl radical then reacts rapidly with dioxygen to regenerate the ketone and form superoxide (O2-), which subsequently dismutates to H2O2. However, as was previously noted for the photosensitized loss of TMP, the incomplete inhibition of the enhanced RH2O2 following borohydride reduction suggests that there may remain another pool of oxidizing triplets. The results demonstrate that H2O2 can be generated through an additional pathway in the presence of sufficiently high concentrations of appropriate electron donors through reaction with the excited triplet states of aromatic ketones and possibly of other species such as quinones. However, in some cases, the much lower ratio of H2O2 produced to phenol consumed suggests that secondary reactions could alter this ratio significantly.

  19. Field Evidence for Co-Metabolism of Trichloroethene Stimulated by Addition of Electron Donor to Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, Mark E.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Radtke, Corey W.; Bill, Markus; Delwiche, Mark E.; Lee, M. Hope; Swift, Dana L.; Colwell, Frederick S.

    2010-05-17

    For more than 10 years, electron donor has been injected into the Snake River aquifer beneath the Test Area North site of the Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of stimulating microbial reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater. This has resulted in significant TCE removal from the source area of the contaminant plume and elevated dissolved CH4 in the groundwater extending 250 m from the injection well. The delta13C of the CH4 increases from 56o/oo in the source area to -13 o/oo with distance from the injection well, whereas the delta13C of dissolved inorganic carbon decreases from 8 o/oo to -13 o/oo, indicating a shift from methanogenesis to methane oxidation. This change in microbial activity along the plume axis is confirmed by PhyloChip microarray analyses of 16S rRNA genes obtained from groundwater microbial communities, which indicate decreasing abundances of reductive dechlorinating microorganisms (e.g., Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) and increasing CH4-oxidizing microorganisms capable of aerobic co-metabolism of TCE (e.g., Methylosinus trichosporium). Incubation experiments with 13C-labeled TCE introduced into microcosms containing basalt and groundwater from the aquifer confirm that TCE co-metabolism is possible. The results of these studies indicate that electron donor amendment designed to stimulate reductive dechlorination of TCE may also stimulate co-metabolism of TCE.

  20. Impact of varying electron donors on the molecular microbial ecology and biokinetics of methylotrophic denitrifying bacteria.

    PubMed

    Baytshtok, Vladimir; Lu, Huijie; Park, Hongkeun; Kim, Sungpyo; Yu, Ran; Chandran, Kartik

    2009-04-15

    The goal of this study was to identify bacterial populations that assimilated methanol in a denitrifying sequencing batch reactor (SBR), using stable isotope probing (SIP) of (13)C labeled DNA and quantitatively track changes in these populations upon changing the electron donor from methanol to ethanol in the SBR feed. Based on SIP derived (13)C 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, dominant SBR methylotrophic bacteria were related to Methyloversatilis spp. and Hyphomicrobium spp. These methylotrophic populations were quantified via newly developed real-time PCR assays. Upon switching the electron donor from methanol to ethanol, Hyphomicrobium spp. concentrations decreased significantly in accordance with their obligately methylotrophic nutritional mode. In contrast, Methyloversatilis spp. concentrations were relatively unchanged, in accordance with their ability to assimilate both methanol and ethanol. Direct assimilation of ethanol by Methyloversatilis spp. but not Hyphomicrobium spp. was also confirmed via SIP. The reduction in methylotrophic bacterial concentration upon switching to ethanol was paralleled by a significant decrease in the methanol supported denitrification biokinetics of the SBR on nitrate. In sum, the results of this study demonstrate that the metabolic capabilities (methanol assimilation and metabolism) and substrate specificity (obligately or facultatively methylotrophic) of two distinct methylotrophic bacterial populations contributed to their survival or washout in denitrifying bioreactors. PMID:19097144

  1. Size and temperature dependence of the electron-phonon scattering by donors in nanowire transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bescond, M.; Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Berrada, S.; Cavassilas, N.; Lannoo, M.

    2016-08-01

    Due to the constant size reduction, single-donor-based nanowire transistors receive an increasing interest from the semi-conductor industry. In this work we theoretically investigate the coupled influence of electron-phonon scattering, temperature and size (cross-section and channel length) on the properties of such systems. The aim is to determine under what conditions the localized character of the donor has a remarkable impact on the current characteristics. We use a quantum non-equilibrium Green's function approach in which the acoustic electron-phonon scattering is treated through local self-energies. We first show how this widely used approach, valid at high temperatures, can be extended to lower temperatures. Our simulations predict a hysteresis in the current when reducing the temperature down to 150 K. We also find that acoustic phonons degrade the current characteristics while their optical counterparts might have a beneficial impact with an increase of the ON-current. Finally we discuss the influence of nanowire length and cross-section and emphasize the complexity of precisely controlling the dopant level at room temperature.

  2. Field evidence for co-metabolism of trichloroethene stimulated by addition of electron donor to groundwater.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Mark E; Brodie, Eoin L; Radtke, Corey W; Bill, Markus; Delwiche, Mark E; Lee, M Hope; Swift, Dana L; Colwell, Frederick S

    2010-06-15

    For more than 10 years, electron donor has been injected into the Snake River aquifer beneath the Test Area North site of the Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of stimulating microbial reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater. This has resulted in significant TCE removal from the source area of the contaminant plume and elevated dissolved CH(4) in the groundwater extending 250 m from the injection well. The delta(13)C of the CH(4) increases from -56 per thousand in the source area to -13 per thousand with distance from the injection well, whereas the delta(13)C of dissolved inorganic carbon decreases from 8 per thousand to -13 per thousand, indicating a shift from methanogenesis to methane oxidation. This change in microbial activity along the plume axis is confirmed by PhyloChip microarray analyses of 16S rRNA genes obtained from groundwater microbial communities, which indicate decreasing abundances of reductive dechlorinating microorganisms (e.g., Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) and increasing CH(4)-oxidizing microorganisms capable of aerobic co-metabolism of TCE (e.g., Methylosinus trichosporium). Incubation experiments with (13)C-labeled TCE introduced into microcosms containing basalt and groundwater from the aquifer confirm that TCE co-metabolism is possible. The results of these studies indicate that electron donor amendment designed to stimulate reductive dechlorination of TCE may also stimulate co-metabolism of TCE. PMID:20476753

  3. Evaluation of sustained release polylactate electron donors for removal of hexavalent chromium from contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, E.L.; Joyner, D. C.; Faybishenko, B.; Conrad, M. E.; Rios-Velazquez, C.; Mork, B.; Willet, A.; Koenigsberg, S.; Herman, D.; Firestone, M. K.; Hazen, T. C.; Malave, Josue; Martinez, Ramon

    2011-02-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in groundwater at the Department of Energy Hanford site, we conducted a series of microcosm experiments using a range of commercial electron donors with varying degrees of lactate polymerization (polylactate). These experiments were conducted using Hanford Formation sediments (coarse sand and gravel) immersed in Hanford groundwater, which were amended with Cr(VI) and several types of lactate-based electron donors (Hydrogen Release Compound, HRC; primer-HRC, pHRC; extended release HRC) and the polylactate-cysteine form (Metal Remediation Compound, MRC). The results showed that polylactate compounds stimulated an increase in bacterial biomass and activity to a greater extent than sodium lactate when applied at equivalent carbon concentrations. At the same time, concentrations of headspace hydrogen and methane increased and correlated with changes in the microbial community structure. Enrichment of Pseudomonas spp. occurred with all lactate additions, and enrichment of sulfate-reducing Desulfosporosinus spp. occurred with almost complete sulfate reduction. The results of these experiments demonstrate that amendment with the pHRC and MRC forms result in effective removal of Cr(VI) from solution most likely by both direct (enzymatic) and indirect (microbially generated reductant) mechanisms.

  4. Characterization of U(VI) reduction in contaminated sediments with slow-degrading electron donor source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Watson, D. B.; Zhang, G.; Mehlhorn, T.; Lowe, K.; Earles, J.; Phillips, J.; Kelly, S. D.; Boyanov, M.; Kemner, K. M.; Schadt, C.; Criddle, C. S.; Jardine, P. M.; Brooks, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    In order to select sustainable, high efficiency and cost effective electron donor source, oleate and emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) were tested uranium (VI) reduction in comparison with ethanol in microcosms using uranium contaminated sediments and groundwater from the US DOE Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFRC) site. The effect of initial sulfate concentration on U(VI) reduction was also tested. Both oleate and EVO were effective electron donor sources for U(VI) reduction. Accumulation of acetate as a major product and the removal of aqueous U(VI) were observed and were associated with sulfate reduction. Both oleate and EVO supported U(VI) reduction but at slower rates with a comparable but slightly lower extent of reduction than ethanol. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis confirmed reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). The extent of U(VI) reduction in solid phase was negatively influenced by aqueous calcium concentration. The majority of electrons of the three substrates were consumed by sulfate reduction, Fe(III) reduction, and methanogenesis. Initial U(VI) concentration in the aqueous phase increased with increased sulfate concentration (1 versus 5 mM), likely due to U(VI) desorption from the solid phase. At the higher initial sulfate concentration more U(VI) was reduced and fewer electrons were used in methanogenesis. Analysis of bacterial and archeal populations using 16S rRNA gene libraries showed a significant increase in Deltaproteobacteria after biostimulation. The microbial community structures developed with oleate and EVO were significantly distinct from those developed with ethanol. Bacteria similar to Desulforegula spp. was predominant for oleate and EVO degradation but were not observed in ethanol-amended microcosms. Known U(VI)-reducing bacteria in the microcosms amended with the three electron donor sources included iron(III) reducing Geobacter spp. but in lower abundances than sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio spp. The

  5. Spectral fine tuning of cyanine dyes: electron donor-acceptor substituted analogues of thiazole orange.

    PubMed

    Rastede, Elizabeth E; Tanha, Matteus; Yaron, David; Watkins, Simon C; Waggoner, Alan S; Armitage, Bruce A

    2015-09-26

    The introduction of electron donor and acceptor groups at strategic locations on a fluorogenic cyanine dye allows fine-tuning of the absorption and emission spectra while preserving the ability of the dye to bind to biomolecular hosts such as double-stranded DNA and a single-chain antibody fragment originally selected for binding to the parent unsubstituted dye, thiazole orange (TO). The observed spectral shifts are consistent with calculated HOMO-LUMO energy gaps and reflect electron density localization on the quinoline half of TO in the LUMO. A dye bearing donating methoxy and withdrawing trifluoromethyl groups on the benzothiazole and quinoline rings, respectively, shifts the absorption spectrum to sufficiently longer wavelengths to allow excitation at green wavelengths as opposed to the parent dye, which is optimally excited in the blue.

  6. Spectral Fine Tuning of Cyanine Dyes: Electron Donor-Acceptor Substituted Analogues of Thiazole Orange†

    PubMed Central

    Rastede, Elizabeth E.; Tanha, Matteus; Yaron, David; Watkins, Simon C.; Waggoner, Alan S.; Armitage, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of electron donor and acceptor groups at strategic locations on a fluorogenic cyanine dye allows fine-tuning of the absorption and emission spectra while preserving the ability of the dye to bind to biomolecular hosts such as double-stranded DNA and a single-chain antibody fragment originally selected for binding to the parent unsubstituted dye, thiazole orange (TO). The observed spectral shifts are consistent with calculated HOMO-LUMO energy gaps and reflect electron density localization on the quinoline half of TO in the LUMO. A dye bearing donating methoxy and withdrawing trifluoromethyl groups on the benzothiazole and quinoline rings, respectively, shifts the absorption spectrum to sufficiently longer wavelengths to allow excitation at green wavelengths as opposed to the parent dye, which is optimally excited in the blue. PMID:26171668

  7. Isolation of acetogenic bacteria that induce biocorrosion by utilizing metallic iron as the sole electron donor.

    PubMed

    Kato, Souichiro; Yumoto, Isao; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    Corrosion of iron occurring under anoxic conditions, which is termed microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) or biocorrosion, is mostly caused by microbial activities. Microbial activity that enhances corrosion via uptake of electrons from metallic iron [Fe(0)] has been regarded as one of the major causative factors. In addition to sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea in marine environments, acetogenic bacteria in freshwater environments have recently been suggested to cause MIC under anoxic conditions. However, no microorganisms that perform acetogenesis-dependent MIC have been isolated or had their MIC-inducing mechanisms characterized. Here, we enriched and isolated acetogenic bacteria that induce iron corrosion by utilizing Fe(0) as the sole electron donor under freshwater, sulfate-free, and anoxic conditions. The enriched communities produced significantly larger amounts of Fe(II) than the abiotic controls and produced acetate coupled with Fe(0) oxidation prior to CH4 production. Microbial community analysis revealed that Sporomusa sp. and Desulfovibrio sp. dominated in the enrichments. Strain GT1, which is closely related to the acetogen Sporomusa sphaeroides, was eventually isolated from the enrichment. Strain GT1 grew acetogenetically with Fe(0) as the sole electron donor and enhanced iron corrosion, which is the first demonstration of MIC mediated by a pure culture of an acetogen. Other well-known acetogenic bacteria, including Sporomusa ovata and Acetobacterium spp., did not grow well on Fe(0). These results indicate that very few species of acetogens have specific mechanisms to efficiently utilize cathodic electrons derived from Fe(0) oxidation and induce iron corrosion.

  8. Synthesis, crystal structure, and properties of a new hydrogen-bonded electron-donor: 1,6-Dithiapyrene-imidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Yasushi; Yakiyama, Yumi; Murata, Tsuyoshi; Nakasuji, Kazuhiro

    2008-12-01

    1,6-Dithiapyrene (DTPY) derivative having an imidazole moiety, DTPY-imidazole, was designed and synthesized as a new hydrogen-bonded electron-donor molecule. The electron-donating ability of the donor estimated by CV measurement was similar to that of DTPY. This molecule formed a two-dimensional network structure involving a one-dimensional H-bonded chain and π-stacking column. The TCNQ complex was characterized as a partial charge-transfer complex having a segregated structure from the IR and electronic spectra and exhibited a high electrical conductivity (5.6 × 10 -2 S cm -1 at 290 K).

  9. A hybrid electron donor comprising cyclopentadithiophene and dithiafulvenyl for dye-sensitized solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Sorohhov, Gleb; Yi, Chenyi; Grätzel, Michael; Decurtins, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Two new photosensitizers featured with a cyanoacrylic acid electron acceptor (A) and a hybrid electron donor (D) of cyclopentadithiophene and dithiafulvenyl, either directly linked or separated by a phenyl ring, were synthesized and characterized. Both of them undergo two reversible oxidations and strongly absorb in the visible spectral region due to a photo-induced intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) transition. To a great extent, the electronic interaction between the D and A units is affected by the presence of a phenyl spacer. Without a phenyl ring, the D unit appears more difficult to oxidize due to a strong electron-withdrawing effect of the A moiety. In sharp contrast, the insertion of the phenyl ring between the D and A units leads to a broken π-conjugation and therefore, the oxidation potentials remain almost unchanged compared to those of an analogue without the A group, suggesting that the electronic coupling between D and A units is relatively weak. As a consequence, the lowest-energy absorption band shows a slight hypsochromic shift upon the addition of the phenyl spacer, indicative of an increased HOMO–LUMO gap. In turn, the direct linkage of D and A units leads to an effective π-conjugation, thus substantially lowering the HOMO–LUMO gap. Moreover, the application in dye-sensitized solar cells was investigated, showing that the power conversion efficiency increases by the insertion of the phenyl unit. PMID:26199660

  10. Chemostat Studies of TCE-Dehalogenating Anaerobic Consortia under Excess and Limited Electron Donor Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semprini, L.; Azizian, M.; Green, J.; Mayer-Blackwell, K.; Spormann, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Two cultures - the Victoria Strain (VS) and the Evanite Strain (EV), enriched with the organohalide respiring bacteria Dehalococcoides mccartyi - were grown in chemostats for more than 4 years at a mean cell residence time of 50 days. The slow doubling rate represents growth likely experienced in the subsurface. The chemostats were fed formate as an electron donor and trichloroethene (TCE) as the terminal electron acceptor. Under excess formate conditions, stable operation was observed with respect to TCE transformation, steady-state hydrogen (H2) concentrations (40 nM), and the structure of the dehalogenating community. Both cultures completely transformed TCE to ethene, with minor amounts of vinyl chloride (VC) observed, along with acetate formation. When formate was limited, TCE was transformed incompletely to ethene (40-60%) and VC (60- 40%), and H2 concentrations ranged from 1 to 3 nM. The acetate concentration dropped below detection. Batch kinetic studies of TCE transformation with chemostat harvested cells found transformation rates of c-DCE and VC were greatly reduced when the cells were grown with limited formate. Upon increasing formate addition to the chemostats, from limited to excess, essentially complete transformation of TCE to ethene was achieved. The increase in formate was associated with an increase in H2 concentration and the production of acetate. Results of batch kinetic tests showed increases in transformation rates for TCE and c-DCE by factors of 3.5 and 2.5, respectively, while VC rates increased by factors of 33 to 500, over a six month period. Molecular analysis of chemostat samples is being performed to quantify the changes in copy numbers of reductase genes and to determine whether shifts in the strains of Dehalococcoides mccartyi where responsible for the observed rate increases. The results demonstrate the importance of electron donor supply for successful in-situ remediation.

  11. Application of acetate, lactate, and fumarate as electron donors in microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliv, Oresta M.; Bilyy, Oleksandr I.; Ferensovych, Yaroslav P.; Hnatush, Svitlana O.

    2013-09-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that use bacteria as the catalysts to oxidize organic and inorganic matter and generate current. Up to now, several classes of extracellular electron transfer mechanisms have been elucidated for various microorganisms. Shewanellaceae and Geobacteraceae families include the most of model exoelectrogenic microorganisms. Desulfuromonas acetoxidans bacterium inhabits aquatic sedimental sulfur-containing environments and is philogenetically close to representatives of Geobacteraceae family. Two chamber microbial fuel cell (0.3 l volume) was constructed with application of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 as anode biocatalyst. Acetic, lactic and fumaric acids were separately applied as organic electron donors for bacterial growth in constructed MFC. Bacterial cultivation in MFC was held during twenty days. Lactate oxidation caused electric power production with the highest value up to 0.071 mW on 64 hour of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 growth. Addition of acetic and fumaric acids into bacterial growth medium caused maximal power production up to 0.075 and 0.074 mW respectively on the 40 hour of their growth. Increasing of incubation time up to twentieth day caused decrease of generated electric power till 0.018 mW, 0.042 mW and 0.047 mW under usage of lactic, acetic and fumaric acids respectively by investigated bacteria. Power generation by D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 was more stabile and durable under application of acetic and fumaric acids as electron donors in constructed MFC, than under addition of lactic acid in the same concentration into the growth medium.

  12. 2010 Electron Donor-Acceptor Interactions Gordon Research Conference, August 8 - 13, 2010.

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald Meyer

    2010-08-18

    The Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions (GRC EDAI) presents and advances the current frontiers in experimental and theoretical studies of Electron Transfer Processes and Energy Conversion. The fundamental concepts underpinning the field of electron transfer and charge transport phenomena are understood, but fascinating experimental discoveries and novel applications based on charge transfer processes are expanding the discipline. Simultaneously, global challenges for development of viable and economical alternative energy resources, on which many researchers in the field focus their efforts, are now the subject of daily news headlines. Enduring themes of this conference relate to photosynthesis, both natural and artificial, and solar energy conversion. More recent developments include molecular electronics, optical switches, and nanoscale charge transport structures of both natural (biological) and man-made origin. The GRC EDAI is one of the major international meetings advancing this field, and is one of the few scientific meetings where fundamental research in solar energy conversion has a leading voice. The program includes sessions on coupled electron transfers, molecular solar energy conversion, biological and biomimetic systems, spin effects, ultrafast reactions and technical frontiers as well as electron transport in single molecules and devices. In addition to disseminating the latest advances in the field of electron transfer processes, the conference is an excellent forum for scientists from different disciplines to meet and initiate new directions; for scientists from different countries to make contacts; for young scientists to network and establish personal contacts with other young scientists and with established scientists who, otherwise, might not have the time to meet young people. The EDAI GRC also features an interactive atmosphere with lively poster sessions, a few of which are selected for oral presentations.

  13. Tuning Optical and Electron Donor Properties by Peripheral Thio-Aryl Substitution of Subphthalocyanine: A New Series of Donor-Acceptor Hybrids for Photoinduced Charge Separation.

    PubMed

    Kc, Chandra B; Lim, Gary N; D'Souza, Francis

    2016-09-01

    Subphthalocyanine (SubPc), a unique ring-reduced member of the common phthalocyanines family, although known for its higher absorptivity, reveals narrow absorption with peak maxima around 570 nm thus limiting its utility in light-energy-harvesting applications. In the present study, by peripheral thio-aryl substitution of SubPc macrocycle, the spectral properties have been modulated to extend the absorption and emission well into the visible/near-IR region. Additionally, for α-ring-substituted derivatives, facile oxidation of SubPc was witnessed, thus making these derivatives better electron donors. Next, the preparation of donor-acceptor dyads containing the well-known electron acceptor C60 connected to the central boron atom of SubPc was accomplished by making use of the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Control experiments and free-energy calculations using the redox and spectral data suggested that the observed fluorescence quenching of SubPc in these dyads is due to electron transfer. Accordingly, transient spectral studies performed both in polar and nonpolar solvents conclusively proved electron transfer to be the quenching mechanism in these dyads. The measured rate constants by fitting kinetic data revealed efficient charge separation and charge recombination processes, suggesting that these dyads could be useful materials for the construction of light-to-electricity or light-to-fuel production devices. PMID:27515576

  14. Tuning Optical and Electron Donor Properties by Peripheral Thio-Aryl Substitution of Subphthalocyanine: A New Series of Donor-Acceptor Hybrids for Photoinduced Charge Separation.

    PubMed

    Kc, Chandra B; Lim, Gary N; D'Souza, Francis

    2016-09-01

    Subphthalocyanine (SubPc), a unique ring-reduced member of the common phthalocyanines family, although known for its higher absorptivity, reveals narrow absorption with peak maxima around 570 nm thus limiting its utility in light-energy-harvesting applications. In the present study, by peripheral thio-aryl substitution of SubPc macrocycle, the spectral properties have been modulated to extend the absorption and emission well into the visible/near-IR region. Additionally, for α-ring-substituted derivatives, facile oxidation of SubPc was witnessed, thus making these derivatives better electron donors. Next, the preparation of donor-acceptor dyads containing the well-known electron acceptor C60 connected to the central boron atom of SubPc was accomplished by making use of the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Control experiments and free-energy calculations using the redox and spectral data suggested that the observed fluorescence quenching of SubPc in these dyads is due to electron transfer. Accordingly, transient spectral studies performed both in polar and nonpolar solvents conclusively proved electron transfer to be the quenching mechanism in these dyads. The measured rate constants by fitting kinetic data revealed efficient charge separation and charge recombination processes, suggesting that these dyads could be useful materials for the construction of light-to-electricity or light-to-fuel production devices.

  15. In situ bioremediation of nitrate and perchlorate in vadose zone soil for groundwater protection using gaseous electron donor injection technology.

    PubMed

    Evans, Patrick J; Trute, Mary M

    2006-12-01

    When present in the vadose zone, potentially toxic nitrate and perchlorate anions can be persistent sources of groundwater contamination. Gaseous electron donor injection technology (GEDIT), an anaerobic variation of petroleum hydrocarbon bioventing, involves injecting electron donor gases, such as hydrogen or ethyl acetate, into the vadose zone, to stimulate biodegradation of nitrate and perchlorate. Laboratory microcosm studies demonstrated that hydrogen and ethanol promoted nitrate and perchlorate reduction in vadose zone soil and that moisture content was an important factor. Column studies demonstrated that transport of particular electron donors varied significantly; ethyl acetate and butyraldehyde were transported more rapidly than butyl acetate and ethanol. Nitrate removal in the column studies, up to 100%, was best promoted by ethyl acetate. Up to 39% perchlorate removal was achieved with ethanol and was limited by insufficient incubation time. The results demonstrate that GEDIT is a promising remediation technology warranting further validation.

  16. Chloroboron (III) subnaphthalocyanine as an electron donor in bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guo; Sasabe, Hisahiro; Sano, Takeshi; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Hong, Ziruo; Kido, Junji; Yang, Yang

    2013-12-01

    In this work, chloroboron (III) subnaphthalocyanine (SubNc) was used as an electron donor, combined with a [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC70BM) or fullerene C70 acceptor in bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells. In spite of the limited solubility of SubNc in organic solvents, the solution processed device exhibited an efficiency of 4.0% under 1 sun, AM1.5G solar irradiation at room temperature, and 5.0% at 80 ° C due to the temperature-dependence of the carrier mobilities. SubNc:C70 bulk heterojunctions were also fabricated via thermal co-evaporation, demonstrating an efficiency of 4.4%. This result shows that SubNc is a promising material for photovoltaic applications via various processing techniques, such as vacuum deposition and wet coating.

  17. Diversity and ubiquity of bacteria capable of utilizing humic substances as electron donors for anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Coates, John D; Cole, Kimberly A; Chakraborty, Romy; O'Connor, Susan M; Achenbach, Laurie A

    2002-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that reduced humic substances (HS) can be reoxidized by anaerobic bacteria such as Geobacter, Geothrix, and Wolinella species with a suitable electron acceptor; however, little is known of the importance of this metabolism in the environment. Recently we investigated this metabolism in a diversity of environments including marine and aquatic sediments, forest soils, and drainage ditch soils. Most-probable-number enumeration studies were performed using 2,6-anthrahydroquinone disulfonate (AHDS), an analog for reduced HS, as the electron donor with nitrate as the electron acceptor. Anaerobic organisms capable of utilizing reduced HS as an electron donor were found in all environments tested and ranged from a low of 2.31 x 10(1) in aquifer sediments to a high of 9.33 x 10(6) in lake sediments. As part of this study we isolated six novel organisms capable of anaerobic AHDS oxidation. All of the isolates coupled the oxidation of AHDS to the reduction of nitrate with acetate (0.1 mM) as the carbon source. In the absence of cells, no AHDS oxidation was apparent, and in the absence of AHDS, no cell density increase was observed. Generally, nitrate was reduced to N(2). Analysis of the AHDS and its oxidized form, 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate (AQDS), in the medium during growth revealed that the anthraquinone was not being biodegraded as a carbon source and was simply being oxidized as an energy source. Determination of the AHDS oxidized and nitrate reduced accounted for 109% of the theoretical electron transfer. In addition to AHDS, all of these isolates could also couple the oxidation of reduced humic substances to the reduction of nitrate. No HS oxidation occurred in the absence of cells and in the absence of a suitable electron acceptor, demonstrating that these organisms were capable of utilizing natural HS as an energy source and that AHDS serves as a suitable analog for studying this metabolism. Alternative electron donors included

  18. Donor ionization in size controlled silicon nanocrystals: The transition from defect passivation to free electron generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, I. F.; Papachristodoulou, N.; Halsall, M. P.; Hylton, N. P.; Hulko, O.; Knights, A. P.; Yang, P.; Gwilliam, R. M.; Shah, M.; Kenyon, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the photoluminescence spectra of silicon and phosphorus co-implanted silica thin films on (100) silicon substrates as a function of isothermal annealing time. The rapid phase segregation, formation, and growth dynamics of intrinsic silicon nanocrystals are observed, in the first 600 s of rapid thermal processing, using dark field mode X-TEM. For short annealing times, when the nanocrystal size distribution exhibits a relatively small mean diameter, formation in the presence of phosphorus yields an increase in the luminescence intensity and a blue shift in the emission peak compared with intrinsic nanocrystals. As the mean size increases with annealing time, this enhancement rapidly diminishes and the peak energy shifts further to the red than the intrinsic nanocrystals. These results indicate the existence of competing pathways for the donor electron, which depends strongly on the nanocrystal size. In samples containing a large density of relatively small nanocrystals, the tendency of phosphorus to accumulate at the nanocrystal-oxide interface means that ionization results in a passivation of dangling bond (Pb-centre) type defects, through a charge compensation mechanism. As the size distribution evolves with isothermal annealing, the density of large nanocrystals increases at the expense of smaller nanocrystals, through an Ostwald ripening mechanism, and the majority of phosphorus atoms occupy substitutional lattice sites within the nanocrystals. As a consequence of the smaller band-gap, ionization of phosphorus donors at these sites increases the free carrier concentration and opens up an efficient, non-radiative de-excitation route for photo-generated electrons via Auger recombination. This effect is exacerbated by an enhanced diffusion in phosphorus doped glasses, which accelerates silicon nanocrystal growth.

  19. Effect of electron donors on the fractionation of sulfur isotopes by a marine Desulfovibrio sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Min Sub; Ono, Shuhei; Donovan, Katie; Templer, Stefanie P.; Bosak, Tanja

    2011-08-01

    Sulfur isotope effects produced by microbial dissimilatory sulfate reduction are used to reconstruct the coupled cycling of carbon and sulfur through geologic time, to constrain the evolution of sulfur-based metabolisms, and to track the oxygenation of Earth's surface. In this study, we investigate how the coupling of carbon and sulfur metabolisms in batch and continuous cultures of a recently isolated marine sulfate reducing bacterium DMSS-1, a Desulfovibrio sp ., influences the fractionation of sulfur isotopes. DMSS-1 grown in batch culture on seven different electron donors (ethanol, glycerol, fructose, glucose, lactate, malate and pyruvate) fractionates 34S/ 32S ratio from 6‰ to 44‰, demonstrating that the fractionations by an actively growing culture of a single incomplete oxidizing sulfate reducing microbe can span almost the entire range of previously reported values in defined cultures. The magnitude of isotope effect correlates well with cell specific sulfate reduction rates (from 0.7 to 26.1 fmol/cell/day). DMSS-1 grown on lactate in continuous culture produces a larger isotope effect (21-37‰) than the lactate-grown batch culture (6‰), indicating that the isotope effect also depends on the supply rate of the electron donor and microbial growth rate. The largest isotope effect in continuous culture is accompanied by measurable changes in cell length and cellular yield that suggest starvation. The use of multiple sulfur isotopes in the model of metabolic fluxes of sulfur shows that the loss of sulfate from the cell and the intracellular reoxidation of reduced sulfur species contribute to the increase in isotope effects in a correlated manner. Isotope fractionations produced during sulfate reduction in the pure culture of DMSS-1 expand the previously reported range of triple sulfur isotope effects ( 32S, 33S, and 34S) by marine sulfate reducing bacteria, implying that microbial sulfur disproportionation may have a smaller 33S isotopic fingerprint

  20. Type IV pili of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans can transfer electrons from extracellular electron donors.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongquan; Li, Hongyu

    2014-03-01

    Studies on Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans accepting electrons from Fe(II) have previously focused on cytochrome c. However, we have discovered that, besides cytochrome c, type IV pili (Tfp) can transfer electrons. Here, we report conduction by Tfp of A. ferrooxidans analyzed with a conducting-probe atomic force microscope (AFM). The results indicate that the Tfp of A. ferrooxidans are highly conductive. The genome sequence of A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 contains two genes, pilV and pilW, which code for pilin domain proteins with the conserved amino acids characteristic of Tfp. Multiple alignment analysis of the PilV and PilW (pilin) proteins indicated that pilV is the adhesin gene while pilW codes for the major protein element of Tfp. The likely function of Tfp is to complete the circuit between the cell surface and Fe(II) oxides. These results indicate that Tfp of A. ferrooxidans might serve as biological nanowires transferring electrons from the surface of Fe(II) oxides to the cell surface.

  1. Denitrification potential in stream sediments impacted by acid mine drainage: Effects of pH, various electron donors, and iron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baeseman, J.L.; Smith, R.L.; Silverstein, J.

    2006-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) contaminates thousands of kilometers of stream in the western United States. At the same time, nitrogen loading to many mountain watersheds is increasing because of atmospheric deposition of nitrate and increased human use. Relatively little is known about nitrogen cycling in acidic, heavy-metal-laden streams; however, it has been reported that one key process, denitrification, is inhibited under low pH conditions. The objective of this research was to investigate the capacity for denitrification in acidified streams. Denitrification potential was assessed in sediments from several Colorado AMD-impacted streams, ranging from pH 2.60 to 4.54, using microcosm incubations with fresh sediment. Added nitrate was immediately reduced to nitrogen gas without a lag period, indicating that denitrification enzymes were expressed and functional in these systems. First-order denitrification potential rate constants varied from 0.046 to 2.964 day-1. The pH of the microcosm water increased between 0.23 and 1.49 pH units during denitrification. Additional microcosm studies were conducted to examine the effects of initial pH, various electron donors, and iron (added as ferrous and ferric iron). Decreasing initial pH decreased denitrification; however, increasing pH had little effect on denitrification rates. The addition of ferric and ferrous iron decreased observed denitrification potential rate constants. The addition of glucose and natural organic matter stimulated denitrification potential. The addition of hydrogen had little effect, however, and denitrification activity in the microcosms decreased after acetate addition. These results suggest that denitrification can occur in AMD streams, and if stimulated within the environment, denitrification might reduce acidity. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006.

  2. Theory and computational modeling: Medium reorganization and donor/acceptor coupling in electron transfer processes

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, M.D.; Feldberg, S.W.; Smalley, J.F.

    1998-03-01

    The continuing goal is to convert the rapidly accumulating mechanistic information about electron transfer (et) kinetics (often representable in terms of simple rate constants) into precise tools for fine-tuned control of the kinetics and for design of molecular-based systems which meet specified et characteristics. The present treatment will be limited to the kinetic framework defined by the assumption of transition state theory (TST). The primary objective of this paper is to report recent advances in the theoretical formulation, calculation, and analysis of energetics and electronic coupling pertinent to et in complex molecular aggregates. The control of et kinetics (i.e., enhancing desired processes, while inhibiting others) involves, of course, both system energetics (especially reorganization energies (E{sub r}) and free energy changes ({Delta}G{sup 0})) and electronic coupling of local D and A sites, which for thermal processes is most directly relevant only after the system has reached the appropriate point (or region) along the reaction coordinate (i.e., the transition state). The authors first discuss TST rate constant models, emphasizing genetic features, but also noting some special features arising when metal electrodes are involved. They then turn to a consideration of detailed aspects of medium reorganization and donor/acceptor coupling. With these theoretical tools in hand, they examine the results of recent applications to complex molecular systems using the techniques of computational quantum chemistry and electrostatics, together with detailed analysis of the numerical results and comparison with recent electrochemical kinetic data.

  3. Enhancement of ion current from the TRIPS source by means of different electron donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Torrisi, L.; Mascali, D.; Passarello, S.; Galatà, A.

    2006-03-01

    A series of measurements were carried out with the TRasco Intense Proton Source (TRIPS) to determine the effectiveness of different materials as electron donors. It is well known that the use of boron nitride (BN) disks inside the plasma chamber increases the current extracted from microwave discharge ion sources, generating additional electrons. In the past, one of the two disks was replaced by a 40μm Al2O3 coating over the extraction electrode, which gave some increase of current, but after less than 200h was heavily damaged. The tests here reported concern three different options: (a) thicker Al2O3 layer (100μm) deposited over the extraction electrode; a 1-mm-thick aluminium foil over which an alumina layer is deposited, inserted in the plasma chamber; a 5-mm-thick Al2O3 tube embedded in the plasma chamber of the TRIPS source (the outer diameter of the tube being slightly smaller than the inner diameter of the chamber). The tests were carried out in the same conditions as for magnetic field topology and only rf power and gas input were variable. Special attention was paid to the proton fraction. In fact, a higher proton fraction can be considered as a signature of the higher availability of electrons in the plasma. With the thick alumina tube not only was a better current and proton fraction observed but also a lower beam ripple and better stability.

  4. An artificial electron donor supported catalytic cycle of Pseudomonas putida cytochrome P450{sub cam}

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Swati . E-mail: swati@scripps.edu; Murugan, Rajamanickam; Mitra, Samaresh

    2005-09-23

    Putidaredoxin (PdX), the physiological effector of cytochrome P450{sub cam} (P450{sub cam}), serves to gate electron transfer into oxy-P450{sub cam} during the catalytic cycle of the enzyme. Redox-linked structural changes in PdX are necessary for the effective P450{sub cam} turnover reaction. PdX is believed to be difficult to be replaced by an artificial electron donor in the reaction pathway of P450{sub cam}. We demonstrate that the catalytic cycle of wild-type P450{sub cam} can be supported in the presence of an artificial reductant, potassium ferrocyanide. Upon rapid mixing of ferrocyanide ion with P450{sub cam}, we observed an intermediate with spectral features characteristic of compound I. The rate constant for the formation of compound I in the presence of ferrocyanide supported reaction cycle was found to be comparable to the ones observed for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} supported compound I formation in wild-type P450{sub cam}, but was much lower than those observed for classical peroxidases. The results presented in this paper form the first kinetic analysis of this intermediate for an artificial electron-driven P450{sub cam} catalytic pathway in solution.

  5. Phenothiazine-anthraquinone donor-acceptor molecules: synthesis, electronic properties and DFT-TDDFT computational study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Wei; Mao, Wei-Li; Hu, Yun-Xia; Tian, Zi-Qi; Wang, Zhi-Lin; Meng, Qing-Jin

    2009-09-17

    Two donor-acceptor molecules with different pi-electron conjugative units, 1-((10-methyl-10H-phenothiazin-3-yl)ethynyl)anthracene-9,10-dione (AqMp) and 1,1'-(10-methyl-10H-phenothiazine-3,7-diyl)bis(ethyne-2,1-diyl)dianthracene-9,10-dione (Aq2Mp), have been synthesized and investigated for their photochemical and electrochemical properties. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations provide insights into their molecular geometry, electronic structures, and properties. These studies satisfactorily explain the electrochemistry of the two compounds and indicate that larger conjugative effect leads to smaller HOMO-LUMO gap (Eg) in Aq2Mp. Both compounds show ICT and pi --> pi* transitions in the UV-visible range in solution, and Aq2Mp has a bathochromic shift and shows higher oscillator strength of the absorption, which has been verified by time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) calculations. The differences between AqMp and Aq2Mp indicate that the structural and conjugative effects have great influence on the electronic properties of the molecules. PMID:19705823

  6. The Nature of the Donor Motif in Acceptor-Bridge-Donor Dyes as an Influence in the Electron Photo-Injection Mechanism in DSSCs.

    PubMed

    Zarate, Ximena; Schott-Verdugo, Stephan; Rodriguez-Serrano, Angela; Schott, Eduardo

    2016-03-10

    The combination and balance of acceptor(A)-bridge-donor(D) architecture of molecules confer suitable attributes and/or properties to act as efficient light-harvesting and sensitizers in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). An important process in a DSSC performance is the electron photoinjection (PI) mechanism which can take place either via type I (indirect), that consists in injecting from the excited state of the dye to the semiconductor, or type II (direct), where the PI is from the ground state of the dye to the semiconductor upon photoexcitation. Here, we present a computational study about the role of the donor motif in the PI mechanisms displayed from a family of 11 A-bridge-D structured dyes to a (TiO2)15 anatase cluster. To this end, different donor motifs (D1-D11) were evaluated while the A and bridge motifs remained the same. All the computations were carried out within the DFT framework, using the B3LYP, PW91, PBE, M06L and CAM-B3LYP functionals. The 6-31G(d) basis set was employed for nonmetallic atoms and the LANL2DZ pseudopotential for Ti atoms. The solvation effects were incorporated using the polarized continuum model (PCM) for acetonitrile. As benchmark systems, alizarin and naphthalenediol dyes were analyzed, as they are known to undergo Type I and Type II PI pathways in DSSCs, respectively. Donors in the studied family of dyes could influence to drive Type I or II PI since it was found that D2 could show some Type II PI route, showing a new absorption band, although with CAM-B3LYP this shows a very low oscillator strength, while the remaining dyes behave according to Type I photoinjectors. Finally, the photovoltaic parameters that govern the light absorption process were evaluated, as the use of these criteria could be applied to predict the efficiency of the studied dyes in DSSCs devices. PMID:26900717

  7. Photochromic and electrochromic performances of new types of donor/acceptor systems based on crosslinked polyviologen film and electron donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li-ping; Ding, Guo-jing; Li, Chao-long; Wang, Yue-chuan

    2011-01-01

    Viologen-functionalized copolymer COPV2+ was synthesized by copolymer graft-modified, which was crosslinked by NH3·H2O gas-fumigated at 25 °C for 4 h due to the condensation of the siloxanes of COPV2+ film. Simultaneously, different donor/acceptor systems had been prepared based on crosslinked polyviologen film (COPV2+) and N,N,N‧,N‧-tetramethyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (TMPD) or hydroxyethylferrocene (HEFc) in order to shorten the response times and improve contrast ratios in response to external photo- and potential stimuli. The evolution of structures from COPO to COPV2+ is carefully characterized. The COPV2+/TMPD and COPV2+/HEFc films exhibited both photochromic and electrochromic performances. After UV irradiations, COPV2+/TMPD and COPV2+/HEFc films changed their colors from colorless to deep blue, while optical transmissions at 610 nm decreased about 64% and 75%, respectively. When removing out from UV irradiation, the colored COPV2+/TMPD and COPV2+/HEFc films faded to the original colors within about 60 min. When COPV2+/TMPD and COPV2+/HEFc films were biased with negative voltage of -2.5 V, they changed their colors from colorless to deep blue in 4 s and 3 s, while the optical transmissions at 556 nm decreased about 81% and 75%, respectively. When electric impulse was switched off, the colored COPV2+/TMPD and COPV2+/HEFc films faded to the original colors within about 7 s and 6 s, respectively.

  8. Interplay between barrier width and height in electron tunneling: photoinduced electron transfer in porphyrin-based donor-bridge-acceptor systems.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Karin; Wiberg, Joanna; Ljungdahl, Thomas; Mårtensson, Jerker; Albinsson, Bo

    2006-01-12

    The rate of electron tunneling in molecular donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) systems is determined both by the tunneling barrier width and height, that is, both by the distance between the donor and acceptor as well as by the energy gap between the donor and bridge moieties. These factors are therefore important to control when designing functional electron transfer systems, such as constructs for photovoltaics, artificial photosynthesis, and molecular scale electronics. In this paper we have investigated a set of D-B-A systems in which the distance and the energy difference between the donor and bridge states (DeltaEDB) are systematically varied. Zinc(II) and gold(III) porphyrins were chosen as electron donor and acceptor because of their suitable driving force for photoinduced electron transfer (-0.9 eV in butyronitrile) and well-characterized photophysics. We have previously shown, in accordance with the superexchange mechanism for electron transfer, that the electron transfer rate is proportional to the inverse of DeltaEDB in a series of zinc/gold porphyrin D-B-A systems with bridges of constant edge to edge distance (19.6 A) and varying DeltaEDB (3900-17 600 cm(-1)). Here, we use the same donor and acceptor but the bridge is shortened or extended giving a set of oligo-p-phenyleneethynylene bridges (OPE) with four different edge to edge distances ranging from 12.7 to 33.4 A. These two sets of D-B-A systems-ZnP-RB-AuP+ and ZnP-nB-AuP+-have one bridge in common, and hence, for the first time both the distance and DeltaEDB dependence of electron transfer can be studied simultaneously in a systematic way.

  9. Electronic states and wavefunctions of diatomic donor molecular ions in silicon: multi-valley envelope function theory.

    PubMed

    Klymenko, M V; Remacle, F

    2014-02-12

    Using the Burt-Foreman envelope function theory and effective mass approximation, we develop a theoretical model for an arbitrary number of interacting donor atoms embedded in silicon which reproduces the electronic energy spectrum with high computational efficiency, taking into account the effective mass anisotropy and the valley-orbit coupling. We show that the variation of the relative magnitudes of the electronic coupling between the donor atoms with respect to the valley-orbit coupling as a function of the internuclear distance leads to different kinds of spatial interference patterns of the wavefunction. We also report on the impact of the orientation of the diatomic phosphorus donor molecular ion in the crystal lattice on the ionization energy and on the energy separation between the ground state and the lowest excited state. PMID:24451236

  10. Electronic coupling for charge transfer in donor-bridge-acceptor systems. Performance of the two-state FCD model.

    PubMed

    Voityuk, Alexander A

    2012-10-28

    Electronic coupling is a key parameter that determines the rate of electron transfer reactions and electrical conductivity of molecular wires. To examine the performance of a two-state approach based on the orthogonal transformation of adiabatic states to diabatic states, we compare the effective donor-acceptor coupling V(DA) computed with three different approaches in model donor-bridge-acceptor (D-B-A) systems. It is found that V(DA) derived with the two-state method accounts properly for both the direct and superexchange interactions. The approach becomes, however, less accurate with the increasing energy difference of the donor and acceptor states. We suggest a simple diagnostic to identify the situation when the estimated coupling might be inaccurate and consider how to improve the performance of the two-state scheme in such a case.

  11. Theoretical investigations of metal-free dyes for solar cells: Effects of electron donor and acceptor groups on sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhanamoorthi, Nachimuthu; Lai, Kuan-Hwa; Taufany, Fadlilatul; Jiang, Jyh-Chiang

    2013-11-01

    The adsorption of different model dyes on the anatase (101) TiO2 surface has been investigated using density functional theory calculations. The main aim of this study is to investigate the effects of different strength of donor and acceptor groups which are substituted in the present organic dyes on the ability of electron injection to the surface. Analysis of the density of states (DOS) demonstrated that the increased strength of the donor and acceptor dyes shifts the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMO) values and decreases the band gap. The strength of the donor and acceptor parts is shown to be effective for the electron injection process. Our present results provide the possibility of the design strategy of dyes to achieve the best dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs).

  12. Electronic states and wavefunctions of diatomic donor molecular ions in silicon: multi-valley envelope function theory.

    PubMed

    Klymenko, M V; Remacle, F

    2014-02-12

    Using the Burt-Foreman envelope function theory and effective mass approximation, we develop a theoretical model for an arbitrary number of interacting donor atoms embedded in silicon which reproduces the electronic energy spectrum with high computational efficiency, taking into account the effective mass anisotropy and the valley-orbit coupling. We show that the variation of the relative magnitudes of the electronic coupling between the donor atoms with respect to the valley-orbit coupling as a function of the internuclear distance leads to different kinds of spatial interference patterns of the wavefunction. We also report on the impact of the orientation of the diatomic phosphorus donor molecular ion in the crystal lattice on the ionization energy and on the energy separation between the ground state and the lowest excited state.

  13. Microbial reduction of sulfur dioxide with anaerobically digested municipal sewage biosolids as electron donors.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, P T; Sublette, K L

    1995-01-01

    A concentrated stream of sulfur dioxide (SO2) is produced by regeneration of the sorbent in certain new regenerable processes for the desulfurization of flue gas. We have previously proposed that this SO2 can be converted to elemental sulfur for disposal or byproduct recovery using a microbial/Claus process. In this process, two-thirds of the SO2-reducing gas stream would be contacted with a mixed culture containing sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), where SO2 would act as an electron acceptor with reduction to hydrogen sulfide (H2S). This H2S could then be recombined with the remaining SO2 and sent to a Claus unit to produce elemental sulfur. The sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, has been immobilized by coculture with flocforming heterotrophs from an anaerobic digester, resulting in a SO2-reducing floc that may be collected from the effluent of a continuous reactor for recycle by gravity sedimentation. The carbon and energy source for these cultures was anaerobically digested municipal sewage solids. The maximum specific activity for SO2 reduction in these cultures, in terms of dry weight of D. desulfuricans biomass, was 9.1 mmol of SO2/h.g. The stoichiometry with respect to the electron donor was 15.5 mg of soluble COD/mmol of SO2 reduced.

  14. Electron Donors Supporting Growth and Electroactivity of Geobacter sulfurreducens Anode Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Speers, Allison M.

    2012-01-01

    Geobacter bacteria efficiently oxidize acetate into electricity in bioelectrochemical systems, yet the range of fermentation products that support the growth of anode biofilms and electricity production has not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we show that Geobacter sulfurreducens oxidized formate and lactate with electrodes and Fe(III) as terminal electron acceptors, though with reduced efficiency compared to acetate. The structure of the formate and lactate biofilms increased in roughness, and the substratum coverage decreased, to alleviate the metabolic constraints derived from the assimilation of carbon from the substrates. Low levels of acetate promoted formate carbon assimilation and biofilm growth and increased the system's performance to levels comparable to those with acetate only. Lactate carbon assimilation also limited biofilm growth and led to the partial oxidization of lactate to acetate. However, lactate was fully oxidized in the presence of fumarate, which redirected carbon fluxes into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and by acetate-grown biofilms. These results expand the known ranges of electron donors for Geobacter-driven fuel cells and identify microbial constraints that can be targeted to develop better-performing strains and increase the performance of bioelectrochemical systems. PMID:22101036

  15. Electronic Structure of Hydrogen Donors in Semiconductors and Insulators Probed by Muon Spin Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Koichiro; Ito, Takashi U.

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen in semiconductors and insulators plays a crucial role in their electric conductivity. Substantial experimental and theoretical efforts have been made to establish this hypothesis in the last decade, and the muon spin rotation technique has played a pioneering role. Positive muons implanted into such low-carrier systems often form a muonium (an analogue of hydrogen, the bound state of a positive muon and an electron). Although its dynamical aspect may be different from the heavier hydrogen, the electronic structure of the muonium is expected to be identical to that of hydrogen after a small correction of the reduced mass (˜0.4%). Since the discovery of a shallow muonium in CdS, its properties have been intensively studied in many semiconductors and insulators, and then it was interpreted as a possible origin of n-type conductivity under the context of a classical shallow donor model. In this article, we will describe the principle of muonium experiments and survey recent achievements in this field.

  16. Longitudinal spin relaxation of donor-bound electrons in direct band-gap semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linpeng, Xiayu; Karin, Todd; Durnev, M. V.; Barbour, Russell; Glazov, M. M.; Sherman, E. Ya.; Watkins, S. P.; Seto, Satoru; Fu, Kai-Mei C.

    2016-09-01

    We measure the donor-bound electron longitudinal spin-relaxation time (T1) as a function of magnetic field (B ) in three high-purity direct band-gap semiconductors: GaAs, InP, and CdTe, observing a maximum T1 of 1.4, 0.4, and 1.2 ms, respectively. In GaAs and InP at low magnetic field, up to ˜2 T, the spin-relaxation mechanism is strongly density and temperature dependent and is attributed to the random precession of the electron spin in hyperfine fields caused by the lattice nuclear spins. In all three semiconductors at high magnetic field, we observe a power-law dependence T1∝B-ν with 3 ≲ν ≲4 . Our theory predicts that the direct spin-phonon interaction is important in all three materials in this regime in contrast to quantum dot structures. In addition, the "admixture" mechanism caused by Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling combined with single-phonon processes has a comparable contribution in GaAs. We find excellent agreement between high-field theory and experiment for GaAs and CdTe with no free parameters, however a significant discrepancy exists for InP.

  17. Reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene DNAPL source zones: source zone architecture versus electron donor availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, M.; Kokkinaki, A.; Sleep, B.

    2014-12-01

    The persistence of dense-non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface has led practitioners and regulatory agencies to turn towards low-maintenance, low-cost remediation methods. Biological degradation has been suggested as a possible solution, based on the well-proven ability of certain microbial species to break down dissolved chlorinated ethenes under favorable conditions. However, the biodegradation of pure phase chlorinated ethenes is subject to additional constraints: the continuous release of electron acceptor at a rate governed by mass transfer kinetics, and the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of DNAPL source zones which leads to spatially and temporally variable availability of the reactants for reductive dechlorination. In this work, we investigate the relationship between various DNAPL source zone characteristics and reaction kinetics using COMPSIM, a multiphase groundwater model that considers non-equilibrium mass transfer and Monod-type kinetics for reductive dechlorination. Numerical simulations are performed for simple, homogeneous trichloroethene DNAPL source zones to demonstrate the effect of single source zone characteristics, as well as for larger, more realistic heterogeneous source zones. It is shown that source zone size, and mass transfer kinetics may have a decisive effect on the predicted bio-enhancement. Finally, we evaluate the performance of DNAPL bioremediation for realistic, thermodynamically constrained, concentrations of electron donor. Our results indicate that the latter may be the most important limitation for the success of DNAPL bioremediation, leading to reduced bio-enhancement and, in many cases, comparable performance with water flooding.

  18. Luminescent zinc terephthalate coordination polymers with pyridylnicotinamide ligands: Effect of added base and nitrogen donor disposition on topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsworthy, Jessica S.; Staples, Richard J.; LaDuca, Robert L.

    2014-03-01

    Hydrothermal reaction of zinc nitrate, potassium terephthalate (K2tere), and 3-pyridylnicotinamide (3-pna) or 4-pyridylnicotinamide (4-pna) afforded coordination polymers with different dimensionality depending on nitrogen donor disposition and the initial pH of the reaction mixture. {[Zn(tere)(3-pna)2(H2O)2]ṡ2H2O}n (1) was prepared in the presence of aqueous NaOH, and manifests 1-D coordination polymer chains with monodentate 3-pna ligands. A mixture of {[Zn(tere)(3-pna)]ṡ3H2O}n (2) and {[Zn4(tere)3(OH)2(3-pna)2]ṡ2H2O}n (3) was prepared by performing a similar reaction in the absence of extra base. Compound 2 shows a 2-D (6,3) hexagonal grid topology with very tight interdigitation, while 3 has a 2-fold interpenetrated 3-D pcu network built from {Zn4(OCO)2(OH)2} centrosymmetric tetrameric nodes. {[Zn(tere)(4-pna)]ṡH2O}n (4) has parallel 2-fold interpenetrated sawtooth layer motifs. Luminescent and thermal decomposition properties are also discussed.

  19. Self-assembly properties of semiconducting donor-acceptor-donor bithienyl derivatives of tetrazine and thiadiazole-effect of the electron accepting central ring.

    PubMed

    Zapala, Joanna; Knor, Marek; Jaroch, Tomasz; Maranda-Niedbala, Agnieszka; Kurach, Ewa; Kotwica, Kamil; Nowakowski, Robert; Djurado, David; Pecaut, Jacques; Zagorska, Malgorzata; Pron, Adam

    2013-11-26

    Scanning tunneling microscopy was used to study the effect of the electron-accepting unit and the alkyl substituent's position on the type and extent of 2D supramolecular organization of penta-ring donor-acceptor-donor (DAD) semiconductors, consisting of either tetrazine or thiadiazole central acceptor ring symmetrically attached to two bithienyl groups. Microscopic observations of monomolecular layers on HOPG of four alkyl derivatives of the studied adsorbates indicate significant differences in their 2D organizations. Ordered monolayers of thiadiazole derivatives are relatively loose and, independent of the position of alkyl substituents, characterized by large intermolecular separation of acceptor units in the adjacent molecules located in the face-to-face configuration. The 2D supramolecular architecture in both derivatives of thiadiazole is very sensitive to the alkyl substituent's position. Significantly different behavior is observed for derivatives of tetrazine (which is a stronger electron acceptor). Stronger intermolecular DA interactions in these adsorbates generate an intermolecular shift in the monolayer, which is a dominant factor determining the 2D structural organization. As a consequence of this molecular arrangement, tetrazine groups (A segments) face thiophene rings (D segments) of the neighboring molecules. Monolayers of tetrazine derivatives are therefore much more densely packed and characterized by similar π-stacking of molecules independently of the position of alkyl substituents. Moreover, a comparative study of 3D supramolecular organization, deduced from the X-ray diffraction patterns, is also presented clearly confirming the polymorphism of the studied adsorbates.

  20. Tuning the electronic coupling in a low-bandgap donor-acceptor copolymer via the placement of side-chains

    SciTech Connect

    Oberhumer, Philipp M.; Huang, Ya-Shih; Massip, Sylvain; Albert-Seifried, Sebastian; Greenham, Neil C.; Hodgkiss, Justin M.; Friend, Richard H.; James, David T.; Kim, Ji-Seon; Tu Guoli; Huck, Wilhelm T. S.; Beljonne, David; Cornil, Jerome

    2011-03-21

    We present a spectroscopic and theoretical investigation of the effect of the presence and position of hexyl side-chains in the novel low-bandgap alternating donor-acceptor copolymer poly[bis-N,N-(4-octylphenyl)-bis-N,N-phenyl-1, 4-phenylenediamine-alt-5,5'-4',7',-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3'-benzothiadiazole] (T8TBT). We use electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopic measurements supported by calculations of chain conformation, electronic transitions, and Raman modes. Using these tools, we find that sterically demanding side-chain configurations induce twisting in the electronic acceptor unit and reduce the electronic interaction with the donor. This leads to a blue-shifted and weakened (partial) charge-transfer absorption band together with a higher photoluminescence efficiency. On the other hand, sterically relaxed side-chain configurations promote coupling between donor and acceptor units and exhibit enhanced absorption at the expense of luminescence efficiency. The possibility of tuning the donor-acceptor character of conjugated polymers by varying the placement of side-chains has very important ramifications for light emitting diode, Laser, display, and photovoltaic device optimization.

  1. Electron donor-dependent radionuclide reduction and nanoparticle formation by Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C.

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Matthew J.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kennedy, David W.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Thomas, Sara H.; Loffler, F. E.; Sanford, Robert; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

    2009-01-15

    Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans strain 2CP-C can rapidly reduce U(VI) or Tc(VII) to U(IV)O2(s) or Tc(IV)O2(S) using either acetate or H2 as an electron donor source. Kinetic studies reveal that the H2-driven reduction of either U(VI) or Tc(VII) is faster than the acetate-driven reduction. The sub-cellular localization of reduced UO2 is extracellular while TcO2 nanoparticles are both periplasmic and extracellular. While electron donor-specific differences in UO2 nanoparticle aggregate size were observed, the association of UO2 nanoparticles with an exopolymeric substance (EPS) was observed and found to be independent of electron donor source. Electron donor-specific localization differences were not observed in cells incubated with Tc(VII). These finding have direct implications on immobilization strategies for highly soluble radionuclide contaminants in subsurface waters and the development of microbially assisted biostimulation efforts.

  2. Electrical Instability Induced by Electron Trapping in Low-Bandgap Donor-Acceptor Polymer Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Phan, Hung; Wang, Ming; Bazan, Guillermo C; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen

    2015-11-18

    The mechanism of electrical instability and the double slope of p-type organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) fabricated from low-bandgap donor-acceptor copolymers are resolved. Those polymers enable electron conduction in the device, which leads to electron trapping and consequent formation of -SiO(-). This causes a turn-on voltage shift, hole-mobility increase, and double-slope occurrence. These findings tremendously impact the molecular design and device engineering of OFETs. PMID:26441385

  3. Fragment charge difference method for estimating donor-acceptor electronic coupling: Application to DNA π-stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.; Rösch, Notker

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this communication is two-fold. We introduce the fragment charge difference (FCD) method to estimate the electron transfer matrix element HDA between a donor D and an acceptor A, and we apply this method to several aspects of hole transfer electronic couplings in π-stacks of DNA, including systems with several donor-acceptor sites. Within the two-state model, our scheme can be simplified to recover a convenient estimate of the electron transfer matrix element HDA=(1-Δq2)1/2(E2-E1)/2 based on the vertical excitation energy E2-E1 and the charge difference Δq between donor and acceptor. For systems with strong charge separation, Δq≳0.95, one should resort to the FCD method. As favorable feature, we demonstrate the stability of the FCD approach for systems which require an approach beyond the two-state model. On the basis of ab initio calculations of various DNA related systems, we compared three approaches for estimating the electronic coupling: the minimum splitting method, the generalized Mulliken-Hush (GMH) scheme, and the FCD approach. We studied the sensitivity of FCD and GMH couplings to the donor-acceptor energy gap and found both schemes to be quite robust; they are applicable also in cases where donor and acceptor states are off resonance. In the application to π-stacks of DNA, we demonstrated for the Watson-Crick pair dimer [(GC),(GC)] how structural changes considerably affect the coupling strength of electron hole transfer. For models of three Watson-Crick pairs, we showed that the two-state model significantly overestimates the hole transfer coupling whereas simultaneous treatment of several states leads to satisfactory results.

  4. Enhancement of ion current from the TRIPS source by means of different electron donors

    SciTech Connect

    Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G.; Celona, L.; Torrisi, L.; Mascali, D.; Passarello, S.; Galata, A.

    2006-03-15

    A series of measurements were carried out with the TRasco Intense Proton Source (TRIPS) to determine the effectiveness of different materials as electron donors. It is well known that the use of boron nitride (BN) disks inside the plasma chamber increases the current extracted from microwave discharge ion sources, generating additional electrons. In the past, one of the two disks was replaced by a 40 {mu}m Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating over the extraction electrode, which gave some increase of current, but after less than 200 h was heavily damaged. The tests here reported concern three different options: (a) thicker Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer (100 {mu}m) deposited over the extraction electrode; a 1-mm-thick aluminium foil over which an alumina layer is deposited, inserted in the plasma chamber; a 5-mm-thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tube embedded in the plasma chamber of the TRIPS source (the outer diameter of the tube being slightly smaller than the inner diameter of the chamber). The tests were carried out in the same conditions as for magnetic field topology and only rf power and gas input were variable. Special attention was paid to the proton fraction. In fact, a higher proton fraction can be considered as a signature of the higher availability of electrons in the plasma. With the thick alumina tube not only was a better current and proton fraction observed but also a lower beam ripple and better stability.

  5. Probing the donor side of photosystem II in spinach chloroplasts and algae using electron paramagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Boska, M.D.

    1985-11-01

    this work concerns electron transfer reactions in photosystem II (PS II). Investigations carried out in this work examine the redox reaction rates in PS II using EPR. In Tris-washed PS II preparations from spinach, it is observed that the oxidation kinetics of S II/sub f/, the EPR signal formed by Z/sup +/ after deactivation of oxygen evolution, mirror the reduction kinetics of P680/sup +/ seen by EPR in samples poised at a variety of pH's. These data agree with previous data on the optically measured reduction kinetics of P680/sup +/. The oxidation kinetics of S II/sub vf/, the EPR transient seen from Z/sup +/ in samples active in O/sub 2/ evolving samples, were instrument limited (t/sub 1/2/ less than 4 ..mu..s) and thus could not be directly measured. These results taken together support a model where Z donates electrons directly to P680/sup +/. The examination of the oxidation and reduction kinetics of S II in monovalent and divalent salt-washed PS II preparations from spinach correlated most of the change of Z oxidation and re-reduction kinetics seen upon Tris-treatment with the loss of a 33 kDa polypeptide associated with the donor side of PS II. These data coupled with observations of stead-state light-induced amplitude changes in S II give evidence for the existance of an electron carrier between the water-splitting enzyme and Z. Observation of S II amplitude and kinetics in highly resolved PS II protein complexes from Synechoccus sp., consisting of either a 5 polypeptide PS II core complex (E-1) or a 4 polypeptide PS II core complex (CP2b), localize Z and P680 within the 4 polypeptide complex. 187 refs., 17 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Recalcitrant Carbonaceous Material: A Source of Electron Donors for Anaerobic Microbial Metabolisms in the Subsurface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, S. L.; Montgomery, W.; Sephton, M. A.; Cockell, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    More than 90% of organic material on Earth resides in sedimentary rocks in the form of kerogens; fossilized organic matter formed through selective preservation of high molecular weight biopolymers under anoxic conditions. Despite its prevalence in the subsurface, the extent to which this material supports microbial metabolisms is unknown. Whilst aerobic microorganisms are known to derive energy from kerogens within shales, utilization in anaerobic microbial metabolisms that proliferate in the terrestrial subsurface, such as microbial iron reduction, has yet to be demonstrated. Data are presented from microbial growth experiments in which kerogens and shales were supplied as the sole electron donor source for microbial iron reduction by an enrichment culture. Four well-characterized kerogens samples (representative of Types I-IV, classified by starting material), and two shale samples, were assessed. Organic analysis was carried out to investigate major compound classes present in each starting material. Parallel experiments were conducted to test inhibition of microbial iron reduction in the presence of each material when the culture was supplied with a full redox couple. The results demonstrate that iron-reducing microorganisms in this culture were unable to use kerogens and shales as a source of electron donors for energy acquisition, despite the presence of compound classes known to support this metabolism. Furthermore, the presence of these materials was found to inhibit microbial iron reduction to varying degrees, with some samples leading to complete inhibition. These results suggest that recalcitrant carbonaceous material in the terrestrial subsurface is not available for microbial iron reduction and similar metabolisms, such as sulphate-reduction. Further research is needed to investigate the inhibition exerted by these materials, and to assess whether these findings apply to other microbial consortia. These results may have significant implications for

  7. Temporal Transcriptomic Analysis as Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Transitions into Stationary Phase during Electron Donor Depletion†

    PubMed Central

    Clark, M. E.; He, Q.; He, Z.; Huang, K. H.; Alm, E. J.; Wan, X.-F.; Hazen, T. C.; Arkin, A. P.; Wall, J. D.; Zhou, J.-Z.; Fields, M. W.

    2006-01-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris was cultivated in a defined medium, and biomass was sampled for approximately 70 h to characterize the shifts in gene expression as cells transitioned from the exponential to the stationary phase during electron donor depletion. In addition to temporal transcriptomics, total protein, carbohydrate, lactate, acetate, and sulfate levels were measured. The microarray data were examined for statistically significant expression changes, hierarchical cluster analysis, and promoter element prediction and were validated by quantitative PCR. As the cells transitioned from the exponential phase to the stationary phase, a majority of the down-expressed genes were involved in translation and transcription, and this trend continued at the remaining times. There were general increases in relative expression for intracellular trafficking and secretion, ion transport, and coenzyme metabolism as the cells entered the stationary phase. As expected, the DNA replication machinery was down-expressed, and the expression of genes involved in DNA repair increased during the stationary phase. Genes involved in amino acid acquisition, carbohydrate metabolism, energy production, and cell envelope biogenesis did not exhibit uniform transcriptional responses. Interestingly, most phage-related genes were up-expressed at the onset of the stationary phase. This result suggested that nutrient depletion may affect community dynamics and DNA transfer mechanisms of sulfate-reducing bacteria via the phage cycle. The putative feoAB system (in addition to other presumptive iron metabolism genes) was significantly up-expressed, and this suggested the possible importance of Fe2+ acquisition under metal-reducing conditions. The expression of a large subset of carbohydrate-related genes was altered, and the total cellular carbohydrate levels declined during the growth phase transition. Interestingly, the D. vulgaris genome does not contain a putative rpoS gene, a common attribute of

  8. Remarkable Dependence of the Final Charge Separation Efficiency on the Donor-Acceptor Interaction in Photoinduced Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Tomohiro; Yamada, Tomoki; Yamamoto, Masanori; Furube, Akihiro; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Miura, Taku; Kobori, Yasuhiro; Jono, Ryota; Yamashita, Koichi; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2016-01-11

    The unprecedented dependence of final charge separation efficiency as a function of donor-acceptor interaction in covalently-linked molecules with a rectilinear rigid oligo-p-xylene bridge has been observed. Optimization of the donor-acceptor electronic coupling remarkably inhibits the undesirable rapid decay of the singlet charge-separated state to the ground state, yielding the final long-lived, triplet charge-separated state with circa 100% efficiency. This finding is extremely useful for the rational design of artificial photosynthesis and organic photovoltaic cells toward efficient solar energy conversion. PMID:26610285

  9. Photoinduced electron transfer and back transfer in systems of randomly distributed donors and acceptors: picosecond transient grating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfman, R.C.; Lin, Y.; Zimmt, M.B.; Baumann, J.; Domingue, R.P.; Fayer, M.D.

    1988-07-28

    Electron transfer from an optically excited donor (rubrene) to randomly distributed acceptors (duroquinone) followed by electron back transfer in a rigid solution (sucrose octaacetate) has been studied theoretically and experimentally. The forward electron transfer process was observed by time-dependent fluorescence quenching measurements, while the electron back transfer from the radical anion to the radical cation was monitored by using the picosecond transient grating (TG) technique. A statistical mechanics theory is used to describe the highly exponential TG signals and to extract the forward and back transfer parameters from the data. The agreement between the theory and experiments is excellent. The values of the forward and back transfer parameters are reported.

  10. Fresh look at electron-transfer mechanisms via the donor/acceptor bindings in the critical encounter complex.

    PubMed

    Rosokha, Sergiy V; Kochi, Jay K

    2008-05-01

    Seminal insights provided by the iconic R. S. Mulliken and his "charge-transfer" theory, H. Taube and his "outer/inner-sphere" mechanisms, R. A. Marcus and his "two-state non-adiabatic" theory, and N. S. Hush and his "intervalence" theory are each separately woven into the rich panoramic tapestry constituting chemical research into electron-transfer dynamics, and its mechanistic dominance for the past half century and more. In this Account, we illustrate how the simultaneous melding of all four key concepts allows sharp focus on the charge-transfer character of the critical encounter complex to evoke the latent facet of traditional electron-transfer mechanisms. To this end, we exploit the intervalence (electronic) transition that invariably accompanies the diffusive encounter of electron-rich organic donors (D) with electron-poor acceptors (A) as the experimental harbinger of the collision complex, which is then actually isolated and X-ray crystallographically established as loosely bound pi-stacked pairs of various aromatic and olefinic donor/acceptor dyads with uniform interplanar separations of r(DA) = 3.1 +/- 0.2 A. These X-ray structures, together with the spectral measurements of their intervalence transitions, lead to the pair of important electron-transfer parameters, H(DA) (electronic coupling element) versus lambdaT (reorganization energy), the ratio of which generally defines the odd-electron mobility within such an encounter complex in terms of the resonance stabilization of the donor/acceptor assembly [D, A] as opposed to the reorganization-energy penalty required for its interconversion to the electron-transfer state [D(+*), A(-*)]. We recognize the resonance-stabilization energy relative to the intrinsic activation barrier as the mechanistic binding factor, Q = 2H(DA)/lambdaT, to represent the quantitative measure of the highly variable continuum of inner-sphere/outer-sphere interactions that are possible within various types of precursor complexes

  11. Sulfide as a Chemoautotrophic Electron Donor for Dissimilatory Arsenate Reduction in Mono Lake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeft, S. E.; Kulp, T. R.; Stolz, J. S.; Oremland, R. S.

    2003-12-01

    In aqueous systems, arsenic occurs as arsenate [As(V)] or as arsenite [As(III)], with the latter form being more toxic and mobile. Mono Lake, California is a meromictic soda lake (pH = 9.8; salinity = 70-90 g/L) with exceptionally high arsenic content ( ˜200 μ M), a consequence of hydrothermal inputs combined with evaporative concentration. Previous work has shown that arsenic speciation changes from As(V) to the more reduced As(III) with vertical transition from the lake's surface oxic waters to its unmixed, anoxic bottom waters and that dissimilatory reduction is responsible for the observed change in arsenic speciation. Rates of in situ dissimilatory As(V) reduction measured by radiotracer ( ˜1- 6 μ mol/L/d) were estimated to be significant enough to mineralize up to 14% of annual primary productivity. Subsequent lab-based investigations with As(V)-amended ( ˜1-2 mM) bottom water displayed significantly higher rates (150-260 μ mol/L/d) of As(V) reduction and were not limited by the availability of organic electron donors such as acetate, lactate, malate and glucose. The focus of this study was to identify a natural source of electrons for As(V) reduction in Mono Lake. While Mono Lake contains plentiful dissolved organic carbon ( ˜7 mM) this material is usually refractory and resistant to bacterial oxidation. Alternatively, the anoxic bottom waters contain high concentrations of sulfide ions ( ˜1-2 mM) that could potentially serve as an electron donor for dissimilatory As(V) reduction. In a time course experiment with As(V)-amended Mono Lake bottom water, we observed oxidation of sulfide linked to the reduction of As(V) to As(III). This reaction did not occur in filter sterilized controls and sulfide loss did not occur in samples lacking As(V). In bottom water amended with additional sulfide (total = 6 mM) and As(V), we observed a linear relationship between rates of dissimilatory As(V) reduction and As(V) concentration. The highest rate observed under

  12. An Effort to Increase Organ Donor Registration Through Intergroup Competition and Electronic Word of Mouth.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sandi W; Hitt, Rose; Park, Hee Sun; Walther, Joseph; Liang, Yuhua Jake; Hsieh, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The effort to increase Web organ donation registrations in Michigan by enhancing 2 types of university campaigns with social media strategies informed by social identity theory is the focus of this research. The two campaigns focused on either ingroup or rivalry outgroup social identification, and each was enhanced with individually focused social media in the first year of the campaign and with electronic word of mouth in Year 2 of the campaign. Results indicated that individually focused social media such as Facebook ads worked well in rivalry campaigns (in which registrations increased two times over baseline) but not in ingroup identification campaigns (in which registrations decreased significantly over baseline when ads were introduced in the first year of each type of campaign). Electronic word-of-mouth strategies worked well in both ingroup identification campaigns (in which registrations increased two times over baseline) and rivalry campaigns (in which registrations rose almost eight times over baseline, when strategies were introduced in the second year of each type of campaign).

  13. Modelling Methane Production and Sulfate Reduction in Anaerobic Granular Sludge Reactor with Ethanol as Electron Donor

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jing; Dai, Xiaohu; Wang, Qilin; Pan, Yuting; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a mathematical model based on growth kinetics of microorganisms and substrates transportation through biofilms was developed to describe methane production and sulfate reduction with ethanol being a key electron donor. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data from two case studies conducted in granule-based Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactors. The results suggest that the developed model could satisfactorily describe methane and sulfide productions as well as ethanol and sulfate removals in both systems. The modeling results reveal a stratified distribution of methanogenic archaea, sulfate-reducing bacteria and fermentative bacteria in the anaerobic granular sludge and the relative abundances of these microorganisms vary with substrate concentrations. It also indicates sulfate-reducing bacteria can successfully outcompete fermentative bacteria for ethanol utilization when COD/SO42− ratio reaches 0.5. Model simulation suggests that an optimal granule diameter for the maximum methane production efficiency can be achieved while the sulfate reduction efficiency is not significantly affected by variation in granule size. It also indicates that the methane production and sulfate reduction can be affected by ethanol and sulfate loading rates, and the microbial community development stage in the reactor, which provided comprehensive insights into the system for its practical operation. PMID:27731395

  14. Modelling Methane Production and Sulfate Reduction in Anaerobic Granular Sludge Reactor with Ethanol as Electron Donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Dai, Xiaohu; Wang, Qilin; Pan, Yuting; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a mathematical model based on growth kinetics of microorganisms and substrates transportation through biofilms was developed to describe methane production and sulfate reduction with ethanol being a key electron donor. The model was calibrated and validated using experimental data from two case studies conducted in granule-based Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactors. The results suggest that the developed model could satisfactorily describe methane and sulfide productions as well as ethanol and sulfate removals in both systems. The modeling results reveal a stratified distribution of methanogenic archaea, sulfate-reducing bacteria and fermentative bacteria in the anaerobic granular sludge and the relative abundances of these microorganisms vary with substrate concentrations. It also indicates sulfate-reducing bacteria can successfully outcompete fermentative bacteria for ethanol utilization when COD/SO42‑ ratio reaches 0.5. Model simulation suggests that an optimal granule diameter for the maximum methane production efficiency can be achieved while the sulfate reduction efficiency is not significantly affected by variation in granule size. It also indicates that the methane production and sulfate reduction can be affected by ethanol and sulfate loading rates, and the microbial community development stage in the reactor, which provided comprehensive insights into the system for its practical operation.

  15. Benzo[e]pyrene skeleton dipyrylium dication with a strong donor-acceptor-donor interaction, and its two-electron reduced molecule.

    PubMed

    Rao, Koya Prabhakara; Kondo, Mio; Sakamoto, Ryota; Kusamoto, Tetsuro; Nishikawa, Michihiro; Kume, Shoko; Nihei, Masayuki; Oshio, Hiroki; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    The donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D) conjugated molecules 1,4-bis(diarylaminophenylethynyl)anthraquinone (1,4-Am(2)Aq) and 1,4-bis(ferrocenylethynyl)anthraquinone (1,4-Fc(2)Aq), undergo a double proton cyclization reaction with bis(trifluoromethanesulfone)imide acid (TFSIH) to yield 1,4-bis(diarylaminophenyl or ferrocenyl) dipyrylium salts [1,4-R(2)Pyl(2)](TFSI)(2) (R=Am or Fc) with novel planar pentacyclic structures similar to the aromatic benzo[e]pyrene-type skeleton. [1,4-Am(2)Pyl(2)](TFSI)(2) could be reduced to give the neutral molecule [1,4-Am(2)Pyl(2)](0), which is stable and maintains the benzo[e]pyrene-type skeleton. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first oxygen-atom-containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon with 22 (4n+2) π-electrons. The obtained condensed-ring benzo[e]pyrene-type skeleton compounds show physical and chemical properties that are significantly different from those of [1,5-Am(2)Pyl(2)](TFSI)(2), which has a perylene-type skeleton.

  16. Microbial selenite reduction with organic carbon and electrode as sole electron donor by a bacterium isolated from domestic wastewater.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van Khanh; Park, Younghyun; Yu, Jaecheul; Lee, Taeho

    2016-07-01

    Selenium is said to be multifaceted element because it is essential at a low concentration but very toxic at an elevated level. For the purpose of screening a potential microorganism for selenite bioremediation, we isolated a bacterium, named strain THL1, which could perform both heterotrophic selenite reduction, using organic carbons such as acetate, lactate, propionate, and butyrate as electron donors under microaerobic condition, and electrotrophic selenite reduction, using an electrode polarized at -0.3V (vs. standard hydrogen electrode) as the sole electron donor under anaerobic condition. This bacterium determined to be a new strain of the genus Cronobacter, could remove selenite with an efficiency of up to 100%. This study is the first demonstration on a pure culture could take up electrons from an electrode to perform selenite reduction. The selenium nanoparticles produced by microbial selenite reduction might be considered for recovery and use in the nanotechnology industry. PMID:27099943

  17. Influence of electron donors and copper concentration on geochemical and mineralogical processes under conditions of biological sulphate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolicka, Dorota; Borkowski, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    Sulphidogenous microorganism communities were isolated from soil polluted by crude oil. The study was focused on determining the influence of 1) copper (II) concentration on the activity of selected microorganism communities and 2) the applied electron donor on the course and evolution of mineral-forming processes under conditions favouring growth of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The influence of copper concentration on the activity of selected microorganism communities and the type of mineral phases formed was determined during experiments in which copper (II) chloride at concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 0.7 g/L was added to SRB cultures. The experiments were performed in two variants: with ethanol (4 g/L) or lactate (4 g/L) as the sole carbon source. In order to determine the taxonomic composition of the selected microorganism communities, the 16S rRNA method was used. Results of this analysis confirmed the presence of Desulfovibrio, Desulfohalobium, Desulfotalea, Thermotoga, Solibacter, Gramella, Anaeromyxobacter and Myxococcus sp. in the stationary cultures. The post-culture sediments contained covelline (CuS) and digenite (Cu9S5 ). Based on the results, it can be stated that the type of carbon source applied during incubation plays a crucial role in determining the mineral composition of the post-culture sediments. Thus, regardless of the amount of copper ion introduced to a culture with lactate as the sole carbon source, no copper sulphide was observed in the post-culture sediments. Cultures with ethanol as the sole carbon source, on the other hand, yielded covelline or digenite in all post-culture sediments.

  18. Electron-transfer and acid-base properties of a two-electron oxidized form of quaterpyrrole that acts as both an electron donor and an acceptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; E, Wenbo; Ohkubo, Kei; Sanchez-Garcia, David; Yoon, Dae-Wi; Sessler, Jonathan L; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Kadish, Karl M

    2008-02-21

    Electron-transfer interconversion between the four-electron oxidized form of a quaterpyrrole (abbreviated as P4 for four pyrroles) and the two-electron oxidized form (P4H2) as well as between P4H2 and its fully reduced form (P4H4) bearing analogous substituents in the alpha- and beta-pyrrolic positions was studied by means of cyclic voltammetry and UV-visible spectroelectrochemistry combined with ESR and laser flash photolysis measurements. The two-electron oxidized form, P4H2, acts as both an electron donor and an electron acceptor. The radical cation (P4H2*+) and radical anion (P4H2*-) are both produced by photoinduced electron transfer from dimeric 1-benzyl-1,4-dihydronicotinamide to P4H2, whereas the cation radical form of the compound is also produced by electron-transfer oxidation of P4H2 with [Ru(bpy)3]3+. The ESR spectra of P4H2*+ and P4H2*- were recorded at low temperature and exhibit spin delocalization over all four pyrrole units. Thus, the two-electron oxidized form of the quaterpyrrole (P4H2) displays redox and electronic features analogous to those seen in the case of porphyrins and may be considered as a simple, open-chain model of this well-studied tetrapyrrolic macrocycle. The dynamics of deprotonation from P4H2*+ and disproportionation of P4H2 were examined by laser flash photolysis measurements of photoinduced electron-transfer oxidation and reduction of P4H2, respectively.

  19. Strong electronic coupling and electron transfer in a Ce2@Ih-C80-H2P electron donor acceptor conjugate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Marc; Feng, Lai; Slanina, Zdenek; Wang, Weiwei; Nagase, Shigeru; Akasaka, Takeshi; Guldi, Dirk M.

    2016-07-01

    A newly designed electron donor-acceptor conjugate, namely Ce2@Ih-C80-H2P consisting of an endohedral dimetallofullerene Ce2@Ih-C80 and a free-base prophyrin (H2P), has been synthesized and systematically investigated. Basic characterization by means of NMR spectroscopy, steady-state absorption spectroscopy, and electrochemistry points to a folded configuration with sizeable interactions between Ce2@Ih-C80 and H2P. Complementary DFT optimization also results in the same conclusions. Time-resolved absorption spectroscopic investigations corroborate the formation of the (Ce2)&z.rad;-@Ih-C80-(H2P)&z.rad;+ radical ion pair state in non-polar as well as polar media. Overall, the modus operandi is an ultrafast through-space electron transfer enabled by the folded configuration in the ground and excited state.A newly designed electron donor-acceptor conjugate, namely Ce2@Ih-C80-H2P consisting of an endohedral dimetallofullerene Ce2@Ih-C80 and a free-base prophyrin (H2P), has been synthesized and systematically investigated. Basic characterization by means of NMR spectroscopy, steady-state absorption spectroscopy, and electrochemistry points to a folded configuration with sizeable interactions between Ce2@Ih-C80 and H2P. Complementary DFT optimization also results in the same conclusions. Time-resolved absorption spectroscopic investigations corroborate the formation of the (Ce2)&z.rad;-@Ih-C80-(H2P)&z.rad;+ radical ion pair state in non-polar as well as polar media. Overall, the modus operandi is an ultrafast through-space electron transfer enabled by the folded configuration in the ground and excited state. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03324e

  20. Estimation of electronic coupling in π-stacked donor-bridge-acceptor systems: Correction of the two-state model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voityuk, Alexander A.

    2006-02-01

    Comparison of donor-acceptor electronic couplings calculated within two-state and three-state models suggests that the two-state treatment can provide unreliable estimates of Vda because of neglecting the multistate effects. We show that in most cases accurate values of the electronic coupling in a π stack, where donor and acceptor are separated by a bridging unit, can be obtained as Ṽda=(E2-E1)μ12/Rda+(2E3-E1-E2)2μ13μ23/Rda2, where E1, E2, and E3 are adiabatic energies of the ground, charge-transfer, and bridge states, respectively, μij is the transition dipole moments between the states i and j, and Rda is the distance between the planes of donor and acceptor. In this expression based on the generalized Mulliken-Hush approach, the first term corresponds to the coupling derived within a two-state model, whereas the second term is the superexchange correction accounting for the bridge effect. The formula is extended to bridges consisting of several subunits. The influence of the donor-acceptor energy mismatch on the excess charge distribution, adiabatic dipole and transition moments, and electronic couplings is examined. A diagnostic is developed to determine whether the two-state approach can be applied. Based on numerical results, we showed that the superexchange correction considerably improves estimates of the donor-acceptor coupling derived within a two-state approach. In most cases when the two-state scheme fails, the formula gives reliable results which are in good agreement (within 5%) with the data of the three-state generalized Mulliken-Hush model.

  1. Charge dynamics of a single donor coupled to a few-electron quantum dot in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzeo, G.; Prati, E.; Belli, M.; Leti, G.; Cocco, S.; Fanciulli, M.; Guagliardo, F.; Ferrari, G.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the charge transfer dynamics between a silicon quantum dot and an individual phosphorous donor extracted from the current through the quantum dot as a probe for the donor ionization state. We employ a silicon n-metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) with two side gates at a single metallization level to control both the device conductance and the donor charge. The elastic nature of the process is demonstrated by temperature and magnetic field independent tunneling times. The Fano factor approaches 1/2 revealing that the process is sub-poissonian.

  2. Microscopic simulations of electronic excitations in donor-acceptor heterojunctions of small-molecule based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumeier, Bjoern

    2015-03-01

    Fundamental processes involving electronic excitations govern the functionality of molecular materials in which the dynamics of excitons and charges is determined by an interplay of molecular electronic structure and morphological order. To understand, e.g., charge separation and recombination at donor-acceptor heterojunctions in organic solar cells, knowledge about the microscopic details influencing these dynamics in the bulk and across the interface is required. For a set of prototypical heterojunctions of small-molecule donor materials with C60, we employ a hybrid QM/MM approach linking density-functional and many-body Green's functions theory and analyze the charged and neutral electronic excitations therein. We pay special attention the spatially-resolved electron/hole transport levels, as well as the relative energies of Frenkel and charge-transfer excitations at the interface. Finally, we link the molecular architecture of the donor material, its orientation on the fullerene substrate as well as mesoscale order to the solar cell performance.

  3. Joint electrical, photophysical, and photovoltaic studies on truxene dye-sensitized solar cells: impact of arylamine electron donors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihui; Liang, Mao; Wang, He; Wang, Peng; Cheng, Fangyi; Sun, Zhe; Song, Xue

    2014-03-01

    The judicious design of electron donors is one of the viable tactics to improve the efficiency of organic dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) employing outer-sphere redox couples. Herein, a hexahexyltruxene-substituted 4-(hexyloxy)-N-phenylaniline (HT-HPA) segment is constructed and employed as the electron donor in two organic push-pull dyes (M28 and M29) with high molar absorption coefficient values. Relative to its congener (C241) possessing the dihexyloxy-substituted triphenylamine electron donor, M29 exhibits red-shifted absorption as well as enhanced maximum molar absorption coefficient values. A thorough comparison with M29 and C241 demonstrates that the HT-HPA segment adequately insulates the TiO2 surface from the electrolyte, which prevents back-recombination and prolongs electron lifetime in the semiconductor. The diminishment of charge recombination not only enables attainment of strikingly high photovoltages (approaching 1 V), but also overcompensates the disadvantageous impact of lower dye-load amounts. As a result, the dye transformation from C241 to M29 brings forth an efficiency improvement from 7.3 % to 8.5 % at the 100 mW cm(-2) simulated AM1.5 conditions. Our work should shed light on the future design of more powerful push-pull organic photosensitizers for iodine-free DSCs.

  4. Electron transport behaviors through donor-induced quantum dot array in heavily n-doped junctionless nanowire transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Liuhong; Han, Weihua Wang, Hao; Hong, Wenting; Lyu, Qifeng; Yang, Xiang; Yang, Fuhua

    2015-01-21

    We investigated single electron tunneling through a phosphorus donor-induced quantum dot array in heavily n-doped junctionless nanowire transistor. Seven subpeaks splitting in current oscillations are clearly observed due to the coupling of quantum dot array under the bias voltage below 1.0 mV at the temperature of 6 K. The conduction system can be well described by a two-band Hubbard model. The activation energy of phosphorus donors is tuned by the gate voltage to be 7.0 meV for the lower Hubbard band and 4.4 meV for the upper Hubbard band due to the localization effects below threshold voltage. The evolution of electron behaviors in the quantum dots is identified by adjusting the gate voltage from quantum-dot regime to one-dimensional regime.

  5. High-Affinity Proton Donors Promote Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer by Samarium Diiodide.

    PubMed

    Chciuk, Tesia V; Anderson, William R; Flowers, Robert A

    2016-05-10

    The relationship between proton-donor affinity for Sm(II) ions and the reduction of two substrates (anthracene and benzyl chloride) was examined. A combination of spectroscopic, thermochemical, and kinetic studies show that only those proton donors that coordinate or chelate strongly to Sm(II) promote anthracene reduction through a PCET process. These studies demonstrate that the combination of Sm(II) ions and water does not provide a unique reagent system for formal hydrogen atom transfer to substrates. PMID:27061351

  6. [Study on sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification with different electron donors].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ying; Zhou, Wei-li; Wang, Hui; He, Sheng-bing

    2013-05-01

    Sulphur-based autotrophic denitrification was applied to treat the low concentration nitrate-contaminated water. Different electron donors, namely, elemental sulfur, sulfide and thiosulfate, were used in three continuous reactors to compare the denitrification performance. When treating the low concentration nitrate-contaminated water (13 mg x L(-1)), the thiosulfate system showed the best performance and the sulfide system was the worst. The thiosulfate system was less sensitive to low temperature than the other two. At temperatures higher than 20 degrees C, the sulfur system was greatly influenced by mass transfer efficiency and HRT. It removed 81% of nitrate and 79% of TN when HRT was no less than 2 h, but could only achieve a low nitrate and TN removal rate of 47% and 51% when HRT was shorter than 2 h. No obvious nitrite accumulation was observed and the average effluent nitrite was 0.53 mg x L(-1). The sulfide system could only remove 47% of nitrate and 41% of TN with 0.29 mg x L(-1) nitrite in the effluent at the HRT of 4 h. Meanwhile, the thiosulfate system had a high removal rate of 99% for nitrate and 90% for TN, with a low content of effluent nitrite of 0.080 mg x L(-1), and the HRT could be shortened to 0.5 h. The molecular biological analysis showed that different bacteria predominated in the three reactors, and that Thiobacillus denitrificans existed abundantly in the sulfur system, while the functional bacteria in the sulfide and thiosulfate systems could not be identified yet. A new species of sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification bacterium may have been found.

  7. Enhanced Alcaligenes faecalis Denitrification Rate with Electrodes as the Electron Donor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Yu, Ping; Zeng, Cuiping; Ding, Hongrui; Wang, Changqiu

    2015-01-01

    The utilization by Alcaligenes faecalis of electrodes as the electron donor for denitrification was investigated in this study. The denitrification rate of A. faecalis with a poised potential was greatly enhanced compared with that of the controls without poised potentials. For nitrate reduction, although A. faecalis could not reduce nitrate, at three poised potentials of +0.06, −0.06, and −0.15 V (versus normal hydrogen electrode [NHE]), the nitrate was partially reduced with −0.15- and −0.06-V potentials at rates of 17.3 and 28.5 mg/liter/day, respectively. The percentages of reduction for −0.15 and −0.06 V were 52.4 and 30.4%, respectively. Meanwhile, for nitrite reduction, the poised potentials greatly enhanced the nitrite reduction. The nitrite reduction rates for three poised potentials (−0.06, −0.15, and −0.30 V) were 1.98, 4.37, and 3.91 mg/liter/h, respectively. When the potentials were cut off, the nitrite reduction rate was maintained for 1.5 h (from 2.3 to 2.25 mg/liter/h) and then greatly decreased, and the reduction rate (0.38 mg/liter/h) was about 1/6 compared with the rate (2.3 mg/liter/h) when potential was on. Then the potentials resumed, but the reduction rate did not resume and was only 2 times higher than the rate when the potential was off. PMID:26048940

  8. A combined FTIR and infrared emission spectroscopy investigation of layered double hydroxide as an effective electron donor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Wei, Feng; Liang, Ying; Zhou, Jizhi; Xi, Yunfei; Qian, Guangren; Frost, Ray

    2016-02-01

    A novel method has been presented to characterize electron transfer in layered double hydroxides (LDHs) utilizing an investigation combing FTIR and infrared emission spectroscopy. At room temperature, electron could transfer to interlayer Fe(3+) through monodentate ligand cyanide, and resulted in a reduction of 40% Fe(3+) to Fe(2+). When the environmental temperature increased from 25 to 300°C, reduction of Fe(3+) and Ni(2+) increased to 94% and 42%. Furthermore, electron also transferred to interlayer cation through multidentate ligand EDTA. As a result, LDHs has been proven to be an effective electron donor, and FTIR was a feasible tool in characterizing this property by monitoring the valence state of cations. It was also concluded that octahedral units with OH(-) groups in LDH layer functioned as electron donor centers. Driving force for electron transfer is attributed to the charge density difference between cation layer and probe anion. These results could help to explain the mechanism of various applications of LDHs in catalysis and photocatalysis.

  9. A combined FTIR and infrared emission spectroscopy investigation of layered double hydroxide as an effective electron donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia; Wei, Feng; Liang, Ying; Zhou, Jizhi; Xi, Yunfei; Qian, Guangren; Frost, Ray

    2016-02-01

    A novel method has been presented to characterize electron transfer in layered double hydroxides (LDHs) utilizing an investigation combing FTIR and infrared emission spectroscopy. At room temperature, electron could transfer to interlayer Fe3 + through monodentate ligand cyanide, and resulted in a reduction of 40% Fe3 + to Fe2 +. When the environmental temperature increased from 25 to 300 °C, reduction of Fe3 + and Ni2 + increased to 94% and 42%. Furthermore, electron also transferred to interlayer cation through multidentate ligand EDTA. As a result, LDHs has been proven to be an effective electron donor, and FTIR was a feasible tool in characterizing this property by monitoring the valence state of cations. It was also concluded that octahedral units with OH- groups in LDH layer functioned as electron donor centers. Driving force for electron transfer is attributed to the charge density difference between cation layer and probe anion. These results could help to explain the mechanism of various applications of LDHs in catalysis and photocatalysis.

  10. Comparative study of donor-induced quantum dots in Si nano-channels by single-electron transport characterization and Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tyszka, K.; Moraru, D.; Samanta, A.; Mizuno, T.; Tabe, M.; Jabłoński, R.

    2015-06-28

    We comparatively study donor-induced quantum dots in Si nanoscale-channel transistors for a wide range of doping concentration by analysis of single-electron tunneling transport and surface potential measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). By correlating KPFM observations of donor-induced potential landscapes with simulations based on Thomas-Fermi approximation, it is demonstrated that single-electron tunneling transport at lowest gate voltages (for smallest coverage of screening electrons) is governed most frequently by only one dominant quantum dot, regardless of doping concentration. Doping concentration, however, primarily affects the internal structure of the quantum dot. At low concentrations, individual donors form most of the quantum dots, i.e., “donor-atom” quantum dots. In contrast, at high concentrations above metal-insulator transition, closely placed donors instead of individual donors form more complex quantum dots, i.e., “donor-cluster” quantum dots. The potential depth of these “donor-cluster” quantum dots is significantly reduced by increasing gate voltage (increasing coverage of screening electrons), leading to the occurrence of multiple competing quantum dots.

  11. ELECTRON DONOR ACCEPTOR DESCRIPTORS OF THE SINGLE AND DOUBLE BONDED SUBSTITUENT AND HETEROATOM INCORPORATION EFFECTS. A REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The properties of the series of Electron Donor-Acceptor (EDA) descriptors of classical substituent effect (sEDA(I), pEDA(I)), double bonded substituent effect (sEDA(=), pEDA(=)), heteroatom incorporation effect in monocyclic systems (sEDA(II), pEDA(II)), and in ring-junction position (sEDA(III), pEDA(III)), are reviewed. The descriptors show the amount of electrons donated to or withdrawn from the σ-(sEDA) or π(pEDA) valence orbitals by the substituent or incorporant. The new descriptors are expected to enrich the potency of QSAR analyses in drug design and materials chemistry.

  12. Humin as an electron donor for enhancement of multiple microbial reduction reactions with different redox potentials in a consortium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongdong; Zhang, Chunfang; Xiao, Zhixing; Suzuki, Daisuke; Katayama, Arata

    2015-02-01

    A solid-phase humin, acting as an electron donor, was able to enhance multiple reductive biotransformations, including dechlorination of pentachlorophenol (PCP), dissimilatory reduction of amorphous Fe (III) oxide (FeOOH), and reduction of nitrate, in a consortium. Humin that was chemically reduced by NaBH4 served as an electron donor for these microbial reducing reactions, with electron donating capacities of 0.013 mmol e(-)/g for PCP dechlorination, 0.15 mmol e(-)/g for iron reduction, and 0.30 mmol e(-)/g for nitrate reduction. Two pairs of oxidation and reduction peaks within the humin were detected by cyclic voltammetry analysis. 16S rRNA gene sequencing-based microbial community analysis of the consortium incubated with different terminal electron acceptors, suggested that Dehalobacter sp., Bacteroides sp., and Sulfurospirillum sp. were involved in the PCP dechlorination, dissimilatory iron reduction, and nitrate reduction, respectively. These findings suggested that humin functioned as a versatile redox mediator, donating electrons for multiple respiration reactions with different redox potentials.

  13. Donor-Acceptor-Type Semiconducting Polymers Consisting of Benzothiadiazole Derivatives as Electron-Acceptor Units for Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Su; Park, Jong Baek; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2015-11-01

    We synthesized two fused pentacyclic donor-acceptor structures, where the two different outer electron rich thiophene (DTPBT) and electron poor benzene (ICTh) moieties are covalently bonded to the central electron-deficient benzothiadiazole core by two nitrogen bridges. These new electron-acceptor DTPBT and ICTh building blocks were copolymerized with fluorene, as the electron donor group, via Suzuki coupling polymerization, to produce two new alternating copolymers, PFDTPBT and PFICTh, respectively. The average molecular weights of the synthesized polymers were determined by GPC. The number-average molecular weights of PFDTPBT and PFICTh were 19,000 (PDI = 2.5) and 20,000 (PDI = 4.0), respectively. The optical bandgap energies of the polymers were measured from their absorption onsets to be 2.15 and 2.55 eV, depending on the polymer structure. The HOMO energy levels of the polymers were determined, by measuring the oxidation onsets of the polymer films by cyclic voltammetry. The measured HOMO energy levels of PFDTPBT and PFICTh were -5.10 and -5.57 eV, respectively. When the polymers were blended with PC71BM, as the active layer for bulk-heterojunction photovoltaic devices, power conversion efficiencies were 2.08% and 0.34%, respectively, under AM 1.5 G (100 mW cm(-2)) conditions.

  14. The separation distance distribution in electron-donor-acceptor systems and the wavelength dependence of free ion yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jinwei; Findley, Bret R.; Braun, Charles L.; Sutin, Norman

    2001-06-01

    We recently reported that free radical ion quantum yields for electron-donor-acceptor (EDA) systems of alkylbenzenes-tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) exhibit a remarkable wavelength dependence in dichloromethane, a medium polarity solvent. We proposed that weak absorption by long-distance, unassociated or "random" D⋯A pairs is mainly responsible for the free radical ion yield. Here a model for the wavelength dependence of the free ion yield is developed for four systems in which differing degrees of EDA complex formation are present: 1,3,5-tri-tert-butylbenzene-TCNE in which only random pairs exist due to the bulky groups on the electron donor, and toluene—TCNE, 1,3,5-triethylbenzene-TCNE and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene-TCNE. Mulliken-Hush theory is used to determine the excitation distance distribution of unassociated, random pairs at different wavelengths. For each absorption distribution, free radical ion yields at different wavelengths are then calculated using Onsager's result for the ion separation probability. Encouraging agreement between the calculated yields and our experimental results is obtained. As far as we are aware, this is the first time that photoexcitation of unassociated donor/acceptor pairs has been invoked as the source of separated radical ion pairs.

  15. BPM ANALOG FRONT-END ELECTRONICS BASED ON THE AD8307 LOG AMPLIFIER

    SciTech Connect

    R. SHURTER; ET AL

    2000-06-01

    Beam position monitor (BPM) signal-processing electronics utilizing the Analog Devices AD8307 logarithmic amplifier has been developed for the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA), part of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project at Los Alamos. The low-pass filtered 350 MHz fundamental signal from each of the four microstrip electrodes in a BPM is ''detected'' by an AD8307 log amp, amplified and scaled to accommodate the 0 to +5V input of an analog-to-digital (A/D) converter. The resultant four digitized signals represent a linear power relationship to the electrode signals, which are in turn related to beam current and position. As the AD8307 has a potential dynamic range of approximately 92 dB, much attention must be given to noise reduction, sources of which can be digital signals on the same board, power supplies, inter-channel coupling, stray RF and others. This paper will describe the operational experience of this particular analog front-end electronic circuit design.

  16. Electron confinement induced by diluted hydrogen-like ad-atoms in graphene ribbons.

    PubMed

    González, J W; Rosales, L; Pacheco, M; Ayuela, A

    2015-10-14

    We report the electronic properties of two-dimensional systems made of graphene nanoribbons, which are patterned with ad-atoms in two separated regions. Due to the extra electronic confinement induced by the presence of impurities, we find resonant levels, quasi-bound and impurity-induced localized states, which determine the transport properties of the system. Regardless of the ad-atom distribution in the system, we apply band-folding procedures to simple models and predict the energies and the spatial distribution of those impurity-induced states. We take into account two different scenarios: gapped graphene and the presence of randomly distributed ad-atoms in a low dilution regime. In both cases the defect-induced resonances are still detected. Our findings would encourage experimentalists to synthesize these systems and characterize their quasi-localized states by employing, for instance, scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). Additionally, the resonant transport features could be used in electronic applications and molecular sensing devices.

  17. 2004 Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions Gordon Conference - August 8-13, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    GUILFORD JONES BOSTON UNIVERSITY PHOTONICS CENTER 8 ST. MARY'S ST BOSTON, MA 02215

    2005-09-14

    The 2004 Gordon Conference on Donor/Acceptor Interactions will take place at Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island on August 8-13, 2004. The conference will be devoted to the consequences of charge interaction and charge motion in molecular and materials systems.

  18. Syntheses of D-A-A Type Small Molecular Donor Materials Having Various Electron Accepting Moiety for Organic Photovoltaic Application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nahyeon; Park, Sangman; Lee, Myong-Hoon; Lee, Jaemin; Lee, Changjin; Yoon, Sung Cheol

    2016-03-01

    Small molecular donor, DTDCTB achieved a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) value of 6.6 ± 0.2% in vacuum-deposited planar mixed heterojunction (PMHJ) structure. However, the same material just recorded PCE of 0.34% in solution processed small molecule based bulk heterjunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic cells. For the improvement of organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs), In this study, we designed and synthesized several D-A-A (donor-acceptor-acceptor) type molecular electron donating materials. Ditolylaminothienyl moiety as an electron donating group connected to 1,2,5-benzothiadiazole as a conjugated electron accepting unit, simultaneously with an electron accepting terminal group such as cyano alkyl acetate and N-alkyl rhodanine. The thermal, photophysical, and electrochemical properties of prepared small molecules were investigated by DSC, UV/Vis spectroscopy and Cyclic Voltametry, respectively. As a result, 0.89% of PCE can be obtained from OPV using a mixture of DTATBTER and PCBM as an active layer with a Voc of 0.87 V, a Jsc of 3.20 mA/cm2, and a fill factor of 31.9%. PMID:27455734

  19. Syntheses of D-A-A Type Small Molecular Donor Materials Having Various Electron Accepting Moiety for Organic Photovoltaic Application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nahyeon; Park, Sangman; Lee, Myong-Hoon; Lee, Jaemin; Lee, Changjin; Yoon, Sung Cheol

    2016-03-01

    Small molecular donor, DTDCTB achieved a high power conversion efficiency (PCE) value of 6.6 ± 0.2% in vacuum-deposited planar mixed heterojunction (PMHJ) structure. However, the same material just recorded PCE of 0.34% in solution processed small molecule based bulk heterjunction (BHJ) organic photovoltaic cells. For the improvement of organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs), In this study, we designed and synthesized several D-A-A (donor-acceptor-acceptor) type molecular electron donating materials. Ditolylaminothienyl moiety as an electron donating group connected to 1,2,5-benzothiadiazole as a conjugated electron accepting unit, simultaneously with an electron accepting terminal group such as cyano alkyl acetate and N-alkyl rhodanine. The thermal, photophysical, and electrochemical properties of prepared small molecules were investigated by DSC, UV/Vis spectroscopy and Cyclic Voltametry, respectively. As a result, 0.89% of PCE can be obtained from OPV using a mixture of DTATBTER and PCBM as an active layer with a Voc of 0.87 V, a Jsc of 3.20 mA/cm2, and a fill factor of 31.9%.

  20. Dph3 Is an Electron Donor for Dph1-Dph2 in the First Step of Eukaryotic Diphthamide Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Diphthamide, the target of diphtheria toxin, is a unique posttranslational modification on translation elongation factor 2 (EF2) in archaea and eukaryotes. The biosynthesis of diphthamide was proposed to involve three steps. The first step is the transfer of the 3-amino-3-carboxypropyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to the histidine residue of EF2, forming a C–C bond. Previous genetic studies showed this step requires four proteins in eukaryotes, Dph1–Dph4. However, the exact molecular functions for the four proteins are unknown. Previous study showed that Pyrococcus horikoshii Dph2 (PhDph2), a novel iron-sulfur cluster-containing enzyme, forms a homodimer and is sufficient for the first step of diphthamide biosynthesis in vitro. Here we demonstrate by in vitro reconstitution that yeast Dph1 and Dph2 form a complex (Dph1-Dph2) that is equivalent to the homodimer of PhDph2 and is sufficient to catalyze the first step in vitro in the presence of dithionite as the reductant. We further demonstrate that yeast Dph3 (also known as KTI11), a CSL-type zinc finger protein, can bind iron and in the reduced state can serve as an electron donor to reduce the Fe-S cluster in Dph1-Dph2. Our study thus firmly establishes the functions for three of the proteins involved in eukaryotic diphthamide biosynthesis. For most radical SAM enzymes in bacteria, flavodoxins and flavodoxin reductases are believed to serve as electron donors for the Fe-S clusters. The finding that Dph3 is an electron donor for the Fe-S clusters in Dph1-Dph2 is thus interesting and opens up new avenues of research on electron transfer to Fe-S proteins in eukaryotic cells. PMID:24422557

  1. Dph3 is an electron donor for Dph1-Dph2 in the first step of eukaryotic diphthamide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Min; Su, Xiaoyang; Dzikovski, Boris; Dando, Emily E; Zhu, Xuling; Du, Jintang; Freed, Jack H; Lin, Hening

    2014-02-01

    Diphthamide, the target of diphtheria toxin, is a unique posttranslational modification on translation elongation factor 2 (EF2) in archaea and eukaryotes. The biosynthesis of diphthamide was proposed to involve three steps. The first step is the transfer of the 3-amino-3-carboxypropyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) to the histidine residue of EF2, forming a C-C bond. Previous genetic studies showed this step requires four proteins in eukaryotes, Dph1-Dph4. However, the exact molecular functions for the four proteins are unknown. Previous study showed that Pyrococcus horikoshii Dph2 (PhDph2), a novel iron-sulfur cluster-containing enzyme, forms a homodimer and is sufficient for the first step of diphthamide biosynthesis in vitro. Here we demonstrate by in vitro reconstitution that yeast Dph1 and Dph2 form a complex (Dph1-Dph2) that is equivalent to the homodimer of PhDph2 and is sufficient to catalyze the first step in vitro in the presence of dithionite as the reductant. We further demonstrate that yeast Dph3 (also known as KTI11), a CSL-type zinc finger protein, can bind iron and in the reduced state can serve as an electron donor to reduce the Fe-S cluster in Dph1-Dph2. Our study thus firmly establishes the functions for three of the proteins involved in eukaryotic diphthamide biosynthesis. For most radical SAM enzymes in bacteria, flavodoxins and flavodoxin reductases are believed to serve as electron donors for the Fe-S clusters. The finding that Dph3 is an electron donor for the Fe-S clusters in Dph1-Dph2 is thus interesting and opens up new avenues of research on electron transfer to Fe-S proteins in eukaryotic cells.

  2. Electrically detected double electron-electron resonance: exchange interaction of ?P donors and P? defects at the Si/SiO? interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suckert, Max; Hoehne, Felix; Dreher, Lukas; Kuenzl, Markus; Huebl, Hans; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S.

    2013-10-01

    We study the coupling of P? dangling bond defects at the Si/SiO2 interface and 31P donors in an epitaxial layer directly underneath using electrically detected double electron-electron resonance (EDDEER). An exponential decay of the EDDEER signal is observed, which is attributed to a broad distribution of exchange coupling strengths J/2π from 25 kHz to 3 MHz. Comparison of the experimental data with a numerical simulation of the exchange coupling shows that this range of coupling strengths corresponds to 31P-P? distances ranging from 14 nm to 20 nm.

  3. Bimolecular electron transfer reactions in coumarin amine systems: Donor acceptor orientational effect on diffusion-controlled reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satpati, A. K.; Nath, S.; Kumbhakar, M.; Maity, D. K.; Senthilkumar, S.; Pal, H.

    2008-04-01

    Electron transfer (ET) reactions between excited coumarin dyes and different aliphatic amine (AlA) and aromatic amine (ArA) donors have been investigated in acetonitrile solution using steady-state (SS) and time-resolved (TR) fluorescence quenching measurements. No ground state complex or emissive exciplex formation has been indicated in these systems. SS and TR measurements give similar quenching constants ( kq) for each of the coumarin-amine pairs, suggesting dynamic nature of interaction in these systems. On correlating kq values with the free energy changes (Δ G0) of the ET reactions show the typical Rehm-Weller type of behavior as expected for bimolecular ET reactions under diffusive condition, where kq increases with -Δ G0 at the lower exergonicity (-Δ G0) region but ultimately saturate to a diffusion-limited value (kqDC) at the higher exergonicity region. It is, however, interestingly observed that the kqDC values vary largely depending on the type of the amines used. Thus, kqDC is much higher with ArAs than AlAs. Similarly, the kqDC for cyclic monoamine 1-azabicyclo-[2,2,2]-octane (ABCO) is distinctly lower and that for cyclic diamine 1,4-diazabicyclo-[2,2,2]-octane (DABCO) is distinctly higher than the kqDC value obtained for other noncyclic AlAs. These differences in the kqDC values have been rationalized on the basis of the differences in the orientational restrictions involved in the ET reactions with different types of amines. As understood, n-type donors (AlAs) introduce large orientational restriction and thus significantly reduces the ET efficiency in comparison to the π-type donors (ArAs). Structural constrains are inferred to be the reason for the differences in the kqDC values involving ABCO, DABCO donors in comparison to other noncyclic AlAs. Supportive evidence for the orientational restrictions involving different types of amines donors has also been obtained from DFT based quantum chemical calculations on the molecular orbitals of

  4. Inside the alkalinity engine: the role of electron donors in the organomineralization potential of sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, K L; Kading, T J; Braissant, O; Dupraz, C; Visscher, P T

    2012-11-01

    Mineral precipitation in microbial mats may have been the key to their preservation as fossil stromatolites, potentially documenting evidence of the earliest life on Earth. Two factors that contribute to carbonate mineral precipitation are the saturation index (SI) and the presence of nucleation sites. Both of these can be influenced by micro-organisms, which can either alter SI through their metabolisms, or produce and consume organic substances such as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) that can affect nucleation. It is the balance of individual metabolisms within the mat community that determines the pH and the dissolved inorganic carbon concentration, thereby potentially increasing the alkalinity and consequently the SI. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are an important component of this 'alkalinity engine.' The activity of SRB often peaks in layers where CaCO(3) precipitates, and mineral precipitation has been demonstrated in SRB cultures; however, the effect of their metabolism on the alkalinity engine and actual contribution to mineral precipitation is the subject of controversy. Here, we show through culture experiments, theoretical calculations, and geochemical modeling studies that the pH, alkalinity, and organomineralization potential will vary depending on the type of electron donor. Specifically, hydrogen and formate can increase the pH, but electron donors like lactate and ethanol, and to a lesser extent glycolate, decrease the pH. The implication of this for the lithification of mats is that the combination of processes supplying electron donors and the utilization of these compounds by SRB may be critical to promoting mineral precipitation.

  5. Electronic spectra and hyperpolarizabilities of structurally similar donor-acceptor dyes. A density functional theory analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Amrita; Das, Mousumi; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2015-12-01

    Studies with density functional theory (DFT) have been done to reinforce our previous experimental findings involving the solvatochromism and the effect of protonation and for three structurally similar donor-acceptor dyes exhibiting intramolecular charge transfer transition. These dyes have similar donor (indole N/amino N) site and similar carbonyl O as the acceptor centre. The dye with an amino N donor site and indanone O as the acceptor centre has the lowest value of the energy gap between HOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital) and LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) and highest percentage of charge transfer from the N to the O centre. Time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has been used to calculate the excitation energy to the lowest singlet excited dipole-allowed states of the dyes. Effect of solvation on excitation energy has been studied by the use of polarisable continuum model (PCM). Computational results indicate that the excitation energy of these dyes is sensitive to solvent polarity and exhibits a red shift as polarity increases. The calculated excitation energies are in good agreement with the values of absorption maximum of these dyes in different solvents obtained in experiment. Studies on protonation of the dyes show that the carbonyl O to be the most favourable site of protonation for all the three dyes. Calculations of linear and first hyperpolarizabilities indicate these dyes to be suitable candidates for possible non-linear optical application.

  6. Influence of donor-acceptor distance variation on photoinduced electron and proton transfer in rhenium(I)-phenol dyads.

    PubMed

    Kuss-Petermann, Martin; Wolf, Hilke; Stalke, Dietmar; Wenger, Oliver S

    2012-08-01

    A homologous series of four molecules in which a phenol unit is linked covalently to a rhenium(I) tricarbonyl diimine photooxidant via a variable number of p-xylene spacers (n = 0-3) was synthesized and investigated. The species with a single p-xylene spacer was structurally characterized to get some benchmark distances. Photoexcitation of the metal complex in the shortest dyad (n = 0) triggers release of the phenolic proton to the acetonitrile/water solvent mixture; a H/D kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 2.0 ± 0.4 is associated with this process. Thus, the shortest dyad basically acts like a photoacid. The next two longer dyads (n = 1, 2) exhibit intramolecular photoinduced phenol-to-rhenium electron transfer in the rate-determining excited-state deactivation step, and there is no significant KIE in this case. For the dyad with n = 1, transient absorption spectroscopy provided evidence for release of the phenolic proton to the solvent upon oxidation of the phenol by intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer. Subsequent thermal charge recombination is associated with a H/D KIE of 3.6 ± 0.4 and therefore is likely to involve proton motion in the rate-determining reaction step. Thus, some of the longer dyads (n = 1, 2) exhibit photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), albeit in a stepwise (electron transfer followed by proton transfer) rather than concerted manner. Our study demonstrates that electronically strongly coupled donor-acceptor systems may exhibit significantly different photoinduced PCET chemistry than electronically weakly coupled donor-bridge-acceptor molecules.

  7. Three Redox States of a Diradical Acceptor-Donor-Acceptor Triad: Gating the Magnetic Coupling and the Electron Delocalization.

    PubMed

    Souto, Manuel; Lloveras, Vega; Vela, Sergi; Fumanal, Maria; Ratera, Imma; Veciana, Jaume

    2016-06-16

    The diradical acceptor-donor-acceptor triad 1(••), based on two polychlorotriphenylmethyl (PTM) radicals connected through a tetrathiafulvalene(TTF)-vinylene bridge, has been synthesized. The generation of the mixed-valence radical anion, 1(•-), and triradical cation species, 1(•••+), obtained upon electrochemical reduction and oxidation, respectively, was monitored by optical and ESR spectroscopy. Interestingly, the modification of electron delocalization and magnetic coupling was observed when the charged species were generated and the changes have been rationalized by theoretical calculations.

  8. Electron-donor dopant, method of improving conductivity of polymers by doping therewith, and a polymer so treated

    SciTech Connect

    Liepins, R.; Aldissi, M.

    1988-07-05

    The electrically conductive material is described comprising a polymer with a conjugated backbone selected from the group consisting of polyacetylene, polypyrrone, and polyphenylquinoxaline, the polymer being electron-donor doped to a controlled degree with an agent derived from an electride dopant or a dopant derived from an alkalide both of which contain a trapping agent being selected from the group consisting of: a crown ether, 1,4,7,10,13,16-hexaoxacyclooctadecane, cryptand, methyl ether cyclodextrin, spherand, methyl ether calixarene, podand, and an octopus molecule, the agent being made in the presence of lithium.

  9. Treatability study for Hill AFB`s Operable Unit-1: Enhanced microaerobic dechlorination using various electron donors. MasMajor report

    SciTech Connect

    Breed, P.G.

    1999-05-13

    A treatability study of the microaerobic biodegradation of cis-dichloroethene (c-DCE) was completed using a series of eight continuously operated columns filled with contaminated soils from Hill Air Force Base`s Operable Unit 1. Columns were supplied groundwater from the site, vitamins and yeast, and an electron donor solution containing one of the following donors: n-butyric acid, benzoic acid, lactic acid, propionic acid, n-propanol, or toluene. Concentrations of c-DCE varied over six months and ranged from 2736 micrograms/L to 30 micrograms/L. Though attempted as an anaerobic study, the ability to continuously eliminate oxygen from an active system proved difficult and columns operated as microaerobic systems. In all columns the degradation of c-DCE was observed, however, the removal efficiencies determined by comparing the influent and effluent concentrations were highly inconsistent throughout the experiment. By comparing the background columns to the columns supplied electron donors, it does not appear the addition of vitamins or electron donors enhance the indigenous microorganism`s ability to remove c-DCE. While c-DCE removal within the background column averaged 17%, the vitamin amended control column averaged only 7% c-DCE removal within the column and the electron donor supplied columns averaged between 7% removal and 5% apparent production. Of the electron donors supporting c-DCE removal, benzoic acid demonstrated 7% removal followed closely by propionic acid and n-propanol, both showing 5% c-DCE removal.

  10. Ultrafast electron transfer in all-carbon-based SWCNT-C60 donor-acceptor nanoensembles connected by poly(phenylene-ethynylene) spacers.

    PubMed

    Barrejón, Myriam; Gobeze, Habtom B; Gómez-Escalonilla, María J; Fierro, José Luis G; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; D'Souza, Francis; Langa, Fernando

    2016-08-21

    Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an electron donating or accepting photosensitizer while the second part should fulfil the role of an electron acceptor or donor. In the present work, we have successfully addressed this issue by synthesizing covalently linked all-carbon-based donor-acceptor nanoensembles using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the donor and C60 as the acceptor. The donor-acceptor entities in the nanoensembles were connected by phenylene-ethynylene spacer units to achieve better electronic communication and to vary the distance between the components. These novel SWCNT-C60 nanoensembles have been characterized by a number of techniques, including TGA, FT-IR, Raman, AFM, absorbance and electrochemical methods. The moderate number of fullerene addends present on the side-walls of the nanotubes largely preserved the electronic structure of the nanotubes. The thermodynamic feasibility of charge separation in these nanoensembles was established using spectral and electrochemical data. Finally, occurrence of ultrafast electron transfer from the excited nanotubes in these donor-acceptor nanohybrids has been established by femtosecond transient absorption studies, signifying their utility in building light energy harvesting devices.

  11. Ultrafast electron transfer in all-carbon-based SWCNT-C60 donor-acceptor nanoensembles connected by poly(phenylene-ethynylene) spacers.

    PubMed

    Barrejón, Myriam; Gobeze, Habtom B; Gómez-Escalonilla, María J; Fierro, José Luis G; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; D'Souza, Francis; Langa, Fernando

    2016-08-21

    Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an electron donating or accepting photosensitizer while the second part should fulfil the role of an electron acceptor or donor. In the present work, we have successfully addressed this issue by synthesizing covalently linked all-carbon-based donor-acceptor nanoensembles using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the donor and C60 as the acceptor. The donor-acceptor entities in the nanoensembles were connected by phenylene-ethynylene spacer units to achieve better electronic communication and to vary the distance between the components. These novel SWCNT-C60 nanoensembles have been characterized by a number of techniques, including TGA, FT-IR, Raman, AFM, absorbance and electrochemical methods. The moderate number of fullerene addends present on the side-walls of the nanotubes largely preserved the electronic structure of the nanotubes. The thermodynamic feasibility of charge separation in these nanoensembles was established using spectral and electrochemical data. Finally, occurrence of ultrafast electron transfer from the excited nanotubes in these donor-acceptor nanohybrids has been established by femtosecond transient absorption studies, signifying their utility in building light energy harvesting devices. PMID:27305145

  12. Computational characterization of competing energy and electron transfer states in bimetallic donor-acceptor systems for photocatalytic conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredin, Lisa A.; Persson, Petter

    2016-09-01

    The rapidly growing interest in photocatalytic systems for direct solar fuel production such as hydrogen generation from water splitting is grounded in the unique opportunity to achieve charge separation in molecular systems provided by electron transfer processes. In general, both photoinduced and catalytic processes involve complicated dynamics that depend on both structural and electronic effects. Here the excited state landscape of metal centered light harvester-catalyst pairs is explored using density functional theory calculations. In weakly bound systems, the interplay between structural and electronic factors involved can be constructed from the various mononuclear relaxed excited states. For this study, supramolecular states of electron transfer and excitation energy transfer character have been constructed from constituent full optimizations of multiple charge/spin states for a set of three Ru-based light harvesters and nine transition metal catalysts (based on Ru, Rh, Re, Pd, and Co) in terms of energy, structure, and electronic properties. The complete set of combined charge-spin states for each donor-acceptor system provides information about the competition of excited state energy transfer states with the catalytically active electron transfer states, enabling the identification of the most promising candidates for photocatalytic applications from this perspective.

  13. Computational characterization of competing energy and electron transfer states in bimetallic donor-acceptor systems for photocatalytic conversion.

    PubMed

    Fredin, Lisa A; Persson, Petter

    2016-09-14

    The rapidly growing interest in photocatalytic systems for direct solar fuel production such as hydrogen generation from water splitting is grounded in the unique opportunity to achieve charge separation in molecular systems provided by electron transfer processes. In general, both photoinduced and catalytic processes involve complicated dynamics that depend on both structural and electronic effects. Here the excited state landscape of metal centered light harvester-catalyst pairs is explored using density functional theory calculations. In weakly bound systems, the interplay between structural and electronic factors involved can be constructed from the various mononuclear relaxed excited states. For this study, supramolecular states of electron transfer and excitation energy transfer character have been constructed from constituent full optimizations of multiple charge/spin states for a set of three Ru-based light harvesters and nine transition metal catalysts (based on Ru, Rh, Re, Pd, and Co) in terms of energy, structure, and electronic properties. The complete set of combined charge-spin states for each donor-acceptor system provides information about the competition of excited state energy transfer states with the catalytically active electron transfer states, enabling the identification of the most promising candidates for photocatalytic applications from this perspective.

  14. Computational characterization of competing energy and electron transfer states in bimetallic donor-acceptor systems for photocatalytic conversion.

    PubMed

    Fredin, Lisa A; Persson, Petter

    2016-09-14

    The rapidly growing interest in photocatalytic systems for direct solar fuel production such as hydrogen generation from water splitting is grounded in the unique opportunity to achieve charge separation in molecular systems provided by electron transfer processes. In general, both photoinduced and catalytic processes involve complicated dynamics that depend on both structural and electronic effects. Here the excited state landscape of metal centered light harvester-catalyst pairs is explored using density functional theory calculations. In weakly bound systems, the interplay between structural and electronic factors involved can be constructed from the various mononuclear relaxed excited states. For this study, supramolecular states of electron transfer and excitation energy transfer character have been constructed from constituent full optimizations of multiple charge/spin states for a set of three Ru-based light harvesters and nine transition metal catalysts (based on Ru, Rh, Re, Pd, and Co) in terms of energy, structure, and electronic properties. The complete set of combined charge-spin states for each donor-acceptor system provides information about the competition of excited state energy transfer states with the catalytically active electron transfer states, enabling the identification of the most promising candidates for photocatalytic applications from this perspective. PMID:27634263

  15. Transition Metal Donor-Peptide-Acceptor Complexes: From Intramolecular Electron Transfer Reactions to the Study of Reactive Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Isied, Stephan S.

    2003-03-11

    The trans-polyproline (PII) oligomers (Figure 1) are unusually rigid peptide structures which have been extensively studied by our group for peptide mediated intramolecular electron transfer (ET) at long distances. We have previously studied ET across a series of metal ion donor (D) acceptor (A) oligoproline peptides with different distances, driving forces and reorganizational energies. The majority of these experiments involve generating the ET intermediate using pulse radiolysis methods, although more recently photochemical methods are also used. Results of these studies showed that ET across peptides can vary by more than twelve orders of magnitude. Using ruthenium bipyridine donors, ET reaction rate constants across several proline residues (n = 4 - 9) occurred in the millisecond (ms) to {micro}s timescale, thus limiting the proline peptide conformational motions to only minor changes (far smaller than the large changes that occur on the ms to sec timescale, such as trans to cis proline isomerization). The present report describes our large data base of experimental results for D-peptide-A complexes in terms of a model where the involvement of both superexchange and hopping (hole and electron) mechanisms account for the long range ET rate constants observed. Our data shows that the change from superexchange to hopping mechanisms occurs at different distances depending on the type of D and A and their interactions with the peptides. Our model is also consistent with generalized models for superexchange and hopping which have been put forward by a number of theoretical groups to account for long range ET phenomena.

  16. Microbial utilization of electrically reduced neutral red as the sole electron donor for growth and metabolite production

    SciTech Connect

    Park, D.H.; Laivenieks, M. ); Guettler, M.V.; Jain, M.K. ); Zeikus, J.G. Michigan Biotechnology Inst., Lansing, MI )

    1999-07-01

    Electrically reduced neutral red (NR) served as the sole source of reducing power for growth and metabolism of pure and mixed cultures of H[sub 2]-consuming bacteria in a novel electrochemical bioreactor system. NR was continuously reduced by the cathodic potential ([minus]1.5 V) generated from an electric current (0.3 to 1.0 mA), and it was subsequently oxidized by Actinobacillus succinogenes or by mixed methanogenic cultures. The A. succinogenes mutant strain FZ-6 did not grow on fumarate alone unless electrically reduced NR or hydrogen was present as the electron donor for succinate production. The mutant strain, unlike the wild type, lacked pyruvate formate lyase and formate dehydrogenase. Electrically reduced NR also replaced hydrogen as the sole electron donor source for growth and production of methane from CO[sub 2]. These results show that both pure and mixed cultures can function as electrochemical devices when electrically generated reducing power can be used to drive metabolism. The potential utility of utilizing electrical reducing power in enhancing industrial fermentations or biotransformation processes is discussed.

  17. Microbial utilization of electrically reduced neutral red as the sole electron donor for growth and metabolite production.

    PubMed

    Park, D H; Laivenieks, M; Guettler, M V; Jain, M K; Zeikus, J G

    1999-07-01

    Electrically reduced neutral red (NR) served as the sole source of reducing power for growth and metabolism of pure and mixed cultures of H2-consuming bacteria in a novel electrochemical bioreactor system. NR was continuously reduced by the cathodic potential (-1.5 V) generated from an electric current (0.3 to 1.0 mA), and it was subsequently oxidized by Actinobacillus succinogenes or by mixed methanogenic cultures. The A. succinogenes mutant strain FZ-6 did not grow on fumarate alone unless electrically reduced NR or hydrogen was present as the electron donor for succinate production. The mutant strain, unlike the wild type, lacked pyruvate formate lyase and formate dehydrogenase. Electrically reduced NR also replaced hydrogen as the sole electron donor source for growth and production of methane from CO2. These results show that both pure and mixed cultures can function as electrochemical devices when electrically generated reducing power can be used to drive metabolism. The potential utility of utilizing electrical reducing power in enhancing industrial fermentations or biotransformation processes is discussed. PMID:10388683

  18. 2008 Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions Gordon Research Conference-August 3-8, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm Forbes and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2009-09-19

    The conference presents and advances the current frontiers in experimental and theoretical studies of Electron Transfer and Transport in Molecular and Nano-scale Systems. The program includes sessions on coupled electron transfers, molecular solar energy conversion, biological and biomimetic systems, spin effects, ultrafast reactions and technical frontiers as well as electron transport in single molecules and devices.

  19. Intramolecular electron transfer in fullerene/ferrocene based donor-bridge-acceptor dyads

    SciTech Connect

    Guldi, D.M.; Maggini, M.; Scorrano, G.; Prato, M.

    1997-02-05

    A systematic steady-state fluorescence and time-resolved flash photolytic investigation of a series of covalently linked fullerene/ferrocene based donor-bridge-acceptor dyads is reported as a function of the nature of the spacer between the donor site (ferrocene) and acceptor site (fullerene) and the dielectric constant of the medium. The fluorescence of the investigated dyads 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 in methylcyclohexane at 77 K were substantially quenched, relative to N-methylfulleropyrrolidine 1, indicating intramolecular quenching of the fullerene excited singlet state. Excitation of N-methylfulleropyrrolidine revealed the immediate formation of the excited singlet state, with {lambda}{sub max} around 886 nm. A rapid intersystem crossing ({tau}{sub 1/2} = 1.2 ps ) to the excited triplet state was observed with characteristic absorption around 705 nm. Picosecond resolved photolysis of dyads 2-6 in toluene showed light-induced formation of the excited singlet state which undergoes rapid intramolecular quenching. Nanosecond-resolved photolysis of dyads 3 and 4 in degassed benzonitrile revealed long-lived charge separated states with characteristic fullerene radical-anion bands at {lambda}{sub max} = 1055 nm. 30 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. The electronic structure of the primary electron donor of reaction centers of purple bacteria at atomic resolution as observed by photo-CIDNP 13C NMR

    PubMed Central

    Daviso, Eugenio; Prakash, Shipra; Alia, A.; Gast, Peter; Neugebauer, Johannes; Jeschke, Gunnar; Matysik, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Composed of the two bacteriochlorophyll cofactors, PL and PM, the special pair functions as the primary electron donor in bacterial reaction centers of purple bacteria of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Under light absorption, an electron is transferred to a bacteriopheophytin and a radical pair is produced. The occurrence of the radical pair is linked to the production of enhanced nuclear polarization called photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP). This effect can be used to study the electronic structure of the special pair at atomic resolution by detection of the strongly enhanced nuclear polarization with laser-flash photo-CIDNP magic-angle spinning NMR on the carotenoid-less mutant R26. In the electronic ground state, PL is strongly disturbed, carrying a slightly negative charge. In the radical cation state, the ratio of total electron spin densities between PL and PM is 2:1, although it is 2.5:1 for the pyrrole carbons, 2.2:1 for all porphyrinic carbons, and 4:1 for the pyrrole nitrogen. It is shown that the symmetry break between the electronic structures in the electronic ground state and in the radical cation state is an intrinsic property of the special pair supermolecule, which is particularly attributable to a modification of the structure of PL. The significant difference in electron density distribution between the ground and radical cation states is explained by an electric polarization effect of the nearby histidine. PMID:20018724

  1. Tuning the opto-electronic properties of donor-acceptor polymers with molecular doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Hauff, Elizabeth

    2015-03-01

    Organic semiconductors offer vast potential for low cost, flexible energy production. The photocurrents in organic solar cells, however, are inherently limited by the poor electrical properties of the active layer. In this talk, strategies to increase the power conversion efficiency of polymer:fullerene solar cells by microscopically tuning the transport properties of the donor material are discussed. We observe that molecular doping the active layer of the device leads to increased charge separation efficiency and photocurrents. To investigate the influence of doping on the transport properties, impedance spectroscopy, a powerful, non-destructive technique, was applied. This allows us to probe carrier dynamics at different operational points in the current-voltage characteristics, and thereby correlate material properties with device performance.

  2. Impact of Organic Carbon Electron Donors on Microbial Community Development under Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Man Jae; O'Loughlin, Edward J; Boyanov, Maxim I; Brulc, Jennifer M; Johnston, Eric R; Kemner, Kenneth M; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A

    2016-01-01

    Although iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface environments have crucial roles in biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe, and S, how specific electron donors impact the compositional structure and activity of native iron- and/or sulfate-reducing communities is largely unknown. To understand this better, we created bicarbonate-buffered batch systems in duplicate with three different electron donors (acetate, lactate, or glucose) paired with ferrihydrite and sulfate as the electron acceptors and inoculated them with subsurface sediment as the microbial inoculum. Sulfate and ferrihydrite reduction occurred simultaneously and were faster with lactate than with acetate. 16S rRNA-based sequence analysis of the communities over time revealed that Desulfotomaculum was the major driver for sulfate reduction coupled with propionate oxidation in lactate-amended incubations. The reduction of sulfate resulted in sulfide production and subsequent abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite. In contrast, glucose promoted faster reduction of ferrihydrite, but without reduction of sulfate. Interestingly, the glucose-amended incubations led to two different biogeochemical trajectories among replicate bottles that resulted in distinct coloration (white and brown). The two outcomes in geochemical evolution might be due to the stochastic evolution of the microbial communities or subtle differences in the initial composition of the fermenting microbial community and its development via the use of different glucose fermentation pathways available within the community. Synchrotron-based x-ray analysis indicated that siderite and amorphous Fe(II) were formed in the replicate bottles with glucose, while ferrous sulfide and vivianite were formed with lactate or acetate. These data sets reveal that use of different C utilization pathways projects significant changes in microbial community composition over time that uniquely impact both the geochemistry and mineralogy of subsurface environments

  3. Electron Donor Substances and Iron Oxides Stimulate Anaerobic Dechlorination of DDT in a Slurry System with Hydragric Acrisols.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cui-Ying; Cade-Menun, Barbara J; Xu, Xiang-Hua; Fan, Jian-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The interactive effects between electron donor substances and iron (Fe) oxides have significant influence on electron transfer and the growth of Fe-reducing bacteria, which may affect the reductive dechlorination of 1,1,1-trichoro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) in soils. To evaluate the roles of volatile fatty acids and Fe(III) oxide in accelerating the reductive dechlorination of DDT in Hydragric Acrisols, a batch anaerobic incubation experiment was conducted in a slurry system with the following seven treatments: sterile soil, control (DDT-contaminated soil), lactic acid, propionic acid, goethite, lactic acid + goethite, and propionic acid + goethite. Results showed that after 20 d of incubation, DDT residues for these treatments decreased by 34, 65, 77, 81, 77, 90, and 92% of the initial quantities, respectively, with 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-ethane as the dominant metabolite. The application of lactic acid had no significant effect on DDT dechlorination in the first 8 d while the methanogenesis rate increased quickly but accelerated DDT dechlorination after Day 8 while the methanogenesis rate decreased and Fe(II) contents increased. The application of propionic acid enhanced DDT dechlorination rates throughout the incubation. The amendment by goethite stimulated microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides to generate Fe(II), which was an efficient electron donor, thus accelerating DDT dechlorination significantly in the early incubation period. A synergetic interaction that accelerated DDT dechlorination, either between lactic acid and goethite or between propionic acid and goethite, was obtained. The results will be of great significance to develop efficient in situ remediation technology of DDT-contaminated soil.

  4. Electron Donor Substances and Iron Oxides Stimulate Anaerobic Dechlorination of DDT in a Slurry System with Hydragric Acrisols.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cui-Ying; Cade-Menun, Barbara J; Xu, Xiang-Hua; Fan, Jian-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The interactive effects between electron donor substances and iron (Fe) oxides have significant influence on electron transfer and the growth of Fe-reducing bacteria, which may affect the reductive dechlorination of 1,1,1-trichoro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) in soils. To evaluate the roles of volatile fatty acids and Fe(III) oxide in accelerating the reductive dechlorination of DDT in Hydragric Acrisols, a batch anaerobic incubation experiment was conducted in a slurry system with the following seven treatments: sterile soil, control (DDT-contaminated soil), lactic acid, propionic acid, goethite, lactic acid + goethite, and propionic acid + goethite. Results showed that after 20 d of incubation, DDT residues for these treatments decreased by 34, 65, 77, 81, 77, 90, and 92% of the initial quantities, respectively, with 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-ethane as the dominant metabolite. The application of lactic acid had no significant effect on DDT dechlorination in the first 8 d while the methanogenesis rate increased quickly but accelerated DDT dechlorination after Day 8 while the methanogenesis rate decreased and Fe(II) contents increased. The application of propionic acid enhanced DDT dechlorination rates throughout the incubation. The amendment by goethite stimulated microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides to generate Fe(II), which was an efficient electron donor, thus accelerating DDT dechlorination significantly in the early incubation period. A synergetic interaction that accelerated DDT dechlorination, either between lactic acid and goethite or between propionic acid and goethite, was obtained. The results will be of great significance to develop efficient in situ remediation technology of DDT-contaminated soil. PMID:26828189

  5. Impact of Organic Carbon Electron Donors on Microbial Community Development under Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Man Jae; O’Loughlin, Edward J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Brulc, Jennifer M.; Johnston, Eric R.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.

    2016-01-01

    Although iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface environments have crucial roles in biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe, and S, how specific electron donors impact the compositional structure and activity of native iron- and/or sulfate-reducing communities is largely unknown. To understand this better, we created bicarbonate-buffered batch systems in duplicate with three different electron donors (acetate, lactate, or glucose) paired with ferrihydrite and sulfate as the electron acceptors and inoculated them with subsurface sediment as the microbial inoculum. Sulfate and ferrihydrite reduction occurred simultaneously and were faster with lactate than with acetate. 16S rRNA-based sequence analysis of the communities over time revealed that Desulfotomaculum was the major driver for sulfate reduction coupled with propionate oxidation in lactate-amended incubations. The reduction of sulfate resulted in sulfide production and subsequent abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite. In contrast, glucose promoted faster reduction of ferrihydrite, but without reduction of sulfate. Interestingly, the glucose-amended incubations led to two different biogeochemical trajectories among replicate bottles that resulted in distinct coloration (white and brown). The two outcomes in geochemical evolution might be due to the stochastic evolution of the microbial communities or subtle differences in the initial composition of the fermenting microbial community and its development via the use of different glucose fermentation pathways available within the community. Synchrotron-based x-ray analysis indicated that siderite and amorphous Fe(II) were formed in the replicate bottles with glucose, while ferrous sulfide and vivianite were formed with lactate or acetate. These data sets reveal that use of different C utilization pathways projects significant changes in microbial community composition over time that uniquely impact both the geochemistry and mineralogy of subsurface environments

  6. In situ Bioreduction of Uranium (VI) in Groundwater and Sediments with Edible Oil as the Electron Donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W.; Watson, D. B.; Mehlhorn, T.; Zhang, G.; Earles, J.; Lowe, K.; Phillips, J.; Boyanov, M.; Kemner, K. M.; Schadt, C. W.; Brooks, S. C.; Criddle, C.; Jardine, P.

    2009-12-01

    In situ bioremediation of a uranium-contaminated aquifer was conducted at the US DOE Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site, in Oak Ridge, TN. Edible oil was tested as a slow-release electron donor for microbially mediated U (VI) reduction. Uranium contaminated sediments from the site were used in laboratory microcosm tests to study the feasibility of using this electron donor under anaerobic, ambient temperature conditions. Parallel microcosms were established using ethanol as electron donor for comparison. The tests also examined the impact of sulfate concentrations on U (VI) reduction. The oil was degraded by indigenous microorganisms with acetate as a major product but at a much slower rate than ethanol. The rapid removal of U (VI) from the aqueous phase occurred concurrently with acetate production and sulfate reduction. Initial U(VI) concentration in the aqueous phase increased with increased sulfate concentration (1 vs. 5 mM), likely due to U(VI) desorption from the solid phase, but more U(VI) was reduced with higher initial sulfate level. Finally, the bioreaction in microcosms progressed to methanogenesis. Subsequently, a field test with the edible oil was conducted in a highly permeable gravelly layer (hydraulic conductivity 0.076 cm/sec). Groundwater at the site contained 5-6 μM U; 1.0-1.2 mM sulfate; 3-4 mM Ca; pH 6.8. Diluted emulsified oil (20% solution) was injected into three injection wells within 2 hrs. Geochemical analysis of site groundwater demonstrated the sequential reduction of nitrate, Mn, Fe(III) and sulfate. Transient accumulation of acetate was observed as an intermediate in the oil degradation. Reduction and removal of uranium from groundwater was observed in all wells connected to the injection wells after 2-4 weeks. Uranium concentrations in groundwater were reduced to below 0.126 μM (EPA drinking water standard), at some well locations. Rebound of U in groundwater was

  7. Electron and hole polaron accumulation in low-bandgap ambipolar donor-acceptor polymer transistors imaged by infrared microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatib, O.; Mueller, A. S.; Stinson, H. T.; Yuen, J. D.; Heeger, A. J.; Basov, D. N.

    2014-12-01

    A resurgence in the use of the donor-acceptor approach in synthesizing conjugated polymers has resulted in a family of high-mobility ambipolar systems with exceptionally narrow energy bandgaps below 1 eV. The ability to transport both electrons and holes is critical for device applications such as organic light-emitting diodes and transistors. Infrared spectroscopy offers direct access to the low-energy excitations associated with injected charge carriers. Here we use a diffraction-limited IR microscope to probe the spectroscopic signatures of electron and hole injection in the conduction channel of an organic field-effect transistor based on an ambipolar DA polymer polydiketopyrrolopyrrole-benzobisthiadiazole. We observe distinct polaronic absorptions for both electrons and holes and spatially map the carrier distribution from the source to drain electrodes for both unipolar and ambipolar biasing regimes. For ambipolar device configurations, we observe the spatial evolution of hole-induced to electron-induced polaron absorptions throughout the transport path. Our work provides a platform for combined transport and infrared studies of organic semiconductors on micron length scales relevant to functional devices.

  8. Synthesis, Structure, and Reactivities of Iminosulfane- and Phosphane-Stabilized Carbones Exhibiting Four-Electron Donor Ability.

    PubMed

    Morosaki, Tomohito; Wang, Wei-Wei; Nagase, Shigeru; Fujii, Takayoshi

    2015-10-19

    Iminosulfane(phosphane)carbon(0) derivatives (iSPCs; Ar3 P→C←SPh2 (NMe); Ar=Ph (1), 4-MeOC6 H4 (2), 4-(Me2 N)C6 H4 (3)) have been successfully synthesized and the molecular structure of 3 characterized. Carbone 3 is the first thermally and hydrolytically stable carbone stabilized by phosphorus and sulfur ligands. DFT calculations reveal the electronic structures of 1-3, which have two lone pairs of electrons at the carbon center. First and second proton affinity values are theoretically calculated to be in the range of 286.8-301.1 and 189.6-208.3 kcal mol(-1) , respectively. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the HOMO energy levels follow the order of 3>2>1 and the HOMO of 3 is at a higher energy than those of bis(chalcogenane)carbon(0) (BChCs). The reactivities of these lone pairs of electrons are demonstrated by the C-diaurated and C-proton-aurated complexes. These results are the first experimental evidence of phosphorus- and sulfur-stabilized carbones behaving as four-electron donors. In addition, the reaction of hydrochloric salts of the carbones with Ag2 O gives the corresponding Ag(I) complexes. The resulting silver(I) carbone complexes can be used as carbone transfer agents. This synthetic protocol can also be used for moisture-sensitive carbone species. PMID:26471447

  9. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-Model application to a field test

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping; Watson, David B; Wu, Wei-min; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    A one-time 2-hour emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) injection in a fast flowing aquifer decreased U discharge to a stream for over a year. Using a comprehensive biogeochemical model developed in the companion article based on microcosm tests, we approximately matched the observed acetate, nitrate, Fe, U, and sulfate concentrations, and described the major evolution trends of multiple microbial functional groups in the field test. While the lab-determined parameters were generally applicable in the field-scale simulation, the EVO hydrolysis rate constant was estimated to be an order of magnitude greater in the field than in the microcosms. The model predicted substantial biomass (sulfate reducers) and U(IV) accumulation near the injection wells and along the side boundaries of the treatment zone where electron donors (long-chain fatty acids) from the injection wells met electron acceptors (sulfate) from the surrounding environment. While EVO retention and hydrolysis characteristics were expected to control treatment longevity, modeling results indicated that electron acceptors such as sulfate may not only compete for electrons but also play a conducive role in degrading complex substrates and enhancing U(VI) reduction and immobilization. As a result, the spacing of the injection wells could be optimized for effective sustainable bioremediation.

  10. Synthesis, Structure, and Reactivities of Iminosulfane- and Phosphane-Stabilized Carbones Exhibiting Four-Electron Donor Ability.

    PubMed

    Morosaki, Tomohito; Wang, Wei-Wei; Nagase, Shigeru; Fujii, Takayoshi

    2015-10-19

    Iminosulfane(phosphane)carbon(0) derivatives (iSPCs; Ar3 P→C←SPh2 (NMe); Ar=Ph (1), 4-MeOC6 H4 (2), 4-(Me2 N)C6 H4 (3)) have been successfully synthesized and the molecular structure of 3 characterized. Carbone 3 is the first thermally and hydrolytically stable carbone stabilized by phosphorus and sulfur ligands. DFT calculations reveal the electronic structures of 1-3, which have two lone pairs of electrons at the carbon center. First and second proton affinity values are theoretically calculated to be in the range of 286.8-301.1 and 189.6-208.3 kcal mol(-1) , respectively. Cyclic voltammetry measurements reveal that the HOMO energy levels follow the order of 3>2>1 and the HOMO of 3 is at a higher energy than those of bis(chalcogenane)carbon(0) (BChCs). The reactivities of these lone pairs of electrons are demonstrated by the C-diaurated and C-proton-aurated complexes. These results are the first experimental evidence of phosphorus- and sulfur-stabilized carbones behaving as four-electron donors. In addition, the reaction of hydrochloric salts of the carbones with Ag2 O gives the corresponding Ag(I) complexes. The resulting silver(I) carbone complexes can be used as carbone transfer agents. This synthetic protocol can also be used for moisture-sensitive carbone species.

  11. Theoretical studies on two-dimensional nonlinear optical chromophores with pyrazinyl cores and organic or ruthenium(II) ammine electron donors.

    PubMed

    Coe, Benjamin J; Pilkington, Rachel A

    2014-03-27

    Density functional theory calculations have been carried out on twelve cationic, 2D nonlinear optical chromophores with pyrazinylbis(pyridinium) electron acceptors. These species contain either 4-(methoxy/dimethylamino)phenyl or pyridyl-coordinated {Ru(II)(NH3)5}(2+)/trans-{Ru(II)(NH3)4(py)}(2+) (py = pyridine) electron donor groups. The results are compared with data obtained by using experimental techniques including hyper-Rayleigh scattering and Stark (electroabsorption) spectroscopy previously (Coe, B. J.; et al. Inorg. Chem. 2010, 49, 10718; J. Org. Chem. 2010, 75, 8550). The B3LYP/6-311G(d) level of theory models the visible absorption spectra in MeCN for the -NMe2 derivatives relatively well, whereas CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d) gives better results for the -OMe-substituted species. These spectra are dominated by intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) bands. Static first hyperpolarizabilities β0 are computed also at the B3LYP/6-311G(d) level. The overall extent of prediction of trends in the ICT bands and β0 responses is partial, with the main discrepancies relating to the progression from one to two electron donor groups. The experimental data show that this structural change red-shifts the ICT bands and increases β0 significantly, but only the second trend is reproduced to some extent by the calculations. The UV-vis absorption spectra of the Ru complexes in MeCN are modeled relatively well with B3LYP and the LANL2DZ/6-311G(d) mixed basis set, including 100 excited states. However, again, some degree of disagreement between theory and experiment is evident, even when a larger basis set like def2-TZVP is used for Ru. In particular, substantial red shifts are predicted on adding a third metal center, whereas the measured spectra show corresponding small blue shifts. The experimental trend of the total β0 value increasing on moving from one to two Ru centers is predicted in the gas phase, but not in MeCN. For both classes of chromophore, the β(xxx) tensor component

  12. Ultrafast electron transfer in all-carbon-based SWCNT-C60 donor-acceptor nanoensembles connected by poly(phenylene-ethynylene) spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrejón, Myriam; Gobeze, Habtom B.; Gómez-Escalonilla, María J.; Fierro, José Luis G.; Zhang, Minfang; Yudasaka, Masako; Iijima, Sumio; D'Souza, Francis; Langa, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an electron donating or accepting photosensitizer while the second part should fulfil the role of an electron acceptor or donor. In the present work, we have successfully addressed this issue by synthesizing covalently linked all-carbon-based donor-acceptor nanoensembles using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the donor and C60 as the acceptor. The donor-acceptor entities in the nanoensembles were connected by phenylene-ethynylene spacer units to achieve better electronic communication and to vary the distance between the components. These novel SWCNT-C60 nanoensembles have been characterized by a number of techniques, including TGA, FT-IR, Raman, AFM, absorbance and electrochemical methods. The moderate number of fullerene addends present on the side-walls of the nanotubes largely preserved the electronic structure of the nanotubes. The thermodynamic feasibility of charge separation in these nanoensembles was established using spectral and electrochemical data. Finally, occurrence of ultrafast electron transfer from the excited nanotubes in these donor-acceptor nanohybrids has been established by femtosecond transient absorption studies, signifying their utility in building light energy harvesting devices.Building all-carbon based functional materials for light energy harvesting applications could be a solution to tackle and reduce environmental carbon output. However, development of such all-carbon based donor-acceptor hybrids and demonstration of photoinduced charge separation in such nanohybrids is a challenge since in these hybrids part of the carbon material should act as an

  13. A benzothiadiazole end capped donor-acceptor based small molecule for organic electronics.

    PubMed

    Sonar, Prashant; Williams, Evan L; Singh, Samarendra P; Manzhos, Sergei; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2013-10-28

    A benzothiadiazole end-capped small molecule 3,6-bis(5-(benzo-[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl)thiophen-2-yl)-2,5-bis(2-butyloctyl)pyrrolo-[3,4-c]pyrrole-1,4(2H,5H)-dione (BO-DPP-BTZ) using a fused aromatic moiety DPP (at the centre) is designed and synthesized. BO-DPP-BTZ is a donor–acceptor–donor (D–A–D) structure which possesses a band gap of 1.6 eV and exhibits a strong solid state ordering inferred from ~120 nm red shift of the absorption maxima from solution to thin film. Field-effect transistors utilizing a spin coated thin film of BO-DPP-BTZ as an active layer exhibited a hole mobility of 0.06 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). Solution-processed bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaics employing a blend of BO-DPP-BTZ and [70]PCBM demonstrated a power conversion efficiency of 0.9%.

  14. Current oscillations in semi-insulating GaAs associated with field-enhanced capture of electrons by the major deep donor EL2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaminska, M.; Parsey, J. M.; Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1982-01-01

    Current oscillations thermally activated by the release of electrons from deep levels in undoped semiinsulating GaAs were observed for the first time. They were attributed to electric field-enhanced capture of electrons by the dominant deep donor EL2 (antisite AsGa defect). This enhanced capture is due to the configurational energy barrier of EL2, which is readily penetrated by hot electrons.

  15. Synthesis, electronic structure and catalytic activity of ruthenium-iodo-carbonyl complexes with thioether containing NNS donor ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Subrata; Jana, Mahendra Sekhar; Biswas, Sujan; Sinha, Chittaranjan; Mondal, Tapan Kumar

    2014-05-01

    The ruthenium carbonyl complexes 1 and 2 with redox noninnocent NNS donor ligand, 1-methyl-2-{(o-thiomethyl)phenylazo}imidazole (L) have been synthesized and characterized by various analytical and spectroscopic (IR, UV-Vis and 1H NMR) techniques. The complexes exhibit a quasi-reversible one electron Ru(II)/Ru(III) oxidation couple at 1.11 V for 1 and 0.76 V for 2 along with two successive one electron ligand reductions. Catalytic activity of the compounds has been investigated to the oxidation of PhCH2OH to PhCHO, 2-butanol (C4H9OH) to 2-butanone, 1-phenylethanol (PhC2H4OH) to acetophenone, cyclopentanol (C5H9OH) to cyclopentanone, cyclohexanol to cyclohexanone, cycloheptanol to cycloheptanone and cycloctanol to cycloctanone using N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMO) as oxidant. The catalytic efficiency of 2 is greater than complex 1 and well correlate with the metal oxidation potential. DFT, NBO and TDDFT calculations in DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d)/lanL2TZ(f) method are employed to interpret the structural and electronic features of the complexes.

  16. Intermolecular electron transfer promoted by directional donor-acceptor attractions in self-assembled diketopyrrolopyrrole-thiophene films.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiying; Jia, Hui; Wang, Lanfen; Wu, Yishi; Zhan, Chuanlang; Fu, Hongbing; Yao, Jiannian

    2012-11-01

    The photophysics of a symmetric triad consisting of two bithiophene (BT) units covalently linked to a central diketopyrrolopyrrole unit (DPP) has been investigated both in dichloromethane and in the thin film. The DPP-BT film exhibits a red-shifted low-energy absorption band compared to its solution, which is indicative of efficient π-π interactions in the solid-state phase. The steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence results revealed that the photoluminescence was subjected to severe emission quenching when DPP-BT changes from its solution phase to its film form. Further femtosecond transient absorption studies clarified that rapid intermolecular electron transfer accounts for the considerable fluorescence quenching event. The structural characterization of DPP-BT nanobelts, based on GIXRD and SAED patterns, suggested that the composite may be self-assembled into a slipped face-to-face configuration in the film, providing compact interlayer D-A interactions. As a result, intermolecular electron transfer is promoted by the favorable donor-acceptor attractions between the adjacent molecules. Moreover, this packing configuration provides a moderate channel for charge transportation. The hole mobility, which was measured based on a single-belt field-effect transistor, was found to be around 0.07 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). Our observation reveals the role of spatial orientation in photophysical processes and the consequential semiconductor performance, providing guidance for the development and self-assembly of new opto-electronic molecules. PMID:22951990

  17. Ad-hoc Solutions for Capturing Electronic Structure Details in Classical Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crill, John Wesley

    Traditional empirical potentials used in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations replace an explicit treatment of the electronic structure with an appropriate interatomic potential energy expression. This enables MD simulations to model atomistic processes, such as dislocation dynamics and plastic deformation, which typically require size and time domains exceeding what is currently feasible with computationally-demanding first principles techniques. However, discarding the electronic degrees of freedom prevents MD simulations from properly resolving certain phenomena which are dominated by electronic interactions. One example is thermal transport in metals, which is often underestimated by orders of magnitude in MD simulations. A recently-developed multi-scale simulation approach, allowing ad-hoc feedback from continuum heat flow solutions to thermostat atoms in an MD simulation, is used to model Joule-heating in nano-scale metallic contacts under electromagnetic stress. The simulations are carried out under conditions representative of contact surfaces in Radio Frequency Electromechanical Switches (RF MEMS) and rail/armature components of Electromagnetic Launchers (EMLs) and are used to speculate on the mechanisms for experimentally-observed material transfer. Another phenomenon that is typically neglected in MD simulations is charge transfer between atoms of dissimilar electronegativity. A common approach to incorporating a dynamic treatment of charge in a classical potential simulation is to solve atomic charges using an equalization of electronegativity in the charge equilibration (QEq) method. The current work studies the effectiveness of the QEq to mimic the charge distribution properties of f-center defects in a sodium chloride crystal. The results indicate that the QEq is able to replicate some of the electrostatic energy features of an f-center, which include an extremely localized potential well in the vicinity of the defect.

  18. Halogen bonding. The role of the polarizability of the electron-pair donor.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Darío J R; Sosa, Gladis L; Peruchena, Nélida M; Alkorta, Ibon

    2016-03-14

    The nature of F-BrX-R interactions (with X = F, Cl, Br, I and R = -H, -F) has been investigated through theoretical calculation of molecular potential electrostatic (MEP), molecular polarizability, atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis and energetic decomposition analysis (EDA). A detailed analysis of the MEPs reveals that considering only the static electrostatic interactions is not sufficient to explain the nature of these interactions. The molecular polarizabilities of X-R molecules suggest that the deformation capacity of the electronic cloud of the lone pairs of the X atom plays an important role in the stability of these complexes. The topological analysis of the L(r) = -¼∇(2)ρ(r) function and the detailed analysis of the atomic quadrupole moments reveal that the BrX interactions are electrostatic in nature. The electron acceptor Br atom causes a polarization of the electronic cloud (electronic induction) on the valence shell of the X atom. Finally, the electrostatic forces and charge transfer play an important role not only in the stabilization of the complex, but also in the determination of the molecular geometry of equilibrium. The dispersive and polarization forces do not influence the equilibrium molecular geometry. PMID:26900007

  19. Halogen bonding. The role of the polarizability of the electron-pair donor.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Darío J R; Sosa, Gladis L; Peruchena, Nélida M; Alkorta, Ibon

    2016-03-14

    The nature of F-BrX-R interactions (with X = F, Cl, Br, I and R = -H, -F) has been investigated through theoretical calculation of molecular potential electrostatic (MEP), molecular polarizability, atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis and energetic decomposition analysis (EDA). A detailed analysis of the MEPs reveals that considering only the static electrostatic interactions is not sufficient to explain the nature of these interactions. The molecular polarizabilities of X-R molecules suggest that the deformation capacity of the electronic cloud of the lone pairs of the X atom plays an important role in the stability of these complexes. The topological analysis of the L(r) = -¼∇(2)ρ(r) function and the detailed analysis of the atomic quadrupole moments reveal that the BrX interactions are electrostatic in nature. The electron acceptor Br atom causes a polarization of the electronic cloud (electronic induction) on the valence shell of the X atom. Finally, the electrostatic forces and charge transfer play an important role not only in the stabilization of the complex, but also in the determination of the molecular geometry of equilibrium. The dispersive and polarization forces do not influence the equilibrium molecular geometry.

  20. Supramolecular donor-acceptor hybrids of porphyrins/phthalocyanines with fullerenes/carbon nanotubes: electron transfer, sensing, switching, and catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Francis; Ito, Osamu

    2009-09-01

    Since the three-dimensional electron-accepting fullerene has been found to be an excellent building block for self-assembled supramolecular systems, we have investigated photoinduced electron transfer processes in supramolecular fullerene systems with porphyrins and phthalocyanines as electron donors to mimic natural photosynthesis. We have successfully formed self-assembled supramolecular dyads and triads via metal-ligand coordination, crown-ether inclusion, ion pairing, hydrogen-bonding, or pi-pi stacking interactions. Although the single mode of binding gives usually flexible supramolecular structures, the newly developed strategy of multiple modes of binding results in conjugates of defined distance and orientation between the donor and acceptor entities, which influences the overall electron transfer reactions. In these conjugates, we observe the anticipated acceleration of the charge separation process and deceleration of the charge recombination process. Applications of these supramolecular systems for reversible photoswitching of inter- and intramolecular electron transfer events open up new opportunities in the area of photosensors. Extension of the self-assembly approaches to single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) results in SWNT-porphyrin/phthalocyanine nanohybrids capable of undergoing photoinduced electron transfer. These photochemical processes lead to photocatalytic reactions accumulating redox active substances of electron acceptor/mediator entities with the help of a sacrificial electron donor. Studies on these self-assembled supramolecular dyads, triads, tetrads, etc., are only in the beginning stages and future studies anticipate involvement of more complex systems targeted for better performances in light-driven devices. PMID:19668806

  1. Added-value from a multi-criteria selection of donor catchments in the prediction of continuous streamflow series at ungauged pollution control-sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drogue, Gilles; Ben Khediri, Wiem; Conan, Céline

    2016-05-01

    We explore the potential of a multi-criteria selection of donor catchments in the prediction of continuous streamflow series by the spatial proximity method. Three criteria have been used: (1) spatial proximity; (2) physical similarity; (3) stream gauging network topology. An extensive assessment of our spatial proximity method variant is made on a 149 catchment-data set located in the Rhine-Meuse catchment. The competitiveness of the method is evaluated against spatial interpolation of catchment model parameters with ordinary kriging. We found that the spatial proximity approach is more efficient than ordinary kriging. When distance to upstream/downstream stream gauge stations is considered as a second order criterion in the selection of donor catchments, an unprecedented level of efficiency is reached for nested catchments. Nevertheless, the spatial proximity method does not take advantage from physical similarity between donor catchments and receiver catchments because catchments that are the most hydrologically similar to each catchment poorly match with the catchments that are the most physically similar to each catchment.

  2. An economic analysis of microbial reduction of sulfur dioxide with anaerobically digested sewage biosolids as electron donor

    SciTech Connect

    Selvaraj, P.T.; Sublette, K.L.

    1996-12-31

    A concentrated stream of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) is produced by regeneration of the sorbent in certain new regenerable processes for the desulfurization of flue gas. It has been previously proposed that this SO{sub 2} can be converted to elemental sulfur for disposal or byproduct recovery using a microbial/Claus process. In this process, two-thirds of the SO{sub 2}-containing gas stream would be contacted with a mixed culture containing sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) where SO{sub 2} would act as an electron acceptor with reduction to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S). This H{sub 2}S could then be recombined with the remaining SO{sub 2} and sent to a Claus unit to produce elemental sulfur. The Claus process is well known in the natural gas industry. Glucose and heat/alkali pretreated municipal sewage sludge have been shown to act as ultimate electron donors and carbon sources for SO{sub 2}-reducing cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. Sublette and Gwozdz performed an economic analysis of this microbial SO{sub 2} reduction process comparing the microbial process with conventional catalytic SO{sub 2} hydrogenation with H{sub 2} generation from methane. The design basis was a regenerator off-gas from a copper oxide, flue gas desulfurization process applied to a 1000 MW{sub e} coal-fired power plant burning 3.5 wt% sulfur coal. All economics were based on an ultimate product gas of H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} in a 2:1 ratio appropriate for feed to a Claus reactor. The fixed capital investments for the two processes were essentially equivalent. However, the annual operating costs for the microbial process were much higher than the conventional process primarily because of the high cost of raw materials, namely DE95 corn hydrolysate, which served as the electron donor and carbon source for the SO{sub 2}-reducing culture. 7 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. 5' modification of duplex DNA with a ruthenium electron donor-acceptor pair using solid-phase DNA synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Natia L.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    Incorporation of metalated nucleosides into DNA through covalent modification is crucial to measurement of thermal electron-transfer rates and the dependence of these rates with structure, distance, and position. Here, we report the first synthesis of an electron donor-acceptor pair of 5' metallonucleosides and their subsequent incorporation into oligonucleotides using solid-phase DNA synthesis techniques. Large-scale syntheses of metal-containing oligonucleotides are achieved using 5' modified phosporamidites containing [Ru(acac)(2)(IMPy)](2+) (acac is acetylacetonato; IMPy is 2'-iminomethylpyridyl-2'-deoxyuridine) (3) and [Ru(bpy)(2)(IMPy)](2+) (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine; IMPy is 2'-iminomethylpyridyl-2'-deoxyuridine) (4). Duplexes formed with the metal-containing oligonucleotides exhibit thermal stability comparable to the corresponding unmetalated duplexes (T(m) of modified duplex = 49 degrees C vs T(m) of unmodified duplex = 47 degrees C). Electrochemical (3, E(1/2) = -0.04 V vs NHE; 4, E(1/2) = 1.12 V vs NHE), absorption (3, lambda(max) = 568, 369 nm; 4, lambda(max) = 480 nm), and emission (4, lambda(max) = 720 nm, tau = 55 ns, Phi = 1.2 x 10(-)(4)) data for the ruthenium-modified nucleosides and oligonucleotides indicate that incorporation into an oligonucleotide does not perturb the electronic properties of the ruthenium complex or the DNA significantly. In addition, the absence of any change in the emission properties upon metalated duplex formation suggests that the [Ru(bpy)(2)(IMPy)](2+)[Ru(acac)(2)(IMPy)](2+) pair will provide a valuable probe for DNA-mediated electron-transfer studies.

  4. Charge transfer in the electron donor-acceptor complexes of a meso-phenol BODIPY dye with chloranils and fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Animesh; Chaudhuri, Tandrima; Mula, Soumyaditya; Chattopadhyay, Subrata

    2015-02-01

    UV-Vis spectral investigations of electron donor-acceptor complexes of laser dye 2,6-Diethyl-4,4-difluoro-1,3,5,7-tetramethyl-8-(4‧-hydroxyphenyl)-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indecene (1c) with chloranils and fullerenes are reported in toluene medium. Well defined charge transfer (CT) absorption bands have been located in the visible region. Oscillator strengths, transition dipole and resonance energies of the CT complexes have been estimated. Vertical ionization potential of 1c has been determined utilizing Mulliken's equation. A possible mechanism for the interaction between electronic subsystems of chloranils, [60]- and [70]fullerenes with three different BODIPY dyes (1a, 1b and 1c shown in Fig. 1) have been discussed in comparing the parameters like degree of charge transfer and binding constant in nonpolar toluene. Comparison of 1c complexes is done with DFT/B3LYP/6-31G optimized gas phase geometries.

  5. Magnetic field enhanced electroluminescence in organic light emitting diodes based on electron donor-acceptor exciplex blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baniya, Sangita; Basel, Tek; Sun, Dali; McLaughlin, Ryan; Vardeny, Zeev Valy

    2016-03-01

    A useful process for light harvesting from injected electron-hole pairs in organic light emitting diodes (OLED) is the transfer from triplet excitons (T) to singlet excitons (S) via reverse intersystem crossing (RISC). This process adds a delayed electro-luminescence (EL) emission component that is known as thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF). We have studied electron donor (D)/acceptor(A) blends that form an exciplex manifold in which the energy difference, ΔEST between the lowest singlet (S1) and triplet (T1) levels is relatively small (<100 meV), and thus allows RISC at ambient temperature. We found that the EL emission in OLED based on the exciplex blend is enhanced up to 40% by applying a relatively weak magnetic field of 50 mT at ambient. Moreover the MEL response is activated with activation energy similar that of the EL emission. This suggests that the large magneto-EL originates from an additional spin-mixing channel between singlet and triplet states of the generated exciplexes, which is due to TADF. We will report on the MEL dependencies on the temperature, bias voltage, and D-A materials for optimum OLED performance. Supported by SAMSUNG Global Research Outreach (GRO) program, and also by the NSF-Material Science & Engineering Center (MRSEC) program at the University of Utah (DMR-1121252).

  6. Sulfur-based mixotrophic denitrification corresponding to different electron donors and microbial profiling in anoxic fluidized-bed membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Chengzhi; Liu, Huijuan; Bai, Yaohui; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-11-15

    Sulfur-based mixotrophic denitrifying anoxic fluidized bed membrane bioreactors (AnFB-MBR) were developed for the treatment of nitrate-contaminated groundwater with minimized sulfate production. The nitrate removal rates obtained in the methanol- and ethanol-fed mixotrophic denitrifying AnFB-MBRs reached 1.44-3.84 g NO3 -N/L reactor d at a hydraulic retention time of 0.5 h, which were significantly superior to those reported in packed bed reactors. Compared to methanol, ethanol was found to be a more effective external carbon source for sulfur-based mixotrophic denitrification due to lower sulfate and total organic carbon concentrations in the effluent. Using pyrosequencing, the phylotypes of primary microbial groups in the reactor, including sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifiers, methanol- or ethanol-supported heterotrophic denitrifiers, were investigated in response to changes in electron donors. Principal component and heatmap analyses indicated that selection of electron donating substrates largely determined the microbial community structure. The abundance of Thiobacillus decreased from 45.1% in the sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrifying reactor to 12.0% and 14.2% in sulfur-based methanol- and ethanol-fed mixotrophic denitrifying bioreactors, respectively. Heterotrophic Methyloversatilis and Thauera bacteria became more dominant in the mixotrophic denitrifying bioreactors, which were possibly responsible for the observed methanol- and ethanol-associated denitrification.

  7. Effect of nitrate concentration, pH, and hydraulic retention time on autotrophic denitrification efficiency with Fe(II) and Mn(II) as electron donors.

    PubMed

    Su, Jun-Feng; Shi, Jing-Xin; Huang, Ting-Lin; Ma, Fang; Lu, Jin-Suo; Yang, Shao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    The role of electron donors (Fe(2+) and Mn(2+)) in the autotrophic denitrification of contaminated groundwater by bacterial strain SY6 was characterized based on empirical laboratory-scale analysis. Strain SY6 can utilize Fe(2+) more efficiently than Mn(2+) as an electron donor. This study has shown that the highest nitrate removal ratio, observed with Fe(2+) as the electron donor, was approximately 88.89%. An immobilized biological filter reactor was tested by using three levels of influent nitrate (10, 30, and 50 mg/L), three pH levels (6, 7, and 8), and three levels of hydraulic retention time (HRT; 6, 8, and 12 h), respectively. An optimal nitrate removal ratio of about 95% was achieved at pH 6.0 using a nitrate concentration of 50 mg/L and HRT of 12 h with Fe(2+) as an electron donor. The study showed that 90% of Fe(2+) and 75.52% removal of Mn(2+) were achieved at pH 8.0 with a nitrate concentration of 50 mg/L and a HRT of 12 h. Removal ratio of Fe(2+) and Mn(2+) is higher with higher influent nitrate and HRT. A weakly alkaline environment assisted the removal of Fe(2+) and Mn(2+). PMID:27642838

  8. Electron donor concentrations in sediments and sediment properties at the agricultural chemicals team research site near New Providence, Iowa, 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maharjan, Bijesh; Korom, Scott F.; Smith, Erik A.

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of electron donors in aquifer sediments are important to the understanding of the fate and transport of redox-sensitive constituents in groundwater, such as nitrate. For a study by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program, 50 sediment samples were collected from below the water table from 11 boreholes at the U.S. Geological Survey Agricultural Chemicals Team research site near New Providence, Iowa, during 2006-07. All samples were analyzed for gravel, sand (coarse, medium, and fine), silt, clay, Munsell soil color, inorganic carbon content, and for the following electron donors: organic carbon, ferrous iron, and inorganic sulfide. A subset of 14 sediment samples also was analyzed for organic sulfur, but all of these samples had concentrations less than the method detection limit; therefore, the presence of this potential electron donor was not considered further. X-ray diffraction analyses provided important semi-quantitative information of well-crystallized dominant minerals within the sediments that might be contributing electron donors.

  9. Development of imide- and imidazole-containing electron acceptors for use in donor-acceptor conjugated compounds and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Duo

    Conjugated organic compounds and polymers have attracted significant attention due to their potential application in electronic devices as semiconducting materials, such as organic solar cells (OSCs). In order to tune band gaps, donor-acceptor (D-A) structure is widely used, which has been proved to be one of the most effective strategies. This thesis consists of three parts: 1) design, syntheses and characterization of new weak acceptors based on imides and the systematic study of the structure-property relationship; (2) introduction of weak and strong acceptors in one polymer to achieve a broad coverage of light absorption and improve the power conversion efficiency (PCE); (3) modification of benzothiadiazole (BT) acceptor in order to increase the electron withdrawing ability. Imide-based electron acceptors, 4-(5-bromothiophen-2-y1)-2-(2-ethylhexyl)-9- phenyl- 1H-benzo[f]isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione (BIDO-1) and 4,9-bis(5-bromothiophen-2-yl)-2-(2-ethylhexyl)-benzo[f]isoindole-1,3-dione (BIDO-2), were designed and synthesized. In this design, naphthalene is selected as its main core to maintain a planar structure, and thienyl groups are able to facilitate the bromination reaction and lower the band gap. BIDO-1 and BIDO-2 were successfully coupled with different donors by both Suzuki cross-coupling and Stille cross-coupling reactions. Based on the energy levels and band gaps of the BIDO-containing compounds and polymers, BIDO-1 and BIDO-2 are proved to be weak electron acceptors. Pyromellitic diimide (PMDI) was also studied and found to be a stronger electron acceptor than BIDO . In order to obtain broad absorption coverage, both weak acceptor ( BIDO-2) and strong acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) were introduced in the same polymer. The resulting polymers show two absorption bands at 400 and 600 nm and two emission peaks at 500 and 680 nm. The band gaps of the polymers are around 1.6 eV, which is ideal for OSC application. The PCE of 1.17% was achieved. Finally

  10. Ammonia synthesis using a stable electride as an electron donor and reversible hydrogen store

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, Masaaki; Inoue, Yasunori; Yamazaki, Youhei; Hayashi, Fumitaka; Kanbara, Shinji; Matsuishi, Satoru; Yokoyama, Toshiharu; Kim, Sung-Wng; Hara, Michikazu; Hosono, Hideo

    2012-11-01

    Industrially, the artificial fixation of atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia is carried out using the Haber-Bosch process, but this process requires high temperatures and pressures, and consumes more than 1% of the world's power production. Therefore the search is on for a more environmentally benign process that occurs under milder conditions. Here, we report that a Ru-loaded electride [Ca24Al28O64]4+(e-)4 (Ru/C12A7:e-), which has high electron-donating power and chemical stability, works as an efficient catalyst for ammonia synthesis. Highly efficient ammonia synthesis is achieved with a catalytic activity that is an order of magnitude greater than those of other previously reported Ru-loaded catalysts and with almost half the reaction activation energy. Kinetic analysis with infrared spectroscopy reveals that C12A7:e- markedly enhances N2 dissociation on Ru by the back donation of electrons and that the poisoning of ruthenium surfaces by hydrogen adatoms can be suppressed effectively because of the ability of C12A7:e- to store hydrogen reversibly.

  11. Effect of the ferredoxin electron donor on sunflower (Helianthus annuus) desaturases.

    PubMed

    Venegas-Calerón, M; Youssar, L; Salas, J J; Garcés, R; Martínez-Force, E

    2009-08-01

    Ferredoxins are proteins that participate in photosynthesis and in other processes that require reducing equivalents, such as the reduction of nitrogen or fatty acid desaturation. Two classes of ferredoxins have been described in plants: light-regulated photosynthetic ferredoxins and heterotrophic ferredoxins whose activity is not influenced by light. Genes encoding the two forms of ferredoxin have been cloned and characterized in developing sunflower cotyledons. Here, these genes were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and they were purified by ion exchange and size exclusion chromatography to study their capacity to supply electrons to two different sunflower desaturases: soluble stearoyl-ACP desaturase from sunflower cotyledons, and membrane bound desaturase FAD7 expressed in yeast. In both cases photosynthetic ferredoxin was the form that promoted the strongest desaturase activity.

  12. [Potential Carbon Fixation Capability of Non-photosynthetic Microbial Community at Different Depth of the South China Sea and Its Response to Different Electron Donors].

    PubMed

    Fang, Feng; Wang, Lei; Xi, Xue-fei; Hu, Jia-jun; Fu, Xiao-hua; Lu, Bing; Xu, Dian-sheng

    2015-05-01

    The seawater samples collected from many different areas with different depth in the South China Sea were cultivated using different electron donors respectively. And the variation in the potential carbon fixation capability ( PCFC ) of non-photosynthetic microbial community (NPMC) in seawater with different depth was determined after a cycle of cultivation through the statistic analysis. In addition, the cause for the variation was clarified through analyzing key gene abundance regarding CO2 fixation and characteristics of seawater with different depth. The result showed that the PCFCs of NPMC in seawater with different depth were generally low and had no significant difference when using NaNO2 as the electron donor. The PCFC of NPMC in surface seawater was higher than that in deep seawater when using H2 as the electron donor, on the contrary, the PCFC of NPMC in deep seawater was higher than that in surface seawater when using Na2S2O3 as the electron donor. The abundance of the main CO2 fixation gene cbbL in surface seawater was higher than that in deep seawater while the cbbM gene abundance in deep seawater was higher than that in surface seawater. Most hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria had the cbbL gene, and most sulfur bacteria had the cbbM gene. The tendency of seawater cbbL/cbbM gene abundance with the change of depth revealed that there were different kinds of bacteria accounting for the majority in NPMC fixing CO2 at different depth of ocean, which led to different response of PCFC of NPMC at different depth of the sea to different electron donors. The distributions of dissolved oxygen and inorganic carbon concentration with the change of the depth of the sea might be an important reason leading to the difference of NPMC structure and even the difference of PCFC at different depth of the sea.

  13. Acidification due to microbial dechlorination near a trichloroethene DNAPL is overcome with pH buffer or formate as electron donor: experimental demonstration in diffusion-cells.

    PubMed

    Philips, Jo; Maes, Nele; Springael, Dirk; Smolders, Erik

    2013-04-01

    Acidification due to microbial dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) can limit the bio-enhanced dissolution of TCE dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). This study related the dissolution enhancement of a TCE DNAPL to the pH buffer capacity of the medium and the type of electron donor used. In batch systems, dechlorination was optimal at pH7.1-7.5, but was completely inhibited below pH6.2. In addition, dechlorination in batch systems led to a smaller pH decrease at an increasing pH buffer capacity or with the use of formate instead of lactate as electron donor. Subsequently, bio-enhanced TCE DNAPL dissolution was quantified in diffusion-cells with a 5.5 cm central sand layer, separating a TCE DNAPL layer from an aqueous top layer. Three different pH buffer capacities (2.9 mM-17.9 mM MOPS) and lactate or formate as electron donor were applied. In the lactate fed diffusion-cells, the DNAPL dissolution enhancement factor increased from 1.5 to 2.2 with an increase of the pH buffer capacity. In contrast, in the formate fed diffusion-cells, the DNAPL dissolution enhancement factor (2.4±0.3) was unaffected by the pH buffer capacity. Measurement of the pore water pH confirmed that the pH decreased less with an increased pH buffer capacity or with formate instead of lactate as electron donor. These results suggest that the significant impact of acidification on bio-enhanced DNAPL dissolution can be overcome by the amendment of a pH buffer or by applying a non acidifying electron donor like formate.

  14. The electronic structure and second-order nonlinear optical properties of donor-acceptor acetylenes - A detailed investigation of structure-property relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiegman, A. E.; Graham, Eva; Khundkar, Lutfur R.; Perry, Joseph W.; Cheng, L.-T.; Perry, Kelly J.

    1991-01-01

    A series of donor-acceptor acetylene compounds was synthesized in which systematic changes in both the conjugation length and the donor-acceptor strength were made. The effect of these structural changes on the spectroscopic and electronic properties of the molecules and, ultimately, on the measured second-order molecular hyperpolarizabilities (beta) was investigated. It was found that increases in the donor-acceptor strength resulted in increases in the magnitude of beta. For this class of molecules, the increase is dominated by the energy of the intramolecular charge-transfer transition, while factors such as the ground to excited-state dipole moment change and the transition-moment integral are much less important. Increasing the conjugation length from one to two acetylene linkers did not result in an increase in the value of beta; however, beta increased sharply in going from two acetylenes to three. This increase is attributed to the superposition of several nearly isoenergetic excited states.

  15. An Inexpensive Co-Intercalated Layered Double Hydroxide Composite with Electron Donor-Acceptor Character for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shufang; Lu, Jun; Yan, Dongpeng; Qin, Yumei; Li, Hailong; Evans, David G; Duan, Xue

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, the inexpensive 4,4-diaminostilbene-2,2-disulfonate (DAS) and 4,4-dinitro-stilbene-2,2- disulfonate (DNS) anions with arbitrary molar ratios were successfully co-intercalated into Zn2Al-layered double hydroxides (LDHs). The DAS(50%)-DNS/LDHs composite exhibited the broad UV-visible light absorption and fluorescence quenching, which was a direct indication of photo-induced electron transfer (PET) process between the intercalated DAS (donor) and DNS (acceptor) anions. This was confirmed by the matched HOMO/LUMO energy levels alignment of the intercalated DAS and DNS anions, which was also compatible for water splitting. The DAS(50%)-DNS/LDHs composite was fabricated as the photoanode and Pt as the cathode. Under the UV-visible light illumination, the enhanced photo-generated current (4.67 mA/cm(2) at 0.8 V vs. SCE) was generated in the external circuit, and the photoelectrochemical water split was realized. Furthermore, this photoelectrochemical water splitting performance had excellent crystalline, electrochemical and optical stability. Therefore, this novel inorganic/organic hybrid photoanode exhibited potential application prospect in photoelectrochemical water splitting.

  16. Use of organic substrates as electron donors for biological sulfate reduction in gypsiferous mine soils from Nakhon Si Thammarat (Thailand).

    PubMed

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2014-04-01

    Soils in some mining areas contain a high gypsum content, which can give adverse effects to the environment and may cause many cultivation problems, such as a low water retention capacity and low fertility. The quality of such mine soils can be improved by reducing the soil's gypsum content. This study aims to develop an appropriate in situ bioremediation technology for abbreviating the gypsum content of mine soils by using sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). The technology was applied to a mine soil from a gypsum mine in the southern part of Thailand which contains a high sulfate content (150 g kg(-1)). Cheap organic substrates with low or no cost, such as rice husk, pig farm wastewater treatment sludge and coconut husk chips were mixed (60:20:20 by volume) and supplied to the soil as electron donors for the SRB. The highest sulfate removal efficiency of 59% was achieved in the soil mixed with 40% organic mixture, corresponding to a reduction of the soil gypsum content from 25% to 7.5%. For economic gains, this treated soil can be further used for agriculture and the produced sulfide can be recovered as the fertilizer elemental sulfur. PMID:24332728

  17. Electron donor-acceptor interaction of 3,4-dimethylaniline with 2,3-dicyano-1,4-naphthoquinone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelgund, Gururaj M.; Magadum, Subash R.; Budni, M. L.

    2011-01-01

    The electron donor-acceptor (EDA) interaction between 2,3-dicyano-1,4-naphthoquinone (DCNQ) and 3,4-dimethylaniline (3,4-DMA) is studied in chloroform, dichloromethane and 1:1 (v/v) mixture of chloroform and dichloromethane. The rate of formation of the product was measured as a function of time using UV-vis spectrophotometer. The formation constant ( K) and molar extinction coefficient ( ɛ) values for the formation of EDA complex were evaluated in the temperature range of 20-35 °C. The pseudo-first-order rate constant ( k1) and the second-order rate constant ( k2) for the disappearance of EDA complex and for the formation of product were evaluated. The activation parameters (Δ H#, Δ S# and Δ G#) of the reaction were determined by temperature dependence of rate constants using the Arrhenius plots. The effect of relative permittivity of the medium on the reaction is discussed. The observed results indicate that formation of final product proceeds through initial formation of EDA complex as an intermediate. The product of the reaction was purified by column chromatography method and identified as 3-( N-3,4-dimethyl-phenylamino)-2-cyano-1,4-naphthoquinone by elemental analysis, IR and NMR spectroscopy. On the basis of kinetic, analytical and spectroscopic results, a plausible mechanism for the formation of EDA complex and its transformation into product is proposed.

  18. Use of organic substrates as electron donors for biological sulfate reduction in gypsiferous mine soils from Nakhon Si Thammarat (Thailand).

    PubMed

    Kijjanapanich, Pimluck; Annachhatre, Ajit P; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2014-04-01

    Soils in some mining areas contain a high gypsum content, which can give adverse effects to the environment and may cause many cultivation problems, such as a low water retention capacity and low fertility. The quality of such mine soils can be improved by reducing the soil's gypsum content. This study aims to develop an appropriate in situ bioremediation technology for abbreviating the gypsum content of mine soils by using sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB). The technology was applied to a mine soil from a gypsum mine in the southern part of Thailand which contains a high sulfate content (150 g kg(-1)). Cheap organic substrates with low or no cost, such as rice husk, pig farm wastewater treatment sludge and coconut husk chips were mixed (60:20:20 by volume) and supplied to the soil as electron donors for the SRB. The highest sulfate removal efficiency of 59% was achieved in the soil mixed with 40% organic mixture, corresponding to a reduction of the soil gypsum content from 25% to 7.5%. For economic gains, this treated soil can be further used for agriculture and the produced sulfide can be recovered as the fertilizer elemental sulfur.

  19. Pilot scale investigation of zinc and sulphate removal from industrial discharges by biological sulphate reduction with molasses as electron donor.

    PubMed

    Liamleam, Warounsak; Oo, Zaw Ko; Thai, Phan Thong; Annachhatre, Ajit P

    2009-11-01

    A biological sulphate reduction process, with molasses as an electron donor, was used for the removal of zinc and sulphate from Rayon industrial wastewater. The process involved reduction of sulphate to sulphide under anaerobic conditions. The sulphide-rich effluent was used to remove zinc as zinc sulphide precipitate. The investigation was conducted at pilot scale with real wastewater from the Rayon industry as feed. The effects of sulphate loading rate and temperature of feeding wastewater were evaluated. The experimental results showed that there was no significant difference in sulphide production when the reactor was operated at 50 +/- 2 degrees C and 65 +/- 2 degrees C. Sulphide production was in the range of 500-515 mg L(-1). In addition, an increase in sulphate loading rate from 6.3 +/- 0.7 kg SO4 m(-3) d(-1) to 14.9 +/- 2.4 kg SO4 m(-3) d(-1) resulted in a dramatic decrease in sulphate removal efficiency. Furthermore, zinc sulphide precipitation at pH 7 removed more than 96% of zinc.

  20. An Inexpensive Co-Intercalated Layered Double Hydroxide Composite with Electron Donor-Acceptor Character for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shufang; Lu, Jun; Yan, Dongpeng; Qin, Yumei; Li, Hailong; Evans, David G.; Duan, Xue

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the inexpensive 4,4-diaminostilbene-2,2-disulfonate (DAS) and 4,4-dinitro-stilbene-2,2- disulfonate (DNS) anions with arbitrary molar ratios were successfully co-intercalated into Zn2Al-layered double hydroxides (LDHs). The DAS(50%)-DNS/LDHs composite exhibited the broad UV-visible light absorption and fluorescence quenching, which was a direct indication of photo-induced electron transfer (PET) process between the intercalated DAS (donor) and DNS (acceptor) anions. This was confirmed by the matched HOMO/LUMO energy levels alignment of the intercalated DAS and DNS anions, which was also compatible for water splitting. The DAS(50%)-DNS/LDHs composite was fabricated as the photoanode and Pt as the cathode. Under the UV-visible light illumination, the enhanced photo-generated current (4.67 mA/cm2 at 0.8 V vs. SCE) was generated in the external circuit, and the photoelectrochemical water split was realized. Furthermore, this photoelectrochemical water splitting performance had excellent crystalline, electrochemical and optical stability. Therefore, this novel inorganic/organic hybrid photoanode exhibited potential application prospect in photoelectrochemical water splitting. PMID:26174201

  1. An ESEEM study of the oxidized electron donor of plant photosystem II: Evidence that D ? is a neutral tyrosine radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evelo, R. G.; Hoff, A. J.; Dikanov, S. A.; Tyryshkin, A. M.

    1989-09-01

    Electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) has been performed on the tyrosyl radical D ? in photosystem II of plants and algae. This radical was investigated in PS II-enriched subchloroplast particles, and in perdeuterated and 15N-substituted Chlorella vulgaris algae. From the ESEEM analysis in the time and frequency domain, two proton hyperfine interactions were determined. One of these protons has hyperfine parameters aiso=27.2 MHz, T11=-3.1 MHz and T22/ T11=0.5. The second proton, which is easily exchangeable by deuterium, has parameters aiso=±1.6 MHz, T11=∓8.4 MHz and T22/ T11=1. The hyperfine parameters of the first proton are characteristic of a β-methylene proton, whereas those of the second indicate that it is a proton hydrogen bonded to the tyrosyl oxygen. We conclude that the oxidized tyrosyl donor is a neutral hydrogen-bonded radical.

  2. U(VI) bioreduction with emulsified vegetable oil as the electron donor-- Microcosm tests and model development

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping; Wu, Wei-min; Watson, David B; Parker, Jack C.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Brooks, Scott C; Shi, Xiaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Microcosm tests were conducted to study U(VI) bioreduction in contaminated sediments with emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor. In the microcosms, EVO was degraded by indigenous microorganisms and stimulated Fe, U, and sulfate bioreduction, and methanogenesis. Removal of aqueous U occurred concurrently with sulfate reduction, with more reduction of total U in the case of higher initial sulfate concentrations. X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) analysis confirmed U(VI) reduction to U(IV). As the acetate concentration peaked in 10~20 days in oleate microcosms, the maximum was reached in 100~120 days in the EVO microcosms, indicating that EVO hydrolysis was rate-limiting. The acetate accumulation was sustained over 50 days longer in the oleate and EVO than in the ethanol microcosms, suggesting that acetate-utilizing methanogenesis was slower in the cases of oleate and EVO. Both slow hydrolysis and methanogenesis could contribute to potential sustained bioreduction in field application. Biogeochemical models were developed to couple degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, glycerol, acetate, and hydrogen, reduction of Fe(III), U(VI) and sulfate, and methanogenesis with growth and decay of microbial functional groups. The models were used to simulate the coupled processes in a field test in a companion article.

  3. Potential benefits of triethylamine as n-electron donor in the estimation of forskolin by electronic absorption and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Gajula; Ram Reddy, A.

    2016-02-01

    Diterpenoid forskolin was isolated from Coleus forskolii. The electronic absorption and emission studies of forskolin were investigated in various solvents with an aim to improve its detection limits. The two chromophores present in the diterpenoid are not conjugated leading to the poor absorption and emission of UV light. The absorption and fluorescence spectra were solvent specific. In the presence of a monodentate ligand, triethylamine the detection of forskolin is improved by 3.63 times in ethanol with the fluorescence method and 3.36 times in DMSO by the absorption spectral method. The longer wavelength absorption maximum is blue shifted while the lower energy fluorescence maximum is red shifted in the presence of triethylamine. From the wavelength of fluorescence maxima of the exciplex formed between excited forskolin and triethylamine it is concluded that the order of reactivity of hydroxyl groups in the excited state forskolin is in the reverse order to that of the order of the reactivity of hydroxyl groups in its ground state.

  4. Recycling of mixed plastic waste from electrical and electronic equipment. Added value by compatibilization.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Yamila V; Barbosa, Silvia E

    2016-07-01

    Plastic waste from electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) grows up exponentially fast in the last two decades. Either consumption increase of technological products, like cellphones or computers, or the short lifetime of this products contributes to this rise generating an accumulation of specific plastic materials such ABS (Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene), HIPS (High impact Polystyrene), PC (Polycarbonate), among others. All of they can be recycled by themselves. However, to separate them by type is neither easy nor economically viable, then an alternative is recycling them together as a blend. Taking into account that could be a deterioration in final properties, to enhance phase adhesion and add value to a new plastic WEEE blend a compatibilization is needed. In this work, a systematical study of different compatibilizers for blends of HIPS and ABS from WEEE was performed. A screening analysis was carried out by adding two different compatibilizer concentration (2wt% and 20wt%) on a HIPS/ABS physical blend 80/20 proportion from plastic e-waste. Three copolymers were selected as possible compatibilizers by their possible affinity with initial plastic WEEE. A complete characterization of each WEEE was performed and compatibilization efficiency was evaluated by comparing either mechanical or morphological blends aspects. Considering blends analyzed in this work, the best performance was achieved by using 2% of styrene-acrylonitrile rubber, obtaining a compatibilized blend with double ultimate strength and modulus respect to the physical blend, and also improve mechanical properties of initial WEEE plastics. The proposed way is a promise route to improve benefit of e-scrap with sustainable, low costs and easy handling process. Consequently, social recycling interest will be encouraged by both ecological and economical points of view.

  5. Recycling of mixed plastic waste from electrical and electronic equipment. Added value by compatibilization.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Yamila V; Barbosa, Silvia E

    2016-07-01

    Plastic waste from electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) grows up exponentially fast in the last two decades. Either consumption increase of technological products, like cellphones or computers, or the short lifetime of this products contributes to this rise generating an accumulation of specific plastic materials such ABS (Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene), HIPS (High impact Polystyrene), PC (Polycarbonate), among others. All of they can be recycled by themselves. However, to separate them by type is neither easy nor economically viable, then an alternative is recycling them together as a blend. Taking into account that could be a deterioration in final properties, to enhance phase adhesion and add value to a new plastic WEEE blend a compatibilization is needed. In this work, a systematical study of different compatibilizers for blends of HIPS and ABS from WEEE was performed. A screening analysis was carried out by adding two different compatibilizer concentration (2wt% and 20wt%) on a HIPS/ABS physical blend 80/20 proportion from plastic e-waste. Three copolymers were selected as possible compatibilizers by their possible affinity with initial plastic WEEE. A complete characterization of each WEEE was performed and compatibilization efficiency was evaluated by comparing either mechanical or morphological blends aspects. Considering blends analyzed in this work, the best performance was achieved by using 2% of styrene-acrylonitrile rubber, obtaining a compatibilized blend with double ultimate strength and modulus respect to the physical blend, and also improve mechanical properties of initial WEEE plastics. The proposed way is a promise route to improve benefit of e-scrap with sustainable, low costs and easy handling process. Consequently, social recycling interest will be encouraged by both ecological and economical points of view. PMID:27140655

  6. Donor-Like Surface Traps on Two-Dimensional Electron Gas and Current Collapse of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chen-hui; Luo, Qing-zhou; Luo, Xiang-dong; Liu, Pei-sheng

    2013-01-01

    The effect of donor-like surface traps on two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) and drain current collapse of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) has been investigated in detail. The depletion of 2DEG by the donor-like surface states is shown. The drain current collapse is found to be more sensitive to the addition of positive surface charges. Surface trap states with higher energy levels result in weaker current collapse and faster collapse process. By adopting an optimized backside doping scheme, the electron density of 2DEG has been improved greatly and the current collapse has been greatly eliminated. These results give reference to the improvement in device performance of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs. PMID:24348195

  7. Subsurface Biogeochemical Heterogeneity (Field-scale removal of U(VI) from groundwater in an alluvial aquifer by electron donor amendment)

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.; N'Guessan, A. L.; Nevin, Kelly; Resch, C. T.; Arntzen, Evan; Druhan, Jenny; Peacock, Aaron; Baldwin, Brett; Dayvault, Dick; Holmes, Dawn; Williams, Ken; Hubbard, Susan; Yabusaki, Steve; Fang, Yilin; White, D. C.; Komlos, John; Jaffe, Peter

    2006-06-01

    Determine if biostimulation of alluvial aquifers by electron donor amendment can effectively remove U(VI) from groundwater at the field scale. Uranium contamination in groundwater is a significant problem at several DOE sites. In this project, the possibility of accelerating bioreduction of U(VI) to U(IV) as a means of decreasing U(VI) concentrations in groundwater is directly addressed by conducting a series of field-scale experiments. Scientific goals include demonstrating the quantitative linkage between microbial activity and U loss from groundwater and relating the dominant terminal electron accepting processes to the rate of U loss. The project is currently focused on understanding the mechanisms for unexpected long-term ({approx}2 years) removal of U after stopping electron donor amendment. Results obtained in the project successfully position DOE and others to apply biostimulation broadly to U contamination in alluvial aquifers.

  8. Density functional study of the electronic structure of dye-functionalized fullerenes and their model donor-acceptor complexes containing P3HT.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Tunna; Garnica, Amanda; Paggen, Marina; Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R

    2016-04-14

    We study the electronic structure of C60 fullerenes functionalized with a thiophene-diketo-pyrrolopyrrole-thiophene based chromophore using density functional theory combined with large polarized basis sets. As the attached chromophore has electron donor character, the functionalization of the fullerene leads to a donor-acceptor (DA) system. We examine in detail the effect of the linker and the addition site on the electronic structure of the functionalized fullerenes. We further study the electronic structure of these DA complexes with a focus on the charge transfer excitations. Finally, we examine the interface of the functionalized fullerenes with the widely used poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) donor. Our results show that all functionalized fullerenes with an exception of the C60-pyrrolidine [6,6], where the pyrrolidine is attached at a [6,6] site, have larger electron affinities relative to the pristine C60 fullerene. We also estimate the quasi-particle gap, lowest charge transfer excitation energy, and the exciton binding energies of the functionalized fullerene-P3MT model systems. Results show that the exciton binding energies in these model complexes are slightly smaller compared to a similarly prepared phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM)-P3MT complex.

  9. Density functional study of the electronic structure of dye-functionalized fullerenes and their model donor-acceptor complexes containing P3HT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruah, Tunna; Garnica, Amanda; Paggen, Marina; Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R.

    2016-04-01

    We study the electronic structure of C60 fullerenes functionalized with a thiophene-diketo-pyrrolopyrrole-thiophene based chromophore using density functional theory combined with large polarized basis sets. As the attached chromophore has electron donor character, the functionalization of the fullerene leads to a donor-acceptor (DA) system. We examine in detail the effect of the linker and the addition site on the electronic structure of the functionalized fullerenes. We further study the electronic structure of these DA complexes with a focus on the charge transfer excitations. Finally, we examine the interface of the functionalized fullerenes with the widely used poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) donor. Our results show that all functionalized fullerenes with an exception of the C60-pyrrolidine [6,6], where the pyrrolidine is attached at a [6,6] site, have larger electron affinities relative to the pristine C60 fullerene. We also estimate the quasi-particle gap, lowest charge transfer excitation energy, and the exciton binding energies of the functionalized fullerene-P3MT model systems. Results show that the exciton binding energies in these model complexes are slightly smaller compared to a similarly prepared phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM)-P3MT complex.

  10. Electron Transfer within Self-Assembling Cyclic Tetramers Using Chlorophyll-Based Donor-Acceptor Building Blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, Victoria L; Smeigh, Amanda L; Kim, Chul Hoon; Co, Dick T; Wasielewski, Michael R

    2012-05-09

    The synthesis and photoinduced charge transfer properties of a series of Chl-based donor-acceptor triad building blocks that self-assemble into cyclic tetramers are reported. Chlorophyll a was converted into zinc methyl 3-ethylpyrochlorophyllide a (Chl) and then further modified at its 20-position to covalently attach a pyromellitimide (PI) acceptor bearing a pyridine ligand and one or two naphthalene-1,8:4,5-bis(dicarboximide) (NDI) secondary electron acceptors to give Chl-PI-NDI and Chl-PI-NDI2. The pyridine ligand within each ambident triad enables intermolecular Chl metal-ligand coordination in dry toluene, which results in the formation of cyclic tetramers in solution, as determined using small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering at a synchrotron source. Femtosecond and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy of the monomers in toluene-1% pyridine and the cyclic tetramers in toluene shows that the selective photoexcitation of Chl results in intramolecular electron transfer from 1*Chl to PI to form Chl+.-PI-.-NDI and Chl+.-PI-.-NDI2. This initial charge separation is followed by a rapid charge shift from PI-. to NDI and subsequent charge recombination of Chl+.-PI-NDI-. and Chl+.-PI-(NDI)NDI-. on a 5-30 ns time scale. Charge recombination in the Chl-PI-NDI2 cyclic tetramer (τCR = 30 ± 1 ns in toluene) is slower by a factor of 3 relative to the monomeric building blocks (τCR = 10 ± 1 ns in toluene-1% pyridine). This indicates that the self-assembly of these building blocks into the cyclic tetramers alters their structures in a way that lengthens their charge separation lifetimes, which is an advantageous strategy for artificial photosynthetic systems.

  11. Oxygen uptake induced by electron transfer from donors to the triplet state of methylene blue and xanthene dyes in air-saturated aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Görner, Helmut

    2008-03-01

    The effects of oxygen in the photolysis of rose bengal, eosin, erythrosin and methylene blue were studied in the presence of formate and electron donors, such as ascorbic acid, aromatic amino acids or aliphatic amines, e.g. triethylamine (TEA). The overall reaction is conversion of oxygen via the hydroperoxyl/superoxide ion radical into hydrogen peroxide. The quantum yield of oxygen uptake (Phi(-O2)) increases with the donor concentration. The photoinduced formation of H2O2 is initiated by quenching of the triplet state of the dye by the donor and subsequent reactions of both the dye and donor radicals with oxygen. For methylene blue and the xanthene dyes in the presence of 10 mM ascorbic acid or 0.1 M TEA Phi(-O2)=0.07-0.25. The spectral and kinetic properties of the specific dye transients, including the radicals involved and the pH and concentration dependences, are discussed. PMID:18389155

  12. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl ([sup 18]F) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    DOEpatents

    Yushin Ding; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1993-10-19

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

  13. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl (18E) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    DOEpatents

    Ding, Yu-Shin; Fowler, Joanna S.; Wolf, Alfred P.

    1993-01-01

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

  14. Motivations for Giving of Alumni Donors, Lapsed Donors and Non-Donors: Implications for Christian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rugano, Emilio Kariuki

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive and causal comparative study sought to identify motivations for alumni donor acquisition and retention in Christian institutions of higher learning. To meet this objective, motivations for alumni donors, lapsed donors, and non-donors were analyzed and compared. Data was collected through an electronic survey of a stratified sample…

  15. Effective treatment of alkaline Cr(VI) contaminated leachate using a novel Pd-bionanocatalyst: Impact of electron donor and aqueous geochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Mathew P.; Coker, Victoria S.; Parry, Stephen A.; Thomas, Russell A.P.; Kalin, Robert; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Palladium catalysts offer the potential for the effective treatment of a variety of priority reducible pollutants in natural waters. In this study, microbially synthesized magnetite nanoparticles were functionalized with Pd(0), creating a highly reactive, magnetically recoverable, nano-scale catalyst (Pd-BnM). This was then investigated for the treatment of model Cr(VI) contaminated solutions at a range of pH values, and also alkaline Cr(VI) contaminated leachates from chromite ore processing residue (COPR); a contaminant issue of global concern. The sample of COPR used in this study was obtained from a site in Glasgow, UK, where extensive Cr(VI) contamination has been reported. In initial experiments Pd-BnM was supplied with H2 gas or formate as electron donors, and Cr(VI) removal from model synthetic solutions was quantified at various pH values (2–12). Effective removal was noted at neutral to environmentally relevant alkaline (pH 12) pH values, while the use of formate as an electron donor resulted in loss of performance under acidic conditions (pH 2). Reaction kinetics were then assessed with increasing Pd-BnM loading in both model pH 12 Cr(VI) solutions and the COPR leachate. When formate was used as the electron donor for Pd-BnM, to treat COPR leachate, there was significant inhibition of Cr(VI) removal. In contrast, a promotion of reaction rate, was observed when H2 was employed. Upon sustained reaction with model Cr(VI) solutions, in the presence of excess electron donor (formate or H2), appreciable quantities of Cr(VI) were removed before eventual inactivation of the catalyst. Faster onset of inactivation was reported in the COPR leachates, removing 4% and 64% of Cr(VI) observed from model Cr(VI) solutions, when formate and H2 were used as electron donors, respectively. XAS, TEM-EDX and XPS analysis of the catalysts that had been inactivated in the model solution, showed that the surface had an extensive covering of reduced Cr(III), most likely as a Cr

  16. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Effects of charge transfer interaction of graphene with electron donor and acceptor molecules examined using Raman spectroscopy and cognate techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voggu, Rakesh; Das, Barun; Sekhar Rout, Chandra; Rao, C. N. R.

    2008-11-01

    The effects of the interaction of few-layer graphene with electron donor and acceptor molecules have been investigated by employing Raman spectroscopy, and the results compared with those from electrochemical doping. The G-band softens progressively with increasing concentration of tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) which is an electron donor, while the band stiffens with increasing concentration of tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) which is an electron acceptor. Interaction with both TTF and TCNE broadens the G-band. Hole and electron doping by electrochemical means, however, stiffen and sharpen the G-band. The 2D-band position is also affected by interaction with TTF and TCNE. More importantly, the intensity of the 2D-band decreases markedly with the concentration of either. The ratio of intensities of the 2D-band and G-band decreases with an increase in TTF or TCNE concentration, and provides a means for carrier titration in the charge transfer system. Unlike the intensity of the 2D-band, that of the D-band increases on interaction with TTF or TCNE. All of these effects occur due to molecular charge transfer, also evidenced by the occurrence of charge transfer bands in the electronic absorption spectra. The electrical resistivity of graphene varies in opposite directions on interaction with TTF and TCNE, the resistivity depending on the concentration of either compound.

  17. Reduction of electron accumulation at InN(0001) surfaces via saturation of surface states by potassium and oxygen as donor- or acceptor-type adsorbates

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenhardt, A.; Reiß, S.; Krischok, S. Himmerlich, M.

    2014-01-28

    The influence of selected donor- and acceptor-type adsorbates on the electronic properties of InN(0001) surfaces is investigated implementing in-situ photoelectron spectroscopy. The changes in work function, surface band alignment, and chemical bond configurations are characterized during deposition of potassium and exposure to oxygen. Although an expected opponent charge transfer characteristic is observed with potassium donating its free electron to InN, while dissociated oxygen species extract partial charge from the substrate, a reduction of the surface electron accumulation occurs in both cases. This observation can be explained by adsorbate-induced saturation of free dangling bonds at the InN resulting in the disappearance of surface states, which initially pin the Fermi level and induce downward band bending.

  18. Prospects for three-electron donor boronyl (BO) ligands and dioxodiborene (B2O2) ligands as bridging groups in binuclear iron carbonyl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu; Li, Qian-Shu; Xie, Yaoming; King, R Bruce

    2012-08-20

    Recent experimental work (2010) on (Cy(3)P)(2)Pt(BO)Br indicates that the oxygen atom of the boronyl (BO) ligand is more basic than that in the ubiquitous CO ligand. This suggests that bridging BO ligands in unsaturated binuclear metal carbonyl derivatives should readily function as three-electron donor bridging ligands involving both the oxygen and the boron atoms. In this connection, density functional theory shows that three of the four lowest energy singlet Fe(2)(BO)(2)(CO)(7) structures have such a bridging η(2)-μ-BO group as well as a formal Fe-Fe single bond. In addition, all four of the lowest energy singlet Fe(2)(BO)(2)(CO)(6) structures have two bridging η(2)-μ-BO groups and formal Fe-Fe single bonds. Other Fe(2)(BO)(2)(CO)(n) (n = 7, 6) structures are found in which the two BO groups have coupled to form a bridging dioxodiborene (B(2)O(2)) ligand with B-B bonding distances of ~1.84 Å. All of these Fe(2)(μ-B(2)O(2))(CO)(n) structures have long Fe···Fe distances indicating a lack of direct iron-iron bonding. One of the singlet Fe(2)(BO)(2)(CO)(7) structures has such a bridging dioxodiborene ligand with cis stereochemistry functioning as a six-electron donor to the pair of iron atoms. In addition, the lowest energy triplet structures for both Fe(2)(BO)(2)(CO)(7) and Fe(2)(BO)(2)(CO)(6) have bridging dioxodiborene ligands with trans stereochemistry functioning as a four-electron donor to the pair of iron atoms. PMID:22862812

  19. The influence of oxygen-17 enriched oxygen-donor ligands on the electronic spin relaxation behaviour of paramagnetic metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Gregg B.; Yim, Moon B.; Makinen, Marvin W.

    Continuous wave microwave power saturation of high-spin paramagnetic metalloprotein complexes of Co2+ and Fe3+ showed that the value of the saturation parameter P1/2 is influenced by the coordination of oxygen-17 enriched water to the metal ion. No change was observed for H218O or 2H2O. Pulse saturation and recovery of paramagnetic high-spin Fe3+ heme proteins identified a fast relaxation component sensitive to isotopic oxygen-17 composition that was assigned to the process of spectral diffusion. It is shown that the change in relaxation time for spectral diffusion can alter the (apparent) spin-lattice relaxation to account for the observed changes in continuous wave microwave power saturation experiments. These changes are shown to correlate with alterations in the extent of covalency between the metal ion and oxygen-donor ligand. The experimental results provide a basis for use of continuous wave microwave saturation to identify the presence of oxygen-donor ligands within the inner coordination shell of high-spin Co2+ or Fe3+ in metalloprotein and small molecule complexes and to qualitatively assess the extent of covalency between the metal ion and the oxygen-donor ligand.

  20. Spectral investigations of multiple charge transfer complex of p-nitrophenol as an electron acceptor with donor p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, A.; Khan, I. M.; Ahmad, A.

    2011-10-01

    The convincing evidence have been given that both the interactions π-π and π-π* (between p-nitrophenol ( p-NTP) and p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde ( p-DAB)) are simultaneously involved. This has been established by using IR spectrometry. Association constant K evaluated by the method of Foster under the condition [A]0 = [D]0 with apply in this equation, [A]0/ A = 1/ Kɛλ[D]0 + 2/ɛλ, where [A]0 is the initial concentration of acceptor equal to [D]0, A is the absorbance of the complex at λ, K is the association constant, and ɛλ is the molar absorptivity of the complex at λ. In the IR spectral studies of several related organic compounds, one comes to the conclusion that p-NTP shows a broad band centred at 1600 cm-1 and to nitro asymmetric stretching vibrations. In the complex while the 1500 cm-1 band remains without shift, the broad band localized at 1600 cm-1 shift to 1610 cm-1. A shift of 10 cm-1 shows weak interactions. Studies on molecular complexes of organ metallic donors and acceptors are of very recent origin. Though alkyl donors have been extensively studied, very few studies have appeared on aryl donors.

  1. Metal-enhanced luminescence of silicon quantum dots: effects of nanoparticles and molecular electron donors and acceptors on the photofading kinetics.

    PubMed

    Abualnaja, Khamael M; Šiller, Lidija; Horrocks, Benjamin R

    2015-04-10

    Alkyl-capped silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) show enhanced luminescence when drop cast as films on glass slides in mixtures with Ag or Au nanoparticles or the electron donor ferrocene (Fc). Metal enhancement of quantum dot photoluminescence (PL) is known to arise from a combination of the intense near-field associated with the surface plasmon of the metal on the rate of absorption and the decrease in the lifetime of the excited state. Here we present evidence that an additional factor is also involved: electron transfer from the metal to the quantum dot. Under CW irradiation with an argon ion laser at 488 nm, SiQDs undergo a reversible photofading of the PL as the particles photoionize. A steady-state condition is established by the competition between photoionization and electron-hole recombination. The fading of the initial PL I0 to the steady-state value I∞ can be modelled by a simple first order decay with a lognormal distribution of rates, which reflects the heterogeneity of the sample. In the presence of Ag and Au nanoparticles, the modal rate constants of photofading increase by factors of up to 4-fold and the ratio I0/I∞ decreases by factors up to 5-fold; this is consistent with an increase in the rate of electron-hole recombination facilitated by the metal nanoparticles acting as sources of electrons. Further support for this interpretation comes from the enhancement in PL observed in photofading experiments with films of SiQDs mixed with Fc; this compound is a well-known one-electron donor, but shows no plasmon band which complicates the estimation of PL enhancement with Ag NPs.

  2. Metal-enhanced luminescence of silicon quantum dots: effects of nanoparticles and molecular electron donors and acceptors on the photofading kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abualnaja, Khamael M.; Šiller, Lidija; Horrocks, Benjamin R.

    2015-04-01

    Alkyl-capped silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) show enhanced luminescence when drop cast as films on glass slides in mixtures with Ag or Au nanoparticles or the electron donor ferrocene (Fc). Metal enhancement of quantum dot photoluminescence (PL) is known to arise from a combination of the intense near-field associated with the surface plasmon of the metal on the rate of absorption and the decrease in the lifetime of the excited state. Here we present evidence that an additional factor is also involved: electron transfer from the metal to the quantum dot. Under CW irradiation with an argon ion laser at 488 nm, SiQDs undergo a reversible photofading of the PL as the particles photoionize. A steady-state condition is established by the competition between photoionization and electron-hole recombination. The fading of the initial PL I0 to the steady-state value {{I}∞ } can be modelled by a simple first order decay with a lognormal distribution of rates, which reflects the heterogeneity of the sample. In the presence of Ag and Au nanoparticles, the modal rate constants of photofading increase by factors of up to 4-fold and the ratio {{I}0}/{{I}∞ } decreases by factors up to 5-fold; this is consistent with an increase in the rate of electron-hole recombination facilitated by the metal nanoparticles acting as sources of electrons. Further support for this interpretation comes from the enhancement in PL observed in photofading experiments with films of SiQDs mixed with Fc; this compound is a well-known one-electron donor, but shows no plasmon band which complicates the estimation of PL enhancement with Ag NPs.

  3. Catchment topography and distribution of electron donors for denitrification control stream NO3- concentration in the Lake Hachiro watershed, Akita, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, A.; Funaki, Y.; Sudo, T.; Watanabe, S.; Ishikawa, Y.; Hidaka, S.

    2012-12-01

    Topography and distribution of electron donors for denitrification in a catchment can control stream NO3- concentration. We examined the linkages between topography, distribution of electron donors and the importance of denitrification as a nitrate removal mechanism in headwater streams in the Lake Hachiro watershed (LHW) at Akita prefecture, Japan. Study sites are 35 headwater streams (0.07-16.9 km2) in the LHW. Streamwater in each catchment was sampled nine times for two years. Stream sediments which can represent a surface soil and geology in a catchment were collected from a top 5 cm of a streambed for a measurement of denitrification potential (DP) and electron donors (water soluble organic carbon, WESOC; easily oxidizable sulfide, EOS). Dissolved nitrous oxide (dN2O) concentration in streamwater was also measured. Topographic index (TI) in each catchment was calculated using 10 m-grid digital elevation model using GIS. Stream NO3- concentrations among catchments had a large spatial variability ranging from 0.06 to 0.52 mg N L-1 and were negatively correlated with TI significantly (r = 0.56, p < 0.01, n = 35), indicated NO3- was removed in a gentle-slope catchment. Sediment DP and dN2O concentration were positively correlated with TI, supporting that denitrification was a dominant mechanism of NO3- removal in such catchments. The WSOC content in the sediment, the primary predictor of denitrification rates, increased with TI and affected sediment DP, significantly. Stream NO3- concentrations tended to decrease with increasing of stream SO42- concentrations and log(EOS) contents in the sediments, indicating sulfur denitrification could occur in the catchments, although the distribution of log(EOS) was independent of TI. Multiple regression analysis showed TI, sediment DP, and log(EOS) content in the sediment affected concentration of stream NO3- significantly. This study demonstrated that catchment's topography and distribution of electron donors evaluated from

  4. Electronic energy and electron transfer processes in photoexcited donor-acceptor dyad and triad molecular systems based on triphenylene and perylene diimide units.

    PubMed

    Lee, K J; Woo, J H; Kim, E; Xiao, Y; Su, X; Mazur, L M; Attias, A-J; Fages, F; Cregut, O; Barsella, A; Mathevet, F; Mager, L; Wu, J W; D'Aléo, A; Ribierre, J-C

    2016-03-21

    We investigate the photophysical properties of organic donor-acceptor dyad and triad molecular systems based on triphenylene and perylene diimide units linked by a non-conjugated flexible bridge in solution using complementary optical spectroscopy techniques. When these molecules are diluted in dichloromethane solution, energy transfer from the triphenylene to the perylene diimide excited moieties is evidenced by time-resolved fluorescence measurements resulting in a quenching of the emission from the triphenylene moieties. Simultaneously, another quenching process that affects the emission from both donor and acceptor units is observed. Solution ultrafast transient absorption measurements provide evidence of photo-induced charge transfer from either the donor or the acceptor depending upon the excitation. Overall, the analysis of the detailed time-resolved spectroscopic measurements carried out in the dyad and triad systems as well as in the triphenylene and perylene diimide units alone provides useful information both to better understand the relations between energy and charge transfer processes with molecular structures, and for the design of future functional dyad and triad architectures based on donor and acceptor moieties for organic optoelectronic applications. PMID:26911420

  5. Boron Doped diamond films as electron donors in photovoltaics: An X-ray absorption and hard X-ray photoemission study

    SciTech Connect

    Kapilashrami, M.; Zegkinoglou, I.; Conti, G.; Nemšák, S.; Conlon, C. S.; Fadley, C. S.; Törndahl, T.; Fjällström, V.; Lischner, J.; Louie, Steven G.; Hamers, R. J.; Zhang, L.; Guo, J.-H.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2014-10-14

    Highly boron-doped diamond films are investigated for their potential as transparent electron donors in solar cells. Specifically, the valence band offset between a diamond film (as electron donor) and Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ (CIGS) as light absorber is determined by a combination of soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which is more depth-penetrating than standard soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, a theoretical analysis of the valence band is performed, based on GW quasiparticle band calculations. The valence band offset is found to be small: VBO=VBM{sub CIGS} – VBM{sub diamond}=0.3 eV±0.1 eV at the CIGS/Diamond interface and 0.0 eV±0.1 eV from CIGS to bulk diamond. These results provide a promising starting point for optimizing the band offset by choosing absorber materials with a slightly lower valence band maximum.

  6. Boron Doped diamond films as electron donors in photovoltaics: An X-ray absorption and hard X-ray photoemission study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapilashrami, M.; Conti, G.; Zegkinoglou, I.; Nemšák, S.; Conlon, C. S.; Törndahl, T.; Fjällström, V.; Lischner, J.; Louie, Steven G.; Hamers, R. J.; Zhang, L.; Guo, J.-H.; Fadley, C. S.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2014-10-01

    Highly boron-doped diamond films are investigated for their potential as transparent electron donors in solar cells. Specifically, the valence band offset between a diamond film (as electron donor) and Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) as light absorber is determined by a combination of soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which is more depth-penetrating than standard soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, a theoretical analysis of the valence band is performed, based on GW quasiparticle band calculations. The valence band offset is found to be small: VBO = VBMCIGS - VBMdiamond = 0.3 eV ± 0.1 eV at the CIGS/Diamond interface and 0.0 eV ± 0.1 eV from CIGS to bulk diamond. These results provide a promising starting point for optimizing the band offset by choosing absorber materials with a slightly lower valence band maximum.

  7. Self-Assembly of Electron Donor-Acceptor-Based Carbazole Derivatives: Novel Fluorescent Organic Nanoprobes for Both One- and Two-Photon Cellular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Chen, Wencheng; Kalytchuk, Sergii; Li, King Fai; Chen, Rui; Adachi, Chihaya; Chen, Zhan; Rogach, Andrey L; Zhu, Guangyu; Yu, Peter K N; Zhang, Wenjun; Cheah, Kok Wai; Zhang, Xiaohong; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2016-05-11

    In this study, we report fluorescent organic nanoprobes with intense blue, green, and orange-red emissions prepared by self-assembling three carbazole derivatives into nanorods/nanoparticles. The three compounds consist of two or four electron-donating carbazole groups linked to a central dicyanobenzene electron acceptor. Steric hindrance from the carbazole groups leads to noncoplanar 3D molecular structures favorable to fluorescence in the solid state, while the donor-acceptor structures endow the molecules with good two-photon excited emission properties. The fluorescent organic nanoprobes exhibit good water dispersibility, low cytotoxicity, superior resistance against photodegradation and photobleaching. Both one- and two-photon fluorescent imaging were shown in the A549 cell line. Two-photon fluorescence imaging with the fluorescent probes was demonstrated to be more effective in visualizing and distinguishing cellular details compared to conventional one-photon fluorescence imaging.

  8. 15N electron nuclear double resonance of the primary donor cation radical P+.865 in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: additional evidence for the dimer model.

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, W; Isaacson, R A; Abresch, E C; Feher, G

    1984-01-01

    Four 15N hyperfine coupling constants, including signs, have been measured by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron nuclear nuclear triple resonance (TRIPLE) for the bacteriochlorophyll a radical cation, BChla+., in vitro and for the light-induced primary donor radical cation, P+.865, in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. A comparison of the data shows that the hyperfine coupling constants have the same sign in both radicals and are, on the average, smaller by a factor of 2 in P+.865. These results provide additional evidence that P+.865 is a bacteriochlorophyll dimer and are in contradiction with the monomer structure of P+.865 recently proposed by O'Malley and Babcock. The reduction factors of the individual 15N couplings, together with the evidence from proton ENDOR data and molecular orbital calculations, indicate a dimer structure in which only two rings (either I and I or III and III) of the bacteriochlorophyll macrocycles overlap. PMID:6096857

  9. Functional Diversity and Electron Donor Dependence of Microbial Populations Capable of U(VI) Reduction in Radionuclide-Contaminated Subsurface Sediments▿

    PubMed Central

    Akob, Denise M.; Mills, Heath J.; Gihring, Thomas M.; Kerkhof, Lee; Stucki, Joseph W.; Anastácio, Alexandre S.; Chin, Kuk-Jeong; Küsel, Kirsten; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Watson, David B.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2008-01-01

    In order to elucidate the potential mechanisms of U(VI) reduction for the optimization of bioremediation strategies, the structure-function relationships of microbial communities were investigated in microcosms of subsurface materials cocontaminated with radionuclides and nitrate. A polyphasic approach was used to assess the functional diversity of microbial populations likely to catalyze electron flow under conditions proposed for in situ uranium bioremediation. The addition of ethanol and glucose as supplemental electron donors stimulated microbial nitrate and Fe(III) reduction as the predominant terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs). U(VI), Fe(III), and sulfate reduction overlapped in the glucose treatment, whereas U(VI) reduction was concurrent with sulfate reduction but preceded Fe(III) reduction in the ethanol treatments. Phyllosilicate clays were shown to be the major source of Fe(III) for microbial respiration by using variable-temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy. Nitrate- and Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) were abundant throughout the shifts in TEAPs observed in biostimulated microcosms and were affiliated with the genera Geobacter, Tolumonas, Clostridium, Arthrobacter, Dechloromonas, and Pseudomonas. Up to two orders of magnitude higher counts of FeRB and enhanced U(VI) removal were observed in ethanol-amended treatments compared to the results in glucose-amended treatments. Quantification of citrate synthase (gltA) levels demonstrated a stimulation of Geobacteraceae activity during metal reduction in carbon-amended microcosms, with the highest expression observed in the glucose treatment. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the active FeRB share high sequence identity with Geobacteraceae members cultivated from contaminated subsurface environments. Our results show that the functional diversity of populations capable of U(VI) reduction is dependent upon the choice of electron donor. PMID:18378664

  10. A Continuous Flow Column Study of the Anaerobic Transformation of a CAH Mixture of Tetrachloroethene and Carbon Tetrachloride Using Formate as an Electron Donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semprini, L.; Azizian, M. F.; Kim, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Many groundwater sites are contaminated with mixtures of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) that represent a challenge when biological remediation processes are being considered. This is especially challenging when high concentrations of CAHs are present.Trichloromethane (CF), for example, has been observed to inhibit and potentially exert toxicity on reductive dehalogenation of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE). Results will be presented from a continuous flow column study where the simultaneous transformation of PCE and carbon tetrachloride (CT) was achieved. The column was packed with a quartz sand and bioaugmented with the Evanite Culture (EV) that is capable of transforming PCE to ethene. The column was fed a synthetic groundwater that was amended with PCE to achieve an influent concentration near its solubility limit (0.10 mM) and formate (1.5 mM) that reacts to produce hydrogen as the ultimate electron donor. The column was operated for over 1600 days prior to the addition of CT. During this period PCE was transformed mainly to vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene (ETH) and minor amounts of cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and TCE. The transformation extent achieved based on the column effluent concentrations ranged from about 50% ETH, 30% VC, and 20 cis-DCE up to 80% ETH and 20% VC. When the column was fed sulfate, it was completely transformed via sulfate reduction. Ferrous iron production from ferric iron reduction was observed early in the study. Acetate was also formed as a result of homoacetogenesis from hydrogen utilization. CT addition (0.015 mM) was started at 1600 days while PCE addition was continued. During the first 25 days of CT addition, CT concentrations gradually increased to 50% of the injection concentration and chloromethane (CM) and CF were observed as transformation products. CT concentrations then decreased with over 98% transformation achieved.CM was removed to below the detection limit and CF concentration decreases to

  11. Chemical probes for water-oxidation: synthetic manganese complexes in photoactivation of water splitting complex and as exogenous electron donors to photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Bernát, G; Padhye, S; Barta, C; Kovács, L; Demeter, S

    2001-01-01

    Photoactivation of the water splitting enzyme was performed with 13 different synthetic manganese complexes and characterized by oxygen evolution yield, thermoluminescence and chlorophyll fluorescence induction kinetics. The efficiency of different compounds in photoactivation correlated with the rate of linear electron transport in the presence of these compounds. The organic ligands, associated with the manganese ions, do not prevent the photoactivation of the water splitting complex (WOC). Photoactivation with different manganese complexes depended on the number of the Mn-ions in the complex, their valence state and the nature of their donor atoms. The most efficient restorations were achieved by using tetrameric complexes having a dimer+dimer structure, complexes containing Mn(II) ions, and having 4-6 oxygen and 0-2 nitrogen atoms as donor atoms. Further, the effectiveness of photoactivation depended largely on the structure of the complexes. Our data support the notion that WOC in intact thylakoids requires the cooperation and well determined arrangement of all four manganese ions, and argue against the hypothesis that two manganese ions are sufficient for water splitting. Photoactivation by some complexes led to anomalous flash-oxygen patterns, which are explained by a modified/perturbed water splitting complex.

  12. Electronic and optical properties of novel carbazole-based donor-acceptor compounds for applications in blue-emitting organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legaspi, Christian M.; Stubbs, Regan E.; Yaron, David J.; Peteanu, Linda A.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Kemboi, Abraham; Picker, Jesse; Fossum, Eric

    2015-08-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have received a significant attention over the past decade due to their energy-saving potential. We have recently synthesized two novel carbazole-based donor-acceptor compounds and analyzed their optical properties to determine their suitability for use as blue emitters in OLEDs. These compounds show remarkable photo-stability and high quantum yields in the blue region of the spectrum. In addition, they have highly solvatochromic emission. In non-polar solvents, bright, blue-shifted (λmax ≈ 398 nm), and highly structured emission is seen. With increasing solvent dielectric constant, the emission becomes weaker, red-shifted (λmax ≈ 507 nm), and broad. We aim to determine the underlying cause of these changes. Electronic structure calculations indicate the presence of multiple excited states with comparable oscillator strength. These states are of interest because there are several with charge-transfer (CT) character, and others centered on the donor moiety. We theorize that CT states play a role in the observed changes in emission lineshape and may promote charge mobility for electrofluorescence in OLEDs. In the future, we plan to use Stark spectroscopy to analyze the polarity of excited states and transient absorption spectroscopy to observe the dynamics in the excited state.

  13. Electronic and Spatial Structures of Water-Soluble Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes with Thiol-Containing Ligands Underlying Their Ability to Act as Nitric Oxide and Nitrosonium Ion Donors

    PubMed Central

    Vanin, Anatoly F.; Burbaev, Dosymzhan Sh.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of mononuclear dinitrosyl iron commplexes (M-DNICs) with thiolate ligands to act as NO donors and to trigger S-nitrosation of thiols can be explain only in the paradigm of the model of the [Fe+(NO+)2] core ({Fe(NO)2}7 according to the Enemark-Feltham classification). Similarly, the {(RS−)2Fe+(NO+)2}+ structure describing the distribution of unpaired electron density in M-DNIC corresponds to the low-spin (S = 1/2) state with a d7 electron configuration of the iron atom and predominant localization of the unpaired electron on MO(dz2) and the square planar structure of M-DNIC. On the other side, the formation of molecular orbitals of M-DNIC including orbitals of the iron atom, thiolate and nitrosyl ligands results in a transfer of electron density from sulfur atoms to the iron atom and nitrosyl ligands. Under these conditions, the positive charge on the nitrosyl ligands diminishes appreciably, the interaction of the ligands with hydroxyl ions or with thiols slows down and the hydrolysis of nitrosyl ligands and the S-nitrosating effect of the latter are not manifested. Most probably, the S-nitrosating effect of nitrosyl ligands is a result of weak binding of thiolate ligands to the iron atom under conditions favoring destabilization of M-DNIC. PMID:22505886

  14. Effects of acceptor-donor complexes on electronic structure properties in co-doped TiO2: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Cai, L. L.; Yuan, X. B.; Hu, G. C.; Ren, J. F.

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the doping effects induced by impurity complexes on the electronic structures of anatase TiO2 based on the density functional theory. Mono-doping and co-doping effects are discussed separately. The results show that the impurity doping can make the band-edges shift. The induced defect levels in the band gaps by impurity doping reduce the band gap predominantly. The compensated acceptor-donor pairs in the co-doped TiO2 will improve the photoelectrochemical activity. From the calculations, it is also found that (S+Zr)-co-doped TiO2 has the ideal band gap and band edge, at the same time, the binding energy is higher than other systems, so (S+Zr)-co-doping in TiO2 is more promise in photoelectrochemical experiments.

  15. (Dibenzoylmethanato)boron difluoride derivatives containing triphenylamine moieties: a new type of electron-donor/π-acceptor system for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yosuke; Yisilamu, Yilihamu; Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Tomura, Masaaki; Funaki, Takashi; Sugihara, Hideki; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2014-10-01

    (Dibenzoylmethanato)boron difluoride derivatives containing triphenylamine moieties were synthesized as a new type of electron-donor/π-acceptor system. These new compounds exhibited long-wavelength absorptions in the UV/Vis spectra, and reversible oxidation and reduction waves in cyclic voltammetry experiments. Their amphoteric redox properties are based on their resonance hybrid forms, in which a positive charge is delocalized on the triphenylamine moieties and a negative charge is localized on the boron atoms. Molecular orbital (MO) calculations indicate that their HOMO and LUMO energies vary with the number of phenylene rings connected to the difluoroboron-chelating ring. This is useful for optimizing the HOMO and LUMO levels to an iodine redox (I(-)/I3(-)) potential and a titanium dioxide conduction band, respectively. Dye-sensitized solar cells fabricated by using these compounds as dye sensitizers exhibited solar-to-electric power conversion efficiencies of 2.7-4.4 % under AM 1.5 solar light.

  16. Long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated organic donor-acceptor layers.

    PubMed

    Nakanotani, Hajime; Furukawa, Taro; Morimoto, Kei; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-02-01

    Understanding exciton behavior in organic semiconductor molecules is crucial for the development of organic semiconductor-based excitonic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells, and the tightly bound electron-hole pair forming an exciton is normally assumed to be localized on an organic semiconducting molecule. We report the observation of long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules across a 10-nanometers-thick spacer layer. We found that the exciton energy can be tuned over 100 megaelectron volts and the fraction of delayed fluorescence can be increased by adjusting the spacer-layer thickness. Furthermore, increasing the spacer-layer thickness produced an organic light-emitting diode with an electroluminescence efficiency nearly eight times higher than that of a device without a spacer layer. Our results demonstrate the first example of a long-range coupled charge-transfer state between electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules in a working device.

  17. Long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated organic donor-acceptor layers

    PubMed Central

    Nakanotani, Hajime; Furukawa, Taro; Morimoto, Kei; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-01-01

    Understanding exciton behavior in organic semiconductor molecules is crucial for the development of organic semiconductor-based excitonic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells, and the tightly bound electron-hole pair forming an exciton is normally assumed to be localized on an organic semiconducting molecule. We report the observation of long-range coupling of electron-hole pairs in spatially separated electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules across a 10-nanometers-thick spacer layer. We found that the exciton energy can be tuned over 100 megaelectron volts and the fraction of delayed fluorescence can be increased by adjusting the spacer-layer thickness. Furthermore, increasing the spacer-layer thickness produced an organic light-emitting diode with an electroluminescence efficiency nearly eight times higher than that of a device without a spacer layer. Our results demonstrate the first example of a long-range coupled charge-transfer state between electron-donating and electron-accepting molecules in a working device. PMID:26933691

  18. Simultaneous chromate reduction and azo dye decolourization by Brevibacterium casei: azo dye as electron donor for chromate reduction.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tsz Wai; Cai, Qinhong; Wong, Chong-Kim; Chow, Alex T; Wong, Po-Keung

    2010-10-15

    Chromate [Cr(VI)] and azo dyes are common pollutants which may co-exist in some industrial effluents. Hence studies of biological treatment of industrial wastewater should include investigation of the co-removal of these two pollutants. Brevibacterium casei, which can reduce Cr(VI) in the presence of the azo dye Acid Orange 7 (AO7) under nutrient-limiting condition, was isolated from a sewage sludge sample of a dyeing factory. Response surface methodology, which is commonly used to optimize growth conditions for food microorganisms to maximize product(s) yield, was used to determine the optimal conditions for chromate reduction and dye decolourization by B. casei. The optimal conditions were 0.24 g/L glucose, 3.0 g/L (NH(4))(2)SO(4) and 0.2 g/L peptone at pH 7 and 35 degrees C. The predicted maximum chromate reduction efficiencies and dye decolourization were 83.4+/-0.6 and 40.7+/-1.7%, respectively. A new mechanism was proposed for chromate reduction coupling with AO7 decolourization by B. casei. Under nutrient-limiting condition, AO7 was used as an e(-) donor by the reduction enzyme(s) of B. casei for the reduction of Cr(VI). The resulted Cr(III) then complexed with the oxidized AO7 to form a purple coloured intermediate.

  19. Copolymer semiconductors comprising thiazolothiazole or benzobisthiazole, or benzobisoxazole electron acceptor subunits, and electron donor subunits, and their uses in transistors and solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Jenekhe, Samson A; Subramaniyan, Selvam; Ahmed, Eilaf; Xin, Hao; Kim, Felix Sunjoo

    2014-10-28

    The inventions disclosed, described, and/or claimed herein relate to copolymers comprising copolymers comprising electron accepting A subunits that comprise thiazolothiazole, benzobisthiazole, or benzobisoxazoles rings, and electron donating subunits that comprise certain heterocyclic groups. The copolymers are useful for manufacturing organic electronic devices, including transistors and solar cells. The invention also relates to certain synthetic precursors of the copolymers. Methods for making the copolymers and the derivative electronic devices are also described.

  20. Biogeochemical Modeling of In Situ U(VI) Reduction and Immobilization with Emulsified Vegetable Oil as the Electron Donor at a Field Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, G.; Parker, J.; Wu, W.; Schadt, C. W.; Watson, D. B.; Brooks, S. C.; Orifrc Team

    2011-12-01

    A comprehensive biogeochemical model was developed to quantitatively describe the coupled hydrologic, geochemical and microbiological processes that occurred following injection of emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) as the electron donor to immobilize U(VI) at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge site (ORIFRC) in Tennessee. The model couples the degradation of EVO, production and oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), glycerol, hydrogen and acetate, reduction of nitrate, manganese, ferrous iron, sulfate and uranium, and methanoganesis with growth of multiple microbial groups. The model describes the evolution of geochemistry and microbial populations not only in the aqueous phase as typically observed, but also in the mineral phase and therefore enables us to evaluate the applicability of rates from the literature for field scale assessment, estimate the retention and degradation rates of EVO and LCFA, and assess the influence of the coupled processes on fate and transport of U(VI). Our results suggested that syntrophic bacteria or metal reducers might catalyze LCFA oxidation in the downstream locations when sulfate was consumed, and competition between methanogens and others for electron donors and slow growth of methanogen might contribute to the sustained reducing condition. Among the large amount of hydrologic, geochemical and microbiological parameter values, the initial biomass, and the interactions (e.g., inhibition) of the microbial functional groups, and the rate and extent of Mn and Fe oxide reduction appear as the major sources of uncertainty. Our model provides a platform to conduct numerical experiments to study these interactions, and could be useful for further iterative experimental and modeling investigations into the bioreductive immobiliztion of radionuclide and metal contaminants in the subsurface.

  1. Theoretical characterization of photoinduced electron transfer in rigidly linked donor-acceptor molecules: the fragment charge difference and the generalized Mulliken-Hush schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sheng-Jui; Chen, Hung-Cheng; You, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Kuan-Lin; Chow, Tahsin J.; Chen, I.-Chia; Hsu, Chao-Ping

    2010-10-01

    We calculate the electron transfer (ET) rates for a series of heptacyclo[6.6.0.02,6.03,13.014,11.05,9.010,14]-tetradecane (HCTD) linked donor-acceptor molecules. The electronic coupling factor was calculated by the fragment charge difference (FCD) [19] and the generalized Mulliken-Hush (GMH) schemes [20]. We found that the FCD is less prone to problems commonly seen in the GMH scheme, especially when the coupling values are small. For a 3-state case where the charge transfer (CT) state is coupled with two different locally excited (LE) states, we tested with the 3-state approach for the GMH scheme [30], and found that it works well with the FCD scheme. A simplified direct diagonalization based on Rust's 3-state scheme was also proposed and tested. This simplified scheme does not require a manual assignment of the states, and it yields coupling values that are largely similar to those from the full Rust's approach. The overall electron transfer (ET) coupling rates were also calculated.

  2. Evidence on Anaerobic Methane Oxidation (AOM) in a boreal cultivated peatland with natural and added electron acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorodnikov, Maxim; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Martikainen, Pertti; Dörsch, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is a process of methane (CH4) consumption under anoxic conditions driven by microorganisms, which oxidize CH4 with various alternate electron acceptors (AEA): sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, metals-(Fe, Mn, Cu), organic compounds. AOM is common in marine ecosystems, where microbial sulfate reduction (SR) consumes most of the CH4 produced in sediments. Despite the global significance of AOM, the exact mechanisms and relevance of the process in terrestrial ecosystems are almost unknown. In the current study the occurrence of AOM was tested for two organic soil horizons (30 and 40 cm depth) and one mineral sub-soil (sand, 50 cm depth) of a cultivated boreal peatland (Linnansuo, Eastern Finland, energy crop Phalaris arundinacea - reed canarygrass) under controlled conditions with the addition of 13C-labeled CH4 and two common AEAs - SO4-2 and Fe+3. Concentrations of CH4, CO2 and O2 were continuously measured during 10 days of incubation and CO2 was sampled periodically under anaerobic conditions for stable 13C analysis. Oxygen dynamics revealed negligible O2 contamination during incubation and its trace amounts (0.05-0.8% from the atmospheric) were accounted in the net CH4 uptake. Application of 13C-enriched CH4 (4.9 atom%) allowed to track the label in CO2 as the end-product of AOM. The highest 13CO2 enrichment (up to 60‰) was observed in mineral sub-soil, however AOM was quantitatively more pronounced in the upper 30 cm horizon (2.1 vs. 0.2 μg CO2 g soil DW-1 in the 50 cm sub-soil). The highest AOM rate of 8.9 ng CO2 g soil DW-1 h-1 was estimated for the control treatment where no AEAs were added indicating sufficient amount of naturally available AEAs, likely organic compounds. This rate was 50 times more intensive (on the C basis) than the CH4 production potential of the same soil. In contrast, external AEAs decreased AOM rates but added Fe+3 stimulated decomposition of native SOM (as seen from the most depleted 13CO2 signatures

  3. New acceptor-bridge-donor strategy for enhancing NLO response with long-range excess electron transfer from the NH2...M/M3O donor (M = Li, Na, K) to inside the electron hole cage C20F19 acceptor through the unusual σ chain bridge (CH2)4.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Zhou, Zhong-Jun; Wang, Jia-Jun; Li, Ying; Wu, Di; Chen, Wei; Li, Zhi-Ru; Sun, Chia-Chung

    2013-04-01

    Using the strong electron hole cage C20F19 acceptor, the NH2...M/M3O (M = Li, Na, and K) complicated donors with excess electron, and the unusual σ chain (CH2)4 bridge, we construct a new kind of electride molecular salt e(-)@C20F19-(CH2)4-NH2...M(+)/M3O(+) (M = Li, Na, and K) with excess electron anion inside the hole cage (to be encapsulated excess electron-hole pair) serving as a new A-B-D strategy for enhancing nonlinear optical (NLO) response. An interesting push-pull mechanism of excess electron generation and its long-range transfer is exhibited. The excess electron is pushed out from the (super)alkali atom M/M3O by the lone pair of NH2 in the donor and further pulled inside the hole cage C20F19 acceptor through the efficient long σ chain (CH2)4 bridge. Owing to the long-range electron transfer, the new designed electride molecular salts with the excess electron-hole pair exhibit large NLO response. For the e(-)@C20F19-(CH2)4-NH2...Na(+), its large first hyperpolarizability (β0) reaches up to 9.5 × 10(6) au, which is about 2.4 × 10(4) times the 400 au for the relative e(-)@C20F20...Na(+) without the extended chain (CH2)4-NH2. It is shown that the new strategy is considerably efficient in enhancing the NLO response for the salts. In addition, the effects of different bridges and alkali atomic number on β0 are also exhibited. Further, three modulating factors are found for enhancing NLO response. They are the σ chain bridge, bridge-end group with lone pair, and (super)alkali atom. The new knowledge may be significant for designing new NLO materials and electronic devices with electrons inside the cages. They may also be the basis of establishing potential organic chemistry with electron-hole pair.

  4. Photoinduced electron donor/acceptor processes in colloidal II-VI semiconductor quantum dots and nitroxide free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Poulami

    Electron transfer (ET) processes are one of the most researched topics for applications ranging from energy conversion to catalysis. An exciting variation is utilizing colloidal semiconductor nanostructures to explore such processes. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are emerging as a novel class of light harvesting, emitting and charge-separation materials for applications such as solar energy conversion. Detailed knowledge of the quantitative dissociation of the photogenerated excitons and the interfacial charge- (electron/hole) transfer is essential for optimization of the overall efficiency of many such applications. Organic free radicals are the attractive counterparts for studying ET to/from QDs because these undergo single-electron transfer steps in reversible fashion. Nitroxides are an exciting class of stable organic free radicals, which have recently been demonstrated to be efficient as redox mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells, making them even more interesting for the aforementioned studies. This dissertation investigates the interaction between nitroxide free radicals TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl), 4-amino-TEMPO (4-amino- 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) and II-VI semiconductor (CdSe and CdTe) QDs. The nature of interaction in these hybrids has been examined through ground-state UV-Vis absorbance, steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, transient absorbance, upconversion photoluminescence spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The detailed analysis of the PL quenching indicates that the intrinsic charge transfer is ultrafast however, the overall quenching is still limited by the lower binding capacities and slower diffusion related kinetics. Careful analysis of the time resolved PL decay kinetics reveal that the decay rate constants are distributed and that the trap states are involved in the overall quenching process. The ultrafast hole transfer from CdSe QDs to 4-Amino TEMPO observed

  5. Electron Spin Density on the N-Donor Atoms of Cu(II)-(Bis)oxamidato Complexes As Probed by a Pulse ELDOR Detected NMR.

    PubMed

    Aliabadi, Azar; Zaripov, Ruslan; Salikhov, Kev; Voronkova, Violeta; Vavilova, Evgeniya; Abdulmalic, Mohammad A; Rüffer, Tobias; Büchner, Bernd; Kataev, Vladislav

    2015-10-29

    We have applied the pulse ELDOR detected NMR (EDNMR) technique to determine the tensors of the transferred Cu (S = 1/2) - (14)N (I = 1) hyperfine (HF) interaction in single crystals of diamagnetically diluted mononuclear o-phenylenebis(N(R)-oxamide) complexes of [(n)Bu4N]2[Cu(opboR2)] (R = Et 1, (n)Pr 2) (1%) in a host lattice of [(n)Bu4N]2[Ni(opboR2)] (R = Et 3, (n)Pr 4) (99%) (1@3 and 2@4)). To facilitate the analysis of our EDNMR data and to analyze possible manifestations of the nuclear quadrupole interaction in the EDNMR spectra, we have treated a model electron-nuclear system of the coupled S = 1/2 and I = 1 spins using the spin density matrix formalism. It appears that this interaction yields a peculiar asymmetry of the EDMR spectra that manifests not only in the shift of the positions of the EDNMR lines that correspond to the forbidden EPR transitions, as expected, but also in the intensities of the EDNMR lines. The symmetric shape of the experimental spectra suggests the conclusion that, in the studied complexes, the quadrupole interaction is negligible. This has simplified the analysis of the spectra. The HF tensors of all four N donor atoms could be accurately determined. On the basis of the HF tensors, an estimate of the spin density transferred from the central paramagnetic Cu(II) ion to the N donor atoms reveals its unequal distribution. We discuss possible implications of our estimates for the magnetic exchange paths and interaction strengths in respective trinuclear complexes [Cu3(opboR2) (pmdta)2](NO3)2 (R = Et 6, (n)Pr 7).

  6. Influence of endogenous and exogenous electron donors and trichloroethylene oxidation toxicity on trichloroethylene oxidation by methanotrophic cultures from a groundwater aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, S.M.; Grbic-Galic, D. )

    1991-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE)-transforming aquifer methanotrophs were evaluated for the influence of TCE oxidation toxicity and the effect of reductant availability on TCE transformation rates during methane starvation. TCE oxidation at relatively low (6 mg liter{sup {minus}1}) TCE concentrations significantly reduced subsequent methane utilization in mixed and pure cultures tested and reduced the number of viable cells in the pure culture Methylomonas sp. strain MM2 by an order of magnitude. Perchloroethylene, tested at the same concentration, had no effect on the cultures. Neither the TCE itself nor the aqueous intermediates were responsible for the toxic effect, and it is suggested that TCE oxidation toxicity may have resulted from reactive intermediates that attacked cellular macromolecules. During starvation, all methanotrophs tested exhibited a decline in TCE transformation rates, and this decline followed exponential decay. Formate, provided as an exogenous electron donor, increased TCE transformation rates in Methylomonas sp. strain MM2, but not in mixed culture MM1 or unidentified isolate, CSC-1. Mixed culture MM2 did not transform TCE after 15 h of starvation, but mixed cultures MM1 and MM3 did. The methanotrophs in mixed cultures MM1 and MM3, and the unidentified isolate CSC-1 that was isolated from mixed culture MM1 contained lipid inclusions, whereas the methanotrophs of mixed culture MM2 and Methylomonas sp. strain MM2 did not. It is proposed that lipid storage granules serve as an endogenous source of electrons for TCE oxidation during methane starvation.

  7. Donor states in inverse opals

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-21

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  8. Donor states in inverse opals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahan, G. D.

    2014-09-01

    We calculate the binding energy of an electron bound to a donor in a semiconductor inverse opal. Inverse opals have two kinds of cavities, which we call octahedral and tetrahedral, according to their group symmetry. We put the donor in the center of each of these two cavities and obtain the binding energy. The binding energies become very large when the inverse opal is made from templates with small spheres. For spheres less than 50 nm in diameter, the donor binding can increase to several times its unconfined value. Then electrons become tightly bound to the donor and are unlikely to be thermally activated to the semiconductor conduction band. This conclusion suggests that inverse opals will be poor conductors.

  9. Synthesis, and spectroscopic studies of charge transfer complex of 1,2-dimethylimidazole as an electron donor with π-acceptor 2,4-dinitro-1-naphthol in different polar solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyan, Lal; Khan, Ishaat M.; Ahmad, Afaq

    2015-07-01

    The charge transfer (CT) complex of 1,2-dimethylimidazole (DMI) as an electron donor with π acceptor 2,4-dinitro-1-naphthol (DNN) has been studied spectrophotometrically in different solvents like chloroform, acetonitrile, methanol, methylene chloride, etc. at room temperature. The CT complex which is formed through the transfer of lone pair electrons from DMI to DNN exhibits well resolved CT bands and the regions of these bands were remarkably different from those of the donor and acceptor. The stoichiometry of the CT complex was found to be 1:1 by a straight-line method between donor and acceptor with maximum absorption bands. The novel CT complex has been characterized by FTIR, TGA-DTA, powder XRD, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques. The Benesi-Hildebrand equation has been used to determine the formation constant (KCT), molar extinction coefficient (εCT), standard gibbs free energy (ΔG°) and other physical parameters of the CT complex. The formation constant recorded higher values and molar extinction coefficient recorded lower values in chloroform compared with methylene chloride, methanol and acetonitrile, confirming the strong interaction between the molecular orbital's of donor and acceptor in the ground state in less polar solvent. This CT complex has been studied by absorption spectra of donor 1,2-dimethylimidazole (DMI) and acceptor 2,4-dinitro-1-naphthol (DNN) by using the spectrophotometric technique in various solvents at room temperature.

  10. Electrode as sole electrons donor for enhancing decolorization of azo dye by an isolated Pseudomonas sp. WYZ-2.

    PubMed

    Wang, You-zhao; Wang, Ai-jie; Zhou, Ai-juan; Liu, Wen-zong; Huang, Li-ping; Xu, Mei-ying; Tao, Hu-chun

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. WYZ-2 was isolated from a biocathode which accelerating azo dye decolorization. When the electrode was polarized at -0.8 V (vs. SCE), WYZ-2 could exist on electrode, because the current of working electrode stabilized at -0.35 mA from -0.13 mA after inoculation. Moreover, cyclic voltammetry scanned an unidentified redox-active molecule which involved in the electron charge transfer potentially. On azo dye decolorization experiments by WYZ-2 modified electrode, electrochemical tests also indicated that the catalytic ability of WYZ-2 modified electrode was improved because charge transfer resistance decreased to 255 Ω from 720 Ω, azo dye reduction potential was shifted to -0.78 V from -0.89 V, and the maximum decolorization efficiency of azo dye was increased to 93.4% from 53.2%, comparing with unmodified electrode. Although numerous studies on azo dye decolorization employed biological agents, electrochemical activity bacteria accelerate the decolorization process using electrode as sole electron source has seldom been reported.

  11. Electrode as sole electrons donor for enhancing decolorization of azo dye by an isolated Pseudomonas sp. WYZ-2.

    PubMed

    Wang, You-zhao; Wang, Ai-jie; Zhou, Ai-juan; Liu, Wen-zong; Huang, Li-ping; Xu, Mei-ying; Tao, Hu-chun

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. WYZ-2 was isolated from a biocathode which accelerating azo dye decolorization. When the electrode was polarized at -0.8 V (vs. SCE), WYZ-2 could exist on electrode, because the current of working electrode stabilized at -0.35 mA from -0.13 mA after inoculation. Moreover, cyclic voltammetry scanned an unidentified redox-active molecule which involved in the electron charge transfer potentially. On azo dye decolorization experiments by WYZ-2 modified electrode, electrochemical tests also indicated that the catalytic ability of WYZ-2 modified electrode was improved because charge transfer resistance decreased to 255 Ω from 720 Ω, azo dye reduction potential was shifted to -0.78 V from -0.89 V, and the maximum decolorization efficiency of azo dye was increased to 93.4% from 53.2%, comparing with unmodified electrode. Although numerous studies on azo dye decolorization employed biological agents, electrochemical activity bacteria accelerate the decolorization process using electrode as sole electron source has seldom been reported. PMID:24314602

  12. An electronic spectroscopic study of micellisation of surfactants and solvation of homomicelles formed by cationic or anionic surfactants using a solvatochromic electron donor acceptor dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedia, Niraja; Sarkar, Amrita; Purkayastha, Pradipta; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2014-10-01

    Solvatochromic absorption and fluorescence bands of a donor-acceptor dye have been utilised for following the micellisation and for probing the polarity of the aqueous homomicellar phase provided separately by cationic (cetyltrimethylammonimum bromide, CTAB and dodecyltrimethylammonimum bromide, DTAB) and anionic (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS) surfactant. Results indicate that for a low concentration of surfactant (below cmc) the dye forms a dimer in aqueous solution. In a micellar media, however, the dye exists as monomers. A strong dye-micelle interaction, as indicated by the shift of the solvatochromic intramolecular charge transfer band of the dye, has also been indicated. The absorption and fluorescence parameters of the dye have been utilised for studying the onset of aggregation of the surfactants. An iterative procedure has been developed for the estimation of cmc and the distribution coefficient (KD) of the dye between the aqueous and the micellar phase. All the parameters provide convergent values of cmc. A high value of KD indicates that the dye exists predominantly in the micellar phase. The solvatochromic parameters characterising the dipolarity-polarisability (π*) and H-bond donation ability (α) of modes of solvation interaction in different micellar media have been estimated. The dye is found to distribute itself between two regions in a catanionic vesicle formed by surfactants SDS and DTAB, one being relatively polar than other. The distribution coefficients have been found out using the fluorescence data.

  13. An electronic spectroscopic study of micellisation of surfactants and solvation of homomicelles formed by cationic or anionic surfactants using a solvatochromic electron donor acceptor dye.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Niraja; Sarkar, Amrita; Purkayastha, Pradipta; Bagchi, Sanjib

    2014-10-15

    Solvatochromic absorption and fluorescence bands of a donor-acceptor dye have been utilised for following the micellisation and for probing the polarity of the aqueous homomicellar phase provided separately by cationic (cetyltrimethylammonimum bromide, CTAB and dodecyltrimethylammonimum bromide, DTAB) and anionic (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS) surfactant. Results indicate that for a low concentration of surfactant (below cmc) the dye forms a dimer in aqueous solution. In a micellar media, however, the dye exists as monomers. A strong dye-micelle interaction, as indicated by the shift of the solvatochromic intramolecular charge transfer band of the dye, has also been indicated. The absorption and fluorescence parameters of the dye have been utilised for studying the onset of aggregation of the surfactants. An iterative procedure has been developed for the estimation of cmc and the distribution coefficient (KD) of the dye between the aqueous and the micellar phase. All the parameters provide convergent values of cmc. A high value of KD indicates that the dye exists predominantly in the micellar phase. The solvatochromic parameters characterising the dipolarity-polarisability (π(*)) and H-bond donation ability (α) of modes of solvation interaction in different micellar media have been estimated. The dye is found to distribute itself between two regions in a catanionic vesicle formed by surfactants SDS and DTAB, one being relatively polar than other. The distribution coefficients have been found out using the fluorescence data.

  14. Electron donor properties of claus catalysts--1. Influence of NaOH on the catalytic activity of silica gel

    SciTech Connect

    Dudzik, Z.; George, Z.M.

    1980-05-01

    ESR spectroscopy showed that SO/sub 2/ adsorbed on silica gel impregnated with NaOH formed the SO/sub 2//sup -/ anion radical. With increasing NaOH concentration, the SO/sub 2/ adsorption and the activity for the reaction of H/sub 2/S with SO/sub 2/ (Claus reaction) went through a maximum at 1.0-1.4% NaOH. The SO/sub 2/ anion radical apparently formed by electron transfer from the catalyst surface and was a reaction intermediate which reacted rapidly with H/sub 2/S. The NaOH catalyst had similar stability and activity as commercial alumina catalyst in five-day tests under Claus conditions.

  15. Dynamics of the cascade capture of electrons by charged donors in GaAs and InP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Gavrilenko, L. V.

    2016-08-01

    The times for the cascade capture of an electron by a charged impurity have been calculated for pulsed and stationary excitations of impurity photoconductivity in GaAs and InP. The characteristic capture times under pulsed and continuous excitations are shown to differ noticeably both from each other and from the value given by the Abakumov-Perel-Yassievich formula for a charged impurity concentration greater than 1010 cm-3. The cause of this difference has been established. The Abakumov-Perel-Yassievich formula for the cascade capture cross section in the case of stationary excitation has been generalized. The dependences of the cascade capture rate on the charged impurity concentration in GaAs and InP have been found for three temperatures in the case of pulsed excitation.

  16. Ferrocene-dithiolene hybrids: control of strong donor-acceptor electronic communication to reverse the charge transfer direction.

    PubMed

    Kusamoto, Tetsuro; Takada, Kenji; Sakamoto, Ryota; Kume, Shoko; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2012-11-19

    We prepared a novel class of ferrocene-dithiolene hybrid molecules, FcS4dt(Me)2 and FcS4dt[Pt((t)Bu2bpy)] (where FcS4dt indicates 2-(1,3-dithia[3]ferrocenophane-2-ylidene)-1,3-dithiole-4,5-dithiolate and (t)Bu2bpy indicates 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine), in which the ferrocene moiety was bound to the planar conjugated dithiolene skeleton via two sulfur atoms such that the cyclopentadienyl rings were perpendicular to the dithiolene backbone. The physical properties and electronic structures of the complexes and their oxidized species [FcS4dt(Me)2](•+) and [FcS4dt[Pt((t)Bu2bpy)

  17. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment.

    PubMed

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J Timothy; Champion, Paul M

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical "gating" distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working near

  18. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: Comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment

    SciTech Connect

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J. Timothy; Champion, Paul M.

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical “gating” distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working

  19. Deep proton tunneling in the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic limits: comparison of the quantum and classical treatment of donor-acceptor motion in a protein environment.

    PubMed

    Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Salna, Bridget; Sage, J Timothy; Champion, Paul M

    2015-03-21

    Analytical models describing the temperature dependence of the deep tunneling rate, useful for proton, hydrogen, or hydride transfer in proteins, are developed and compared. Electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic expressions are presented where the donor-acceptor (D-A) motion is treated either as a quantized vibration or as a classical "gating" distribution. We stress the importance of fitting experimental data on an absolute scale in the electronically adiabatic limit, which normally applies to these reactions, and find that vibrationally enhanced deep tunneling takes place on sub-ns timescales at room temperature for typical H-bonding distances. As noted previously, a small room temperature kinetic isotope effect (KIE) does not eliminate deep tunneling as a major transport channel. The quantum approach focuses on the vibrational sub-space composed of the D-A and hydrogen atom motions, where hydrogen bonding and protein restoring forces quantize the D-A vibration. A Duschinsky rotation is mandated between the normal modes of the reactant and product states and the rotation angle depends on the tunneling particle mass. This tunnel-mass dependent rotation contributes substantially to the KIE and its temperature dependence. The effect of the Duschinsky rotation is solved exactly to find the rate in the electronically non-adiabatic limit and compared to the Born-Oppenheimer (B-O) approximation approach. The B-O approximation is employed to find the rate in the electronically adiabatic limit, where we explore both harmonic and quartic double-well potentials for the hydrogen atom bound states. Both the electronically adiabatic and non-adiabatic rates are found to diverge at high temperature unless the proton coupling includes the often neglected quadratic term in the D-A displacement from equilibrium. A new expression is presented for the electronically adiabatic tunnel rate in the classical limit for D-A motion that should be useful to experimentalists working near

  20. Electronic structure, molecular orientation, charge transfer dynamics and solar cells performance in donor/acceptor copolymers and fullerene: Experimental and theoretical approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Basabe, Y.; Borges, B. G. A. L.; Rocco, M. L. M. E-mail: luiza@iq.ufrj.br; Marchiori, C. F. N.; Yamamoto, N. A. D.; Koehler, M.; Roman, L. S. E-mail: luiza@iq.ufrj.br; Macedo, A. G.

    2014-04-07

    By combining experimental and theoretical approaches, the electronic structure, molecular orientation, charge transfer dynamics and solar cell performance in donor/acceptor copolymer poly[2,7-(9,9-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-dibenzosilole)-alt-4,7-bis(thiophen-2-yl) benzo-2,1,3-thiadiazole] (PSiF-DBT) films and blended with 6,6.-phenyl-C 61-butyric acid methyl ester (PSiF-DBT:PCBM) were investigated. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical PSiF-DBT UV-Vis absorption spectrum is observed and the main molecular orbitals contributing to the spectrum were determined using DFT single point calculations. Non-coplanar configuration was determined by geometric optimization calculation in isolated PSiF-DBT pentamer and corroborated by angular variation of the sulphur 1s near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra. Edge-on and plane-on molecular orientations were obtained for thiophene and benzothiadiazole units, respectively. A power conversion efficiency up to 1.58%, open circuit voltage of 0.51 V, short circuit current of 8.71 mA/cm{sup 2} and a fill factor of 35% was obtained using blended PSiF-DBT:PCBM as active layer in a bulk heterojunction solar cell. Ultrafast electron dynamics in the low-femtosecond regime was evaluated by resonant Auger spectroscopy using the core-hole clock methodology around sulphur 1s absorption edge. Electron delocalization times for PSiF-DBT and PSiF-DBT:PCBM polymeric films were derived for selected excitation energies corresponding to the main transitions in the sulphur 1s NEXAFS spectra. The mixture of PSiF-DBT with PCBM improves the charge transfer process involving the π* molecular orbital of the thiophene units.

  1. Electronic structure, molecular orientation, charge transfer dynamics and solar cells performance in donor/acceptor copolymers and fullerene: Experimental and theoretical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Basabe, Y.; Marchiori, C. F. N.; Borges, B. G. A. L.; Yamamoto, N. A. D.; Macedo, A. G.; Koehler, M.; Roman, L. S.; Rocco, M. L. M.

    2014-04-01

    By combining experimental and theoretical approaches, the electronic structure, molecular orientation, charge transfer dynamics and solar cell performance in donor/acceptor copolymer poly[2,7-(9,9-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-dibenzosilole)-alt-4,7-bis(thiophen-2-yl)benzo-2,1,3-thiadiazole] (PSiF-DBT) films and blended with 6,6.-phenyl-C 61-butyric acid methyl ester (PSiF-DBT:PCBM) were investigated. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical PSiF-DBT UV-Vis absorption spectrum is observed and the main molecular orbitals contributing to the spectrum were determined using DFT single point calculations. Non-coplanar configuration was determined by geometric optimization calculation in isolated PSiF-DBT pentamer and corroborated by angular variation of the sulphur 1s near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra. Edge-on and plane-on molecular orientations were obtained for thiophene and benzothiadiazole units, respectively. A power conversion efficiency up to 1.58%, open circuit voltage of 0.51 V, short circuit current of 8.71 mA/cm2 and a fill factor of 35% was obtained using blended PSiF-DBT:PCBM as active layer in a bulk heterojunction solar cell. Ultrafast electron dynamics in the low-femtosecond regime was evaluated by resonant Auger spectroscopy using the core-hole clock methodology around sulphur 1s absorption edge. Electron delocalization times for PSiF-DBT and PSiF-DBT:PCBM polymeric films were derived for selected excitation energies corresponding to the main transitions in the sulphur 1s NEXAFS spectra. The mixture of PSiF-DBT with PCBM improves the charge transfer process involving the π* molecular orbital of the thiophene units.

  2. The interaction domain of the redox protein adrenodoxin is mandatory for binding of the electron acceptor CYP11A1, but is not required for binding of the electron donor adrenodoxin reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz, Achim; Hannemann, Frank; Mueller, Juergen J.; Heinemann, Udo; Bernhardt, Rita . E-mail: ritabern@mx.uni-saarland.de

    2005-12-09

    Adrenodoxin (Adx) is a [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin involved in electron transfer reactions in the steroid hormone biosynthesis of mammals. In this study, we deleted the sequence coding for the complete interaction domain in the Adx cDNA. The expressed recombinant protein consists of the amino acids 1-60, followed by the residues 89-128, and represents only the core domain of Adx (Adx-cd) but still incorporates the [2Fe-2S] cluster. Adx-cd accepts electrons from its natural redox partner, adrenodoxin reductase (AdR), and forms an individual complex with this NADPH-dependent flavoprotein. In contrast, formation of a complex with the natural electron acceptor, CYP11A1, as well as electron transfer to this steroid hydroxylase is prevented. By an electrostatic and van der Waals energy minimization procedure, complexes between AdR and Adx-cd have been proposed which have binding areas different from the native complex. Electron transport remains possible, despite longer electron transfer pathways.

  3. Enhancement of p-Type Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Performance by Supramolecular Assembly of Electron Donor and Acceptor

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Haining; Oscarsson, Johan; Gabrielsson, Erik; Eriksson, Susanna K.; Lindblad, Rebecka; Xu, Bo; Hao, Yan; Boschloo, Gerrit; Johansson, Erik M. J.; Gardner, James M.; Hagfeldt, Anders; Rensmo, Håkan; Sun, Licheng

    2014-01-01

    Supramolecular interactions based on porphyrin and fullerene derivatives were successfully adopted to improve the photovoltaic performance of p-type dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) measurements suggest a change in binding configuration of ZnTCPP after co-sensitization with C60PPy, which could be ascribed to supramolecular interaction between ZnTCPP and C60PPy. The performance of the ZnTCPP/C60PPy-based p-type DSC has been increased by a factor of 4 in comparison with the DSC with the ZnTCPP alone. At 560 nm, the IPCE value of DSCs based on ZnTCPP/C60PPy was a factor of 10 greater than that generated by ZnTCPP-based DSCs. The influence of different electrolytes on charge extraction and electron lifetime was investigated and showed that the enhanced Voc from the Co2+/3+(dtbp)3-based device is due to the positive EF shift of NiO. PMID:24603319

  4. Photodynamic therapy with decacationic [60]fullerene monoadducts: effect of a light absorbing electron-donor antenna and micellar formulation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Rui; Wang, Min; Huang, Ying-Ying; Huang, Huang-Chiao; Avci, Pinar; Chiang, Long Y; Hamblin, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    We report the synthesis and anticancer photodynamic properties of two new decacationic fullerene (LC14) and red light-harvesting antenna-fullerene conjugated monoadduct (LC15) derivatives. The antenna of LC15 was attached covalently to C60> with distance of only <3.0 Ǻ to facilitate ultrafast intramolecular photoinduced-electron-transfer (for type-I photochemistry) and photon absorption at longer wavelengths. Because LC15 was hydrophobic we compared formulation in CremophorEL micelles with direct dilution from dimethylacetamide. LC14 produced more 1O2 than LC15, while LC15 produced much more HO· than LC14 as measured by specific fluorescent probes. When delivered by DMA, LC14 killed more HeLa cells than LC15 when excited by UVA light, while LC15 killed more cells when excited by white light consistent with the antenna effect. However LC15 was more effective than LC14 when delivered by micelles regardless of the excitation light. Micellar delivery produced earlier apoptosis and damage to the endoplasmic reticulum as well as to lysosomes and mitochondria. PMID:24333585

  5. Ab initio and density functional theoretical design and screening of model crown ether based ligand (host) for extraction of lithium metal ion (guest): effect of donor and electronic induction.

    PubMed

    Boda, Anil; Ali, Sk Musharaf; Rao, Hanmanth; Ghosh, Sandip K

    2012-08-01

    The structures, energetic and thermodynamic parameters of model crown ethers with different donor, cavity and electron donating/ withdrawing functional group have been determined with ab initio MP2 and density functional theory in gas and solvent phase. The calculated values of binding energy/ enthalpy for lithium ion complexation are marginally higher for hard donor based aza and oxa crown compared to soft donor based thia and phospha crown. The calculated values of binding enthalpy for lithium metal ion with 12C4 at MP2 level of theory is in good agreement with the available experimental result. The binding energy is altered due to the inductive effect imparted by the electron donating/ withdrawing group in crown ether, which is well correlated with the values of electron transfer. The role of entropy for extraction of hydrated lithium metal ion by different donor and functional group based ligand has been demonstrated. The HOMO-LUMO gap is decreased and dipole moment of the ligand is increased from gas phase to organic phase because of the dielectric constant of the solvent. The gas phase binding energy is reduced in solvent phase as the solvent molecules weaken the metal-ligand binding. The theoretical values of extraction energy for LiCl salt from aqueous solution in different organic solvent is validated by the experimental trend. The study presented here should contribute to the design of model host ligand and screening of solvent for metal ion recognition and thus can contribute in planning the experiments.

  6. Synergistic, reconstruction and bonding effects during the adsorption of internal electron donors and TiCl4 on MgCl2 surface: A periodic-DFT investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Sharankumar

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, periodic-DFT approach has been employed to investigate the synergistic, reconstruction and bonding effects during the adsorption of different classes of internal electron donors (IDs) and TiCl4 on the MgCl2 (104) and (110) surfaces. The results indicate that the monoesters possess more than one binding mode and hence have different adsorption behavior compared to ketone in agreement with the experimental data. Chelate coordination of diesters on (104) surface reconstruct the Mg site, while on the (110) surface chelate coordination contributes to stable coordination. The results of monoesters and di-esters also suggest that the bulkiness of the groups can affect the adsorption energies. Adsorption of diether indicate higher stabilization on (110) surface compared to (104) surface. The results suggest that the adsorption energies of IDs increased in the presence of co-adsorbed TiCl4 compared to the absence of TiCl4. This is attributed to the strong bonding of ID with the surface as evident from the difference charge density analysis and attractive lateral interaction between the co-adsorbed IDs and TiCl4.

  7. The solution structure of the soluble form of the lipid-modified azurin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the electron donor of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Nóbrega, Cláudia S; Saraiva, Ivo H; Carreira, Cíntia; Devreese, Bart; Matzapetakis, Manolis; Pauleta, Sofia R

    2016-02-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae colonizes the genitourinary track, and in these environments, especially in the female host, the bacteria are subjected to low levels of oxygen, and reactive oxygen and nitrosyl species. Here, the biochemical characterization of N. gonorrhoeae Laz is presented, as well as, the solution structure of its soluble domain determined by NMR. N. gonorrhoeae Laz is a type 1 copper protein of the azurin-family based on its spectroscopic properties and structure, with a redox potential of 277±5 mV, at pH7.0, that behaves as a monomer in solution. The globular Laz soluble domain adopts the Greek-key motif, with the copper center located at one end of the β-barrel coordinated by Gly48, His49, Cys113, His118 and Met122, in a distorted trigonal geometry. The edge of the His118 imidazole ring is water exposed, in a surface that is proposed to be involved in the interaction with its redox partners. The heterologously expressed Laz was shown to be a competent electron donor to N. gonorrhoeae cytochrome c peroxidase. This is an evidence for its involvement in the mechanism of protection against hydrogen peroxide generated by neighboring lactobacilli in the host environment. PMID:26589091

  8. Application of ultrasound and air stripping for the removal of aromatic hydrocarbons from spent sulfidic caustic for use in autotrophic denitrification as an electron donor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Ho; Park, Jeung-Jin; Choi, Gi-Choong; Byun, Im-Gyu; Park, Tae-Joo; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Spent sulfidic caustic (SSC) produced from petroleum industry can be reused to denitrify nitrate-nitrogen via a biological nitrogen removal process as an electron donor for sulfur-based autotrophic denitrification, because it has a large amount of dissolved sulfur. However, SSC has to be refined because it also contains some aromatic hydrocarbons, typically benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (BTEX) and phenol that are recalcitrant organic compounds. In this study, laboratory-scale ultrasound irradiation and air stripping treatment were applied in order to remove these aromatic hydrocarbons. In the ultrasound system, both BTEX and phenol were exponentially removed by ultrasound irradiation during 60 min of reaction time to give the greatest removal efficiency of about 80%. Whereas, about 95% removal efficiency of BTEX was achieved, but not any significant phenol removal, within 30 min in the air stripping system, indicating that air stripping was a more efficient method than ultrasound irradiation. However, since air stripping did not remove any significant phenol, an additional process for degrading phenol was required. Accordingly, we applied a combined ultrasound and air stripping process. In these experiments, the removal efficiencies of BTEX and phenol were improved compared to the application of ultrasound and air stripping alone. Thus, the combined ultrasound and air stripping treatment is appropriate for refining SSC.

  9. Photocatalytic reduction of CO2 and protons using water as an electron donor over potassium tantalate nanoflakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kimfung; Handoko, Albertus D.; Khraisheh, Majeda; Tang, Junwang

    2014-07-01

    amounts of CH4 is produced from CO2 photoreduction. Upon addition of a silver cocatalyst on KTO, the reduction selectivity has been controlled to favour CO2 photoreduction, and the CO2 to CO yield has been doubled compared to bare KTaO3. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Borosilicate glass transmittance spectrum and whole XRD pattern fitting (LeBail) results. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01490a

  10. In situ enzymatic ascorbic acid production as electron donor for CdS quantum dots equipped TiO2 nanotubes: a general and efficient approach for new photoelectrochemical immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Ma, Zheng-Yuan; Yan, Dong-Yang; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2012-12-18

    In this work, a novel photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunoanalysis format was developed for sensitive and specific detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) based on an in situ electron donor producing approach. Thioglycolic acid-capped CdS quantum dots (QDs) equipped TiO(2) nanotubes (NTs) were fabricated via a facile electrostatic adsorption method. The coupling of CdS QDs and TiO(2) NTs results in an enhanced excitation and photo-to-electric conversion efficiency. Using alkaline phosphatase catalytic chemistry to in situ generate ascorbic acid for electron donating, an exquisite immunosandwich protocol was successfully constructed for the PSA assay due to the dependence of the photocurrent signal on the concentration of electron donor. This work opens a different perspective for transducer design in PEC detection and provides a general format for future development of PEC immunoanalysis.

  11. The role of amino acid electron-donor/acceptor atoms in host-cell binding peptides is associated with their 3D structure and HLA-binding capacity in sterile malarial immunity induction

    SciTech Connect

    Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Almonacid, Hannia; Moreno-Vranich, Armando

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fundamental residues located in some HABPs are associated with their 3D structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random, distorted {alpha}-helix structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-donor atoms bound to HLA-DR53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. -- Abstract: Plasmodium falciparum malaria continues being one of the parasitic diseases causing the highest worldwide mortality due to the parasite's multiple evasion mechanisms, such as immunological silence. Membrane and organelle proteins are used during invasion for interactions mediated by high binding ability peptides (HABPs); these have amino acids which establish hydrogen bonds between them in some of their critical binding residues. Immunisation assays in the Aotus model using HABPs whose critical residues had been modified have revealed a conformational change thereby enabling a protection-inducing response. This has improved fitting within HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules where amino acid electron-donor atoms present in {beta}-turn, random or distorted {alpha}-helix structures preferentially bound to HLA-DR53 molecules, whilst HABPs having amino acid electron-acceptor atoms present in regular {alpha}-helix structure bound to HLA-DR52. This data has great implications for vaccine development.

  12. Effects of the acceptor unit in dyes with acceptor-bridge-donor architecture on the electron photo-injection mechanism and aggregation in DSSCs.

    PubMed

    Zarate, Ximena; Claveria-Cadiz, Francisca; Arias-Olivares, David; Rodriguez-Serrano, Angela; Inostroza, Natalia; Schott, Eduardo

    2016-09-21

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are devices that convert light to electrical energy. Nowadays, researchers have focused on the understanding of the performance of dyes in solar cells. In this way, new efficient dyes have been obtained which can act as efficient light-harvesting compounds where the combination and the balance of acceptor(A)-bridge-donor(D) architectures confer suitable attributes and properties to the dye. Herein, we have carried out a DFT study on the optical and electronic properties of eight different A motifs and their influence on the electron photo-injection (PI) mechanisms through type I (indirect) or type II (direct) pathways in A-bridge-D dyes in DSSCs. The models consisted of thiophene as a bridge and triphenylamine as a D anchored to a TiO2 anatase cluster. All geometry optimizations were calculated using the B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP and BHandHLYP functionals combined with the 6-31G(d,p) basis set for C, H, N, O and S and the LANL2DZ pseudopotential for Ti atoms. Most of the A dyes display optoelectronic properties consistent with a type-I (indirect) mechanism except for the A5 dye where the results suggest a type-II (direct) PI pathway. In addition, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out in order to describe the formation of dye dimers and analyze the stability of the aggregates due to intermolecular interactions. The observed trends indicate that dyes with A2 and A5 anchoring groups have less tendency to dimerize due to weaker intermolecular interactions resulting in less stable dimer complexes. Specifically, we found that the A motif influences the PI by a dye and the dimerization profiles. PMID:27530076

  13. [Influence of the interaction between iron oxide and electron donor substances on 1,1,1-trichloro- 2, 2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane ( DDT) reductive dechlorination in hydragric acrisols].

    PubMed

    Liu, Cui-Ying; Xu, Xiang-Hua; Wang, Zhuang; Yao, Tong-Yan

    2014-11-01

    The interaction between iron oxide and electron donor substance have significant influences on electron transfer and the growth of iron-reducing bacteria, which may affect the reductive dechlorination of polychlorinated organic compounds in soil. Anaerobic soil incubation experiment was conducted to study the effect and its mechanism of iron oxide (goethite), electron donor substances (butyrate and ethanol), and their interaction on DDT reductive dechlorination in Hydragric Acrisols. Results showed that after 6 weeks of anaerobic incubation, the extractable residues of DDT were between 1.29% and 2.01% of initial DDT amounts in soils, which was attributed to the dechlorinated degradation of DDT and formation of bound residues of DDT and its dechlorinated products. The main product of DDT anaerobic dechlorination was 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chloro-phenyl) ethane (DDD). During the prophase of incubation, the application of butyrate or ethanol led to the decreased pH and increased Eh for reaction system, thus inhibited DDT dechlorination. The applications of only goethite or goethite and electron donor substances resulted in the increased soil pH, decreased soil Eh and increased Fe( II ) contents, thus accelerated DDT dechlorination. There was no significant interaction between butyrate and iron oxide on DDT dechlorination, whereas there was antagonistic action between ethanol and iron oxide on DDT dechlorination. The results will be of great significance for developing efficient and in-situ remediation technology of DDT contaminated soil.

  14. B4H4 and B4(CH3)4 as Unique Electron Donors in Hydrogen-Bonded and Halogen-Bonded Complexes.

    PubMed

    Del Bene, Janet E; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2016-07-21

    Ab initio MP2/aug'-cc-pVTZ calculations have been carried out on B4H4 and B4(CH3)4 to investigate the base properties of these molecules with Td symmetry. Each face of the tetrahedral structure of B4H4 and B4(CH3)4 is stabilized by a two-electron, three-center B-B-B bond. The face uses these two electrons to act uniquely as an electron-pair donor for the formation of stable hydrogen-bonded and halogen-bonded complexes with C3v symmetry. The hydrogen-bonded complexes are B4H4:HY and B4(CH3)4:HY, with HY = HNC, HF, HCl, HCN, and HCCH; the halogen-bonded complexes are B4H4:ClY and B4(CH3)4:ClY, with ClY = ClF, ClCl, ClNC, ClCN, ClCCH, and ClH. The absolute values of the binding energies of the hydrogen-bonded complexes B4(CH3)4:HY and of the halogen-bonded complexes B4(CH3)4:ClY are significantly greater than the binding energies of the corresponding complexes with B4H4. The binding energies of each series correlate with the distance from the hydrogen-bonded H atom or halogen-bonded Cl atom to the centroid of the interacting face. Charge transfer stabilizes all complexes and occurs from the B2-B3-B4 orbital of the face to the antibonding H-X orbital of HY in hydrogen-bonded complexes and to the antibonding Cl-X orbital of ClY in halogen-bonded complexes, with X being the atom of Y that is directly bonded to either H or Cl. For fixed HY, EOM-CCSD spin-spin coupling constants J(X-B1) are greater than J(X-Bn) for complexes B4H4:HY, even though the X-B1 distances are longer. B1 and Bn are the atoms at the apex and in the interacting face, respectively. Similarly, for complexes B4H4:ClY, J(Cl-B1) is greater than J(Cl-Bn). In the halogen-bonded complexes, both coupling constants correlate with the corresponding distances. PMID:27399838

  15. In Situ Generation of Electron Donor to Assist Signal Amplification on Porphyrin-Sensitized Titanium Dioxide Nanostructures for Ultrasensitive Photoelectrochemical Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jian; Qiu, Zhenli; Zhuang, Junyang; Xu, Mingdi; Tang, Dianping

    2015-10-28

    An ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunoassay protocol for quantitative detection of low-abundant proteins at a low potential was designed by utilizing porphyrin-sensitized titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanostructures. Experimental results demonstrated that the water-soluble 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-sulfophenyl)-21H,23H-porphyrin (TSPP) could be bound onto titanium dioxide via the sulfonic group. TSPP-sensitized TiO2 nanostructures exhibited better photoelectrochemical responses and stability in comparison with TiO2 nanoparticles alone under continuous illumination. Using carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a model analyte, a typical PEC immunosensor by using TSPP-TiO2 as the affinity support of anti-CEA capture antibody (Ab1) to facilitate the improvement of photocurrent response was developed. Bioconjugates of secondary antibody and glucose oxidase with gold nanoparticles (Ab2/GOx-AuNPs) was introduced by an antigen-antibody immunoreaction. AuNP acted as a powerful scaffold to bind with bioactive molecules, while GOx catalyzed glucose to in situ generate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The generated H2O2 as a sacrificial electron donor could be oxidized by the photogenerated holes to assist the signal amplification at a low potential under light excitation, thus eliminating interference from other species coexisting in the samples. Under optimal conditions, the PEC immunosensor showed a good linear relationship ranging from 0.02 to 40 ng mL(-1) with a low detection limit of 6 pg mL(-1) CEA. The precision, reproducibility, and specificity were acceptable. In addition, the method accuracy was also evaluated for quantitatively monitoring human serum samples, giving results matching with the referenced CEA ELISA kit. PMID:26451956

  16. Hexameric oligomerization of mitochondrial peroxiredoxin PrxIIF and formation of an ultrahigh affinity complex with its electron donor thioredoxin Trx-o

    PubMed Central

    Barranco-Medina, Sergio; Krell, Tino; Bernier-Villamor, Laura; Sevilla, Francisca; Lázaro, Juan-José; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondria from plants, yeast, and animals each contain at least one peroxiredoxin (Prx) that is involved in peroxide detoxification and redox signalling. The supramolecular dynamics of atypical type II Prx targeted to the mitochondrion was addressed in pea. Microcalorimetric (ITC) titrations identified an extremely high-affinity binding between the mitochondrial PsPrxIIF and Trx-o with a KD of 126±14 pM. Binding was driven by a favourable enthalpy change (ΔH= –60.6 kcal mol−1) which was counterbalanced by unfavourable entropy changes (TΔS= –47.1 kcal mol−1). This is consistent with the occurrence of large conformational changes during binding which was abolished upon site-directed mutaganesis of the catalytic C59S and C84S. The redox-dependent interaction was confirmed by gel filtration of mitochondrial extracts and co-immunoprecipitation from extracts. The heterocomplex of PsPrxIIF and Trx-o reduced peroxide substrates more efficiently than free PsPrxIIF suggesting that Trx-o serves as an efficient and specific electron donor to PsPrxIIF in vivo. Other Trx-s tested by ITC analysis failed to interact with PsPrxIIF indicating a specific recognition of PsPrxIIF by Trx-o. PsPrxIIF exists primarily as a dimer or a hexamer depending on the redox state. In addition to the well-characterized oligomerization of classical 2-Cys Prx the results also show that atypical Prx undergo large structural reorganization with implications for protein–protein interaction and function. PMID:18632730

  17. In Situ Generation of Electron Donor to Assist Signal Amplification on Porphyrin-Sensitized Titanium Dioxide Nanostructures for Ultrasensitive Photoelectrochemical Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jian; Qiu, Zhenli; Zhuang, Junyang; Xu, Mingdi; Tang, Dianping

    2015-10-28

    An ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunoassay protocol for quantitative detection of low-abundant proteins at a low potential was designed by utilizing porphyrin-sensitized titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanostructures. Experimental results demonstrated that the water-soluble 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-sulfophenyl)-21H,23H-porphyrin (TSPP) could be bound onto titanium dioxide via the sulfonic group. TSPP-sensitized TiO2 nanostructures exhibited better photoelectrochemical responses and stability in comparison with TiO2 nanoparticles alone under continuous illumination. Using carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a model analyte, a typical PEC immunosensor by using TSPP-TiO2 as the affinity support of anti-CEA capture antibody (Ab1) to facilitate the improvement of photocurrent response was developed. Bioconjugates of secondary antibody and glucose oxidase with gold nanoparticles (Ab2/GOx-AuNPs) was introduced by an antigen-antibody immunoreaction. AuNP acted as a powerful scaffold to bind with bioactive molecules, while GOx catalyzed glucose to in situ generate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The generated H2O2 as a sacrificial electron donor could be oxidized by the photogenerated holes to assist the signal amplification at a low potential under light excitation, thus eliminating interference from other species coexisting in the samples. Under optimal conditions, the PEC immunosensor showed a good linear relationship ranging from 0.02 to 40 ng mL(-1) with a low detection limit of 6 pg mL(-1) CEA. The precision, reproducibility, and specificity were acceptable. In addition, the method accuracy was also evaluated for quantitatively monitoring human serum samples, giving results matching with the referenced CEA ELISA kit.

  18. Influence of the Terminal Electron Donor in D-D-π-A Organic Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Dithieno[3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyrrole versus Bis(amine).

    PubMed

    Dai, Panpan; Yang, Lin; Liang, Mao; Dong, Huanhuan; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Chunyao; Sun, Zhe; Xue, Song

    2015-10-14

    With respect to the electron-withdrawing acceptors of D-A-π-A organic dyes, reports on the second electron-donating donors for D-D-π-A organic dyes are very limited. Both of the dyes have attracted significant attention in the field of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). In this work, four new D-D-π-A organic dyes with dithieno[3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyrrole (DTP) or bis(amine) donor have been designed and synthesized for a investigation of the influence of the terminal electron donor in D-D-π-A organic dye-sensitized solar cells. It is found that DTP is a promising building block as the terminal electron donor when introduced in the dithiophenepyrrole direction, but not just a good bridge, which exhibits several characteristics: (i) efficiently increasing the maximum molar absorption coefficient and extending the absorption bands; (ii) showing stronger charge transfer interaction as compared with the pyrrole direction; (iii) beneficial to photocurrent generation of DSCs employing cobalt electrolytes. DSCs based on M45 with the Co-phen electrolyte exhibit good light-to-electric energy conversion efficiencies as high as 9.02%, with a short circuit current density (JSC) of 15.3 mA cm(-2), open circuit voltage (VOC) of 867 mV and fill factor (FF) of 0.68 under AM 1.5 illumination (100 mW cm(-2)). The results demonstrate that N,S-heterocycles such as DTP unit could be promising candidates for application in highly efficient DSCs employing cobalt electrolyte.

  19. Influence of the Terminal Electron Donor in D-D-π-A Organic Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Dithieno[3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyrrole versus Bis(amine).

    PubMed

    Dai, Panpan; Yang, Lin; Liang, Mao; Dong, Huanhuan; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Chunyao; Sun, Zhe; Xue, Song

    2015-10-14

    With respect to the electron-withdrawing acceptors of D-A-π-A organic dyes, reports on the second electron-donating donors for D-D-π-A organic dyes are very limited. Both of the dyes have attracted significant attention in the field of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). In this work, four new D-D-π-A organic dyes with dithieno[3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyrrole (DTP) or bis(amine) donor have been designed and synthesized for a investigation of the influence of the terminal electron donor in D-D-π-A organic dye-sensitized solar cells. It is found that DTP is a promising building block as the terminal electron donor when introduced in the dithiophenepyrrole direction, but not just a good bridge, which exhibits several characteristics: (i) efficiently increasing the maximum molar absorption coefficient and extending the absorption bands; (ii) showing stronger charge transfer interaction as compared with the pyrrole direction; (iii) beneficial to photocurrent generation of DSCs employing cobalt electrolytes. DSCs based on M45 with the Co-phen electrolyte exhibit good light-to-electric energy conversion efficiencies as high as 9.02%, with a short circuit current density (JSC) of 15.3 mA cm(-2), open circuit voltage (VOC) of 867 mV and fill factor (FF) of 0.68 under AM 1.5 illumination (100 mW cm(-2)). The results demonstrate that N,S-heterocycles such as DTP unit could be promising candidates for application in highly efficient DSCs employing cobalt electrolyte. PMID:26394089

  20. Experimental and computational studies of a multi-electron donor-acceptor ligand containing the thiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole core and its incorporation into a metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Rizzuto, Felix J; Faust, Thomas B; Chan, Bun; Hua, Carol; D'Alessandro, Deanna M; Kepert, Cameron J

    2014-12-22

    A ligand containing the thiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole (TzTz) core (acceptor) with terminal triarylamine moieties (donors), N,N'-(thiazolo[5,4-d]thiazole-2,5-diylbis(4,1-phenylene))bis(N-(pyridine-4-yl)pyridin-4-amine (1), was designed as a donor-acceptor system for incorporation into electronically active metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The capacity for the ligand to undergo multiple sequential oxidation and reduction processes was examined using UV/Vis-near-infrared spectroelectrochemistry (UV/Vis-NIR SEC) in combination with DFT calculations. The delocalized nature of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) was found to inhibit charge-transfer interactions between the terminal triarylamine moieties upon oxidation, whereas radical species localized on the TzTz core were formed upon reduction. Conversion of 1 to diamagnetic 2+ and 4+ species resulted in marked changes in the emission spectra. Incorporation of this highly delocalized multi-electron donor-acceptor ligand into a new two-dimensional MOF, [Zn(NO3 )2 (1)] (2), resulted in an inhibition of the oxidation processes, but retention of the reduction capability of 1. Changes in the electrochemistry of 1 upon integration into 2 are broadly consistent with the geometric and electronic constraints enforced by ligation. PMID:25346539

  1. Significant Influences of Elaborately Modulating Electron Donors on Light Absorption and Multichannel Charge-Transfer Dynamics for 4-(Benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-ylethynyl)benzoic Acid Dyes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Erfeng; Yao, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Yiqiang; Shao, Guosheng; Zhang, Min; Wang, Peng

    2016-07-20

    4-(Benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-ylethynyl)benzoic acid (BTEBA) as a promising electron acceptor has been used in the highly efficient organic dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) recently. Because of its strong electron-deficient character, BTEBA could bring forth a remarkable decline in the energy level of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and further reduce the energy gap of dye molecules significantly. In this contribution, two metal-free organic dyes WEF1 and WEF2 were synthesized by simply combining BTEBA with two slightly tailored electron-releasing moieties: 4-hexylphenyl substituted indaceno[1,2-b:5,6-b']dithiophene (IDT) and cyclopenta[1,2-b:5,4-b']dithiophene[2',1':4,5]thieno[2,3-d]thiophene (CPDTDT), which were screened rationally from an electron-donor pool via computational simulation. With respect to those of WEF1, WEF2-sensitized solar cells demonstrate a far better short-circuit photocurrent density (JSC) and open-circuit photovoltage (VOC), resulting in a ∼50% improved power conversion efficiency of 10.0% under irradiance of 100 mW cm(-2) AM1.5G sunlight. We resorted to theoretical calculations, electrical measurements, steady-state, and time-resolved spectroscopic methods to shed light on the fatal influences of elaborately modulating electron donors on light absorption, interfacial energetics, and multichannel charge-transfer dynamics.

  2. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [{sup 18}F]fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Yu-Shin; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1991-12-31

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [{sup 18}F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substituent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is carried out by nucleophilic aromatic substitution with a no-carrier-added (NCA) [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion. The method can be used to synthesize various no-carrier-added aryl [{sup 18}F]fluoride compositions, including 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-DOPA, 2-[{sup 18}F]fluorotyrosine, 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoronorepinephrine, and 6-[{sup 18}F]fluorodopamine. In those instances when a racemic mixture of enantiomers is produced by the present invention, such as in the synthesis of 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoronorepinephrine, a preferred method also includes resolution of the racemic mixture on a chiral HPLC column. This procedure results in a high yield of enantiomerically pure [{sup 18}F] labeled isomers, for example [-]-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoronorepinephrine and [+]-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoronorepinephrine.

  3. Solicited kidney donors: Are they coerced?

    PubMed

    Serur, David; Bretzlaff, Gretchen; Christos, Paul; Desrosiers, Farrah; Charlton, Marian

    2015-12-01

    Most non-directed donors (NDDs) decide to donate on their own and contact the transplant centre directly. Some NDDs decide to donate in response to community solicitation such as newspaper ads or donor drives. We wished to explore whether subtle coercion might be occurring in such NDDs who are part of a larger community. One successful organization in a community in Brooklyn, NY, provides about 50 NDDs per year for recipients within that community. The donors answer ads in local papers and attend donor drives. Herein, we evaluated the physical and emotional outcomes of community-solicited NDDs in comparison to traditional NDDs who come from varied communities and are not responding to a specific call for donation. An assessment of coercion was used as well. PMID:26511772

  4. Solicited kidney donors: Are they coerced?

    PubMed Central

    SERUR, DAVID; BRETZLAFF, GRETCHEN; CHRISTOS, PAUL; DESROSIERS, FARRAH; CHARLTON, MARIAN

    2016-01-01

    Most non-directed donors (NDDs) decide to donate on their own and contact the transplant centre directly. Some NDDs decide to donate in response to community solicitation such as newspaper ads or donor drives. We wished to explore whether subtle coercion might be occurring in such NDDs who are part of a larger community. One successful organization in a community in Brooklyn, NY, provides about 50 NDDs per year for recipients within that community. The donors answer ads in local papers and attend donor drives. Herein, we evaluated the physical and emotional outcomes of community-solicited NDDs in comparison to traditional NDDs who come from varied communities and are not responding to a specific call for donation. An assessment of coercion was used as well. PMID:26511772

  5. Solicited kidney donors: Are they coerced?

    PubMed

    Serur, David; Bretzlaff, Gretchen; Christos, Paul; Desrosiers, Farrah; Charlton, Marian

    2015-12-01

    Most non-directed donors (NDDs) decide to donate on their own and contact the transplant centre directly. Some NDDs decide to donate in response to community solicitation such as newspaper ads or donor drives. We wished to explore whether subtle coercion might be occurring in such NDDs who are part of a larger community. One successful organization in a community in Brooklyn, NY, provides about 50 NDDs per year for recipients within that community. The donors answer ads in local papers and attend donor drives. Herein, we evaluated the physical and emotional outcomes of community-solicited NDDs in comparison to traditional NDDs who come from varied communities and are not responding to a specific call for donation. An assessment of coercion was used as well.

  6. Modeling Groundwater-Quality Data from In-Situ Mesocosms Using PHREEQC to Provide Insights into the Electron Donors Involved in Denitrification in the Karlsruhe Aquifer, ND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korom, S. F.; Tesfay, T.

    2009-12-01

    Groundwater nitrate concentrations in the Karlsruhe aquifer in north-central North Dakota increased in the mid-1990s. In response, state regulators developed a remediation plan that included research into the natural denitrifying capabilities of the aquifer, including the analysis of aquifer sediment samples and the installation of a pair of in-situ mesocosms (ISMs) below the water table to study denitrification reactions. Sediment analysis showed concentrations of the potential electron donors ferrous iron, inorganic sulfide, and organic carbon (OC). X-ray diffraction showed the dominant minerals are quartz, plagioclase feldspar, alkali feldspar, calcite, and dolomite, with lesser amounts of ferrous-iron silicates (chlorite, hornblende, biotite) and pyrite. In the ISMs tracer tests were initiated by pumping groundwater from them, amending it with sodium nitrate and sodium bromide (Br was used as a tracer for nitrate), and pumping the amended water back into the ISMs. The large size of the ISMs (> 180 L of aquifer sediments) allowed large samples (> 1 L) to be taken from the ISMs about every two months for over two years. Samples were analyzed for major ions and saturation indices [SI = log (ion activity product/equilibrium constant)] computed. Any loss of nitrate beyond that attributable to dilution, based on the Br tracer, was considered denitrified. Major sulfate minerals were undersaturated in the ISMs; therefore, any increase in sulfate was attributed to the oxidation of pyrite. PHREEQC was used to determine if the remaining nitate lost to denitrification could be explained best by a reaction with ferrous-iron silicate (as grunerite), organic carbon (as CH2O), or a 50/50 stoichiometric mix of both. After each simulation, the modeled groundwater was “equilibrated” with quartz, albite, anorthite, calcite, dolomite, chlorite, and magnesite, such that the modeled groundwater and the actual groundwater had the same SI values for these minerals. Simulated

  7. Value-added Synthesis of Graphene: Recycling Industrial Carbon Waste into Electrodes for High-Performance Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Sik; Park, Chibeom; Xu, Wentao; Baek, Kangkyun; Bae, Sang-Hoon; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Kimoon; Choi, Hee Cheul; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a simple, scalable, transfer-free, ecologically sustainable, value-added method to convert inexpensive coal tar pitch to patterned graphene films directly on device substrates. The method, which does not require an additional transfer process, enables direct growth of graphene films on device substrates in large area. To demonstrate the practical applications of the graphene films, we used the patterned graphene grown on a dielectric substrate directly as electrodes of bottom-contact pentacene field-effect transistors (max. field effect mobility ~0.36 cm(2)·V(-1)·s(-1)), without using any physical transfer process. This use of a chemical waste product as a solid carbon source instead of commonly used explosive hydrocarbon gas sources for graphene synthesis has the dual benefits of converting the waste to a valuable product, and reducing pollution.

  8. Value-added Synthesis of Graphene: Recycling Industrial Carbon Waste into Electrodes for High-Performance Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Sik; Park, Chibeom; Xu, Wentao; Baek, Kangkyun; Bae, Sang-Hoon; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Kimoon; Choi, Hee Cheul; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a simple, scalable, transfer-free, ecologically sustainable, value-added method to convert inexpensive coal tar pitch to patterned graphene films directly on device substrates. The method, which does not require an additional transfer process, enables direct growth of graphene films on device substrates in large area. To demonstrate the practical applications of the graphene films, we used the patterned graphene grown on a dielectric substrate directly as electrodes of bottom-contact pentacene field-effect transistors (max. field effect mobility ~0.36 cm2·V-1·s-1), without using any physical transfer process. This use of a chemical waste product as a solid carbon source instead of commonly used explosive hydrocarbon gas sources for graphene synthesis has the dual benefits of converting the waste to a valuable product, and reducing pollution.

  9. Value-added Synthesis of Graphene: Recycling Industrial Carbon Waste into Electrodes for High-Performance Electronic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Sik; Park, Chibeom; Xu, Wentao; Baek, Kangkyun; Bae, Sang-Hoon; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Kimoon; Choi, Hee Cheul; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a simple, scalable, transfer-free, ecologically sustainable, value-added method to convert inexpensive coal tar pitch to patterned graphene films directly on device substrates. The method, which does not require an additional transfer process, enables direct growth of graphene films on device substrates in large area. To demonstrate the practical applications of the graphene films, we used the patterned graphene grown on a dielectric substrate directly as electrodes of bottom-contact pentacene field-effect transistors (max. field effect mobility ~0.36 cm2·V−1·s−1), without using any physical transfer process. This use of a chemical waste product as a solid carbon source instead of commonly used explosive hydrocarbon gas sources for graphene synthesis has the dual benefits of converting the waste to a valuable product, and reducing pollution. PMID:26567845

  10. Value-added Synthesis of Graphene: Recycling Industrial Carbon Waste into Electrodes for High-Performance Electronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Sik; Park, Chibeom; Xu, Wentao; Baek, Kangkyun; Bae, Sang-Hoon; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Kimoon; Choi, Hee Cheul; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a simple, scalable, transfer-free, ecologically sustainable, value-added method to convert inexpensive coal tar pitch to patterned graphene films directly on device substrates. The method, which does not require an additional transfer process, enables direct growth of graphene films on device substrates in large area. To demonstrate the practical applications of the graphene films, we used the patterned graphene grown on a dielectric substrate directly as electrodes of bottom-contact pentacene field-effect transistors (max. field effect mobility ~0.36 cm(2)·V(-1)·s(-1)), without using any physical transfer process. This use of a chemical waste product as a solid carbon source instead of commonly used explosive hydrocarbon gas sources for graphene synthesis has the dual benefits of converting the waste to a valuable product, and reducing pollution. PMID:26567845

  11. Curved Oligophenylenes as Donors in Shape-Persistent Donor-Acceptor Macrocycles with Solvatofluorochromic Properties.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Takuya; Orii, Jun; Segawa, Yasutomo; Itami, Kenichiro

    2015-08-10

    Many optoelectronic organic materials are based on donor-acceptor (D-A) systems with heteroatom-containing electron donors. Herein, we introduce a new molecular design for all-carbon curved oligoparaphenylenes as donors, which results in the generation of unique shape-persistent D-A macrocycles. Two types of acceptor-inserted cycloparaphenylenes were synthesized. These macrocycles display positive solvatofluorochromic properties owing to their D-A characteristics, which were confirmed by theoretical and electrochemical studies. PMID:26140706

  12. Adding the Third Dimension to Virus Life Cycles: Three-Dimensional Reconstruction of Icosahedral Viruses from Cryo-Electron Micrographs

    PubMed Central

    Baker, T. S.; Olson, N. H.; Fuller, S. D.

    1999-01-01

    Viruses are cellular parasites. The linkage between viral and host functions makes the study of a viral life cycle an important key to cellular functions. A deeper understanding of many aspects of viral life cycles has emerged from coordinated molecular and structural studies carried out with a wide range of viral pathogens. Structural studies of viruses by means of cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction methods have grown explosively in the last decade. Here we review the use of cryo-electron microscopy for the determination of the structures of a number of icosahedral viruses. These studies span more than 20 virus families. Representative examples illustrate the use of moderate- to low-resolution (7- to 35-Å) structural analyses to illuminate functional aspects of viral life cycles including host recognition, viral attachment, entry, genome release, viral transcription, translation, proassembly, maturation, release, and transmission, as well as mechanisms of host defense. The success of cryo-electron microscopy in combination with three-dimensional image reconstruction for icosahedral viruses provides a firm foundation for future explorations of more-complex viral pathogens, including the vast number that are nonspherical or nonsymmetrical. PMID:10585969

  13. Ultrafast transient absorption studies on photosystem I reaction centers from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. 2: mutations near the P700 reaction center chlorophylls provide new insight into the nature of the primary electron donor.

    PubMed

    Holzwarth, Alfred R; Müller, Marc G; Niklas, Jens; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2006-01-15

    donor P700", are not oxidized in the first electron transfer process, but rather only in the secondary electron transfer step. We thus propose a new electron transfer mechanism for Photosystem I where the accessory Chl(s) function as the primary electron donor(s) and the A0 Chl(s) are the primary electron acceptor(s). This new mechanism also resolves in a straightforward manner the difficulty with the previous mechanism, where an electron would have to overcome a distance of approximately 14 A in <1 ps in a single step. If interpreted within a scheme of single-sided electron transfer, our data suggest that the B-branch is the active branch, although parallel A-branch activity cannot be excluded. All the mutations do affect to a varying extent the energy difference between the reaction center excited state RC* and the first radical pair and thus affect the rate constant of charge recombination. It is interesting to note that the new mechanism proposed is in fact analogous to the electron transfer mechanism in Photosystem II, where the accessory Chl also plays the role of the primary electron donor, rather than the special Chl pair P680 (Prokhorenko, V. and A. R. Holzwarth. 2000. J. Phys. Chem. B. 104:11563-11578). PMID:16258055

  14. Hairy AdS solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabalón, Andrés; Astefanesei, Dumitru; Choque, David

    2016-11-01

    We construct exact hairy AdS soliton solutions in Einstein-dilaton gravity theory. We examine their thermodynamic properties and discuss the role of these solutions for the existence of first order phase transitions for hairy black holes. The negative energy density associated to hairy AdS solitons can be interpreted as the Casimir energy that is generated in the dual filed theory when the fermions are antiperiodic on the compact coordinate.

  15. Becoming a Donor

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Organ and Gender. > U.S. Waiting List Candidate Data HOW TO BECOME A DONOR The most important thing to do is to sign up as an organ and tissue donor in your state's donor registry. To cover all bases, it's also helpful to: Designate your decision on ...

  16. The Effect of Donor Group Rigidification on the Electronic and Optical Properties of Arylamine-Based Metal-Free Dyes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: A Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Liezel L; Balanay, Mannix P; Kim, Dong Hee

    2016-07-28

    One of the most significant aspects in the development of dye-sensitized solar cells is the exploration and design of high-efficiency and low-cost dyes. This paper reports the theoretical design of various triphenylamine analogues, wherein the central nitrogen moiety establishes an sp(2)-hybridization, which endows a significant participation in the charge-transfer properties. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT methodologies were utilized to investigate the geometry, electronic structure, photochemical properties, and electrochemical properties of these dyes. Different exchange-correlation functionals were initially evaluated to establish a proper methodology for calculating the excited-state energy of the reference dye, known as DIA3. Consequently, TD-LC-ωPBE with a damping parameter of 0.175 Bohr(-1) best correlates with the experimental value. Four new dyes, namely, Dhk1, Dhk2, Dhk3, and Dhk4, were designed by modifying the rigidity of the donor moiety. According to the results, altering the type and position of binding in the donor group leads to distinct planarity of the dyes, which significantly affects their properties. The designed Dhk4 dye showed more red-shifted and broadened absorption spectra owing to the enhanced coplanarity between its donor and π-bridge moiety, which brings an advantage for its potential use as sensitizer for photovoltaic applications. PMID:27388927

  17. Living donor nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, S C; Flowers, J L; Dunkin, B; Sklar, G N; Cho, E

    1999-03-01

    The need for more organs for kidney transplantation is increasing. Cadaver sources for these organs are stable, therefore living donation must increase if the need is to be met. Less perfect kidneys are now being transplanted. The pool of potential donors is being expanded. The process of kidney donation is being made easier in an effort to increase the number of donors. The donor work-up is being streamlined. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy has been introduced, and appears to be promising as a technique of lessening donor pain and suffering, while maintaining excellent graft results.

  18. Value Added?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UCLA IDEA, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Value added measures (VAM) uses changes in student test scores to determine how much "value" an individual teacher has "added" to student growth during the school year. Some policymakers, school districts, and educational advocates have applauded VAM as a straightforward measure of teacher effectiveness: the better a teacher, the better students…

  19. [Altruism and the donor].

    PubMed

    Langlois, A

    1991-08-01

    On December 20, 1988, the government of France passed a law to protect people who voluntarily participate in biomedical research. This article makes extensive reference to a major study, titled From Biology to Ethics, by Jean Bernard, a well-respected authority in the field of bioethics. The author looks at models proposed by Bernard, as examples for health volunteers, in particular, the blood donor and the self-experimenter. To set the tone of the article, she recalls the concept of altruism, as first proposed by Auguste Comte, then makes a linkage between his philosophy and Bernard's point of view. By trial and error, in their discussions, various ethics committees and the French State Council have agreed upon what constitutes fair compensation under the law. Unlike their Canadian counterparts, medical researchers in France have free access to volunteers who are not in perfect health--e.g., the elderly, people suffering from kidney deficiency, cirrhosis of the liver, etc.--but these "experimental subjects" receive no monetary compensation. Thus, healthy and less-than-healthy volunteers do not receive equal treatment under the law. This inequity, added to the fear of what amounts to a tax on the human body and the difficulty of ensuring just compensation, is giving rise to a great deal of uncertainty.

  20. [Altruism and the donor].

    PubMed

    Langlois, A

    1991-08-01

    On December 20, 1988, the government of France passed a law to protect people who voluntarily participate in biomedical research. This article makes extensive reference to a major study, titled From Biology to Ethics, by Jean Bernard, a well-respected authority in the field of bioethics. The author looks at models proposed by Bernard, as examples for health volunteers, in particular, the blood donor and the self-experimenter. To set the tone of the article, she recalls the concept of altruism, as first proposed by Auguste Comte, then makes a linkage between his philosophy and Bernard's point of view. By trial and error, in their discussions, various ethics committees and the French State Council have agreed upon what constitutes fair compensation under the law. Unlike their Canadian counterparts, medical researchers in France have free access to volunteers who are not in perfect health--e.g., the elderly, people suffering from kidney deficiency, cirrhosis of the liver, etc.--but these "experimental subjects" receive no monetary compensation. Thus, healthy and less-than-healthy volunteers do not receive equal treatment under the law. This inequity, added to the fear of what amounts to a tax on the human body and the difficulty of ensuring just compensation, is giving rise to a great deal of uncertainty. PMID:1878857

  1. Donor-dependent Extent of Uranium Reduction for Bioremediation of Contaminated Sediment Microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, Andrew S.; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Ravel, Bruce; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Brandt, Craig C.

    2009-03-16

    Bioremediation of uranium was investigated in microcosm experiments containing contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge, Tennessee to explore the importance of electron donor selection for uranium reduction rate and extent. In these experiments, all of the electron donors, including ethanol, glucose, methanol, and methanol with added humic acids, stimulated the reduction and immobilization of aqueous uranium by the indigenous microbial community. Uranium loss from solution began after the completion of nitrate reduction but essentially concurrent with sulfate reduction. When electron donor concentrations were normalized for their equivalent electron donor potential yield, the rates of uranium reduction were nearly equivalent for all treatments (0.55-0.95 {micro}mol L{sup -1} d{sup -1}). Uranium reduction with methanol proceeded after a 15-d longer lag time relative to that of ethanol or glucose. Significant differences were not found with the inclusion of humic acids. The extent of U reduction in sediment slurries measured by XANES at various time periods after the start of the experiment increased in the order of ethanol (5-7% reduced at 77 and 153 d), glucose (49% reduced at 53 d), and methanol (93% reduced at 90 d). The microbial diversity of ethanol- and methanol-amended microcosms in their late stage of U reduction was analyzed with 16S rRNA gene amplification. Members of the Geobacteraceae were found in all microcosms as well as other potential uranium-reducing organisms, such as Clostridium and Desulfosporosinus. The effectiveness of methanol relative to ethanol at reducing aqueous and sediment-hosted uranium suggests that bioremediation strategies that encourage fermentative poising of the subsurface to a lower redox potential may be more effective for long-term uranium immobilization as compared with selecting an electron donor that is efficiently metabolized by known uranium-reducing microorganisms.

  2. Donor-dependent Extent of Uranium Reduction for Bioremediation of Contaminated Sediment Microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Ravel, Bruce; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Brandt, Craig C

    2009-01-01

    Bioremediation of uranium was investigated in microcosm experiments containing contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge, Tennessee to explore the importance of electron donor selection for uranium reduction rate and extent. In these experiments, all of the electron donors, including ethanol, glucose, methanol, and methanol with added humic acids, stimulated the reduction and immobilization of aqueous uranium by the indigenous microbial community. Uranium loss from solution began after the completion of nitrate reduction but essentially concurrent with sulfate reduction. When electron donor concentrations were normalized for their equivalent electron donor potential yield, the rates of uranium reduction were nearly equivalent for all treatments (0.55-0.95 {micro}mol L{sup -1} d{sup -1}). Uranium reduction with methanol proceeded after a 15-d longer lag time relative to that of ethanol or glucose. Significant differences were not found with the inclusion of humic acids. The extent of U reduction in sediment slurries measured by XANES at various time periods after the start of the experiment increased in the order of ethanol (5-7% reduced at 77 and 153 d), glucose (49% reduced at 53 d), and methanol (93% reduced at 90 d). The microbial diversity of ethanol- and methanol-amended microcosms in their late stage of U reduction was analyzed with 16S rRNA gene amplification. Members of the Geobacteraceae were found in all microcosms as well as other potential uranium-reducing organisms, such as Clostridium and Desulfosporosinus. The effectiveness of methanol relative to ethanol at reducing aqueous and sediment-hosted uranium suggests that bioremediation strategies that encourage fermentative poising of the subsurface to a lower redox potential may be more effective for long-term uranium immobilization as compared with selecting an electron donor that is efficiently metabolized by known uranium-reducing microorganisms.

  3. First principle study of magnetic and electronic properties of single X (X = Al, Si) atom added to small carbon clusters (C n X, n = 2-10)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar, M.; Hoseini, S. S.; Sargolzaei, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the magnetic and electronic properties of single aluminum and silicon atom added to small carbon clusters (C n X; X = Al, Si; n = 2-10) are studied in the framework of generalized-gradient approximation using density functional theory. The calculations were performed for linear, two dimensional and three dimensional clusters based on full-potential local-orbital (FPLO) method. The total energies, HOMO-LUMO energy gap and total magnetic moments of the most stable structures are presented in this work. The calculations show that C n Si clusters have more stability compared to C n Al clusters. In addition, our magnetic calculations were shown that the C n Al isomers are magnetic objects whereas C n Si clusters are nonmagnetic objects.

  4. Encapsulation of MEH-PPV:PCBM Hybrids in the Cores of Block Copolymer Micellar Assemblies: Photoinduced Electron Transfer in a Nanoscale Donor-Acceptor System.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suxiao; Ryan, James William; Singh, Amita; Beirne, Jason Gerard; Palomares, Emilio; Redmond, Gareth

    2016-01-12

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate that conjugated polymer:fullerene hybrid nanoparticles encapsulated in the hydrophobic cores of triblock copolymer micelles may successfully act as spatially confined donor-acceptor systems capable of facilitating photoinduced charge carrier separation. To this end, aqueous dispersions of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) nanoparticles were first prepared by solubilization of the polymer in the cores of poly(oxyethylene)-poly(oxypropylene)-poly(oxyethylene) triblock copolymer, Pluronic F-127 micelles. A number of significant optical spectroscopic changes were observed on transfer of the conjugated polymer from a nonaqueous solvent to the aqueous micellar environment. These were primarily attributed to increased interchain interactions due to conjugated polymer chain collapse during encapsulation in the micellar cores. When prepared in buffer solution, the micelles exhibited good long-term collodial stability. When MEH-PPV micelles were blended by the addition of controlled amounts of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), the observed correspondence of photoluminescence emission quenching, quantum yield decreases, and emission lifetime shortening with increasing PCBM concentration indicated efficient photoinduced donor-to-acceptor charge transfer between MEH-PPV and the fullerenes in the cores of the micelles, an assignment that was confirmed by transient absorption spectroscopic monitoring of carrier photogeneration and recombination. PMID:26653672

  5. Past and future of providing matched, unrelated donors for marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Roeckel, I E; Baker, J

    1997-01-01

    Prior to 1979, bone marrow transplants were only performed with histocompatible sibling donors. Once it was established that histocompatible, unrelated donors could donate marrow for transplantation, the recruitment of such donors needed to be standardized. Blood donor centers had already identified the histocompatibility locus antigen (HLA) typing for donors who could be recruited to donate bone marrow. Recruiting a large number of donors required systematic evaluation and testing according to defined standards which were published in 1988 by the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP). Peripheral stem cell collection (PBS) has been added as a transplant source. It promises additional therapeutic modalities, such as gene splicing to address other than cancer therapy.

  6. Expanded criteria donors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Sandy; Lai, Jennifer C

    2014-08-01

    The greatest challenge facing liver transplantation today is the shortage of donor livers. Demand far exceeds supply, and this deficit has driven expansion of what is considered an acceptable organ. The evolving standard has not come without costs, however, as each new frontier of expanded donor quality (i.e., advancing donor age, donation after cardiac death, and split liver) may have traded wait-list for post-transplant morbidity and mortality. This article delineates the nature and severity of risk associated with specific deceased donor liver characteristics and recommends strategies to maximally mitigate these risks. PMID:25017080

  7. ADS pilot program Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauson, J.; Heuser, J.

    1981-01-01

    The Applications Data Service (ADS) is a system based on an electronic data communications network which will permit scientists to share the data stored in data bases at universities and at government and private installations. It is designed to allow users to readily locate and access high quality, timely data from multiple sources. The ADS Pilot program objectives and the current plans for accomplishing those objectives are described.

  8. Comparison of the electronic properties of diarylamido-based PNZ pincer ligands: redox activity at the ligand and donor ability toward the metal.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Jillian J; DeMott, Jessica C; Douvris, Christos; Fafard, Claudia M; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai; Chen, Chun-Hsing; Herbert, David E; Lee, Chun-I; McCulloch, Billy J; Foxman, Bruce M; Ozerov, Oleg V

    2015-03-16

    This paper presents the synthesis and characterization of a series of pincer ligands and their Ni, Pd, Pt, and Rh complexes. The ligands under examination are based on a diarylamine which is modified either by two phosphino (-PR2) substituents in the ortho-positions (PNP ligands) or by a combination of a phosphino and an iminyl (-CH═NX) substituent (PNN ligands). The ligands can be broken down into three groups: (a) C2v-symmetric PNP ligands with identical side -PR2 donors, (b) Cs-symmetric PNP' ligands with different -PR2 side donors, and (c) PNN ligands containing a -P(i)Pr2 side donor. All of the ligands under study readily formed square-planar complexes of the types (PNZ)PdCl, (PNZ)Pd(OAc), and (PNZ)RhCO, where PNZ is the corresponding anionic tridentate pincer ligand. For select PNP ligands, (PNP)NiCl and (PNP)PtCl were also studied. The (PNZ)MCl complexes (M = Ni, Pd, Pt) underwent quasireversible oxidation in cyclic voltammetry experiments. Based on the close similarity of formal potentials for Ni, Pd, and Pt analogs, and based on the previous literature evidence, these oxidation events are ascribed primarily to the PNZ ligand, and the E1/2 values can be used to compare the ease of oxidation of different ligands. A (PNP)PdCl complex containing methoxy substituents para- to the central nitrogen underwent two quasireversible oxidations. Two mono-oxidized complexes were isolated and structurally characterized in comparison to their neutral analog, revealing minimal changes in the bond distances and angles. Several other neutral complexes were also structurally characterized. The carbonyl stretching frequency in (PNZ)RhCO complexes was used to gauge the donating ability of the various pincer ligands toward the metal. Comparison of E1/2 values for (PNZ)PdCl and νCO values for (PNZ)RhCO revealed that the two are not consistently correlated across all the studied ligands and can be tuned to different degrees through judicious ligand alteration. PMID:25714352

  9. Nitric oxide as an electron donor, an atom donor, an atom acceptor, and a ligand in reactions with atomic transition-metal and main-group cations in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Blagojevic, Voislav; Flaim, Eric; Jarvis, Michael J Y; Koyanagi, Gregory K; Bohme, Diethard K

    2005-12-15

    The room-temperature reactions of nitric oxide with 46 atomic cations have been surveyed systematically across and down the periodic table using an inductively-coupled plasma/selected-ion flow tube (ICP/SIFT) tandem mass spectrometer. Rate coefficients and product distributions were measured for the reactions of first-row cations from K+ to Se+, of second-row cations from Rb+ to Te+ (excluding Tc+), and of third-row cations from Cs+ to Bi+. Reactions both first and second order in NO were identified. The observed bimolecular reactions were thermodynamically controlled. Efficient exothermic electron transfer was observed with Zn+, As+, Se+, Au+, and Hg+. Bimolecular O-atom transfer was observed with Sc+, Ti+, Y+, Zr+, Nb+, La+, Hf+, Ta+, and W+. Of the remaining 32 atomic ions, all but 8 react in novel termolecular reactions second order in NO to produce NO+ and the metal-nitrosyl molecule, the metal-monoxide cation and nitrous oxide, and/or the metal-nitrosyl cation. K+, Rb+, Cs+, Ga+, In+, Tl+, Pb+, and Bi+ are totally unreactive. Further reactions with NO produce the dioxide cations CaO2+, TiO2+, VO2+, CrO2+, SrO2+, ZrO2+, NbO2+, RuO2+, BaO2+, HfO2+, TaO2+, WO2+, ReO2+, and OsO2+ and the still higher order oxides WO3+, ReO3+, and ReO4+. NO ligation was observed in the formation of CaO+(NO), ScO+(NO), TiO+(NO), VO+(NO)(1-3), VO2+(NO)(1-3), SrO+(NO), SrO2+(NO)1,2, RuO+(NO)(1-3), RuO2+(NO)1,2, OsO+(NO)(1-3), and IrO+(NO). The reported reactivities for bare atomic ions provide a benchmark for reactivities of ligated atomic ions and point to possible second-order NO chemistry in biometallic and metal-surface environments leading to the conversion of NO to N2O and the production of metal-nitrosyl molecules.

  10. Donor Telomere Length SAA

    Cancer.gov

    A new NCI study has found that, among patients with severe aplastic anemia who received a hematopoietic cell transplant from an unrelated donor, those whose donor white blood cells had longer telomeres had higher survival rates five-years after transplant

  11. Rich Donors, Poor Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    The shifting ideological winds of foreign aid donors have driven their policy towards governments in poor countries. Donors supported state-led development policies in poor countries from the 1940s to the 1970s; market and private-sector driven reforms during the 1980s and 1990s; and returned their attention to the state with an emphasis on…

  12. Dealing with Donor Anger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamee, Mike

    1995-01-01

    Techniques that reduce donors' resistance to college fund-raising requests, either direct mail or telephone solicitations, are offered. These include: respecting the prospects' concerns about privacy; offering nonintrusive giving options; honesty and clarity of communication; reinforcing donor sense of control; connecting with prospects'…

  13. D-A-D-π-D-A-D type diketopyrrolopyrrole based small molecule electron donors for bulk heterojunction organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Patil, Yuvraj; Misra, Rajneesh; Sharma, Abhishek; Sharma, Ganesh D

    2016-06-22

    Two organic small molecules based on diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) units having a D-A-D-π-D-A-D structure denoted as and were synthesized. Their optical and electrochemical properties relevant to organic solar cells were investigated. The wider optical absorption coverage from 450-800 nm, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) (-5.23 eV and -5.34 eV for and , respectively) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) (-3.47 and -3.45 eV for and , respectively) make these small molecules suitable as donors for bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. The bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells based on an active layer consists of a blend of these small molecules as donors and PC71BM as an acceptor with an optimized weight ratio of 1 : 2 cast from chloroform (CF) showed overall power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 1.98% (with Jsc = 5.38 mA cm(-2), Voc = 0.84 V and FF = 0.42) and 1.85% (with Jsc = 4.56 mA cm(-2), Voc = 0.96 V and FF = 0.42) for and respectively. The relatively high Voc value based on the based device has been attributed to the deeper HOMO of compared to . The optimized  : PC71BM (1 : 2) and  : PC71BM (1 : 2) active layers were subjected to two step annealing (TSA), i.e. thermal annealing and subsequent solvent vapor annealing and the corresponding BHJ organic solar cells showed a PCE of 5.28% (Jsc = 11.53 mA cm(-2), Voc = 0.79 V and FF = 0.58) and 5.52% (Jsc = 10.84 mA cm(-2), Voc = 0.91 V and FF = 0.56), respectively. The enhancement in PCE is mainly due to the improvement in Jsc and FF, related to light absorption in an active layer, a better nanoscale morphology, and an increase in the crystalline nature of the active layer and balanced charge transport, induced by the TSA treatment.

  14. Pulse radiolysis study of polystyrene-based polymers with added photoacid generators: Reaction mechanism of extreme-ultraviolet and electron-beam chemically amplified resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Kazumasa; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Kozawa, Takahiro; Fujiyoshi, Ryoko; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2015-02-01

    The reaction mechanism of chemically amplified resist (CAR) after irradiation with ionizing radiation is important for developing extreme-ultraviolet and electron-beam lithography. The acid generation after the ionization is an essential reaction in CAR. In this study, the intermediate of the proton source of acid (a radical cation of the base polymer) in the presence of a photoacid generator (PAG) was investigated by the pulse radiolysis method. The deprotonation kinetics of the radical cation of poly(4-hydroxystyrene) (PHS) in solutions with and without PAG shows only a small difference. However, the yield of radical cations of poly(4-methoxystyrene) (PMOS) as a model of the resist with a protecting (releasing) group increases upon adding PAG. The formation of the ion pair between the PMOS radical cation and the dissociated anion with a lifetime of approximately 30 to 40 µs is suggested. The lower acid yield in PMOS than in PHS film is also discussed in terms of the stability of the radical cation.

  15. 2,3-Dipentyldithieno[3,2-f:2',3'-h]quinoxaline-Based Organic Dyes for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Effect of π-Bridges and Electron Donors on Solar Cell Performance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zu-Sheng; Zang, Xu-Feng; Hua, Tao; Wang, Lingyun; Meier, Herbert; Cao, Derong

    2015-09-16

    Five novel metal-free organic dyes DQ1-5 containing a dipentyldithieno[3,2-f:2',3'-h]quinoxaline (DPQ) unit were synthesized and applied in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), where DPQ was employed as a π-spacer for the first time. Their photophysical, electrochemical, and theoretical calculations and photovoltaic properties were systematically investigated. All the five dyes show broad photoresponse. Especially the absorption edges of DQ3-5 extend to 800 nm on the TiO2 films. The inserted electron-rich unit 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene or electron-withdrawing group benzothiadiazole (BTD) in DPQ-based dyes can greatly influence the optoelectronic properties of the dyes. In addition, the different electron donors also significantly affect the performance of the DSSCs. Under standard global AM 1.5 solar light conditions, the DQ5 sensitized solar cell obtained a power conversion efficiency of 7.12%. The result indicates that the rigid DPQ-based organic dye is a promising candidate for efficient DSSCs.

  16. Benzofurocarbazole and benzothienocarbazole as donors for improved quantum efficiency in blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent devices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Ryun; Hwang, Seok-Ho; Jeon, Sang Kyu; Lee, Chil Won; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-05-11

    Benzofurocarbazole and benzothienocarbazole were used as electron donors of thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitters and the performances of the TADF devices were examined. The benzofurocarbazole and benzothienocarbazole donor moieties were better than carbazole as the electron donors of the TADF emitters. PMID:25869643

  17. Cadaveric donor selection and management.

    PubMed

    Studer, Sean M; Orens, Jonathan B

    2006-10-01

    While there is little doubt that proper donor selection is extremely important to achieve good outcomes from transplantation, there are only limited data regarding the current criteria utilized to select the "ideal donor". Importantly, there are not enough donor lungs available for all of those in need. Until an adequate supply of donor organs exists, lives will be lost on the transplant waiting list. While efforts have been made to increase donor awareness, additional transplants can be realized by improving donor utilization. This can be achieved by active participation of transplant teams in donor management and by utilizing "extended criteria" organs. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of using "extended criteria" donors, as this practice could result in increased posttransplant morbidity and mortality. This article summarizes the approach to identification of potential lung donors, optimal donor management, and the clinical importance of various donor factors upon recipient outcomes.

  18. Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Deger, S; Giessing, M; Roigas, J; Wille, A H; Lein, M; Schönberger, B; Loening, S A

    2005-01-01

    Laparoscopic live donor nephrectomy (LDN) has removed disincentives of potential donors and may bear the potential to increase kidney donation. Multiple modifications have been made to abbreviate the learning curve while at the same time guarantee the highest possible level of medical quality for donor and recipient. We reviewed the literature for the evolution of the different LDN techniques and their impact on donor, graft and operating surgeon, including the subtleties of different surgical accesses, vessel handling and organ extraction. We performed a literature search (PubMed, DIMDI, medline) to evaluate the development of the LDN techniques from 1995 to 2003. Today more than 200 centres worldwide perform LDN. Hand-assistance has led to a spread of LDN. Studies comparing open and hand-assisted LDN show a reduction of operating and warm ischaemia times for the hand-assisted LDN. Different surgical access sites (trans- or retroperitoneal), different vessel dissection approaches, donor organ delivery techniques, delivery sites and variations of hand-assistance techniques reflect the evolution of LDN. Proper techniques and their combination for the consecutive surgical steps minimize both warm ischaemia time and operating time while offering the donor a safe minimally invasive laparoscopic procedure. LDN has breathed new life into the moribund field of living kidney donation. Within a few years LDN could become the standard approach in living kidney donation. Surgeons working in this field must be trained thoroughly and well acquainted with the subtleties of the different LDN techniques and their respective advantages and disadvantages. PMID:16754618

  19. Quantifying the electron donor and acceptor ability of the ketimide ligands in M(N=CtBu2)4 (M = V, Nb, Ta)

    PubMed Central

    Damon, Peter L.; Liss, Cameron J.; Lewis, Richard A.; Morochnik, Simona; Szpunar, David E.; Telser, Joshua; Hayton, Trevor W.

    2015-01-01

    Addition of 4 equiv of Li(N=CtBu2) to VCl3 in THF, followed by addition of 0.5 equiv I2, generates the homoleptic V(IV) ketimide complex, V(N=CtBu2)4 (1), in 42% yield. Similarly, reaction of 4 equiv of Li(N=CtBu2) with NbCl4(THF)2 in THF affords the homoleptic Nb(IV) ketimide complex, Nb(N=CtBu2)4 (2), in 55% yield. Seeking to extend the series to the tantalum congener, a new Ta(IV) starting material, TaCl4(TMEDA) (3), was prepared via reduction of TaCl5 with Et3SiH, followed by addition of TMEDA. Reaction of 3 with 4 equiv of Li(N=CtBu2) in THF results in a isolation of a Ta(V) ketimide complex, Ta(Cl)(N=CtBu2)4 (5), which can be isolated in 32% yield. Reaction of 5 with Tl(OTf) yields Ta(OTf)(N=CtBu2)4 (6) in 44% yield. Subsequent reduction of 6 with Cp*2Co in toluene generates the homoleptic Ta(IV) congener Ta(N=CtBu2)4 (7), although the yields are poor. All three homoleptic Group 5 ketimide complexes exhibit squashed tetrahedral geometries in the solid state, as determined by X-ray crystallography. This geometry leads to a dx2−y21 (2B1 in D2d) ground state, as supported by DFT calculations. EPR spectroscopic analysis of 1 and 2, performed at X- and Q-band frequencies (~9 and 35 GHz, respectively), further supports the 2B1 ground state assignment, while comparison of 1, 2, and 7 with related Group 5 tetra(aryl), tetra(amido) and tetra(alkoxo) complexes shows a higher M-L covalency in the ketimide-metal interaction. In addition, a ligand field analysis of 1 and 2 demonstrates that the ketimide ligand is both a strong π-donor and strong π-acceptor, an unusual combination found in very few organometallic ligands. PMID:26419513

  20. Distinctive Characteristics of Educational Donors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Russell N., III.

    2008-01-01

    Examining the charitable behavior of 56,663 US households, this paper evaluates the distinctive characteristics of educational donors as compared with donors to noneducational charitable organizations and with nondonors. In general, educational donors had significantly greater income, wealth, and education than other donors. Educational donors…

  1. Involvement of histidine 190 on the D1 protein in electron/proton transfer reactions on the donor side of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Mamedov, F; Sayre, R T; Styring, S

    1998-10-01

    Flash-induced chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics from photosystem II in thylakoids from the dark-grown wild type and two site-directed mutants of the D1 protein His190 residue (D1-H190) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii have been characterized. Induction of the chlorophyll fluorescence on the first flash, reflecting electron transport from YZ to P680(+), exhibited a strong pH dependence with a pK of 7.6 in the dark-grown wild type which lacks the Mn cluster. The chlorophyll fluorescence decay, measured in the presence of DCMU, which reflects recombination between QA- and YZox, was also pH-dependent with a similar pK of 7.5. These results indicate participation by the same base, which is suggested to be D1-H190, in oxidation and reduction of YZ in forward electron transfer and recombination pathways, respectively. This hypothesis was tested in the D1-H190 mutants. Induction of chlorophyll fluorescence in these H190 mutants has been observed to be inefficient due to slow electron transfer from YZ to P680(+) [Roffey, R. A., et al. (1994) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1185, 257-270]. We show that this reaction is pH-dependent, with a pK of 8. 1, and at pH >/=9, the fluorescence induction is efficient in the H190 mutants, suggesting direct titration of YZ. The efficient oxidation of YZ ( approximately 70% at pH 9.0) at high pH was confirmed by kinetic EPR measurements. In contrast to the wild type, the H190 mutants show little or no observable fluorescence decay. Our data suggest that H190 is an essential component in the electron transfer reactions in photosystem II and acts as a proton acceptor upon YZ oxidation. In the H190 mutants, this reaction is inefficient and YZ oxidation only occurs at elevated pHs when YZ itself probably is deprotonated. We also propose that H190 is able to return a proton to YZox during electron recombination from QA- in a reaction which does not take place in the D1-H190 mutants. PMID:9760263

  2. DIS in AdS

    SciTech Connect

    Albacete, Javier L.; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Taliotis, Anastasios

    2009-03-23

    We calculate the total cross section for the scattering of a quark-anti-quark dipole on a large nucleus at high energy for a strongly coupled N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory using AdS/CFT correspondence. We model the nucleus by a metric of a shock wave in AdS{sub 5}. We then calculate the expectation value of the Wilson loop (the dipole) by finding the extrema of the Nambu-Goto action for an open string attached to the quark and antiquark lines of the loop in the background of an AdS{sub 5} shock wave. We find two physically meaningful extremal string configurations. For both solutions we obtain the forward scattering amplitude N for the quark dipole-nucleus scattering. We study the onset of unitarity with increasing center-of-mass energy and transverse size of the dipole: we observe that for both solutions the saturation scale Q{sub s} is independent of energy/Bjorken-x and depends on the atomic number of the nucleus as Q{sub s}{approx}A{sup 1/3}. Finally we observe that while one of the solutions we found corresponds to the pomeron intercept of {alpha}{sub P} = 2 found earlier in the literature, when extended to higher energy or larger dipole sizes it violates the black disk limit. The other solution we found respects the black disk limit and yields the pomeron intercept of {alpha}{sub P} = 1.5. We thus conjecture that the right pomeron intercept in gauge theories at strong coupling may be {alpha}{sub P} = 1.5.

  3. Independent donor ethical assessment: aiming to standardize donor advocacy.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Devasmita; Jotterand, Fabrice; Casenave, Gerald; Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    Living organ donation has become more common across the world. To ensure an informed consent process, given the complex issues involved with organ donation, independent donor advocacy is required. The choice of how donor advocacy is administered is left up to each transplant center. This article presents the experience and process of donor advocacy at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center administered by a multidisciplinary team consisting of physicians, surgeons, psychologists, medical ethicists and anthropologists, lawyers, a chaplain, a living kidney donor, and a kidney transplant recipient. To ensure that advocacy remains fair and consistent for all donors being considered, the donor advocacy team at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center developed the Independent Donor Ethical Assessment, a tool that may be useful to others in rendering donor advocacy. In addition, the tool may be modified as circumstances arise to improve donor advocacy and maintain uniformity in decision making.

  4. Independent donor ethical assessment: aiming to standardize donor advocacy.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Devasmita; Jotterand, Fabrice; Casenave, Gerald; Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    Living organ donation has become more common across the world. To ensure an informed consent process, given the complex issues involved with organ donation, independent donor advocacy is required. The choice of how donor advocacy is administered is left up to each transplant center. This article presents the experience and process of donor advocacy at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center administered by a multidisciplinary team consisting of physicians, surgeons, psychologists, medical ethicists and anthropologists, lawyers, a chaplain, a living kidney donor, and a kidney transplant recipient. To ensure that advocacy remains fair and consistent for all donors being considered, the donor advocacy team at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center developed the Independent Donor Ethical Assessment, a tool that may be useful to others in rendering donor advocacy. In addition, the tool may be modified as circumstances arise to improve donor advocacy and maintain uniformity in decision making. PMID:24919733

  5. Electronic structure of p-type perylene monoimide-based donor-acceptor dyes on the nickel oxide (100) surface: a DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Kontkanen, O V; Niskanen, M; Hukka, T I; Rantala, T T

    2016-05-25

    A p-type dye-sensitized solar cell, where the dye injects a hole into the semiconductor, could be combined with a typical Grätzel cell to create an efficient tandem device. However, the current p-type devices suffer from low efficiency. Here, geometries and electronic structures of four perylenemonoimide-based dyes () both as free and adsorbed on the NiO(100) semiconductor surface have been investigated to gain a better understanding of the p-type devices. In particular, the electronic transitions relevant to charge transfer between the dye and the surface have been identified. Excitations have been evaluated using the time-dependent DFT calculations, and the roles of frontier orbitals and band edges in transitions have been assessed. The adsorbed dyes can adopt either upright or slightly tilted geometries depending on the structure of the anchoring group and the binding mode of the dye. The adsorption slightly lowers the NiO band gap, from 4.06 eV to 3.90-3.96 eV, depending on the surface-adsorbate system and the band gaps of the dye molecules by 0.1-0.2 eV. Additionally, the adsorption mode of dye moves the LUMO+1 level down by 0.5 eV. The effective mass of charge carrier holes is significantly smaller at the NiO surface than in the bulk indicating the importance of surface conductivity. We also found that the potential drop, i.e. the driving force for charge transfer from NiO to the dye molecule, depends on the adsorption mode of . PMID:27224900

  6. NADH:Cytochrome b5 Reductase and Cytochrome b5 Can Act as Sole Electron Donors to Human Cytochrome P450 1A1-Mediated Oxidation and DNA Adduct Formation by Benzo[a]pyrene

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a human carcinogen that covalently binds to DNA after activation by cytochrome P450 (P450). Here, we investigated whether NADH:cytochrome b5 reductase (CBR) in the presence of cytochrome b5 can act as sole electron donor to human P450 1A1 during BaP oxidation and replace the canonical NADPH:cytochrome P450 reductase (POR) system. We also studied the efficiencies of the coenzymes of these reductases, NADPH as a coenzyme of POR, and NADH as a coenzyme of CBR, to mediate BaP oxidation. Two systems containing human P450 1A1 were utilized: human recombinant P450 1A1 expressed with POR, CBR, epoxide hydrolase, and cytochrome b5 in Supersomes and human recombinant P450 1A1 reconstituted with POR and/or with CBR and cytochrome b5 in liposomes. BaP-9,10-dihydrodiol, BaP-7,8-dihydrodiol, BaP-1,6-dione, BaP-3,6-dione, BaP-9-ol, BaP-3-ol, a metabolite of unknown structure, and two BaP-DNA adducts were generated by the P450 1A1-Supersomes system, both in the presence of NADPH and in the presence of NADH. The major BaP-DNA adduct detected by 32P-postlabeling was characterized as 10-(deoxyguanosin-N2-yl)-7,8,9-trihydroxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-BaP (assigned adduct 1), while the minor adduct is probably a guanine adduct derived from 9-hydroxy-BaP-4,5-epoxide (assigned adduct 2). BaP-3-ol as the major metabolite, BaP-9-ol, BaP-1,6-dione, BaP-3,6-dione, an unknown metabolite, and adduct 2 were observed in the system using P450 1A1 reconstituted with POR plus NADPH. When P450 1A1 was reconstituted with CBR and cytochrome b5 plus NADH, BaP-3-ol was the predominant metabolite too, and an adduct 2 was also generated. Our results demonstrate that the NADH/cytochrome b5/CBR system can act as the sole electron donor both for the first and second reduction of P450 1A1 during the oxidation of BaP in vitro. They suggest that NADH-dependent CBR can replace NADPH-dependent POR in the P450 1A1-catalyzed metabolism of BaP. PMID:27404282

  7. NADH:Cytochrome b5 Reductase and Cytochrome b5 Can Act as Sole Electron Donors to Human Cytochrome P450 1A1-Mediated Oxidation and DNA Adduct Formation by Benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Stiborová, Marie; Indra, Radek; Moserová, Michaela; Frei, Eva; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Kopka, Klaus; Philips, David H; Arlt, Volker M

    2016-08-15

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a human carcinogen that covalently binds to DNA after activation by cytochrome P450 (P450). Here, we investigated whether NADH:cytochrome b5 reductase (CBR) in the presence of cytochrome b5 can act as sole electron donor to human P450 1A1 during BaP oxidation and replace the canonical NADPH:cytochrome P450 reductase (POR) system. We also studied the efficiencies of the coenzymes of these reductases, NADPH as a coenzyme of POR, and NADH as a coenzyme of CBR, to mediate BaP oxidation. Two systems containing human P450 1A1 were utilized: human recombinant P450 1A1 expressed with POR, CBR, epoxide hydrolase, and cytochrome b5 in Supersomes and human recombinant P450 1A1 reconstituted with POR and/or with CBR and cytochrome b5 in liposomes. BaP-9,10-dihydrodiol, BaP-7,8-dihydrodiol, BaP-1,6-dione, BaP-3,6-dione, BaP-9-ol, BaP-3-ol, a metabolite of unknown structure, and two BaP-DNA adducts were generated by the P450 1A1-Supersomes system, both in the presence of NADPH and in the presence of NADH. The major BaP-DNA adduct detected by (32)P-postlabeling was characterized as 10-(deoxyguanosin-N(2)-yl)-7,8,9-trihydroxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-BaP (assigned adduct 1), while the minor adduct is probably a guanine adduct derived from 9-hydroxy-BaP-4,5-epoxide (assigned adduct 2). BaP-3-ol as the major metabolite, BaP-9-ol, BaP-1,6-dione, BaP-3,6-dione, an unknown metabolite, and adduct 2 were observed in the system using P450 1A1 reconstituted with POR plus NADPH. When P450 1A1 was reconstituted with CBR and cytochrome b5 plus NADH, BaP-3-ol was the predominant metabolite too, and an adduct 2 was also generated. Our results demonstrate that the NADH/cytochrome b5/CBR system can act as the sole electron donor both for the first and second reduction of P450 1A1 during the oxidation of BaP in vitro. They suggest that NADH-dependent CBR can replace NADPH-dependent POR in the P450 1A1-catalyzed metabolism of BaP. PMID:27404282

  8. Tuning the Rainbow: Systematic Modulation of Donor-Acceptor Systems through Donor Substituents and Solvent.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Christopher B; van der Salm, Holly; Shillito, Georgina E; Lucas, Nigel T; Gordon, Keith C

    2016-09-01

    A series of donor-acceptor compounds is reported in which the energy of the triarylamine donor is systematically tuned through para substitution with electron-donating methoxy and electron-withdrawing cyano groups. The acceptor units investigated are benzothiadiazole (btd), dipyridophenazine (dppz), and its [ReCl(CO)3(dppz)] complex. The effect of modulating donor energy on the electronic and photophysical properties is investigated using (1)H NMR spectroscopy, DFT calculations, electrochemistry, electronic absorption and emission spectroscopies, ground state and resonance Raman spectroscopy, and transient absorption spectroscopy. Qualitative correlations between the donor energy and the properties of interest are obtained using Hammett σ(+) constants. Methoxy and cyano groups are shown to destabilize and stabilize, respectively, the frontier molecular orbitals, with the HOMO affected more significantly than the LUMO, narrowing the HOMO-LUMO band gap as the substituent becomes more electron-donating-observable as a bathochromic shift in low-energy charge-transfer absorption bands. Charge-transfer emission bands are also dependent on the electron-donating/withdrawing nature of the substituent, and in combination with the highly solvatochromic nature of charge-transfer states, emission can be tuned to span the entire visible region. PMID:27500590

  9. Electronic properties of disordered zigzag carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezania, Hamed

    2015-11-01

    We study the density of states of zigzag carbon nanotube (CNT) doped with both Boron and nitrogen atoms as donor and acceptor impurities, respectively. The effect of scattering of the electrons on the electronic spectrum of the system can be obtained via adding random on-site energy term to the tight binding model Hamiltonian which describes the clean system. Green's function approach has been implemented to find the behavior of electronic density. Due to Boron (Nitrogen) doping, Fermi surface tends to the valence (conduction) band of semiconductor CNT so that the energy gap width reduces. Furthermore the density of states of disordered metallic zigzag CNTs includes a peak near the Fermi energy.

  10. Synthesis, spectral investigations, antimicrobial activity and DNA-binding studies of novel charge transfer complex of 1,10-phenanthroline as an electron donor with π-acceptor p-Nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Ishaat M.; Ahmad, Afaq

    2010-08-01

    Proton or charge transfer (CT) complex of donor, 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) with π-acceptor, p-Nitrophenol (PNP) has been studied spectrophotometrically in methanol at room temperature. The binding of the CT complex with calf thymus (ct) DNA has been investigated by fluorescence spectrum, to establish the ability of the CT complex of its interaction with DNA. Stern-Volmer quenching constant ( Ksv) has also been calculated. The formation constant ( KCT), molar extinction coefficient ( ɛCT), free energy (Δ Go) and stoichiometric ratio of the CT complex have been determined by Benesi-Hildebrand equation. The stoichiometry was found to be 1:1. The CT complex was screened for its pharmacology as antibacterial and antifungal activity against various bacterial and fungal strains, showing excellent antibacterial and antifungal activity. The newly synthesized CT complex has been characterized by FTIR spectra, elemental analysis, 1H NMR, electronic absorption spectra. TGA-DTA studies were also carried out to check the stability of CT complex.

  11. Electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springford, Michael

    1997-03-01

    1. J. J. Thomson and the discovery of the electron A. B. P. Pippard; 2. The isolated electron W. N. Cottingham; 3. The relativistic electron D. I. Olive; 4. The electron glue B. L. Gyorffy; 5. The electron fluid P. Coleman; 6. The magnetic electron G. G. Lonzarich; 7. The paired electron A. J. Leggett; 8. The heavy electron M. Springford; 9. The coherent electron Y. Imry and M. Peskin; 10. The composite electron R. Nicholas; 11. The electron in the cosmos M. S. Longair.

  12. Electron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springford, Michael

    2008-12-01

    1. J. J. Thomson and the discovery of the electron A. B. P. Pippard; 2. The isolated electron W. N. Cottingham; 3. The relativistic electron D. I. Olive; 4. The electron glue B. L. Gyorffy; 5. The electron fluid P. Coleman; 6. The magnetic electron G. G. Lonzarich; 7. The paired electron A. J. Leggett; 8. The heavy electron M. Springford; 9. The coherent electron Y. Imry and M. Peskin; 10. The composite electron R. Nicholas; 11. The electron in the cosmos M. S. Longair.

  13. Influence of coagulation factor x on in vitro and in vivo gene delivery by adenovirus (Ad) 5, Ad35, and chimeric Ad5/Ad35 vectors.

    PubMed

    Greig, Jenny A; Buckley, Suzanne Mk; Waddington, Simon N; Parker, Alan L; Bhella, David; Pink, Rebecca; Rahim, Ahad A; Morita, Takashi; Nicklin, Stuart A; McVey, John H; Baker, Andrew H

    2009-10-01

    The binding of coagulation factor X (FX) to the hexon of adenovirus (Ad) 5 is pivotal for hepatocyte transduction. However, vectors based on Ad35, a subspecies B Ad, are in development for cancer gene therapy, as Ad35 utilizes CD46 (which is upregulated in many cancers) for transduction. We investigated whether interaction of Ad35 with FX influenced vector tropism using Ad5, Ad35, and Ad5/Ad35 chimeras: Ad5/fiber(f)35, Ad5/penton(p)35/f35, and Ad35/f5. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) revealed that Ad35 and Ad35/f5 bound FX with approximately tenfold lower affinities than Ad5 hexon-containing viruses, and electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) demonstrated a direct Ad35 hexon:FX interaction. The presence of physiological levels of FX significantly inhibited transduction of vectors containing Ad35 fibers (Ad5/f35, Ad5/p35/f35, and Ad35) in CD46-positive cells. Vectors were intravenously administered to CD46 transgenic mice in the presence and absence of FX-binding protein (X-bp), resulting in reduced liver accumulation for all vectors. Moreover, Ad5/f35 and Ad5/p35/f35 efficiently accumulated in the lung, whereas Ad5 demonstrated poor lung targeting. Additionally, X-bp significantly reduced lung genome accumulation for Ad5/f35 and Ad5/p35/f35, whereas Ad35 was significantly enhanced. In summary, vectors based on the full Ad35 serotype will be useful vectors for selective gene transfer via CD46 due to a weaker FX interaction compared to Ad5.

  14. Why Minority Donors Are Needed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Search Register with your state as an Organ Donor Home Why Donate Becoming a Donor About Donation & ... Why Donate RELATED INFORMATION Minority Focused Grantee Publications Organ Donation Process Enrolling as a Donor Trying to Save a Life Testing for Brain ...

  15. Pressure dependence of donor excitation spectra in AlSb

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, L.; McCluskey, M.D.; Haller, E.E.

    2002-01-16

    We have investigated the behavior of ground to bound excited-state electronic transitions of Se and Te donors in AlSb as a function of hydrostatic pressure. Using broadband far-infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, we observe qualitatively different behaviors of the electronic transition energies of the two donors. While the pressure derivative of the Te transition energy is small and constant, as might be expected for a shallow donor, the pressure derivatives of the Se transition energies are quadratic and large at low pressures, indicating that Se is actually a deep donor. In addition, at pressures between 30 and 50 kbar, we observe evidence of an anti-crossing between one of the selenium electronic transitions and a two-phonon mode.

  16. Comparison of lactate, formate, and propionate as hydrogen donors for the reductive dehalogenation of trichloroethene in a continuous-flow column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizian, Mohammad F.; Marshall, Ian P. G.; Behrens, Sebastian; Spormann, Alfred M.; Semprini, Lewis

    2010-04-01

    A continuous-flow column study was conducted to analyze the reductive dehalogenation of trichloroethene (TCE) with aquifer material with high content of iron oxides. The column was bioaugmented with the Point Mugu (PM) culture, which is a mixed microbial enrichment culture capable of completely transforming TCE to ethene (ETH). We determined whether lactate, formate, or propionate fermentation resulted in more effective dehalogenation. Reductive dehalogenation, fermentation, and sulfate, Fe(III), and Mn(IV) reduction were all exhibited within the column. Different steady-states of dehalogenation were achieved based on the concentration of substrates added, with effective transformation to ETH obtained when ample electron donor equivalents were provided. Most of the metabolic reducing equivalents were channeled to sulfate, Fe(III), and Mn(IV) reduction. When similar electron reducing equivalents were added, the most effective dehalogenation was achieved with formate, with 14% of the electron equivalents going towards dehalogenation reactions, compared to 6.5% for lactate and 9.6% for propionate. Effective dehalogenation was maintained over 1000 days of column operation. Over 90% of electron equivalents added could be accounted for by the different electron accepting processes in the column, with 50% associated with soluble and precipitated Fe(II) and Mn(II). Bulk Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction was rather associated with lactate and propionate addition than formate addition. Sulfate reduction was a competing electron acceptor reaction with all three electron donors. DNA was extracted from solid coupon samples obtained during the course of the experiment and analyzed using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and quantitative PCR. Lactate and propionate addition resulted in a significant increase in Geobacter, Spirochaetes, and Desulfitobacterium phylotypes relative to " Dehalococcoides" when compared to formate addition. Results from the molecular biological analyses support

  17. Comparison of lactate, formate, and propionate as hydrogen donors for the reductive dehalogenation of trichloroethene in a continuous-flow column.

    PubMed

    Azizian, Mohammad F; Marshall, Ian P G; Behrens, Sebastian; Spormann, Alfred M; Semprini, Lewis

    2010-04-01

    A continuous-flow column study was conducted to analyze the reductive dehalogenation of trichloroethene (TCE) with aquifer material with high content of iron oxides. The column was bioaugmented with the Point Mugu (PM) culture, which is a mixed microbial enrichment culture capable of completely transforming TCE to ethene (ETH). We determined whether lactate, formate, or propionate fermentation resulted in more effective dehalogenation. Reductive dehalogenation, fermentation, and sulfate, Fe(III), and Mn(IV) reduction were all exhibited within the column. Different steady-states of dehalogenation were achieved based on the concentration of substrates added, with effective transformation to ETH obtained when ample electron donor equivalents were provided. Most of the metabolic reducing equivalents were channeled to sulfate, Fe(III), and Mn(IV) reduction. When similar electron reducing equivalents were added, the most effective dehalogenation was achieved with formate, with 14% of the electron equivalents going towards dehalogenation reactions, compared to 6.5% for lactate and 9.6% for propionate. Effective dehalogenation was maintained over 1000 days of column operation. Over 90% of electron equivalents added could be accounted for by the different electron accepting processes in the column, with 50% associated with soluble and precipitated Fe(II) and Mn(II). Bulk Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction was rather associated with lactate and propionate addition than formate addition. Sulfate reduction was a competing electron acceptor reaction with all three electron donors. DNA was extracted from solid coupon samples obtained during the course of the experiment and analyzed using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and quantitative PCR. Lactate and propionate addition resulted in a significant increase in Geobacter, Spirochaetes, and Desulfitobacterium phylotypes relative to "Dehalococcoides" when compared to formate addition. Results from the molecular biological analyses support

  18. Blood Donor Management in China

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ling; Wang, Jingxing; Liu, Zhong; Stevens, Lori; Sadler, Andrew; Ness, Paul; Shan, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite a steady increase in total blood collections and voluntary non-remunerated blood donors, China continues to have many challenges with its blood donation system. The country's donation rate remains low at 9%o, with over 60% of donors being first-time donors. Generally there is a lack of adequate public awareness about blood donation. The conservative donor selection criteria, the relatively long donation interval, and the small donation volume have further limited blood supply. To ensure a sufficient and safe blood supply that meets the increasing clinical need for blood products, there is an urgent need to strengthen the country's blood donor management. This comprehensive effort should include educating and motivating more individuals especially from the rural areas to be involved in blood donation, developing rational and evidence-based selection criteria for donor eligibility, designing a donor follow-up mechanism to encourage more future donations, assessing the current donor testing strategy, improving donor service and care, building regional and national shared donor deferral database, and enhancing the transparency of the blood donation system to gain more trust from the general public. The purpose of the review is to provide an overview of the key process of and challenges with the blood donor management system in China. PMID:25254023

  19. Four-Electron-Donor Hemilabile N3-PPh3 Ligand that Binds through a C=C Bond Rather than an Agostic C-H Interaction, and Displaceement of the C=C by Methyl Iodide or Water

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng,T.; Szalda, D.; Hanson, J.; Muckerman, J.; Bullock, R.

    2008-01-01

    Hydride transfer from Cp(CO)2(PPh3)MoH to Ph3C+BAr'4- [Ar' = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl] produces [Cp(CO)2(3-PPh3)Mo]+[BAr'4]-. Spectroscopic and crystallographic data indicate that one C{double_bond}C of a Ph ring is weakly bound to the Mo, so that the PPh3 ligand is a four-electron-donor ligand. Computations (DFT/B3LYP and MP2 on [Cp(CO)2(3-PPh3)Mo]+ and [Cp(CO)2(3-PH2Ph)Mo]+, and DFT/B3LYP on [Cp(CO)2(3-PHtBuPh)Mo]+ and [Cp(CO)2(3-PH2Ph)Nb]) provide further information on the bonding and on the preference for bonding of the metal to the C{double_bond}C bond rather than an agostic C-H interaction found in many related complexes. The hemilabile C{double_bond}C bond is readily displaced by CH3I or H2O, and crystal structures are reported for [Cp(CO)2(PPh3)Mo(ICH3)]+ and [Cp(CO)2(PPh3)Mo(OH2)]+. The equilibrium constant for [Cp(CO)2(3-PPh3)Mo]+ + ICH3 to give [Cp(CO)2(PPh3)Mo(ICH3)]+ is Keq = 5.2 x 102 M-1 in CD2Cl2 at 22 C.

  20. Donor deactivation in silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björk, Mikael T.; Schmid, Heinz; Knoch, Joachim; Riel, Heike; Riess, Walter

    2009-02-01

    The operation of electronic devices relies on the density of free charge carriers available in the semiconductor; in most semiconductor devices this density is controlled by the addition of doping atoms. As dimensions are scaled down to achieve economic and performance benefits, the presence of interfaces and materials adjacent to the semiconductor will become more important and will eventually completely determine the electronic properties of the device. To sustain further improvements in performance, novel field-effect transistor architectures, such as FinFETs and nanowire field-effect transistors, have been proposed as replacements for the planar devices used today, and also for applications in biosensing and power generation. The successful operation of such devices will depend on our ability to precisely control the location and number of active impurity atoms in the host semiconductor during the fabrication process. Here, we demonstrate that the free carrier density in semiconductor nanowires is dependent on the size of the nanowires. By measuring the electrical conduction of doped silicon nanowires as a function of nanowire radius, temperature and dielectric surrounding, we show that the donor ionization energy increases with decreasing nanowire radius, and that it profoundly modifies the attainable free carrier density at values of the radius much larger than those at which quantum and dopant surface segregation effects set in. At a nanowire radius of 15 nm the carrier density is already 50% lower than in bulk silicon due to the dielectric mismatch between the conducting channel and its surroundings.

  1. Donor-acceptor-donor tetrazines containing a ferrocene unit: synthesis, electrochemical and spectroscopic properties.

    PubMed

    Janowska, Izabela; Miomandre, Fabien; Clavier, Gilles; Audebert, Pierre; Zakrzewski, Janusz; Thi, Khuyen Hoang; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle

    2006-11-30

    Donor-acceptor-donor tetrazines containing ferrocene moieties and phenyl unit as a pi-bridge have been synthesized and characterized. UV-vis spectroscopic and cyclic voltamperometric results indicate sizable intramolecular charge transfer interactions in the ground state when the ferrocene is directly bound to the tetrazine. On the other hand, the results show reduction of the electron-donor strength of ferrocene moieties when there is a phenyl linkage. Both tetrazines display a high reduction potential. The role of ferrocenyl groups appear to be detrimental to maximize the cubic hyperpolarizability gamma of tetrazines, as compared to purely organic groups such as thiophene. A possible explanation for this behavior may originate from metal-to-ligand charge transfer processes.

  2. Intramolecular Charge-Transfer Interaction of Donor-Acceptor-Donor Arrays Based on Anthracene Bisimide.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Tetsuo; Ogawa, Marina; Yamauchi, Tomokazu; Toyota, Shinji

    2016-05-20

    We designed anthracene bisimide (ABI) derivatives having two triphenylamine (TPA) groups as donor units at the 9,10-positions to form a novel π-conjugated donor-acceptor system. These compounds and their analogues with ethynylene linkers were synthesized by Suzuki-Miyaura and Sonogashira coupling reactions, respectively. In UV-vis spectra, the linker-free derivatives showed broad absorption bands arising from intramolecular charge-transfer interactions. Introducing ethynylene linkers resulted in a considerable red shift of the absorption bands. In fluorescence spectra, the ethynylene derivatives showed intense emission bands at 600-650 nm. Their photophysical and electrochemical properties were compared with those of the corresponding mono TPA derivatives on the basis of theoretical calculations and cyclic voltammetry to evaluate the intramolecular electronic interactions between the donor and acceptor units.

  3. Scalable quantum computer architecture with coupled donor-quantum dot qubits

    DOEpatents

    Schenkel, Thomas; Lo, Cheuk Chi; Weis, Christoph; Lyon, Stephen; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-08-26

    A quantum bit computing architecture includes a plurality of single spin memory donor atoms embedded in a semiconductor layer, a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, wherein a first voltage applied across at least one pair of the aligned quantum dot and donor atom controls a donor-quantum dot coupling. A method of performing quantum computing in a scalable architecture quantum computing apparatus includes arranging a pattern of single spin memory donor atoms in a semiconductor layer, forming a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, applying a first voltage across at least one aligned pair of a quantum dot and donor atom to control a donor-quantum dot coupling, and applying a second voltage between one or more quantum dots to control a Heisenberg exchange J coupling between quantum dots and to cause transport of a single spin polarized electron between quantum dots.

  4. Segmented strings in AdS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callebaut, Nele; Gubser, Steven S.; Samberg, Andreas; Toldo, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    We study segmented strings in flat space and in AdS 3. In flat space, these well known classical motions describe strings which at any instant of time are piecewise linear. In AdS 3, the worldsheet is composed of faces each of which is a region bounded by null geodesics in an AdS 2 subspace of AdS 3. The time evolution can be described by specifying the null geodesic motion of kinks in the string at which two segments are joined. The outcome of collisions of kinks on the worldsheet can be worked out essentially using considerations of causality. We study several examples of closed segmented strings in AdS 3 and find an unexpected quasi-periodic behavior. We also work out a WKB analysis of quantum states of yo-yo strings in AdS 5 and find a logarithmic term reminiscent of the logarithmic twist of string states on the leading Regge trajectory.

  5. Polarised black holes in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Miguel S.; Greenspan, Lauren; Oliveira, Miguel; Penedones, João; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-06-01

    We consider solutions in Einstein-Maxwell theory with a negative cosmological constant that asymptote to global AdS 4 with conformal boundary {S}2× {{{R}}}t. At the sphere at infinity we turn on a space-dependent electrostatic potential, which does not destroy the asymptotic AdS behaviour. For simplicity we focus on the case of a dipolar electrostatic potential. We find two new geometries: (i) an AdS soliton that includes the full backreaction of the electric field on the AdS geometry; (ii) a polarised neutral black hole that is deformed by the electric field, accumulating opposite charges in each hemisphere. For both geometries we study boundary data such as the charge density and the stress tensor. For the black hole we also study the horizon charge density and area, and further verify a Smarr formula. Then we consider this system at finite temperature and compute the Gibbs free energy for both AdS soliton and black hole phases. The corresponding phase diagram generalizes the Hawking-Page phase transition. The AdS soliton dominates the low temperature phase and the black hole the high temperature phase, with a critical temperature that decreases as the external electric field increases. Finally, we consider the simple case of a free charged scalar field on {S}2× {{{R}}}t with conformal coupling. For a field in the SU(N ) adjoint representation we compare the phase diagram with the above gravitational system.

  6. The Advantages of Using Electronic Processes for Commenting on and Exchanging the Written Work of Students with Learning Disabilities and/or AD/HD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmichael, Stephen; Alden, Peg

    2006-01-01

    Researchers have explored the impact of computer-assisted feedback and electronic mail on students' writing, but most of the work to date seems to have focused on second language writers, peer response, or response as part of an online composition course. Although research has documented the importance of certain generic features of word…

  7. Characterization of human milk donors.

    PubMed

    Osbaldiston, Richard; Mingle, Leigh A

    2007-11-01

    The primary objective of this research was to create a detailed characterization of human milk donors, including descriptive information about demographics and lifestyle, involvement with the milk bank, reasons for donating, problems encountered while breastfeeding and pumping milk, barriers to donating milk, affective experiences, and personal values. Data were collected via telephone interview of 87 donors and 19 nondonor controls. Few relationships were found between the descriptive information and amount of milk donated. Donors reported fewer problems pumping milk than nondonors. Strategies for recruiting new donors and strategies for increasing donation amounts are presented.

  8. Facile and Promising Method for Michael Addition of Indole and Pyrrole to Electron-Deficient trans-β-Nitroolefins Catalyzed by a Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalyst Feist's Acid and Preliminary Study of Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al Majid, Abdullah M. A.; Islam, Mohammad Shahidul; Barakat, Assem; Al-Agamy, Mohamed H. M.; Naushad, Mu.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of cooperative hydrogen-bonding effects has been demonstrated using novel 3-methylenecyclopropane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid (Feist's acid (FA)) as hydrogen bond donor catalysts for the addition of indole and pyrrole to trans-β-nitrostyrene derivatives. Because of the hydrogen bond donor (HBD) ability, Feist's acid (FA) has been introduced as a new class of hydrogen bond donor catalysts for the activation of nitroolefin towards nucleophilic substitution reaction. It has effectively catalyzed the Michael addition of indoles and pyrrole to β-nitroolefins under optimum reaction condition to furnish the corresponding Michael adducts in good to excellent yields (up to 98%). The method is general, atom-economical, convenient, and eco-friendly and could provide excellent yields and regioselectivities. Some newly synthesized compounds were for examined in vitro antimicrobial activity and their preliminary results are reported. PMID:24574906

  9. Organ Donor FAQ's: Who Can Be a Donor

    MedlinePlus

    ... citizens have been organ donors. Can non-resident aliens donate and receive organs? Non-resident aliens can both donate and receive organs in the ... the 12,375 organ donors were non-resident aliens. In this same year, 259 (1%) of the ...

  10. 29Si nuclear spins as a resource for donor spin qubits in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfowicz, Gary; Mortemousque, Pierre-André; Guichard, Roland; Simmons, Stephanie; Thewalt, Mike L. W.; Itoh, Kohei M.; Morton, John J. L.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear spin registers in the vicinity of electron spins in solid state systems offer a powerful resource to address the challenge of scalability in quantum architectures. We investigate here the properties of 29Si nuclear spins surrounding donor atoms in silicon, and consider the use of such spins, combined with the donor nuclear spin, as a quantum register coupled to the donor electron spin. We find the coherence of the nearby 29Si nuclear spins is effectively protected by the presence of the donor electron spin, leading to coherence times in the second timescale—over two orders of magnitude greater than the coherence times in bulk silicon. We theoretically investigate the use of such a register for quantum error correction (QEC), including methods to protect nuclear spins from the ionisation/neutralisation of the donor, which is necessary for the re-initialisation of the ancillae qubits. This provides a route for multi-round QEC using donors in silicon.

  11. Spin relaxation and donor-acceptor recombination of Se+ in 28-silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Nardo, Roberto; Wolfowicz, Gary; Simmons, Stephanie; Tyryshkin, Alexei M.; Riemann, Helge; Abrosimov, Nikolai V.; Becker, Peter; Pohl, Hans-Joachim; Steger, Michael; Lyon, Stephen A.; Thewalt, Mike L. W.; Morton, John J. L.

    2015-10-01

    Selenium impurities in silicon are deep double donors and their optical and electronic properties have been recently investigated due to their application for infrared detection. However, a singly ionized selenium donor (Se+) possesses an electron spin which makes it a potential candidate as a silicon-based spin qubit, with significant potential advantages compared to the more commonly studied group V donors. Here we study the electron spin relaxation (T1) and coherence (T2) times of Se+ in isotopically purified 28-silicon, and find them to be up to two orders of magnitude longer than shallow group V donors at temperatures above ˜15 K . We further study the dynamics of donor-acceptor recombination between selenium and boron, demonstrating that it is possible to control the donor charge state through optical excitation of neutral Se0.

  12. Dynamics of homology searching during gene conversion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed by donor competition.

    PubMed

    Coïc, Eric; Martin, Joshua; Ryu, Taehyun; Tay, Sue Yen; Kondev, Jané; Haber, James E

    2011-12-01

    One of the least understood aspects of homologous recombination is the process by which the ends of a double-strand break (DSB) search the entire genome for homologous templates that can be used to repair the break. We took advantage of the natural competition between the alternative donors HML and HMR employed during HO endonuclease-induced switching of the budding yeast MAT locus. The strong mating-type-dependent bias in the choice of the donors is enforced by the recombination enhancer (RE), which lies 17 kb proximal to HML. We investigated factors that improve the use of the disfavored donor. We show that the normal heterochromatic state of the donors does not impair donor usage, as donor choice is not affected by removing this epigenetic silencing. In contrast, increasing the length of homology shared by the disfavored donor increases its use. This result shows that donor choice is not irrevocable and implies that there are several encounters between the DSB ends and even the favored donor before recombination is accomplished. The increase by adding more homology is not linear; these results can be explained by a thermodynamic model that determines the energy cost of using one donor over the other. An important inference from this analysis is that when HML is favored as the donor, RE causes a reduction in its effective genomic distance from MAT from 200 kb to ∼20 kb, which we hypothesize occurs after the DSB is created, by epigenetic chromatin modifications around MAT.

  13. Transport Measurements on Si Nanostructures with Counted Sb Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Meenakshi; Bielejec, Edward; Garratt, Elias; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Bishop, Nathaniel; Wendt, Joel; Luhman, Dwight; Carroll, Malcolm; Lilly, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Donor based spin qubits are a promising platform for quantum computing. Single qubits using timed implant of donors have been demonstrated.1 Extending this to multiple qubits requires precise control over the placement and number of donors. Such control can be achieved by using a combination of low-energy heavy-ion implants (to reduce depth straggle), electron-beam lithography (to define position), focused ion beam (to localize implants to one lithographic site) and counting the number of implants with a single ion detector.2 We report transport measurements on MOS quantum dots implanted with 5, 10 and 20 Sb donors using the approach described above. A donor charge transition is identified by a charge offset in the transport characteristics. Correlation between the number of donors and the charge offsets is studied. These results are necessary first steps towards fabricating donor nanostructures for two qubit interactions. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000. 1J. J. Pla et al., Nature 496, 334 (2013) 2J. A. Seamons et al., APL 93, 043124 (2008).

  14. The Lombardy Rare Donor Programme

    PubMed Central

    Revelli, Nicoletta; Villa, Maria Antonietta; Paccapelo, Cinzia; Manera, Maria Cristina; Rebulla, Paolo; Migliaccio, Anna Rita; Marconi, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2005, the government of Lombardy, an Italian region with an ethnically varied population of approximately 9.8 million inhabitants including 250,000 blood donors, founded the Lombardy Rare Donor Programme, a regional network of 15 blood transfusion departments coordinated by the Immunohaematology Reference Laboratory of the Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico in Milan. During 2005 to 2012, Lombardy funded LORD-P with 14.1 million euros. Materials and methods During 2005–2012 the Lombardy Rare Donor Programme members developed a registry of blood donors and a bank of red blood cell units with either rare blood group phenotypes or IgA deficiency. To do this, the Immunohaematology Reference Laboratory performed extensive serological and molecular red blood cell typing in 59,738 group O or A, Rh CCDee, ccdee, ccDEE, ccDee, K− or k− donors aged 18–55 with a record of two or more blood donations, including both Caucasians and ethnic minorities. In parallel, the Immunohaematology Reference Laboratory implemented a 24/7 service of consultation, testing and distribution of rare units for anticipated or emergent transfusion needs in patients developing complex red blood cell alloimmunisation and lacking local compatible red blood cell or showing IgA deficiency. Results Red blood cell typing identified 8,747, 538 and 33 donors rare for a combination of common antigens, negative for high-frequency antigens and with a rare Rh phenotype, respectively. In June 2012, the Lombardy Rare Donor Programme frozen inventory included 1,157 red blood cell units. From March 2010 to June 2012 one IgA-deficient donor was detected among 1,941 screened donors and IgA deficiency was confirmed in four previously identified donors. From 2005 to June 2012, the Immunohaematology Reference Laboratory provided 281 complex red blood cell alloimmunisation consultations and distributed 8,008 Lombardy Rare Donor Programme red blood cell units within and outside the region

  15. Spatially resolving valley quantum interference of a donor in silicon.

    PubMed

    Salfi, J; Mol, J A; Rahman, R; Klimeck, G; Simmons, M Y; Hollenberg, L C L; Rogge, S

    2014-06-01

    Electron and nuclear spins of donor ensembles in isotopically pure silicon experience a vacuum-like environment, giving them extraordinary coherence. However, in contrast to a real vacuum, electrons in silicon occupy quantum superpositions of valleys in momentum space. Addressable single-qubit and two-qubit operations in silicon require that qubits are placed near interfaces, modifying the valley degrees of freedom associated with these quantum superpositions and strongly influencing qubit relaxation and exchange processes. Yet to date, spectroscopic measurements have only probed wavefunctions indirectly, preventing direct experimental access to valley population, donor position and environment. Here we directly probe the probability density of single quantum states of individual subsurface donors, in real space and reciprocal space, using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. We directly observe quantum mechanical valley interference patterns associated with linear superpositions of valleys in the donor ground state. The valley population is found to be within 5% of a bulk donor when 2.85 ± 0.45 nm from the interface, indicating that valley-perturbation-induced enhancement of spin relaxation will be negligible for depths greater than 3 nm. The observed valley interference will render two-qubit exchange gates sensitive to atomic-scale variations in positions of subsurface donors. Moreover, these results will also be of interest for emerging schemes proposing to encode information directly in valley polarization. PMID:24705384

  16. Spatially resolving valley quantum interference of a donor in silicon.

    PubMed

    Salfi, J; Mol, J A; Rahman, R; Klimeck, G; Simmons, M Y; Hollenberg, L C L; Rogge, S

    2014-06-01

    Electron and nuclear spins of donor ensembles in isotopically pure silicon experience a vacuum-like environment, giving them extraordinary coherence. However, in contrast to a real vacuum, electrons in silicon occupy quantum superpositions of valleys in momentum space. Addressable single-qubit and two-qubit operations in silicon require that qubits are placed near interfaces, modifying the valley degrees of freedom associated with these quantum superpositions and strongly influencing qubit relaxation and exchange processes. Yet to date, spectroscopic measurements have only probed wavefunctions indirectly, preventing direct experimental access to valley population, donor position and environment. Here we directly probe the probability density of single quantum states of individual subsurface donors, in real space and reciprocal space, using scanning tunnelling spectroscopy. We directly observe quantum mechanical valley interference patterns associated with linear superpositions of valleys in the donor ground state. The valley population is found to be within 5% of a bulk donor when 2.85 ± 0.45 nm from the interface, indicating that valley-perturbation-induced enhancement of spin relaxation will be negligible for depths greater than 3 nm. The observed valley interference will render two-qubit exchange gates sensitive to atomic-scale variations in positions of subsurface donors. Moreover, these results will also be of interest for emerging schemes proposing to encode information directly in valley polarization.

  17. A theoretical study on tuning the electronic structures and photophysical properties of newly designed platinum(II) complexes by adding substituents on functionalized ligands as highly efficient OLED emitters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luqiong; Tian, Li; Li, Ming; He, Rongxing; Shen, Wei

    2014-05-01

    By imitating FIrpic, seven new platinum(II) complexes with pic (pic = picolinate) ligand have been designed to be guest materials by means of adding different substituents to functionalized ligands (ppy and fpy, ppy = phenylpyridyl-N,C and fpy = 2-(9',9'-diethyl-9H-fluorenyl)pyridyl-N,C). In order to reveal their molecular structures, photophysical properties and structure-property relationships with typical host materials, an in-depth theoretical investigation was performed via quantum chemical calculations. The electronic structures and photophysical properties of these complexes were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using the B3LYP functional with LANL2DZ and 6-31G* basis sets. It turns out that electronic structures and photophysical properties can be tuned by substituent modifications on functionalized ligands. This work highlights that the match between guest materials and host materials in typical OLED structures can be weighed by the energy levels of the HOMO and LUMO and the adiabatic triplet energy of each complex. Also, a combined analysis of electronic structures, host-guest match, reorganization energies (λ) and triplet exciton generation fraction (χ(T)) is helpful in exploring triplet emitters with high phosphorescence efficiency in OLEDs, which is an interesting and creative aspect of this work. Thereinto, λ reveals the capability of carrier transport and the balance between holes and electrons, whilst structural parameters and d-orbital splittings show that those complexes that have strong electron-withdrawing and electron-donating groups are nonemissive. Consequently, complexes 3-7 can be better triplet emitters than FIrpic. Moreover, the emission colors could be predicted by the 0-0 transition energy (E(0-0)) instead of the triplet vertical transition energy (E(vert)). Accordingly, complexes 3, 4 and 6 would be efficient phosphorescent materials with different predicted

  18. A theoretical study on tuning the electronic structures and photophysical properties of newly designed platinum(II) complexes by adding substituents on functionalized ligands as highly efficient OLED emitters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luqiong; Tian, Li; Li, Ming; He, Rongxing; Shen, Wei

    2014-05-01

    By imitating FIrpic, seven new platinum(II) complexes with pic (pic = picolinate) ligand have been designed to be guest materials by means of adding different substituents to functionalized ligands (ppy and fpy, ppy = phenylpyridyl-N,C and fpy = 2-(9',9'-diethyl-9H-fluorenyl)pyridyl-N,C). In order to reveal their molecular structures, photophysical properties and structure-property relationships with typical host materials, an in-depth theoretical investigation was performed via quantum chemical calculations. The electronic structures and photophysical properties of these complexes were investigated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using the B3LYP functional with LANL2DZ and 6-31G* basis sets. It turns out that electronic structures and photophysical properties can be tuned by substituent modifications on functionalized ligands. This work highlights that the match between guest materials and host materials in typical OLED structures can be weighed by the energy levels of the HOMO and LUMO and the adiabatic triplet energy of each complex. Also, a combined analysis of electronic structures, host-guest match, reorganization energies (λ) and triplet exciton generation fraction (χ(T)) is helpful in exploring triplet emitters with high phosphorescence efficiency in OLEDs, which is an interesting and creative aspect of this work. Thereinto, λ reveals the capability of carrier transport and the balance between holes and electrons, whilst structural parameters and d-orbital splittings show that those complexes that have strong electron-withdrawing and electron-donating groups are nonemissive. Consequently, complexes 3-7 can be better triplet emitters than FIrpic. Moreover, the emission colors could be predicted by the 0-0 transition energy (E(0-0)) instead of the triplet vertical transition energy (E(vert)). Accordingly, complexes 3, 4 and 6 would be efficient phosphorescent materials with different predicted

  19. Living kidney donors and ESRD.

    PubMed

    Ross, Lainie Friedman

    2015-07-01

    There are more than 325 living kidney donors who have developed end-stage renal disease and have been listed on the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN)/United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) deceased donor kidney wait list. The OPTN/UNOS database records where these kidney donors are listed and, if they donated after April 1994, where that donation occurred. These 2 locations are often not the same. In this commentary, I examine whether a national living donor registry should be created and whether transplantation centers should be notified when one of their living kidney donors develops end-stage renal disease. I consider and refute 5 potential objections to center notification. I explain that transplantation centers should look back at these cases and input data into a registry to attempt to identify patterns that could improve donor evaluation protocols. Creating a registry and mining the information it contains is, in my view, our moral and professional responsibility to future patients and the transplantation endeavor. As individuals and as a community, we need to acknowledge the many unknown risks of living kidney donation and take responsibility for identifying these risks. We then must share information about these risks, educate prospective donors about them, and attempt to minimize them.

  20. AdS duals of matrix strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Jose F.; Samtleben, Henning

    2003-06-01

    We review recent work on the holographic duals of type II and heterotic matrix string theories described by warped AdS3 supergravities. In particular, we compute the spectra of Kaluza-Klein primaries for type I, II supergravities on warped AdS3 × S7 and match them with the primary operators in the dual two-dimensional gauge theories. The presence of non-trivial warp factors and dilaton profiles requires a modification of the familiar dictionary between masses and 'scaling' dimensions of fields and operators. We present these modifications for the general case of domain wall/QFT correspondences between supergravities on warped AdSd+1 × Sq geometries and super Yang-Mills theories with 16 supercharges.

  1. Charge and energy transfer in a bithiophene perylenediimide based donor-acceptor-donor system for use in organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Jan; Dreuw, Andreas; Burghardt, Irene

    2013-07-28

    The elementary charge and excitation energy transfer steps in a novel symmetric donor-acceptor-donor triad first described in Roland et al. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 273, consisting of a central perylenediimide moiety as a potential electron acceptor and two identical electron rich bithiophene compounds, have been investigated using quantum chemical methodology. These elementary processes determine the applicability of such systems in photovoltaic devices. The molecular structure, excited states and the photo-physical properties are investigated using smaller model systems and including solvation effects. The donor and acceptor π-systems are separated by an ethyl bridge such that the molecular orbitals are either located on the donor or acceptor moiety making the identification of locally excited versus charge transfer states straightforward. Using excited state geometry optimizations, the mechanism of photo-initiated charge separation could be identified. Geometry relaxation in the excited donor state leads to a near-degeneracy with the locally excited acceptor state, entailing strong excitonic coupling and resonance energy transfer. This energy transfer process is driven by planarization and bond length alternation of the donor molecule. Geometry relaxation of the locally excited acceptor state in turn reveals a crossing with the energetically lowest charge transfer excited state. The energetic position of the latter depends in a sensitive fashion on the solvent. This provides an explanation of the sequential process observed in the experiment, favoring ultrafast (∼130 fs) formation of the excited acceptor state followed by slower (∼3 ps scale) formation of the charge separated state.

  2. Singlet-triplet donor-quantum-dot qubit in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.; Wendt, Joel R.; Pluym, Tammy; Lilly, Michael P.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel

    2015-03-01

    Electron spins bound to phosphorus (P) donors in silicon (Si) are promising qubits due to their high fidelities, but donor-donor coupling is challenging. We propose an alternative two-electron singlet-triplet quantum-dot (QD) and donor (D) hybrid qubit. A QD is formed at a MOS 28-Si interface and is tunnel-coupled to implanted P. The proposed two-axis system is defined by the exchange and contact hyperfine interactions. We demonstrate that a few electron QD can be formed and tuned to interact with a donor. We investigate the spin filling of the QD-D system through charge-sensed (CS) magnetospectroscopy and identify spin-up loading consistent with a singlet-triplet splitting of ~100 μeV near a QD-D anti-crossing. We also demonstrate an enhanced CS readout contrast and time window due to the restricted relaxation path of the D through the QD. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Being a Living Donor: Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... for blood transfusions side effects associated with allergic reactions to the anesthesia death The best source of information about risks and expected donor outcomes is your transplant team. In addition, it’s important to take an active role in ...

  4. Donor selection in heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Emani, Sitaramesh; Sai-Sudhakar, Chittoor B.; Higgins, Robert S. D.; Whitson, Bryan A.

    2014-01-01

    There is increased scrutiny on the quality in health care with particular emphasis on institutional heart transplant survival outcomes. An important aspect of successful transplantation is appropriate donor selection. We review the current guidelines as well as areas of controversy in the selection of appropriate hearts as donor organs to ensure optimal outcomes. This decision is paramount to the success of a transplant program as well as recipient survival and graft function post-transplant. PMID:25132976

  5. Through-Solvent Tunneling in Donor-Bridge-Acceptor Molecules Containing a Molecular Cleft.

    PubMed

    Graff, B M; Lamont, D N; Parker, M F L; Bloom, B P; Schafmeister, C E; Waldeck, D H

    2016-08-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer is used to investigate the solvent-mediated electron tunneling between electron donor and acceptor groups in polar solvents. Bis-peptide scaffolds are used to control the spatial positioning of electron donor and acceptor groups and create a molecular cleft. The photoinduced electron transfer is studied for two different cleft sizes, and the electronic coupling is found to be controlled by the nature of the solvent and the ability of the molecular cleft to accommodate it, as well as interact directly with it. These studies demonstrate the importance of electron tunneling through nonbonded contacts and reveal a strategy for examining such tunneling pathways in polar solvents. PMID:27401503

  6. Theory of Primary Photoexcitations in Donor-Acceptor Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryanpour, Karan; Dutta, Tirthankar; Huynh, Uyen N. V.; Vardeny, Zeev Valy; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2015-12-01

    We present a generic theory of primary photoexcitations in low band gap donor-acceptor conjugated copolymers. Because of the combined effects of strong electron correlations and broken symmetry, there is considerable mixing between a charge-transfer exciton and an energetically proximate triplet-triplet state with an overall spin singlet. The triplet-triplet state, optically forbidden in homopolymers, is allowed in donor-acceptor copolymers. For an intermediate difference in electron affinities of the donor and the acceptor, the triplet-triplet state can have a stronger oscillator strength than the charge-transfer exciton. We discuss the possibility of intramolecular singlet fission from the triplet-triplet state, and how such fission can be detected experimentally.

  7. [Non-heart-beating donors are ineligible].

    PubMed

    Heide, W

    2016-02-01

    The death of the donor is a mandatory prerequisite for organ transplantation (dead donor rule) worldwide. It is a medical, legal and ethical consensus to accept the concept of brain death, as first proposed in 1968 by the ad hoc committee of the Harvard Medical School, as a certain criterion of death. In isolated cases where the diagnosis of brain death was claimed to be wrong, it could be demonstrated that the diagnostic procedure for brain death had not been correctly performed. In March 2014 a joint statement by the German neuromedical societies emphasized that 1) the diagnosis of brain death is one of the safest diagnoses in medicine if performed according to accepted medical standards and criteria and 2) the concept of non-heart-beating donors (NHBD, i. e. organ donation after an arbitrarily defined duration of circulatory and cardiac arrest) practiced in some European countries must be absolutely rejected because it implicates a high risk of diagnostic error. According to the current literature it is unclear at what time cardiac and circulatory arrest is irreversible and leads to irreversible cessation of all functions of the entire brain including the brainstem, even though clinical signs of cessation of brain functions are always found after 10 min. Furthermore, is it often an arbitrary decision to exactly define the duration of cardiac arrest if continuous echocardiographic monitoring has not been carried out from the very beginning. Last but not least there are ethical concerns against the concept of NHBD because it might influence therapeutic efforts to resuscitate a patient with cardiac arrest. Therefore, the German Medical Council (BÄK) has repeatedly rejected the concept of NHBD for organ transplantation since 1995. PMID:26830897

  8. Blood Donation by Elderly Repeat Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Zeiler, Thomas; Lander-Kox, Jutta; Alt, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Upper age limits for blood donors are intended to protect elderly blood donors from donor reactions. However, due to a lack of data about adverse reactions in elderly blood donors, upper age limits are arbitrary and vary considerably between different countries. Methods Here we present data from 171,231 voluntary repeat whole blood donors beyond the age of 68 years. Results Blood donations from repeat blood donors beyond the age of 68 years increased from 2,114 in 2005 to 38,432 in 2012 (from 0,2% to 4.2% of all whole blood donations). Adverse donor reactions in repeat donors decreased with age and were lower than in the whole group (0.26%), even in donors older than 71 years (0.16%). However, from the age of 68 years, the time to complete recovery after donor reactions increased. Donor deferrals were highest in young blood donors (21.4%), but increased again in elderly blood donors beyond 71 years (12.6%). Conclusion Blood donation by regular repeat blood donors older than 71 years may be safely continued. However, due to a lack of data for donors older than 75 years, blood donation in these donors should be handled with great caution. PMID:25254019

  9. Agricultural Education: Value Adding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riesenberg, Lou E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This issue develops the theme of "Agricultural Education--Value Adding." The concept value adding has been a staple in the world of agricultural business for describing adding value to a commodity that would profit the producer and the local community. Agricultural education should add value to individuals and society to justify agricultural…

  10. Design and synthesis of molecular donors for solution-processed high-efficiency organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Jessica E; Henson, Zachary B; Welch, Gregory C; Bazan, Guillermo C

    2014-01-21

    efficient molecular donors that achieve power conversion efficiencies greater than 7%. The molecules are based on a modular D(1)-A-D(2)-A-D(1) architecture, where A is an asymmetric electron deficient heterocycle, which allowed us to quickly access a library of compounds and develop structure-property-performance relationships. Modifications to the D1 and D2 units enable spectral coverage throughout the entire visible region and control of HOMO energy levels, while adjustments to the pendant alkyl substituents dictate molecular solubility, thermal transition temperatures, and solid-state organizational tendencies. Additionally, we discuss regiochemical considerations that highlight how individual atom placements can significantly influence molecular and subsequently device characteristics. Our results demonstrate the utility of this architecture for generating promising materials to be integrated into organic photovoltaic devices, call attention to areas for improvement, and provide guiding principles to sustain the steady increases necessary to move this technology forward.

  11. Quadrupolar effects on nuclear spins of neutral arsenic donors in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franke, David P.; Pflüger, Moritz P. D.; Mortemousque, Pierre-André; Itoh, Kohei M.; Brandt, Martin S.

    2016-04-01

    We present electrically detected electron nuclear double resonance measurements of the nuclear spins of ionized and neutral arsenic donors in strained silicon. In addition to a reduction of the hyperfine coupling, we find significant quadrupole interactions of the nuclear spin of the neutral donors of the order of 10 kHz. By comparing these to the quadrupole shifts due to crystal fields measured for the ionized donors, we identify the effect of the additional electron on the electric field gradient at the nucleus. This extra component is expected to be caused by the coupling to electric field gradients created due to changes in the electron wave function under strain.

  12. Who is the best alternative allotransplant donor?

    PubMed Central

    Gale, RP; Eapen, M

    2015-01-01

    Assuming that most physicians will chose an HLA-identical sibling as the best allotransplant donor, the question arises who is the best alternative donor when an HLA-identical sibling is unavailable? The most commonly used alternative donors are HLA-identical or -mismatched unrelated donors, HLA-matched or -mismatched umbilical cord blood donor or a related, HLA-haplotype-matched related donors. Each alternative donor option has advantages and disadvantages. We discuss selected aspects of these issues based on data from randomized clinical trials and observational databases. However, because there are limited data to address specific clinical settings, quantification of expert opinion is sometimes needed. PMID:26039206

  13. Alcohols as hydrogen-donor solvents for treatment of coal

    DOEpatents

    Ross, David S.; Blessing, James E.

    1981-01-01

    A method for the hydroconversion of coal by solvent treatment at elevated temperatures and pressure wherein an alcohol having an .alpha.-hydrogen atom, particularly a secondary alcohol such as isopropanol, is utilized as a hydrogen donor solvent. In a particular embodiment, a base capable of providing a catalytically effective amount of the corresponding alcoholate anion under the solvent treatment conditions is added to catalyze the alcohol-coal reaction.

  14. Donor substrate regulation of transketolase.

    PubMed

    Esakova, Olga A; Meshalkina, Ludmilla E; Golbik, Ralph; Hübner, Gerhard; Kochetov, German A

    2004-11-01

    The influence of substrates on the interaction of apotransketolase with thiamin diphosphate was investigated in the presence of magnesium ions. It was shown that the donor substrates, but not the acceptor substrates, enhance the affinity of the coenzyme either to only one active center of transketolase or to both active centers, but to different degrees in each, resulting in a negative cooperativity for coenzyme binding. In the absence of donor substrate, negative cooperativity is not observed. The donor substrate did not affect the interaction of the apoenzyme with the inactive coenzyme analogue, N3'-pyridyl-thiamin diphosphate. The influence of the donor substrate on the coenzyme-apotransketolase interaction was predicted as a result of formation of the transketolase reaction intermediate 2-(alpha,beta-dihydroxyethyl)-thiamin diphosphate, which exhibited a higher affinity to the enzyme than thiamin diphosphate. The enhancement of thiamin diphosphate's affinity to apotransketolase in the presence of donor substrate is probably one of the mechanisms underlying the substrate-affected transketolase regulation at low coenzyme concentrations.

  15. Valley-enhanced fast relaxation of gate-controlled donor qubits in silicon.

    PubMed

    Boross, Péter; Széchenyi, Gábor; Pályi, András

    2016-08-01

    Gate control of donor electrons near interfaces is a generic ingredient of donor-based quantum computing. Here, we address the question: how is the phonon-assisted qubit relaxation time T 1 affected as the electron is shuttled between the donor and the interface? We focus on the example of the 'flip-flop qubit' (Tosi et al arXiv:1509.08538v1), defined as a combination of the nuclear and electronic states of a phosphorus donor in silicon, promising fast electrical control and long dephasing times when the electron is halfway between the donor and the interface. We theoretically describe orbital relaxation, flip-flop relaxation, and electron spin relaxation. We estimate that the flip-flop qubit relaxation time can be of the order of 100 μs, 8 orders of magnitude shorter than the value for an on-donor electron in bulk silicon, and a few orders of magnitude shorter (longer) than the predicted inhomogeneous dephasing time (gate times). All three relaxation processes are boosted by (i) the nontrivial valley structure of the electron-phonon interaction, and (ii) the different valley compositions of the involved electronic states. PMID:27334425

  16. Valley-enhanced fast relaxation of gate-controlled donor qubits in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boross, Péter; Széchenyi, Gábor; Pályi, András

    2016-08-01

    Gate control of donor electrons near interfaces is a generic ingredient of donor-based quantum computing. Here, we address the question: how is the phonon-assisted qubit relaxation time T 1 affected as the electron is shuttled between the donor and the interface? We focus on the example of the ‘flip-flop qubit’ (Tosi et al arXiv:1509.08538v1), defined as a combination of the nuclear and electronic states of a phosphorus donor in silicon, promising fast electrical control and long dephasing times when the electron is halfway between the donor and the interface. We theoretically describe orbital relaxation, flip-flop relaxation, and electron spin relaxation. We estimate that the flip-flop qubit relaxation time can be of the order of 100 μs, 8 orders of magnitude shorter than the value for an on-donor electron in bulk silicon, and a few orders of magnitude shorter (longer) than the predicted inhomogeneous dephasing time (gate times). All three relaxation processes are boosted by (i) the nontrivial valley structure of the electron-phonon interaction, and (ii) the different valley compositions of the involved electronic states.

  17. Valley-enhanced fast relaxation of gate-controlled donor qubits in silicon.

    PubMed

    Boross, Péter; Széchenyi, Gábor; Pályi, András

    2016-08-01

    Gate control of donor electrons near interfaces is a generic ingredient of donor-based quantum computing. Here, we address the question: how is the phonon-assisted qubit relaxation time T 1 affected as the electron is shuttled between the donor and the interface? We focus on the example of the 'flip-flop qubit' (Tosi et al arXiv:1509.08538v1), defined as a combination of the nuclear and electronic states of a phosphorus donor in silicon, promising fast electrical control and long dephasing times when the electron is halfway between the donor and the interface. We theoretically describe orbital relaxation, flip-flop relaxation, and electron spin relaxation. We estimate that the flip-flop qubit relaxation time can be of the order of 100 μs, 8 orders of magnitude shorter than the value for an on-donor electron in bulk silicon, and a few orders of magnitude shorter (longer) than the predicted inhomogeneous dephasing time (gate times). All three relaxation processes are boosted by (i) the nontrivial valley structure of the electron-phonon interaction, and (ii) the different valley compositions of the involved electronic states.

  18. [Living donor transplantation. Surgical complications].

    PubMed

    Karam, Georges

    2008-02-01

    Although nephrectomy by open surgery is the most used technique for the extraction of kidney transplants in the living donor, nephrectomy under laparaoscopy is increasingly practiced. Laparoscopic nephrectomy is less invasive and performed under videoscopy control, after insufflation of the peritoneal cavity. Three to four incisions are done in order to enter the surgical instruments. The kidney is extracted through a horizontal sus-pubic incision. The exposition is either exclusively transperitoneal, retroperitoneal or hand assisted. The advantages of laparoscopy are esthetical, financial due to a shorter hospitalisation and a quicker recovery, as well a confort for the donor. The disadvantages are a longer warm ischemia time and possibly a higher risk of delayed graft function. Randomised studies having compared laparoscopy and open surgery in the living donor have not find any significant difference regarding the per- and perioperative in the complications.

  19. [Living donor transplantation. Surgical complications].

    PubMed

    Karam, Georges

    2008-02-01

    Although nephrectomy by open surgery is the most used technique for the extraction of kidney transplants in the living donor, nephrectomy under laparaoscopy is increasingly practiced. Laparoscopic nephrectomy is less invasive and performed under videoscopy control, after insufflation of the peritoneal cavity. Three to four incisions are done in order to enter the surgical instruments. The kidney is extracted through a horizontal sus-pubic incision. The exposition is either exclusively transperitoneal, retroperitoneal or hand assisted. The advantages of laparoscopy are esthetical, financial due to a shorter hospitalisation and a quicker recovery, as well a confort for the donor. The disadvantages are a longer warm ischemia time and possibly a higher risk of delayed graft function. Randomised studies having compared laparoscopy and open surgery in the living donor have not find any significant difference regarding the per- and perioperative in the complications. PMID:18160357

  20. Donor criteria in hepatic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jonas, S; Bechstein, W O; Keck, H; Lemmens, H P; Blumhardt, G; Neuhaus, P

    1994-01-01

    The early outcome of 201 liver grafts transplanted consecutively between September 1988 and November 1991 was investigated retrospectively. Donors were categorized according to their hospitalization periods in an intensive care unit (ICU) prior to harvesting, their causes of death, and the variables generally believed to be critical in liver donation, such as arterial hypotension (n = 69; 34.3%), cardiopulmonary resuscitation (n = 20; 9.9%), elevated serum-aminotransferases (s-AT) (n = 11; 5.5%), or an age over 50 years (n = 16; 8.0%). Ninety-one donors (45.3%) spent less than 24 h in an ICU; 29 donors (14.4%) and 14 donors (7.0%) had hospitalization periods generally considered critical of 4-6 days and more than 6 days, respectively. The most common causes of death were subarachnoidal bleeding (n = 70; 34.8%), isolated head injuries (n = 68; 33.8%), and polytraumata (n = 33; 16.4%). The postischemic hepatocellular damage was evaluated comparing peak post-transplant s-AT, which did not differ significantly between groups; nor did donor and recipient ages or cold ischemia times. Fourteen grafts (7.0%) showed a reversible preservation injury presenting with post-transplant s-AT elevated above 2000 IU/l. Five cases (2.5%) of a primary non-functioning graft (PNF) underwent early retransplantation successfully. Serum-aminotransferases (AST: 4944 +/- 2280 IU/l; ATL: 3186 +/- 1918 IU/l) were significantly (P < 0.01) elevated as compared to primary functioning grafts (AST: 699 +/- 935 IU/l; ALT: 620 +/- 701 IU/l). The donor structure of both groups reflected the distribution of variables in the entire collective. No significant overrepresentations were observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. [The safety of blood donors].

    PubMed

    Courchelle, J; Baudry, C; Bourboul, M-C; Coudurier, N

    2011-04-01

    For a long time, safety has been patient-centred and taken for granted. Indeed, it needed a dramatic accident and the study of post-donation information for the question to be looked into again. However, under various statutory, organizational aspects and the professionalization of the staffs, safety has always accompanied the donor throughout its course of donation. Self-sufficiency is, certainly, the first mission of the Établissement Français du Sang: while we have to supply patients with sufficient blood products complying with quality criteria, we must not however forget the essential respect for the safety of the donor.

  2. Adding flavor to AdS4/CFT3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammon, Martin; Erdmenger, Johanna; Meyer, René; O'Bannon, Andy; Wrase, Timm

    2009-11-01

    Aharony, Bergman, Jafferis, and Maldacena have proposed that the low-energy description of multiple M2-branes at a Bbb C4/Bbb Zk singularity is a (2+1)-dimensional Script N = 6 supersymmetric U(Nc) × U(Nc) Chern-Simons matter theory, the ABJM theory. In the large-Nc limit, its holographic dual is supergravity in AdS4 × S7/Bbb Zk. We study various ways to add fields that transform in the fundamental representation of the gauge groups, i.e. flavor fields, to the ABJM theory. We work in a probe limit and perform analyses in both the supergravity and field theory descriptions. In the supergravity description we find a large class of supersymmetric embeddings of probe flavor branes. In the field theory description, we present a general method to determine the couplings of the flavor fields to the fields of the ABJM theory. We then study four examples in detail: codimension-zero Script N = 3 supersymmetric flavor, described in supergravity by Kaluza-Klein monopoles or D6-branes; codimension-one Script N = (0,6) supersymmetric chiral flavor, described by D8-branes; codimension-one Script N = (3,3) supersymmetric non-chiral flavor, described by M5/D4-branes; codimension-two Script N = 4 supersymmetric flavor, described by M2/D2-branes. Finally we discuss special physical equivalences between brane embeddings in M-theory, and their interpretation in the field theory description.

  3. Donor Properties of a New Class of Guanidinate Ligands Possessing Ketimine Backbones: A Comparative Study Using Iron.

    PubMed

    Maity, Arnab K; Metta-Magaña, Alejandro J; Fortier, Skye

    2015-10-19

    Addition of 1 equiv of LiN═C(t)Bu2 or LiN═Ad (Ad = 2-adamantyl) to the aryl carbodiimide C(NDipp)2 (Dipp = 2,6-diisopropylphenyl) readily generates the lithium ketimine-guanidinates Li(THF)2[(X)C(NDipp)2] (X = N═C(t)Bu2 (1-(t)Bu), N═Ad (1-Ad)) in excellent yields. These new ligands can be readily metalated with iron to give the N,N'-bidentate chelates [{(X)C(NDipp)2}FeBr]2 (X = N═C(t)Bu2 (5-(t)Bu), N═Ad (5-Ad)), in which the ketimines behave as noncoordinating backbone substituents. In an effort to understand the potential electronic contributions of the ketimine group to the ligand architecture, a thorough structural and electronic study was conducted comparing the features and properties of 5-(t)Bu and 5-Ad to their guanidinate and amidinate analogues [{(X)C(NDipp)2}FeBr]2 (X = (i)Pr2N (6), (t)Bu (7)). Solid-state structural analyses indicate little electronic contribution from the N-ketimine nitrogen atom, while solution-phase electronic absorption spectra of 5-(t)Bu and 5-Ad are qualitatively similar to the amidinate complex 7. Yet, electrochemical measurements do show the donor properties of the ketimine-guanidinate in 5-(t)Bu to be intermediate between its guanidinate and amidinate counterparts in 6 and 7. Preliminary reactivity studies also show that the reduction chemistry of 5-(t)Bu diverges significantly from that of 6 and 7. Treatment of 5-(t)Bu with excess magnesium or 1 equiv of KC8 leads to the formation of the Fe(I)-Fe(I) complex [{μ-((t)Bu2C═N)C(NDipp)2}2Fe2] (11), which possesses an exceedingly short Fe═Fe bond (2.1516(5) Å), while neither 6 nor 7 forms dinuclear complexes upon reduction. This result demonstrates that ketimine-guanidinates do not simply behave as amidinate variants but can contribute to distinctive metal chemistry of their own. PMID:26419613

  4. Valley-enhanced fast relaxation of gate-controlled donor qubits in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boross, Péter; Széchenyi, Gábor; Pályi, András

    2016-08-01

    Gate control of donor electrons near interfaces is a generic ingredient of donor-based quantum computing. Here, we address the question: how is the phonon-assisted qubit relaxation time T 1 affected as the electron is shuttled between the donor and the interface? We focus on the example of the ‘flip-flop qubit’ (Tosi et al arXiv:1509.08538v1), defined as a combination of the nuclear and electronic states of a phosphorus donor in silicon, promising fast electrical control and long dephasing times when the electron is halfway between the donor and the interface. We theoretically describe orbital relaxation, flip-flop relaxation, and electron spin relaxation. We estimate that the flip-flop qubit relaxation time can be of the order of 100 μs, 8 orders of magnitude shorter than the value for an on-donor electron in bulk silicon, and a few orders of magnitude shorter (longer) than the predicted inhomogeneous dephasing time (gate times). All three relaxation processes are boosted by (i) the nontrivial valley structure of the electron–phonon interaction, and (ii) the different valley compositions of the involved electronic states.

  5. Donor-Appended N,C-Chelate Organoboron Compounds: Influence of Donor Strength on Photochromic Behaviour.

    PubMed

    Mellerup, Soren K; Yuan, Kang; Nguyen, Carmen; Lu, Zheng-Hong; Wang, Suning

    2016-08-22

    Recently, four-coordinated N,C-chelate organoboron compounds have been found to show many interesting photochemical transformations depending on the nature of their chelating framework. As such, the effect of substitution on the chelate ligand has been well-established and understood, but the impact of the aryl groups attached to the boron atom remains less clear. To investigate the effect of enhanced charge-transfer character, a series of new N,C-chelate organoboron compounds with donor-functionalized aryl groups have been synthesized and characterized using NMR, UV/Vis, and electrochemical methods. These compounds were found to possess bright and tunable charge-transfer luminescence which is dependent on the donor strength of the amino substituent. In addition, some of these compounds undergo photochromic switching, producing dark isomers of various colors. This work establishes that donor-functionalization of the aryl groups in N,C-chelate boron compounds is an effective strategy for tuning both the photophysical and photochemical properties of such systems. The new findings also help elucidate the influence of electronic structure on the photoreactivity of N,C-chelate organoboron compounds which appears to be as important as steric crowding around the boron atom.

  6. 78 FR 50421 - Guidance for Industry: Recommendations for Donor Questioning, Deferral, Reentry, and Product...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... deferral recommendations. In the Federal Register of July 6, 2012 (77 FR 40068), FDA announced the... applicable to donors of Source Plasma. DATES: Submit either electronic or written comments on...

  7. Twistor methods for AdS5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamo, Tim; Skinner, David; Williams, Jack

    2016-08-01

    We consider the application of twistor theory to five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space. The twistor space of AdS5 is the same as the ambitwistor space of the four-dimensional conformal boundary; the geometry of this correspondence is reviewed for both the bulk and boundary. A Penrose transform allows us to describe free bulk fields, with or without mass, in terms of data on twistor space. Explicit representatives for the bulk-to-boundary propagators of scalars and spinors are constructed, along with twistor action functionals for the free theories. Evaluating these twistor actions on bulk-to-boundary propagators is shown to produce the correct two-point functions.

  8. AdS3: the NHEK generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Heurtier, Lucien; Puhm, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    It was argued in [1] that the five-dimensional near-horizon extremal Kerr (NHEK) geometry can be embedded in String Theory as the infrared region of an infinite family of non-supersymmetric geometries that have D1, D5, momentum and KK monopole charges. We show that there exists a method to embed these geometries into asymptotically- {AdS}_3× {S}^3/{{Z}}_N solutions, and hence to obtain infinite families of flows whose infrared is NHEK. This indicates that the CFT dual to the NHEK geometry is the IR fixed point of a Renormalization Group flow from a known local UV CFT and opens the door to its explicit construction.

  9. Single-Donor Leukophoretic Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, R. N.

    1977-01-01

    Leukocyte separation-and-retrieval device utilizes granulocyte and monocyte property of leukoadhesion to glass surfaces as basis of their separation from whole blood. Device is used with single donor technique and has application in biological and chemical processing, veterinary research and clinical care.

  10. Radio frequency reflectometry and charge sensing of a precision placed donor in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hile, Samuel J.; House, Matthew G.; Peretz, Eldad; Verduijn, Jan; Widmann, Daniel; Kobayashi, Takashi; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y.

    2015-08-01

    We compare charge transitions on a deterministic single P donor in silicon using radio frequency reflectometry measurements with a tunnel coupled reservoir and DC charge sensing using a capacitively coupled single electron transistor (SET). By measuring the conductance through the SET and comparing this with the phase shift of the reflected radio frequency (RF) excitation from the reservoir, we can discriminate between charge transfer within the SET channel and tunneling between the donor and reservoir. The RF measurement allows observation of donor electron transitions at every charge degeneracy point in contrast to the SET conductance signal where charge transitions are only observed at triple points. The tunnel coupled reservoir has the advantage of a large effective lever arm (˜35%), allowing us to independently extract a neutral donor charging energy ˜62 ± 17 meV. These results demonstrate that we can replace three terminal transistors by a single terminal dispersive reservoir, promising for high bandwidth scalable donor control and readout.

  11. Surface code architecture for donors and dots in silicon with imprecise and nonuniform qubit couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pica, G.; Lovett, B. W.; Bhatt, R. N.; Schenkel, T.; Lyon, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    A scaled quantum computer with donor spins in silicon would benefit from a viable semiconductor framework and a strong inherent decoupling of the qubits from the noisy environment. Coupling neighboring spins via the natural exchange interaction according to current designs requires gate control structures with extremely small length scales. We present a silicon architecture where bismuth donors with long coherence times are coupled to electrons that can shuttle between adjacent quantum dots, thus relaxing the pitch requirements and allowing space between donors for classical control devices. An adiabatic SWAP operation within each donor/dot pair solves the scalability issues intrinsic to exchange-based two-qubit gates, as it does not rely on subnanometer precision in donor placement and is robust against noise in the control fields. We use this SWAP together with well established global microwave Rabi pulses and parallel electron shuttling to construct a surface code that needs minimal, feasible local control.

  12. Shadows, currents, and AdS fields

    SciTech Connect

    Metsaev, R. R.

    2008-11-15

    Conformal totally symmetric arbitrary spin currents and shadow fields in flat space-time of dimension greater than or equal to four are studied. A gauge invariant formulation for such currents and shadow fields is developed. Gauge symmetries are realized by involving the Stueckelberg fields. A realization of global conformal boost symmetries is obtained. Gauge invariant differential constraints for currents and shadow fields are obtained. AdS/CFT correspondence for currents and shadow fields and the respective normalizable and non-normalizable solutions of massless totally symmetric arbitrary spin AdS fields are studied. The bulk fields are considered in a modified de Donder gauge that leads to decoupled equations of motion. We demonstrate that leftover on shell gauge symmetries of bulk fields correspond to gauge symmetries of boundary currents and shadow fields, while the modified de Donder gauge conditions for bulk fields correspond to differential constraints for boundary conformal currents and shadow fields. Breaking conformal symmetries, we find interrelations between the gauge invariant formulation of the currents and shadow fields, and the gauge invariant formulation of massive fields.

  13. Counted Sb donors in Si quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Meenakshi; Pacheco, Jose; Bielejec, Edward; Perry, Daniel; Ten Eyck, Gregory; Bishop, Nathaniel; Wendt, Joel; Luhman, Dwight; Carroll, Malcolm; Lilly, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Deterministic control over the location and number of donors is critical for donor spin qubits in semiconductor based quantum computing. We have developed techniques using a focused ion beam and a diode detector integrated next to a silicon MOS single electron transistor to gain such control. With the diode detector operating in linear mode, the numbers of ions implanted have been counted and single ion implants have been detected. Poisson statistics in the number of ions implanted have been observed. Transport measurements performed on samples with counted number of implants have been performed and regular coulomb blockade and charge offsets observed. The capacitances to various gates are found to be in agreement with QCAD simulations for an electrostatically defined dot. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Theory of one and two donors in silicon.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, A L; Baena, A; Calderón, M J; Koiller, Belita

    2015-04-22

    We provide here a roadmap for modeling silicon nano-devices with one or two group V donors (D). We discuss systems containing one or two electrons, that is, D(0), D(-), D(+)(2) and D(0)(2) centers. The impact of different levels of approximation is discussed. The most accurate instances--for which we provide quantitative results--are within multivalley effective mass including the central cell correction and a configuration interaction account of the electron-electron correlations. We also derive insightful, yet less accurate, analytical approximations and discuss their validity and limitations--in particular, for a donor pair, we discuss the single orbital LCAO method, the Hückel approximation and the Hubbard model. Finally, we connect these results with recent experiments on devices with few dopants. PMID:25783857

  15. Theory of one and two donors in silicon.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, A L; Baena, A; Calderón, M J; Koiller, Belita

    2015-04-22

    We provide here a roadmap for modeling silicon nano-devices with one or two group V donors (D). We discuss systems containing one or two electrons, that is, D(0), D(-), D(+)(2) and D(0)(2) centers. The impact of different levels of approximation is discussed. The most accurate instances--for which we provide quantitative results--are within multivalley effective mass including the central cell correction and a configuration interaction account of the electron-electron correlations. We also derive insightful, yet less accurate, analytical approximations and discuss their validity and limitations--in particular, for a donor pair, we discuss the single orbital LCAO method, the Hückel approximation and the Hubbard model. Finally, we connect these results with recent experiments on devices with few dopants.

  16. Charge transport and exciton dissociation in organic solar cells consisting of dipolar donors mixed with C70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Olga L.; Liu, Xiao; Amonoo, Jojo A.; Djurovich, Peter I.; Thompson, Mark E.; Green, Peter F.; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate dipolar donor materials mixed with a C70 acceptor in an organic photovoltaic (OPV) cell. Dipolar donors that have donor-acceptor-acceptor (d-a-a') structure result in high conductivity pathways due to close coupling between neighboring molecules in the mixed films. We analyze the charge transfer properties of the dipolar donor:C70 mixtures and corresponding neat donors using a combination of time-resolved electroluminescence from intermolecular polaron pair states and conductive tip atomic force microscopy, from which we infer that dimers of the d-a-a' donors tend to form a continuous network of nanocrystalline clusters within the blends. Additional insights are provided by quantum-mechanical calculations of hole transfer coupling and hopping rates between donor molecules using nearest-neighbor donor packing motifs taken from crystal structural data. The approximation using only nearest-neighbor interactions leads to good agreement between donor hole hopping rates and the conductive properties of the donor:C70 blends. This represents a significant simplification from requiring details of the nano- and mesoscale morphologies of thin films to estimate their electronic characteristics. Using these dipolar donors, we obtain a maximum power conversion efficiency of 9.6 ±0.5 % under 1 sun, AM1.5G simulated illumination for an OPV comprised of an active layer containing a dipolar donor mixed with C70.

  17. Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor

    MedlinePlus

    ... total__ Find out why Close Becoming a Blood Stem Cell Donor NCIcancertopics Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 359 359 Loading... ... Ever considered becoming a bone marrow or blood stem cell donor? Follow this true story of a former ...

  18. Low temperature pulsed EPR study at 34 GHz of the triplet states of the primary electron donor P865 and the carotenoid in native and mutant bacterial reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides†

    PubMed Central

    Marchanka, Aliaksandr; Paddock, Mark; Lubitz, Wolfgang; van Gastel, Maurice

    2008-01-01

    The photosynthetic charge separation in bacterial reaction centers occurs predominantly along one of two nearly symmetric branches of cofactors. Low temperature EPR spectra of the triplet states of the chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments in the reaction center of Rb. sphaeroides R-26.1, 2.4.1 and two double mutants GD(M203)/AW(M260) and LH(M214)/AW(M260) have been recorded at 34 GHz to investigate the relative activities of the ‘A’ and ‘B’ branches. The triplet states are found to derive from radical pair and intersystem crossing mechanisms and the rates of formation are anisotropic. The former mechanism is operative for Rb. sphaeroides R-26.1, 2.4.1 and mutant GD(M203)/AW(M260) and indicates that A-branch charge separation proceeds at temperatures down to 10 K. The latter mechanism, derived from the spin polarization and operative for mutant LH(M214)/AW(M260) indicates that no long-lived radical pairs are formed upon direct excitation of the primary donor and that virtually no charge separation at the B-branch occurs at low temperatures. When the temperature is raised above 30 K, B-branch charge separation is observed, which is at most 1% of A-branch charge separation. B-branch radical pair formation can be induced at 10 K with low yield by direct excitation of the bacteriopheophytin of the B-branch at 590 nm. The formation of a carotenoid triplet state is observed. The rate of formation depends on the orientation of the reaction center in the magnetic field and is caused by a magnetic field dependence of the oscillation frequency by which the singlet and triplet radical pair precursor states interchange. Combination of these findings with literature data provides strong evidence that the thermally activated transfer step on the B-branch occurs between the primary donor, P865, and the accessory bacteriochlorophyll, whereas this step is barrierless down to 10 K along the A-branch. PMID:18052205

  19. Communication gaps associated with donor-derived infections.

    PubMed

    Miller, R; Covington, S; Taranto, S; Carrico, R; Ehsan, A; Friedman, B; Green, M; Ison, M G; Kaul, D; Kubak, B; Lebovitz, D J; Lyon, G M; Nalesnik, M A; Pruett, T L; Teperman, L; Vasudev, B; Blumberg, E

    2015-01-01

    The detection and management of potential donor-derived infections is challenging, in part due to the complexity of communications between diverse labs, organ procurement organizations (OPOs), and recipient transplant centers. We sought to determine if communication delays or errors occur in the reporting and management of donor-derived infections and if these are associated with preventable adverse events in recipients. All reported potential donor-derived transmission events reviewed by the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network Ad Hoc Disease Transmission Advisory Committee from January 2008 to June 2010 were evaluated for communication gaps between the donor center, OPO and transplant centers. The impact on recipient outcomes was then determined. Fifty-six infection events (IEs; involving 168 recipients) were evaluated. Eighteen IEs (48 recipients) were associated with communication gaps, of which 12 resulted in adverse effects in 69% of recipients (20/29), including six deaths. When IEs and test results were reported without delay, appropriate interventions were taken, subsequently minimizing or averting recipient infection (23 IEs, 72 recipients). Communication gaps in reported IEs are frequent, occur at multiple levels in the communication process, and contribute to adverse outcomes among affected transplant recipients. Conversely, effective communication minimized or averted infection in transplant recipients.

  20. Impact of donor-acceptor geometry and metal chelation on photophysical properties and applications of triarylboranes.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Zachary M; Wang, Suning

    2009-10-20

    Three-coordinate organoboron compounds have recently found a wide range of applications in materials chemistry as nonlinear optical materials, chemical sensors, and emitters for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). These compounds are excellent electron acceptors due to the empty p(pi) orbital on the boron center. When accompanied by electron donors such as amines, these molecules possess large electronic dipoles, which promote donor-acceptor charge-transfer upon excitation with light. Because of this, donor-acceptor triarylboranes are often highly luminescent both in the solid state and in solution. In this Account, we describe our research to develop donor-acceptor triarylboranes as efficient blue emitters for OLEDs. Through the use of hole-transporting donor groups such as 1-napthylphenylamines, we have prepared multifunctional triarylboranes that can act as the emissive, electron transport, or hole transport layers in OLEDs. We have also examined donor-acceptor compounds based on 2,2'-dipyridylamine or 7-azaindolyl donors, several of which have fluorescent quantum efficiencies approaching 100%. We are also investigating the chemistry of metal-containing triarylboranes. Our studies show that the electron-deficient boryl group can greatly facilitate metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions and phosphorescence. In addition, electronegative linker groups such as 2,2'-bipyridine can act in synergy with metal chelation to greatly improve the electron-accepting ability and Lewis acidity of triarylboranes. Donor-acceptor triarylboranes developed in our laboratory can also serve as a series of "switch-on" sensors for fluoride ions. When the donor and acceptor are linked by rigid naphthyl or nonrigid silane linkers, donor-acceptor conjugation is disrupted and charge transfer occurs primarily through space. The binding of fluoride ions to the boron center disrupts this charge transfer, activating alternative pi --> pi* transitions in the molecule and changing the

  1. Fluorescence of Dendrons based on Donors and Accepter with Different Linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. H.; Wu, Y.; Modarelli, D. A.; Parquette, J. R.; Epstein, A. J.

    2007-03-01

    Earlier indirect studies utilizing wavelength and bias spectra of photocurrent in simple photovoltaic cells demonstrated charge transfer (CT) in 1st generation dendritic macromolecules prepared using two different donor (tetraphenylporphyrin) groups bound to an accepter (naphthalenediimide) group. We report here fluorescence for solid-state films and solutions of these donor and dendrons. Using 460nm excitation, fluorescence (660nm, 715nm) in solution samples can be observed for both donor and dendron but fluorescence in the solid state can be observable only in donor sample due to fluorescence quenching within the dendron. This demonstrates intermolecular CT from donor to accepter. Fluorescence lifetime measurements (460nm 1.5nsec FWHM pulse excitation) of donor and dendron solutions show that it depends on length of the linkage between donor and accepter. This shows a direct relaxation path from donor to accepter (intramolecular CT). The separation of the exciton to separate electron and on the donor and acceptor portions of the dendron would open the potential for its use in photovoltaic application. Supported in part by DOE #DE-FG02-01ER45931

  2. A compact planar low-energy-gap molecule with a donor-acceptor-donor nature based on a bimetal dithiolene complex.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Mikihiro; Otsubo, Kazuya; Kato, Tatsuhisa; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2015-11-11

    We present the first report of a compact, planar and low-energy-gap molecule based on a π-conjugated bimetal system comprising a tetrathiooxalate (tto) skeleton. The observed low HOMO-LUMO energy gap (1.19 eV) is attributed to its donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D) nature because the skeleton acts as an electron acceptor as well as a tiny and noninnocent bridging moiety.

  3. Electrical current through individual pairs of phosphorus donor atoms and silicon dangling bonds

    PubMed Central

    Ambal, K.; Rahe, P.; Payne, A.; Slinkman, J.; Williams, C. C.; Boehme, C.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear spins of phosphorus [P] donor atoms in crystalline silicon are among the most coherent qubits found in nature. For their utilization in scalable quantum computers, distinct donor electron wavefunctions must be controlled and probed through electrical coupling by application of either highly localized electric fields or spin-selective currents. Due to the strong modulation of the P-donor wavefunction by the silicon lattice, such electrical coupling requires atomic spatial accuracy. Here, the spatially controlled application of electrical current through individual pairs of phosphorus donor electron states in crystalline silicon and silicon dangling bond states at the crystalline silicon (100) surface is demonstrated using a high‐resolution scanning probe microscope operated under ultra‐high vacuum and at a temperature of 4.3K. The observed pairs of electron states display qualitatively reproducible current-voltage characteristics with a monotonous increase and intermediate current plateaus. PMID:26758087

  4. Electrical current through individual pairs of phosphorus donor atoms and silicon dangling bonds.

    PubMed

    Ambal, K; Rahe, P; Payne, A; Slinkman, J; Williams, C C; Boehme, C

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear spins of phosphorus [P] donor atoms in crystalline silicon are among the most coherent qubits found in nature. For their utilization in scalable quantum computers, distinct donor electron wavefunctions must be controlled and probed through electrical coupling by application of either highly localized electric fields or spin-selective currents. Due to the strong modulation of the P-donor wavefunction by the silicon lattice, such electrical coupling requires atomic spatial accuracy. Here, the spatially controlled application of electrical current through individual pairs of phosphorus donor electron states in crystalline silicon and silicon dangling bond states at the crystalline silicon (100) surface is demonstrated using a high-resolution scanning probe microscope operated under ultra-high vacuum and at a temperature of 4.3 K. The observed pairs of electron states display qualitatively reproducible current-voltage characteristics with a monotonous increase and intermediate current plateaus. PMID:26758087

  5. Designing shallow donors in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    The production of n-type semiconducting diamond has been a long-standing experimental challenge. The first-principles simulation of shallow dopants in semiconductors has been a long-standing theoretical challenge. A desirable theoretical goal is to identify impurities that will act as shallow donors in diamond and assess their experimental viability. I will discuss this identification process for the LiN4 donor complex. It builds a scientific argument from several models and computational results in the absence of computational tools that are both trustworthy and computationally tractable for this task. I will compare the theoretical assessment of viability with recent experimental efforts to co-dope diamond with lithium and nitrogen. Finally, I discuss the computational tools needed to facilitate future work on this problem and some preliminary simulations of donors near diamond surfaces. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program lab managed and operated by Sandia Corp., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Changing Pattern of Donor Selection Criteria in Deceased Donor Liver Transplant: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Routh, Dronacharya; Naidu, Sudeep; Sharma, Sanjay; Ranjan, Priya; Godara, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    During the last couple of decades, with standardization and progress in surgical techniques, immunosuppression and post liver transplantation patient care, the outcome of liver transplantation has been optimized. However, the principal limitation of transplantation remains access to an allograft. The number of patients who could derive benefit from liver transplantation markedly exceeds the number of available deceased donors. The large gap between the growing list of patients waiting for liver transplantation and the scarcity of donor organs has fueled efforts to maximize existing donor pool and identify new avenues. This article reviews the changing pattern of donor for liver transplantation using grafts from extended criteria donors (elderly donors, steatotic donors, donors with malignancies, donors with viral hepatitis), donation after cardiac death, use of partial grafts (split liver grafts) and other suboptimal donors (hypernatremia, infections, hypotension and inotropic support). PMID:25755521

  7. Photoconductivity in donor-acceptor heterojunction organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renshaw, C. K.; Zimmerman, J. D.; Lassiter, B. E.; Forrest, S. R.

    2012-08-01

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) differ from ideal inorganic solar cells due to their pronounced voltage dependence under reverse bias. This feature is commonly modeled in an ad hoc fashion by including a parallel junction resistance (Rp) that bypasses the heterojunction energy barrier between donor and acceptor. The existence of a finite Rp has variously been attributed to rough interfaces, pinhole defects, or to the electric field dependence of the dissociation of polaron pairs that are bound at the heterojunction. Here we show that the voltage dependence of the photocurrent can also arise from photoconductivity resulting from exciton generation followed by dissociation into free polarons within the bulk of the donor and acceptor layers. The presence of photoconductivity of the active layers does not result in an increase in power conversion efficiency, and places a constraint on the maximum fill factor that can be achieved in an OPV cell.

  8. Management of the feline blood donor.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, P M

    1992-12-01

    The feline blood donor should be considered a valuable asset to the veterinary clinic. As public awareness increases, so will the demand for high-quality blood products. Meeting this demand will require planning and a blood donor management program tailored to the clinic's needs. Consideration should be given to the areas of blood value, donor selection, blood collection, and maintaining donor health when developing a donor management program. Suggestions for reducing the stress and aggravation often associated with feline blood collection are provided.

  9. The probability of finding suitable directed donors.

    PubMed

    Kanter, M; Selvin, S; Myhre, B A

    1989-02-01

    A series of tables based on mathematical calculations is given as guidelines for the number of directed donors needed by members of various ethnic/racial groups to provide a desired number of units of blood with a selected probability of achieving this result. From these tables, certain conclusions can be drawn. Unrelated donors who do not know their blood type are an inefficient source of directed donors. Rh-negative patients are unlikely to obtain enough directed-donor units from either related or unrelated donors with confidence unless these donors known their blood type. In general, siblings, parents, and offspring are the most efficient directed donors from the standpoint of compatibility. Cousins, uncles, aunts, nieces, and nephews are not much more likely to be compatible than unrelated donors are. It is easier to obtain suitable directed-donor units among Hispanics than among whites, blacks, or Asians, due to their skewed blood group frequencies. In general, using O-negative directed donors for Rh-positive recipients does not significantly increase the likelihood of finding suitable donors.

  10. The identification of potential cadaveric organ donors.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J F; McCosker, C J; Hibberd, A D; Chapman, J R; Compton, J S; Mahony, J F; Mohacsi, P J; MacDonald, G J; Spratt, P M

    1995-02-01

    Most Australian transplantation programs are severely restricted in their activities by a limited availability of cadaveric donor organs. To investigate possible reasons for this problem, an audit was undertaken over three 12-month periods of all deaths in 13 hospitals in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory. From 7406 deaths, 271 patients were classified as having been realistic, medically suitable potential donors. Of these, only 60 (22%) became actual donors. In the other 211 patients, donation did not occur because of unsuccessful resuscitation (30%), permission refusal by relatives (34%), and failure to identify or support the potential donors (36%). If the impediments to organ donation which were identified in this study could be overcome, allowing a greater number of potential donors to become actual donors, the chronic shortage of cadaveric donor organs for transplantation could be at least partly relieved.

  11. Simulation shows that HLA-matched stem cell donors can remain unidentified in donor searches.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Jürgen; Solloch, Ute V; Giani, Anette S; Hofmann, Jan A; Schmidt, Alexander H

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of HLA information in real-life stem cell donor registries may hamper unrelated donor searches. It is even possible that fully HLA-matched donors with incomplete HLA information are not identified. In our simulation study, we estimated the probability of these unnecessarily failed donor searches. For that purpose, we carried out donor searches in several virtual donor registries. The registries differed by size, composition with respect to HLA typing levels, and genetic diversity. When up to three virtual HLA typing requests were allowed within donor searches, the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches ranged from 1.19% to 4.13%, thus indicating that non-identification of completely HLA-matched stem cell donors is a problem of practical relevance. The following donor registry characteristics were positively correlated with the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches: large registry size, high genetic diversity, and, most strongly correlated, large fraction of registered donors with incomplete HLA typing. Increasing the number of virtual HLA typing requests within donor searches up to ten had a smaller effect. It follows that the problem of donor non-identification can be substantially reduced by complete high-resolution HLA typing of potential donors.

  12. Simulation shows that HLA-matched stem cell donors can remain unidentified in donor searches

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Jürgen; Solloch, Ute V.; Giani, Anette S.; Hofmann, Jan A.; Schmidt, Alexander H.

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of HLA information in real-life stem cell donor registries may hamper unrelated donor searches. It is even possible that fully HLA-matched donors with incomplete HLA information are not identified. In our simulation study, we estimated the probability of these unnecessarily failed donor searches. For that purpose, we carried out donor searches in several virtual donor registries. The registries differed by size, composition with respect to HLA typing levels, and genetic diversity. When up to three virtual HLA typing requests were allowed within donor searches, the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches ranged from 1.19% to 4.13%, thus indicating that non-identification of completely HLA-matched stem cell donors is a problem of practical relevance. The following donor registry characteristics were positively correlated with the share of unnecessarily failed donor searches: large registry size, high genetic diversity, and, most strongly correlated, large fraction of registered donors with incomplete HLA typing. Increasing the number of virtual HLA typing requests within donor searches up to ten had a smaller effect. It follows that the problem of donor non-identification can be substantially reduced by complete high-resolution HLA typing of potential donors. PMID:26876789

  13. Organic electronic devices with multiple solution-processed layers

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lassiter, Brian E.; Zimmerman, Jeramy D.

    2015-08-04

    A method of fabricating a tandem organic photosensitive device involves depositing a first layer of an organic electron donor type material film by solution-processing of the organic electron donor type material dissolved in a first solvent; depositing a first layer of an organic electron acceptor type material over the first layer of the organic electron donor type material film by a dry deposition process; depositing a conductive layer over the interim stack by a dry deposition process; depositing a second layer of the organic electron donor type material over the conductive layer by solution-processing of the organic electron donor type material dissolved in a second solvent, wherein the organic electron acceptor type material and the conductive layer are insoluble in the second solvent; depositing a second layer of an organic electron acceptor type material over the second layer of the organic electron donor type material film by a dry deposition process, resulting in a stack.

  14. Design directed self-assembly of donor-acceptor polymers.

    PubMed

    Marszalek, Tomasz; Li, Mengmeng; Pisula, Wojciech

    2016-09-21

    Donor-acceptor polymers with an alternating array of donor and acceptor moieties have gained particular attention during recent years as active components of organic electronics. By implementation of suitable subunits within the conjugated backbone, these polymers can be made either electron-deficient or -rich. Additionally, their band gap and light absorption can be precisely tuned for improved light-harvesting in solar cells. On the other hand, the polymer design can also be modified to encode the desired supramolecular self-assembly in the solid-state that is essential for an unhindered transport of charge carriers. This review focuses on three major factors playing a role in the assembly of donor-acceptor polymers on surfaces which are (1) nature, geometry and substitution position of solubilizing alkyl side chains, (2) shape of the conjugated polymer defined by the backbone curvature, and (3) molecular weight which determines the conjugation length of the polymer. These factors adjust the fine balance between attractive and repulsive forces and ensure a close polymer packing important for an efficient charge hopping between neighboring chains. On the microscopic scale, an appropriate domain formation with a low density of structural defects in the solution deposited thin film is crucial for the charge transport. The charge carrier transport through such thin films is characterized by field-effect transistors as basic electronic elements. PMID:27440174

  15. Donor free radical explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E. [15 Way Points Rd., Danville, CA 94526; Wasley, Richard J. [4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-04-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising an organic compound or mixture of organic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and which is not an explosive, or an inorganic compound or mixture of inorganic compounds capable of releasing low molecular weight free radicals or ions under mechanical or electrical shock conditions and selected from ammonium or alkali metal persulfates.

  16. Coexistence of two deep donor states, DX- and DX0, of the Sn donor in Ga1-xAlxAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bardeleben, H. J.; Buyanova, I.; Belyaev, A.; Sheinkman, M.

    1992-05-01

    We present results of correlated electron-paramagnetic-resonance and photoconductivity measurements on the tin donor in Ga1-xAlxAs (0.3donor state, DX0(Sn), according to the reaction DX--->DX0+e-, in agreement with negative-U models for the DX ground state. The DX0 state, which has been previously attributed by us to the Aab1 antibonding state, is observed only in a limited alloy range 0.3electron-capture process of the single donors, the existence of which has been postulated previously from an analysis of the electron-capture kinetics of the DX center as well as from low-temperature photo-DLTS (deep-level transient spectroscopy) measurements: the one-electron Aab1 state. As Aab1 states are a fundamental property of substitutional donors, these results are also relevant for the analysis of DX-center properties of the other substitutional donors Si, Se, Te, and S in Ga1-xAlxAs.

  17. Aromatic fumaronitrile core-based donor-linker-acceptor-linker-donor (D-pi-A-pi-D) compounds: synthesis and photophysical properties.

    PubMed

    Panthi, Krishna; Adhikari, Ravi M; Kinstle, Thomas H

    2010-04-01

    A new class of aromatic fumaronitrile core-based compounds with different donors and linkers has been synthesized and well characterized. Compounds 1 and 2 have indole and 2-phenylindole groups as electron donors, respectively. Compounds 3 and 4 have a diphenylamino group as the electron donor, and compound 5 has a 3,6-di-tert-butylcarbazole group as an electron donor. These compounds absorb in the blue-to-green region and emit in the blue-to-red region depending on the electron donor, linker, and solvents. The quantum yields of fluorescence of these compounds in solution are measured and found to be moderate, but in solid states, they are high. These compounds display strong emission solvatochromism that is reflected by a large shift in their fluorescence emission maxima on changing the solvents. This change is accompanied by a successive decrease in fluorescence intensity. The fluorescence lifetimes of these compounds are measured in different solvent and found to vary from <1 to 7 ns. Optical switching of these compounds with solvents, concentration, and excitation energy have been studied. The correlation between the functional group and optical properties has been established to some extent. The ability of these compounds to function as colorimetric and luminescence pH sensors is demonstrated with color changes and luminescence switching upon the addition of trifluoroacetic acid. The potentiality of these compounds for application in optoelectronics has been optically assessed.

  18. Effects of Cu deficiency on photosynthetic electron transport

    SciTech Connect

    Droppa, M.; Terry, N.; Horvath, G.

    1984-04-01

    The role of copper (Cu) in photosynthetic electron transport was explored by using Cu deficiency in sugar beet as an experimental approach. Copper influenced electron transport at two sites in addition to plastocyanin. Under mild deficiency (0.84 nmol of Cu per cm/sup 2/ of leaf area), electron transport between the two photosystems (PS) is inhibited but not electron transport within PS I or PS II measured separately. The chlorophyll/plastoquinone ratio was normal in Cu-deficient plants. However, the breakpoint in the Arrhenius plot of electron transport was shifted towards a higher temperature. It is concluded that Cu is necessary to maintain the appropriate membrane fluidity to ensure the mobility of plastoquinone molecules to transfer electrons between the two photosystems. Under severe deficiency (0.22 nmol of Cu per cm/sup 2/ of leaf area) both PS II and PS I electron transports were inhibited and to the same extent. PS II electron transport activity could not be restored by adding artifical electron donors. Polypeptides with M/sub r/s of 28,000 and 13,500 were missing in Cu-deficient chloroplast membranes. In PS II particles prepared from normal chloroplasts of spinach, 2 atoms of Cu per reaction center are present. We conclude that Cu influences PS II electron transport either directly, by participation in electron transfer as a constituent of an electron carrier, or indirectly, via the polypeptide composition of the membrane in the PS II complex.

  19. Risk information provided to prospective oocyte donors in a preliminary phone call.

    PubMed

    Gurmankin, A D

    2001-01-01

    In order to accommodate for the present shortage of oocyte donors, oocyte-donation programs place ads in college newspapers and provide large monetary compensation to encourage participation. Large compensation acts as a strong incentive for young women to undergo the potentially risky procedure of donation. In this enticing situation, it is particularly important for programs to fully inform prospective donors of the risks of the procedure so that they can accurately weigh the costs and benefits of donating. However, because oocyte-donor programs must alleviate the shortage of donors if they wish to maintain a financially viable business, there is reason to fear that they may minimize or misrepresent risks when recruiting egg donors. In this pilot study, the risk information provided by programs (n=19) to prospective oocyte donors in a preliminary phone call inquiry was investigated. The majority of the programs provided incomplete and/or inaccurate risk information. Policy changes are recommended to reduce the potential for undue influence and to standardize and regulate the risk information provided to prospective egg donors. PMID:11954633

  20. What Value "Value Added"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Two quantitative measures of school performance are currently used, the average points score (APS) at Key Stage 2 and value-added (VA), which measures the rate of academic improvement between Key Stage 1 and 2. These figures are used by parents and the Office for Standards in Education to make judgements and comparisons. However, simple…

  1. Gamete donors' expectations and experiences of contact with their donor offspring

    PubMed Central

    Kirkman, Maggie; Bourne, Kate; Fisher, Jane; Johnson, Louise; Hammarberg, Karin

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION What are the expectations and experiences of anonymous gamete donors about contact with their donor offspring? SUMMARY ANSWER Rather than consistently wanting to remain distant from their donor offspring, donors' expectations and experiences of contact with donor offspring ranged from none to a close personal relationship. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Donor conception is part of assisted reproduction in many countries, but little is known about its continuing influence on gamete donors' lives. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION A qualitative research model appropriate for understanding participants' views was employed; semi-structured interviews were conducted during January–March 2013. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Before 1998, gamete donors in Victoria, Australia, were subject to evolving legislation that allowed them to remain anonymous or (from 1988) to consent to the release of identifying information. An opportunity to increase knowledge of donors' expectations and experiences of contact with their donor offspring recently arose in Victoria when a recommendation was made to introduce mandatory identification of donors on request from their donor offspring, with retrospective effect. Pre-1998 donors were invited through an advertising campaign to be interviewed about their views, experiences and expectations; 36 sperm donors and 6 egg donors participated. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE This research is unusual in achieving participation by donors who would not normally identify themselves to researchers or government inquiries. Qualitative thematic analysis revealed that most donors did not characterize themselves as parents of their donor offspring. Donors' expectations and experiences of contact with donor offspring ranged from none to a close personal relationship. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION It is not possible to establish whether participants were representative of all pre-1998 donors. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS Anonymous

  2. Hydroperoxides as Hydrogen Bond Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Møller, Kristian H.; Tram, Camilla M.; Hansen, Anne S.; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2016-06-01

    Hydroperoxides are formed in the atmosphere following autooxidation of a wide variety of volatile organics emitted from both natural and anthropogenic sources. This raises the question of whether they can form hydrogen bonds that facilitate aerosol formation and growth. Using a combination of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, FT-IR, and ab initio calculations, we have compared the gas phase hydrogen bonding ability of tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBuOOH) to that of tert-butanol (tBuOH) for a series of bimolecular complexes with different acceptors. The hydrogen bond acceptor atoms studied are nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulphur. Both in terms of calculated redshifts and binding energies (BE), our results suggest that hydroperoxides are better hydrogen bond donors than the corresponding alcohols. In terms of hydrogen bond acceptor ability, we find that nitrogen is a significantly better acceptor than the other three atoms, which are of similar strength. We observe a similar trend in hydrogen bond acceptor ability with other hydrogen bond donors including methanol and dimethylamine.

  3. Enhancement in Organic Photovoltaic Efficiency through the Synergistic Interplay of Molecular Donor Hydrogen Bonding and -Stacking

    DOE PAGES

    Shewmon, Nathan; Watkins, Davita; Galindo, Johan; Zerdan, Raghida; Chen, Jihua; Keum, Jong Kahk; Roitberg, Adrian; Xue, Jiangeng; Castellano, Ronald

    2015-07-20

    For organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells based on the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) structure, it remains challenging to rationally control the degree of phase separation and percolation within blends of donors and acceptors to secure optimal charge separation and transport. Reported is a bottom-up, supramolecular approach to BHJ OPVs wherein tailored hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) interactions between π-conjugated electron donor molecules encourage formation of vertically aligned donor π-stacks while simultaneously suppressing lateral aggregation; the programmed arrangement facilitates fine mixing with fullerene acceptors and efficient charge transport. The approach is illustrated using conventional linear or branched quaterthiophene donor chromophores outfitted with terminal functional groupsmore » that are either capable or incapable of self-complementary H-bonding. When applied to OPVs, the H-bond capable donors yield a twofold enhancement in power conversion efficiency relative to the comparator systems, with a maximum external quantum efficiency of 64%. H-bond promoted assembly results in redshifted absorption (in neat films and donor:C 60 blends) and enhanced charge collection efficiency despite disparate donor chromophore structure. Both features positively impact photocurrent and fill factor in OPV devices. Film structural characterization by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering reveals a synergistic interplay of lateral H-bonding interactions and vertical π-stacking for directing the favorable morphology of the BHJ.« less

  4. Enhancement in Organic Photovoltaic Efficiency through the Synergistic Interplay of Molecular Donor Hydrogen Bonding and -Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Shewmon, Nathan; Watkins, Davita; Galindo, Johan; Zerdan, Raghida; Chen, Jihua; Keum, Jong Kahk; Roitberg, Adrian; Xue, Jiangeng; Castellano, Ronald

    2015-07-20

    For organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells based on the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) structure, it remains challenging to rationally control the degree of phase separation and percolation within blends of donors and acceptors to secure optimal charge separation and transport. Reported is a bottom-up, supramolecular approach to BHJ OPVs wherein tailored hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) interactions between π-conjugated electron donor molecules encourage formation of vertically aligned donor π-stacks while simultaneously suppressing lateral aggregation; the programmed arrangement facilitates fine mixing with fullerene acceptors and efficient charge transport. The approach is illustrated using conventional linear or branched quaterthiophene donor chromophores outfitted with terminal functional groups that are either capable or incapable of self-complementary H-bonding. When applied to OPVs, the H-bond capable donors yield a twofold enhancement in power conversion efficiency relative to the comparator systems, with a maximum external quantum efficiency of 64%. H-bond promoted assembly results in redshifted absorption (in neat films and donor:C 60 blends) and enhanced charge collection efficiency despite disparate donor chromophore structure. Both features positively impact photocurrent and fill factor in OPV devices. Film structural characterization by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and grazing incidence wide angle X-ray scattering reveals a synergistic interplay of lateral H-bonding interactions and vertical π-stacking for directing the favorable morphology of the BHJ.

  5. Introducing ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Henneken, E.; Grant, C. S.; Kurtz, M. J.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Thompson, D. M.; Bohlen, E.; Murray, S. S.

    2011-05-01

    ADS Labs is a platform that ADS is introducing in order to test and receive feedback from the community on new technologies and prototype services. Currently, ADS Labs features a new interface for abstract searches, faceted filtering of results, visualization of co-authorship networks, article-level recommendations, and a full-text search service. The streamlined abstract search interface provides a simple, one-box search with options for ranking results based on a paper relevancy, freshness, number of citations, and downloads. In addition, it provides advanced rankings based on collaborative filtering techniques. The faceted filtering interface allows users to narrow search results based on a particular property or set of properties ("facets"), allowing users to manage large lists and explore the relationship between them. For any set or sub-set of records, the co-authorship network can be visualized in an interactive way, offering a view of the distribution of contributors and their inter-relationships. This provides an immediate way to detect groups and collaborations involved in a particular research field. For a majority of papers in Astronomy, our new interface will provide a list of related articles of potential interest. The recommendations are based on a number of factors, including text similarity, citations, and co-readership information. The new full-text search interface allows users to find all instances of particular words or phrases in the body of the articles in our full-text archive. This includes all of the scanned literature in ADS as well as a select portion of the current astronomical literature, including ApJ, ApJS, AJ, MNRAS, PASP, A&A, and soon additional content from Springer journals. Fulltext search results include a list of the matching papers as well as a list of "snippets" of text highlighting the context in which the search terms were found. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  6. Effect of a metallic gate on the energy levels of a shallow donor

    SciTech Connect

    Slachmuylders, A. F.; Partoens, B.; Peeters, F. M.; Magnus, W.

    2008-02-25

    We have investigated the effect of a metallic gate on the bound states of a shallow donor located near the gate. We calculate the energy spectrum as a function of the distance between the metallic gate and the donor and find an anticrossing behavior in the energy levels for certain distances. We show how a transverse electric field can tune the average position of the electron with respect to the metallic gate and the impurity.

  7. Enhancement of donor ionization in phosphorus-doped n-diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koide, Yasuo

    2005-05-01

    In order to explore a possibility for controlling an electron concentration in phosphorus-doped n-diamond, electron and ionized-donor concentrations in n-diamond/cBN and n-diamond/AlN heterojunctions are analyzed by self-consistently solving Poisson and Schrödinger equations. Although the electron concentration is an order of 10 11 cm -3 at room temperature for single n-diamond with a donor concentration of 5 × 10 18 cm -3 and a compensation ratio of 0.01, a modulation-doping technique predicts to provide full ionization of phosphorus donor in the n-diamond/cBN heterostructure and generation of an electron concentration larger than 10 18 cm -3 at room temperature.

  8. Living-donor liver transplantation: current perspective.

    PubMed

    Lobritto, Steven; Kato, Tomoaki; Emond, Jean

    2012-11-01

    The disparity between the number of available deceased liver donors and the number of patients awaiting transplantation continues to be an ongoing issue predisposing to death on the liver transplant waiting list. Deceased donor shortage strategies including the use of extended donor-criteria deceased donor grafts, split liver transplants, and organs harvested after cardiac death have fallen short of organ demand. Efforts to raise donor awareness are ongoing, but the course has been arduous to date. Living donor transplantation is a means to access an unlimited donor organ supply and offers potential advantages to deceased donation. Donor safety remains paramount demanding improvements and innovations in both the donor and recipient operations to ensure superior outcomes. The specialty operation is best preformed at centers with specific expertise and shuttling of select patients to these centers supported by third party payers is critical. Training future surgeons at centers with this specific experience can help disseminate this technology to improve local availability. Ongoing research in immunosuppression minimization, withdrawal and tolerance induction may make living donation a desired first-line operation rather than a necessary albeit less-desirable option. This chapter summarizes the progress of living liver donation and its potential applications. PMID:23397534

  9. [Living donor liver transplantation in adults].

    PubMed

    Neumann, U P; Neuhaus, P; Schmeding, M

    2010-09-01

    The worldwide shortage of adequate donor organs implies that living donor liver transplantation represents a valuable alternative to cadaveric transplantation. In addition to the complex surgical procedure the correct identification of eligible donors and recipients plays a decisive role in living donor liver transplantation. Donor safety must be of ultimate priority and overrules all other aspects involved. In contrast to the slightly receding numbers in Europe and North America, in recent years Asian programs have enjoyed constantly increasing living donor activity. The experience of the past 15 years has clearly demonstrated that technical challenges of both bile duct anastomosis and venous outflow of the graft significantly influence postoperative outcome. While short-term in-hospital morbidity remains increased compared to cadaveric transplantation, long-term survival of both graft and patient are comparable or even better than in deceased donor transplantation. Especially for patients expecting long waiting times under the MELD allocation system, living donor liver transplantation offers an excellent therapeutic alternative. Expanding the so-called "Milan criteria" for HCC patients with the option for living donor liver transplantation is currently being controversially debated.

  10. Gamete donation: ethical implications for donors.

    PubMed

    Shenfield, Francoise

    1999-01-01

    The interests of gamete donors have only recently been recognized in assisted reproduction; traditionally, the interests of the patients (typically a couple) and the prospective child are paramount. However, assisted reproduction would not be possible without donors, and the simple utilitarian view would be to place their interests first to maximize the availability of the practice. There are several ethical issues on both sides of the donor--recipient equation, some of which are mutual and others are in conflict. For example, the word 'donation' implies there is no payment. Informed consent for donation is essential if the autonomy of the donor is to be respected, and includes information about the results of screening. This is a sensitive issue, especially when pathology is found in a donor who is not being screened for his or her own immediate benefit. Counselling may result in donors refusing to take part, but may also lead to selection by the person recruiting the donors, sometimes as a consequence of examining the motivation of the donor. In this case, the main problem is the ethical basis of the selection process. Other aspects of gamete donation may lead to a conflict of interests between the donor, the recipients and even the prospective child, particularly in terms of anonymity and the information that is made available about the specific circumstances of donation. Implications and support counselling are essential tools in achieving an acceptable balance for all parties involved.

  11. Electronic transport behavior of off-stoichiometric La and Nb doped SrxTiyO3-δ epitaxial thin films and donor doped single-crystalline SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baniecki, J. D.; Ishii, M.; Aso, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Kurihara, K.; Yamanaka, K.; Vailionis, A.; Schafranek, R.

    2011-12-01

    Above room temperature electronic transport properties of SrxTiyO3-δ films with cation A/B = (La + Sr/Nb + Ti) ratios of 0.9 to 1.2 are compared to STO single crystals with combined Hall carrier densities of 3 × 1016 cm-3 ≤ nH ≤ 1022 cm-3. In contrast to Hall mobility which is single crystal-like (μH ≈ 6 cm2/Vs) only near A/B = 1, the Seebeck coefficient (S) is single crystal-like over a range of nonstoichiometry. For nH < 1020 cm-3, S is well described by nondegenerate band-like transport with a constant effective mass m∗/mo ≈ 5-8. For nH > 1021 cm-3, S is metallic-like with m∗/mo ˜ 8. No marked increase in m∗ with decreasing nH owing to a carrier filling dependence is observed.

  12. The interaction among donor characteristics, severity of liver disease and the cost of liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Salvalaggio, Paolo R.; Dzebisashvili, Nino; MacLeod, Kara E.; Lentine, Krista L.; Gheorghian, Adrian; Schnitzler, Mark A.; Hohmann, Samuel; Segev, Dorry L.; Gentry, Sommer E.; Axelrod, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Accurate assessment of the impact of donor quality on liver transplant (LT) costs has been limited by the lack of a large, multicenter study of detailed clinical and economic data. Methods A novel, retrospective database linking information from the University HealthSystem Consortium and the OPTN registry was analyzed using multivariate regression to determine the relationship between donor quality (assessed through the Donor Risk Index (DRI)), recipient illness severity, and total inpatient costs (transplant and all readmissions) for 1 year following LT. Results Cost data were available for 9,059 LT recipients. Increasing MELD score, higher DRI, simultaneous liver kidney transplant, female gender and prior liver transplant were associated with increasing cost of LT (P<0.05). MELD and DRI interact to synergistically increase the cost of LT (P<0.05). Donors in the highest DRI quartile added close to $12,000 to the cost of transplantation and nearly $22,000 to post-transplant costs in comparison to the lowest risk donors. Among the individual components of the DRI, donation after cardiac death (increased $20,769 vs. brain dead donors) had the greatest impact on transplant costs. Overall one year costs were increased in older donors, minority donors, nationally shared organs, and those with cold ischemic times 7–13 hours (p<0.05 for all) Conclusion Donor quality, as measured by the DRI, is an independent predictor of LT costs in the perioperative and post-operative periods. Centers in highly competitive regions who transplant higher MELD patients with high DRI livers may be particularly affected by the synergistic impact of these factors. PMID:21384505

  13. DGTI Register of Rare Donors

    PubMed Central

    Hustinx, Hein

    2014-01-01

    Summary For patients with antibodies against the most common blood groups a rapid and efficient supply of compatible erythrocyte concentrates is self-evident. But typically we have to make the greatest effort providing blood for these patients, which have made antibodies against common blood groups. There are however patients with antibodies against rare blood group antigens that need special blood. The supply of such blood can be very difficult and mostly time-consuming. For this reason we set up a database of blood donors with rare blood groups. Since 2005 the BTS SRC Berne Ltd. has run this database on behalf of the Swiss BTS SRC. After a reorganization and extension of the database, conducted during 2011/2012, the data file was renamed ‘DGTI Register of Rare Donors’ and is now run under the patronage of the German Society for Transfusion Medicine and Immunohematology (DGTI). PMID:25538534

  14. [Liver transplants from living donors].

    PubMed

    Rogiers, X; Danninger, F; Malagó, M; Knoefel, W T; Gundlach, M; Bassas, A; Burdelski, M; Broelsch, C E

    1996-03-01

    In this article the authors discuss the advantages of Living Related Liver Transplantation (LRLT), criteria for the selection of donors and the standard operation technique. Among a total of 241 liver transplantation (LTx), 42 LRLT were performed at the University of Hamburg between October 1, 1991 and December 19, 1994. The body weight of recipients for LRLT ranged from 4,6 to 39 kg, with 64,2% having less than 10 kg. The volume of the donor left lateral liver lobe ranged from 100 cc to 350 cc. The average one year survival rate among electively operated patients-status 3-4 (UNOS 1995 classification) was 86.7%, two year survival rate 83.3%. The main advantages of LRLT are consired the following: 1. Absence of mortality on the waiting list, 2. Optimal timing of the transplantation (elective procedure, patient in a good condition), 3. Excellent organ (no primary non function), 4. A possible immunologic advantage, 5. Relief of the waiting list for cadaveric organs, 6. Psychological benefit for the family, 7. Cost effectiveness. Potential candidates for living donation with more than one cardiovascular risk factors were excluded. Social and psychological reasons leading to rejection of candidates were as follows: unstable family structure, expected professional or financial difficulties after living donation or withdrawal from consent. LRLT gives parents of a child with TLD a chance to avoid the risk of death on the waiting list or primary non function of the graft. LRLT has therefore established an important place in pediatric liver transplantation. PMID:8768973

  15. The end of donor anonymity: how genetic testing is likely to drive anonymous gamete donation out of business.

    PubMed

    Harper, Joyce C; Kennett, Debbie; Reisel, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Thousands of people worldwide have been conceived using donor gametes, but not all parents tell their children of their origin. Several countries now allow donor-conceived offspring to potentially know their genetic parent if they are informed of their donor-conceived status. At the same time, personal genetic testing is a rapidly expanding field. Over 3 million people have already used direct-to-consumer genetic testing to find information about their ancestry, and many are participating in international genetic genealogy databases that will match them with relatives. The increased prevalence of these technologies poses numerous challenges to the current practice of gamete donation. (i) Whether they are donating in a country that practices anonymous donation or not, donors should be informed that their anonymity is not guaranteed, as they may be traced if their DNA, or that of a relative, is added to a database. (ii) Donor-conceived adults who have not been informed of their status may find out that they are donor-conceived. (iii) Parents using donor conception need to be fully informed that their children's DNA will identify that they are not the biological parents and they should be encouraged to disclose the use of donor gametes to their children. Together, these concerns make urgent a wide-ranging societal conversation about how to best safeguard and promote the interests of donor-conceived offspring and protect the rights of donors. Specifically, there is a need to ensure that new genetic information is communicated in a way that promotes both the safety and the privacy rights of offspring and donors alike. All parties concerned must be aware that, in 2016, donor anonymity does not exist.

  16. The end of donor anonymity: how genetic testing is likely to drive anonymous gamete donation out of business.

    PubMed

    Harper, Joyce C; Kennett, Debbie; Reisel, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Thousands of people worldwide have been conceived using donor gametes, but not all parents tell their children of their origin. Several countries now allow donor-conceived offspring to potentially know their genetic parent if they are informed of their donor-conceived status. At the same time, personal genetic testing is a rapidly expanding field. Over 3 million people have already used direct-to-consumer genetic testing to find information about their ancestry, and many are participating in international genetic genealogy databases that will match them with relatives. The increased prevalence of these technologies poses numerous challenges to the current practice of gamete donation. (i) Whether they are donating in a country that practices anonymous donation or not, donors should be informed that their anonymity is not guaranteed, as they may be traced if their DNA, or that of a relative, is added to a database. (ii) Donor-conceived adults who have not been informed of their status may find out that they are donor-conceived. (iii) Parents using donor conception need to be fully informed that their children's DNA will identify that they are not the biological parents and they should be encouraged to disclose the use of donor gametes to their children. Together, these concerns make urgent a wide-ranging societal conversation about how to best safeguard and promote the interests of donor-conceived offspring and protect the rights of donors. Specifically, there is a need to ensure that new genetic information is communicated in a way that promotes both the safety and the privacy rights of offspring and donors alike. All parties concerned must be aware that, in 2016, donor anonymity does not exist. PMID:27073260

  17. Two Virasoro symmetries in stringy warped AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Guica, Monica; Rodriguez, Maria J.

    2014-12-01

    We study three-dimensional consistent truncations of type IIB supergravity which admit warped AdS3 solutions. These theories contain subsectors that have no bulk dynamics. We show that the symplectic form for these theories, when restricted to the non-dynamical subsectors, equals the symplectic form for pure Einstein gravity in AdS3. Consequently, for each consistent choice of boundary conditions in AdS3, we can define a consistent phase space in warped AdS3 with identical conserved charges. This way, we easily obtain a Virasoro × Virasoro asymptotic symmetry algebra in warped AdS3; two different types of Virasoro × Kač-Moody symmetries are also consistent alternatives.

  18. ZnO Transistor Interfaces Sensitized with Photo Donor Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalenka, Josef; Zhang, Lushuai; Gopalan, Padma; Evans, Paul

    2013-03-01

    A better understanding of the physics at interfaces between semiconducting oxides and monolayers of covalently bonded organic molecules is relevant to important applications such as inexpensive chemical sensors and improved dye-sensitized solar cells. We use field-effect transistor (FET) structures in which electrical measurements are made before and after functionalizing the surface of ZnO nanocrystalline films, which form the channel of the FET, with organic dye molecules based on rhenium-bipyridine complexes that act as electron donors during illumination with monochromatic light. Measurements of the charge transfer as a function of light intensity and dye coverage give the ratio between the rates of charge transfer and recombination between the dyes and the ZnO, an important parameter to maximize to further improve the efficiency of solar cells based on donor functionalized oxides. This work supported by the National Science Foundation through the University of Wisconsin Materials Research Science and Engineering Center under Grant No. DMR-1121288

  19. Quantum dot spectroscopy using a single phosphorus donor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büch, Holger; Fuechsle, Martin; Baker, William; House, Matthew G.; Simmons, Michelle Y.

    2015-12-01

    Using a deterministic single P donor placed with atomic precision accuracy next to a nanoscale silicon quantum dot, we present a way to analyze the energy spectrum of small quantum dots in silicon by tunnel-coupled transport measurements. The energy-level structure of the quantum dot is observed as resonance features within the transport bias triangles when the donor chemical potential is aligned with states within the quantum dot as confirmed by a numeric rate equation solver SIMON. This technique allows us to independently extract the quantum dot level structure irrespective of the density of states in the leads. Such a method is useful for the investigation of silicon quantum dots in the few-electron regime where the level structure is governed by an intricate interplay between the spin- and the valley-orbit degrees of freedom.

  20. Preferential inhibition of the plasma membrane NADH oxidase (NOX) activity by diphenyleneiodonium chloride with NADPH as donor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James

    2002-01-01

    The cell-surface NADH oxidase (NOX) protein of plant and animal cells will utilize both NADH and NADPH as reduced electron donors for activity. The two activities are distinguished by a differential inhibition by the redox inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI). Using both plasma membranes and cells, activity with NADPH as donor was markedly inhibited by DPI at submicromolar concentrations, whereas with NADH as donor, DPI was much less effective or had no effect on the activity. The possibility of the inhibition being the result of two different enzymes was eliminated by the use of a recombinant NOX protein. The findings support the concept that NOX proteins serve as terminal oxidases for plasma membrane electron transport involving cytosolic reduced pyridine nucleotides as the natural electron donors and with molecular oxygen as the electron acceptor.

  1. Structure-property relationship of extended π-conjugation of ancillary ligands with and without an electron donor of heteroleptic Ru(II) bipyridyl complexes for high efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Maqbool; El-Shafei, Ahmed; Islam, Ashraful; Han, Liyuan

    2013-06-01

    Two new heteroleptic Ru(II) bipyridyl complexes MH06 and MH11 were designed, synthesized and characterized for DSSCs. While the ancillary ligand of MH06 was molecularly engineered with a strong electron donating group coupled with an extended π-conjugated system, the ancillary ligand of MH11 contained a longer π-conjugated system only. Molecular modeling, photophysical, and photovoltaic properties were compared under the same experimental conditions against the benchmark N719. In an effort to understand the structure-property relationship, their photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical properties including Jsc, Voc, ground and excited state oxidation potentials, UV-Vis absorption, and molar extinction coefficients were studied. The UV-Vis results showed intense MLCT absorption peaks of MH06 and MH11 in the visible region with a red shift of 12 and 18 nm, respectively, with significantly higher molar extinction coefficients compared to N719. Tetrabutylammonium (TBA) substituted MH11-TBA demonstrated the most efficient IPCE of over 90% in the plateau region covering the entire visible spectrum and extending into the near IR region (ca. 890 nm), which showed a solar-to-power conversion efficiency (η) of 10.06%, significantly higher than that of the benchmark N719 dye (9.32%). The superior performance in terms of the IPCE and Jsc of MH11 can be attributed to the bulky and highly hydrophobic nature of the pyrene-based ancillary ligand, which behaves as a shielding barrier for hole-transport recombination between TiO2 and the electrolyte. In addition, the IMPS results showed that the contribution of dyes to the conduction band shift of the TiO2 level is almost similar, regardless of different substitutions on the bipy-moiety. This implies that the open-circuit photovoltage (Voc) increases with reduced charge recombination in the presence of a thick layer of tetrabutyl ammonium ions (TBA) of the dye anchored on the surface of TiO2.

  2. The value of living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoli; Gong, Junhua; Gong, JianPing

    2012-12-31

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is a very successful procedure that develops liver resources in case of worldwide shortages. As the technology has developed so much in the past 2 decades, LDLT has the same good prognosis as DDLT. However, LDLT still has lots of ethical & technical problems. It causes great psychiatric, physical and psychosocial harm to donors. Also, it has some negative effects on society by providing a platform for organ trade. Therefore, there is much controversy about the social value of LDLT. After review of recent papers, we find much progress can be made in inspiring the public to become organ donors and creating donation model new to improve the consent rate for solid organ donation from deceased donors. That is the key strategy for increasing the liver supply. With this serious shortage of organs, liver donor transplantation still has its advantages, but we should not place all our hopes on LDLT to increase the liver supply. We all need to try our best to increase donor awareness and promote organ donor registration--when cadaver organs could meet the needs for liver transplantation, living donor liver transplants would not be necessary. PMID:23274332

  3. 42 CFR 35.64 - Donors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Donors. 35.64 Section 35.64 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT Contributions for the Benefit of Patients § 35.64 Donors. Authorized contributions...

  4. The Experience of Living Kidney Donors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Judith Belle; Karley, Mary Lou; Boudville, Neil; Bullas, Ruth; Garg, Amit X.; Muirhead, Norman

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the experiences, feelings, and ideas of living kidney donors. Using a phenomenological, qualitative research approach, the authors interviewed 12 purposefully selected living kidney donors (eight men and four women), who were between four and 29 years since donation. Interviews were audiotaped, and transcribed verbatim, and…

  5. 21 CFR 610.41 - Donor deferral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Testing Requirements for Communicable Disease Agents § 610.41 Donor... testing reactive by a screening test for evidence of infection due to a communicable disease agent(s... infection due to a communicable disease agent(s) listed in § 610.40(a) may serve as a donor for blood...

  6. 21 CFR 610.41 - Donor deferral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Testing Requirements for Communicable Disease Agents § 610.41 Donor... testing reactive by a screening test for evidence of infection due to a communicable disease agent(s... infection due to a communicable disease agent(s) listed in § 610.40(a) may serve as a donor for blood...

  7. 21 CFR 610.41 - Donor deferral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Testing Requirements for Communicable Disease Agents § 610.41 Donor... testing reactive by a screening test for evidence of infection due to a communicable disease agent(s... infection due to a communicable disease agent(s) listed in § 610.40(a) may serve as a donor for blood...

  8. 21 CFR 610.41 - Donor deferral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Testing Requirements for Communicable Disease Agents § 610.41 Donor... testing reactive by a screening test for evidence of infection due to a communicable disease agent(s... infection due to a communicable disease agent(s) listed in § 610.40(a) may serve as a donor for blood...

  9. 21 CFR 610.41 - Donor deferral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS Testing Requirements for Communicable Disease Agents § 610.41 Donor... testing reactive by a screening test for evidence of infection due to a communicable disease agent(s... infection due to a communicable disease agent(s) listed in § 610.40(a) may serve as a donor for blood...

  10. Recipients' views on payment of sperm donors.

    PubMed

    Ravelingien, An; Provoost, Veerle; Wyverkens, Elia; Buysse, Ann; De Sutter, Petra; Pennings, Guido

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to explore how recipients viewed payment of sperm donors. The study was conducted in Belgium, where, as in many countries, sperm donors receive recompense for their time and expenses. Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with 34 heterosexual and lesbian couples who, at the time of data collection, had at least one donor-conceived child aged 7-10 years or who were undergoing donor conception treatment. Although participants commonly described the issue of financial compensation as something that did not really concern them, all supported the idea that some level of payment was acceptable or even necessary. The participants also identified several ways in which donor payment offered advantages to their own position as (future) parents. Although the idea is commonly rehearsed that sperm donation is a gift and that monetary transaction for conception is demeaning, the participants of this study did not generally share this view. To them, a small financial return served as a symbolic acknowledgement of the donor's contribution and helped secure the type of relationship they expected from their donor. There was clearly concern, however, over high payments and the risk of attracting the wrong kind of donor. PMID:26099446

  11. Payment for donor kidneys: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Friedman, E A; Friedman, A L

    2006-03-01

    Continuous growth of the end stage renal disease population treated by dialysis, outpaces deceased donor kidneys available, lengthens the waiting time for a deceased donor transplant. As estimated by the United States Department of Health & Human Services: '17 people die each day waiting for transplants that can't take place because of the shortage of donated organs.' Strategies to expand the donor pool--public relations campaigns and Drivers' license designation--have been mainly unsuccessful. Although illegal in most nations, and viewed as unethical by professional medical organizations, the voluntary sale of purchased donor kidneys now accounts for thousands of black market transplants. The case for legalizing kidney purchase hinges on the key premise that individuals are entitled to control of their body parts even to the point of inducing risk of life. One approach to expanding the pool of kidney donors is to legalize payment of a fair market price of about 40,000 dollars to donors. Establishing a federal agency to manage marketing and purchase of donor kidneys in collaboration with the United Network for Organ Sharing might be financially self-sustaining as reduction in costs of dialysis balances the expense of payment to donors. PMID:16482095

  12. The value of living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoli; Gong, Junhua; Gong, JianPing

    2012-12-31

    Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is a very successful procedure that develops liver resources in case of worldwide shortages. As the technology has developed so much in the past 2 decades, LDLT has the same good prognosis as DDLT. However, LDLT still has lots of ethical & technical problems. It causes great psychiatric, physical and psychosocial harm to donors. Also, it has some negative effects on society by providing a platform for organ trade. Therefore, there is much controversy about the social value of LDLT. After review of recent papers, we find much progress can be made in inspiring the public to become organ donors and creating donation model new to improve the consent rate for solid organ donation from deceased donors. That is the key strategy for increasing the liver supply. With this serious shortage of organs, liver donor transplantation still has its advantages, but we should not place all our hopes on LDLT to increase the liver supply. We all need to try our best to increase donor awareness and promote organ donor registration--when cadaver organs could meet the needs for liver transplantation, living donor liver transplants would not be necessary.

  13. 21 CFR 630.6 - Donor notification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the reason for that decision; (ii) Where appropriate, the types of donation of blood or blood... GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR BLOOD, BLOOD COMPONENTS, AND BLOOD DERIVATIVES § 630.6 Donor notification. (a) Notification of donors. You, an establishment that collects blood or blood components, must make...

  14. Leading Change, Adding Value.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nick

    2016-09-12

    Essential facts Leading Change, Adding Value is NHS England's new nursing and midwifery framework. It is designed to build on Compassion in Practice (CiP), which was published 3 years ago and set out the 6Cs: compassion, care, commitment, courage, competence and communication. CiP established the values at the heart of nursing and midwifery, while the new framework sets out how staff can help transform the health and care sectors to meet the aims of the NHS England's Five Year Forward View. PMID:27615573

  15. Chylous ascites secondary to laparoscopic donor nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Shafizadeh, Stephen F; Daily, Patrick P; Baliga, Prabhakar; Rogers, Jeffrey; Baillie, G Mark; Rajagopolan, P R; Chavin, Kenneth D

    2002-08-01

    Live donor renal transplantation offers many significant advantages over cadaveric donor transplantation. Yet living donation continues to be underused, accounting for less than 30% of all donor renal transplants. In an attempt to remove the disincentives to live donation, Ratner et al. developed laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN). LDN is gaining acceptance in the transplant community. The overriding concern must always be the safety and welfare of the donor. To this end, potential complications of LDN must be identified and discussed. We present a patient who developed the complication of chylous ascites from LDN. To improve the laparoscopic technique further, a discussion of its successes and complications needs to be encouraged. To this end, we present chylous ascites as a potential complication after LDN. We also offer suggestions to minimize the likelihood of this complication. PMID:12137847

  16. Kinetics of thermal donor generation in silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, B.-Y.; Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1984-01-01

    The generation kinetics of thermal donors at 450 C in Czochralski-grown silicon was found to be altered by high-temperature preannealing (e.g., 1100 C for 30 min). Thus, when compared with as-grown Si, high-temperature preannealed material exhibits a smaller concentration of generated thermal donors and a faster thermal donor saturation. A unified mechanism of nucleation and oxygen diffusion-controlled growth (based on solid-state plate transformation theory) is proposed to account for generation kinetics of thermal donors at 450 C, in as-grown and high-temperature preannealed Czochralski silicon crystals. This mechanism is consistent with the main features of the models which have been proposed to explain the formation of oxygen thermal donors in silicon.

  17. First principles NEXAFS simulations of N-donor Uranyl complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pemmaraju, C. D.; Duan, R.; Copping, R.; Jeon, B.; Teat, S. J.; Janousch, M.; Tyliszczak, T.; Canning, A.; Grønbech-Jensen, N.; Shuh, D. K.; Prendergast, D.

    2013-03-01

    The synthesis and study of soft-donor uranyl complexes can provide new insights into the coordination chemistry of non-aqueous [UO]2+ Recently, the tunable N-donor ligand 2,6-Bis(2-benzimidazyl)pyridine (BBP) was employed to produce novel uranyl complexes in which the [UO]2+ cation is ligated by anionic and covalent groups with discrete chemical differences. In this work we investigate the electronic structure of the three such uranyl-BBP complexes via near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) experiments and simulations using the eXcited electron and Core-Hole (XCH) approach. The evolution of the structural as well as electronic properties across the three complexes is studied systematically. Computed N K-edge and O K-edge NEXAFS spectra are compared with experiment and spectral features assigned to specific electronic transitions in these complexes. Studying the variations in spectral features arising from N K-edge absorption provides a clear picture of ligand-uranyl bonding in these systems.

  18. Correlation between donor age and organs transplanted per donor: our experience in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ashikari, J; Omiya, K; Konaka, S; Nomoto, K

    2014-05-01

    The shortage of available organs for transplantation is a worldwide issue. To maximize the number of transplantations, increasing the number of organs transplanted per donor (OTPD) is widely recognized as an important factor for improving the shortage. In Japan, we have had 211 donors, 1112 organs transplanted, and 924 recipients receiving the transplants, resulting in 4.4 ± 1.4 recipients receiving transplants per donor and 5.3 ± 1.6 OTPD as of February 2013. Because donor age is a well-recognized factor of donor suitability, we analyzed the correlation between donor age group and OTPD. Only the age group 60 to 69 years and the age group 70 to 79 years were significantly different (P < .05) from adjacent age groups. We estimate that a donor under age 70 years has the potential to donate 4.6 to 6.7 organs.

  19. Nonlinear realization of local symmetries of AdS space

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, T.E.; Love, S.T.; Nitta, Muneto; Veldhuis, T. ter

    2005-10-15

    Coset methods are used to construct the action describing the dynamics associated with the spontaneous breaking of the local symmetries of AdS{sub d+1} space due to the embedding of an AdS{sub d} brane. The resulting action is an SO(2,d) invariant AdS form of the Einstein-Hilbert action, which in addition to the AdS{sub d} gravitational vielbein, also includes a massive vector field localized on the brane. Its long wavelength dynamics is the same as a massive Abelian vector field coupled to gravity in AdS{sub d} space.

  20. Oocyte cryopreservation for donor egg banking.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Ana; Remohí, José; Chang, Ching-Chien; Nagy, Zsolt Peter

    2011-09-01

    Oocyte donation is an efficient alternative to using own oocytes in IVF treatment for different indications. Unfortunately, 'traditional' (fresh) egg donations are challenged with inefficiency, difficulties of synchronization, very long waiting periods and lack of quarantine measures. Given the recent improvements in the efficiency of oocyte cryopreservation, it is reasonable to examine if egg donation through oocyte cryopreservation has merits. The objective of the current manuscript is to review existing literature on this topic and to report on the most recent outcomes from two established donor cryobank centres. Reports on egg donation using slow freezing are scarce and though results are encouraging, outcomes are not yet comparable to a fresh egg donation treatment. Vitrification on the other hand appears to provide high survival rates (90%) of donor oocytes and comparable fertilization, embryo development, implantation and pregnancy rates to traditional (fresh) egg donation. Besides the excellent outcomes, the ease of use for both donors and recipients, higher efficiency, lower cost and avoiding the problem of synchronization are all features associated with the benefit of a donor egg cryobank and makes it likely that this approach becomes the future standard of care. Oocyte donation is one of the last resorts in IVF treatment for couples challenged with infertility problems. However, traditional (fresh) egg donation, as it is performed today, is not very efficient, as typically all eggs from one donor are given to only one recipient, it is arduous as it requires an excellent synchronization between the donor and recipient and there are months or years of waiting time. Because of the development of an efficient oocyte cryopreservation technique, it is now possible to cryo-store donor (as well as non-donor) eggs, maintaining their viability and allowing their use whenever there is demand. Therefore, creating a donor oocyte cryobank would carry many advantages

  1. Oocyte cryopreservation for donor egg banking.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Ana; Remohí, José; Chang, Ching-Chien; Nagy, Zsolt Peter

    2011-09-01

    Oocyte donation is an efficient alternative to using own oocytes in IVF treatment for different indications. Unfortunately, 'traditional' (fresh) egg donations are challenged with inefficiency, difficulties of synchronization, very long waiting periods and lack of quarantine measures. Given the recent improvements in the efficiency of oocyte cryopreservation, it is reasonable to examine if egg donation through oocyte cryopreservation has merits. The objective of the current manuscript is to review existing literature on this topic and to report on the most recent outcomes from two established donor cryobank centres. Reports on egg donation using slow freezing are scarce and though results are encouraging, outcomes are not yet comparable to a fresh egg donation treatment. Vitrification on the other hand appears to provide high survival rates (90%) of donor oocytes and comparable fertilization, embryo development, implantation and pregnancy rates to traditional (fresh) egg donation. Besides the excellent outcomes, the ease of use for both donors and recipients, higher efficiency, lower cost and avoiding the problem of synchronization are all features associated with the benefit of a donor egg cryobank and makes it likely that this approach becomes the future standard of care. Oocyte donation is one of the last resorts in IVF treatment for couples challenged with infertility problems. However, traditional (fresh) egg donation, as it is performed today, is not very efficient, as typically all eggs from one donor are given to only one recipient, it is arduous as it requires an excellent synchronization between the donor and recipient and there are months or years of waiting time. Because of the development of an efficient oocyte cryopreservation technique, it is now possible to cryo-store donor (as well as non-donor) eggs, maintaining their viability and allowing their use whenever there is demand. Therefore, creating a donor oocyte cryobank would carry many advantages

  2. Liver regeneration after living donor transplant

    PubMed Central

    Olthoff, Kim M.; Emond, Jean C.; Shearon, Tempie H.; Everson, Greg; Baker, Talia B.; Fisher, Robert A.; Freise, Chris E.; Gillespie, Brenda W.; Everhart, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Adult-to-adult living donors and recipients were studied to characterize patterns of liver growth and identify associated factors in a multicenter study. Methods 350 donors and 353 recipients in A2ALL (Adult to Adult Living Donor Liver Transplantation Cohort Study) transplanted between March 2003 and February 2010 were included. Potential predictors of 3-month liver volume included total and standard liver volumes (TLV, SLV), the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score (in recipients), remnant and graft size, remnant to donor and graft to recipient weight ratio (RDWR, GRWR), remnant/TLV, and graft/SLV. Results Among donors, 3-month absolute growth was 676±251g (mean± SD) and percent reconstitution was 80%±13%. Among recipients, GRWR was 1.3%±0.4% (8<0.8%). Graft weight was 60%±13% of SLV. Three-month absolute growth was 549±267g and percent reconstitution was 93%±18%. Predictors of greater 3-month liver volume included larger patient size (donors, recipients), larger graft volume (recipients), and larger TLV (donors). Donors with the smallest remnant/TLV ratios had larger than expected growth, but also had higher postoperative bilirubin and international normalized ratio at 7 and 30 days. In a combined donor-recipient analysis, donors had smaller 3-month liver volumes than recipients adjusted for patient size, remnant or graft volume, and TLV or SLV (p=0.004). Recipient graft failure in the first 90 days was predicted by poor graft function at day 7 (HR=4.50, p=0.001), but not by GRWR or graft fraction (p>0.90 for each). Conclusions Both donors and recipients had rapid yet incomplete restoration of tissue mass in the first 3 months, confirming previous reports. Recipients achieved a greater percentage of expected total volume. Patient size and recipient graft volume significantly influenced 3 month volumes. Importantly, donor liver volume is a critical predictor of the rate of regeneration, and donor remnant fraction impacts post

  3. Bright Solid-State Emission of Disilane-Bridged Donor-Acceptor-Donor and Acceptor-Donor-Acceptor Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Masaki; Tsuchiya, Mizuho; Sakamoto, Ryota; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nishibori, Eiji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2016-02-24

    The development of disilane-bridged donor-acceptor-donor (D-Si-Si-A-Si-Si-D) and acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-Si-Si-D-Si-Si-A) compounds is described. Both types of compound showed strong emission (λem =ca. 500 and ca. 400 nm, respectively) in the solid state with high quantum yields (Φ: up to 0.85). Compound 4 exhibited aggregation-induced emission enhancement in solution. X-ray diffraction revealed that the crystal structures of 2, 4, and 12 had no intermolecular π-π interactions to suppress the nonradiative transition in the solid state.

  4. Effects of Alkylthio and Alkoxy Side Chains in Polymer Donor Materials for Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chaohua; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2016-02-01

    Side chains play a considerable role not only in improving the solubility of polymers for solution-processed device fabrication, but also in affecting the molecular packing, electron affinity and thus the device performance. In particular, electron-donating side chains show unique properties when employed to tune the electronic character of conjugated polymers in many cases. Therefore, rational electron-donating side chain engineering can improve the photovoltaic properties of the resulting polymer donors to some extent. Here, a survey of some representative examples which use electron-donating alkylthio and alkoxy side chains in conjugated organic polymers for polymer solar cell applications will be presented. It is envisioned that an analysis of the effect of such electron-donating side chains in polymer donors would contribute to a better understanding of this kind of side chain behavior in solution-processed conjugated organic polymers for polymer solar cells.

  5. Effects of Alkylthio and Alkoxy Side Chains in Polymer Donor Materials for Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chaohua; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2016-02-01

    Side chains play a considerable role not only in improving the solubility of polymers for solution-processed device fabrication, but also in affecting the molecular packing, electron affinity and thus the device performance. In particular, electron-donating side chains show unique properties when employed to tune the electronic character of conjugated polymers in many cases. Therefore, rational electron-donating side chain engineering can improve the photovoltaic properties of the resulting polymer donors to some extent. Here, a survey of some representative examples which use electron-donating alkylthio and alkoxy side chains in conjugated organic polymers for polymer solar cell applications will be presented. It is envisioned that an analysis of the effect of such electron-donating side chains in polymer donors would contribute to a better understanding of this kind of side chain behavior in solution-processed conjugated organic polymers for polymer solar cells. PMID:26754772

  6. [MODERN APPROACHES TO TREATMENT OF A DONOR'S WOUNDS IN THE INJURED PERSONS WITH THE BURNS].

    PubMed

    Pertsov, V I; Odnosteblytsya, O L; Ponomarenko, O V

    2016-03-01

    The impact of the treatment method proposed, using antioxidant therapy in patients, suffering the burns, on the speed and efficacy of the donor's wounds healing in their extremities was studied. In a control group of patients a standard treatment of the donor's wounds in extremities was conducted, while in the main group of patients the treatment was added with lymphotropic injection of antioxidant preparation Mexidol. Due to application of the method proposed, the wounds healing in the main group of the injured persons have had occurred significantly faster, than in the patients of a control group, and the complications of the wounds healing were absent. PMID:27514095

  7. Hemochromatosis: the new blood donor.

    PubMed

    Leitman, Susan F

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) due to homozygosity for the C282Y mutation in the HFE gene is a common inherited iron overload disorder in whites of northern European descent. Hepcidin deficiency, the hallmark of the disorder, leads to dysregulated intestinal iron absorption and progressive iron deposition in the liver, heart, skin, endocrine glands, and joints. Survival is normal if organ damage is prevented by early institution of phlebotomy therapy. HH arthropathy is the symptom most affecting quality of life and can be debilitating. Genotype screening in large population studies has shown that the clinical penetrance of C282Y homozygosity is highly variable and can be very low, with up to 50% of women and 20% of men showing a silent phenotype. Targeted population screening for the HFE C282Y mutation is not recommended at present, but might be reconsidered as a cost-effective approach to management if counseling and care were better organized and standardized. Referral of patients to the blood center for phlebotomy therapy and use of HH donor blood for transfusion standardizes treatment, minimizes treatment costs, and may benefit society as a whole. Physician practices should be amended such that HH subjects are more frequently referred to the blood center for therapy.

  8. Transport of spin qubits with donor chains under realistic experimental conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Mohiyaddin, Fahd A.; Kalra, Rachpon; Laucht, Arne; Rahman, Rajib; Klimeck, Gerhard; Morello, Andrea

    2016-07-25

    The ability to transport quantum information across some distance can facilitate the design and operation of a quantum processor. One-dimensional spin chains provide a compact platform to realize scalable spin transport for a solid-state quantum computer. Here, we model odd-sized donor chains in silicon under a range of experimental nonidealities, including variability of donor position within the chain. We show that the tolerance against donor placement inaccuracies is greatly improved by operating the spin chain in a mode where the electrons are confined at the Si-SiO2 interface. We then estimate the required time scales and exchange couplings, and the levelmore » of noise that can be tolerated to achieve high-fidelity transport. As a result, we also propose a protocol to calibrate and initialize the chain, thereby providing a complete guideline for realizing a functional donor chain and utilizing it for spin transport.« less

  9. Transport of spin qubits with donor chains under realistic experimental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohiyaddin, Fahd A.; Kalra, Rachpon; Laucht, Arne; Rahman, Rajib; Klimeck, Gerhard; Morello, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    The ability to transport quantum information across some distance can facilitate the design and operation of a quantum processor. One-dimensional spin chains provide a compact platform to realize scalable spin transport for a solid-state quantum computer. Here, we model odd-sized donor chains in silicon under a range of experimental nonidealities, including variability of donor position within the chain. We show that the tolerance against donor placement inaccuracies is greatly improved by operating the spin chain in a mode where the electrons are confined at the Si-SiO2 interface. We then estimate the required time scales and exchange couplings, and the level of noise that can be tolerated to achieve high-fidelity transport. We also propose a protocol to calibrate and initialize the chain, thereby providing a complete guideline for realizing a functional donor chain and utilizing it for spin transport.

  10. Computational design of donor-bridge-acceptor systems exhibiting pronounced quantum interference effects.

    PubMed

    Gorczak, Natalie; Renaud, Nicolas; Galan, Elena; Eelkema, Rienk; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2016-03-01

    Quantum interference is a well-known phenomenon that dictates charge transport properties of single molecule junctions. However, reports on quantum interference in donor-bridge-acceptor molecules are scarce. This might be due to the difficulties in meeting the conditions for the presence of quantum interference in a donor-bridge-acceptor system. The electronic coupling between the donor, bridge, and acceptor moieties must be weak in order to ensure localised initial and final states for charge transfer. Yet, it must be strong enough to allow all bridge orbitals to mediate charge transfer. We present the computational route to the design of a donor-bridge-acceptor molecule that features the right balance between these contradicting requirements and exhibits pronounced interference effects.

  11. Reducing infection transmission in solid organ transplantation through donor nucleic acid testing: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Lai, J C; Kahn, J G; Tavakol, M; Peters, M G; Roberts, J P

    2013-10-01

    For solid organ transplant (SOT) donors, nucleic acid-amplification testing (NAT) may reduce human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission over antibody (Ab) testing given its shorter detection window period. We compared SOT donor NAT + Ab versus Ab alone using decision models to estimate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs; cost per quality-adjusted life year [QALY] gained) from the societal perspective across a range of HIV/HCV prevalence values and NAT costs. The cost per QALY gained was calculated for two scenarios: (1) favorable: low cost ($150/donor)/high prevalence (HIV: 1.5%; HCV: 18.2%) and (2) unfavorable: high cost ($500/donor)/low prevalence (HIV: 0.1%; HCV: 1.5%). In the favorable scenario, adding NAT screening cost $161 013 per QALY gained for HIV was less costly) for HCV, and cost $86 653 per QALY gained for HIV/HCV combined. For the unfavorable scenario, the costs were $15 568 484, $221 006 and $10 077 599 per QALY gained, respectively. Universal HCV NAT + Ab for donors appears cost-effective to reduce infection transmission from SOT donors, while HIV NAT + Ab is not, except where HIV NAT is ≤$150/donor and prevalence is ≥1.5%. Our analyses provide important data to facilitate the decision to implement HIV and HCV NAT for deceased SOT donors and shape national policy regarding how to reduce infection transmission in SOT.

  12. Reducing Infection Transmission in Solid Organ Transplantation Through Donor Nucleic Acid Testing: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, J. C.; Kahn, J. G.; Tavakol, M.; Peters, M. G.; Roberts, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    For solid organ transplant (SOT) donors, nucleic acid-amplification testing (NAT) may reduce human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission over antibody (Ab) testing given its shorter detection window period. We compared SOT donor NAT + Ab versus Ab alone using decision models to estimate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs; cost per quality-adjusted life year [QALY] gained) from the societal perspective across a range of HIV/HCV prevalence values and NAT costs. The cost per QALY gained was calculated for two scenarios: (1) favorable: low cost ($150/donor)/high prevalence (HIV: 1.5%; HCV: 18.2%) and (2) unfavorable: high cost ($500/donor)/low prevalence (HIV: 0.1%; HCV: 1.5%). In the favorable scenario, adding NAT screening cost $161 013 per QALY gained for HIV was less costly) for HCV, and cost $86 653 per QALY gained for HIV/HCV combined. For the unfavorable scenario, the costs were $15 568 484, $221 006 and $10 077 599 per QALY gained, respectively. Universal HCV NAT + Ab for donors appears cost-effective to reduce infection transmission from SOT donors, while HIV NAT + Ab is not, except where HIV NAT is ≤$150/donor and prevalence is ≥1.5%. Our analyses provide important data to facilitate the decision to implement HIV and HCV NAT for deceased SOT donors and shape national policy regarding how to reduce infection transmission in SOT. PMID:24034208

  13. Donor research in australia: challenges and promise.

    PubMed

    Masser, Barbara; Smith, Geoff; Williams, Lisa A

    2014-07-01

    Donors are the key to the core business of Blood Collection Agencies (BCAs). However, historically, they have not been a focus of research undertaken by these organizations. This model is now changing, with significant donor research groups established in a number of countries, including Australia. Donor research in the Australian Red Cross Blood Service (Blood Service) is concentrated in the Donor and Community Research (DCR) team. Cognizant of the complex and ever-changing landscape with regard to optimal donor management, the DCR team collaborates with academics located at universities around Australia to coordinate a broad program of research that addresses both short- and-long term challenges to the blood supply. This type of collaboration is not, however, without challenges. Two major collaborative programs of the Blood Service's research, focusing on i) the recruitment and retention of plasmapheresis donors and ii) the role of the emotion pride in donor motivation and return, are showcased to elucidate how the challenges of conducting collaborative BCA research can be met. In so doing, these and the other research programs described herein demonstrate how the Blood Service supports and contributes to research that not only revises operational procedures but also contributes to advances in basic science. PMID:25254025

  14. Donor Research in Australia: Challenges and Promise

    PubMed Central

    Masser, Barbara; Smith, Geoff; Williams, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Donors are the key to the core business of Blood Collection Agencies (BCAs). However, historically, they have not been a focus of research undertaken by these organizations. This model is now changing, with significant donor research groups established in a number of countries, including Australia. Donor research in the Australian Red Cross Blood Service (Blood Service) is concentrated in the Donor and Community Research (DCR) team. Cognizant of the complex and ever-changing landscape with regard to optimal donor management, the DCR team collaborates with academics located at universities around Australia to coordinate a broad program of research that addresses both short- and-long term challenges to the blood supply. This type of collaboration is not, however, without challenges. Two major collaborative programs of the Blood Service's research, focusing on i) the recruitment and retention of plasmapheresis donors and ii) the role of the emotion pride in donor motivation and return, are showcased to elucidate how the challenges of conducting collaborative BCA research can be met. In so doing, these and the other research programs described herein demonstrate how the Blood Service supports and contributes to research that not only revises operational procedures but also contributes to advances in basic science. PMID:25254025

  15. Dressing phases of AdS3/CFT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsato, Riccardo; Ohlsson Sax, Olof; Sfondrini, Alessandro; Stefański, Bogdan, Jr.; Torrielli, Alessandro

    2013-09-01

    We determine the all-loop dressing phases of the AdS3/CFT2 integrable system related to type IIB string theory on AdS3×S3×T4 by solving the recently found crossing relations and studying their singularity structure. The two resulting phases present a novel structure with respect to the ones appearing in AdS5/CFT4 and AdS4/CFT3. In the strongly coupled regime, their leading order reduces to the universal Arutyunov-Frolov-Staudacher phase as expected. We also compute their subleading order and compare it with recent one-loop perturbative results and comment on their weak-coupling expansion.

  16. Bubbling geometries for AdS2× S2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunin, Oleg

    2015-10-01

    We construct BPS geometries describing normalizable excitations of AdS2×S2. All regular horizon-free solutions are parameterized by two harmonic functions in R 3 with sources along closed curves. This local structure is reminiscent of the "bubbling solutions" for the other AdS p ×S q cases, however, due to peculiar asymptotic properties of AdS2, one copy of R 3 does not cover the entire space, and we discuss the procedure for analytic continuation, which leads to a nontrivial topological structure of the new geometries. We also study supersymmetric brane probes on the new geometries, which represent the AdS2×S2 counterparts of the giant gravitons.

  17. Living donor liver transplantation in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Marwan, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    In Egypt there is no doubt that chronic liver diseases are a major health concern. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevalence among the 15−59 years age group is estimated to be 14.7%. The high prevalence of chronic liver diseases has led to increasing numbers of Egyptian patients suffering from end stage liver disease (ESLD), necessitating liver transplantation (LT). We reviewed the evolution of LT in Egypt and the current status. A single center was chosen as an example to review the survival and mortality rates. To date, deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT) has not been implemented in any program though Egyptian Parliament approved the law in 2010. Living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) seemed to be the only logical choice to save many patients who are in desperate need for LT. By that time, there was increase in number of centers doing LDLT (13 centers) and increase in number of LDLT cases [2,400] with improvement of the results. Donor mortality rate is 1.66 per 1,000 donors; this comprised four donors in the Egyptian series. The exact recipient survival is not accurately known however, and the one-year, three-year and five-year survival were 73.17%, 70.83% and 64.16% respectively in the International Medical Center (IMC) in a series of 145 adult to adult living donor liver transplantation (AALDLT) cases. There was no donor mortality in this series. LDLT are now routinely and successfully performed in Egypt with reasonable donor and recipient outcomes. Organ shortage remains the biggest hurdle facing the increasing need for LT. Although LDLT had reasonable outcomes, it carries considerable risks to healthy donors. For example, it lacks cadaveric back up, and is not feasible for all patients. The initial success in LDLT should drive efforts to increase the people awareness about deceased organ donation in Egypt. PMID:27115003

  18. Thermal donor formation and annihilation in oxygen-implanted float-zone silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, S. ); Stein, H.J. ); Shatas, S.C. ); Ponce, F.A. )

    1992-09-01

    The formation and annihilation behaviors of thermal donors in {sup 16}O{sup +}-, {sup 18}O{sup +}-, or {sup 16}O{sup +}+{sup 12}C{sup +}-implanted float-zone silicon have been investigated with secondary ion mass spectrometry, spreading resistance probe, Hall effect, and transmission electron microscopy. Various oxygen or carbon+oxygen-implanted samples were laser annealed to remove implant damage and subjected to furnace annealing at 450 {degree}C for up to 100 h to activate oxygen-related thermal donors. Oxygen concentrations at the peak of the implanted profiles exceed the maximum for Czochralski Si by an order of magnitude. It is found that the third to fourth power dependence of thermal donor formation on oxygen generally observed for Czochralski Si does not hold for the higher oxygen concentration in the implanted layer. Annihilation characteristics of thermal donors formed in the oxygen implanted layers were investigated by the rapid thermal annealing technique. A rapid thermal anneal at 1150 {degree}C for 30 s was required to remove all the thermal donors. Based upon the annihilation kinetics data, it is tentatively concluded that both old and new thermal donors exist in the oxygen-implanted layer. For carbon+oxygen-coimplanted samples, the data have shown that carbon greatly increases the new thermal donor concentration in the implanted layer. Finally, precipitate morphologies for both oxygen-only- and carbon+oxygen-coimplanted samples after a 450 {degree}C furnace annealing were investigated by high resolution electron microscopy. In the case of oxygen-implant-only samples, predominant precipitate morphologies are needlelike while platelet defects predominate for carbon+oxygen-coimplanted samples. Since carbon increases the formation rate of new thermal donors, it is unlikely that they are distinctly related to needlelike precipitates as claimed in previous studies.

  19. Donor-acceptor heteroleptic open sandwiches.

    PubMed

    Merino, Gabriel; Beltrán, Hiram I; Vela, Alberto

    2006-02-01

    A series of donor-acceptor heteroleptic open sandwiches with formula CpM-M'Pyl (M = B, Al, Ga; M' = Li, Na; Cp = cyclopentadienyl; Pyl = pentadienyl) has been designed in silico using density functional theory. The most stable complexes are those containing boron as a donor atom. A molecular orbital analysis shows that the s character of the lone pair located at the group 13 element is mainly responsible for the complex stabilization. It is also found that the surrounding medium has a similar effect on these sandwiches such as in the "classical" donor-acceptor complexes, showing a decrement in the group 13 element-alkaline metal bond lengths.

  20. Interventional radiology in living donor liver transplant

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Fan; Ou, Hsin-You; Yu, Chun-Yen; Tsang, Leo Leung-Chit; Huang, Tung-Liang; Chen, Tai-Yi; Hsu, Hsien-Wen; Concerjero, Allan M; Wang, Chih-Chi; Wang, Shih-Ho; Lin, Tsan-Shiun; Liu, Yueh-Wei; Yong, Chee-Chien; Lin, Yu-Hung; Lin, Chih-Che; Chiu, King-Wah; Jawan, Bruno; Eng, Hock-Liew; Chen, Chao-Long

    2014-01-01

    The shortage of deceased donor liver grafts led to the use of living donor liver transplant (LDLT). Patients who undergo LDLT have a higher risk of complications than those who undergo deceased donor liver transplantation (LT). Interventional radiology has acquired a key role in every LT program by treating the majority of vascular and non-vascular post-transplant complications, improving graft and patient survival and avoiding, in the majority of cases, surgical revision and/or re-transplant. The aim of this paper is to review indications, diagnostic modalities, technical considerations, achievements and potential complications of interventional radiology procedures after LDLT. PMID:24876742