Science.gov

Sample records for added mass effects

  1. Higgs mechanism and the added-mass effect.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswami, Govind S; Phatak, Sachin S

    2015-04-08

    In the Higgs mechanism, mediators of the weak force acquire masses by interacting with the Higgs condensate, leading to a vector boson mass matrix. On the other hand, a rigid body accelerated through an inviscid, incompressible and irrotational fluid feels an opposing force linearly related to its acceleration, via an added-mass tensor. We uncover a striking physical analogy between the two effects and propose a dictionary relating them. The correspondence turns the gauge Lie algebra into the space of directions in which the body can move, encodes the pattern of gauge symmetry breaking in the shape of an associated body and relates symmetries of the body to those of the scalar vacuum manifold. The new viewpoint is illustrated with numerous examples, and raises interesting questions, notably on the fluid analogues of the broken symmetry and Higgs particle, and the field-theoretic analogue of the added mass of a composite body.

  2. Higgs mechanism and the added-mass effect

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswami, Govind S.; Phatak, Sachin S.

    2015-01-01

    In the Higgs mechanism, mediators of the weak force acquire masses by interacting with the Higgs condensate, leading to a vector boson mass matrix. On the other hand, a rigid body accelerated through an inviscid, incompressible and irrotational fluid feels an opposing force linearly related to its acceleration, via an added-mass tensor. We uncover a striking physical analogy between the two effects and propose a dictionary relating them. The correspondence turns the gauge Lie algebra into the space of directions in which the body can move, encodes the pattern of gauge symmetry breaking in the shape of an associated body and relates symmetries of the body to those of the scalar vacuum manifold. The new viewpoint is illustrated with numerous examples, and raises interesting questions, notably on the fluid analogues of the broken symmetry and Higgs particle, and the field-theoretic analogue of the added mass of a composite body. PMID:27547077

  3. The generalized added mass revised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Wilde, Juray

    2007-05-01

    The reformulation of the generalized or apparent added mass presented by De Wilde [Phys. Fluids 17, 113304 (2005)] neglects the presence of a drag-type force in the gas and solid phase momentum equations. Reformulating the generalized added mass accounting for the presence of a drag-type force, an apparent drag force appears next to the apparent distribution of the filtered gas phase pressure gradient over the phases already found by De Wilde in the above-cited reference. The reformulation of the generalized added mass and the evaluation of a linear wave propagation speed test then suggest a generalized added mass type closure approach to completely describe filtered gas-solid momentum transfer, that is, including both the filtered drag force and the correlation between the solid volume fraction and the gas phase pressure gradient.

  4. The effect of rotary inertia of added masses on vibrations of empty and fluid-filled circular cylindrical shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabili, M.; Garziera, R.; Carra, S.

    2005-12-01

    This paper completes a study of Amabili and Garziera [2000, Vibrations of circular cylindrical shells with nonuniform constraints, elastic bed and added mass; Part I: empty and fluid-filled shells. J. Fluids Struct. 14, 669 690; 2002a, Vibrations of circular cylindrical shells with nonuniform constraints, elastic bed and added mass; Part II: shells containing or immersed in axial flow. J. Fluids Struct. 16, 31 51; 2002b, Vibrations of circular cylindrical shells with nonuniform constraints, elastic bed and added mass; Part III: steady viscous effects on shells conveying fluid. J. Fluids Struct. 16, 795 809] by adding the effect of rotary inertia of added masses to the DIVA code, based on the Rayleigh Ritz method and developed to study free vibrations of circular cylindrical shells with nonuniform boundary conditions, added masses, partial elastic bed, initial pre-stress, conveying flow or immersed in axial flow. The effect of rotary inertia has also been evaluated by commercial FEM software and experiments in order to validate the DIVA code. Calculations and experiments show that the effect of rotary inertia of added masses is generally negligible, except for additional local modes; this is in contrast with what has been found for thin plates, due to the geometric stiffness of the circular cylindrical shell.

  5. Investigation on fluid added mass effect in the modal response of a pump-turbine runner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y He, L.; He, Y.; Y Luo, Y.; Wang, Z. W.

    2013-12-01

    With the improvement of technology and manufacturing level of hydraulic turbine, there is a trend to increase the power concentration of the units. As a consequence, heads, fluid velocities and rotational speeds are higher which lead to larger hydraulic excitation forces on the structures. Accordingly, vibration and high stress levels will arise, which may cause fatigue damage. Therefore, how to predict the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the runner during the design stage is of paramount importance. In this paper, numerical simulation to analyze the influence of the surrounding water in a pump-turbine runner modal has been carried out by using finite element method. The modal behavior of the runner in air and in water has been calculated. In addition, the added mass effect by comparing the natural frequencies and mode shapes in both cases has been determined. The results show that, due to the added mass effect of the surrounding water, natural frequencies are considerably reduced. The frequency reduction ratio (FRR) varies in a range of 0.06~0.43, depending on the mode shapes. Vibration amplitude and complexity of modes are the two main factors that affect the reduction ratio of runner natural frequencies. For the FRR of in-phase (IP) mode shapes, the vibration amplitude of each mode is considered to be the dominant reason. It is clear that the FRR decreases as the nodal diameter (ND) increases (except for 0ND). While for counter-phase (CP) mode shapes, with the frequency increases, the runner modes will become more and more complex, as a result of which, the FRR increases.

  6. Added mass in human swimmers: age and gender differences.

    PubMed

    Caspersen, Cecilie; Berthelsen, Petter A; Eik, Mari; Pâkozdi, Csaba; Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik

    2010-08-26

    In unstationary swimming (changing velocity), some of the water around the swimmer is set in motion. This can be thought of as an added mass (M(a)) of water. The purpose of this study was to find added mass on human swimmers and investigate the effect of shape and body size. Thirty subjects were connected to a 2.8m long bar with handles, attached with springs (stiffness k = 318 N/m) and a force cell. By oscillating this system vertically and registering the period of oscillations it was possible to find the added mass of the swimmer, given the known masses of the bar and swimmer. Relative added mass (M(a)%) for boys, women and men were, respectively, 26.8 +/- 2.9%, 23.6 +/- 1.6% and 26.8 +/- 2.3% of the subjects total mass. This study reported significantly lower added mass (p < 0.001) and relative added mass (p < 0.002) for women compared to men, which indicate that the possible body shape differences between genders may be an important factor for determining added mass. Boys had significantly lower (p < 0.001) added mass than men. When added mass was scaled for body size there were no significant differences (p = 0.996) between boys and men, which indicated that body size is an important factor that influences added mass. The added mass in this study seems to be lower and within a smaller range than previously reported (Klauck, 1999; Eik et al., 2008). It is concluded that the added mass in human swimmers, in extended gliding position, is approximately 1/4 of the subjects' body mass.

  7. Creating images by adding masses to gravitational point lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sète, Olivier; Luce, Robert; Liesen, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    A well-studied maximal gravitational point lens construction of S. H. Rhie produces images of a light source using deflector masses. The construction arises from a circular, symmetric deflector configuration on masses (producing only images) by adding a tiny mass in the center of the other mass positions (and reducing all the other masses a little bit). In a recent paper we studied this "image creating effect" from a purely mathematical point of view (Sète, Luce & Liesen, Comput. Methods Funct. Theory 15(1), 2014). Here we discuss a few consequences of our findings for gravitational microlensing models. We present a complete characterization of the effect of adding small masses to these point lens models, with respect to the number of images. In particular, we give several examples of maximal lensing models that are different from Rhie's construction and that do not share its highly symmetric appearance. We give generally applicable conditions that allow the construction of maximal point lenses on masses from maximal lenses on masses.

  8. Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. It summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30 degrees of yaw.

  9. Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code

    SciTech Connect

    Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. This paper summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30{sup o} of yaw.

  10. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Wade C; Lewis, Charlotte R; Openshaw, Anna P; Farnsworth, Paul B

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Wade C.; Lewis, Charlotte R.; Openshaw, Anna P.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration.

  12. Octopus-inspired drag cancelation by added mass pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weymouth, Gabriel; Giorgio-Serchi, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Recent work has shown that when an immersed body suddenly changes its size, such as a deflating octopus during rapid escape jetting, the body experiences large forces due to the variation of added-mass energy. We extend this line of research by investigating a spring-mass oscillator submerged in quiescent fluid subject to periodic changes in its volume. This system isolates the ability of the added-mass thrust to cancel the bluff body resistance (having no jet flow to confuse the analysis) and moves closer to studying how these effects would work in a sustained propulsion case by studying periodic shape-change instead of a "one-shot" escape maneuver. With a combination of analytical, numerical, and experimental results, we show that the recovery of added-mass kinetic energy can be used to completely cancel the drag of the fluid, driving the onset of sustained oscillations with amplitudes as large as four times the average body radius. Moreover, these results are fairly independent of the details of the shape-change kinematics as long as the Stokes number and shape-change number are large. In addition, the effective pumping frequency range based on parametric oscillator analysis is shown to predict large amplitude response region observed in the numerics and experiments.

  13. Metabolic rate of carrying added mass: a function of walking speed, carried mass and mass location.

    PubMed

    Schertzer, Eliran; Riemer, Raziel

    2014-11-01

    The effort of carrying additional mass at different body locations is important in ergonomics and in designing wearable robotics. We investigate the metabolic rate of carrying a load as a function of its mass, its location on the body and the subject's walking speed. Novel metabolic rate prediction equations for walking while carrying loads at the ankle, knees and back were developed based on experiments where subjects walked on a treadmill at 4, 5 or 6km/h bearing different amounts of added mass (up to 2kg per leg and 22kg for back). Compared to previously reported equations, ours are 7-69% more accurate. Results also show that relative cost for carrying a mass at a distal versus a proximal location changes with speed and mass. Contrary to mass carried on the back, mass attached to the leg cannot be modeled as an increase in body mass.

  14. Thermo-mechanical phase-shift determination in Coriolis mass-flowmeters with added masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghayesh, Mergen H.; Amabili, Marco; Païdoussis, Michael P.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop an approximate analytical solution for phase-shift (and thus mass flow) prediction along the length of the measuring tube of a Coriolis mass-flowmeter. A single, straight measuring tube is considered; added masses at the sensor and excitation locations are included in the model, and thus in the equation of motion. The measuring tube is excited harmonically by an electromagnetic driver. Taking into account thermal effects, the equation of motion is derived through use of the extended Hamilton's principle and constitutive relations. The equation of motion is discretized into a set of ordinary differential equations via Galerkin's technique. The method of multiple timescales is applied to the set of resultant equations, and the equations of order one and epsilon are obtained analytically for the system at primary resonance. The solution of the equation of motion is obtained by satisfying the solvability condition (making the solution of order epsilon free of secular terms). The flow-related phase-shift in the driver-induced tube vibration is measured at two symmetrically located points on either side of the mid-length of the tube. The analytical results for the phase-shift are compared to those obtained numerically. The effect of system parameters on the measured phase-shift is discussed. It is shown that the measured phase-shift depends on the mass flow rate, of course, but it is also affected by the magnitude of the added sensor mass and location, and the temperature change; nevertheless, the factors investigated do not induce a zero phase-shift.

  15. Proposed Framework for Determining Added Mass of Orion Drogue Parachutes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraire, Usbaldo, Jr.; Dearman, James; Morris, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is executing a program to qualify a parachute system for a next generation human spacecraft. Part of the qualification process involves predicting parachute riser tension during system descent with flight simulations. Human rating the CPAS hardware requires a high degree of confidence in the simulation models used to predict parachute loads. However, uncertainty exists in the heritage added mass models used for loads predictions due to a lack of supporting documentation and data. Even though CPAS anchors flight simulation loads predictions to flight tests, extrapolation of these models outside the test regime carries the risk of producing non-bounding loads. A set of equations based on empirically derived functions of skirt radius is recommended as the simplest and most viable method to test and derive an enhanced added mass model for an inflating parachute. This will increase confidence in the capability to predict parachute loads. The selected equations are based on those published in A Simplified Dynamic Model of Parachute Inflation by Dean Wolf. An Ames 80x120 wind tunnel test campaign is recommended to acquire the reefing line tension and canopy photogrammetric data needed to quantify the terms in the Wolf equations and reduce uncertainties in parachute loads predictions. Once the campaign is completed, the Wolf equations can be used to predict loads in a typical CPAS Drogue Flight test. Comprehensive descriptions of added mass test techniques from the Apollo Era to the current CPAS project are included for reference.

  16. Value-added logistics: the answer to mass customization.

    PubMed

    Verwoerd, W

    1999-11-01

    Value added logistics: A new concept or just new terminology? If you read Today and Tomorrow you will notice that Henry Ford used postponed manufacturing to save on transportation costs: On one railway-wagon he could ship either three T-Fords or the parts for seven T-Fords. This is one of the reasons he build several assembly plants in the United States and in Europe (Dagenham, UK; Koln, Germany; and Amsterdam). Although this concept has existed for more than 70 years, I found out that it is still quite unknown. Thanks to information technology, it is becoming more powerful. This opens large possibilities for mass customization.

  17. Added mass and damping on an oscillating surface-piercing circular column with a circular footing

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, J.S.

    1994-12-31

    Added mass and damping on a vertical, surface-piercing, circular cylinder or column with a submerged sharp-cornered circular floating, oscillating in water of finite and infinite depths are measured using a planar motion mechanism. The model is made of aluminum, and the outer diameters of the column and footing are 26.67 cm and 60.96 cm, and their lengths are 90.17 cm and 22.86 cm, respectively. The bodies were forced to oscillate sinusoidally with small amplitudes, for several submergences below a free surface. The added-mass and wave-damping coefficients are shown to be influenced strongly by the free-surface effect and are presented as a function of water depth, frequency and direction of oscillation and of depth of submergence from the free surface. For the vertical oscillation close to the free surface, negative added mass values are measured, and the predictions of the added mass by a 3-D diffraction theory are 10--20% lower than the experimental values at the model submergences tested. The experimental added mass coefficient values for the horizontal oscillation and the wave damping coefficients for the vertical oscillation in finite depth differ more than 100% from the corresponding 3-D theory prediction at a certain at-sea operational frequency range. This set of data provides further experimental information for the improvement of theoretical predictions.

  18. Free vibrations of circular cylindrical shells with a small added concentrated mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leizerovich, G. S.; Seregin, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of a small added mass on the frequency and shape of free vibrations of a thin shell is studied using shallow shell theory. The proposed mathematical model assumes that mass asymmetry even in a linear formulation leads to coupled radial flexural vibrations. The interaction of shape-generating waves is studied using modal equations obtained by the Bubnov-Galerkin method. Splitting of the flexural frequency spectrum is found, which is caused not only by the added mass but also by the wave-formation parameters of the shell. The ranges of the relative lengths and shell thicknesses are determined in which the interaction of flexural and radial vibrations can be neglected.

  19. Study of micro piezoelectric vibration generator with added mass and capacitance suitable for broadband vibration

    SciTech Connect

    He, Qing Mao, Xinhua Chu, Dongliang

    2015-07-15

    This study proposes an optimized frequency adjustment method that uses a micro-cantilever beam-based piezoelectric vibration generator based on a combination of added mass and capacitance. The most important concept of the proposed method is that the frequency adjustment process is divided into two steps: the first is a rough adjustment step that changes the size of the mass added at the end of cantilever to adjust the frequency in a large-scale and discontinuous manner; the second step is a continuous but short-range frequency adjustment via the adjustable added capacitance. Experimental results show that when the initial natural frequency of a micro piezoelectric vibration generator is 69.8 Hz, then this natural frequency can be adjusted to any value in the range from 54.2 Hz to 42.1 Hz using the combination of the added mass and the capacitance. This method simply and effectively matches a piezoelectric vibration generator’s natural frequency to the vibration source frequency.

  20. Effects of ad placement and type on consumer responses to podcast ads.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Eric A; Cho, Chang-Hoan

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the effects of podcast ad placement and podcast ad type on consumers' perceived intrusiveness, perceived irritation, attitude toward the ad, and ad avoidance. Our 2 x 2 (traditional ad vs. sponsorship by beginning vs. middle) experimental study found that sponsorships generated better consumer responses than did traditional ads and that podcast ads placed at the beginning of audio podcasts yielded better consumer responses than those placed in the middle. Implications for marketers and advertisers are discussed.

  1. Rotational-Mode-Shape-Based Added Mass Identification Using Wavelet Packet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, Prakash; Sivakumar, Srinivasan M.

    2015-05-01

    A novel approach is proposed in this article that the combination of rotational mode shape with wavelet packet transform can detect the relatively small added mass (damage) location and its intensity in a beam structure. The rotational mode shapes of added mass state are obtained from a finite element model and used as input in wavelet analysis to capture signatures arising from even small damage in the beam. The proposed algorithm is able to clearly identify single and multiple added mass locations and their intensities in a cantilever beam. It is also tested with noise-contaminated signals to show its feasibility in practical situations.

  2. Bioenergetic flux, mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial morphology dynamics in AD and MCI cybrid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Diana F.; Selfridge, J. Eva; Lu, Jianghua; E, Lezi; Roy, Nairita; Hutfles, Lewis; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Michaelis, Elias K.; Yan, ShiDu; Cardoso, Sandra M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.

    2013-01-01

    Bioenergetic dysfunction occurs in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a clinical syndrome that frequently precedes symptomatic AD. In this study, we modeled AD and MCI bioenergetic dysfunction by transferring mitochondria from MCI, AD and control subject platelets to mtDNA-depleted SH-SY5Y cells. Bioenergetic fluxes and bioenergetics-related infrastructures were characterized in the resulting cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) cell lines. Relative to control cybrids, AD and MCI cybrids showed changes in oxygen consumption, respiratory coupling and glucose utilization. AD and MCI cybrids had higher ADP/ATP and lower NAD+/NADH ratios. AD and MCI cybrids exhibited differences in proteins that monitor, respond to or regulate cell bioenergetic fluxes including HIF1α, PGC1α, SIRT1, AMPK, p38 MAPK and mTOR. Several endpoints suggested mitochondrial mass increased in the AD cybrid group and probably to a lesser extent in the MCI cybrid group, and that the mitochondrial fission–fusion balance shifted towards increased fission in the AD and MCI cybrids. As many of the changes we observed in AD and MCI cybrid models are also seen in AD subject brains, we conclude reduced bioenergetic function is present during very early AD, is not brain-limited and induces protean retrograde responses that likely have both adaptive and mal-adaptive consequences. PMID:23740939

  3. Adding interventions to mass measles vaccinations in India

    PubMed Central

    Verguet, Stéphane; Morris, Shaun K; Sharma, Jitendar K; Ram, Usha; Gauvreau, Cindy; Jones, Edward; Jha, Prabhat; Jit, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To quantify the impact on mortality of offering a hypothetical set of technically feasible, high-impact interventions for maternal and child survival during India’s 2010–2013 measles supplementary immunization activity. Methods We developed Lives Saved Tool models for 12 Indian states participating in the supplementary immunization, based on state- and sex-specific data on mortality from India’s Million Deaths Study and on health services coverage from Indian household surveys. Potential add-on interventions were identified through a literature review and expert consultations. We quantified the number of lives saved for a campaign offering measles vaccine alone versus a campaign offering measles vaccine with six add-on interventions (nutritional screening and complementary feeding for children, vitamin A and zinc supplementation for children, multiple micronutrient and calcium supplementation in pregnancy, and free distribution of insecticide-treated bednets). Findings The measles vaccination campaign saved an estimated 19 016 lives of children younger than 5 years. A hypothetical campaign including measles vaccine with add-on interventions was projected to save around 73 900 lives (range: 70 200–79 300), preventing 73 700 child deaths (range: 70 000–79 000) and 300 maternal deaths (range: 200–400). The most effective interventions in the whole package were insecticide-treated bednets, measles vaccine and preventive zinc supplementation. Girls accounted for 66% of expected lives saved (12 712/19 346) for the measles vaccine campaign, and 62% of lives saved (45 721/74 367) for the hypothetical campaign including add-on interventions. Conclusion In India, a measles vaccination campaign including feasible, high-impact interventions could substantially increase the number of lives saved and mitigate gender-related inequities in child mortality. PMID:27843161

  4. Resistive thrust production can be as crucial as added mass mechanisms for inertial undulatory swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piñeirua, M.; Godoy-Diana, R.; Thiria, B.

    2015-08-01

    In this Rapid Communication, we address a crucial point regarding the description of moderate to high Reynolds numbers aquatic swimmers. For decades, swimming animals have been classified in two different families of propulsive mechanisms based on the Reynolds number: the resistive swimmers, using local friction to produce the necessary thrust force for locomotion at low Reynolds number, and the reactive swimmers, lying in the high Reynolds range, and using added mass acceleration (described by perfect fluid theory). However, inertial swimmers are also systems that dissipate energy, due to their finite size, therefore involving strong resistive contributions, even for high Reynolds numbers. Using a complete model for the hydrodynamic forces, involving both reactive and resistive contributions, we revisit here the physical mechanisms responsible for the thrust production of such swimmers. We show, for instance, that the resistive part of the force balance is as crucial as added mass effects in the modeling of the thrust force, especially for elongated species. The conclusions brought by this work may have significant contributions to the understanding of complex swimming mechanisms, especially for the future design of artificial swimmers.

  5. Resistive thrust production can be as crucial as added mass mechanisms for inertial undulatory swimmers.

    PubMed

    Piñeirua, M; Godoy-Diana, R; Thiria, B

    2015-08-01

    In this Rapid Communication, we address a crucial point regarding the description of moderate to high Reynolds numbers aquatic swimmers. For decades, swimming animals have been classified in two different families of propulsive mechanisms based on the Reynolds number: the resistive swimmers, using local friction to produce the necessary thrust force for locomotion at low Reynolds number, and the reactive swimmers, lying in the high Reynolds range, and using added mass acceleration (described by perfect fluid theory). However, inertial swimmers are also systems that dissipate energy, due to their finite size, therefore involving strong resistive contributions, even for high Reynolds numbers. Using a complete model for the hydrodynamic forces, involving both reactive and resistive contributions, we revisit here the physical mechanisms responsible for the thrust production of such swimmers. We show, for instance, that the resistive part of the force balance is as crucial as added mass effects in the modeling of the thrust force, especially for elongated species. The conclusions brought by this work may have significant contributions to the understanding of complex swimming mechanisms, especially for the future design of artificial swimmers.

  6. Feasibility Study of a Wearable Exoskeleton for Children: Is the Gait Altered by Adding Masses on Lower Limbs?

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Stefano; Colazza, Alessandra; Petrarca, Maurizio; Castelli, Enrico; Cappa, Paolo; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2013-01-01

    We are designing a pediatric exoskeletal ankle robot (pediatric Anklebot) to promote gait habilitation in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). Few studies have evaluated how much or whether the unilateral loading of a wearable exoskeleton may have the unwanted effect of altering significantly the gait. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether adding masses up to 2.5 kg, the estimated overall added mass of the mentioned device, at the knee level alters the gait kinematics. Ten healthy children and eight children with CP, with light or mild gait impairment, walked wearing a knee brace with several masses. Gait parameters and lower-limb joint kinematics were analyzed with an optoelectronic system under six conditions: without brace (natural gait) and with masses placed at the knee level (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 kg). T-tests and repeated measures ANOVA tests were conducted in order to find noteworthy differences among the trial conditions and between loaded and unloaded legs. No statistically significant differences in gait parameters for both healthy children and children with CP were observed in the five “with added mass” conditions. We found significant differences among “natural gait” and “with added masses” conditions in knee flexion and hip extension angles for healthy children and in knee flexion angle for children with CP. This result can be interpreted as an effect of the mechanical constraint induced by the knee brace rather than the effect associated with load increase. The study demonstrates that the mechanical constraint induced by the brace has a measurable effect on the gait of healthy children and children with CP and that the added mass up to 2.5 kg does not alter the lower limb kinematics. This suggests that wearable devices weighing 25 N or less will not noticeably modify the gait patterns of the population examined here. PMID:24023822

  7. The Use of Stereotypes in Mass Media Advertising: Blacks in Magazine, Newspaper and Television Ads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culley, James D.; Bennett, Rex

    A brief review of the literature on the use of black stereotypes in mass media advertising, and the results of a current study in this area are presented. Data were gathered by analysis of 1,536 ads in six general interest magazines and 4,371 ads in the New York Times over a one month period, and 368 television commercials on three networks over a…

  8. A note on physical mass and the thermodynamics of AdS-Kerr black holes

    SciTech Connect

    McInnes, Brett; Ong, Yen Chin E-mail: yenchin.ong@nordita.org

    2015-11-01

    As with any black hole, asymptotically anti-de Sitter Kerr black holes are described by a small number of parameters, including a ''mass parameter'' M that reduces to the AdS-Schwarzschild mass in the limit of vanishing angular momentum. In sharp contrast to the asymptotically flat case, the horizon area of such a black hole increases with the angular momentum parameter a if one fixes M; this appears to mean that the Penrose process in this case would violate the Second Law of black hole thermodynamics. We show that the correct procedure is to fix not M but rather the ''physical'' mass E=M/(1−a{sup 2}/L{sup 2}){sup 2}; this is motivated by the First Law. For then the horizon area decreases with a. We recommend that E always be used as the mass in physical processes: for example, in attempts to ''over-spin'' AdS-Kerr black holes.

  9. Thermal and mechanical analysis on the cold mass support assembly of test cryomodule for IMP ADS-injector-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X. L.; Wang, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S. Y.; Liu, Y. Y.; Sun, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Injector-II of ADS project will include two cryomodules, each of which consists of eight HWR cavities and nine SC solenoid magnets. A test cryomodule (TCM1) containing one HWR cavity and two SC magnets was developed for verification of related technique at the first stage. The TCM1 cryostat was designed by Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics of Chinese Academy of Sciences (SINAP, CAS). The cold mass support assembly in the test cryomodule should accommodate the unbalanced loads induced by each cold mass assembly, the deformation induced by thermal shrinkage, and the thermal stress between different materials. In order to validate the structure design, coupled thermal and mechanical analysis on the cold mass support assembly was performed. The temperature, deformation and stress of the cold mass support assembly were obtained. The results effectively provide the guideline for the design and improvement of the cold mass support assembly.

  10. Nondestructive characterization of tie-rods by means of dynamic testing, added masses and genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentilini, C.; Marzani, A.; Mazzotti, M.

    2013-01-01

    The structural characterization of tie-rods is crucial for the safety assessments of historical buildings. The main parameters that characterize the behavior of tie-rods are the tensile force, the modulus of elasticity of the material and the rotational stiffness at both restraints. Several static, static-dynamic and pure dynamic nondestructive methods have been proposed in the last decades to identify such parameters. However, none of them is able to characterize all the four mentioned parameters. To fill this gap, in this work a procedure based on dynamic testing, added masses and genetic algorithms (GA) is proposed. The identification is driven by GA where the objective function is a metric of the discrepancy between the experimentally determined (by dynamic impact testing) and the numerically computed (by a fast and reliable finite element formulation) frequencies of vibration of some modified systems obtained from the tie-rod by adding a concentrated mass in specific positions. It is shown by a comprehensive numerical testing campaign in which several cases spanning from short, low-stressed, and almost hinged tie-rods to long, high-tensioned, and nearly clamped tie-rods, that the proposed strategy is reliable in the identification of the four unknowns. Finally, the procedure has been applied to characterize a metallic tie-rod located in Palazzo Paleotti, Bologna (Italy).

  11. Full Adaptive Optics Images of ADS 9731 and MU Cassiopeiae: Orbits and Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Jack D.; Christou, Julian C.; Fugate, Robert Q.

    1995-09-01

    The double double ADS 9731 and the nearby Population II astrometric binary μ Cas have been imaged with full adaptive optics employed at the 1.5 m telescope belonging to the USAF Phillips Laboratory's Starfire Optical Range near Albuquerque, New Mexico. On 1994 May 4 at a wavelength of 0.85 μm, the Δmag values and separations for ADS 9731 components AB were observed to be 2.19 and 1".27, 0.90 and 1".55 for CD, and 0.40 and 14".8 between A and C. Combining these observations with earlier ones, we have obtained circular, highly inclined, long-period (834 and 1230 yr) preliminary orbits for both pairs and derived their masses along with other astrophysical quantities. However, consideration of stellar evolutionary models leads to a disagreement in the derived distance to the system (108.1 pc) and/or masses, which will perhaps be resolved by subsequent orbital refinement. The first ever real-time images at short wavelengths (<1 μm) of the faint companion to the astrometric binary μ Cas A component were easily made at 0.85 microns on 1994 August 28 and October 22, with movement noted between the two dates. The Δmag value was determined to be 4.9±0.1, and the separation on the two dates was 0".73 and 0".66. Combining our measurements with astrometric data from both Sproul and Allegheny Observatories, we make a simultaneous fit for a new master orbit and find masses of 0.742±0.059 and 0.173±0.011 Msun for A and B, respectively. From further analysis we derive a presumably primordial helium abundance f6r μ Cas of Y = 0.24±0.07 for an assumed age of 1010 yr and the latest measured metallicity of Z = 0.0021.

  12. A study on the characteristic behavior of mass inclusions added to a poro-elastic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idrisi, Kamal; Johnson, Marty E.; Theurich, Daniel; Carneal, James P.

    2010-09-01

    Heterogeneous (HG) blankets consist of a layer of poro-elastic media with small embedded masses that replicate the behavior of a distributed mass-spring-damper system. The concept of an HG blanket used to control the sound transmission through an aircraft double-panel system has already been developed and cited in the present literature. However, deficiencies in methodical property control exist; therefore, the prime objective of this research is to provide a simple method to predict and control material properties of the heterogeneous blankets through alteration of mass and stiffness parameters. Mass inclusion size, shape, and placement were varied. If optimized heterogeneous (HG) blankets targeted to specific applications are to be successfully developed, control of these parameters is necessary. This research offers a detailed analysis of the behavior of the mass inclusions, highlighting controlled stiffness variation of the mass-spring-damper systems inside the HG blanket. Characteristic parameters of the HG blanket like the "footprint," "effective area," and the "mass interaction distance" are defined and confirmed through mathematical calculations and experimental results. A novel, empirical approach to predict the natural frequency of different mass shapes embedded in porous media was derived and experimentally verified for many different types of porous media, including melamine foam, polyurethane, and polyamide. A maximum error of 8% existed for all the predictions made in this document.

  13. Teacher Effects, Value-Added Models, and Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konstantopoulos, Spyros

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the last decade, the effects of teachers on student performance (typically manifested as state-wide standardized tests) have been re-examined using statistical models that are known as value-added models. These statistical models aim to compute the unique contribution of the teachers in promoting student achievement gains from grade…

  14. Responsibility and decision making help to minimise effects of AD.

    PubMed

    Sander, Ruth

    2008-02-01

    People with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are affected not only by changes in the brain but also by the way they react to the effect of these changes and the way they are treated by others. When treated by 'healthy others' in a way that could be described as 'malignant social psychology', the person with AD can become depressed and angry and lose their sense of self-worth. This article discusses the importance of the sense of self-worth in all older people; they perform better on memory tests after being exposed to positive subliminal messages about older people.

  15. The Effect of Increasing Mass upon Locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John; Hagan, Donald

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if increasing body mass while maintaining bodyweight would affect ground reaction forces and joint kinetics during walking and running. It was hypothesized that performing gait with increased mass while maintaining body weight would result in greater ground reaction forces, and would affect the net joint torques and work at the ankle, knee and hip when compared to gait with normal mass and bodyweight. Vertical ground reaction force was measured for ten subjects (5M/5F) during walking (1.34 m/s) and running (3.13 m/s) on a treadmill. Subjects completed one minute of locomotion at normal mass and bodyweight and at four added mass (AM) conditions (10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of body mass) in random order. Three-dimensional joint position data were collected via videography. Walking and running were analyzed separately. The addition of mass resulted in several effects. Peak impact forces and loading rates increased during walking, but decreased during running. Peak propulsive forces decreased during walking and did not change during running. Stride time increased and hip extensor angular impulse and positive work increased as mass was added for both styles of locomotion. Work increased at a greater rate during running than walking. The adaptations to additional mass that occur during walking are different than during running. Increasing mass during exercise in microgravity may be beneficial to increasing ground reaction forces during walking and strengthening hip musculature during both walking and running. Future study in true microgravity is required to determine if the adaptations found would be similar in a weightless environment.

  16. Effects of added fluids on the perception of solid food.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Luciano Jose; de Wijk, René A; Gavião, Maria Beatriz D; van der Bilt, Andries

    2006-07-30

    The production of sufficient saliva is indispensable for good chewing. Recent research has demonstrated that salivary flow rate has little influence on the swallowing threshold. We examined the hypothesis that adding fluid to a food will influence the chewing process. Twenty healthy subjects chewed on melba toast, breakfast cake, carrot, peanut and Gouda cheese. In addition they chewed on these foods after we added different volumes of tap water or a solution of alpha-amylase. We measured jaw muscle activity and the number of cycles until swallowing. Furthermore, we obtained visual analogue scale (VAS) scores for texture and sound attributes for all foods and fluid conditions. The additional fluids significantly lowered muscle activity and swallowing threshold for melba, cake and peanut. The effect of alpha-amylase in the solutions was rather limited. Doubling the volume of tap water had a larger effect. Several texture and sound attributes of melba, cake and peanut were also significantly affected by the additional fluids. For melba, cake, and peanut we observed significant correlations between the physiology parameters and several attributes for the various fluid conditions. This indicates that the added fluid affects both the physiology (muscle activity and number of cycles) and the sensory perception of a number of texture and sound attributes. Adding fluid facilitates the chewing of dry foods (melba, cake), but does not influence the chewing of fatty (cheese) and wet products (carrot).

  17. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection of low polar compounds by adding NaAuCl4.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS) has been widely used for various analyses. However, it is difficult to use LC/ESI/MS for the analysis of low polar compounds, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. It is well known that AuCl4(-) ion decomposes to AuCl3 by heating, and AuCl3 is a strong π-electrophilic Lewis acid. Low polar compounds (pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene, perylene, benzo[ghi]perylene, dibenzothiophene and p-dimethoxybenzene) were detected by ESI/MS in the positive ion mode by adding NaAuCl4 . The low polar compound interacts with AuCl3 formed at the ESI interface, and undergoes electron transfer to AuCl3 . The radical cation of the low polar compound was then detected by MS. In addition, the LC/ESI/MS determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by the post-column addition of NaAuCl4 was studied. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Mass Spectrometry Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Mass-independent isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L

    2013-02-28

    Three fundamental properties of atomic nuclei-mass, spin (and related magnetic moment), and volume-are the source of isotope effects. The mostly deserved and popular, with almost hundred-year history, is the mass-dependent isotope effect. The first mass-independent isotope effect which chemically discriminates isotopes by their nuclear spins and nuclear magnetic moments rather than by their masses was detected in 1976. It was named as the magnetic isotope effect because it is controlled by magnetic interaction, i.e., electron-nuclear hyperfine coupling in the paramagnetic species, the reaction intermediates. The effect follows from the universal physical property of chemical reactions to conserve angular momentum (spin) of electrons and nuclei. It is now detected for oxygen, silicon, sulfur, germanium, tin, mercury, magnesium, calcium, zinc, and uranium in a great variety of chemical and biochemical reactions including those of medical and ecological importance. Another mass-independent isotope effect was detected in 1983 as a deviation of isotopic distribution in reaction products from that which would be expected from the mass-dependent isotope effect. On the physical basis, it is in fact a mass-dependent effect, but it surprisingly results in isotope fractionation which is incompatible with that predicted by traditional mass-dependent effects. It is supposed to be a function of dynamic parameters of reaction and energy relaxation in excited states of products. The third, nuclear volume mass-independent isotope effect is detected in the high-resolution atomic and molecular spectra and in the extraction processes, but there are no unambiguous indications of its importance as an isotope fractionation factor in chemical reactions.

  19. Toxicity of ad lib. overfeeding: effects on cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Faine, L A; Diniz, Y S; Almeida, J A; Novelli, E L B; Ribas, B O

    2002-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of ad lib. overfeeding and of dietary restriction (DR) on oxidative stress in cardiac tissue. Lipoperoxide concentrations were decreased and antioxidant enzymes were increased in moderate-DR-fed rats. Severe-DR induced increased lipoperoxide concentrations. Overfeeding increased lipoperoxide levels in cardiac tissue. Total superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu-Zn SOD) activities were decreased in cardiac tissue at 35 days of overfeeding. As no changes in glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were observed in overfed rats, while SOD and Cu-Zn SOD activities were decreased in these animals, it is assumed that superoxide anion is an important intermediate in the toxicity of ad lib. overfeeding. Overfeeding induced alterations in markers of oxidative stress in cardiac tissue.

  20. Higher Daily Energy Expenditure and Respiratory Quotient, Rather Than Fat-Free Mass, Independently Determine Greater ad Libitum Overeating

    PubMed Central

    Thearle, Marie S.; Krakoff, Jonathan; Votruba, Susanne B.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Body fat-free mass (FFM), energy expenditure (EE), and respiratory quotient (RQ) are known predictors of daily food intake. Because FFM largely determines EE, it is unclear whether body composition per se or the underlying metabolism drives dietary intake. Objective: The objective of the study was to test whether 24-hour measures of EE and RQ and their components influence ad libitum food intake independently of FFM. Design and Participants: One hundred seven healthy individuals (62 males/45 females, 84 Native Americans/23 whites; age 33 ± 8 y; body mass index 33 ± 8 kg/m2; body fat 31% ± 8%) had 24-hour measures of EE in a whole-room indirect calorimeter during energy balance, followed by 3 days of ad libitum food intake using computerized vending machine systems. Body composition was estimated by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Main Outcome Measures: FFM, 24-hour EE, RQ, spontaneous physical activity, sleeping EE (sleeping metabolic rate), awake and fed thermogenesis, and ad libitum food intake (INTAKE) were measured. Results: Higher 24-hour RQ (P < .001, partial R2 = 16%) and EE (P = .01, partial R2 = 7%), but not FFM (P = .65), were independent predictors of INTAKE. Mediation analysis demonstrated that 24-hour EE is responsible for 80% of the FFM effect on INTAKE (44.5 ± 16.9 kcal ingested per kilogram of FFM, P= .01), whereas the unique effect due to solely FFM was negligible (10.6 ± 23.2, P = .65). Spontaneous physical activity (r = 0.33, P = .001), but not sleeping metabolic rate (P = .71), positively predicted INTAKE, whereas higher awake and fed thermogenesis determined greater INTAKE only in subjects with a body mass index of 29 kg/m2 or less (r = 0.44, P = .01). Conclusions: EE and RQ, rather than FFM, independently determine INTAKE, suggesting that competitive energy-sensing mechanisms driven by the preferential macronutrient oxidation and total energy demands may regulate food intake. PMID:26086330

  1. Added effect of heat wave on mortality in Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Won Kyung; Lee, Hye Ah; Lim, Youn Hee; Park, Hyesook

    2016-05-01

    A heat wave could increase mortality owing to high temperature. However, little is known about the added (duration) effect of heat wave from the prolonged period of high temperature on mortality and different effect sizes depending on the definition of heat waves and models. A distributed lag non-linear model with a quasi-Poisson distribution was used to evaluate the added effect of heat wave on mortality after adjusting for long-term and intra-seasonal trends and apparent temperature. We evaluated the cumulative relative risk of the added wave effect on mortality on lag days 0-30. The models were constructed using nine definitions of heat wave and two relationships (cubic spline and linear threshold model) between temperature and mortality to leave out the high temperature effect. Further, we performed sensitivity analysis to evaluate the changes in the effect of heat wave on mortality according to the different degrees of freedom for time trend and cubic spline of temperature. We found that heat wave had the added effect from the prolonged period of high temperature on mortality and it was considerable in the aspect of cumulative risk because of the lagged influence. When heat wave was defined with a threshold of 98th percentile temperature and ≥2, 3, and 4 consecutive days, mortality increased by 14.8 % (7.5-22.6, 95 % confidence interval (CI)), 18.1 % (10.8-26.0, 95 % CI), 18.1 % (10.7-25.9, 95 % CI), respectively, in cubic spline model. When it came to the definitions of 90th and 95th percentile, the risk increase in mortality declined to 3.7-5.8 % and 8.6-11.3 %, respectively. This effect was robust to the flexibility of the model for temperature and time trend, while the definitions of a heat wave were critical in estimating its relationship with mortality. This finding could help deepen our understanding and quantifying of the relationship between heat wave and mortality and select an appropriate definition of heat wave and temperature model in the future

  2. Added effect of heat wave on mortality in Seoul, Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Kyung; Lee, Hye Ah; Lim, Youn Hee; Park, Hyesook

    2016-05-01

    A heat wave could increase mortality owing to high temperature. However, little is known about the added (duration) effect of heat wave from the prolonged period of high temperature on mortality and different effect sizes depending on the definition of heat waves and models. A distributed lag non-linear model with a quasi-Poisson distribution was used to evaluate the added effect of heat wave on mortality after adjusting for long-term and intra-seasonal trends and apparent temperature. We evaluated the cumulative relative risk of the added wave effect on mortality on lag days 0-30. The models were constructed using nine definitions of heat wave and two relationships (cubic spline and linear threshold model) between temperature and mortality to leave out the high temperature effect. Further, we performed sensitivity analysis to evaluate the changes in the effect of heat wave on mortality according to the different degrees of freedom for time trend and cubic spline of temperature. We found that heat wave had the added effect from the prolonged period of high temperature on mortality and it was considerable in the aspect of cumulative risk because of the lagged influence. When heat wave was defined with a threshold of 98th percentile temperature and ≥2, 3, and 4 consecutive days, mortality increased by 14.8 % (7.5-22.6, 95 % confidence interval (CI)), 18.1 % (10.8-26.0, 95 % CI), 18.1 % (10.7-25.9, 95 % CI), respectively, in cubic spline model. When it came to the definitions of 90th and 95th percentile, the risk increase in mortality declined to 3.7-5.8 % and 8.6-11.3 %, respectively. This effect was robust to the flexibility of the model for temperature and time trend, while the definitions of a heat wave were critical in estimating its relationship with mortality. This finding could help deepen our understanding and quantifying of the relationship between heat wave and mortality and select an appropriate definition of heat wave and temperature model in the future

  3. An added-mass partition algorithm for fluid–structure interactions of compressible fluids and nonlinear solids

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, J.W. Henshaw, W.D. Kapila, A.K. Schwendeman, D.W.

    2016-01-15

    We describe an added-mass partitioned (AMP) algorithm for solving fluid–structure interaction (FSI) problems involving inviscid compressible fluids interacting with nonlinear solids that undergo large rotations and displacements. The computational approach is a mixed Eulerian–Lagrangian scheme that makes use of deforming composite grids (DCG) to treat large changes in the geometry in an accurate, flexible, and robust manner. The current work extends the AMP algorithm developed in Banks et al. [1] for linearly elasticity to the case of nonlinear solids. To ensure stability for the case of light solids, the new AMP algorithm embeds an approximate solution of a nonlinear fluid–solid Riemann (FSR) problem into the interface treatment. The solution to the FSR problem is derived and shown to be of a similar form to that derived for linear solids: the state on the interface being fundamentally an impedance-weighted average of the fluid and solid states. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the AMP algorithm is stable even for light solids when added-mass effects are large. The accuracy and stability of the AMP scheme is verified by comparison to an exact solution using the method of analytical solutions and to a semi-analytical solution that is obtained for a rotating solid disk immersed in a fluid. The scheme is applied to the simulation of a planar shock impacting a light elliptical-shaped solid, and comparisons are made between solutions of the FSI problem for a neo-Hookean solid, a linearly elastic solid, and a rigid solid. The ability of the approach to handle large deformations is demonstrated for a problem of a high-speed flow past a light, thin, and flexible solid beam.

  4. [Chemicals added to cigarettes and their effects on tobacco dependence].

    PubMed

    Gonseth, S; Cornuz, J

    2009-07-01

    This paper summarizes data on the factors involved in addiction and dependence to cigarettes. Nicotine has been intensively studied by the tobacco industry, for instance for its addictive effect at the lowest possible rates. The addition of diammonium phosphate and urea produces an alcalinization of the pH of cigarette smoke, and promotes the absorption and the trans-membrane passage of nicotine. The taste, the smell of smoke, and the visual aspect of the pack of cigarettes are also sensory components that promote addiction. Finally, menthol, sugar, cocoa and liquorice added to cigarettes also play a role in dependence and addiction to cigarettes by, for instance, making an anesthetic effect on the airways.

  5. Adding value through accelerator mass spectrometry-enabled first in human studies.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Mark A

    2016-12-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an ultra-sensitive technique for the analysis of radiocarbon. It is applicable to bioanalysis of any (14) C-labelled analyte and any sample type. The increasing body of data generated using LC+AMS indicates that the methodology is robust and reliable, and capable of meeting the same validation criteria as conventional bioanalytical techniques. Because it is a tracer technique, AMS is capable of discriminating between an administered radiolabelled dose and endogenous compound or non-radiolabelled compound administered separately. This paper discusses how it can be used to enhance the design of first in human (FIH) clinical studies and generate significant additional data, including: fundamental pharmacokinetics (CL and V), absolute bioavailability, mass balance, routes and rates of excretion, metabolic fate (including first-pass metabolism, identification of biliary metabolites and quantitative data to address metabolite safety testing issues), and tissue disposition of parent compound and metabolites. Because the (14) C-labelled microtracer dose is administered at the same time as a pharmacologically relevant non-radiolabelled dose, there is no concern about dose-linearity. However the mass of the microtracer dose itself is negligible and therefore does not affect the outcome of the FIH study. The addition of microtracer doses to a FIH study typically requires little additional expense, apart from the AMS analytics, making the approach cost-effective. It can also save significant time, compared to conventional approaches, and, by providing reliable human in vivo data as early as possible, prevent unnecessary expenditure later in drug development.

  6. Effects of message framing and visual-fear appeals on smoker responses to antismoking ads.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jungsuk; Lin, Carolyn A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of antismoking ads on Korean adult male smokers. An experiment was conducted to explore how message framing and visual-fear appeals embedded in antismoking ads may influence ad-evoked fear, threat appraisals, and intention to quit smoking. Results showed that (a) antismoking ad exposure increased ad-evoked fear and cessation intention; (b) optimistic bias was stronger when the visual-fear appeal was absent in antismoking ads; and

  7. Finite-size effect of η-deformed AdS5 × S5 at strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Changrim

    2017-04-01

    We compute Lüscher corrections for a giant magnon in the η-deformed (AdS5×S5)η using the su(2 | 2) q-invariant S-matrix at strong coupling and compare with the finite-size effect of the corresponding string state, derived previously. We find that these two results match and confirm that the su(2 | 2) q-invariant S-matrix is describing world-sheet excitations of the η-deformed background.

  8. Cost-effective advertising through TV and newspaper "banner" ads.

    PubMed

    Gombeski, William R; Taylor, Jan; Krauss, Katie; Medeiros, Clayton

    2003-01-01

    Banner ads, small strip ads in newspapers used to specifically promote an information piece, were introduced into one newspaper in the Connecticut market in 1999 by Yale-New Haven Hospital (YNHH). Based on their success, the concept was expanded to six additional newspapers in late 2000 and to TV in the summer of 2001. Between 2000-2002, even as the overall marketing/advertising budget declined 30%, switching advertising dollars from image/display ads to banner ads resulted in consumer awareness of YNHH increasing from 29% to 42%. Perception of YNHH as "the advanced medicine" hospital grew from 22% to 40% during the same period. The specific strategic and operational actions generated since the implementation of the program are detailed and the advantages and disadvantages of this banner advertising approach are discussed. Banner ads may offer an alternative approach for organizations to advertise their products and programs.

  9. An experimental and numerical study of heave added mass and damping of horizontally submerged and perforated rectangular plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Song; Faltinsen, Odd M.

    2013-05-01

    Forced harmonic heave motions of horizontally submerged and perforated rectangular plates are studied experimentally and numerically at both a deep and shallow submergence. The steady-state vertical forces are expressed in terms of added mass and damping coefficients. The numerical results are partly obtained by combining potential flow with linear free-surface conditions and a nonlinear viscous pressure loss condition at the mean oscillatory plate position. A domain decomposition technique is applied with a boundary element method in the inner domain and an analytical representation of the velocity potential in the outer domain. A drag term accounts for the vortex shedding at the outer plate edges. The numerically predicted Keulegan-Carpenter number dependent heave added mass and damping coefficients agree reasonably with experimental values, in particular for the deeper submergence.

  10. The added mass, Basset, and viscous drag coefficients in nondilute bubbly liquids undergoing small-amplitude oscillatory motion

    SciTech Connect

    Sangani, A.S. ); Zhang, D.Z.; Prosperetti, A. )

    1991-12-01

    The motion of bubbles dispersed in a liquid when a small-amplitude oscillatory motion is imposed on the mixture is examined in the limit of small frequency and viscosity. Under these conditions, for bubbles with a stress-free surface, the motion can be described in terms of added mass and viscous force coefficients. For bubbles contaminated with surface-active impurities, the introduction of a further coefficient to parametrize the Basset force is necessary. These coefficients are calculated numerically for random configurations of bubbles by solving the appropriate multibubble interaction problem exactly using a method of multipole expansion. Results obtained by averaging over several configurations are presented. Comparison of the results with those for periodic arrays of bubbles shows that these coefficients are, in general, relatively insensitive to the detailed spatial arrangement of the bubbles. On the basis of this observation, it is possible to estimate them via simple formulas derived analytically for dilute periodic arrays. The effect of surface tension and density of bubbles (or rigid particles in the case where the no-slip boundary condition is applicable) is also examined and found to be rather small.

  11. Imaging of Cells and Tissues with Mass Spectrometry: Adding Chemical Information to Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Tyler A.; Monroe, Eric B.; Tucker, Kevin R.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2009-01-01

    Techniques that map the distribution of compounds in biological tissues can be invaluable in addressing a number of critical questions in biology and medicine. One of the newest methods, mass spectrometric imaging, has enabled investigation of spatial localization for a variety of compounds ranging from atomics to proteins. The ability of mass spectrometry to detect and differentiate a large number of unlabeled compounds makes the approach amenable to the study of complex biological tissues. This chapter focuses on recent advances in the instrumentation and sample preparation protocols that make mass spectrometric imaging of biological samples possible, including strategies for both tissue and single cell imaging using the following mass spectrometric ionization methods: matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, secondary ion, electrospray and desorption electrospray. PMID:19118682

  12. Model of neutrino effective masses

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh Nguyen Dinh; Nguyen Thi Hong Van; Nguyen Anh Ky; Phi Quang Van

    2006-10-01

    It is shown that an effective (nonrenormalizable) coupling of lepton multiplets to scalar triplets in the 331 model with sterile/exotic neutrinos, can be a good way for generating neutrino masses of different types. The method is simple and avoids radiative/loop calculations which, sometimes, are long and complicated. Basing on some astrophysical arguments it is also stated that the scale of SU(3){sub L} symmetry breaking is at TeV scale, in agreement with earlier investigations. Or equivalently, starting from this symmetry breaking scale we could have sterile/exotic neutrinos with mass of a few keV's which could be used to explain several astrophysical and cosmological puzzles, such as the dark matter, the fast motion of the observed pulsars, the re-ionization of the Universe, etc.

  13. The Effective Mass of a Ball in the Air

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messer, J.; Pantaleone, J.

    2010-01-01

    The air surrounding a projectile affects the projectile's motion in three very different ways: the drag force, the buoyant force, and the added mass. The added mass is an increase in the projectile's inertia from the motion of the air around it. Here we experimentally measure the added mass of a spherical projectile in air. The results agree well…

  14. Adding the Long-Term Perspective: Tien Shan's Glacier Mass Change during 1961-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinotti, D.; Longuevergne, L.; Moholdt, G.; Duethmann, D.; Bolch, T.; Vorogushyn, S.; Guntner, A.; Gafurov, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Tien Shan, Central Asia's major mountain range, has recently been the focus of a series of studies targeting changes in meteorological variables, glacier mass and extent, as well as runoff. Reviews have repeatedly highlighted the importance of glacier melt for total runoff on the one hand, but the scarcity of direct glaciological observation on the other. At the regional to global scale, the lack of such direct observations has been tackled by using remotely sensed products such as satellite gravimetry and altimetry, but the covered time frame is typically in the order of one decade, thus hampering robust assessments. Here, an ensemble of approaches based on the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), the Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat), and in-situ glacier mass balance measurements is used for estimating glacier mass changes in the Tien Shan during the last decade, and for validating a glacier mass balance model that we subsequently use for reconstructing a continuous mass balance time series over the last half-century. The model ensemble is designed to take into account a wide range of uncertainty sources including often-neglected differences such as data sources or model structure. We cross-validate our different approaches during the period 2003-2009, and find an average glacier mass change of -6.1±4.4 Gt/a, thus confirming previously published estimates. We use the glaciological modelling approach to extend our estimates over the period 1961-2012, and gain insights in the spatial and temporal evolution of the regional glacier melt. Estimated melt rates are in turn used for assessing the contribution of glacier melt to the total runoff of major hydrological basins, and indicate that the contribution from glaciers has likely been overestimated in a series of previous studies.

  15. Maintained total body water content and serum sodium concentrations despite body mass loss in female ultra-runners drinking ad libitum during a 100 km race.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Senn, Oliver; Imoberdorf, Reinhard; Joleska, Irena; Wirth, Andrea; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We investigated in 11 female ultra-runners during a 100 km ultra-run, the association between fluid intake and prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia in a cross-sectional study. Athletes drank ad libitum and recorded their fluid intake. They competed at 8.0 (1.0) km/h and finished within 762 (91) min. Fluid intake was 4.1 (1.3) L during the race, equal to 0.3 (0.1) L/h. Body mass decreased by 1.5 kg (p< 0.01); pre race body mass was related to speed in the race (r = -0.78, p< 0.05); and change (Delta) in body mass was not associated with speed in the race. Change in body mass was positively (r = 0.70; p< 0.05), and Delta urinary specific gravity negatively (r = -0.67; p< 0.05), correlated to Delta percent total body water. Changes in body mass were not related to fluid intake during the race. Fluid intake was not correlated to running speed and showed no association with either Delta percent total body water nor Delta [Na] in plasma. Fluid intake showed no relationship with both Delta haematocrit and Delta plasma volume. No exercise-associated hyponatremia occurred. Female ultra- runners consuming fluids ad libitum during the race experienced no fluid overload, and ad libitum drinking protects against exercise-associated hyponatremia. The reported higher incidence of exercise-associated hyponatremia in women is not really a gender effect but due to women being more prone to overdrink.

  16. Spatial and temporal distribution of mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet since AD 1900.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, Kristian K; Korsgaard, Niels J; Bjørk, Anders A; Khan, Shfaqat A; Box, Jason E; Funder, Svend; Larsen, Nicolaj K; Bamber, Jonathan L; Colgan, William; van den Broeke, Michiel; Siggaard-Andersen, Marie-Louise; Nuth, Christopher; Schomacker, Anders; Andresen, Camilla S; Willerslev, Eske; Kjær, Kurt H

    2015-12-17

    The response of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) to changes in temperature during the twentieth century remains contentious, largely owing to difficulties in estimating the spatial and temporal distribution of ice mass changes before 1992, when Greenland-wide observations first became available. The only previous estimates of change during the twentieth century are based on empirical modelling and energy balance modelling. Consequently, no observation-based estimates of the contribution from the GIS to the global-mean sea level budget before 1990 are included in the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Here we calculate spatial ice mass loss around the entire GIS from 1900 to the present using aerial imagery from the 1980s. This allows accurate high-resolution mapping of geomorphic features related to the maximum extent of the GIS during the Little Ice Age at the end of the nineteenth century. We estimate the total ice mass loss and its spatial distribution for three periods: 1900-1983 (75.1 ± 29.4 gigatonnes per year), 1983-2003 (73.8 ± 40.5 gigatonnes per year), and 2003-2010 (186.4 ± 18.9 gigatonnes per year). Furthermore, using two surface mass balance models we partition the mass balance into a term for surface mass balance (that is, total precipitation minus total sublimation minus runoff) and a dynamic term. We find that many areas currently undergoing change are identical to those that experienced considerable thinning throughout the twentieth century. We also reveal that the surface mass balance term shows a considerable decrease since 2003, whereas the dynamic term is constant over the past 110 years. Overall, our observation-based findings show that during the twentieth century the GIS contributed at least 25.0 ± 9.4 millimetres of global-mean sea level rise. Our result will help to close the twentieth-century sea level budget, which remains crucial for evaluating the reliability of models used to

  17. Spatial and temporal distribution of mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet since AD 1900

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjeldsen, Kristian K.; Korsgaard, Niels J.; Bjørk, Anders A.; Khan, Shfaqat A.; Box, Jason E.; Funder, Svend; Larsen, Nicolaj K.; Bamber, Jonathan L.; Colgan, William; van den Broeke, Michiel; Siggaard-Andersen, Marie-Louise; Nuth, Christopher; Schomacker, Anders; Andresen, Camilla S.; Willerslev, Eske; Kjær, Kurt H.

    2015-12-01

    The response of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) to changes in temperature during the twentieth century remains contentious, largely owing to difficulties in estimating the spatial and temporal distribution of ice mass changes before 1992, when Greenland-wide observations first became available. The only previous estimates of change during the twentieth century are based on empirical modelling and energy balance modelling. Consequently, no observation-based estimates of the contribution from the GIS to the global-mean sea level budget before 1990 are included in the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Here we calculate spatial ice mass loss around the entire GIS from 1900 to the present using aerial imagery from the 1980s. This allows accurate high-resolution mapping of geomorphic features related to the maximum extent of the GIS during the Little Ice Age at the end of the nineteenth century. We estimate the total ice mass loss and its spatial distribution for three periods: 1900-1983 (75.1 ± 29.4 gigatonnes per year), 1983-2003 (73.8 ± 40.5 gigatonnes per year), and 2003-2010 (186.4 ± 18.9 gigatonnes per year). Furthermore, using two surface mass balance models we partition the mass balance into a term for surface mass balance (that is, total precipitation minus total sublimation minus runoff) and a dynamic term. We find that many areas currently undergoing change are identical to those that experienced considerable thinning throughout the twentieth century. We also reveal that the surface mass balance term shows a considerable decrease since 2003, whereas the dynamic term is constant over the past 110 years. Overall, our observation-based findings show that during the twentieth century the GIS contributed at least 25.0 ± 9.4 millimetres of global-mean sea level rise. Our result will help to close the twentieth-century sea level budget, which remains crucial for evaluating the reliability of models used to

  18. Rotating thin shells in (2 + 1)-dimensional asymptotically AdS spacetimes: Mechanical properties, machian effects, and energy conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, José P. S.; Lopes, Francisco J.; Minamitsuji, Masato

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a rotating thin shell in a (2 + 1)-dimensional asymptotically AdS spacetime is studied. The spacetime exterior to the shell is the rotating BTZ spacetime and the interior is the empty spacetime with a cosmological constant. Through the Einstein equation in (2 + 1) dimensions and the corresponding junction conditions we calculate the dynamical relevant quantities, namely, the rest energy-density, the pressure, and the angular momentum flux density. We also analyze the matter in a frame where its energy-momentum tensor has a perfect fluid form. In addition, we show that Machian effects, such as the dragging of inertial frames, also occur in rotating (2 + 1)-dimensional spacetimes. The weak and the dominant energy condition for these shells are discussed.

  19. Implementing Value-Added Measures of School Effectiveness: Getting the Incentives Right.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladd, Helen F.; Walsh, Randall P.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluates value-added approach to measuring school effectiveness in North and South Carolina. Finds that value-added approach favors high-achievement schools, with large percentage of students from high-SES backgrounds. Discusses statistical problems in measuring value added. Concludes teachers' and administrators' avoidance of low-achievement,…

  20. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based metabolomics study of cloned versus normal pigs fed either restricted or ad libitum high-energy diets.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Kirstine L; Hedemann, Mette S; Jørgensen, Henry; Stagsted, Jan; Knudsen, Knud Erik B

    2012-07-06

    Genetically identical cloned pigs should in principle eliminate biological variation and provide more pronounced effects when subjected to, e.g., dietary interventions, but little is known about how phenotype and phenotypic variation is affected by cloning. Therefore, an investigation of the metabolome of cloned pigs compared to normal control pigs was performed to elucidate the variation and possible differences in the metabolic phenotypes during a dietary intervention. A total of 19 control pigs and 17 cloned pigs were given the same high-energy dense diet either ad libitum or in a restricted manner (60% of ad libitum) for ∼6 months, and plasma was subjected to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry nontargeted metabolomics and biochemical analyses. Low systemic levels of IGF-1 could indicate altered growth conditions and energy metabolism in cloned pigs. In response to ad libitum feeding, clones had a decreased energy intake and lower weight gain compared to controls, and plasma lipid profiles were changed accordingly. Elevated lactate and decreased creatine levels implied an increased anaerobic metabolism in ad libitum fed clones. Less interindividual variation between cloned pigs was however not established, suggesting a strong role for epigenetics and/or the gut microbiota to develop variation.

  1. The effect of added dimensionality on perceived image value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnand, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Texture is an important element of the world around us. It can convey information about the object at hand. Although embossing has been used in a limited way, to enhance the appearance of greeting cards and book covers for example, texture is something that printed material traditionally lacks. Recently, techniques have been developed that allow the incorporation of texture in printed material. Prints made using such processes are similar to traditional 2D prints but have added texture such that a reproduction of an oil painting can have the texture of oil paint on canvas or a picture of a lizard can actually have the texture of lizard skin. It seems intuitive that the added dimensionality would add to the perceived quality of the image, but to what degree? To examine the question of the impact of a third dimension on the perceived quality of printed images, a survey was conducted asking participants to determine the relative worth of sets of print products. Pairs of print products were created, where one print of each pair was 2D and the other was the same image with added texture. Using these print pairs, thirty people from the Rochester Institute of Technology community were surveyed. The participants were shown seven pairs of print products and asked to rate the relative value of each pair by apportioning a specified amount of money between the two items according to their perception of what each item was worth. The results indicated that the addition of a third dimension or texture to the printed images gave a clear boost to the perceived worth of the printed products. The rating results were 50% higher for the 3D products than the 2D products, with the participants apportioning approximately 60% of each dollar to the 3D product and 40% to the 2D product. About 80% of the time participants felt that the 3D items had at least some added value over their 2D counterparts, about 15% of the time, they felt the products were essentially equivalent in value and 4% of

  2. Dreaming during scientific papers: effects of added extrinsic material.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, R F; Schullinger, M B; Stassinopoulos, A; Winkle, E

    1983-01-01

    During a series of presentations of scientific papers 40.6% of 276 subjects reported dreaming, but only 18.1% actually fell asleep. The frequency of dreaming was significantly increased by the addition of either "very boring" or "very interesting" slides to the usual ones, but not by "neutral" slides. The recall of lecture content and the proportion of audience asleep were (surprisingly) not greatly affected by the addition of extraneous slides of any sort. On the other hand, adding "very interesting" slides greatly increases audience enjoyment. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 PMID:6197133

  3. Virtual mass effect in dynamic micromechanical mass sensing in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiker, P.; Oesterschulze, E.

    2016-06-01

    Weighing individual micro- or nanoscale particles in solution using dynamic micromechanical sensors is quite challenging: viscous losses dramatically degrade the sensor's performance by both broadening the resonance peak and increasing the effective total mass of the resonator by the dragged liquid. While the virtual mass of the resonator was discussed frequently, little attention has been paid to the virtual mass of particles attached to the resonator's surface and its impact on the accuracy of mass sensing. By means of the in situ detection of a polystyrene microbead in water using a bridge-based microresonator, we demonstrate that the virtual mass of the bead significantly affects the observed frequency shift. In fact, 55 % of the frequency shift was caused by the virtual mass of the adsorbed bead, predicted by Stoke's theory. Based on the observed shift in the resonator's quality factor during particle adsorption, we confirm this significant effect of the virtual mass. Thus, a quantitative analysis of the mass of a single adsorbed particle is strongly diminished if dynamic micromechanical sensors are operated in a liquid environment.

  4. Effects of Data Replication on Data Exfiltration in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks Utilizing Reactive Protocols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    IN MOBILE AD HOC NETWORKS UTILIZING REACTIVE PROTOCOLS THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Graduate...EFFECTS OF DATA REPLICATION ON DATA EXFILTRATION IN MOBILE AD HOC NETWORKS UTILIZING REACTIVE PROTOCOLS THESIS Corey T. Willinger, Captain, USAF AFIT...APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENG-MS-15-M-035 EFFECTS OF DATA REPLICATION ON DATA EXFILTRATION IN MOBILE AD HOC NETWORKS

  5. Tobacco socialization and anti-tobacco ad effectiveness among children.

    PubMed

    Khalbous, Slim; Bouslama, Heifa

    2012-01-01

    In order to prevent smoking onset among children, it is essential to know the process of smoking socialization and its various dimensions before being able to design any effective anti-tobacco advertisements. This research aims to conceptualize this process and to test the effectiveness of certain styles of anti-tobacco advertising addressed to children. The results show that both attitudinal and behavioral smoking socialization influence anti-tobacco advertisements effectiveness and that the least offensive and humoristic are most effective in Tunisia.

  6. The Effect of Comparatively-Framed versus Similarity-Framed E-Cigarette and Snus Print Ads on Young Adults’ Ad and Product Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Smita C.; Greene, Kathryn; Li, Yuelin; Ostroff, Jamie S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study examined the effects of comparative-framing [C-F; ads highlighting differences between the advertised product and conventional cigarettes and/or smokeless tobacco products] versus similarity-framing (S-F; ads highlighting congruence with conventional cigarettes and/or smokeless tobacco products) in e-cigarette and snus ads on young adult smokers’ and non-smokers’ ad- and product-related perceptions. Methods One thousand fifty one (1,051) young adults (18–24 years; 76% women; 50% smokers) from existing consumer panels were recruited in a within-subjects quasi-experiment. Each participant viewed 4 online advertisements, varied by tobacco product type (e-cigarette or snus) and ad framing (C-F or S-F). The dependent measures for this study were ad-related (ad perceptions, ad credibility) and product-related perceptions (absolute and comparative risk perceptions, product appeal, and product use intentions). Results Former and current smokers rated C-F ads as more persuasive than S-F ads, as evidenced by favorable ad perceptions and high product use intentions. Former and current smokers also rated e-cigarette ads with more favorable ad perceptions, low absolute and comparative risk perceptions, high product appeal, and high product use intentions as compared to snus ads. However, the effect sizes of the significant differences are less than.2, indicating small magnitude of difference between the study variables. Conclusions Unless FDA regulates e-cig and snus advertising, there is a potential of decreasing risk perceptions and increasing use of e-cigs among young adults. Further research on implicit/explicit comparative claims in e-cigarettes and snus advertisements that encourage risk misperceptions is recommended. PMID:28042597

  7. Progressing towards more quantitative analytical pyrolysis of soil organic matter using molecular beam mass spectroscopy of whole soils and added standards

    SciTech Connect

    Haddix, Michelle L.; Magrini-Bair, Kim; Evans, Robert J.; Conant, Richard T.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Morris, Sherri J.; Calderón, Francisco; Paul, Eldor A.

    2016-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is extremely complex. It is composed of hundreds of different organic substances and it has been difficult to quantify these diverse substances in a dynamic-ecosystem functioning standpoint. Analytical pyrolysis has been used to compare chemical differences between soils, but its ability to measure the absolute amount of a specific compound in the soil is still in question. Our objective was to assess whether utilizing pyrolysis-molecular beam mass spectroscopy (py-MBMS) to define the signature of known reference compounds (adenine, indole, palmitic acid, etc.) and biological samples (chitin, fungi, cellulose, etc.) separately and when added to whole soils it was possible to make py-MBMS more quantitative. Reference compounds, spanning a wide variety of compound categories, and biological samples, expected to be present in SOM, were added to three soils from Colorado, Ohio, and Massachusetts that have varying total C, % clay, and clay type. Py-MBMS, a rapid analysis technique originally developed to analyze complex biomolecules, flash pyrolyzes soil organic matter to form products that are often considered characteristic of the original molecular structure. Samples were pyrolyzed at 550 degrees C by py-MBMS. All samples were weighed and %C and %N determined both before and after pyrolysis to evaluate mass loss, C loss, and N loss for the samples.An average relationship of r2 = 0.76 (P = 0.005) was found for the amount of cellulose added to soil at 25, 50, and 100% of soil C relative to the ion intensity of select mass/charge of the compound.There was a relationship of r2 = 0.93 (P < 0.001) for the amount of indole added to soil at 25, 50, and 100% of soil C and the ion intensity of the associated mass variables (mass/charge). Comparing spectra of pure compounds with the spectra of the compounds added to soil and isolated clay showed that interference could occur based on soil type and compound with the Massachusetts soil with high C (55

  8. The effect of nanoparticles added to heated micropolar fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nering, Konrad; Rup, Kazimierz

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents an analysis of momentum, angular momentum and heat transfer during the unsteady natural convection in micropolar nanofluids. Presented phenomena are modelled in the vicinity of a vertical plate and heat flux which rises suddenly at a given moment, using the boundary layer concept. Differential equations of angular momentum conservation are used according to the theory of micropolar fluids developed by Eringen. Finite difference method is used to solve the equations for conservation of mass, energy, momentum and angular momentum. Selected nanofluids treated as single phase fluids contain small particles with diameter size d = 10 nm and d = 38.4 nm. In particular, two ethylene glycol based nanofluids and one water-based nanofluid are analysed. Volume fraction of these solutions is 6%. First ethylene glycol solution contain Al2 O3 nanoparticles (d = 38.4 nm), and the second ethylene glycol solution contained Cu nanoparticles (d = 10 nm). Water based nanofluid contain Al2 O3 nanoparticles (d = 38.4 nm). As a result of solving conservation equations, unsteady velocity field (U, V), temperature (T), microrotation component normal to (x, y) plane (N), velocity gradient ∂U/∂Y and temperature gradient ∂T/∂Y are obtained. These results are compared to theoretical and experimental results presented in literature. At the end of this paper, heat transfer enhancement for analysed nanofluids is estimated.

  9. Effects of Adding Nanoparticles on Boiling and Condensing Heat Transfer inside a horizontal round tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, Mohsen; Sadoughi, Mohammadkazem; Shariatmadar, Hamed; Akhavan-Behabadi, Mohammad Ali

    2015-11-01

    An experimental investigation is performed on heat transfer evaluation of a nano-refrigerant flow during condensation and evaporation inside a horizontal round tube. Experiments are carried out for three working fluid types including: i) pure refrigerant (R600a); ii) refrigerant/lubricant (R600a/oil); and iii) nano-refrigerant: refrigerant/lubricant/nanoparticles (R600a/oil/CuO). Nanoparticles are added to the lubricant and their mixture is mixed with pure refrigerant. Therefore, nano-refrigerants (R600a/oil/CuO) are prepared by dispersing CuO nanoparticles with different fractions of 0.5%, 1% and 1.5% in the baseline mixture (R600a/oil). Effects of different factors including vapor quality, mass flux, and nanoparticles on the heat transfer coefficient are examined for both of condensation and evaporation flows, separately. The results shows that maximum heat transfer augmentation of 79% and 83% are achieved by using the refrigerant/lubricant/nanoparticles mixture, in comparison with the pure refrigerant case in condensation and evaporation, respectively which are occurred for nano-refrigerant with 1.5% mass fraction in both of them.

  10. Mass Fractionation Laws, Mass-Independent Effects, and Isotopic Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauphas, Nicolas; Schauble, Edwin A.

    2016-06-01

    Isotopic variations usually follow mass-dependent fractionation, meaning that the relative variations in isotopic ratios scale with the difference in mass of the isotopes involved (e.g., δ17O ≈ 0.5×δ18O). In detail, however, the mass dependence of isotopic variations is not always the same, and different natural processes can define distinct slopes in three-isotope diagrams. These variations are subtle, but improvements in analytical capabilities now allow precise measurement of these effects and make it possible to draw inferences about the natural processes that caused them (e.g., reaction kinetics versus equilibrium isotope exchange). Some elements, in some sample types, do not conform to the regularities of mass-dependent fractionation. Oxygen and sulfur display a rich phenomenology of mass-independent fractionation, documented in the laboratory, in the rock record, and in the modern atmosphere. Oxygen in meteorites shows isotopic variations that follow a slope-one line (δ17O ≈ δ18O) whose origin may be associated with CO photodissociation. Sulfur mass-independent fractionation in ancient sediments provides the tightest constraint on the oxygen partial pressure in the Archean and the timing of Earth's surface oxygenation. Heavier elements also show departures from mass fractionation that can be ascribed to exotic effects associated with chemical reactions such as magnetic effects (e.g., Hg) or the nuclear field shift effect (e.g., U or Tl). Some isotopic variations in meteorites and their constituents cannot be related to the terrestrial composition by any known process, including radiogenic, nucleogenic, and cosmogenic effects. Those variations have a nucleosynthetic origin, reflecting the fact that the products of stellar nucleosynthesis were not fully homogenized when the Solar System formed. Those anomalies are found at all scales, from nanometer-sized presolar grains to bulk terrestrial planets. They can be used to learn about stellar

  11. The Reliability, Impact, and Cost-Effectiveness of Value-Added Teacher Assessment Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Stuart S.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews evidence regarding the intertemporal reliability of teacher rankings based on value-added methods. Value-added methods exhibit low reliability, yet are broadly supported by prominent educational researchers and are increasingly being used to evaluate and fire teachers. The article then presents a cost-effectiveness analysis…

  12. How Unstable Are "School Effects" Assessed by a Value-Added Technique?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorad, Stephen; Hordosy, Rita; Siddiqui, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    This paper re-considers the widespread use of value-added approaches to estimate school "effects", and shows the results to be very unstable over time. The paper uses as an example the contextualised value-added scores of all secondary schools in England. The study asks how many schools with at least 99% of their pupils included in the…

  13. Appropriate Measures of Effectiveness: Teacher Evaluations and Value-Added Measures in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covington, Azure Camille

    2016-01-01

    The increased use of value-added measures is a result of policymakers viewing traditional measures of teacher effectiveness as obsolete and unrelated to student achievement. Additionally, literature lacks substantial findings examining the relationship between principal observation ratings and a teacher's value-added scores based on the…

  14. Adding Liquid Payloads Effects to the 6-DOF Trajectory of Spinning Projectiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Adding Liquid Payloads Effects to the 6-DOF Trajectory of Spinning Projectiles by Gene R. Cooper ARL-TR-5118 March 2010...Liquid Payloads Effects to the 6-DOF Trajectory of Spinning Projectiles Gene R. Cooper Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL...September 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Adding Liquid Payloads Effects to the 6-DOF Trajectory of Spinning Projectiles 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  15. Effective Mass of an Oscillating Spring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Eduardo E.; Gesnouin, Gabriel A.

    2007-01-01

    We present an experimental method to obtain the effective mass of an unloaded oscillating spring. We measure the period "T"("n") of the partial springs that result when hanging "n" of the total "N" coils of a given spring. Data are correlated with the expectation of a simple model for "T"("n") that takes into account the effective mass of the…

  16. Mass movement deposit and Tsunami in Lake Geneva (Switzerland-France) caused by a rockslide in 563 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, K.; Simpson, G.; Girardclos, S.

    2012-04-01

    Steep continental margins are known to collapse, producing submarine landslides that can generate Tsunamis. At smaller scale, the same can happen in lake basins. Lake sediments are excellent archives of such events. The study of mass movement deposits in lake sediments allows a better knowledge of past natural hazards in intracontinental regions at historic and prehistoric timescales. In Lake Geneva (Switzerland-France), more than 100 km of high resolution seismic reflection profiles reveal two distinct sequences in the lakes' late Holocene sedimentation history. The first sequence consists mainly of a succession of five large lens-shaped seismic units (A to E), characterized by transparent/chaotic seismic facies with irregular lower boundaries, interpreted as mass-movement deposits. These units are interbedded with parallel, continuous and strong amplitude reflections, interpreted as the 'background' lake sediment. The largest and most recent unit (E) is 5 m thick, covers an area of 50 km2 and has an estimated minimum volume of 0.25 km3, making it the largest sub-lacustrine mass-movement unit in Switzerland. The second sediment sequence consists of 5 m of 'background' seismic facies with parallel geometry, varying at small scale between chaotic/transparent and continuous, high amplitude reflections, which is interpreted as alternating turbidite and hemipelagic layers, respectively. Four 10 m long sediment cores confirm the seismic interpretation and show that the 5 m thick deposit can be described as a co-genetic debrite turbidite (Talling et al., 2004). Radiocarbon dating of plant macro-remains reveals that the unit E deposit may be linked to the Tauredunum rockslide of 563 AD in Rhone delta area. The induced sediment failure in the Rhone delta triggered a tsunami wave destroying parts of the Geneva Burgudian city and other villages at the lake borders as described in historical records. Numerical simulations, based on the shallow water equations, performed here

  17. Sleep duration modifies effects of free ad libitum school meals on adiposity and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, Mads F; Sjödin, Anders; Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; Damsgaard, Camilla Trab; Michaelsen, Kim F; Biltoft-Jensen, Anja; Andersen, Rikke; Ritz, Christian; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Astrup, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient sleep can potentially affect both energy intake and energy expenditure, resulting in obesity and reduced cardiometabolic health. The objective of the study was to investigate if habitual sleep duration of 8- to 11-year-olds modifies the effect of free ad libitum school meals on cardiometabolic markers, body composition, dietary intake, and physical activity. For 2 consecutive 3-month periods, this cluster-randomized, controlled, cross-over trial provided 530 children with school meals or usual lunch brought from home. Dietary intake, activity, and sleep were measured simultaneously for 7 consecutive days using dietary records and accelerometers. Short- and long-sleeping children were defined as lower and upper tertile of sleep duration. Body composition, blood pressure, blood lipids, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMAIR) were measured/calculated. Overall, school meals compared with lunch from home had positive effects on physical activity and blood pressure in long-sleeping children and negative effects on body fat in short-sleeping children. Short-sleeping children increased fat mass compared with long-sleeping children by 0.21 (95% confidence interval 0.03-0.38) kg, android fat mass by 0.02 (0.001-0.04) kg, waist circumference by 0.73 (0.23-1.24) cm, blood pressure by 1.5 (0.4-2.6) mm Hg, fat intake by 1.1 (0.2-2.0) percentage of energy, and decreased total physical activity by 7.2 (1.6-12.7) % (all P ≤ 0.04), while HOMAIR and blood lipids were not modified by sleep duration (all P ≥ 0.32). In conclusion, the susceptibility to increase abdominal adiposity and blood pressure when exposed to dietary changes can potentially be explained by too little sleep, which results in increased caloric intake and reduced physical activity.

  18. Effect of the transverse parasitic mode on beam performance for the ADS driver linac in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Peng; Pei, Shi-Lun; Wang, Jiu-Qing; Li, Zhi-Hui

    2015-05-01

    The ADS (Accelerator Driven subcritical System) driver linac in China is designed to run in CW (Continuous Wave) mode with 10 mA designed beam current. In this scenario, the beam-induced parasitic modes in the ADS driver linac may make the beam unstable or deteriorate the beam performance. To evaluate the parasitic mode effect on the beam dynamics systematically, simulation studies using the ROOT-based numerical code SMD have been conducted. The longitudinal beam instability induced by the HOMs (High Order Modes) and SOMs (Same Order Modes) has little effect on the longitudinal beam performance for the current ADS driver linac design based on the 10 MeV/325 MHz injector I from previous studies. Here the transverse parasitic mode (i.e., dipole HOM) effect on the transverse beam performance at the ADS driver linac exit is investigated. To more reasonably quantify the dipole mode effect, the multi-bunch effective emittance is introduced in this paper.

  19. Value Added?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UCLA IDEA, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Value added measures (VAM) uses changes in student test scores to determine how much "value" an individual teacher has "added" to student growth during the school year. Some policymakers, school districts, and educational advocates have applauded VAM as a straightforward measure of teacher effectiveness: the better a teacher,…

  20. Particle motion in a periodic driving flow. The role of added mass force and the finite size of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Chavarria, Gerardo; Lopez Sanchez, Erick Javier

    2016-11-01

    The motion of particles in a fluid is an open problem. The main difficulty arises from the fact that hydrodynamical forces acting on a particle depend on the flow properties. In addition, the form and the size of particles must be taken into account. In this work we present numerical results of the particle transport in a periodic driving flow in a channel flushing into an open domain. To study the transport of particles we solve the equation of motion for a spherical particle in which we include the drag, the gravity, the buoyancy, the added mass and the history force. Additionally we include the corrections for a particle of finite size. For solving this equation a knowledge of the velocity field is required. To obtain the velocity field we solve the Navier Stokes and the continuity equations with a finite volume method. In the flow under study a vorticity dipole and a spanwise vortex are present, both have an important influence on the motion of particles. The dipole enhances displacement of particles because flow between vortices behaves like a jet and the spanwise vortex produces the lifting and deposition of particles from/to the bottom. We observe clustering of particles both into the channel and in the open domain as observed in coastal systems. The authors acknowledge DGAPA-UNAM by support under project PAPIIT IN115315 "Ondas y estructuras coherentes en dinámica de fluidos".

  1. Adding thermal and granularity effects to the effective density fluid model.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kevin L

    2013-05-01

    Previously, an effective density fluid model (EDFM) was developed by the author [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 2276-2281 (2001)] for unconsolidated granular sediments and applied to sand. The model is a simplification of the full Biot porous media model. Here two additional effects are added to the EDFM model: heat transfer between the liquid and solid at low frequencies and the granularity of the medium at high frequencies. The frequency range studied is 100 Hz-1 MHz. The analytical sound speed and attenuation expressions obtained have no free parameters. The resulting model is compared to ocean data.

  2. Effect of Adding on the Critical Current Density and Lateral Levitation Force of Bulk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savaşkan, B.; Koparan, E. Taylan; Güner, S. B.; Çelik, Ş.; Öztürk, K.; Yanmaz, E.

    2015-10-01

    We fabricated malic acid -added bulks by wet mixing and "Two-step solid state reaction method". The effects of adding malic acid on , behaviour and lateral levitation force features of bulk have been investigated. A systematic decrease in the critical temperature with increasing adding level confirms the substitution of C at the B site of . While the 4 wt% sample showed the best of at 4 T and 5 K, 15 wt% sample showed uncompetitive lower critical current density , which ascribes the poor connectivity due to the excessive unsubstituted C distribution at grain boundaries and the presence of high MgO amount. At 24 and 28 K, the 4 and 6 wt% malic-acid-added samples exhibit a higher lateral force than pure sample. Based on the observed values of M- H, ( H) and lateral levitation force , it can be concluded that the 4 wt% malic-acid-added sample is the best of the studied samples.

  3. The effect of marijuana scenes in anti-marijuana public service announcements on adolescents' evaluation of ad effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yahui; Cappella, Joseph N; Fishbein, Martin

    2009-09-01

    This study explored the possible negative impact of a specific ad feature-marijuana scenes-on adolescents' perceptions of ad effectiveness. A secondary data analysis was conducted on adolescents' evaluations of 60 anti-marijuana public service announcements that were a part of national and state anti-drug campaigns directed at adolescents. The major finding of the study was that marijuana scenes in anti-marijuana public service announcements negatively affected ad liking and thought valence toward the ads among adolescents who were at higher levels of risk for marijuana use. This negative impact was not reversed in the presence of strong anti-marijuana arguments. The results may be used to partially explain the lack of effectiveness of the anti-drug media campaign. It may also help researchers design more effective anti-marijuana ads by isolating adverse elements in the ads that may elicit boomerang effects in the target population.

  4. Effects of the Mass Media of Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Walter

    The mass media are considered to be television, radio, movies, and newspapers. They may generate changes in cognition and comprehension. They do effect emotional arousal, sex and behavior identification, and changes in allocation of time, consumer purchase, and voting behavior. The only data which show a clear relationship between the mass media…

  5. Evaluation of absorbent materials for use as ad hoc dry decontaminants during mass casualty incidents as part of the UK’s Initial Operational Response (IOR)

    PubMed Central

    Kassouf, Nick; Syed, Sara; Larner, Joanne; Amlôt, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The UK’s Initial Operational Response (IOR) is a revised process for the medical management of mass casualties potentially contaminated with hazardous materials. A critical element of the IOR is the introduction of immediate, on-scene disrobing and decontamination of casualties to limit the adverse health effects of exposure. Ad hoc cleansing of the skin with dry absorbent materials has previously been identified as a potential means of facilitating emergency decontamination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro oil and water absorbency of a range of materials commonly found in the domestic and clinical environments and to determine the effectiveness of a small, but representative selection of such materials in skin decontamination, using an established ex vivo model. Five contaminants were used in the study: methyl salicylate, parathion, diethyl malonate, phorate and potassium cyanide. In vitro measurements of water and oil absorbency did not correlate with ex vivo measurements of skin decontamination. When measured ex vivo, dry decontamination was consistently more effective than a standard wet decontamination method (“rinse-wipe-rinse”) for removing liquid contaminants. However, dry decontamination was ineffective against particulate contamination. Collectively, these data confirm that absorbent materials such as wound dressings and tissue paper provide an effective, generic capability for emergency removal of liquid contaminants from the skin surface, but that wet decontamination should be used for non-liquid contaminants. PMID:28152053

  6. Evaluation of absorbent materials for use as ad hoc dry decontaminants during mass casualty incidents as part of the UK's Initial Operational Response (IOR).

    PubMed

    Kassouf, Nick; Syed, Sara; Larner, Joanne; Amlôt, Richard; Chilcott, Robert P

    2017-01-01

    The UK's Initial Operational Response (IOR) is a revised process for the medical management of mass casualties potentially contaminated with hazardous materials. A critical element of the IOR is the introduction of immediate, on-scene disrobing and decontamination of casualties to limit the adverse health effects of exposure. Ad hoc cleansing of the skin with dry absorbent materials has previously been identified as a potential means of facilitating emergency decontamination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro oil and water absorbency of a range of materials commonly found in the domestic and clinical environments and to determine the effectiveness of a small, but representative selection of such materials in skin decontamination, using an established ex vivo model. Five contaminants were used in the study: methyl salicylate, parathion, diethyl malonate, phorate and potassium cyanide. In vitro measurements of water and oil absorbency did not correlate with ex vivo measurements of skin decontamination. When measured ex vivo, dry decontamination was consistently more effective than a standard wet decontamination method ("rinse-wipe-rinse") for removing liquid contaminants. However, dry decontamination was ineffective against particulate contamination. Collectively, these data confirm that absorbent materials such as wound dressings and tissue paper provide an effective, generic capability for emergency removal of liquid contaminants from the skin surface, but that wet decontamination should be used for non-liquid contaminants.

  7. The effectiveness of coaching for children and teens with AD/HD.

    PubMed

    Sleeper-Triplett, Jodi

    2008-01-01

    Specialized AD/HD coaching can be a helpful service for families and children. Coaching can help children and teens with numerous important yet challenging tasks, such as improving focus, staying on task, managing time, developing organizational skills, strengthening motivation, building self-awareness and confidence, and developing structures and routines to promote success. Readiness for AD/HD coaching is individual and depends on understanding cause and effect. AD/HD coaches work with parents of very young children, with parents and children in the pre-teen years, and directly with teen clients. AD/HD coaching for children and teens can lead to improved family life, better success in school, and optimum readiness for adult life.

  8. Effect of salt intensity in soup on ad libitum intake and on subsequent food choice.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Dieuwerke P; Lakemond, Catriona M M; de Wijk, Rene A; Luning, Pieternel A; de Graaf, Cees

    2012-02-01

    The effect of salt intensity on ad libitum intake of tomato soup was investigated when soup was served as a first course and as a second course. Also the effect of salt intensity in soup on subsequent sweet vs. savory choice of sandwich fillings was investigated. Forty-three healthy subjects consumed ad libitum a low-salt (LS), ideal-salt (IS) and high-salt (HS) tomato soup in both meal settings. The salt concentrations were selected on an individual basis, in a way that IS was most pleasant and LS and HS were similar in pleasantness. The ad libitum intake of IS soup was higher than that of LS and HS soup, and the ad libitum intake of LS soup was higher than that of HS soup. The meal setting, soup as a first or as a second course, did not affect ad libitum intake. Salt intensity in soup did not predict sweet vs. savory choice of fillings in grams or energy, although most sodium from fillings was consumed after intake of HS soup. In conclusion, a higher salt intensity lead to lower ad libitum intake of soup similar in palatability (LS vs. HS). In addition, salt intensity in soup does not predict sweet vs. savory food choice.

  9. Item analysis of ADAS-Cog: effect of baseline cognitive impairment in a clinical AD trial.

    PubMed

    Sevigny, Jeffrey J; Peng, Yahong; Liu, Lian; Lines, Christopher R

    2010-03-01

    We explored the association of Alzheimer's disease (AD) Assessment Scale (ADAS-Cog) item scores with AD severity using cross-sectional and longitudinal data from the same study. Post hoc analyses were performed using placebo data from a 12-month trial of patients with mild-to-moderate AD (N =281 randomized, N =209 completed). Baseline distributions of ADAS-Cog item scores by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score and Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) sum of boxes score (measures of dementia severity) were estimated using local and nonparametric regressions. Mixed-effect models were used to characterize ADAS-Cog item score changes over time by dementia severity (MMSE: mild =21-26, moderate =14-20; global CDR: mild =0.5-1, moderate =2). In the cross-sectional analysis of baseline ADAS-Cog item scores, orientation was the most sensitive item to differentiate patients across levels of cognitive impairment. Several items showed a ceiling effect, particularly in milder AD. In the longitudinal analysis of change scores over 12 months, orientation was the only item with noticeable decline (8%-10%) in mild AD. Most items showed modest declines (5%-20%) in moderate AD.

  10. Effective vortex mass from microscopic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jung Hoon; Kim, June Seo; Kim, Min Jae; Ao, Ping

    2005-03-01

    We calculate the effective mass of a single quantized vortex in the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconductor at finite temperature. Based on effective action approach, we arrive at the effective mass of a vortex as integral of the spectral function J(ω) divided by ω3 over frequency. The spectral function is given in terms of the quantum-mechanical transition elements of the gradient of the Hamiltonian between two Bogoliubov-deGennes (BdG) eigenstates. Based on self-consistent numerical diagonalization of the BdG equation we find that the effective mass per unit length of vortex at zero temperature is of order m(kfξ0)2 ( kf=Fermi momentum, ξ0=coherence length), essentially equaling the electron mass displaced within the coherence length from the vortex core. Transitions between the core states are responsible for most of the mass. The mass reaches a maximum value at T≈0.5Tc and decreases continuously to zero at Tc .

  11. Effects of adding fluids to solid foods on muscle activity and number of chewing cycles.

    PubMed

    van der Bilt, Andries; Engelen, Lina; Abbink, Jan; Pereira, Luciano J

    2007-06-01

    The production of a sufficient amount of saliva is indispensable for good chewing. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that adding fluid to a food will facilitate the chewing process, especially for dry foods. The effect might be larger for subjects with relatively low salivary flow rates. Furthermore, adding fluids that contain mucins or alpha-amylase may have a larger facilitating effect on mastication than the addition of water alone. Twenty subjects chewed on melba toast, breakfast cake, carrot, peanut, and Gouda cheese. In addition, they chewed on these foods after different volumes of water, artificial saliva containing mucins, or a solution of alpha-amylase had been added. Muscle activity and number of chewing strokes until swallowing were measured. The salivary flow rates of the subjects were also determined. Adding fluid to the food significantly reduced the number of chewing cycles and total muscular work (i.e. the integrated surface electromyograpy of masseter and temporalis muscles measured bilaterally, summed for all chewing cycles) until swallowing for all foods, except carrot. The largest effects were observed for melba and cake, which are dry products requiring sufficient saliva to form a coherent bolus safe for swallowing. More facilitation of the chewing process was observed after adding fluid to breakfast cake for subjects with relatively low salivary flow rates. The type of fluid had no significant effect on the chewing process.

  12. Robustness of Value-Added Analysis of School Effectiveness. Research Report. ETS RR-08-22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Henry; Qu, Yanxuan

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on a study conducted to investigate the consistency of the results between 2 approaches to estimating school effectiveness through value-added modeling. Estimates of school effects from the layered model employing item response theory (IRT) scaled data are compared to estimates derived from a discrete growth model based on the…

  13. Effects of acute exercise on appetite hormones and ad libitum energy intake in men and women.

    PubMed

    Hagobian, Todd Alan; Yamashiro, Megan; Hinkel-Lipsker, Jake; Streder, Katherine; Evero, Nero; Hackney, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Acute exercise suppresses relative energy intake; however, it remains unclear whether this occurs in both men and women exposed to the same relative exercise treatment. Eleven healthy men (22 ± 2 years; 16% ± 6% body fat (BF); 26 ± 4 body mass index (BMI); 42.9 ± 6.5 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) peak oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]O(2peak))) and 10 healthy women (21 ± 2 years; 24 ± 2 BMI; 23% ± 3% BF; 39.9 ± 5.5 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) [Formula: see text]O(2peak)) rested for 60 min or exercised on a cycle ergometer at 70% [Formula: see text]O(2peak) until 30% of total daily energy expenditure was expended (men, expenditure = 975 ± 195 kcal in 82 ± 13 min; women, expenditure = 713 ± 86 kcal in 84 ± 17 min) in a counterbalanced, crossover fashion. Appetite hormones and appetite ratings were assessed in response to each condition. Forty minutes after both conditions, ad libitum total and relative energy intake (energy intake minus energy cost of exercise) were assessed at a buffet meal. There was no significant sex or condition effect in appetite hormones (PYY(3-36), acylated ghrelin, insulin) and appetite ratings (hunger, satisfaction, fullness). Total energy intake in men was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in exercise and rest conditions (1648 ± 950, 1216 ± 633 kcal, respectively) compared with women (591 ± 183, 590 ± 231 kcal, respectively). Relative energy intake was significantly lower (P < 0.05) after exercise compared with rest in men (672 ± 827, 1133 ± 619 kcal, respectively) and women (-121 ± 243, 530 ± 233 kcal, respectively). These data highlight the effectiveness of acute exercise to suppress relative energy intake regardless of sex.

  14. Elevated corticosterone levels decrease reproductive output of chick-rearing Adélie penguins but do not affect chick mass at fledging

    PubMed Central

    Thierry, Anne-Mathilde; Ropert-Coudert, Yan; Raclot, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Study of physiological mechanisms can help us to understand how animals respond to changing environmental conditions. In particular, stress hormones (i.e. glucocorticoids, such as corticosterone) are described as mediating resource allocation, allowing animals to adjust their physiology and behaviour to predictable and unpredictable changes in the environment. In this study, we investigated the effects of an experimental increase in baseline corticosterone levels on the breeding effort and the reproductive output of chick-rearing male Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae). The number of chicks per nest, their body mass, and their size were monitored throughout the study. Direct observations allowed measurement of the time spent foraging at sea and caring for the young on the nest. At the end of the treatment, blood samples were collected for isotope analysis. Although all birds raised at least one chick, reproductive output was decreased by 42% in corticosterone-treated birds compared with control birds. The increase in corticosterone levels during the guard stage did not affect the mass of surviving chicks or the brood mass at fledging. Corticosterone-treated males spent on average 21% more time at the nest than control birds. However, the duration of foraging trips was similar between both groups. In addition, the similarity of isotopic signatures suggests that both groups foraged at similar locations and ingested the same prey species. The detailed on-land behaviour of birds should be examined in further studies to clarify the possible links between corticosterone levels, brooding time, and reproductive output. Understanding the relationships between glucocorticoids, fitness, and ultimately population dynamics is fundamental to enabling conservation physiology as a discipline to be successful in helping to manage species of conservation concern. PMID:27293591

  15. Effects of independently altering body weight and body mass on the metabolic cost of running.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Lennart P J; Grabowski, Alena; Kram, Rodger

    2007-12-01

    The metabolic cost of running is substantial, despite the savings from elastic energy storage and return. Previous studies suggest that generating vertical force to support body weight and horizontal forces to brake and propel body mass are the major determinants of the metabolic cost of running. In the present study, we investigated how independently altering body weight and body mass affects the metabolic cost of running. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that reducing body weight would decrease metabolic rate proportionally, and adding mass and weight would increase metabolic rate proportionally. Further, because previous studies show that adding mass alone does not affect the forces generated on the ground, we hypothesized that adding mass alone would have no substantial effect on metabolic rate. We manipulated the body weight and body mass of 10 recreational human runners and measured their metabolic rates while they ran at 3 m s(-1). We reduced weight using a harness system, increased mass and weight using lead worn about the waist, and increased mass alone using a combination of weight support and added load. We found that net metabolic rate decreased in less than direct proportion to reduced body weight, increased in slightly more than direct proportion to added load (added mass and weight), and was not substantially different from normal running with added mass alone. Adding mass alone was not an effective method for determining the metabolic cost attributable to braking/propelling body mass. Runners loaded with mass alone did not generate greater vertical or horizontal impulses and their metabolic costs did not substantially differ from those of normal running. Our results show that generating force to support body weight is the primary determinant of the metabolic cost of running. Extrapolating our reduced weight data to zero weight suggests that supporting body weight comprises at most 74% of the net cost of running. However, 74% is probably an

  16. Effect of processing and storage on the stability of flaxseed lignan added to dairy products.

    PubMed

    Hyvärinen, Helena K; Pihlava, Juha-Matti; Hiidenhovi, Jaakko A; Hietaniemi, Veli; Korhonen, Hannu J T; Ryhänen, Eeva-Liisa

    2006-11-15

    This study investigated the effects of processing and storage on the stability of purified, flaxseed-derived secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) added to milk prior to the manufacture of different dairy products. We analyzed the effect of high-temperature pasteurization, fermentation, and milk renneting as well as storage on the stability of SDG added to milk, yogurt, and cheese. Also, the stability of SDG in whey-based drinks was studied. Added SDG was found to withstand the studied processes well. In edam cheese manufacture, most of the added SDG was retained in the whey fraction and 6% was found in the cheese curd. SDG was also relatively stable in edam cheese during ripening of 6 weeks at 9 degrees C and in yogurt during storage of 21 days at 4 degrees C. Up to 25% of added SDG was lost in whey-based drinks during storage of 6 months at 8 degrees C. We conclude that SDG can be successfully supplemented in dairy-based products.

  17. The type of caloric sweetener added to water influences weight gain, fat mass, and reproduction in growing Sprague-Dawley female rats.

    PubMed

    Light, Heather R; Tsanzi, Embedzayi; Gigliotti, Joseph; Morgan, Keri; Tou, Janet C

    2009-06-01

    Caloric sweetened beverages have been suggested to be a major dietary contributor to weight gain, particularly among adolescents. Dietary recommendations are for moderating intakes of added sugars; however, the question remains whether certain types of sugars should be limited. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of drinking different caloric sweetened beverages on the development of adiposity, metabolic, and endocrine disorders. Young (age 28 days) female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8-9 rats/group) were randomly assigned to drink either deionized distilled water (ddH2O) or ddH2O sweetened with 13% (w/v) glucose, sucrose, fructose or high fructose corn syrup 55 (HFCS-55) for 8 weeks. Rats drinking caloric sweetened solutions failed to completely compensate for liquid calories ingested by reducing their consumption of solid food. This resulted in greater total energy intake compared to the ddH2O control; however, there was no significant difference in total energy intake between rats drinking sucrose, fructose or HFCS-55. Of the different caloric sweeteners, only rats drinking HFCS-55 had greater (P < 0.05) final body weights and fat mass compared to the rats drinking ddH2O or glucose solution. This may have occurred because drinking HFCS-55 solution promoted a faster body weight gain. Adiposity induced by caloric sweetened water was not accompanied by metabolic disorders indicated by the absence of dyslipidemia and no differences in fasting serum glucose, insulin or C-peptide among the treatment groups. However, rats drinking HFCS-55 showed lengthened estrous cycles due to prolonged estrus. Based on this study, the type of caloric sweetener added to beverages should be considered when making dietary recommendation for reducing excess body weight and related health risk.

  18. The Promise and Peril of Using Value-Added Modeling to Measure Teacher Effectiveness. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RAND Corporation, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Value-added modeling offers the possibility of estimating the effects of teachers and schools on student performance, a potentially important contribution in the current environment of concern for accountability in education. These techniques, however, are susceptible to a number of sources of bias, depending on decisions about how the modeling is…

  19. Tradeoffs in the Use of Value-Added Estimates of Teacher Effectiveness by School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Andrew David

    2011-01-01

    A new capacity to track the inputs and outcomes of individual students' education production function has spurred a growing number of school districts to attempt to measure the productivity of their teachers in terms of student outcomes. The use of these value-added measures of teacher effectiveness is at the center of current education reform.…

  20. A Value-Added Study of Teacher Spillover Effects across Four Core Subjects in Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Kun

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the existence, magnitude, and impact of teacher spillover effects (TSEs) across teachers of four subject areas (i.e., mathematics, English language arts [ELA], science, and social studies) on student achievement in each of the four subjects at the middle school level. The author conducted a series of value-added (VA) analyses,…

  1. The Effect of Summer on Value-Added Assessments of Teacher and School Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palardy, Gregory J.; Peng, Luyao

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effects of including the summer period on value-added assessments (VAA) of teacher and school performance at the early grades. The results indicate that 40-62% of the variance in VAA estimates originates from the summer period, depending on the outcome (i.e., reading or math achievement gains). Furthermore, when summer is…

  2. Comparing the Effects of Four Instructional Treatments on EFL Students' Achievement in Writing Classified Ads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khodabandeh, Farzaneh

    2016-01-01

    The current study set out to compare the effect of traditional and non-traditional instructional treatments; i.e. explicit, implicit, task-based and no-instruction approaches on students' abilities to learn how to write classified ads. 72 junior students who have all taken a course in Reading Journalistic Texts at the Payame-Noor University…

  3. Beyond Traditional School Value-Added Models: A Multilevel Analysis of Complex School Effects in Chile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troncoso, Patricio; Pampaka, Maria; Olsen, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    School value-added studies have largely demonstrated the effects of socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of the schools and the pupils on performance in standardised tests. Traditionally, these studies have assessed the variation coming only from the schools and the pupils. However, recent studies have shown that the analysis of academic…

  4. Improving Biomethane Production and Mass Bioconversion of Corn Stover Anaerobic Digestion by Adding NaOH Pretreatment and Trace Elements

    PubMed Central

    Liu, ChunMei; Yuan, HaiRong; Zou, DeXun; Liu, YanPing; Zhu, BaoNing; Li, XiuJin

    2015-01-01

    This research applied sodium hydroxide (NaOH) pretreatment and trace elements to improve biomethane production when using corn stover for anaerobic digestion. Full-factor experimental tests identified the best combination of trace elements with the NaOH pretreatment, indicating that the best combination was with 1.0, 0.4, and 0.4 mg·L−1·d−1 of elements Fe, Co, and Ni, respectively. The cumulative biomethane production adding NaOH pretreatment and trace elements was 11,367 mL; total solid bioconversion rate was 55.7%, which was 41.8%–62.2% higher than with NaOH-pretreatment alone and 22.2%–56.3% higher than with untreated corn stover. The best combination was obtained 5–9 days shorter than T90 and maintained good system operation stability. Only a fraction of the trace elements in the best combination was present in the resulting solution; more than 85% of the total amounts added were transferred into the solid fraction. Adding 0.897 g of Fe, 0.389 g of Co, and 0.349 g of Ni satisfied anaerobic digestion needs and enhanced biological activity at the beginning of the operation. The results showed that NaOH pretreatment and adding trace elements improve corn stover biodegradability and enhance biomethane production. PMID:26137469

  5. Warped AdS3 black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anninos, Dionysios; Li, Wei; Padi, Megha; Song, Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    Three dimensional topologically massive gravity (TMG) with a negative cosmological constant -l-2 and positive Newton constant G admits an AdS3 vacuum solution for any value of the graviton mass μ. These are all known to be perturbatively unstable except at the recently explored chiral point μl = 1. However we show herein that for every value of μl ≠ 3 there are two other (potentially stable) vacuum solutions given by SL(2,Bbb R) × U(1)-invariant warped AdS3 geometries, with a timelike or spacelike U(1) isometry. Critical behavior occurs at μl = 3, where the warping transitions from a stretching to a squashing, and there are a pair of warped solutions with a null U(1) isometry. For μl > 3, there are known warped black hole solutions which are asymptotic to warped AdS3. We show that these black holes are discrete quotients of warped AdS3 just as BTZ black holes are discrete quotients of ordinary AdS3. Moreover new solutions of this type, relevant to any theory with warped AdS3 solutions, are exhibited. Finally we note that the black hole thermodynamics is consistent with the hypothesis that, for μl > 3, the warped AdS3 ground state of TMG is holographically dual to a 2D boundary CFT with central charges c_R-formula and c_L-formula.

  6. Warped AdS3 black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Anninos, Dionysios; Li, Wei; Padi, Megha; Strominger, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    Three dimensional topologically massive gravity (TMG) with a negative cosmological constant -ell-2 and positive Newton constant G admits an AdS3 vacuum solution for any value of the graviton mass μ. These are all known to be perturbatively unstable except at the recently explored chiral point μell = 1. However we show herein that for every value of μell ≠ 3 there are two other (potentially stable) vacuum solutions given by SL(2,Bbb R) × U(1)-invariant warped AdS3 geometries, with a timelike or spacelike U(1) isometry. Critical behavior occurs at μell = 3, where the warping transitions from a stretching to a squashing, and there are a pair of warped solutions with a null U(1) isometry. For μell > 3, there are known warped black hole solutions which are asymptotic to warped AdS3. We show that these black holes are discrete quotients of warped AdS3 just as BTZ black holes are discrete quotients of ordinary AdS3. Moreover new solutions of this type, relevant to any theory with warped AdS3 solutions, are exhibited. Finally we note that the black hole thermodynamics is consistent with the hypothesis that, for μell > 3, the warped AdS3 ground state of TMG is holographically dual to a 2D boundary CFT with central charges c_R-formula and c_L-formula.

  7. Direction of associations between added sugar intake in early childhood and body mass index at age 7 years may depend on intake levels.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Antje; Diethelm, Katharina; Cheng, Guo; Alexy, Ute; Icks, Andrea; Buyken, Anette E

    2011-07-01

    Dietary factors, especially during early childhood, have been discussed as potentially critical for the development of childhood overweight. This study evaluated associations between added sugar intake during early childhood and BMI and body fat at age 7 y. Analysis was based on data from 216 participants of the Dortmund Nutritional and Anthropometric Longitudinally Designed (DONALD) Study. Life-course plots were constructed to evaluate the association between added sugar intake at different ages (0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 y) and BMI SD score (BMI-SDS) and % body fat (%BF) at age 7 y. Multivariable analyses were performed for the periods identified as critical for later BMI and body fat. Added sugar intake at age 1 y and the change in intake levels during the second year of life emerged as potentially critical. At age 1 y, a higher total added sugar intake was related to a lower BMI-SDS at age 7 y [adjusted β ± SE: -0.116 ± 0.057 BMI-SDS/percent energy (%En) added sugar; P = 0.04]. Conversely, an increase in total added sugar in the second year of life (Δ%En between age 1 and 2 y) tended to be associated with a higher BMI-SDS (adjusted β ± SE: 0.074 ± 0.043 BMI-SDS/Δ%En added sugar; P = 0.09). No associations were observed with %BF. In conclusion, added sugar intake at low intake levels during early childhood does not appear to be critical for BMI and body fat at age 7 y. However, detrimental effects on BMI development may emerge when added sugar intakes are increased to higher levels.

  8. REBOUNDx: A library for adding additional effects to N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamayo, Daniel; Rein, Hanno; Shi, Pengshuai

    2016-05-01

    Many astrophysical applications involve additional perturbations beyond point-source gravity. We have recently developed REBOUNDx, a library for adding such effects in numerical simulations with the open-source N-body package REBOUND. Various implementations have different numerical properties that in general depend on the underlying integrator employed. In particular, I will discuss adding velocity-dependent/dissipative effects to widely used symplectic integrators, and how one can estimate the introduced numerical errors using the operator-splitting formalism traditionally applied to symplectic integrators. Finally, I will demonstrate how to use the code, and how the Python wrapper we have developed for REBOUND/REBOUNDx makes it easy to interactively leverage powerful analysis, visualization and parallelization libraries.

  9. Surfactant recovery from water using foam fractionation: Effect of temperature and added salt

    SciTech Connect

    Kumpabooth, K.; Osuwan, S.; Scamehorn, J.F.; Harwell, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of foam fractionation to recover surfactant present at low concentrations in aqueous streams. A simple continuous mode foam fractionation was used, and three surfactants were chosen for this study: sodium dodecyl sulfate, cetylpyridinium chloride, and sodium n-hexadecyl diphenyloxide disulfonate. In a previous study the effects of surfactant concentration, air flow rate, liquid- and vapor-phase heights, and sparger type were investigated for these surfactants. Here, the effects of temperature and added salt are studied. It is found that the foam flow rate and enrichment ratio increase whereas the foam wetness and the rate of surfactant recovery decrease with increasing temperature. Increasing the concentration of added salt decreases the CMC of the surfactants. The foam flow rate, foam wetness, and the rate of surfactant recovery increase, while the enrichment ratio decreases with increasing concentration of salt.

  10. The Effect of QBO on the Total Mass Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saǧır, Selçuk; Atıcı, Ramazan

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (QBO) measured at 10 hPa altitude and total mass density (TMD) values obtained from NRLMSIS-00 model for 90 km altitude of ionosphere known as Mesosphere-Lower Thermosphere (MLT) region is statistically investigated. For this study, multiple-regression model is used. To see the effect on TMD of QBO directions, Dummy variables are also added to model. In the result of calculations, it is observed that QBO is effected on TMD. It is determined that 69% of variations at TMD can be explainable by QBO. It is determined that the explainable ratio is at the rate of 5%. Also, it is seen that an increase/a decrease of 1 meter per second at QBO give rise to an increase/a decrease of 7,2x10-4 g/cm3 at TMD.

  11. Concentrated mass effects on the flutter of a composite advanced turboprop model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, J. K.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1986-01-01

    The effects on bending-torsion flutter due to the addition of a concentrated mass to an advanced turboprop model blade with rigid hub are studied. Specifically the effects of the magnitude and location of added mass on the natural frequencies, mode shapes, critical interblade phase angle, and flutter Mach number are analytically investigated. The flutter of a propfan model is shown to be sensitive to the change in mass distribution. Static unbalance effects, like those for fixed wings, were shown to occur as the concentrated mass was moved from the leading edge to the trailing edge with the exception of one mass location. Mass balancing is also inferred to be a feasible method for increasing the flutter speed.

  12. Free vibrations of a cantilevered SWCNT with distributed mass in the presence of nonlocal effect.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, M A; Lippiello, M; Martin, H D

    2015-01-01

    The Hamilton principle is applied to deduce the free vibration frequencies of a cantilever single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) in the presence of an added mass, which can be distributed along an arbitrary part of the span. The nonlocal elasticity theory by Eringen has been employed, in order to take into account the nanoscale effects. An exact formulation leads to the equations of motion, which can be solved to give the frequencies and the corresponding vibration modes. Moreover, two approximate semianalytical methods are also illustrated, which can provide quick parametric relationships. From a more practical point of view, the problem of detecting the mass of the attached particle has been solved by calculating the relative frequency shift due to the presence of the added mass: from it, the mass value can be easily deduced. The paper ends with some numerical examples, in which the nonlocal effects are thoroughly investigated.

  13. The effects of involvement and ad type on attitudes toward direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs.

    PubMed

    Limbu, Yam; Torres, Ivonne M

    2009-01-01

    This article examines consumers' attitudes toward Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) advertising of prescription drugs that are influenced by the use different types of DTC ads and product involvement. Our findings suggest that product involvement and the type of DTC ad are significant predictors of consumers' attitudinal responses toward DTC advertising. High involvement consumers have more favorable attitudes toward the drug's price, DTC ad and brand name, and a higher intention to ask a doctor about the advertised drug than low involvement consumers. In contrast to Informational and Reminder DTC ads, Persuasive ads have more favorable effects on consumers' reactions to DTC prescription drug advertising.

  14. The Effect of Marijuana Scenes in Anti-marijuana Public Service Announcements on Adolescents’ Evaluation of Ad Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yahui; Cappella, Joseph N.; Fishbein, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the possible negative impact of a specific ad feature—marijuana scenes—on adolescents’ perception of ad effectiveness. A secondary data analysis was conducted on adolescents’ evaluations of 60 anti-marijuana public service announcements (PSAs) that were a part of national and state anti-drug campaigns directed at adolescents. The major finding of the study was that marijuana scenes in anti-marijuana PSAs negatively affected ad liking and thought valence toward the ads among adolescents who are at higher levels of risk for marijuana use. This negative impact was not reversed in the presence of strong anti-marijuana arguments. The results may be used to partially explain the lack of effectiveness of the anti-drug media campaign. It may also help us design more effective anti-marijuana PSAs by isolating adverse elements in the ads that may elicit boomerang effects in the target population. Limitations of the study and future directions were discussed. PMID:19735026

  15. The effects of prosthesis mass on metabolic cost of ambulation in non-vascular trans-tibial amputees.

    PubMed

    Gailey, R S; Nash, M S; Atchley, T A; Zilmer, R M; Moline-Little, G R; Morris-Cresswell, N; Siebert, L I

    1997-04-01

    The effect of prosthesis mass on the metabolic cost of steady-state walking was studied in ten male non-vascular trans-tibial amputees (TTAs) and ten non-amputee controls. The subjects underwent four trials of treadmill ambulation, with each trial performed for nine minutes at level grade and 76 m/min. Twenty minutes of seated rest followed each trial. During trials numbers one and two, TTAs ambulated without mass added to their prosthesis. During the third and fourth trials, either 454 or 907 grammes mass (1 or 2lbs mass respectively) were randomly assigned and added to either the prosthesis or the leg of the non-amputee control. Subjects were blinded to the amount of mass added to their limb. Within-group comparisons across the four trials showed significant differences in oxygen consumption (VO2) and heart rate (HR) between the two non "mass added" trials, but no effect for addition of mass. The VO2 of TTAs was only 0.6 ml/kg/min (4.7 percent) greater during walking following the addition of 907 grammes to the prosthesis than without mass addition at all, while HR averaged only 1.4 beats/min. higher under the same testing condition. Pearson-product moment correlations echoed these findings, as moderate, but in all cases, negative correlations were observed for associations among the factors of subject age, stump length, and prosthesis-shoe weight, and both VO2 and HR. It was concluded that adding up to 907 grammes mass to a non-vascular TTA's prosthesis will not significantly increase the energy expenditure or HR at a normal walking speed, and that elevated energy cost of ambulation in repeated measures testing without mass added may reflect task familiarization and not an added burden of prosthesis mass.

  16. Effect of processing and storage on the stability of flaxseed lignan added to bakery products.

    PubMed

    Hyvärinen, Helena K; Pihlava, Juha-Matti; Hiidenhovi, Jaakko A; Hietaniemi, Veli; Korhonen, Hannu J T; Ryhänen, Eeva-Liisa

    2006-01-11

    The study focused on the effects of processing and storage on the stability of flaxseed-derived secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) added to various bakery products. The SDG concentration of doughs, baked rye breads, graham buns, and muffins was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection; the baked products were analyzed immediately after baking and upon storage at room temperature for 1 week and at -25 degrees C for 1 and 2 months, respectively. Added SDG was found to withstand normal baking temperatures in all bakery products. SDG also was a relatively stable compound during storage. Similarly, the content of SDG in flax buns containing fat-free flaxseed meal was unaffected by storage. We conclude that cereal-based bakery products can be supplemented with flaxseed-derived SDG.

  17. Orienting response reinstatement and dishabituation: effects of substituting, adding, and deleting components of nonsignificant stimuli.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shakhar, G; Gati, I; Ben-Bassat, N; Sniper, G

    2000-01-01

    The prediction that orienting response (OR) reinstatement is negatively related to the measure of common features, shared by the stimulus input and representations of preceding events, and positively related to the measure of their distinctive features, was examined. A nonsignificant test stimulus (TS) was presented after nine repetitions of a standard stimulus (SS), followed by two additional repetitions of SS. TS was created by either substituting 0, 1, or 2 components of SS (Experiment 1), or by either adding or deleting 0, 1, or 2 components of SS (Experiment 2). Skin conductance changes to TS (OR reinstatement) and the subsequent SS (dishabituation) were used as dependent measures. The results of Experiment 1 supported the prediction that substituting components of neutral stimuli affects OR reinstatement, with a larger effect for between-categories than within-categories substitution. Experiment 2 demonstrated that adding and deleting components similarly affects OR reinstatement.

  18. Dynamic effective mass of granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David; Ingale, Rohit; Valenza, John; Hsu, Chaur-Jian; Gland, Nicolas; Makse, Hernan

    2009-03-01

    We report an experimental and theoretical investigation of the frequency-dependent effective mass, M(φ), of loose granular particles which occupy a rigid cavity to a filling fraction of 48%, the remaining volume being air of differing humidities. We demonstrate that this is a sensitive and direct way to measure those properties of the granular medium that are the cause of the changes in acoustic properties of structures containing grain-filled cavities. Specifically, we apply this understanding to the case of the flexural resonances of a rectangular bar with a grain-filled cavity within it. The dominant features of M(φ) are a sharp resonance and a broad background, which we analyze within the context of simple models. We find that: a) These systems may be understood in terms of a height-dependent and diameter-dependent effective sound speed (˜130 m/s) and an effective viscosity (˜2x10^4 Poise). b) There is a dynamic Janssen effect in the sense that, at any frequency, and depending on the method of sample preparation, approximately one-half of the effective mass is borne by the side walls of the cavity and one-half by the bottom. c) On a fundamental level, dissipation is dominated by adsorbed films of water at grain-grain contacts in our experiments.

  19. Mass relocation through soil exhaustion: Transformation of habitation patterns in the southern Netherlands (1000 BC-500 AD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluiving, Sjoerd; Bekkema, Marijke; Roymans, Nico; van Mourik, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Long-term archaeological data gathering in the southern Netherlands may deliver an unprecedented regional comparison that could be exemplary for the Pleistocene sand areas of the Northwest European Plain. On a micro-scale level, it has become clear that Bronze Age (2000-800 BC) and Iron Age (800-12 BC) farmers intensively used the landscape, resulting in a relatively dense distribution pattern of settlements all over the ridges and planes of the cover sand landscape. However, this agricultural use of the landscape related to the "celtic field" system led to a process of soil degradation by increased acidification during which Umbric Podzols gradually transformed into Carbic Podzols that could no longer be used as farmland. According to established "models," this process of "secondary podzolization" particularly affected those sections of the landscape that were dominated by dry sandy soils with a low loam content (loam = clay and silt, between c. 10% and 20%). In the Late Iron Age (250-12 BC), the changing soil conditions resulted in a dramatic shift in the habitation pattern that clearly manifests itself in the Roman period (12 BC-410 AD); on the local scale, the habitation moved from the degenerated soils to nearby areas with better soil conditions (higher loam content), which became more densely inhabited now than in the Bronze Age/Early Iron Age (2000-500 BC). The introduction of new land management (in the later Iron Age, and also by Romans) could also have been important for soil degradation. The areas where the Roman period settlements concentrated became also the areas where we can find the early medieval habitation (447-751 AD) and where the Plaggic Anthrosols started to develop in the late medieval period (1270-1500 AD). This poster is based on the analysis of soil properties. Measured loam values of soil samples (n=181) in Veldhoven, southern Netherlands, are in agreement with the described model that the plaggen cover is located on soils containing high

  20. Suspensions of polymer-grafted nanoparticles with added polymers-Structure and effective pair-interactions.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Sivasurender; Saw, Shibu; Kandar, A K; Dasgupta, C; Sprung, M; Basu, J K

    2015-08-28

    We present the results of combined experimental and theoretical (molecular dynamics simulations and integral equation theory) studies of the structure and effective interactions of suspensions of polymer grafted nanoparticles (PGNPs) in the presence of linear polymers. Due to the absence of systematic experimental and theoretical studies of PGNPs, it is widely believed that the structure and effective interactions in such binary mixtures would be very similar to those of an analogous soft colloidal material-star polymers. In our study, polystyrene-grafted gold nanoparticles with functionality f = 70 were mixed with linear polystyrene (PS) of two different molecular weights for obtaining two PGNP:PS size ratios, ξ = 0.14 and 2.76 (where, ξ = Mg/Mm, Mg and Mm being the molecular weights of grafting and matrix polymers, respectively). The experimental structure factor of PGNPs could be modeled with an effective potential (Model-X), which has been found to be widely applicable for star polymers. Similarly, the structure factor of the blends with ξ = 0.14 could be modeled reasonably well, while the structure of blends with ξ = 2.76 could not be captured, especially for high density of added polymers. A model (Model-Y) for effective interactions between PGNPs in a melt of matrix polymers also failed to provide good agreement with the experimental data for samples with ξ = 2.76 and high density of added polymers. We tentatively attribute this anomaly in modeling the structure factor of blends with ξ = 2.76 to the questionable assumption of Model-X in describing the added polymers as star polymers with functionality 2, which gets manifested in both polymer-polymer and polymer-PGNP interactions especially at higher fractions of added polymers. The failure of Model-Y may be due to the neglect of possible many-body interactions among PGNPs mediated by matrix polymers when the fraction of added polymers is high. These observations point to the need for a new framework to

  1. Acute effects of nicotine and mecamylamine on tobacco withdrawal symptoms, cigarette reward and ad lib smoking.

    PubMed

    Rose, J E; Behm, F M; Westman, E C

    2001-02-01

    Separate and combined effects of nicotine and the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine were studied in 32 healthy volunteer smokers after overnight abstinence from smoking. Subjects participated in three sessions (3 h each), during which they wore skin patches delivering either 0 mg/24 h, 21 mg/24 h or 42 mg/24 h nicotine. Thirty-two subjects were randomly assigned to two groups receiving oral mecamylamine hydrochloride (10 mg) vs. placebo capsules. Two and one-half hours after drug administration, subjects were allowed to smoke ad lib, rating the cigarettes for rewarding and aversive effects. Transdermal nicotine produced a dose-related reduction in the subjective rewarding qualities of smoking. Nicotine also reduced craving for cigarettes and this effect was attenuated, but not eliminated, by mecamylamine. Mecamylamine blocked the discriminability of high vs. low nicotine puffs of smoke, and increased nicotine intake substantially during the ad lib smoking period. Some of the psychophysiological effects of each drug (elevation in blood pressure from nicotine, sedation and decreased blood pressure from mecamylamine) were offset by the other drug. The results supported the hypothesis that nicotine replacement can alleviate tobacco withdrawal symptoms even in the presence of an antagonist such as mecamylamine. Mecamylamine did not precipitate withdrawal beyond the level associated with overnight cigarette deprivation, suggesting its effects were primarily due to offsetting the action of concurrently administered nicotine as opposed to blocking endogenous cholinergic transmission.

  2. Plasmonic Effect in Au-Added TiO2-Based Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hong, Le; Cat, Do Tran; Chi, Le Ha; Thuy, Nguyen Thi; Van Hung, Tran; Tai, Ly Ngoc; Long, Pham Duy

    2016-10-01

    TiO2 nano thin films have been fabricated on fluoride tin oxide (FTO) film electrodes by hydrothermal synthesis at temperatures of 80°C, 120°C, 150°C, and 200°C for different synthesis times of 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h in 2.5 mol, 5 mol, and 7.5 mol NaOH solution. X-ray diffraction patterns and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images were recorded for all the film samples, and the results confirmed that TiO2 anatase phase was generally formed in nanowire form. The influence of synthesis temperature, processing time, and NaOH content on the structure and morphology of the TiO2 material was studied. Au nanoparticles with size of around 2 × 10-8 m were added into the TiO2 thin films by thermal evaporation in vacuum combined with thermal annealing. Based on photocurrent-voltage ( I- V) characteristics measured under irradiation with visible light, the short-circuit current, open-circuit voltage, and efficiency of solar cells with FTO/Au-added TiO2/(I-/I2-) electrolyte/Pt configuration were evaluated. The short-circuit current and efficiency of the Au-added solar cell were greatly improved, which is supposed to be related to a contribution of the surface plasmon resonance effect.

  3. Environmental effects on protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis after immunization with Ad85A.

    PubMed

    Beverley, Peter; Ronan, Edward; Lee, Lianni; Arnold, Isabelle; Bolinger, Beatrice; Powrie, Fiona; Tchilian, Elma

    2013-02-04

    Previously we have shown that intradermal (i.d.) immunization with a recombinant adenovirus expressing antigen 85A (Ad85A) induced a strong splenic CD8T cell response in BALB/c mice but a weak lung immune response and did not protect mice against challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). After moving to a new animal house, the same i.d. immunization induced a strong lung immune response and the mice were protected against Mtb challenge. Increased numbers of antigen 85A-specific CD8 cells were present in lung tissue but were not recoverable by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Mycobacterial growth was inhibited 21 days after Mtb challenge. In contrast, the effects of intranasal (i.n.) immunization did not change between the animal houses; 85A-specific T cells were recovered by BAL and were able to inhibit Mtb growth early after challenge. The effect of alterations to the environment was investigated by administering BCG or Mycobacterium abscessus in the drinking water, which induced protection against Mtb challenge, while Mycobacterium smegmatis did not. However, when Ad85A was given i.d. at the same time as BCG or M. abscessus, but not M. smegmatis, the protection induced by Ad85A was abolished. Treatment of mice with a CD25 antibody during the challenge period, abolished the suppressive effect of oral mycobacterial administration, suggesting that regulatory T cells (T regs) were involved. These results showed that exposure to environmental microorganisms can alter the protective immune response to a parenterally administered subunit vaccine, a result with important implications for the use of such vaccines in humans.

  4. Effect of Added Brine on the Physico Chemical Studies of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate and Aqueous Gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Jinu; Sreejith, Lisa

    2011-10-01

    Effect of added brine on the structural transitions of SDS, in different compositions of gelatin has been investigated by viscosity, circular dichroism, TGA and DSC. The slow and steady growth of the normal spherical micelles to the higher order aggregates were predicted by viscosity and conductivity measurements. The large negative value for ellipticity observed from CD measurements indicated absence of any conformational change for gelatin. Other measurements were used to study the molecular packing in the micellar aggregates. The complex formed exhibits fantastic properties to be explored in the field of smart gels.

  5. Effects of added caffeine on results following artificial insemination with fresh and refrigerated rabbit semen.

    PubMed

    López, F J; Alvariño, J M

    2000-02-28

    Lactating rabbits (n=1335) were artificially inseminated to study the effect of the addition of caffeine on rabbit semen stored for up to 96 h. Concentration of 0-5 mM/l were tested. Whereas a concentration of 0.2 mM/l increased spermatozoa motility, higher concentration values adversely affected reproductive parameters. Spermatozoa stored at 18 degrees C for 72-96 h did not have the capacity to react with caffeine when it was added before insemination. Caffeine did not enhance fertility or prolificacy, regardless of its ability to increase sperm motility.

  6. Effect of adding cofactors to exogenous fibrolytic enzymes on preingestive hydrolysis, in vitro digestibility, and fermentation of bermudagrass haylage.

    PubMed

    Romero, J J; Ma, Z X; Gonzalez, C F; Adesogan, A T

    2015-07-01

    Our objectives were to examine if adding metal ion cofactors (COF) to exogenous fibrolytic enzymes (EFE) would increase the beneficial effects of the EFE on the preingestive hydrolysis and in vitro digestibility and fermentation of bermudagrass haylage. In experiment 1, 5 COF (Mn(2+), Co(2+), Fe(2+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+)) were screened to select the best candidates for synergistically enhancing release of water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) from bermudagrass haylage by 5 EFE. The 5 EFE (1A, 2A, 11C, 13D, and 15D) were sourced from Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus oryzae and they were the most effective of 12 EFE at increasing the neutral detergent fiber digestibility of bermudagrass haylage in a previous trial. Adding 1mM of each of the COF to EFE 2A or 11C synergistically increased release of WSC from bermudagrass haylage, as did adding (1mM) Fe(2+) to 1A, Mn(2+), Co(2+), or Fe(2+) to 13D, or Co(2+)or Fe(2+) to 15D. The greatest release of WSC responses were obtained by adding Mn(2+) to 11C (38%) or by adding Fe(2+) to 2A or 13D (10 and 21.9%, respectively). In experiment 2, the effect of increasing the COF dose on in vitro digestibility and fermentation of bermudagrass haylage was examined using the best EFE-COF combinations from experiment 1. Effects of adding increasing doses of these COF on EFE-mediated changes in vitro digestibility depended on the COF-EFE combination. Adding 10mM Mn(2+) alone to bermudagrass haylage increased DMD and NDFD by 2.7 and 6.3% and adding 11C alone increased these measures by 6.6 and 15.5%, respectively. However, adding 10mM Mn(2+) with 11C resulted in 3.5 and 8.1% increases in DMD and NDFD, respectively, beyond the increases caused by adding 11C alone. Adding Fe(2+) to 2A had no effects on EFE-mediated digestibility responses, but 2A prevented adverse effects of adding Fe(2+) alone on DMD and NDFD. In contrast, adding Fe(2+) to 13D reduced the increases in DMD and NDFD caused by adding the EFE alone. This study shows that adding COF

  7. [From the therapeutic utility to the added therapeutic value and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio].

    PubMed

    Puig-Junoy, Jaume; Peiró, Salvador

    2009-01-01

    From the social perspective, the concepts of therapeutic utility and degree of innovation of new drugs should be referred to their social added value in relation to the available treatment alternatives and the added costs that they imply; that is, to their incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. The analytic elements highlighting this approach are: 1) the dimensions of the social value of the medication that should go beyond the conventional outcomes measures to also incorporate measures of health related quality of life, patient and family comfort and convenience, healthcare consumption avoided and productive losses avoided; 2) the relative or incremental character of this value that should be quantified in front of previous alternatives -not versus placebo- and under conditions of real use; and 3) the incremental costs that bears the administration of the new medication. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is the appropriate approach for decisions about coverage of a treatment by the public insurer, the price that he is willing to pay for the drug, and the clinical situations and patient groups in which it is recommended. The incremental cost-effectiveness analysis and the use of an indicative threshold of the maximum cost that the society is willing to pay for one additional "quality adjusted life year" are the essential elements of this approach, which doesn't require to fix the price of the new medications at the threshold of the willingness to pay.

  8. Effect of Citalopram on Agitation in Alzheimer's Disease – The CitAD Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Drye, Lea T.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Devanand, D.P.; Frangakis, Constantine; Ismail, Zahinoor; Marano, Christopher; Meinert, Curtis L.; Mintzer, Jacobo E.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Pelton, Gregory; Rabins, Peter V.; Rosenberg, Paul B.; Schneider, Lon S.; Shade, David M.; Weintraub, Daniel; Yesavage, Jerome; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Agitation is common, persistent, and associated with adverse consequences for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Pharmacological treatment options, including antipsychotics are not satisfactory. Objective The primary objective was to evaluate the efficacy of citalopram for agitation in patients with AD. Key secondary objectives examined effects of citalopram on function, caregiver distress, safety, cognitive safety, and tolerability. Design, Setting and Participants The Citalopram for Agitation in Alzheimer's Disease Study (CitAD) was a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel group trial that enrolled 186 patients with probable AD and clinically significant agitation from eight academic centers in the US and Canada from August 2009 to January 2013. Interventions Participants (n=186) were randomized to receive a psychosocial intervention plus either citalopram (n=94) or placebo (n=92) for 9 weeks. Dose began at 10 mg/d with planned titration to 30 mg/d over 3 weeks based on response and tolerability. Main Outcomes and Measures Primary outcome measures were the Neurobehavioral Rating Scale, agitation subscale (NBRS-A) and the modified Alzheimer Disease Cooperative Study-Clinical Global Impression of Change (mADCS-CGIC) Other outcomes were the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI), Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI), activities of daily living (ADLs), caregiver distress, cognitive safety (MMSE), and adverse events. Results Participants on citalopram showed significant improvement compared to placebo on both primary outcome measures. NBRS-A estimated treatment difference at week 9 (citalopram minus placebo) was −0.93 [95% CI: −1.80 to −0.06], p = 0.036. mADCS-CGIC results showed 40% of citalopram participants having moderate or marked improvement from baseline compared to 26% on placebo, with estimated treatment effect (odds ratio of being at or better than a given CGIC category) of 2.13 [95% CI 1.23 to 3.69], p = 0

  9. Dynamic Effective Mass of Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chaur-Jian; Johnson, David L.; Ingale, Rohit A.; Valenza, John J.; Gland, Nicolas; Makse, Hernán A.

    2009-02-01

    We develop the concept of frequency dependent effective mass, Mtilde (ω), of jammed granular materials which occupy a rigid cavity to a filling fraction of 48%, the remaining volume being air of normal room condition or controlled humidity. The dominant features of Mtilde (ω) provide signatures of the dissipation of acoustic modes, elasticity, and aging effects in the granular medium. We perform humidity controlled experiments and interpret the data in terms of a continuum model and a “trap” model of thermally activated capillary bridges at the contact points. The results suggest that attenuation of acoustic waves in granular materials can be influenced significantly by the kinetics of capillary condensation between the asperities at the contacts.

  10. Effect of exercise on cigarette cravings and ad libitum smoking following concurrent stressors.

    PubMed

    Fong, Angela J; De Jesus, Stefanie; Bray, Steven R; Prapavessis, Harry

    2014-10-01

    The health consequences of smoking are well documented, yet quit rates are modest. While exercise has supported decreased cravings and withdrawal symptoms in temporarily abstinent smokers, it has yet to be applied when smokers are experiencing concurrent stressors. This study examined the effect of an acute bout of moderate intensity exercise on cravings (primary outcome) and ad libitum smoking (secondary outcome) following concurrent stressors (i.e., temporary abstinence and environmental manipulation-Stroop cognitive task+cue-elicited smoking stimuli). Twenty-five smokers (>10cig/day; Mean age=37.4years) were randomized into either exercise (n=12) or passive sitting conditions. A repeated measure (RM) ANOVA showed that psychological withdrawal symptoms (a measure of distress) were significantly exacerbated after temporary abstinence and then again after the environmental manipulation for all participants (p<.0001, η(2)=.50). Furthermore, a treatment by time RM ANOVA revealed decreases in psychological withdrawal symptoms for only the exercise condition (p<.001, η(2)=.42). A treatment by time RM ANOVA also revealed craving reductions for only the exercise condition (p<.0001, η(2)=.82). Exercise had no effect on ad libitum smoking. This is the first study to use a lab-based scenario with high ecological validity to show that an acute bout of exercise can reduce cravings following concurrent stressors. Future work is now needed where momentary assessment is used in people's natural environment to examine changes in cigarette cravings following acute bouts of exercise.

  11. How Effective Are Active Videogames Among the Young and the Old? Adding Meta-analyses to Two Recent Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Crutzen, Rik; Lu, Amy Shirong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Two recent systematic reviews have surveyed the existing evidence for the effectiveness of active videogames in children/adolescents and in elderly people. In the present study, effect sizes were added to these systematic reviews, and meta-analyses were performed. Materials and Methods: All reviewed studies were considered for inclusion in the meta-analyses, but only studies were included that investigated the effectiveness of active videogames, used an experimental design, and used actual health outcomes as the outcome measures (body mass index for children/adolescents [k=5] and functional balance for the elderly [k=6]). Results: The average effect of active videogames in children and adolescents was small and nonsignificant: Hedges' g=0.20 (95 percent confidence interval, −0.08 to 0.48). Limited heterogeneity was observed, and no moderator analyses were performed. For the effect of active videogames on functional balance in the elderly, the analyses revealed a medium-sized and significant effect of g=0.68 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.13–1.24). For the elderly studies, substantial heterogeneity was observed. Moderator analyses showed that there were no significant effects of using a no-treatment control group versus an alternative treatment control group or of using games that were especially created for health-promotion purposes versus off-the-shelf games. Also, intervention duration and frequency, sample size, study quality, and dropout did not significantly moderate the effect of active videogames. Conclusions: The results of these meta-analyses provide preliminary evidence that active videogames can have positive effects on relevant outcome measures in children/adolescents and elderly individuals. PMID:26192486

  12. Nonlinear effects of winter sea ice on the survival probabilities of Adélie penguins.

    PubMed

    Ballerini, Tosca; Tavecchia, Giacomo; Olmastroni, Silvia; Pezzo, Francesco; Focardi, Silvano

    2009-08-01

    The population dynamics of Antarctic seabirds are influenced by variations in winter sea ice extent and persistence; however, the type of relationship differs according to the region and the demographic parameter considered. We used annual presence/absence data obtained from 1,138 individually marked birds to study the influence of environmental and individual characteristics on the survival of Adélie penguins Pygoscelis adeliae at Edmonson Point (Ross Sea, Antarctica) between 1994 and 2005. About 25% of 600 birds marked as chicks were reobserved at the natal colony. The capture and survival rates of Adélie penguins at this colony increased with the age of individuals, and five age classes were identified for both parameters. Mean adult survival was 0.85 (SE = 0.01), and no effect of sex on survival was evident. Breeding propensity, as measured by adult capture rates, was close to one, indicating a constant breeding effort through time. Temporal variations in survival were best explained by a quadratic relationship with winter sea ice extent anomalies in the Ross Sea, suggesting that for this region optimal conditions are intermediate between too much and too little winter sea ice. This is likely the result of a balance between suitable wintering habitat and food availability. Survival rates were not correlated with the Southern Oscillation Index. Low adult survival after a season characterized by severe environmental conditions at breeding but favorable conditions during winter suggested an additional mortality mediated by the reproductive effort. Adélie penguins are sensitive indicators of environmental changes in the Antarctic, and the results from this study provide insights into regional responses of this species to variability in winter sea ice habitat.

  13. Matrix Effects in Biological Mass Spectrometry Imaging: Identification and Compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Stevens, Susan; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Laskin, Julia

    2014-07-21

    Matrix effects in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) may affect the observed molecular distribution in chemical and biological systems. In this study, we introduce an experimental approach that efficiently compensates for matrix effects in nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) MSI without introducing any complexity into the experimental protocol. We demonstrate compensation for matrix effects in nano-DESI MSI of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in normal and ischemic mouse brain tissue by doping the nano-DESI solvent with PC standards. Specifically, we use mouse brain tissue of a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model with an ischemic region localized to one hemisphere of the brain. Due to similar suppression in ionization of endogenous PC molecules extracted from the tissue and PC standards added to the solvent, matrix effects are eliminated by normalizing the intensity of the sodium and potassium adducts of endogenous PC to the intensity of the corresponding adduct of the PC standard. This approach efficiently compensates for signal variations resulting from differences in the local concentrations of sodium and potassium in tissue sections and from the complexity of the extracted analyte mixture derived from local variations in molecular composition.

  14. Public Health Effects of Restricting Retail Tobacco Product Displays and Ads

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David T.; Lindblom, Eric N.; Fleischer, Nancy L.; Thrasher, James; Mohlman, Mary Kate; Zhang, Yian; Monshouwer, Karin; Nagelhout, Gera E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the public health impact from restricting US retail point-of-sale (POS) tobacco product displays and advertising. Methods Based on existing research, this paper estimates the effects on initiation and cessation rates from restricting POS tobacco product displays and ads in the US and uses the SimSmoke simulation model to project related smoking declines and health benefits. Results New comprehensive POS restrictions are projected to reduce smoking prevalence by approximately 16% [range=3%–31%] relative to the status quo by 2065, preventing about 630,000 smoking-attributable deaths [range=108,000–1,225,000], 215,000 low birth weight births [range=33,000–421,000], 140,000 preterm births [range=22,000–271,000], and 1900 infant deaths from SIDSs [range=300–3800]. Conclusions Federal, state, or local action to restrict POS tobacco product displays and ads would contribute to a substantial reduction in smoking-attributed death and disease. PMID:26191538

  15. Effects of Experimental Negative Affect Manipulations on Ad Lib Smoking: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Heckman, Bryan W.; Carpenter, Mathew J.; Correa, John B.; Wray, Jennifer M.; Saladin, Michael E.; Froeliger, Brett; Drobes, David J.; Brandon, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To quantify the effect of negative affect (NA), when manipulated experimentally, upon smoking as measured within laboratory paradigms. Quantitative meta-analyses tested the effects of NA vs. neutral conditions on 1) latency to smoke and 2) number of puffs taken. Methods Twelve experimental studies tested the influence of NA induction, relative to a neutral control condition (N = 1,190; range = 24–235). Those providing relevant data contributed to separate random effects meta-analyses to examine the effects of NA on two primary smoking measures: 1) latency to smoke (nine studies) and 2) number of puffs taken during ad lib smoking (eleven studies). Hedge’s g was calculated for all studies through the use of post-NA cue responses relative to post-neutral cue responses. This effect size estimate is similar to Cohen’s d, but corrects for small sample size bias. Results NA reliably decreased latency to smoke (g = −.14; CI = −.23 to −.04; p = .007) and increased number of puffs taken (g = .14; CI = .02 to .25; p = .02). There was considerable variability across studies for both outcomes (I2 = 51% and 65% for latency and consumption, respectively). Potential publication bias was indicated for both outcomes, and adjusted effect sizes were smaller and no longer statistically significant. Conclusions In experimental laboratory studies of smokers, negative affect appears to reduce latency to smoking and increase number of puffs taken but this could be due to publication bias. PMID:25641624

  16. AdS duals of matrix strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Jose F.; Samtleben, Henning

    2003-06-01

    We review recent work on the holographic duals of type II and heterotic matrix string theories described by warped AdS3 supergravities. In particular, we compute the spectra of Kaluza-Klein primaries for type I, II supergravities on warped AdS3 × S7 and match them with the primary operators in the dual two-dimensional gauge theories. The presence of non-trivial warp factors and dilaton profiles requires a modification of the familiar dictionary between masses and 'scaling' dimensions of fields and operators. We present these modifications for the general case of domain wall/QFT correspondences between supergravities on warped AdSd+1 × Sq geometries and super Yang-Mills theories with 16 supercharges.

  17. Effects of trace elements and pesticides on dephosphorylation of RNA and DNA added to soils

    SciTech Connect

    Frankenberger, W.T. Jr.; Johanson, J.B.; Lund L.J.

    1986-01-01

    This study was carried out to assess the effects of 14 trace elements, 12 herbicides, and two fungicides on dephosphorylation of yeast ribonucleic acid (RNA) and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) added to soils (Xerollic Calciorthids and Typic Haploxeralfs). The cumulative amount of ortho phosphate (Pi) released from nucleic acids increased linearly with time of incubation (up to 72 h), decreased with profile depth, and was highly influenced by soil pH. When trace elements were applied and compared by using 2.5 mmol kg/sup -1/ of soil, the average inhibition in dephosphorylation of RNA and DNA in two soils ranged from 17% with Co(II) to 52% with Cu(II). The most effective inhibitors of nucleic acid dephosphorylation were Ag(I), Cu(I), Cd(II), Cu(II), Mn(II), Ni(II), and Pb(II) (avg inhibition greater than or equal to 35%). Other elements that inhibited dephosphorylation of RNA and DNA added to soils included Ba(II), Co(II), Hg(II), Zn(II), Ti(IV), V(IV), and W(VI). When the pesticides were compared by using 5 mg of active ingredient kg/sup -1/ of soil, the average inhibition in nucleic acid dephosphorylation ranged from 14% with butylate to 39% with chloramben. The most effective inhibitors (> 25%) were atrazine, naptalam, chloramben, dicamba, trifluralin, and maneb. Other pesticides that inhibited RNA and DNA dephosphorylation in soils included cyanazine, 2,4-D, dinitroamine, EPTC plus R-25788, alachlor, paraquat, butylate, and captan.

  18. Can Teachers Be Evaluated by Their Students' Test Scores? Should They Be? The Use of Value-Added Measures of Teacher Effectiveness in Policy and Practice. Education Policy for Action Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Sean P.

    2010-01-01

    Value-added measures of teacher effectiveness are the centerpiece of a national movement to evaluate, promote, compensate, and dismiss teachers based in part on their students' test results. Federal, state, and local policy-makers have adopted these methods en masse in recent years in an attempt to objectively quantify teaching effectiveness and…

  19. Does it really matter that people zip through ads? Testing the effectiveness of simultaneous presentation advertising in an IDTV environment.

    PubMed

    Nam, Yoonjae; Kwon, Kyonghee H; Lee, Sungjoon

    2010-04-01

    In an IDTV environment, which facilitates self-scheduling, skipping advertisements by zipping is an emerging ad-avoidance behavior. This study explores whether an alternative ad format, called simultaneous presentation advertising (SPA), may overcome the limitations of classical sequential advertising (CSA) in controlling zipping behavior and increasing the effectiveness of ads. The experiment revealed that SPA is more effective than CSA in reducing zipping and increasing recall, but SPA was more intrusive and produced a negative product image. There was no difference regarding cognitive avoidance. This work discusses the implications of these findings in the interactive media environment.

  20. Effective Route Maintenance and Restoration Schemes in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Byung-Seok; Ko, In-Young

    2010-01-01

    This study proposes a location-based hybrid routing protocol to improve data packet delivery and to reduce control message overhead in mobile ad hoc networks. In mobile environments, where nodes move continuously at a high speed, it is generally difficult to maintain and restore route paths. Therefore, this study suggests a new flooding mechanism to control route paths. The essence of the proposed scheme is its effective tracking of the destination’s location based on the beacon messages of the main route nodes. Through experiments based on an NS-2 simulator, the proposed scheme shows improvements in the data packet delivery ratio and reduces the amount of routing control message overhead compared with existing routing protocols such as AODV, LAR, ZRP and AODV-DFR. PMID:22315570

  1. Multiscale computations of mass accumulation effect on mass transfer in bubbly flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboulhasanzadeh, Bahman; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2014-11-01

    Mass transfer in bubbly flow generally takes place on a much smaller length and time scale than the length and time scale of the momentum flow, resulting in a thin mass boundary layer around the bubbles. We developed a multiscale model to solve a boundary layer equation for the mass boundary layer next to the bubble interface, assuming zero mass concentration in the far field, which couples with the rest of domain using a source/sink term. Here, we extend our model to account for non-zero concentration next to the mass boundary layer. Comparison of simple case studies in 1D and 2D problems show good agreement between the fully resolved solution and the solution on a much coarser grid using our model. We study the effect of mass accumulation in a domain and also the effect of bubble moving into the wake of another bubble on the mass transfer. This study was funded by NSF Grant CBET-1132410.

  2. Effects of Rapid or Slow Body Mass Reduction on Body Composition in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Shinji; Tsurumi, Yasukimi; Yokota, Yukari; Masuhara, Mitsuhiko; Okamura, Koji

    2009-01-01

    Whether the speed of body mass (BM) reduction influences the body composition is uncertain. To investigate the effects of rapid vs slow body mass reduction on body composition, rats were divided into three groups; fed ad libitum for 16-day (Control, C); received restricted food intake during 16-day to decrease BM slowly (Slow, S); or fed ad libitum for 13-days and fasted for the last 3 days to rapidly reach a BM comparable to that of S (Rapid, R). Drinking water was restricted for R on day 16 to rapidly decrease their BM. All rats trained during the study. Final BM and adipose tissues mass were similar for R and S, and both were lesser than C. The skeletal muscle mass did not decrease in R and S. The liver mass was lower in R and S than C, and the decrease tended to be greater in R than S. Both the stomach and small intestine masses were significantly lower in R than C, but did not differ between S and C. In conclusion, differences of the speed of BM reduction affect the splanchnic tissues, and the decrease in splanchnic tissue mass was greater with rapid than slow BM reduction. PMID:19794927

  3. Hairy AdS solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabalón, Andrés; Astefanesei, Dumitru; Choque, David

    2016-11-01

    We construct exact hairy AdS soliton solutions in Einstein-dilaton gravity theory. We examine their thermodynamic properties and discuss the role of these solutions for the existence of first order phase transitions for hairy black holes. The negative energy density associated to hairy AdS solitons can be interpreted as the Casimir energy that is generated in the dual filed theory when the fermions are antiperiodic on the compact coordinate.

  4. Inhibitory effect of added adenosine diphosphate on palmitate oxidation in mitochondria from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, N.

    1986-05-01

    It is generally accepted that fatty acids are poor substrates for the oxidation in brain because plasma fatty acids do not traverse the blood-brain barrier. However, a regional difference in the barrier suggests that fatty acids are available for oxidation. Why most of fatty acids are not oxidized is not certain. For this reason, regulation of oxidation of (1-/sup 14/C)palmitate (pal) in rat brain has been studied in nonsynaptic mitochondria (mit) prepared by use of Ficoll/sucrose density gradient. The authors found two contrasting oxidations with respect to ATP concentration; Type A at 2 mM and Type B at 0.5 mM. The rate of Type A was 50% of the level of B. Type A was inhibited by high levels of L-carnitine (car) and Mg/sup 2 +/. Added ADP inhibited Type A, but stimulated B. Addition of carboxyatractyloside was stimulatory for Type A, but inhibitory for B. The rate of Type A showed a downward curvature with increasing protein concentration while that of B showed a linear relationship. Addition of NH/sub 4//sup +/ to Type A stimulated the rate and reduced the inhibitory effects of both added ADP and high levels of car. These results suggest that under the normal level of ATP, the carnitine-dependent transport of pal is inhibited (thereby resulting in the inhibition in pal oxidation) by the transport of ADP into mit mediated by the ATP-ADP translocase, but that the inhibition is not observed under the specified conditions or regions where ATP levels are low or ammonia levels are high.

  5. Aharonov-Bohm effect on AdS{sub 2} and nonlinear supersymmetry of reflectionless Poeschl-Teller system

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Francisco Jakubsky, Vit Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    2009-05-15

    We explain the origin and the nature of a special nonlinear supersymmetry of a reflectionless Poeschl-Teller system by the Aharonov-Bohm effect for a non-relativistic particle on the AdS{sub 2}. A key role in the supersymmetric structure appearing after reduction by a compact generator of the AdS{sub 2} isometry is shown to be played by the discrete symmetries related to the space and time reflections in the ambient Minkowski space. We also observe that a correspondence between the two quantum non-relativistic systems is somewhat of the AdS/CFT holography nature.

  6. Assessing the effect of adding interactive modeling to the geoscience curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, A.; Marshall, J.; Cardenas, M.

    2013-12-01

    Technology and computer models enhance the learning experience when appropriately utilized. Moreover, learning is significantly improved when effective visualization is combined with models of processes allowing for inquiry-based problem solving. Still, hands-on experiences in real scenarios result in better contextualization of related problems compared to virtual laboratories. Therefore, the role of scientific visualization, technology, and computer modeling is to enhance, not displace, the learning experience by supplementing real-world problem solving and experiences, although in some circumstances, they can adequately serve to take the place of reality. The key to improving scientific education is to embrace an inquiry-based approach that favorably uses technology. This study will attempt to evaluate the effect of adding interactive modeling to the geological sciences curriculum. An assessment tool, designed to assess student understanding of physical hydrology, was used to evaluate a curriculum intervention based on student learning with a data- and modeling-driven approach using COMSOL Multiphysics software. This intervention was implemented in an upper division and graduate physical hydrology course in fall 2012. Students enrolled in the course in fall 2011 served as the control group. Interactive modeling was added to the curriculum in fall 2012 to replace the analogous mathematical modeling done by hand in fall 2011. Pre- and post-test results were used to assess and report its effectiveness. Student interviews were also used to probe student reactions to both the experimental and control curricula. The pre- and post-tests asked students to describe the significant processes in the hydrological cycle and describe the laws governing these processes. Their ability to apply their knowledge in a real-world problem was also assessed. Since the pre- and post-test data failed to meet the assumption of normality, a non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test was run to

  7. Effect of four levels of added fat on broiler breeder performance.

    PubMed

    Brake, J

    1990-10-01

    Broiler breeders were fed corn-soybean diets and reared under 8 h of incandescent light. Birds were photostimulated with a mixture of incandescent light and daylight at 20 wk of age. Corn-soybean breeder diets with 0, 2, 4, and 6% added poultry fat were fed from 24 to 64 wk of age. Daily feed allocations were adjusted to provide comparable calculated protein intake at peak egg production; calculated ME intake was 413, 437, 461, and 484 kcal per bird per day for the 0, 2, 4, and 6% added fat diets, respectively. Feed was gradually reduced such that ME intake reached 400, 415, 429, and 422 kcal ME per bird per day from 57 to 64 wk of age for the respective diets. When compared with 0%, all levels of added fat significantly increased egg production and feed conversion. Fertility was increased significantly with the 4% added fat when compared with fertility at 2%; fertility with 0 or 6% added fat was intermediate. Female body weight increased in a dose-related manner in response to added fat. Chicks per hen was maximized at 4% added fat. Taken together, the data are interpreted to mean that 4% added fat is near the optimum for broiler breeders.

  8. Effects of adding silica particles on certain properties of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement

    PubMed Central

    Felemban, Nayef H.; Ebrahim, Mohamed I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of incorporation of silica particles with different concentrations on some properties of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC): Microleakage, compressive strength, tensile strength, water sorption, and solubility. Materials and Methods: Silica particle was incorporated into RMGIC powder to study its effects, one type of RMGIC (Type II visible light-cured) and three concentrations of silica particles (0.06, 0.08, and 0.1% weight) were used. One hundred and twenty specimens were fabricated for measuring microleakage, compressive strength, tensile strength, water sorption, and solubility. Statistical Analysis: One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's tests were used for measuring significance between means where P ≤ 0.05. Results: RMGIC specimens without any additives showed significantly highest microleakage and lowest compressive and tensile strengths. Conclusion: Silica particles added to RMGIC have the potential as a reliable restorative material with increased compressive strength, tensile strength, and water sorption but decreased microleakage and water solubility. PMID:27095901

  9. Effects of manganese deficiency and added cerium on nitrogen metabolism of maize.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaolan; Qu, Chunxiang; Liu, Chao; Hong, Mengmeng; Wang, Ling; Hong, Fashui

    2011-12-01

    Manganese is one of the essential microelements for plant growth, and cerium is a beneficial element for plant growth. However, whether manganese deficiency affects nitrogen metabolism of plants and cerium improves the nitrogen metabolism of plants by exposure to manganese-deficient media are still unclear. The main aim of the study was to determine the effects of manganese deficiency in nitrogen metabolism and the roles of cerium in the improvement of manganese-deficient effects in maize seedlings. Maize seedlings were cultivated in manganese present Meider's nutrient solution. They were subjected to manganese deficiency and to cerium chloride administered in the manganese-present and manganese-deficient media. Maize seedlings grown in the various media were measured for key enzyme activities involved in nitrogen metabolism, such as nitrate reductase, glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamic-oxaloace transaminase. We found that manganese deficiency restricted uptake and transport of NO(3)(-), inhibited activities of nitrogen-metabolism-related enzymes, such as nitrate reductase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamic-oxaloace transaminase, thus decreasing the synthesis of chlorophyll and soluble protein, and inhibited the growth of maize seedlings. Manganese deficiency promoted the activity of glutamate dehydrogenase and reduced the toxicity of excess ammonia to the plant, while added cerium relieved the damage to nitrogen metabolism caused by manganese deficiency in maize seedlings. However, cerium addition exerted positively to relieve the damage of nitrogen metabolism process in maize seedlings caused by exposure to manganese-deficient media.

  10. Effects of added PGX®, a novel functional fibre, on the glycaemic index of starchy foods.

    PubMed

    Brand-Miller, Jennie C; Atkinson, Fiona S; Gahler, Roland J; Kacinik, Veronica; Lyon, Michael R; Wood, Simon

    2012-07-01

    The development of lower-glycaemic index (GI) foods requires simple, palatable and healthy strategies. The objective of the present study was to determine the most effective dose of a novel viscous fibre supplement (PGX®) to be added to starchy foods to reduce their GI. Healthy subjects (n 10) consumed glucose sugar (50 g in water × 3) and six starchy foods with a range of GI values (52-72) along with 0 (inert fibre), 2.5 or 5 g granular PGX® dissolved in 250 ml water. GI testing according to ISO Standard 26,642-2010 was used to determine the reduction in GI. PGX® significantly reduced the GI of all six foods (P < 0.001), with an average reduction of 19 % for the 2.5 g dose and 30 % for the 5 g dose, equivalent to a reducing the GI by 7 and 15 units, respectively. Consuming small quantities of the novel functional fibre PGX®, mixed with water at the start of a meal, is an effective strategy to reduce the GI of common foods.

  11. The Cost-Effectiveness of Replacing the Bottom Quartile of Novice Teachers through Value-Added Teacher Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Stuart S.; Ritter, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted of Gordon, Kane, and Staiger's (2006) proposal to raise student achievement by identifying and replacing the bottom quartile of novice teachers, using value-added assessment of teacher performance. The cost effectiveness of this proposal was compared to the cost effectiveness of voucher programs, charter…

  12. Inter-Method Reliability of School Effectiveness Measures: A Comparison of Value-Added and Regression Discontinuity Estimates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Value-added (VA) measures are currently the predominant approach used to compare the effectiveness of schools. Recent educational effectiveness research, however, has developed alternative approaches including the regression discontinuity (RD) design, which also allows estimation of absolute school effects. Initial research suggests RD is a viable…

  13. Effects of long-term treatment with pioglitazone on cognition and glucose metabolism of PS1-KI, 3xTg-AD, and wild-type mice

    PubMed Central

    Masciopinto, F; Di Pietro, N; Corona, C; Bomba, M; Pipino, C; Curcio, M; Di Castelnuovo, A; Ciavardelli, D; Silvestri, E; Canzoniero, L MT; Sekler, I; Pandolfi, A; Sensi, S L

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of long-term (9-month) treatment with pioglitazone (PIO; 20 mg/kg/d) in two animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related neural dysfunction and pathology: the PS1-KIM146V (human presenilin-1 M146V knock-in mouse) and 3xTg-AD (triple transgenic mouse carrying AD-linked mutations) mice. We also investigated the effects on wild-type (WT) mice. Mice were monitored for body mass changes, fasting glycemia, glucose tolerance, and studied for changes in brain mitochondrial enzyme activity (complexes I and IV) as well as energy metabolism (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)). Cognitive effects were investigated with the Morris water maze (MWM) test and the object recognition task (ORT). Behavioral analysis revealed that PIO treatment promoted positive cognitive effects in PS1-KI female mice. These effects were associated with normalization of peripheral gluco-regulatory abnormalities that were found in untreated PS1-KI females. PIO-treated PS1-KI females also showed no statistically significant alterations in brain mitochondrial enzyme activity but significantly increased reverse LDH activity.PIO treatment produced no effects on cognition, glucose metabolism, or mitochondrial functioning in 3xTg-AD mice. Finally, PIO treatment promoted enhanced short-term memory performance in WT male mice, a group that did not show deregulation of glucose metabolism but that showed decreased activity of complex I in hippocampal and cortical mitochondria. Overall, these results indicate metabolically driven cognitive-enhancing effects of PIO that are differentially gender-related among specific genotypes. PMID:23254291

  14. The thermodynamic effect of atmospheric mass on early Earth's temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemke, R.; Kaspi, Y.; Halevy, I.

    2016-11-01

    Observations suggest that Earth's early atmospheric mass differed from the present day. The effects of a different atmospheric mass on radiative forcing have been investigated in climate models of variable sophistication, but a mechanistic understanding of the thermodynamic component of the effect of atmospheric mass on early climate is missing. Using a 3-D idealized global circulation model (GCM), we systematically examine the thermodynamic effect of atmospheric mass on near-surface temperature. We find that higher atmospheric mass tends to increase the near-surface temperature mostly due to an increase in the heat capacity of the atmosphere, which decreases the net radiative cooling effect in the lower layers of the atmosphere. Additionally, the vertical advection of heat by eddies decreases with increasing atmospheric mass, resulting in further near-surface warming. As both net radiative cooling and vertical eddy heat fluxes are extratropical phenomena, higher atmospheric mass tends to flatten the meridional temperature gradient.

  15. Mass loss from warm giants: Magnetic effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    Among warm giant stars, rapid mass loss sets in along a well defined velocity dividing line (VDL). Hot corona also disappear close to the VDL and thermal pressure cannot drive the observed rapid mass loss in these stars. The VDL may be associated with magnetic fields changing from closed to open. Such a change is consistent with the lack of X-rays from late-type giants. A magnetic transition locus based on Pneuman's work on helmet streamer stability agrees well with the empirical VDL. The change from closed to open fields not only makes rapid mass loss possible, but also contributes to energizing the mass loss in the form of discrete bubbles.

  16. Effect of Added Carbohydrates on Glycemic and Insulin Responses to Children’s Milk Products

    PubMed Central

    Brand-Miller, Jennie; Atkinson, Fiona; Rowan, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Powdered milk products for children (Growing Up Milk Powders or GUMPs) containing added carbohydrates such as glucose and sucrose are now well established in parts of Asia. We surveyed GUMPs in Malaysia and Indonesia to determine the content of added carbohydrates. The ingredient lists and nutrition information panels were used to calculate the percentage of declared carbohydrates contributed by added carbohydrates and a subset of seven products was tested for their glycemic index (GI) and insulin responses in healthy adults. The glycemic load for each product was calculated. In total, 58 products (n = 24 in Malaysia and n = 34 in Indonesia) were surveyed. Added carbohydrate content (excluding fibre) ranged from 0 to 21.5 g per serve. Milk powders without added sources of carbohydrate had similar GI values to standard liquid whole milk. Products containing maltodextrins, corn or glucose syrups increased the GI by more than 2-fold, and glycemic load (GL) by 7-fold compared to milk powders with no added carbohydrates. Insulin responses were significantly but not strongly correlated with glucose responses (r = 0.32, p < 0.006). Children’s milk powders containing higher levels of added carbohydrate ingredients elicit higher glucose and insulin responses than liquid or powdered whole milk. PMID:23306187

  17. [Fast screening of 24 sedative hypnotics illegally added in improving sleep health foods by high performance liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Lu, Li; Gong, Xu; Tan, Li

    2015-03-01

    A fast screening method was established for the simultaneous determination of 24 sedative hypnotics illegally added in improving sleep health foods by high performance liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC-IT MS). The method was based on the sonication assisted extraction of the improving sleep health food samples using methanol. The extract was then filtrated with 0.45 µm filter membrane and the filtrate was separated on a Phenomenex Luna C18 column with isocratic elution at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min. A binary mobile phase was 0.05% (v/v) formic acid (solvent A)-methanol/acetonitrile (15:25, v/v, solvent B). The electrospray ionization (ESI) source in positive ion mode or negative ion mode was used to scan MS1-MS3 spectra for the 24 sedative hypnotics. The MS2 and MS3 spectra were used for qualitative analysis of samples. The calibration graphs were linear in their concentration ranges with the correlation coefficients (r2) more than 0.999. The limits of detection (LODs) were 4.0-446.6 µg/L. The recoveries for all the drugs in the improving sleep health foods were 88.6%-110.3% with the relative standard deviations no more than 9.8% at three spiked levels. Twenty-seven batches of the improving sleep health foods were tested. Melatonin was found in eighteen batches. The method is fast, specific, sensitive, easy and suitable for fast screening of 24 sedative hypnotics illegally added in improving sleep health foods.

  18. The effect of types of banner ad, Web localization, and customer involvement on Internet users' attitudes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jengchung Victor; Ross, William H; Yen, David C; Akhapon, Lerdsuwankij

    2009-02-01

    In this study, three characteristics of Web sites were varied: types of banner ad, Web localization, and involvement in purchasing a product. The dependent variable was attitude toward the site. In laboratory experiments conducted in Thailand and Taiwan, participants browsed versions of a Web site containing different types of banner ads and products. As a within-participants factor, each participant browsed both a standardized English-language Web site and a localized Web site. Results showed that animated (rather than static) banner ads, localized versions (rather than a standardized version) of Web sites, and high (rather than low) product involvement led to favorable attitudes toward the site.

  19. Added Sugars

    MedlinePlus

    ... need sugar to function properly. Added sugars contribute zero nutrients but many added calories that can lead to extra pounds or even obesity, thereby reducing heart health. If you think of your daily calorie needs as a budget, you want to “spend” ...

  20. Effective forces between macroions: The cases of asymmetric macroions and added salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahyarov, E.; Löwen, H.; Trigger, S.

    1998-05-01

    The distance-resolved effective forces between two spherical, highly charged colloidal macroions are calculated by computer simulation within the primitive model of strongly asymmetric electrolytes. In particular we consider the case of two asymmetric macroions, i.e., two particles with different charges and different radii, as well as the case of added salt ions. Different parameter sets corresponding to typical experimental samples are investigated. The results are compared with the predictions of traditional linear screening theory of Derjaguin and Landau [Acta Physicochim. URSS 14, 633 (1941)] and of Verwey and Overbeek [Theory of the Stability of Lyophobic Colloids (Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1948)]. For moderate charge asymmetries we find a semiquantitative agreement and verify different scaling laws obtained from Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory justifying the DLVO description of binary mixtures and of charge- and size-polydisperse macroion samples. However for very large asymmetry, particularly for the mixture of charged and uncharged colloid particles, we obtain a nonzero repulsive interaction contrarily to DLVO theory.

  1. Effect of added polymer in free jets of a dilute polymer solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renoult, Marie-Charlotte; Charpentier, Jean-Baptiste; Crumeyrolle, Olivier; Mutabazi, Innocent

    2016-11-01

    The instability of a free viscoelastic jet is experimentally investigated by extruding an aqueous solution containing five parts per million of Poly(ethylene oxide) into air from a sixty micrometers orifice at relative low speeds. A method of image analysis was developed to quantify the effect of the added polymer on the morphology and the stability of the jet breakup. Three main representations were considered: the area versus perimeter relation for all liquid objects detected on the images, i.e. jets and jet fragments, the equivalent diameter distribution of jet fragments and the standard deviation curve of jets profiles. The former two provide information on the morphology of jet fragments: distinction of two classes, products and residues, and existence of coalescence. The latter gives information on the jet breakup stability: measurement of the growth rate and initial amplitude of the jet instability and detection of beads-on-a-string structures in the jet interface deformation. Experimental results will be presented and compared to theory.

  2. Theoretical re-evaluations of the black hole mass-bulge mass relation - I. Effect of seed black hole mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirakata, Hikari; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Okamoto, Takashi; Makiya, Ryu; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Nagashima, Masahiro; Enoki, Motohiro; Oogi, Taira; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.

    2016-10-01

    We explore the effect of varying the mass of a seed black hole on the resulting black hole mass-bulge mass relation at z ˜ 0, using a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation combined with large cosmological N-body simulations. We constrain our model by requiring that the observed properties of galaxies at z ˜ 0 are reproduced. In keeping with previous semi-analytic models, we place a seed black hole immediately after a galaxy forms. When the mass of the seed is set at 105 M⊙, we find that the model results become inconsistent with recent observational results of the black hole mass-bulge mass relation for dwarf galaxies. In particular, the model predicts that bulges with ˜109 M⊙ harbour larger black holes than observed. On the other hand, when we employ seed black holes of 103 M⊙ or select their mass randomly within a 103-5 M⊙ range, the resulting relation is consistent with observation estimates, including the observed dispersion. We find that, to obtain stronger constraints on the mass of seed black holes, observations of less massive bulges at z ˜ 0 are a more powerful comparison than the relations at higher redshifts.

  3. Effects of adding MIN-AD to steam-flaked corn-based diets with or without wet corn distiller's grain plus solubles on performance by beef cattle during receiving and finishing phases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of wet corn distillers grain (WCDG) and MIN-AD (MIN-AD Inc., Amarillo, TX), a commercial source of calcium-magnesium carbonate, on cattle performance and carcass measurements were evaluated in a 42-d receiving phase (220 steers; initial BW = 279.3 kg) and a subsequent finishing phase (192 s...

  4. The analgesic effect of midazolam when added to lidocaine for intravenous regional anaesthesia*

    PubMed Central

    Kashefi, Parviz; Montazeri, Kamran; Honarmand, Azim; Safavi, Mohammadreza; Hosseini, Hashem Mirzaee

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Midazolam has analgesic properties. The aim of the present study was to assess the analgesic effect of midazolam when added to lidocaine in intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA). METHODS: Sixty patients undergoing hand surgery were randomly allocated into two groups to receive 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine diluted with saline to a total volume of 40 mL in the control group (group lidocaine saline ~ LS, n=30) or 50 μg/kg midazolam plus 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine diluted with saline to a total volume of 40 mL in the midazolam group (group lidocaine midazolam ~ LM, n=30). Before and after the tourniquet application, hemodynamic variables, tourniquet pain, sedation, and analgesic use were recorded. RESULTS: Shortened sensory and motor block onset time [4.20 (0.84) vs. 5.94 (0.83) min, p = 0.001 and 6.99 (0.72) vs. 9.07 (0.99) min, p = 0.001 in LM and LS groups, respectively], prolonged sensory and motor block recovery times [8.41 (0.94) vs. 5.68 (0.90) min, p = 0.001 and 11.85 (1.18) vs. 7.06 (0.82) min, p = 0.001 in LM and LS groups, respectively], shortened visual analog scale (VAS) scores of tourniquet pain (p < 0.05), and improved quality of anesthesia were found in group LM (p < 0.05). VAS scores were lower in group LM in the postoperative period (p = 0.001). Postoperative analgesic requirements were significantly smaller in group LM (p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The addition of 50 μg/kg midazolam to lidocaine for IVRA shortens the onset of sensory and motor block, and improves quality of anesthesia and perioperative analgesia without causing side effects. PMID:22973382

  5. Effect of adding alum or zeolite to dairy slurry on ammonia volatilization and chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Lefcourt, A M; Meisinger, J J

    2001-08-01

    Development of cost-effective amendments for treating dairy slurry has become a critical problem as the number of cows on farms continues to grow and the acreage available for manure spreading continues to shrink. To determine effectiveness and optimal rates of addition of either alum or zeolite to dairy slurry, we measured ammonia emissions and resulting chemical changes in the slurry in response to the addition of amendments at 0.4, 1.0, 2.5, and 6.25% by weight. Ammonia volatilization over 96 h was measured with six small wind tunnels with gas scrubbing bottles at the inlets and outlets. Manure samples from the start and end of trials were analyzed for total nitrogen and phosphorus, and were extracted with 0.01 M CaCl2, 1.0 M KCl, and water with the extracts analyzed for ammonium nitrogen, phosphorous, aluminum, and pH. The addition of 6.25% zeolite or 2.5% alum to dairy slurry reduced ammonia emissions by nearly 50 and 60%, respectively. Alum treatment retained ammonia by reducing the slurry pH to 5 or less. In contrast, zeolite, being a cation exchange medium, adsorbed ammonium and reduced dissolved ammonia gas. In addition, alum essentially eliminated soluble phosphorous. Zeolite also reduced soluble phosphorous by over half, but the mechanism for this reduction is unclear. Alum must be carefully added to slurry to avoid effervescence and excess additions, which can increase soluble aluminum in the slurry. The use of alum or zeolites as on-farm amendment to dairy slurry offers the potential for reducing ammonia emissions and soluble phosphorus in dairy slurry.

  6. Music and Moral Judgment: The Effect of Background Music on the Evaluation of Ads Promoting Unethical Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziv, Naomi; Hoftman, Moran; Geyer, Mor

    2012-01-01

    Background music is often used in ads as a means of persuasion. Previous research has studied the effect of music in advertising using neutral or uncontroversial products. The aim of the studies reported here was to examine the effect of music on the perception of products promoting unethical behavior. Each of the series of three studies described…

  7. Effectiveness Measures for Cross-Sectional Studies: A Comparison of Value-Added Models and Contextualised Attainment Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenkeit, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Educational effectiveness research often appeals to "value-added models (VAM)" to gauge the impact of schooling on student learning net of the effect of student background variables. A huge amount of cross-sectional studies do not, however, meet VAM's requirement for longitudinal data. "Contextualised attainment models (CAM)"…

  8. Effect of mass gain on stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, R.; Zinnecker, H.

    A fully hydrodynamical treatment is given of the stationary isothermal accretion problem onto a moving gravitating point mass. It is noted that the derivation is purely analytical. It is found that the accretion rate is more than a factor of 50 higher than the accretion rate derived from the partially nonhydrodynamical treatment by Hoyle and Lyttleton (1939) or Bondi and Hoyle (1944). It is thought that his result may have some bearing on the evolutionary tracks of young pre-Main Sequence stars still embedded in their parent protocluster cloud. Also discussed is the work of Federova (1979), who investigated the pre-Main Sequence evolution of degenerate low mass 'stars' with strong accretion of protocluster cloud material. It is suggested that the stars that lie below the Main Sequence in young clusters could strongly accrete matter at the pre-Main Sequence stage. It is also suggested that the observed lack of low mass stars in open galactic clusters (van den Bergh, 1961) compared to the field may derive from the accretion of residual gas preferentially by low mass stars.

  9. Caffeine effects on resting-state electrodermal levels in AD/HD suggest an anomalous arousal mechanism.

    PubMed

    Barry, Robert J; Clarke, Adam R; McCarthy, Rory; Selikowitz, Mark; MacDonald, Brett; Dupuy, Franca E

    2012-03-01

    The effect of a single oral dose of caffeine was examined in a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled repeated-measures cross-over study. Eighteen children with AD/HD, aged between 8 and 13 years, were individually age- and gender-matched with a control group. All children participated in two sessions, one week apart. Skin conductance level (SCL) from a 3 min eyes-closed epoch, commencing 30 min after ingestion of caffeine or placebo, was examined. Across conditions, mean SCL was lower in the AD/HD group than controls, confirming hypoarousal in AD/HD. Caffeine produced an increase in SCL, and this increase did not differ between the groups. However, arousal increases were dose-dependent in controls, but not in AD/HD. Rather, caffeine-induced arousal increases in the AD/HD group were positively related to their hyperactivity/impulsivity levels. This suggests an anomalous arousal mechanism in AD/HD functionally related to impairment in one symptom dimension.

  10. Orexin receptors exert a neuroprotective effect in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) via heterodimerization with GPR103

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Julie; Chen, Jing; Pink, Ryan; Carter, David; Saunders, Nigel; Sotiriadis, Georgios; Bai, Bo; Pan, Yanyou; Howlett, David; Payne, Annette; Randeva, Harpal; Karteris, Emmanouil

    2015-01-01

    Orexins are neuropeptides that regulate the sleep-wake cycle and feeding behaviour. QRFP is a newly discovered neuropeptide which exerts similar orexigenic activity, thus playing an important role in energy homeostasis and regulation of appetite. The exact expression and signalling characteristics and physiological actions of QRFP and its receptor GPR103 are poorly understood. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients experience increased nocturnal activity, excessive daytime sleepiness, and weight loss. We hypothesised therefore that orexins and QRFP might be implicated in the pathophysiology of AD. We report that the down-regulation of hippocampal orexin receptors (OXRs) and GPR103 particularly in the cornu ammonis (CA) subfield from AD patients suffering from early onset familial AD (EOFAD) and late onset familial AD (LOAD). Using an in vitro model we demonstrate that this downregulation is due to to Aβ-plaque formation and tau hyper-phosphorylation. Transcriptomics revealed a neuroprotective role for both orexins and QRFP. Finally we provide conclusive evidence using BRET and FRET that OXRs and GPR103 form functional hetero-dimers to exert their effects involving activation of ERK1/2. Pharmacological intervention directed at the orexigenic system may prove to be an attractive avenue towards the discovery of novel therapeutics for diseases such as AD and improving neuroprotective signalling pathways. PMID:26223541

  11. Quark-gluon plasma effects on hadrons in AdS/QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartz, Sean; Jacobson, Theodore

    2016-09-01

    The AdS/CFT correspondence has succeeded in describing qualitatively many features of non-perturbative QCD. An approach known as bottom-up AdS/QCD uses a dilaton field to break conformal symmetry, introducing confinement and describing well the features of hadronic spectra at zero temperature. Introducing a black hole into the AdS metric allows for the study of thermodynamic properties of QCD, mimicking the behavior of hadrons interacting with a hot, dense medium such as the quark-gluon plasma produced in heavy ion collisions. We present an improved AdS/QCD model for meson and glueball spectra at finite temperature and baryon chemical potential. The spectra match the experimental and lattice data qualitatively well at low temperature, but we also find some subtleties in connecting to the best zero-temperature models. We find a melting temperature for light mesons that is below the current estimates for the deconfinement temperature. Finally, we examine the melting and jet-quenching of heavy quarkonia, which more commonly act as probes of the QGP in heavy ion collisions.

  12. A non-resonant mass sensor to eliminate the "missing mass" effect during mass measurement of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrikanth, V.; Bobji, M. S.

    2014-10-01

    Resonant sensors and crystal oscillators for mass detection need to be excited at very high natural frequencies (MHz). Use of such systems to measure mass of biological materials affects the accuracy of mass measurement due to their viscous and/or viscoelastic properties. The measurement limitation of such sensor system is the difficulty in accounting for the "missing mass" of the biological specimen in question. A sensor system has been developed in this work, to be operated in the stiffness controlled region at very low frequencies as compared to its fundamental natural frequency. The resulting reduction in the sensitivity due to non-resonant mode of operation of this sensor is compensated by the high resolution of the sensor. The mass of different aged drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) is measured. The difference in its mass measurement during resonant mode of operation is also presented. That, viscosity effects do not affect the working of this non-resonant mass sensor is clearly established by direct comparison.

  13. A non-resonant mass sensor to eliminate the "missing mass" effect during mass measurement of biological materials.

    PubMed

    Shrikanth, V; Bobji, M S

    2014-10-01

    Resonant sensors and crystal oscillators for mass detection need to be excited at very high natural frequencies (MHz). Use of such systems to measure mass of biological materials affects the accuracy of mass measurement due to their viscous and/or viscoelastic properties. The measurement limitation of such sensor system is the difficulty in accounting for the "missing mass" of the biological specimen in question. A sensor system has been developed in this work, to be operated in the stiffness controlled region at very low frequencies as compared to its fundamental natural frequency. The resulting reduction in the sensitivity due to non-resonant mode of operation of this sensor is compensated by the high resolution of the sensor. The mass of different aged drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) is measured. The difference in its mass measurement during resonant mode of operation is also presented. That, viscosity effects do not affect the working of this non-resonant mass sensor is clearly established by direct comparison.

  14. SEM analysis of ionizing radiation effects in an analog to digital converter /AD571/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gauthier, M. K.; Perret, J.; Evans, K. C.

    1981-01-01

    The considered investigation is concerned with the study of the total-dose degradation mechanisms in an IIL analog to digital (A/D) converter. The A/D converter is a 10 digit device having nine separate functional units on the chip which encompass several hundred transistors and circuit elements. It was the objective of the described research to find the radiation sensitive elements by a systematic search of the devices on the LSI chip. The employed technique using a scanning electron microscope to determine the functional blocks of an integrated circuit which are sensitive to ionizing radiation and then progressively zeroing in on the soft components within those blocks, proved extremely successful on the AD571. Four functional blocks were found to be sensitive to radiation, including the Voltage Reference, DAC, IIL Clock, and IIL SAR.

  15. Enhancement of Ad-CRT/E7-mediated antitumor effect by preimmunization with L. lactis expressing HPV-16 E7.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Colmenero, Blanca R; Gomez-Gutierrez, Jorge G; Villatoro-Hernández, Julio; Zavala-Flores, Laura M; Quistián-Martínez, Deyanira; Rojas-Martínez, Augusto; Arce-Mendoza, Alma Y; Guzmán-López, Santos; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, Roberto; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila

    2014-11-01

    Although current polyvalent vaccines can prevent development of cervical cancer, they cannot be used to treat patients who already have the disease. Adenovirus expressing calreticulin-E7 (Ad-CRT-E7) has shown promising results in the cervical cancer murine model. We also demonstrated that immunization with Lactococcus lactis encoding HPV-16 E7 (Ll-E7) anchored to its surface induces significant HPV-16 E7-specific immune response. Here, we assessed the combination of both approaches in the treatment of a cervical cancer animal model. Intranasal preimmunization of Ll-E7, followed by a single Ad-CRT/E7 application, induced ∼80% of tumor suppression in comparison with controls. Mice treated with a combination of Ll-E7 and Ad-CRT/E7 resulted in a 70% survival rate 300 days post-treatment, whereas 100% of the mice in the control groups died by 50 days. Significant CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocytes infiltration was detected in the tumors of mice treated with Ll-E7+Ad-CRT/E7. Tumors with regression showed a greater number of positive cells for in situ TUNEL staining than controls. Our results suggest that preimmunization with Ll-E7 enhances the Ad-CRT/E7-mediated antitumor effect. This treatment provides an enormous advantage over repeated applications of Ad-CRT/E7 by maintaining the effectiveness of the three-dose application of Ad-CRT/E7, but avoiding the high systemic toxicities associated with such repeat treatments.

  16. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  17. Determination of effective mass density and modulus for resonant metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeongwon; Park, Buhm; Kim, Deokman; Park, Junhong

    2012-10-01

    This work presents a method to determine the effective dynamic properties of resonant metamaterials. The longitudinal vibration of a rod with periodically attached oscillators was predicted using wave propagation analysis. The effective mass density and modulus were determined from the transfer function of vibration responses. Predictions of these effective properties compared favorably with laboratory measurements. While the effective mass density showed significant frequency dependent variation near the natural frequency of the oscillators, the elastic modulus was largely unchanged for the setup considered in this study. The effective mass density became complex-numbered when the spring element of the oscillator was viscoelastic. As the real part of the effective mass density became negative, the propagating wavenumber components disappeared, and vibration transmission through the metamaterial was prohibited. The proposed method provides a consistent approach for evaluating the effective parameters of resonant metamaterials using a small number of vibration measurements.

  18. Examining the Relationship between Value-Added Results and Elements of Teacher Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Carla Euniece

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative, correlational study was to determine if student growth as measured by value-added measure of fourth grade 2011-2012 reading test scores was correlated with teacher observation ratings on the Teach and Cultivate Learning Environment domains of the Teaching and Learning Framework Rubric. A second purpose of the…

  19. Value-Added Modeling of Teacher Effectiveness: An Exploration of Stability across Models and Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Xiaoxia A.; Darling-Hammond, Linda; Haertel, Edward; Thomas, Ewart

    2010-01-01

    Recent policy interest in tying student learning to teacher evaluation has led to growing use of value-added methods for assessing student learning gains linked to individual teachers. VAM analyses rely on complex assumptions about the roles of schools, multiple teachers, student aptitudes and efforts, homes and families in producing measured…

  20. Effects of the antimicrobial peptide cecropin AD on performance and intestinal health in weaned piglets challenged with Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shudan; Zhang, Fengrui; Huang, Zhimin; Liu, Hong; Xie, Chunyuan; Zhang, Jiang; Thacker, Philip A; Qiao, Shiyan

    2012-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of the antimicrobial peptide cecropin on performance and intestinal health in piglets. Newly weaned barrows were randomly assigned to one of three treatments (n=8), including a corn-soybean basal diet or similar diets supplemented with antibiotics (100 mg/kg kitasamycin plus 800 mg/kg colistin sulfate) or 400 mg/kg cecropin AD. On day 13, all piglets were orally challenged with 10(9)CFU/mL of Escherichia coli K88. On day 19, all piglets were euthanized and sampled. Before challenge, piglets fed antibiotics had greater weight gain, feed efficiency, nitrogen and energy retention than the control (P<0.05). E. coli challenge decreased weight gain, feed intake and feed efficiency for the control piglets (P<0.05) but not for the antibiotic or cecropin AD treated piglets. The incidence of diarrhea post-challenge in the antibiotic and cecropin AD treatments decreased compared with the control piglets. The total viable counts of cecal E. coli were lower while the Lactobacilli counts were higher in the antibiotic and cecropin AD treatments compared with the control (P<0.05). Cecropin AD treatment decreased total aerobes while increasing total anaerobes in the ileum (P<0.05). A higher villus height to crypt depth ratio in the jejunum and ileum as well as a deeper crypt depth in the jejunum and higher villus height in the ileum were observed in piglets fed antibiotics or cecropin AD compared with control piglets (P<0.05). Piglets fed the control diet had lower levels of secretory IgA in their jejunum and lower serum IgA, IgG, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 compared with the other treatments (P<0.05). Overall, these data suggest that cecropin AD enhances pig performance through increasing immune status and nitrogen and energy retention as well as reducing intestinal pathogens in weaned piglets.

  1. Gravitational waves and mass ejecta from binary neutron star mergers: Effect of the mass ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Tim; Ujevic, Maximiliano; Tichy, Wolfgang; Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Brügmann, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    We present new (3 +1 )D numerical relativity simulations of the binary neutron star (BNS) merger and postmerger phase. We focus on a previously inaccessible region of the binary parameter space spanning the binary's mass ratio q ˜1.00 - 1.75 for different total masses and equations of state, and up to q ˜2 for a stiff BNS system. We study the mass ratio effect on the gravitational waves (GWs) and on the possible electromagnetic (EM) emission associated with dynamical mass ejecta. We compute waveforms, spectra, and spectrograms of the GW strain including all the multipoles up to l =4 . The mass ratio has a specific imprint on the GW multipoles in the late-inspiral-merger signal, and it affects qualitatively the spectra of the merger remnant. The multipole effect is also studied by considering the dependency of the GW spectrograms on the source's sky location. Unequal mass BNSs produce more ejecta than equal mass systems with ejecta masses and kinetic energies depending almost linearly on q . We estimate luminosity peaks and light curves of macronova events associated with the mergers using a simple approach. For q ˜2 the luminosity peak is delayed for several days and can be up to 4 times larger than for the q =1 cases. The macronova emission associated with the q ˜2 BNS is more persistent in time and could be observed for weeks instead of a few days (q =1 ) in the near infrared. Finally, we estimate the flux of possible radio flares produced by the interaction of relativistic outflows with the surrounding medium. Also in this case a large q can significantly enhance the emission and delay the peak luminosity. Overall, our results indicate that the BNS merger with a large mass ratio has EM signatures distinct from the equal mass case and more similar to black hole-neutron star binaries.

  2. The effect of three different methods of adding O2 additive on O concentration of atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Y.; Xian, Y.; Pei, X.; Lu, X.

    2016-12-01

    In order to maximize the O concentration generated by the atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs), several different methods of adding O2 additive to working gas have been proposed. However, it is not clear, which method is capable of generating the highest concentration of O atom. In this paper, the concentration of O atoms in an APPJs by adding O2 to (1) the working gas, to (2) the downstream inside the tube, and (3) to the shielding gas is investigated by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectrometry. The results clearly demonstrate that the highest O density is achieved when 1.5% of O2 is added to the working gas rather than the other two methods. In other words, the most effective way to generate O atoms is by premixing O2 with the working gas. Further investigation suggests that O atoms are mainly generated around the electrode region, where the electric field is highest. In addition, when O2 is added to the working gas, if in the meantime extra O2 is added to the downstream inside the tube, a significant decrease of O density is observed.

  3. Computed tomography: an evaluation of the effect of adding polymer SBS to asphaltic mixtures used in paving

    PubMed

    Braz; Lopes; da Motta LM

    2000-10-01

    This work applies the Computed Tomography (CT) technique to the study of asphaltic mixtures to which polymer has been added. An evaluation has been made of the effect of adding Brazilian produced polymer SBS (styrene-butadiene-styrene), to the asphaltic mixtures used in paving. Laboratory mechanical tests and non-destructive testing (NDT) of cylindrical specimens have been made. Three mixtures were prepared for the purpose of this study, all containing 5.4% of asphalt RASF (propane deashalting). One of the mixtures contained no polymer, while the other two were made with 7 and 5% of the SBS polymer. Investigations of Brazilian pavements have shown that cracking is the most important defect due to fatigue in the asphaltic contained overlay. Preliminary results of mechanical tests show that the polymer additive favorably enhances performance of the mixtures. It may be noted that adding polymer SBS to the asphaltic mixture used in paving increases the percentage void. Crack growth in specimens of asphaltic mixtures to which polymer has been added displays the same behaviors as that in specimens in which polymer has not been added.

  4. Excited-State Effective Masses in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    George Fleming, Saul Cohen, Huey-Wen Lin

    2009-10-01

    We apply black-box methods, i.e. where the performance of the method does not depend upon initial guesses, to extract excited-state energies from Euclidean-time hadron correlation functions. In particular, we extend the widely used effective-mass method to incorporate multiple correlation functions and produce effective mass estimates for multiple excited states. In general, these excited-state effective masses will be determined by finding the roots of some polynomial. We demonstrate the method using sample lattice data to determine excited-state energies of the nucleon and compare the results to other energy-level finding techniques.

  5. Excited-State Effective Masses in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, George; Cohen, Saul; Lin, Huey-Wen

    2009-01-01

    We apply black-box methods, i.e. where the performance of the method does not depend upon initial guesses, to extract excited-state energies from Euclidean-time hadron correlation functions. In particular, we extend the widely used effective-mass method to incorporate multiple correlation functions and produce effective mass estimates for multiple excited states. In general, these excited-state effective masses will be determined by finding the roots of some polynomial. We demonstrate the method using sample lattice data to determine excited-state energies of the nucleon and compare the results to other energy-level finding techniques.

  6. Analytic estimation of recycled products added value as a means for effective environmental management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzias, Dimitris F.

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we present an analytic estimation of recycled products added value in order to provide a means for determining the degree of recycling that maximizes profit, taking also into account the social interest by including the subsidy of the corresponding investment. A methodology has been developed based on Life Cycle Product (LCP) with emphasis on added values H, R as fractions of production and recycle cost, respectively (H, R >1, since profit is included), which decrease by the corresponding rates h, r in the recycle course, due to deterioration of quality. At macrolevel, the claim that "an increase of exergy price, as a result of available cheap energy sources becoming more scarce, leads to less recovered quantity of any recyclable material" is proved by means of the tradeoff between the partial benefits due to material saving and resources degradation/consumption (assessed in monetary terms).

  7. Dietary flavonoids added to pharmacological antihypertensive therapy are effective in improving blood pressure.

    PubMed

    de Jesús Romero-Prado, Marina María; Curiel-Beltrán, Jesús Aarón; Miramontes-Espino, María Viviana; Cardona-Muñoz, Ernesto Germán; Rios-Arellano, Angeles; Balam-Salazar, Lol-Be

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that the daily intake of flavonoids is associated with a decreased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Our purpose was to evaluate the effect of the addition of dietary flavonoids (DF) to antihypertensive treatment (AHT), based on telmisartan (Tms) or captopril (Cpr), on blood pressure (BP), body mass index (BMI), waist/hip ratio, leptin, lipid profile and inflammation in hypertensive young patients. An open-label, randomized, controlled trial was performed among 79 patients aged 20-55 years with grade I or grade II systemic arterial hypertension. The subjects were assigned to one of four groups for AHT plus DF during 6 months: Cpr (n = 14), Cpr + DF (n = 19), Tms (n = 25) and Tms + DF (n = 21). DF consisted of dark chocolate, dehydrated red apple and green tea in an infusion to obtain a daily dose of 425.8 ± 13.9 mg epicatechin equivalents. The BP and anthropometric parameters were measured every 2 weeks. Lipid profile, leptin and hsCRP were determined by standard methods. The combination AHT-DF produced an additional and significant reduction in (i) SBP/DBP of -5/-4 mmHg, being -7/-5 for Cpr + DF and -4/-3 for Tms + DF; (ii) triglyceride levels (-30.6%) versus AHT alone (-9.6%); and (iii) leptin: Cpr + DF versus Tms + DF (p < 0.005). Finally, C-reactive protein plasma levels were reduced significantly in all groups independently of the applied treatment. We conclude that the addition of flavonoids to pharmacological antihypertensive therapy shows additional benefits on BP, lipid profile, leptin, obesity and inflammation.

  8. Differentiated effective connectivity patterns of the executive control network in progressive MCI: a potential biomarker for predicting AD.

    PubMed

    Cai, Suping; Peng, Yanlin; Chong, Tao; Zhang, Yun; von Deneen, Karen M; Huang, Liyu; Aibl Research Group

    2017-03-09

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is often a transitional state between normal aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). When observed longitudinally, some MCI patients convert to AD, while a considerable portion either remain MCI or revert to a normal functioning state. This divergence has provided some enlightenment on a potential biomarker be represented in the resting state brain activities of MCI patients with different post-hoc labels. Recent studies have shown impaired executive functions, other than typically explicated memory impairment with AD/MCI patients. This observation raises the question that whether or not the executive control network (ECN) was impaired, as which pivotally supports the central executive functions. Given the fact that effective connectivity is a sufficient index in detecting resting brain abnormalities in AD/MCI, the current study specifically asks a question whether the effective connectivity patterns are differentiated in MCI patients with different post-hoc labels. We divided the MCI subjects into three groups depending on their progressive state obtained longitudinally: 1) 15 MCI-R subjects: MCI reverted to the normal functioning state and stabilized to the normal state in 24 months; 2) 35 MCI-S subjects: MCI patients maintained this disease in a stable state for 24 months; 3) 22 MCI-P subjects: MCI progressed to AD and stabilized to AD in 24 months, and 4) 39 age-matched normal control subjects (NC). We conducted a Granger causality analysis after identifying the core nodes of ECN in all of the subjects using Independent Component Analysis. Our findings revealed that different MCI groups presented different effective connectivity patterns within the ECN compared to the NC group. Specifically, (1) dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dLPFC) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) were the core nodes in the ECN network that exhibited different connecting patterns; (2) an effective connection circuit "R.dLPFC right caudate Left thalamus

  9. Adding Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsini, Larry L.; Hudack, Lawrence R.; Zekan, Donald L.

    1999-01-01

    The value-added statement (VAS), relatively unknown in the United States, is used in financial reports by many European companies. Saint Bonaventure University (New York) has adapted a VAS to make it appropriate for not-for-profit universities by identifying stakeholder groups (students, faculty, administrators/support personnel, creditors, the…

  10. The Effect of Manipulating Subject Mass on Lower Extremity Torque Patterns During Locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John K.; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Hagan, R. Donald

    2007-01-01

    During locomotion, humans adapt their motor patterns to maintain coordination despite changing conditions (Reisman et al., 2005). Bernstein (1967) proposed that in addition to the present state of a given joint, other factors, including limb inertia and velocity, must be taken into account to allow proper motion to occur. During locomotion with added mass counterbalanced using vertical suspension to maintain body weight, vertical ground reaction forces (GRF's) increase during walking but decrease during running, suggesting that adaptation may be velocity-specific (De Witt et al., 2006). It is not known, however, how lower extremity joint torques adapt to changes in inertial forces. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of increasing body mass while maintaining body weight upon lower-limb joint torque during walking and running. We hypothesized that adaptations in joint torque patterns would occur with the addition of body mass.

  11. Seasonality and the effectiveness of mass vaccination.

    PubMed

    Chao, Dennis L; Dimitrov, Dobromir T

    2016-04-01

    Many infectious diseases have seasonal outbreaks, which may be driven by cyclical environmental conditions (e.g., an annual rainy season) or human behavior (e.g., school calendars or seasonal migration). If a pathogen is only transmissible for a limited period of time each year, then seasonal outbreaks could infect fewer individuals than expected given the pathogen's in-season transmissibility. Influenza, with its short serial interval and long season, probably spreads throughout a population until a substantial fraction of susceptible individuals are infected. Dengue, with a long serial interval and shorter season, may be constrained by its short transmission season rather than the depletion of susceptibles. Using mathematical modeling, we show that mass vaccination is most efficient, in terms of infections prevented per vaccine administered, at high levels of coverage for pathogens that have relatively long epidemic seasons, like influenza, and at low levels of coverage for pathogens with short epidemic seasons, like dengue. Therefore, the length of a pathogen's epidemic season may need to be considered when evaluating the costs and benefits of vaccination programs.

  12. Systematics of Coupling Flows in AdS Backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberger, Walter D.; Rothstein, Ira Z.

    2003-03-18

    We give an effective field theory derivation, based on the running of Planck brane gauge correlators, of the large logarithms that arise in the predictions for low energy gauge couplings in compactified AdS}_5 backgrounds, including the one-loop effects of bulk scalars, fermions, and gauge bosons. In contrast to the case of charged scalars coupled to Abelian gauge fields that has been considered previously in the literature, the one-loop corrections are not dominated by a single 4D Kaluza-Klein mode. Nevertheless, in the case of gauge field loops, the amplitudes can be reorganized into a leading logarithmic contribution that is identical to the running in 4D non-Abelian gauge theory, and a term which is not logarithmically enhanced and is analogous to a two-loop effect in 4D. In a warped GUT model broken by the Higgs mechanism in the bulk,we show that the matching scale that appears in the large logarithms induced by the non-Abelian gauge fields is m_{XY}^2/k where m_{XY} is the bulk mass of the XY bosons and k is the AdS curvature. This is in contrast to the UV scale in the logarithmic contributions of scalars, which is simply the bulk mass m. Our results are summarized in a set of simple rules that can be applied to compute the leading logarithmic predictions for coupling constant relations within a given warped GUT model. We present results for both bulk Higgs and boundary breaking of the GUT gauge

  13. Effects of BMI, Fat Mass, and Lean Mass on Asthma in Childhood: A Mendelian Randomization Study

    PubMed Central

    Granell, Raquel; Henderson, A. John; Evans, David M.; Smith, George Davey; Ness, Andrew R.; Lewis, Sarah; Palmer, Tom M.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Observational studies have reported associations between body mass index (BMI) and asthma, but confounding and reverse causality remain plausible explanations. We aim to investigate evidence for a causal effect of BMI on asthma using a Mendelian randomization approach. Methods and Findings We used Mendelian randomization to investigate causal effects of BMI, fat mass, and lean mass on current asthma at age 7½ y in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). A weighted allele score based on 32 independent BMI-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was derived from external data, and associations with BMI, fat mass, lean mass, and asthma were estimated. We derived instrumental variable (IV) estimates of causal risk ratios (RRs). 4,835 children had available data on BMI-associated SNPs, asthma, and BMI. The weighted allele score was strongly associated with BMI, fat mass, and lean mass (all p-values<0.001) and with childhood asthma (RR 2.56, 95% CI 1.38–4.76 per unit score, p = 0.003). The estimated causal RR for the effect of BMI on asthma was 1.55 (95% CI 1.16–2.07) per kg/m2, p = 0.003. This effect appeared stronger for non-atopic (1.90, 95% CI 1.19–3.03) than for atopic asthma (1.37, 95% CI 0.89–2.11) though there was little evidence of heterogeneity (p = 0.31). The estimated causal RRs for the effects of fat mass and lean mass on asthma were 1.41 (95% CI 1.11–1.79) per 0.5 kg and 2.25 (95% CI 1.23–4.11) per kg, respectively. The possibility of genetic pleiotropy could not be discounted completely; however, additional IV analyses using FTO variant rs1558902 and the other BMI-related SNPs separately provided similar causal effects with wider confidence intervals. Loss of follow-up was unlikely to bias the estimated effects. Conclusions Higher BMI increases the risk of asthma in mid-childhood. Higher BMI may have contributed to the increase in asthma risk toward the end of the 20th century. Please see

  14. A Correlated Random Effects Model for Nonignorable Missing Data in Value-Added Assessment of Teacher Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karl, Andrew T.; Yang, Yan; Lohr, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    Value-added models have been widely used to assess the contributions of individual teachers and schools to students' academic growth based on longitudinal student achievement outcomes. There is concern, however, that ignoring the presence of missing values, which are common in longitudinal studies, can bias teachers' value-added scores.…

  15. Thermal /Soret/ diffusion effects on interfacial mass transport rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that thermal (Soret) diffusion significantly alters convective mass transport rates and important transition temperatures in highly nonisothermal flow systems involving the transport of 'heavy' species (vapors or particles). Introduction of the Soret transport term is shown to result in mass transfer effects similar to those of 'suction' and a homogeneous chemical 'sink'. It is pointed out that this analogy provides a simple method of correlating and predicting thermal diffusion effects in the abovementioned systems.

  16. Effects of adding yeast cell walls and Yucca schidigera extract to diets of layer chicks.

    PubMed

    Gurbuz, E; Balevi, T; Kurtoglu, V; Oznurlu, Y

    2011-10-01

    This research was conducted to determine the impact of diet supplementation with yeast cell walls and Yucca schidigera extract on the growth performance, antibody titres, and intestinal tissue histology of layer chicks. White, 1-d-old, Hy-Line hybrid chicks (n = 840) were divided into 4 main groups, each comprising 7 replicates of 30 chicks (n = 210): (1) control; (2) 1000 mg/kg yeast cell walls (YCW) added; (3) 1000 mg/kg Yucca schidigera extract (YE) added; and (4) 500 mg/kg YE + 500 mg/kg YCW added. The trial lasted 60 d. Daily weight gain of the chicks was positively affected between d 45-60 in the YE and YCW + YE groups compared with the control group. Overall, feed consumption did not differ between the control and YCW, YE, YCW + YE groups during the 60 d study period. Feed efficiency was better in the YE and YCW + YE groups than in the control group between d 1-60. During the 60 d evaluation period, live weight gain, and final live weight were higher in YE and YCW + YE groups than in the control group. Antibody titres against infectious bronchitis and infectious bursal disease did not differ among the 4 treatments, but those for Newcastle disease were higher in the YE + YCW groups than in the control, YCW and YE groups on d 45. There were differences in intestinal histomorphometry between the 4 treatments. The height of the jejunal and ileal villi was greater in the YE and YCW + YE groups than in the control and YCW groups. It can be concluded that YCW and YE supplementation for layer chicks is beneficial for growth performance and intestinal histology during the 1-60 d growing period.

  17. Effective pion mass term and the trace anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golterman, Maarten; Shamir, Yigal

    2017-01-01

    Recently, we developed an effective theory of pions and a light dilatonic meson for gauge theories with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry that are close to the conformal window. The pion mass term in this effective theory depends on an exponent y . We derive the transformation properties under dilatations of the renormalized fermion mass and use this to rederive y =3 -γm* , where γm* is the fixed-point value of the mass anomalous dimension at the sill of the conformal window. This value for y is consistent with the trace anomaly of the underlying near-conformal gauge theory.

  18. Effect of added thiamine on the key odorant compounds and aroma of cooked ham.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Caroline; Mercier, Frédéric; Tournayre, Pascal; Martin, Jean-Luc; Berdagué, Jean-Louis

    2015-04-15

    This study shows that thiamine plays a major role in the formation of three key odorants of cooked ham: 2-methyl-3-furanthiol, 2-methyl-3-methyldithiofuran, and bis(2-methyl-3-furyl)disulphide. Analyses revealed that under identical cooking conditions, the productions of these three aroma compounds increase in a closely intercorrelated way when the dose of thiamine increases. Using a specific 2-methyl-3-furanthiol extraction-quantification method, it was possible to relate the amounts of thiamine added in model cooked hams to the amounts of 2-methyl-3-furanthiol produced in the cooking process. Sensory analyses highlighted the role of thiamine as a precursor of cooked ham aroma.

  19. Aspects of warped AdS3/CFT2 correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Zhang, Jia-Ju; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Zhong, De-Liang

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we apply the thermodynamics method to investigate the holographic pictures for the BTZ black hole, the spacelike and the null warped black holes in three-dimensional topologically massive gravity (TMG) and new massive gravity (NMG). Even though there are higher derivative terms in these theories, the thermodynamics method is still effective. It gives consistent results with the ones obtained by using asymptotical symmetry group (ASG) analysis. In doing the ASG analysis we develop a brute-force realization of the Barnich-Brandt-Compere formalism with Mathematica code, which also allows us to calculate the masses and the angular momenta of the black holes. In particular, we propose the warped AdS3/CFT2 correspondence in the new massive gravity, which states that quantum gravity in the warped spacetime could holographically dual to a two-dimensional CFT with {c_R}={c_L}=24 /{Gm{β^2√{{2( {21-4{β^2}} )}}}}.

  20. Protection of total body water content and absence of hyperthermia despite 2% body mass loss ('voluntary dehydration') in soldiers drinking ad libitum during prolonged exercise in cool environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Heinrich W; Noakes, Timothy D; van Vuuren, Bernard

    2011-11-01

    The extent to which humans need to replace fluid losses during exercise remains contentious despite years of focused research. The primary objective was to evaluate ad libitum drinking on hydration status to determine whether body mass loss can be used as an accurate surrogate for changes in total body water (TBW) during exercise. Data were collected during a 14.6-km route march (wet bulb globe temperature of 14.1°C ). 18 subjects with an average age of 26 ± 2.5 (SD) years participated. Their mean ad libitum total fluid intake was 2.1 ± 1.4 litres during the exercise. Predicted sweat rate was 1.289 ± 0.530 l/h. There were no significant changes (p>0.05) in TBW, urine specific gravity or urine osmolality despite an average body mass loss (p<0.05) of 1.3 ± 0.45 kg during the march. Core temperature rose as a function of marching speed and was unrelated to the % change in body mass. This suggests that changes in mass do not accurately predict changes in TBW (r=-0.16) because either the body mass loss during exercise includes losses other than water or there is an endogenous body water source that is released during exercise not requiring replacement during exercise, or both. Ad libitum water replacement between 65% and 70% of sweat losses maintained safe levels of hydration during the experiment. The finding that TBW was protected by ad libitum drinking despite approximately 2% body mass loss suggests that the concept of 'voluntary dehydration' may require revision.

  1. Study on the effect of different concentration of Spirulina platensis paste added into dried noodle to its quality characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustini, T. W.; Ma’ruf, W. F.; Widayat; Wibowo, B. A.; Hadiyanto

    2017-02-01

    High nutritional content of microalgae S. platensis is very good for human health especially for its protein and β-carotene. These compounds can be used for improving quality of food from nutritional point of view. This study was designed to observe the effect of different concentration of S. platensis paste to dried noodle quality based on physical, chemical and sensory perspectives. Material used in this study was S. platensis powder obtained from CV Neoalgae, Sukoharjo. The best treatment observed from preliminary study was then used for further study and compared to control treatment (without added S. platensis paste). The dried noodle resulted was then analyzed for elasticity, chemical (β-carotene, water, protein, ash, fat and carbohydrate) and sensory (hedonic). Parametric data obtained were analyzed using t-Test while non-parametric data was analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis followed by Multiple Comparison test. The study showed that dried noodle added with 9% S. platensis paste give significant effect (P<0.05) on elasticity; β-carotene, water, protein, ash, fat and carbohydrate and also sensory (hedonic). Dried noodle without added S. platensis paste has lower in β-carotene and protein compared to that of added S. platensis paste with the value of 0.06 mg/100 gr and 17.51 mg/100gr (β-carotene) and 8.88% and 38.6% (protein), respectively. Those, chemical composition of dried noodle added with S. platensis comply with Indonesian National Standard in term of protein, water, and ash content with sensory of 7.26 ≤ μ ≤ 7.63. Addition of S. platensis can significantly increase the nutritional of dried noodle especially protein (by 4 times) and β-carotene.

  2. Sensitivity of β -decay rates to the radial dependence of the nucleon effective mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severyukhin, A. P.; Margueron, J.; Borzov, I. N.; Van Giai, N.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the sensitivity of β -decay rates in 78Ni and Sn,132100 to a correction term in Skyrme energy-density functionals (EDFs) which modifies the radial shape of the nucleon effective mass. This correction is added on top of several Skyrme parametrizations which are selected from their effective mass properties and predictions about the stability properties of 132Sn . The impact of the correction on high-energy collective modes is shown to be moderate. From the comparison of the effects induced by the surface-peaked effective mass in the three doubly magic nuclei, it is found that 132Sn is largely impacted by the correction, while 78Ni and 100Sn are only moderately affected. We conclude that β -decay rates in these nuclei can be used as a test of different parts of the nuclear EDF: 78Ni and 100Sn are mostly sensitive to the particle-hole interaction through the B (GT) values, while 132Sn is sensitive to the radial shape of the effective mass. Possible improvements of these different parts could therefore be better constrained in the future.

  3. Effects of adding bulking agents on biostabilization and drying of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Difang; Li, Yun; Chadwick, David; Li, Guoxue; Li, Yu; Du, Longlong

    2017-03-05

    The influence of adding a bulking agent on the bio-stabilization and drying of municipal solid waste (MSW) was investigated. Three treatments were considered: the addition of either cornstalks or wood peat to MSW as a bulking agent before bio-drying and a control treatment that contained no bulking agent. Addition of bulking agents to MSW produced less leachate, higher moisture-removal rates, and consumed less volatile solids. Bulking with cornstalks achieved the highest water-removal rate (0.58-0.65kgkg(-1)). The extent of organic degradation was related to temperature integration during bio-drying. Lipids and cellulose were the main components of organic losses in all treatments and adding a bulking agent changed the sequence and extent of degradation of biochemical components. The bio-drying index values were 1.75, 3.18, and 2.64 for MSW alone, MSW with cornstalks, and MSW with wood peat, respectively. Evaporation heat was the main component of heat consumption, accounting for 58.1-60.7% of the total energy consumption.

  4. Terrestrial Planet Formation around Low-Mass Stars: Effect of the Mass of Central Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshino, Shoichi; Matsumoto, Yuji; Kokubo, Eiichiro

    2015-12-01

    The Kepler space telescope has detected several thousand planets and candidates.Their central stars are mainly FGK-type stars.It is difficult to observe M-stars by using visible light since M-stars have their peak radiation in the infrared region.However, recently there are several survey projects for planets around M-stars such as the InfraRed Doppler (IRD) survey of the Subaru telescope.Therefore it is expected that the number of planets around M-stars will increase in the near future.The habitable zone of M-stars is closer to the stars than that of G-stars.For this reason, the possibility of finding habitable planets is expected to be higher.Here we study the formation of close-in terrestrial planets by giant impacts of protoplanets around low-mass stars by using N-body simulations.An important parameter that controls formation processes is the ratio between the physical radius of a planet and its Hill radius, which decreases with the stellar mass.We systematically change the mass of the central stars and investigate its effects on terrestrial planet formation.We find that the mass of the maximum planet decreases with the mass of central stars, while the number of planets in the system increases.We also find that the orbital separation of adjacent planets normalized by their Hill radius increases with the stellar mass.

  5. The effects of body mass on cremation weight.

    PubMed

    May, Shannon E

    2011-01-01

    Cremains have become increasingly frequent in forensic contexts, while higher body mass in the general population has simultaneously made cremation a more cost-effective mortuary practice. This study analyzed the relationship between body mass and bone mass, as reflected through cremation weight. Antemortem data were recorded for samples used in the multi-regional data set. Each was rendered through commercial crematoriums and reweighed postincineration. Pearson's correlation demonstrates clear association between body mass and cremation weight (r=0.56; p<0.0001). However, multiple linear regression revealed sex and age variables also have a significant relationship (t=7.198; t=-2.5, respectively). Regressed in conjunction, body mass, sex, and age contribute approximately 67% of all variation observed in cremation weight (r=0.668). Analysis of covariance indicates significant regional variation in body and cremation weight. Explanations include bone modification resulting from increased loading stress, as well as glucose intolerance and altered metabolic pathways related to obesity.

  6. Added copper filtration in digital paediatric double-contrast colon examinations: effects on radiation dose and image quality.

    PubMed

    Hansson, B; Finnbogason, T; Schuwert, P; Persliden, J

    1997-01-01

    Paediatric double-contrast barium enema examinations are usually performed at high tube voltage, 102-105 kV. The aim of this study was to investigate how much the effective dose to the child could be reduced by increasing the X-ray energy further by adding copper filter in the beam, and if this dose reduction could be achieved without endangering image quality. Organ doses to an anthropomorphic phantom simulating a 1-year-old child was measured using thermoluminescence dosimetry for assessment of the effective dose and this value was compared with the energy imparted which was obtained from kerma-area product measurements. To verify that the image quality achieved with this added filtration was still diagnostically acceptable, the study included 15 patient examinations. Since the increased X-ray energy will most probably affect low-contrast objects, image quality was also evaluated with two different phantoms containing low-contrast objects. Effective dose for a complete examination can be decreased 44 % and energy imparted 77 % when a 0.3-mm copper filter is inserted in the beam at tube voltage 102 kV. The patient study did not show any significant deterioration of image quality, whereas phantom measurements of contrast-detail resolution and signal-to-noise ratio was marginally impaired by the added copper filtration. This technique is now in clinical practice for paediatric colon examinations.

  7. Differential effects of adding and removing components of a context on the generalization of conditional freezing.

    PubMed

    González, Felisa; Quinn, Jennifer J; Fanselow, Michael S

    2003-01-01

    Rats were conditioned across 2 consecutive days where a single unsignaled footshock was presented in the presence of specific contextual cues. Rats were tested with contexts that had additional stimulus components either added or subtracted. Using freezing as a measure of conditioning, removal but not addition of a cue from the training context produced significant generalization decrement. The results are discussed in relation to the R. A. Rescorla and A. R. Wagner (1972), J. M. Pearce (1994), and A. R. Wagner and S. E. Brandon (2001) accounts of generalization. Although the present data are most consistent with elemental models such as Rescorla and Wagner, a slight modification of the Wagner-Brandon replaced-elements model that can account for differences in the pattern of generalization obtained with contexts and discrete conditional stimuli is proposed.

  8. Is effective mass in combat sports punching above its weight?

    PubMed

    Lenetsky, Seth; Nates, Roy J; Brughelli, Matt; Harris, Nigel K

    2015-04-01

    The segmental and muscular complexity of the human body can result in challenges when examining the kinetics of impacts. To better understand this complexity, combat sports literature has selected effective mass as a measure of an athlete's inertial contribution to the momentum transfer during the impact of strikes. This measure helps to clarify the analysis of striking kinetics in combat sports. This paper will review: (1) effective mass as a concept and its usage as a measure of impact intensity in combat sports, (2) the neuromuscular pattern known as "double peak muscle activation" which has been theorized to help enhance initial hand velocity upon impact and joint stiffening during impact, (3) the methods and equations used to calculate effective mass, and (4) practitioner recommendations based on the literature. We will argue in this manuscript that the act of punching presents unique challenges to the current understanding of effective mass due to additional force application during impact. This review will improve the understanding of effective mass and its roles in effective striking serving to underpin future research into performance enhancement in striking based combat sports.

  9. Effective kaon masses in dense nuclear and neutron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waas, T.; Kaiser, N.; Weise, W.

    1996-02-01

    The effective mass and decay width of kaonic modes in baryonic matter are studied within a coupled-channel approach based on the Chiral SU(3) Effective Lagrangian which describes all available low energy data of the coupled overlineKN, π∑, πΛ system. Including Pauli blocking and Fermi motion in the kaon dispersion relation, we find a strong non-linear density dependence of the K - effective mass and decay width in symmetric nuclear matter at densities around 0.1 times normal nuclear matter density ϱ0 due to the in-medium dynamics of the Λ(1405) resonance. At higher densities the K - effective mass decreases slowly but stays above 0.5 mK at least up to densities below 3 ϱ0. In neutron matter the K - effective mass decreases almost linearly with increasing density but remains relatively large ( m K∗ > 0.65 m K) for ϱn ≲ 3 ϱ0. The K + effective mass turns out to increase very slowly with rising density.

  10. Spin-orbit coupling induced by effective mass gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos-Abiague, A.

    2010-04-01

    The existence of a spin-orbit coupling (SOC) induced by the gradient of the effective mass in low-dimensional heterostructures is revealed. In structurally asymmetric quasi-two-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures the presence of a mass gradient across the interfaces results in a SOC which competes with the SOC created by the electric field in the valence band. However, in graded quantum wells subjected to an external electric field, the mass-gradient-induced SOC can be finite even when the electric field in the valence band vanishes.

  11. [Effects of adding straw carbon source to root knot nematode diseased soil on soil microbial biomass and protozoa abundance].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si-Hui; Lian, Jian-Hong; Cao, Zhi-Ping; Zhao, Li

    2013-06-01

    A field experiment with successive planting of tomato was conducted to study the effects of adding different amounts of winter wheat straw (2.08 g x kg(-1), 1N; 4.16 g x kg(-1), 2N; and 8.32 g x kg(-1), 4N) to the soil seriously suffered from root knot nematode disease on the soil microbial biomass and protozoa abundance. Adding straw carbon source had significant effects on the contents of soil microbial biomass carbon (MBC) and microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) and the abundance of soil protozoa, which all decreased in the order of 4N > 2N > 1N > CK. The community structure of soil protozoa also changed significantly under straw addition. In the treatments with straw addition, the average proportion of fagellate, amoeba, and ciliates accounted for 36.0%, 59.5%, and 4.5% of the total protozoa, respectively. Under the same adding amounts of wheat straw, there was an increase in the soil MBC and MBN contents, MBC/MBN ratio, and protozoa abundance with increasing cultivation period.

  12. Effects of select nitrocompounds on in vitro ruminal fermentation during conditions of limiting or excess added reductant.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robin C; Krueger, Nathan A; Stanton, Thaddeus B; Callaway, Todd R; Edrington, Thomas S; Harvey, Roger B; Jung, Yong Soo; Nisbet, David J

    2008-12-01

    Ruminal methane (CH(4)) production results in the loss of up to 12% of gross energy intake and contributes nearly 20% of the United States' annual emission of this greenhouse gas. We report the effects of select nitrocompounds on ruminal fermentation after 22 h in vitro incubation (39 degrees C) with or without additions of hydrogen (H(2)), formate or both. In incubations containing no added reductant, CH(4) production was inhibited 41% by 2-nitro-1-propanol (2NPOH) and >97% by 3-nitro-1-propionic acid (3NPA), nitroethane (NE) and 2-nitroethanol (2NEOH) compared to non-treated controls and H(2) did not accumulate. With formate as the sole added reductant, nitro-treatment reduced CH(4) production by >99% and caused 42% to complete inhibition of formate catabolism compared to controls, and the accumulation of H(2) increased slightly. Nitro-treatment decreased CH(4) production 57-98% from that of controls when supplied H(2) or formate plus H(2). Formate catabolism was decreased 42-84% from that in controls by all nitro-treatments except 3NPA with both formate and H(2). Greater than 97% of the added H(2) was catabolized within controls; >84% was catabolized in nitro-treated incubations. Acetate, propionate and butyrate accumulations were unaffected by nitro-treatment irregardless of reductant; however, effects on ammonia and branched chain fatty acid accumulations varied. These results suggest that nitro-treatment inhibited formate dehydrogenase/formate hydrogen lyase and hydrogenase activity.

  13. Estimation of the effective phase function of bulk diffusing materials with the inverse adding-doubling method.

    PubMed

    Leyre, Sven; Meuret, Youri; Durinck, Guy; Hofkens, Johan; Deconinck, Geert; Hanselaer, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The accuracy of optical simulations including bulk diffusors is heavily dependent on the accuracy of the bulk scattering properties. If no knowledge on the physical scattering effects is available, an iterative procedure is usually used to obtain the scattering properties, such as the inverse Monte Carlo method or the inverse adding-doubling (AD) method. In these methods, a predefined phase function with one free parameter is usually used to limit the number of free parameters. In this work, three predefined phase functions (Henyey-Greenstein, two-term Henyey-Greenstein, and Gegenbauer kernel (GK) phase function) are implemented in the inverse AD method to determine the optical properties of two strongly diffusing materials: low-density polyethylene and TiO₂ particles. Using the presented approach, an estimation of the effective phase function was made. It was found that the use of the GK phase function resulted in the best agreement between calculated and experimental transmittance, reflectance, and scattered radiant intensity distribution for the LDPE sample. For the TiO₂ sample, a good agreement was obtained with both the two-term Henyey-Greenstein and the GK phase function.

  14. Influence of adding borax and modifying pH on effectiveness of food attractants for melon fly (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Duyck, P F; Rousse, P; Ryckewaert, P; Fabre, F; Quilici, S

    2004-06-01

    The melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Coquillett) (Diptera: Tephritidae), is the most damaging pest of cucurbits in Reunion Island. The influence of adding borax and modifying pH on the effectiveness of different food attractants for both sexes of the melon fly is analyzed by a release-recapture method in field cages. Adding borax to protein hydrolysates Nulure and Buminal strongly reduced their attractiveness for B. cucurbitae. Acidification of 5% Buminal solution (from pH 6 to pH 3) doubled its attractiveness for melon fly. Conversely, Torula yeast at pH 10.5 was significantly more attractive than the standard Torula yeast at pH 9 (28% of captured flies compared with 17%). However, a further pH increase of the yeast solution does not improve its attractiveness. The results are discussed in relation to other studies on pH modification of various baits for Tephritidae.

  15. Enhancing elderly health examination effectiveness by adding physical function evaluations and interventions.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia-Ming; Chang, Ching-I; Yu, Wen-Ruey; Yang, Winnie; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Ching-Yu

    2016-12-24

    This study aimed to assess the benefit of adding physical function evaluations and interventions to routine elderly health examination. This is a Quasi-experimental controlled trial. 404 elderly adults (aged 70 and over) scoring 3-6 on the Canadian Study of Health and Aging Clinical Frailty Scale Chinese In-Person Interview Version (CSHA-CFS) in a 2012 annual elderly health examination were enrolled. Both the control and experimental groups received the routine annual health examination with the latter further provided with functional evaluations, exercise instruction, and nutrition education. 112 (84.8%) persons in the experiment group and 267 (98.2%) in the control group completed the study. CSHA-CFS performance of the experimental group was more likely to improve (odds ratio=9.50, 95% confidence interval (CI)=4.62-19.56) and less likely to deteriorate (OR=0.04, 95% CI=0.01-0.31) one year after intervention. Within the experimental group, Fried Frailty Index improvement percentage surpassed the deterioration percentage (29.5% vs. 0.9%, p<0.001), five-meter walk speed rose from 1.0±0.2 to 1.2±0.2m/s (p<0.001), grip strength escalated from 22.3±7.1 to 24.8±6.7kg (p<0.001), Short-form Physical Performance Battery increased from 10.0±1.6 to 11.6±0.9 (p<0.001), and timed up and go test decreased from 10.9±2.9 to 8.9±2.7s (p<0.001). However, no statistical difference was detected in composite adverse endpoints, including hospitalization, emergency department visit and falls, between the two groups, though the incidence was higher in the control group. Adding functional evaluations, exercise and nutrition interventions to the annual elderly health examination appeared to benefit the health of adults aged 70 years and older.

  16. Effective mass discontinuity and current oscillations in stratified systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halilov, S.; Mil'shtein, S.

    2015-11-01

    Tunnelling transport in modulated film, which occurs either stoichiometrically or due to a stress field, is analysed in terms of the variable carrier effective mass tensor. It is shown that the mass tensor discontinuity alone, i.e. with no actual potential barrier present, may lead to current oscillations versus the size of the modulated region. While both effects of mass discontinuity and the band offset upon the carrier flow are formally described in terms of wave mechanics, their mechanisms are quite distinct: the magnitude of the current oscillations due to mass disruption is determined by the differential mass across the interface, i.e. by change in the covalency due to structural modulation, whereas the band offset is generally an effect of the affinity change across the interface. Both effects are superimposed by the 3D kinematic coupling of the orthogonal transport, either constructively or destructively, leading to an oscillatory dependence of the current magnitude on the film dimension. As an illustration, the analysis is applied to a Si1-x Ge x /Si stratified structure to demonstrate the effect of quasi-bound states on the transport. The modelling is corroborated by a device simulation of a SiGe system in a heterojunction bipolar transistor setting. The findings can be used as a general method to control anisotropic tunnelling transport in stratified structures.

  17. The effects of injury and illness on haemoglobin mass.

    PubMed

    Gough, C E; Sharpe, K; Garvican, L A; Anson, J M; Saunders, P U; Gore, C J

    2013-09-01

    This study sought to quantify the effects of reduced training, surgery and changes in body mass on haemoglobin mass (Hbmass) in athletes. Hbmass of 15 athletes (6 males, 9 females) was measured 9±6 (mean±SD) times over 162±198 days, during reduced training following injury or illness. Additionally, body mass (n=15 athletes) and episodes of altitude training (n=2), iron supplementation (n=5), or surgery (n=3) were documented. Training was recorded and compared with pre-injury levels. Analysis used linear mixed models for ln(Hbmass), with Sex, Altitude, Surgery, Iron, Training and log(Body Mass) as fixed effects, and Athlete as a fixed and random effect. Reduced training and surgery led to 2.3% (p=0.02) and 2.7% (p=0.04) decreases in Hbmass, respectively. Altitude and iron increased Hbmass by 2.4% (p=0.03) and 4.2% (p=0.05), respectively. The effect of changes in body mass on Hbmass was not statistically significant (p=0.435).The estimates for the effects of surgery and altitude on Hbmass should be confirmed by future research using a larger sample of athletes. These estimates could be used to inform the judgements of experts examining athlete biological passports, improving their interpretation of Hbmass perturbations, which athletes claim are related to injury, thereby protecting innocent athletes from unfair sanctioning.

  18. The Effect of Ad Libitum Consumption of a Milk-Based Liquid Meal Supplement vs. a Traditional Sports Drink on Fluid Balance After Exercise.

    PubMed

    Baguley, Brenton; Zilujko, Jessica; Leveritt, Michael D; Desbrow, Ben; Irwin, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of ad libitum intake of a milk-based liquid meal supplement against a carbohydrate-electrolyte sports drink following exercise induced fluid loss. Seven male participants (age 22.3 ± 3.4 years, height 179.3 ± 7.9 cm, body mass 74.3 ± 7.3 kg; mean ± SD) completed 4 separate trials and lost 1.89 ± 0.44% body mass through moderate intensity exercise in the laboratory. After exercise, participants consumed ad libitum over 2 h a milk-based liquid meal supplement (Sustagen Sport) on two of the trials (S1, S2) or a carbohydrate-electrolyte sports drink (Powerade) on two of the trials (P1, P2), with an additional 1 hr observational period. Measures of body mass, urine output, gastrointestinal tolerance and palatability were collected throughout the recovery period. Participants consumed significantly more Powerade than Sustagen Sport over the 2 h rehydration period (P1 = 2225 ± 888 ml, P2 = 2602 ± 1119 mL, S1 = 1375 ± 711 mL, S2 = 1447 ± 857 ml). Total urine output on both Sustagen trails was significantly lower than the second Powerade trial (P2 = 1447 ± 656 ml, S1 = 153 ± 62 ml, S2 = 182 ± 118 mL; p < .05) and trended toward being lower compared with the first Powerade trial (P1 = 1057 ± 699 ml vs. S1, p = .067 and vs. S2, p = .061). No significant differences in net fluid balance were observed between any of the drinks at the conclusion of each trial (P1 = -0.50 ±0. 46 kg, P2 = -0.40 ± 0.35 kg, S1 = -0.61 ± 0.74 kg, S2 = -0.45 ± 0.58 kg). Gastrointestinal tolerance and beverage palatability measures indicated Powerade to be preferred as a rehydration beverage. Ad libitum milk-based liquid meal supplement results in similar net fluid balance as a carbohydrate-electrolyte sports drink after exercise induced fluid loss.

  19. Black hole formation in AdS Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deppe, Nils; Kolly, Allison; Frey, Andrew R.; Kunstatter, Gabor

    2016-10-01

    AdS spacetime has been shown numerically to be unstable against a large class of arbitrarily small perturbations. In [1], the authors presented a preliminary study of the effects on stability of changing the local dynamics by adding a Gauss-Bonnet term to the Einstein action. Here we provide further details as well as new results with improved numerical methods. In particular, we elucidate new structure in Choptuik scaling plots. We also provide evidence of chaotic behavior at the transition between immediate horizon formation and horizon formation after the matter pulse reflects from the AdS conformal boundary. Finally, we present data suggesting the formation of naked singularities in spacetimes with ADM mass below the algebraic bound for black hole formation.

  20. Internal structure of charged AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Srijit; Sarkar, Sudipta; Virmani, Amitabh

    2016-06-01

    When an electrically charged black hole is perturbed, its inner horizon becomes a singularity, often referred to as the Poisson-Israel mass inflation singularity. Ori constructed a model of this phenomenon for asymptotically flat black holes, in which the metric can be determined explicitly in the mass inflation region. In this paper we implement the Ori model for charged AdS black holes. We find that the mass function inflates faster than the flat space case as the inner horizon is approached. Nevertheless, the mass inflation singularity is still a weak singularity: Although spacetime curvature becomes infinite, tidal distortions remain finite on physical objects attempting to cross it.

  1. Effect of montelukast added to inhaled budesonide on control of mild to moderate asthma

    PubMed Central

    Vaquerizo, M; Casan, P; Castillo, J; Perpina, M; Sanchis, J; Sobradillo, V; Valencia, A; Verea, H; Viejo, J; Villasante, C; Gonzalez-Esteban, J; Picado, C

    2003-01-01

    Background: Proinflammatory leukotrienes, which are not completely inhibited by inhaled corticosteroids, may contribute to asthmatic problems. A 16 week multicentre, randomised, double blind, controlled study was undertaken to study the efficacy of adding oral montelukast, a leukotriene receptor antagonist, to a constant dose of inhaled budesonide. Methods: A total of 639 patients aged 18–70 years with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) ≥55% predicted and a minimum predefined level of asthma symptoms during a 2 week placebo run in period were randomised to receive montelukast 10 mg (n=326) or placebo (n=313) once daily for 16 weeks. All patients received a constant dose of budesonide (400–1600 µg/day) by Turbuhaler throughout the study. Results: Mean FEV1 at baseline was 81% predicted. The median percentage of asthma exacerbation days was 35% lower (3.1% v 4.8%; p=0.03) and the median percentage of asthma free days was 56% higher (66.1% v 42.3%; p=0.001) in the montelukast group than in the placebo group. Patients receiving concomitant treatment with montelukast had significantly (p<0.05) fewer nocturnal awakenings and significantly (p<0.05) greater improvements in ß agonist use and morning peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR). Conclusions: For patients with mild airway obstruction and persistent asthma symptoms despite budesonide treatment, concomitant treatment with montelukast significantly improves asthma control. PMID:12612294

  2. Effects of food colouring added to 2% chlorhexidine gluconate and 70% alcohol for surgical site antisepsis.

    PubMed

    Chow, Jason; Ng, Jonathan; Pun, Alvin

    2013-11-01

    Preoperative cleansing of a patient's skin with chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) in alcohol is superior to cleansing with povidone-iodine for preventing surgical site infection (SSI) after clean-contaminated surgery (Darouilche et al 2010). However, 2% CHG in 70% alcohol, tinted pink, is colourless when applied to limbs for surgery and complete coverage cannot be assured. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of food colouring added to CHG in preoperative skin preparation. Two hundred and eight subjects were randomly selected from a population of healthy young adults and were given a questionnaire. They were excluded if they had a known allergy to CHG or food dye, a current infection at the preparation site, or previous preparation with CHG at the site. CHG with food dye additive was applied on the subject's left foot while CHD without the additive was applied on the right. Skin swabs were then taken of both feet and plated on blood agar plates and incubated for 48 hours. Assessment of growth was compared. Patients treated with tinted CHG had around 3.4 times (95% CI: 1.5, 7.8) the risk of a positive bacterial swab compared with those treated with untinted CHG. The efficacy of CHG significantly decreased with food colouring additive. This is consistent with previous studies conducted on similar incompatible substances. In order to have the full efficacy of CHG as a preparation, much thought and care needs to be taken to prevent contamination of the site and substance.

  3. Effect of added dispersants on diamond particles in Ni-diamond composites fabricated with electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongje; Kim, Donghyun; Son, Kyungsik; Lee, Sanghyuk; Chung, Wonsub

    2015-11-01

    The electrodeposition of Ni-diamond composites was investigated to improve the dispersion and adhesion of the diamond particles, and thus, increase the performance of cutting tools. The additives, so called firstclass brighteners, benzoic sulfimide, benzene sulfonamide, and benzene sulfonic acid were used as dispersants to enhance the dispersivity of diamond particles. The dispersivity was analyzed with Image-Pro software, which was used to asses optical microscopy images, and the number of individual diamond particles and area fraction were calculated. In addition, electrochemical tests were performed, including zeta potential and galvanostatic measurements, and the adhesion strengths was tested by evaluating the wear resistance using ball-on-disk tester. The dispersion and adhesion of the diamond particles were improved when benzoic sulfimide was added to the composite plating bath at a concentration of 0.06 g/L. The number of individual diamond particles was 56 EA/mm2, and the weight loss of alumina ball and specimen was 2.88 mg and 0.80 mg, respectively.

  4. Effect of transglutaminase on quality characteristics of a value-added product tilapia wastes.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Maria Lúcia Guerra; Mársico, Eliane Teixeira; Lázaro, César Aquiles; da Silva Canto, Anna Carolina Vilhena Cruz; Lima, Bruno Reis Carneiro da Costa; da Cruz, Adriano Gomes; Conte-Júnior, Carlos Adam

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the physico-chemical, instrumental color and texture, and sensory qualities of restructured tilapia steaks elaborated with small sized (non-commercial) tilapia fillets and different levels of microbial transglutaminase (MTG). Four concentrations of MTG were used: CON (0 % MTG), T1 (0.1 % MTG), T2 (0.5 % MTG), and T3 (0.8 % MTG). In addition, bacterial content and pH shifts were also evaluated during 90 days of frozen storage. The different levels of MTG did not affect (P > 0.05) either the proximate composition of the restructured tilapia steaks or the bacterial growth during the frozen storage. MTG improved (P < 0.05) cooking yield and instrumental hardness and chewiness as well as sensory (salty taste, succulence and tenderness) attributes; strongly contributing to greater overall acceptance. Therefore, restructured tilapia steaks manufactured with MTG are potentially valued-added products with good consumer acceptance and better purchase-intention than steaks formulated with 0 % MTG.

  5. The Effect of Adding Corrosion Inhibitors into an Electroless Nickel Plating Bath for Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rong; Su, Yongyao; Liu, Hongdong; Cheng, Jiang; Yang, Xin; Shao, Zhongcai

    2016-10-01

    In this work, corrosion inhibitors were added into an electroless nickel plating bath to realize nickel-phosphorus (Ni-P) coating deposition on magnesium alloy directly. The performance of five corrosion inhibitors was evaluated by inhibition efficiency. The results showed that only ammonium hydrogen fluoride (NH4HF2) and ammonium molybdate ((NH4)2MoO4) could be used as corrosion inhibitors for magnesium alloy in the bath. Moreover, compounding NH4HF2 and (NH4)2MoO4, the optimal concentrations were both at 1.5 ~ 2%. The deposition process of Ni-P coating was observed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). It showed corrosion inhibitors inhibited undesired dissolution of magnesium substrate during the electroless plating process. In addition, SEM observation indicated that the corrosion inhibition reaction and the Ni2+ replacement reaction were competitive at the initial deposition time. Both electrochemical analysis and thermal shock test revealed that the Ni-P coating exhibited excellent corrosion resistance and adhesion properties in protecting the magnesium alloy.

  6. COMPARISON OF TIME-OF-FLIGHT AND DOUBLE FOCUSING MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR REACHING TENTATIVE IDENTIFICATIONS FOR UNANTICIPATED COMPOUNDS ADDED TO DRINKING WATER BY TERRORISTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Local monitoring of post-treatment drinking water using bench-top mass spectrometers could identify target compounds in a mass spectral library. However, a terrorist might seek to incite greater hysteria by injecting or infusing a mixture of unanticipated compounds of unknown tox...

  7. Quark mass correction to chiral separation effect and pseudoscalar condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Er-dong; Lin, Shu

    2017-01-01

    We derived an analytic structure of the quark mass correction to chiral separation effect (CSE) in small mass regime. We confirmed this structure by a D3/D7 holographic model study in a finite density, finite magnetic field background. The quark mass correction to CSE can be related to correlators of pseudo-scalar condensate, quark number density and quark condensate in static limit. We found scaling relations of these correlators with spatial momentum in the small momentum regime. They characterize medium responses to electric field, inhomogeneous quark mass and chiral shift. Beyond the small momentum regime, we found existence of normalizable mode, which possibly leads to formation of spiral phase. The normalizable mode exists beyond a critical magnetic field, whose magnitude decreases with quark chemical potential.

  8. Active and sterile neutrino mass effects on beta decay spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Boillos, Juan Manuel; Moya de Guerra, Elvira

    2013-06-10

    We study the spectra of the emitted charged leptons in charge current weak nuclear processes to analyze the effect of neutrino masses. Standard active neutrinos are studied here, with masses of the order of 1 eV or lower, as well as sterile neutrinos with masses of a few keV. The latter are warm dark matter (WDM) candidates hypothetically produced or captured as small mixtures with the active neutrinos. We compute differential decay or capture rates spectra in weak charged processes of different nuclei ({sup 3}H, {sup 187}Re, {sup 107}Pd, {sup 163}Ho, etc) using different masses of both active and sterile neutrinos and different values of the mixing parameter.

  9. Effect of Al deoxidation on the formation behavior of inclusions in Ce-added stainless steel melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sun Kuk; Kong, Young-Min; Park, Joo Hyun

    2014-09-01

    The effect of Al deoxidation on the oxygen content and the inclusion properties (composition, size and morphology) of Ce-added stainless steel melts at 1873 K was investigated. The total oxygen content was about 310(±40) ppm before Al addition and slightly decreases with holding time when Al content was lower than 0.01%, whereas the oxygen content drastically decreased when Al content was greater than about 0.05%. Al content initially decreased, followed by an increase by addition of Ce, which originates from the reduction of Al2O3 in the refractory and/or inclusions by added Ce. The initial inclusions before Al addition were mainly Mn(Cr)-silicates. When Ce was added without Al deoxidation, small amounts of Ce oxide were detected after Ce addition. However, the content of Ce oxide decreased with holding time, and the inclusion composition reverted to the MnO-SiO2-Cr2O3 system. The initial Mn(Cr)-silicate inclusions transformed to Al2O3-rich inclusions by Al addition, and then Ce2O3 was enriched by Ce addition due to local enrichment of Ce around Al2O3 particles, resulting in the formation of AlCeO3-type inclusions. However, the Ce2O3 in the inclusions was continuously reduced by Al due to higher chemical potential of Al than Ce, finally forming the Al2O3-CeAl11O18 complex inclusions.

  10. Derivative expansion at small mass for the spinor effective action

    SciTech Connect

    Dunne, Gerald V.; Huet, Adolfo; Hur, Jin; Min, Hyunsoo

    2011-05-15

    We study the small-mass limit of the one-loop spinor effective action, comparing the derivative expansion approximation with exact numerical results that are obtained from an extension to spinor theories of the partial-wave cutoff method. In this approach, one can compute numerically the renormalized one-loop effective action for radially separable gauge field background fields in spinor QED. We highlight an important difference between the small-mass limit of the derivative expansion for spinor and scalar theories.

  11. Dietary supplemented and meat-added antioxidants effect on the lipid oxidative stability of refrigerated and frozen cooked chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Avila-Ramos, F; Pro-Martínez, A; Sosa-Montes, E; Cuca-García, J Manuel; Becerril-Pérez, C; Figueroa-Velasco, J L; Ruiz-Feria, C A; Hernández-Cázares, A S; Narciso-Gaytán, C

    2013-01-01

    The oxidation of fatty acids decreases the quality and shelf-life of meats. To reduce this process, dietary supplemented and meat-added antioxidants were evaluated on the lipid oxidative stability of cooked chicken meat. Broilers were fed 2 levels of vitamin E (10 or 100 mg•kg(-1) of feed; VE-10 and VE-100, respectively) or oregano essential oil (100 mg•kg(-1) of feed; OR-100). Additionally, honey (3%) or butylated hydroxytoluene (0.02%; BHT) were added to chicken meat from the control treatment (VE-10). Breast meat was ground, formed into patties, and cooked on electric grills until it reached an internal temperature of 74°C. Cooked meat was cooled at room temperature, packaged, and stored under refrigeration for 9 d (4°C) or frozen for 45 d (-20°C). The 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substance test was used to quantify malondialdehyde (MDA) values in the meat. Data were analyzed using a repeated measures design, 5 treatments with 12 replications each, and the least squares means were compared with 4 orthogonal contrasts. The results showed that the meat of the VE-10 treatment had higher values of MDA (P ≤ 0.05) compared with the other antioxidant treatments in all the storage days. There were no differences (P ≥ 0.05) in MDA values between the dietary supplemented and meat-added antioxidant treatments. The meat added with honey had lower MDA values than the one with BHT (P ≤ 0.05). Meat of the VE-100 treatment showed lower MDA values than the one of OR-100 (P ≤ 0.05) in most storage days. In conclusion, supplementation of 10 mg•kg(-1) of vitamin E to the diet resulted in a higher development of lipid oxidation in the meat. Both dietary supplemented or meat-added antioxidants had similar effects on the lipid oxidative stability. The addition of honey maintained longer the lipid oxidative stability of the meat than BHT. Finally, dietary supplementation of vitamin E at the same level of oregano oil, 100 mg•kg(-1), resulted in a higher antioxidant

  12. Do Sex and Violence Sell? A Meta-Analytic Review of the Effects of Sexual and Violent Media and Ad Content on Memory, Attitudes, and Buying Intentions.

    PubMed

    Lull, Robert B; Bushman, Brad J

    2015-09-01

    It is commonly assumed that sex and violence sell. However, we predicted that sex and violence would have the opposite effect. We based our predictions on the evolution and emotional arousal theoretical framework, which states that people are evolutionarily predisposed to attend to emotionally arousing cues such as sex and violence. Thus, sexual and violent cues demand more cognitive resources than nonsexual and nonviolent cues. Using this framework, we meta-analyzed the effects of sexual media, violent media, sexual ads, and violent ads on the advertising outcomes of brand memory, brand attitudes, and buying intentions. The meta-analysis included 53 experiments involving 8,489 participants. Analyses found that brands advertised in violent media content were remembered less often, evaluated less favorably, and less likely to be purchased than brands advertised in nonviolent, nonsexual media. Brands advertised using sexual ads were evaluated less favorably than brands advertised using nonviolent, nonsexual ads. There were no significant effects of sexual media on memory or buying intentions. There were no significant effects of sexual or violent ads on memory or buying intentions. As intensity of sexual ad content increased, memory, attitudes, and buying intentions decreased. When media content and ad content were congruent (e.g., violent ad in a violent program), memory improved and buying intentions increased. Violence and sex never helped and often hurt ad effectiveness. These results support the evolution and emotional arousal framework. Thus, advertisers should consider the effects of media content, ad content, content intensity, and congruity to design and place more effective ads.

  13. AdS2 holographic dictionary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetič, Mirjam; Papadimitriou, Ioannis

    2016-12-01

    We construct the holographic dictionary for both running and constant dilaton solutions of the two dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theory that is obtained by a circle reduction from Einstein-Hilbert gravity with negative cosmological constant in three dimensions. This specific model ensures that the dual theory has a well defined ultraviolet completion in terms of a two dimensional conformal field theory, but our results apply qualitatively to a wider class of two dimensional dilaton gravity theories. For each type of solutions we perform holographic renormalization, compute the exact renormalized one-point functions in the presence of arbitrary sources, and derive the asymptotic symmetries and the corresponding conserved charges. In both cases we find that the scalar operator dual to the dilaton plays a crucial role in the description of the dynamics. Its source gives rise to a matter conformal anomaly for the running dilaton solutions, while its expectation value is the only non trivial observable for constant dilaton solutions. The role of this operator has been largely overlooked in the literature. We further show that the only non trivial conserved charges for running dilaton solutions are the mass and the electric charge, while for constant dilaton solutions only the electric charge is non zero. However, by uplifting the solutions to three dimensions we show that constant dilaton solutions can support non trivial extended symmetry algebras, including the one found by Compère, Song and Strominger [1], in agreement with the results of Castro and Song [2]. Finally, we demonstrate that any solution of this specific dilaton gravity model can be uplifted to a family of asymptotically AdS2 × S 2 or conformally AdS2 × S 2 solutions of the STU model in four dimensions, including non extremal black holes. The four dimensional solutions obtained by uplifting the running dilaton solutions coincide with the so called `subtracted geometries', while those obtained

  14. Investigating the effect of adding an on-axis jet to Ar gas puff Z pinches on Z.

    DOE PAGES

    Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Jennings, Christopher Ashley; Jones, Brent M.; ...

    2016-10-20

    Double-shell Ar gas puff implosions driven by 16.5±0.5 MA on the Z generator at Sandia National Laboratories are very effective emitters of Ar K-shell radiation (photon energy >3 keV), producing yields of 330 ± 9% kJ (B. Jones et al., Phys. Plasmas, 22, 020706, 2015). In addition, previous simulations and experiments have reported dramatic increases in K-shell yields when adding an on-axis jet to double shell gas puffs for some configurations.

  15. Relation between meteor head echo mass-velocity selection effects, shower mass distribution indices, and mass threshold of the MU radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kero, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Observations are described that led to a study of the relationship between the head echo mass-velocity selection effect, the mass distribution indices of the Geminid and Orionid meteor showers, and the mass threshold of the MU radar, published by Kero et al. (2013).

  16. Effects of mass loss for highly-irradiated giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, W. B.; Hattori, M. F.; Burrows, A.; Hubeny, I.; Sudarsky, D.

    2007-04-01

    We present calculations for the evolution and surviving mass of highly-irradiated extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) at orbital semimajor axes ranging from 0.023 to 0.057 AU using a generalized scaled theory for mass loss, together with new surface-condition grids for hot EGPs and a consistent treatment of tidal truncation. Theoretical estimates for the rate of energy-limited hydrogen escape from giant-planet atmospheres differ by two orders of magnitude, when one holds planetary mass, composition, and irradiation constant. Baraffe et al. [Baraffe, I., Selsis, F., Chabrier, G., Barman, T.S., Allard, F., Hauschildt, P.H., Lammer, H., 2004. Astron. Astrophys. 419, L13-L16] predict the highest rate, based on the theory of Lammer et al. [Lammer, H., Selsis, F., Ribas, I., Guinan, E.F., Bauer, S.J., Weiss, W.W., 2003. Astrophys. J. 598, L121-L124]. Scaling the theory of Watson et al. [Watson, A.J., Donahue, T.M., Walker, J.C.G., 1981. Icarus 48, 150-166] to parameters for a highly-irradiated exoplanet, we find an escape rate ˜10 lower than Baraffe's. With the scaled Watson theory we find modest mass loss, occurring early in the history of a hot EGP. In this theory, mass loss including the effect of Roche-lobe overflow becomes significant primarily for masses below a Saturn mass, for semimajor axes ⩾0.023 AU. This contrasts with the Baraffe model, where hot EGPs are claimed to be remnants of much more massive bodies, originally several times Jupiter and still losing substantial mass fractions at present.

  17. Cost-effectiveness analysis: adding value to assessment of animal health welfare and production.

    PubMed

    Babo Martins, S; Rushton, J

    2014-12-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) has been extensively used in economic assessments in fields related to animal health, namely in human health where it provides a decision-making framework for choices about the allocation of healthcare resources. Conversely, in animal health, cost-benefit analysis has been the preferred tool for economic analysis. In this paper, the use of CEA in related areas and the role of this technique in assessments of animal health, welfare and production are reviewed. Cost-effectiveness analysis can add further value to these assessments, particularly in programmes targeting animal welfare or animal diseases with an impact on human health, where outcomes are best valued in natural effects rather than in monetary units. Importantly, CEA can be performed during programme implementation stages to assess alternative courses of action in real time.

  18. Effect of added drinking water nitrate on the vitamin A status of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kammerer, M; Pinault, L

    1998-08-01

    In animals, chronic exposure to nitrates has been shown to affect vitamin A nutrition, and researchers have explored this effect with conflicting results. To study this relationship, 24 female rabbits were given 8, 250 or 500 mg nitrate/L drinking water for 22 w, and their second litters were given the same dose for 5 w from 18 to 53 d of age. Liver samples were analyzed for retinol and retinyl palmitate. There was no effect of the nitrate on total liver vitamin A stores, but the balance between esterified and nonesterified forms of retinol was altered in pregnant females and their weaned young.

  19. Resonance Effects in Magnetically Driven Mass-Spring Oscillations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Resonance effects are among the most intriguing phenomena in physics and engineering. The classical case of a mass-spring oscillator driven at its resonant frequency is one of the earliest examples that students encounter. Perhaps the most commonly depicted method of driving the vibrating system is mechanical. An alternative approach presented in…

  20. Effects of the tidal mass redistribution on the Earth rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baenas, T.; Ferrándiz, J.; Escapa, A.; Getino, J.

    2015-08-01

    The effects of the tidal mass redistributions on the Earth precession and nutations are revisited, under various hypothesis on the elastic response of the Earth and using the Hamiltonian approach. New non-negligible secular and periodic contributions have been found.

  1. Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Mass Media Ethics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Byung; Padgett, George

    2000-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of an ethics education component in a media law and ethics course. Suggests that a short-term mass media ethics study could not develop values considered essential for ethical behavior. Argues that students developed more complexity in their reasoning not measurable by the scale. Suggests a course or module on ethics…

  2. Intracranial hypertension secondary to a skull lesion without mass effect.

    PubMed

    Serlin, Yonatan; Benifla, Mony; Kesler, Anat; Cohen, Avi; Shelef, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    We report and discuss five patients with intracranial hypertension due to a skull lesion reducing cerebral sinus patency with a compressive, non-thrombotic mechanism. We illustrate the importance of a high level of suspicion for this condition in patients presenting with headache, papilledema and increased intracranial pressure in the absence of focal signs or radiological evidence of mass effect.

  3. Estimated effects of adding universal public coverage of an essential medicines list to existing public drug plans in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Steven G.; Li, Winny; Yau, Brandon; Persaud, Nav

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Canada’s universal health care system does not include universal coverage of prescription drugs. We sought to estimate the effects of adding universal public coverage of an essential medicines list to existing public drug plans in Canada. METHODS: We used administrative and market research data to estimate the 2015 shares of the volume and cost of prescriptions filled in the community setting that were for 117 drugs on a model list of essential medicines for Canada. We compared prices of these essential medicines in Canada with prices in the United States, Sweden and New Zealand. We estimated the cost of adding universal public drug coverage of these essential medicines based on anticipated effects on medication use and pricing. RESULTS: The 117 essential medicines on the model list accounted for 44% of all prescriptions and 30% of total prescription drug expenditures in 2015. Average prices of generic essential medicines were 47% lower in the US, 60% lower in Sweden and 84% lower in New Zealand; brand-name drugs were priced 43% lower in the US. Estimated savings from universal public coverage of these essential medicines was $4.27 billion per year (range $2.72 billion to $5.83 billion; 28% reduction) for patients and private drug plan sponsors, at an incremental government cost of $1.23 billion per year (range $373 million to $1.98 billion; 11% reduction). INTERPRETATION: Our analysis showed that adding universal public coverage of essential medicines to the existing public drug plans in Canada could address most of Canadians’ pharmaceutical needs and save billions of dollars annually. Doing so may be a pragmatic step forward while more comprehensive pharmacare reforms are planned. PMID:28246223

  4. Expertise Reversal Effect in Reading Chinese Texts with Added Causal Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyuga, Slava; Law, Yin Kum; Lee, Chee Ha

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated the effectiveness of causal words embedded in Chinese texts to explicitly indicate causal links between the described events. Primary school students with different levels of reading expertise participated in the experiment that compared an embedded casual-words format with the original no-causal-words format. An interaction…

  5. Effects of Attractiveness of the Endorser on the Performance of Testimonial Ads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Gary B.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    When affective and cognitive scores were used as measures, the attractiveness level of the endorser of a product in an advertisement appeared to have a significant effect on the scores with the high attractiveness level producing the most favorable evaluations. When cognitive scores were used, however, the attractiveness level had no significant…

  6. Assessing the Value-Added Effects of Literacy Collaborative Professional Development on Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biancarosa, Gina; Bryk, Anthony S.; Dexter, Emily R.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a 4-year longitudinal study of the effects of Literacy Collaborative (LC), a school-wide reform model that relies primarily on the one-on-one coaching of teachers as a lever for improving student literacy learning. Kindergarten through second-grade students in 17 schools were assessed twice annually with DIBELS and Terra…

  7. Leptin extends the anorectic effects of chronic PYY(3-36) administration in ad libitum-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Unniappan, Suraj; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2008-07-01

    Acute administration of peptide YY(3-36) [PYY(3-36)] results in a reduction in food intake in several different vertebrates. However, long-term continuous administration of PYY(3-36) causes only a transient reduction in food intake, thus potentially limiting its therapeutic efficacy. We hypothesized that a fall in leptin levels associated with reduced food intake could contribute to the transient anorectic effects of continuous PYY(3-36) infusion and thus that leptin replacement might prolong the anorectic effects of PYY(3-36). Seven-day administration of 100 microg x kg body wt(-1) x day(-1) PYY(3-36) using osmotic minipumps caused a significant reduction in food intake of ad libitum-fed rats, but only for the first 2 days postimplantation. Circulating levels of leptin were reduced 1 day following continuous infusion of PYY(3-36), and combined leptin infusion at a dose of leptin that had no anorectic effects on its own (100 microg x kg body wt(-1) x day(-1)) prolonged the anorectic actions of PYY(3-36) in ad libitum-fed rats for up to 6 days postimplantation and yielded reduced weight gain compared with either peptide alone. The inhibitory effects of 100 microg x kg body wt(-1) x day(-1) PYY(3-36) on food intake were absent in rats refed after a 24-h fast and substantially reduced at a dose of 1,000 microg x kg body wt(-1) x day(-1) PYY(3-36). Leptin replacement was unable to recover the anorectic effects of PYY(3-36) in fasted rats. Our results suggest that an acute fall in leptin levels is not solely responsible for limiting duration of action of chronic PYY(3-36) infusion, yet chronic coadministration of a subanorectic dose of leptin can extend the anorectic effects of PYY(3-36).

  8. Searching for AdS3 waves and asymptotically Lifshitz black holes in R3 new massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiou, Giorgos G.; Setare, M. R.; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we consider the structure of the AdS3 vacua in R3 expansion of new massive gravity (R3-NMG). We obtain the degeneracies of the AdS3 vacua at several points of the parametric space. Additionally, following a specific analysis we show that AdS3 wave solutions are present. Using these wave solutions, we single out two special points of the parametric space for which logarithmic terms appear in the solutions. The first one is a point at which the effective mass of the wave profile, which is interpreted as a scalar mode, completely saturates the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound of the AdS3 space in which the wave is propagating. The second special point is a point at which the central charge of the theory vanishes. Furthermore, we investigate the possibility of asymptotically Lifshitz black hole solutions to be present in the three-dimensional R3-NMG. We derive analytically the Lifshitz vacua considering specific relations between the mass parameters of R3-NMG. A certain polynomial equation arises at the first special point where solutions with logarithmic falloff in the AdS3 space appear. Solving this polynomial equation, we obtain the values of the dynamical exponent z which correspond to possible asymptotically Lifshitz black hole solutions. However, it is shown that asymptotically Lifshitz black hole solutions do not exist in the three-dimensional R3-NMG for a specific ansatz of the black hole metric.

  9. Effect of externally added carnitine on the synthesis of acetylcholine in rat cerebral cortex cells.

    PubMed

    Wawrzeńczyk, A; Nałecz, K A; Nałecz, M J

    1995-06-01

    Acetylcholine synthesis from radiolabelled glucose was monitored in cerebral cortex cells isolated from brains of suckling and adult rats. Acetylcholine synthesis was found much higher in suckling animals, both in the absence and presence of acetylcholinesterase (acetylcholine hydrolase, EC 3.1.1.7) inhibitor, paraoxon. Together with choline (20 microM), carnitine was found to stimulate acetylcholine synthesis in a synergistic way in cortex cells from adult rats (18%). Choline, however, was incapable of reversing an inhibitory effect exerted by carnitine on acetylcholine synthesis in cortex cells from suckling animals. Distribution of carnitine derivatives was found significantly different in the cells from young and old animals, the content of acetylcarnitine decreased with age with a corresponding increase of free carnitine. The observed differences in carnitine effect on acetylcholine synthesis suggested that high acetylcarnitine in cells capable of beta-oxidation might be correlated with the lower level of acetylcholine synthesis.

  10. This Ad is for You: Targeting and the Effect of Alcohol Advertising on Youth Drinking.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Eamon

    2016-02-01

    Endogenous targeting of alcohol advertisements presents a challenge for empirically identifying a causal effect of advertising on drinking. Drinkers prefer a particular media; firms recognize this and target alcohol advertising at these media. This paper overcomes this challenge by utilizing novel data with detailed individual measures of media viewing and alcohol consumption and three separate empirical techniques, which represent significant improvements over previous methods. First, controls for the average audience characteristics of the media an individual views account for attributes of magazines and television programs alcohol firms may consider when deciding where to target advertising. A second specification directly controls for each television program and magazine a person views. The third method exploits variation in advertising exposure due to a 2003 change in an industry-wide rule that governs where firms may advertise. Although the unconditional correlation between advertising and drinking by youth (ages 18-24) is strong, models that include simple controls for targeting imply, at most, a modest advertising effect. Although the coefficients are estimated less precisely, estimates with models including more rigorous controls for targeting indicate no significant effect of advertising on youth drinking.

  11. Negative ion photodetachment and the electron effective mass in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, J.K.

    1983-07-01

    The electron photodetachment cross section for a negative ion in the gas phase is compared with the photodetachment cross section for the same ion when it is dissolved in a liquid supporting ''free'' electron propagation. The ratio of the amplitudes of these two cross sections near threshold is found to depend upon the effective mass m* of an electron in the conduction band of the liquid. We apply this result to electron photodetachment from O/sub 2//sup -/. In terms of the electron's free mass m, we find for liquid argon at 87 K (m* = 0.26 m), 2,2-dimethylbutane at 296 K (m* = 0.27 m), 2,2,4-trimethylpentane at 296 K (m* = 0.27 m), and tetramethylsilane at 296 K (m* = 0.27 m). At 200 K, the effective mass in tetramethylsilane decreases to m* = 0.21 m. In the case of liquid argon, the effective mass calculated herein agrees qualitatively with values which can be estimated from measurements of the electron mobility and exciton spectrum.

  12. Added noise due to the effect of an upstream wake on a propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takallu, M. A.; Spence, P. L.; Block, P. J. W.

    1987-10-01

    An analytical/computational study has been conducted to predict the effect of an upstream wing or pylon on the noise of an operating propeller. The wing trailing edge was placed at variable distances (0.1 and 0.3 chord) upstream of a scaled model propeller (SR-2). The wake was modeled using a similarity formulation. The instantaneous pressure distribution on the propeller blades during the passage through the wake was formulated in terms of a time-dependent variation of each blade section's angle of attack and in terms of the shed vortices from the blade trailing edge. It was found that the final expressions for the unsteady loads considerably altered the radiated noise pattern. Predicted noise for various observer positions, rotational speeds, and propeller/pylon distances were computed and are presented in terms of the pressure time history, harmonics of the Fourier analysis, and overall sound pressure levels (OASPL). The addition of the tangential stress due to skin friction was found to have a damping effect on the acoustic pressure time history and the resulting spectrum of the generated noise. It is shown that the positioning of a pylon upstream of a propeller indeed increases the overall noise.

  13. Effects of adding nitroprusside on arsenic stressed response of Pistia stratiotes L. under hydroponic conditions.

    PubMed

    Farnese, Fernanda S; Oliveira, Juraci A; Gusman, Grasielle S; Leão, Gabriela A; Silveira, Neidiquele M; Silva, Paulo M; Ribeiro, Cléberson; Cambraia, José

    2014-01-01

    Effect of nitric oxide (NO) in mitigating stress induced by arsenic (As) was assessed in Pistia stratiotes, with NO supplied as sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Plants were exposed to four treatments: control, SNP (0.1 mg L(-1)), As (1.5 mg L(-1)), As + SNP (1.5 and 0.1 mg L(-1)), for seven days (analyses of growth, absorption of As and mineral nutrients) and for 24 h (analyses of concentration of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs), antioxidant capacity and photosynthesis). P. stratiotes accumulated high concentrations of As and this accumulation wasn't affected by the addition of SNP, but the tolerance index of the plant to As increased. SNP attenuated effects of As on the absorption of mineral nutrients (Ca, Fe, Mn, and Mg), but not for phosphorus, and maintained concentrations of ROIs to normal levels, probably due to the increase in antioxidant capacity. The As damaged the photosynthesis by the decrease in pigment contents and by disturbance the photochemical (loss of PSII efficiency and increases in non-photochemical quenching coefficient) and biochemical (reductions in carbon assimilation, increase in the C(i)/C(a) and phi(PSII)/phi(CO2) ratios) steps. The addition of SNP restored these parameters to normal levels. Thus, NO was able to increasing the resistance of P. stratiotes to As.

  14. [Improving the effect of orthograde colonic lavage with golytely solution by adding dimethicone].

    PubMed

    Kark, W; Krebs-Richter, H; Hotz, J

    1995-01-01

    The effectiveness of an additional application of Simethicone during an orthograde lavage with Golytely solution in preparation for colonoscopy was tested in a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled double blind study on 152 patients 78 Simethicone, 74 placebo). The colon regions were separated into rectosigmoid, descending colon, transverse colon and ascending colon and interpreted according to the criteria formation of foam and contamination with feces. By the endoscopic examination of the colon we found a statistically significant improvement in visibility in the patients treated with Simethicone in contrast to placebo both in the individual scores, separated according to each of the colon regions, and in the total scores (p < 0.01). Furthermore, the time needed for the colonoscopy could be significantly shortened in the Simethicone group (p < 0.05). Adverse effects were not observed. We conclude that the additional application of Simethicone during the orthograde colon lavage with Golytely solution results in an improvement in the preparation for the colonoscopy as well as visibility of the colon mucosa.

  15. Effective field theory for vibrations in odd-mass nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coello Pérez, E. A.; Papenbrock, T.

    2016-11-01

    Heavy even-even nuclei exhibit low-energy collective excitations that are separated in scale from the microscopic (fermion) degrees of freedom. This separation of scale allows us to approach nuclear vibrations within an effective field theory (EFT). In odd-mass nuclei collective and single-particle properties compete at low energies, and this makes their description more challenging. In this article we describe spherical odd-mass nuclei with ground-state spin I =1/2 by means of an EFT that couples a fermion to the collective degrees of freedom of an even-even core. The EFT relates observables such as energy levels, electric quadrupole transition strengths, and magnetic dipole moments of the odd-mass nucleus to those of its even-even neighbor and allows us to quantify theoretical uncertainties. For isotopes of rhodium and silver the theoretical description is consistent with data within experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Several testable predictions are made.

  16. Gravity effects on neutrino masses in split supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Koch, Benjamin; Panes, Boris

    2009-06-01

    The mass differences and mixing angles of neutrinos can neither be explained by R-parity violating split supersymmetry nor by flavor blind quantum gravity alone. It is shown that combining both effects leads, within the allowed parameter range, to good agreement with the experimental results. The atmospheric mass is generated by supersymmetry through mixing between neutrinos and neutralinos, while the solar mass is generated by gravity through flavor blind dimension five operators. Maximal atmospheric mixing forces the tangent squared of the solar angle to be equal to 1/2. The scale of the quantum gravity operator is predicted within a 5% error, implying that the reduced Planck scale should lie around the grand unified theory scale. In this way, the model is very predictive and can be tested at future experiments.

  17. Torsion effects on a relativistic position-dependent mass system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitória, R. L. L.; Bakke, K.

    2016-12-01

    We analyse a relativistic scalar particle with a position-dependent mass in a spacetime with a space-like dislocation by showing that relativistic bound states solutions can be achieved. Further, we consider the presence of the Coulomb potential and analyse the relativistic position-dependent mass system subject to the Coulomb potential in the spacetime with a space-like dislocation. We also show that a new set of relativistic bound states solutions can be obtained, where there also exists the influence of torsion of the relativistic energy levels. Finally, we investigate an analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm effect for bound states in this position-dependent mass in a spacetime with a space-like dislocation.

  18. Effects of olive mill wastes added to olive grove soils on erosion and soil properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano-García, Beatriz; Parras-Alcántara, Luis

    2014-05-01

    INTRODUCTION The increasing degradation of olive groves by effect of organic matter losses derived from intensive agricultural practices has promoted the use (by olive farmers) of olive mill wastes (olive leaves and alperujo) which contain large amounts of organic matter and are free of heavy metals and pathogenic microorganisms. In this work we compared the effects of these oil mill wastes on the decrease of soil erosion, also, we undertook the assessment of the organic carbon and nitrogen contents of soil, their distribution across the profile, the accumulation and Stratification ratios (SRs) of soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN), and the C:N ratio, in Cambisols in Mediterranean olive groves treated with olive leaves and alperujo. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study area was a typical olive grove in southern Spain under conventional tillage (CT). Three plots were established. The first one was the control plot; the second one was treated with olive leaves (CTol) and the third one, with alperujo (CTa). 9 samples per plot were collected to examine the response of the soil 3 years after application of the wastes. Soil properties determined were: soil particle size, pH, bulk density, the available water capacity, SOC, TN and C:N ratio. SOC and N stock, expressed for a specific depth in Mg ha-1. Stratification ratios (SRs) (that can be used as an indicator of dynamic soil quality) for SOC and TN at three different depths were calculated. The erosion study was based on simulations of rain; that have been carried out in order to highlight differences in the phenomena of runoff and soil losses in the three plots considered. The effect of different treatments on soil properties was analyzed using a ANOVA, followed by an Anderson-Darling test. RESULTS Supplying the soil with the wastes significantly improved physical and chemical properties in the studied soils with respect to the control. C and N stocks increased, the SOC stock was 75.4 Mg ha-1 in CT, 91.5 Mg

  19. Effects of adding a weekly eccentric-overload training session on strength and athletic performance in team-handball players.

    PubMed

    Sabido, Rafael; HernáNdez-Davó, Jose Luis; Botella, Javier; Navarro, Angel; Tous-Fajardo, Julio

    2017-02-02

    To investigate the influence of adding a weekly eccentric-overload training (EOT) session in several athletic performance's tests, 18 team-handball players were assigned either to an EOT (n = 11) or a Control (n = 7) group. Both groups continued to perform the same habitual strength training, but the EOT group added one session/week during a 7-week training programme consisting of four sets of eight repetitions for the bilateral half-squat and unilateral lunge exercises. The test battery included handball throwing velocity, maximum dynamic strength (1RM), countermovement jump (CMJ), 20 m sprint, triple hop for distance, and eccentric/concentric power in both the half-squat and lunge exercises. Data were analysed using magnitude-based inferences. Both groups improved their 1RM in the half squat, 20 m sprint time, and CMJ performance to a similar extent, but the EOT group showed a beneficial effect for both right [(42/58/0), possibly positive] and left [(99/1/0), very likely positive] triple hop for distance performance. In addition, the EOT group showed greater power output improvements in both eccentric and concentric phases of the half-squat (difference in percent of change ranging from 6.5% to 22.0%) and lunge exercises (difference in per cent of change ranging from 13.1% to 24.9%). Nevertheless, no group showed changes in handball throwing velocity. Selected variables related to team-handball performance (i.e. functional jumping performance, power output) can be improved by adding a single EOT session per week, highlighting the usefulness of this low-volume/high-intensity training when aiming at optimizing dynamic athletic performance.

  20. Gravitational and mass distribution effects on stationary superwinds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Añorve-Zeferino, G. A.

    2016-11-01

    Here, we model the effect of non-uniform dynamical mass distributions and their associated gravitational fields on the stationary galactic superwind solution. We do this by considering an analogue injection of mass and energy from stellar winds and SNe. We consider both compact dark-matter and baryonic haloes that does not extend further from the galaxies optical radii Ropt as well as extended gravitationally interacting ones. We consider halo profiles that emulate the results of recent cosmological simulations and coincide also with observational estimations from galaxy surveys. This allows us to compare the analytical superwind solution with outflows from different kinds of galaxies. We give analytical formulae that establish when an outflow is possible and also characterize distinct flow regimes and enrichment scenarios. We also constraint the parameter space by giving approximate limits above which gravitation, self-gravitation and radiative cooling can inhibit the stationary flow. We obtain analytical expressions for the free superwind hydrodynamical profiles. We find that the existence or inhibition of the superwind solution highly depends on the steepness and concentration of the dynamical mass and the mass and energy injection rates. We compare our results with observational data and a recent numerical work. We put our results in the context of the mass-metallicity relationship to discuss observational evidence related to the selective loss of metals from the least massive galaxies and also discuss the case of massive galaxies.

  1. The Effect of Body Mass on Outdoor Adult Human Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lindsey G; Spencer, Jessica R; Dabbs, Gretchen R

    2017-02-23

    Forensic taphonomy explores factors impacting human decomposition. This study investigated the effect of body mass on the rate and pattern of adult human decomposition. Nine males and three females aged 49-95 years ranging in mass from 73 to 159 kg who were donated to the Complex for Forensic Anthropology Research between December 2012 and September 2015 were included in this study. Kelvin accumulated degree days (KADD) were used to assess the thermal energy required for subjects to reach several total body score (TBS) thresholds: early decomposition (TBS ≥6.0), TBS ≥12.5, advanced decomposition (TBS ≥19.0), TBS ≥23.0, and skeletonization (TBS ≥27.0). Results indicate no significant correlation between body mass and KADD at any TBS threshold. Body mass accounted for up to 24.0% of variation in decomposition rate depending on stage, and minor differences in decomposition pattern were observed. Body mass likely has a minimal impact on postmortem interval estimation.

  2. Effect of body mass and clothing on carrion entomofauna.

    PubMed

    Matuszewski, Szymon; Frątczak, Katarzyna; Konwerski, Szymon; Bajerlein, Daria; Szpila, Krzysztof; Jarmusz, Mateusz; Szafałowicz, Michał; Grzywacz, Andrzej; Mądra, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Carcass mass largely affects pattern and rate of carrion decomposition. Supposedly, it is similarly important for carrion entomofauna; however, most of its likely effects have not been tested experimentally. Here, simultaneous effects of carcass mass and clothing are analyzed. A factorial block experiment with four levels of carcass mass (small carcasses 5-15 kg, medium carcasses 15.1-30 kg, medium/large carcasses 35-50 kg, large carcasses 55-70 kg) and two levels of carcass clothing (clothed and unclothed) was made in a grassland habitat of Western Poland. Pig carcasses (N = 24) were grouped into spring, early summer, and late summer blocks. Insects were sampled manually and with pitfall traps. Results demonstrate that insect assemblages are more complex, abundant, and long-lasting on larger carcasses, whereas clothing is of minor importance in this respect. Only large or medium/large carcasses were colonized by all guilds of carrion insects, while small or medium carcasses revealed high underrepresentation of late-colonizing insects (e.g., Cleridae or Nitidulidae). This finding indicates that carcasses weighing about 23 kg-a standard in forensic decomposition studies-give an incomplete picture of carrion entomofauna. Residencies of all forensically relevant insects were distinctly prolonged on larger carcasses, indicating that cadaver mass is a factor of great importance in this respect. The pre-appearance interval of most taxa was found to be unrelated to mass or clothing of a carcass. Moreover, current results suggest that rate of larval development is higher on smaller carcasses. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that carcass mass is a factor of crucial importance for carrion entomofauna, whereas the importance of clothing is small.

  3. Solutions of free higher spins in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, H.; Shao, Kai-Nan

    2011-11-01

    We consider free massive and massless higher integer spins in AdS backgrounds in general D dimensions. We obtain the solutions corresponding to the highest-weight state of the spin-ℓ representations of the SO (2 , D - 1) isometry groups. The solution for the spin-ℓ field is expressed recursively in terms of that for the spin- (ℓ - 1). Thus starting from the explicit spin-0, all the higher-spin solutions can be obtained. These solutions allow us to derive the generalized Breitenlohner-Freedman bound, and analyze the asymptotic falloffs. In particular, solutions with negative mass square in general have falloffs slower than those of the Schwarzschild AdS black holes in the AdS boundaries.

  4. Effects of adding ethanol to KOH electrolyte on electrochemical performance of titanium carbide-derived carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiang; Zhang, Ruijun; Chen, Peng; Ge, Shanhai

    2014-01-01

    Porous carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) are synthesized from TiC at different chlorination temperatures as electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors. It is found that the microstructure of the produced CDCs has significant influence on both the hydrophilicity in aqueous KOH electrolyte and the resultant electrochemical performance. Because the TiC-CDC synthesized at higher temperature (e.g. 1000 °C) contains well-ordered graphite ribbons, it shows lower hydrophilicity and specific capacitance. It is also found that addition of a small amount of ethanol to KOH electrolyte effectively improves the wettability of the CDCs synthesized at higher temperature and the corresponding specific capacitance. Compared with the CDC synthesized at 600 °C, the CDC synthesized at 1000 °C shows fast ion transport and excellent capacitive behavior in KOH electrolyte with addition of ethanol because of the existences of mesopores and high specific surface area.

  5. Effect of adding phosphate to drinking water on bacterial growth in slightly and highly corroded pipes.

    PubMed

    Appenzeller, B M; Batté, M; Mathieu, L; Block, J C; Lahoussine, V; Cavard, J; Gatel, D

    2001-03-01

    The effect of phosphate addition in drinking water was tested under static conditions as batch tests and under dynamic conditions using continuously fed reactors. Phosphate supplements in batch tests from 0.1 to 2 mg P-PO4 L(-1) did not show any relationship between bacterial growth and phosphate concentration. Dynamic tests in slightly corroded reactor (stainless steel) treated at 1 mg P-PO4 L(-1) showed only a moderate improvement in the growth of microorganisms. On the contrary, phosphate treatment applied to the highly corroded reactor (unlined cast iron) led to an immediate, drastic drop in iron oxide release and bacterial production. Phosphate uptake by the reactor wall was less than 14% with the stainless-steel reactor and 70-90% with the corroded cast iron reactor. Moreover, about 5% of the phosphate associated to corroded iron pipe walls was released for 20 days after the end of treatment.

  6. Wheat straw hemicelluloses added with cellulose nanocrystals and citric acid. Effect on film physical properties.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Paulo H F; Waldron, Keith W; Wilson, David R; Cunha, Arcelina P; Brito, Edy S de; Rodrigues, Tigressa H S; Rosa, Morsyleide F; Azeredo, Henriette M C

    2017-05-15

    Wheat straw has been used as a source of hemicelluloses (WSH) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) for the elaboration of biodegradable films. Different films have been formed by using WSH as a matrix and different contents of CNC and citric acid. The predominant hemicelluloses were arabinoxylans. CNC reinforced the films, improving tensile strength and modulus, water resistance and water vapor barrier. Citric acid, on the other hand, presented concomitant plasticizing and crosslinking effects (the latter also evidenced by FTIR), probably due to a crosslinking extension by glycerol. The use of 5.9wt% CNC and 30wt% citric acid was defined as optimal conditions, resulting in minimum water sensitivity and permeability, while maintaining a good combination of tensile properties. Under those conditions, the films presented enhanced modulus, elongation, water resistance, and barrier to water vapor when compared to the control WSH film, and might be used for wrapping or coating a variety of foods.

  7. The effect of adding metformin to insulin therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus children: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Al Khalifah, Reem A; Alnhdi, Abdulrahman; Alghar, Hassan; Alanazi, Mohammad; Florez, Ivan D

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to assess the effectiveness of adding metformin to insulin in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) children for improving metabolic outcomes. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted on children age 6 to 19 years who are diagnosed with T1DM, and examined the effect of adding Metformin to standard insulin therapy. We performed literature searches on Ovid Midline, Ovid Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) from the date of inception of the database to February 15, 2016. Two reviewers screened titles and abstracts independently, assessed full text eligibility, and extracted information from eligible trials. The primary outcome is glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and the secondary outcomes are health-related quality of life, body mass index (BMI), lipid profile, total insulin daily dose, hypoglycaemia, and diabetes ketoacidosis. We screened 736 studies, and included 6 RCTs with 325 patients. All RCTs were of low risk of bias, and included adolescents (mean age 15 years). The meta-analysis showed that the addition of Metformin resulted in decreased total insulin daily dose (TIDD) (unit/kg/d) (mean difference [MD] = -0.15, 95%CI, -0.24, -0.06), and reduced BMI kg/m(2) (MD -1.46, 95%CI -2.54, 0.38), and BMI z-score (MD= - 0.11, 95%CI -0.21, -0.01), and similar HbA1c (%) (MD= - 0.05, 95%CI, -0.19, 0.29). The overall evidence quality was high to moderate. Current evidence does not support use of Metformin in T1DM adolescents to improve HbA1c. However, Metformin may provide modest reduction in TIDD and BMI.

  8. Homogenization limit for a multiband effective mass model in heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Morandi, O.

    2014-06-15

    We study the homogenization limit of a multiband model that describes the quantum mechanical motion of an electron in a quasi-periodic crystal. In this approach, the distance among the atoms that constitute the material (lattice parameter) is considered a small quantity. Our model include the description of materials with variable chemical composition, intergrowth compounds, and heterostructures. We derive the effective multiband evolution system in the framework of the kp approach. We study the well posedness of the mathematical problem. We compare the effective mass model with the standard kp models for uniform and non-uniforms crystals. We show that in the limit of vanishing lattice parameter, the particle density obtained by the effective mass model, converges to the exact probability density of the particle.

  9. Impact of Heat Wave Definitions on the Added Effect of Heat Waves on Cardiovascular Mortality in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wentan; Zeng, Qiang; Ma, Yue; Li, Guoxing; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-01-01

    Heat waves are associated with increased mortality, however, few studies have examined the added effect of heat waves. Moreover, there is limited evidence for the influence of different heat wave definitions (HWs) on cardiovascular mortality in Beijing, the capital of China. The aim of this study was to find the best HW definitions for cardiovascular mortality, and we examined the effect modification by an individual characteristic on cardiovascular mortality in Beijing, a typical northern city in China. We applied a Poisson generalized additive approach to estimate the differences in cardiovascular mortality during heat waves (using 12 HWs) compared with non-heat-wave days in Beijing from 2006 to 2009. We also validated the model fit by checking the residuals to ensure that the autocorrelation was successfully removed. In addition, the effect modifications by individual characteristics were explored in different HWs. Our results showed that the associations between heat waves and cardiovascular mortality differed from different HWs. HWs using the 93th percentile of the daily average temperature (27.7 °C) and a duration ≥5 days had the greatest risk, with an increase of 18% (95% confidence interval (CI): 6%, 31%) in the overall population, 24% (95% CI: 10%, 39%) in an older group (ages ≥65 years), and 22% (95% CI: 3%, 44%) in a female group. The added effect of heat waves was apparent after 5 consecutive heat wave days for the overall population and the older group. Females and the elderly were at higher risk than males and younger subjects (ages <65 years). Our findings suggest that heat wave definitions play a significant role in the relationship between heat wave and cardiovascular mortality. Using a suitable definition may have implications for designing local heat early warning systems and protecting the susceptible populations during heat waves. PMID:27657103

  10. Different Effects of Adding White Noise on Cognitive Performance of Sub-, Normal and Super-Attentive School Children

    PubMed Central

    Helps, Suzannah K.; Bamford, Susan; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.; Söderlund, Göran B. W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Noise often has detrimental effects on performance. However, because of the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), auditory white noise (WN) can alter the “signal to noise” ratio and improve performance. The Moderate Brain Arousal (MBA) model postulates different levels of internal “neural noise” in individuals with different attentional capacities. This in turn determines the particular WN level most beneficial in each individual case–with one level of WN facilitating poor attenders but hindering super-attentive children. The objective of the present study is to find out if added WN affects cognitive performance differently in children that differ in attention ability. Methods Participants were teacher-rated super- (N = 25); normal- (N = 29) and sub-attentive (N = 36) children (aged 8 to 10 years). Two non-executive function (EF) tasks (a verbal episodic recall task and a delayed verbal recognition task) and two EF tasks (a visuo-spatial working memory test and a Go-NoGo task) were performed under three WN levels. The non-WN condition was only used to control for potential differences in background noise in the group testing situations. Results There were different effects of WN on performance in the three groups-adding moderate WN worsened the performance of super-attentive children for both task types and improved EF performance in sub-attentive children. The normal-attentive children’s performance was unaffected by WN exposure. The shift from moderate to high levels of WN had little further effect on performance in any group. Significance The predicted differential effect of WN on performance was confirmed. However, the failure to find evidence for an inverted U function challenges current theories. Alternative explanations are discussed. We propose that WN therapy should be further investigated as a possible non-pharmacological treatment for inattention. PMID:25393410

  11. Impact of Heat Wave Definitions on the Added Effect of Heat Waves on Cardiovascular Mortality in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wentan; Zeng, Qiang; Ma, Yue; Li, Guoxing; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-09-21

    Heat waves are associated with increased mortality, however, few studies have examined the added effect of heat waves. Moreover, there is limited evidence for the influence of different heat wave definitions (HWs) on cardiovascular mortality in Beijing, the capital of China. The aim of this study was to find the best HW definitions for cardiovascular mortality, and we examined the effect modification by an individual characteristic on cardiovascular mortality in Beijing, a typical northern city in China. We applied a Poisson generalized additive approach to estimate the differences in cardiovascular mortality during heat waves (using 12 HWs) compared with non-heat-wave days in Beijing from 2006 to 2009. We also validated the model fit by checking the residuals to ensure that the autocorrelation was successfully removed. In addition, the effect modifications by individual characteristics were explored in different HWs. Our results showed that the associations between heat waves and cardiovascular mortality differed from different HWs. HWs using the 93th percentile of the daily average temperature (27.7 °C) and a duration ≥5 days had the greatest risk, with an increase of 18% (95% confidence interval (CI): 6%, 31%) in the overall population, 24% (95% CI: 10%, 39%) in an older group (ages ≥65 years), and 22% (95% CI: 3%, 44%) in a female group. The added effect of heat waves was apparent after 5 consecutive heat wave days for the overall population and the older group. Females and the elderly were at higher risk than males and younger subjects (ages <65 years). Our findings suggest that heat wave definitions play a significant role in the relationship between heat wave and cardiovascular mortality. Using a suitable definition may have implications for designing local heat early warning systems and protecting the susceptible populations during heat waves.

  12. Effect of hydrogen addition on the deposition of titanium nitride thin films in nitrogen added argon magnetron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, P.; Bhuyan, H.; Diaz-Droguett, D. E.; Guzman, F.; Mändl, S.; Saikia, B. K.; Favre, M.; Maze, J. R.; Wyndham, E.

    2016-06-01

    The properties and performance of thin films deposited by plasma assisted processes are closely related to their manufacturing techniques and processes. The objective of the current study is to investigate the modification of plasma parameters occurring during hydrogen addition in N2  +  Ar magnetron plasma used for titanium nitride thin film deposition, and to correlate the measured properties of the deposited thin film with the bulk plasma parameters of the magnetron discharge. From the Langmuir probe measurements, it was observed that the addition of hydrogen led to a decrease of electron density from 8.6 to 6.2  ×  (1014 m-3) and a corresponding increase of electron temperature from 6.30 to 6.74 eV. The optical emission spectroscopy study reveals that with addition of hydrogen, the density of argon ions decreases. The various positive ion species involving hydrogen are found to increase with increase of hydrogen partial pressure in the chamber. The thin films deposited were characterized using standard surface diagnostic tools such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Although it was possible to deposit thin films of titanium nitride with hydrogen addition in nitrogen added argon magnetron plasma, the quality of the thin films deteriorates with higher hydrogen partial pressures.

  13. Effects of added fruits and vegetables on dietary intakes and body weight in Scottish adults.

    PubMed

    Whybrow, Stephen; Harrison, Claire L S; Mayer, Claus; James Stubbs, R

    2006-03-01

    An increased consumption of fruits and vegetables (F&V) has been suggested as a way to limit, or even lower, energy and fat intakes. The present study examined the effects of incorporating F&V supplements into the diets of adults who reported consuming <240 g (three portions) of F&V per d on energy and fat intakes, and change in body weight, over 8 weeks using a randomised parallel design. Thirty-four males and twenty-eight females (age 42.6 (sd 11.1) years, BMI 23.7 (sd 2.7) kg/m(2)) were each provided with supplements of 0, 300 or 600 g F&V per d. Food, nutrient and energy intakes were measured before, during and at the end of the supplementation period using 7 d weighed records. Mean daily energy intakes were not different among the three groups before (P = 0.151) or during the supplementation periods (P = 0.407), although changes in energy intakes over the study period tended to be more positive with increasing amounts of F&V supplements (P = 0.078). There was no difference in changes of body weights during the study (P = 0.242). Carbohydrate (P < 0.001), sugar (P < 0.001), fibre (P < 0.001) and weight of food consumed (P = 0.022) increased in the treatment groups. There were no significant differences, or changes, in fat intakes among the three groups. Consumption of mandatory F&V supplements for 8 weeks produced beneficial changes in diet composition, but did not result in lower reported energy or fat intakes, and did not result in loss of body weight.

  14. Sevoflurane-induced isoelectric EEG and burst suppression: differential and antagonistic effect of added nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Niu, B; Xiao, J Y; Fang, Y; Zhou, B Y; Li, J; Cao, F; Tian, Y K; Mei, W

    2017-03-08

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether nitrous oxide influenced the ED50 of sevoflurane for induction of isoelectric electroencephalogram (ED50isoelectric ) differently from its influence on the ED50 of sevoflurane for electroencephalogram burst suppression (ED50burst ). In a prospective, randomised, double-blind, parallel group, up-down sequential allocation study, 77 ASA physical status 1 and 2 patients received sevoflurane induction and, after tracheal intubation, were randomly allocated to receive sevoflurane with either 40% oxygen in air (control group) or 60% nitrous oxide in oxygen mixture (nitrous group). The ED50isoelectric in the two groups was determined using Dixon's up and down method, starting at 2.5% with 0.2% step size of end-tidal sevoflurane. The electroencephalogram was considered as isoelectric when a burst suppression ratio of 100% lasted > 1 min. The subsequent concentrations of sevoflurane administered were determined by the presence or absence of isoelectric electroencephalogram in the previous patient in the same group. The ED50isoelectric in the nitrous group 4.08 (95%CI, 3.95-4.38)% was significantly higher than that in the control group 3.68 (95%CI, 3.50-3.78)% (p < 0.0001). The values for ED50burst were 3.05 (95%CI, 2.66-3.90)% and 3.02 (95%CI, 3.00-3.05)% in nitrous group and control group, respectively (p = 0.52). The addition of 60% nitrous oxide increases ED50isoelectric , but not the ED50burst of sevoflurane. Neither result indicates an additive effect of anaesthetic agents, as might be expected, and possible reasons for this are discussed.

  15. Effect of adding human chorionic gonadotropin to frozen thawed embryo transfer cycles with history of thin endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Davar, Robab; Miraj, Sepideh; Farid Mojtahedi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Embryo implantation process is a complex phenomenon and depends on fetal and maternal factors interaction. Endometrial thickness is needed for successful implantation. Objective: We designed this study in order to assess adding human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) to the conventional protocol in endometrial preparation in women with thin endometrium and a history of in vitro fertilization–embryo transfer (IVF-ET) failure. Materials and Methods: The non-randomized clinical trial study (quasi experimental design) was performed on 28 patients. Participants were women who were candidate for frozen-thawed (ET) and had two previous failed ET cycles because of thin endometrial. HCG was administrated (150 IU, intramuscular) from the 8th day of cycle and when endometrial thickness reached at least 7mm HCG was discontinued and frozen thawed ET was done. Results: Totally 28 patients were included. The mean ± SD age of participants was 30.39±4.7. The mean of endometrium thickness before and after HCG were 5.07±0.43 and 7.85±0.52, respectively p<0.001. Also, there were five clinically and chemically pregnant women. Conclusion: The findings of the study suggested that adding HCG to the conventional preparation method was an effective protocol and significantly improved endometrial thickness and pregnancy outcomes in women with previous embryo transfer failure because of thin endometrium. PMID:27141549

  16. Experimental observations on the effect of added dispersing agent on phenol biodegradation in a microporous membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Juang, Ruey-Shin; Chung, Tsuey-Ping; Wang, Maw-Ling; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2008-03-01

    The effect of added dispersing agent tetrasodium pyrophosphate (TSP) on the degradation of phenol by Pseudomonas putida BCRC 14365 in a microporous membrane bioreactor was experimentally studied at 30 degrees C and pH 7. The hollow fibers were pre-wetted with ethanol to make them more hydrophilic. Phenol solution was passed through the lumen of the module and the cell medium was flowed across the shell. All Experiments were carried out at a fixed initial cell density of 0.023 g/L (0.06 optical density). Phenol could be completely degraded with the help of the biofilm formed on the outer surfaces of the fibers even though its level was high up to 3 g/L. It was also shown that the presence of TSP in cell medium could improve biodegradation. The amount of added TSP was optimized to be 1 g/L under the conditions studied. In this situation, 3 g/L of phenol could be completely removed within 76 h, much shorter than the absence of TSP (within 92 h).

  17. Investigating the effect of adding an on-axis jet to Ar gas puff Z pinches on Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Jennings, C. A.; Jones, B.; Apruzese, J. P.; Ampleford, D. J.; Lamppa, D. C.; Coverdale, C. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Giuliani, J. L.; Hansen, S. B.; Jones, M. C.; Moore, N. W.; Rochau, G. A.; Thornhill, J. W.

    2016-10-01

    Double-shell Ar gas puff implosions driven by 16.5 ± 0.5 MA on the Z generator at Sandia National Laboratories are very effective emitters of Ar K-shell radiation (photon energy >3 keV), producing yields of 330 ± 9% kJ [B. Jones et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 020706 (2015)]. Previous simulations and experiments have reported dramatic increases in K-shell yields when adding an on-axis jet to double shell gas puffs for some configurations. We report on a series of experiments on Z testing Ar gas puff configurations with and without an on-axis jet guided by 3D magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. Adding an on-axis jet was found to significantly improve the performance of some, but not all, configurations. The maximum observed K-shell yield of 375 ± 9% kJ was produced with a configuration that rapidly imploded onto an on-axis jet. A dramatic difference was observed in the plasma conditions at stagnation when a jet was used, producing a narrower stagnation column in experiments with a higher density but relatively lower electron temperature. The MHD simulations accurately reproduce the experimental measurements. The conversion efficiency for electrical energy delivered to the load to K-shell x-rays is estimated to be ˜12.5% for the best-performing configuration, similar to the best results from experiments at smaller facilities.

  18. The effect of adding roughness and thickness to a transonic axial compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth L.; Chima, Rodrick V.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Roberts, William B.

    1995-01-01

    The performance deterioration of a high speed axial compressor rotor due to surface roughness and airfoil thickness variations is reported. A 0.025 mm (0.001 in.) thick rough coating with a surface finish of 2.54-3.18 RMS microns (100-125 RMS microinches) is applied to the pressure and suction surface of the rotor blades. Coating both surfaces increases the leading edge thickness by 10% at the hub and 20% at the tip. Application of this coating results in a loss in efficiency of 6 points and a 9% reduction in the pressure ratio across the rotor at an operating condition near the design point. To separate the effect of thickness and roughness, a smooth coating of equal thickness is also applied to the blade. The smooth coating surface finish is 0.254-0.508 RMS microns (10-20 RMS microinches), compared to the bare metal blade surface finish of 0.508 RMS microns (20 RMS microinches). The smooth coating results in approximately half of the performance deterioration found from the rough coating. Both coatings are then applied to different portions of the blade surface to determine which portions of the airfoil are most sensitive to thickness/roughness variations. Aerodynamic performance measurements are presented for a number of coating configurations at 60%, 80%, and 100% of design speed. The results indicate that thickness/roughness over the first 10% of blade chord accounts for virtually all of the observed performance degradation for the smooth coating, compared to about 70% of the observed performance degradation for the rough coating. The performance deterioration is investigated in more detail at design speed using laser anemometer measurements as well as predictions generated by a quasi-3D Navier-Stokes flow solver which includes a surface roughness model. Measurements and analysis are performed on the baseline blade and the full-coverage smooth and rough coatings. The results indicate that coating the blade causes a thickening of the blade boundary layers. The

  19. Effect of recombinant human interferon-alpha A/D on in vivo murine tumor cell growth.

    PubMed

    Uno, K; Shimizu, S; Inaba, K; Kitaura, M; Nakahira, K; Kato, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Muramatsu, S

    1988-05-01

    We investigated the effect of human recombinant interferon-alpha A/D A/D-IFN), which is known to delay the growth of murine tumor cells, on the growth of S1 and R1 subline cells of murine Meth A fibrosarcoma in the peritoneal cavity of mice. In vitro growth of S1 cells was sensitive to, and that of R1 cells was resistant to, the direct effect of A/D-IFN, as with murine natural IFN-alpha/beta, which was used originally to isolate these sublines. In vivo, however, the growth of not only S1 cells but also R1 cells was suppressed by the administration of A/D-IFN, and the survival time of tumor-bearing mice was prolonged. Although A/D-IFN had a direct effect on S1 cells in vivo, R1 cells were susceptible only to the indirect effect via the host cells. Macrophages (M phi) harvested from the peritoneal cavity of A/D-IFN-treated mice bearing ascitic R1 cells were very effective in suppressing the in vitro growth of R1 cells; those from non-R1-bearing A/D-IFN-treated mice were less effective. The results of in vitro experiments indicate that M phi are very probably activated by the synergism of A/D-IFN and M phi diameter-activating factor(s) produced by lymphoid cells in tumor-bearing mice.

  20. EFFECT OF MOBILITY ON PERFORMANCE OF WIRELESS AD-HOC NETWORK PROTOCOLS.

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C. L.; Drozda, M.; Marathe, M. V.; Marathe, A.

    2001-01-01

    We empirically study the effect of mobility on the performance of protocols designed for wireless adhoc networks. An important ohjective is to study the interaction of the Routing and MAC layer protocols under different mobility parameters. We use three basic mobility models: grid mobility model, random waypoint model, and exponential correlated random model. The performance of protocols was measured in terms of (i) latency, (ii) throughput, (iii) number of packels received, (iv) long term fairness and (v) number of control packets at the MAC layer level. Three different commonly studied routing protocols were used: AODV, DSR and LAR1. Similarly three well known MAC protocols were used: MACA, 802.1 1 and CSMA. The inair1 conclusion of our study include the following: 1. 'I'he performance of the: network varies widely with varying mobility models, packet injection rates and speeds; and can ba in fact characterized as fair to poor depending on the specific situation. Nevertheless, in general, it appears that the combination of AODV and 802.1 I is far better than other combination of routing and MAC protocols. 2. MAC layer protocols interact with routing layer protocols. This concept which is formalized using statistics implies that in general it is not meaningful to speak about a MAC or a routing protocol in isolation. Such an interaction leads to trade-offs between the amount of control packets generated by each layer. More interestingly, the results wise the possibility of improving the performance of a particular MAC layer protocol by using a cleverly designed routing protocol or vice-versa. 3. Routing prolocols with distributed knowledge about routes are more suitable for networks with mobility. This is seen by comparing the performance of AODV with DSR or LAR scheme 1. In DSli and IAR scheme 1, information about a computed path is being stored in the route query control packct. 4. MAC layer protocols have varying performance with varying mobility models. It is

  1. Effects of ad libitum ingestion of monosodium glutamate on weight gain in C57BL6/J mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xueying; Ferreira, Jozélia G; Yeckel, Catherine W; Kondoh, Takashi; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2011-01-01

    Although the umami compound monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a widely used flavor enhancer, controversy still persists regarding the effects of MSG intake on body weight. It has been claimed, in particular, that chronic MSG intake may result in excessive body weight gain and obesity. In this study we assessed the effects of chronic (16 weeks) ad libitum MSG on body weight and metabolism of C57BL6/J mice. Adult male mice were divided in four experimental groups and fed with either a low-fat (LF) or high-fat (HF) diet and with either two bottles of plain water or one bottle containing 1% MSG and another one containing water according to a factorial design. Mice were monitored weekly for body weight and food/fluid intake for 15 weeks. At the end of the experiments, the circulating levels of leptin, insulin, total protein, total cholesterol, triglyceride, blood urea nitrogen, and non-esterified fatty acids were also analyzed. Our results show that MSG intake did not influence body weight in either LF or HF groups. Interestingly, although animals overall displayed strong preferences for MSG against water, preferences were relatively higher in LF compared to HF group. Consistent with the body weight data, while significant differences in leptin, insulin, total cholesterol, and non-esterified fatty acids were found between HF and LF groups, such an effect was not influenced by MSG intake. Finally, indirect calorimetry measurements revealed similar energy expenditure levels between animals being presented water only and MSG only. In summary, our data does not support the notion that ad libitum MSG intake should trigger the development of obesity or other metabolic abnormalities.

  2. Orientifolded locally AdS3 geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loran, F.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Continuing the analysis of [Loran F and Sheikh-Jabbari M M 2010 Phys. Lett. B 693 184-7], we classify all locally AdS3 stationary axi-symmetric unorientable solutions to AdS3 Einstein gravity and show that they are obtained by applying certain orientifold projection on AdS3, BTZ or AdS3 self-dual orbifold, respectively, O-AdS3, O-BTZ and O-SDO geometries. Depending on the orientifold fixed surface, the O-surface, which is either a space-like 2D plane or a cylinder, or a light-like 2D plane or a cylinder, one can distinguish four distinct cases. For the space-like orientifold plane or cylinder cases, these geometries solve AdS3 Einstein equations and are hence locally AdS3 everywhere except at the O-surface, where there is a delta-function source. For the light-like cases, the geometry is a solution to Einstein equations even at the O-surface. We discuss the causal structure for static, extremal and general rotating O-BTZ and O-SDO cases as well as the geodesic motion on these geometries. We also discuss orientifolding Poincaré patch AdS3 and AdS2 geometries as a way to geodesic completion of these spaces and comment on the 2D CFT dual to the O-geometries.

  3. Effects of adding injection-compression to rapid heat cycle molding on the structure of a light guide plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokkwan; Min, Inki; Yoon, Kyunghwan; Kang, Jeongjin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of adding injection-compression to rapid heat cycle molding (RHCM) (rapid heat cycle injection-compression molding (RICM)) on the physical quality and optical anisotropy of a molded light guide plate (LGP). Transcription ratio of microstructure, uniformity of part thickness and birefringence were experimentally evaluated on a 7 inch LGP of nominal thickness of 1.12 mm (including a microstructure array of 30 µm diameter and 14 µm height). The designed mold was equipped with rapid heating and compressing facilities and a microstructured nickel stamper was fabricated by UV LIGA process. In addition, to investigate the efficacy of RICM, experiments involving conventional injection molding (CIM), ICM, and RHCM were conducted in parallel with RICM using the same mold. RHCM and RICM yielded excellent transcription ratios for the microstructure, while CIM and RICM provided high thickness uniformity and low birefringence. Thus, RICM obtains high transcription ratio of microstructure, uniform thickness and low birefringence.

  4. Effects on Undercooling and Interfacial Reactions with Cu Substrates of Adding Bi and In to Sn-3Ag Solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Yu-Yan; Cheng, Robbin; Wu, Albert T.

    2010-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of adding Bi and In to Sn-3Ag Pb-free solder on undercooling, interfacial reactions with Cu substrates, and the growth kinetics of intermetallic compounds (IMCs). The amount of Sn dominates the undercooling, regardless of the amount or species of further additives. The interfacial IMC that formed in Sn-Ag-Bi-In and Sn-In-Bi solders is Cu6Sn5, while that in Sn-Ag-In solders is Cu6(Sn,In)5, since Bi enhances the solubility of In in Sn matrices. The activation energy for the growth of IMCs in Sn-Ag-Bi-In is nearly double that in Sn-Ag-In solders, because Bi in the solder promotes Cu dissolution. The bright particles that form inside the Sn-Ag-In bulk solders are the ζ-phase.

  5. Effect of adding nanometre-sized heterogeneities on the structural dynamics and the excess wing of a molecular glass former

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, S.; Fischer, J. K. H.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Loidl, A.; Novak, E.; Jalarvo, N.; Ohl, M.

    2016-10-01

    We present the relaxation dynamics of glass-forming glycerol mixed with 1.1 nm sized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) molecules using dielectric spectroscopy (DS) and two different neutron scattering (NS) techniques. Both, the reorientational dynamics as measured by DS and the density fluctuations detected by NS reveal a broadening of the α relaxation when POSS molecules are added. Moreover, we find a significant slowing down of the α-relaxation time. These effects are in accord with the heterogeneity scenario considered for the dynamics of glasses and supercooled liquids. The addition of POSS also affects the excess wing in glycerol arising from a secondary relaxation process, which seems to exhibit a dramatic increase in relative strength compared to the α relaxation.

  6. Effect of adding nanometre-sized heterogeneities on the structural dynamics and the excess wing of a molecular glass former

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, S.; Fischer, J. K. H.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Loidl, A.; Novak, E.; Jalarvo, N.; Ohl, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present the relaxation dynamics of glass-forming glycerol mixed with 1.1 nm sized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) molecules using dielectric spectroscopy (DS) and two different neutron scattering (NS) techniques. Both, the reorientational dynamics as measured by DS and the density fluctuations detected by NS reveal a broadening of the α relaxation when POSS molecules are added. Moreover, we find a significant slowing down of the α-relaxation time. These effects are in accord with the heterogeneity scenario considered for the dynamics of glasses and supercooled liquids. The addition of POSS also affects the excess wing in glycerol arising from a secondary relaxation process, which seems to exhibit a dramatic increase in relative strength compared to the α relaxation. PMID:27725747

  7. No Effect of Added Sugar Consumed at Median American Intake Level on Glucose Tolerance or Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lowndes, Joshua; Sinnett, Stephanie S.; Rippe, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Excess sugar consumption may promote adverse changes in hepatic and total body insulin resistance. Debate continues over the effects of sugars at more typically consumed levels and whether the identity of the sugar consumed is important. In the present study participants (20–60 years old) were randomly assigned to one of five groups, three that consumed low fat milk with added fructose containing sugars in amounts equivalent to the 50th percentile of fructose consumption (US), one which consumed low-fat milk sweetened with glucose, and one unsweetened low-fat milk control group. The intervention lasted ten weeks. In the entire study population there was less than 1 kg increase in weight (73.6 ± 13.0 vs. 74.5 ± 13.3 kg, p < 0.001), but the change in weight was comparable among groups (p > 0.05). There were no changes in fasting glucose (49 ± 0.4 vs. 5.0 ± 0.5 mmol/L), insulin (56.9 ± 38.9 vs. 61.8 ± 50.0 pmol/L), or insulin resistance, as measured by the Homeostasis Model Assessment method (1.8 ± 1.3 vs. 2.0 ± 1.5, all p > 0.05). These data suggest that added sugar consumed at the median American intake level does not produce changes in measures of insulin sensitivity or glucose tolerance and that no sugar has more deleterious effects than others. PMID:26512691

  8. Detection of frequency modulation by hearing-impaired listeners: Effects of carrier frequency, modulation rate, and added amplitude modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Brian C. J.; Skrodzka, Ewa

    2002-01-01

    It has been proposed that the detection of frequency modulation (FM) of sinusoidal carriers can be mediated by two mechanisms: a place mechanism based on FM-induced amplitude modulation (AM) in the excitation pattern, and a temporal mechanism based on phase-locking in the auditory nerve. The temporal mechanism appears to be ``sluggish'' and does not play a role for FM rates above about 10 Hz. It also does not play a role for high carrier frequencies (above about 5 kHz). This experiment examined FM detection in three young subjects with normal hearing and four elderly subjects with cochlear hearing loss. Carrier frequencies were 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 6 kHz and modulation rates were 2, 5, 10, and 20 Hz. FM detection thresholds were measured both in the absence of AM, and with AM of a fixed depth (m=0.33) added in both intervals of a forced-choice trial. The added AM was intended to disrupt cues based on FM-induced AM in the excitation pattern. Generally, the hearing-impaired subjects performed markedly more poorly than the normal-hearing subjects. For the normal-hearing subjects, the disruptive effect of the AM tended to increase with increasing modulation rate, for carrier frequencies below 6 kHz, as found previously by Moore and Sek [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100, 2320-2331 (1996)]. For the hearing-impaired subjects, the disruptive effective of the AM was generally larger than for the normal-hearing subjects, and the magnitude of the disruption did not consistently increase with increasing modulation rate. The results suggest that cochlear hearing impairment adversely affects both temporal and excitation pattern mechanisms of FM detection.

  9. Effects of encapsulated nitrate on eating behavior, rumen fermentation, and blood profile of beef heifers fed restrictively or ad libitum.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Araujo, R C; Koenig, K M; Beauchemin, K A

    2015-05-01

    A slow-release form of nitrate (encapsulated nitrate [EN]) was investigated for effects on risk of toxicity, feed consumption rates, and feed sorting behavior in 2 experiments. In Exp. 1, 5 beef heifers (806 ± 72 kg BW) were fed once daily at 75% of ad libitum intake. Supplementary EN (85.6% DM; 71.4% NO3(-) on a DM basis) was increased by 1% every 4 d from 0 to 1.0, 2.0, 2.9, 3.9, 4.8, and 5.8% of dietary DM (from 10.3 to 15.6% CP and 0.11 to 4.8% total NO3(-)). During the study, a heifer was removed due to nitrate poisoning with 59% blood methemoglobin (MetHb; % of total hemoglobin) at 2.9% EN and another due to refusal to eat the 2% EN diet. When dietary EN increased from 0 to 5.8%, DMI (8.8 to 7.6 kg/d; P < 0.001) and feed consumption from 0 to 3 h were decreased (70.3 to 48.6% of total feed offered on an as-is basis; P = 0.001) and feed consumption from 12 to 24 h was increased (0.6 to 22.6%; P < 0.001). Blood MetHb at 1% EN was negligible (<1.5% of total hemoglobin). However, MetHb levels were greater (average 9.8 vs. 3.1% and maximum 23.6 vs. 13.6% at 3 h) at 2.0 and 2.9% EN than at 3.9, 4.8, and 5.8% EN. In Exp. 2, 8 beef heifers (451 ± 21 kg BW) were used in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design and fed for ad libitum intake, once daily, diets containing 0, 1, 2, and 3% EN (isonitrogenous, 12.7% CP, and 0.15 to 2.5% total NO3(-) in dietary DM). Each period consisted of 14 d for adaption and 14 d for sampling followed by a 7-d washout. During adaptation, EN was provided to heifers in a stepwise manner (an increase by 1% every 4 d). In Exp. 2 with ad libitum feeding, feed consumption rates were not different (41.8% of total feed consumed from 0 to 3 h; P = 0.56) among EN levels, but DMI tended to decrease linearly (0 to 3% EN; 10.4 to 10.1 kg/d; P = 0.06) and feed was sorted (linear, P < 0.05) against concentrates (containing EN) with EN inclusion. Potential toxicity of nitrate based on blood MetHb was not observed (all samples <2.0% of total hemoglobin

  10. Effects of adding different surfactants on antibiotic resistance genes and intI1 during chicken manure composting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yajun; Li, Haichao; Gu, Jie; Qian, Xun; Yin, Yanan; Li, Yang; Zhang, Ranran; Wang, Xiaojuan

    2016-11-01

    Aerobic composting is usually employed to treat livestock manure. In this study, a bio-surfactant (rhamnolipid, RL) and chemical surfactant (Tween 80, Tw) were added to chicken manure during composting and their effects were determined on the variations in ARGs and intI1. After composting, the reductions in the RAs of ARGs and intI1 with the addition of Tw (1-4.7logs) were generally greater than that with the addition of RL (0.8-3.7logs) and the control (CK) (0.3-2.6logs), and the enrichment of ARGs was higher with CK (0.9-1.8logs). The ARG profiles were affected significantly by temperature and the water-soluble carbon contents. RL and Tw effectively reduced the concentrations of bio-available Cu and Zn, thereby hindering the co-selection of ARGs by heavy metals. The effects of RL and Tw on ARGs and intI1 indicate that the addition of Tw was slightly more effective than RL after composting.

  11. The Effect of Protein Mass Modulation on Human Dihydrofolate Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Kevin; Sapienza, Paul J.; Lee, Andrew L.; Kohen, Amnon

    2016-01-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from Escherichia coli has long served as a model enzyme with which to elucidate possible links between protein dynamics and the catalyzed reaction. Such physical properties of its human counterpart have not been rigorously studied so far, but recent computer-based simulations suggest that these two DHFRs differ significantly in how closely coupled the protein dynamics and the catalyzed C-H→C hydride transfer step are. To test this prediction, two contemporary probes for studying the effect of protein dynamics on catalysis were combined here: temperature dependence of intrinsic kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) that are sensitive to the physical nature of the chemical step, and protein mass-modulation that slows down fast dynamics (femto- to picosecond timescale) throughout the protein. The intrinsic H/T KIEs of human DHFR, like those of E. coli DHFR, are shown to be temperature-independent in the range from 5–45 °C, indicating fast sampling of donor and acceptor distances (DADs) at the reaction’s transition state (or tunneling ready state – TRS). Mass modulation of these enzymes through isotopic labeling with 13C, 15N, and 2H at nonexchangeable hydrogens yield an 11% heavier enzyme. The additional mass has no effect on the intrinsic KIEs of the human enzyme. This finding indicates that the mass-modulation of the human DHFR affects neither DAD distribution nor the DAD’s conformational sampling dynamics. Furthermore, reduction in the enzymatic turnover number and the dissociation rate constant for the product indicate that the isotopic substitution affects kinetic steps that are not the catalyzed C-H→C hydride transfer. The findings are discussed in terms of fast dynamics and their role in catalysis, the comparison of calculations and experiments, and the interpretation of isotopically-modulated heavy enzymes in general. PMID:26813442

  12. Evaluation of recent glacier recession in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru (AD 1962 1999): spatial distribution of mass loss and climatic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, Bryan G.; Seltzer, Geoffrey O.

    2005-11-01

    We use a combination of aerial photogrammetry, satellite imagery, and differential GPS mapping to quantify the volume of ice lost between AD 1962 and 1999 from three glaciers on Nevado Queshque in the Cordillera Blanca, Perú (˜10°S). The largest averaged surface lowering (thinning) occurred in the southwest aspect (22 m) and the least in the eastern aspect (5 m). A heuristic sensitivity analysis indicates that 9.3 W m -2 was required to melt the total observed ice loss and this can be explained by sensible heat transfer related to a temperature rise of 1 °C, combined with a latent heat decrease related to a 0.14 g kg -1 increase in specific humidity. A first-difference analysis of temperature records from 29 stations in the Cordillera Blanca shows an average rising trend of 0.26 °C per decade over the 37 year interval, more than adequate to supply the hypothesized sensible heat transfer. A simple transmittivity model within a digital elevation model indicates solar radiation related to altered cloudiness was not a predominant climatic forcing. The distribution of glacier area with altitude calculated with the digital terrain model explains the observed asymmetrical ice melt.

  13. Effects of Distortion on Mass Flow Plug Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasson, Jonathan; Davis, David O.; Barnhart, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    A numerical, and experimental investigation to study the effects of flow distortion on a Mass Flow Plug (MFP) used to control and measure mass-flow during an inlet test has been conducted. The MFP was first calibrated using the WIND-US flow solver for uniform (undistorted) inflow conditions. These results are shown to compare favorably with an experimental calibration under similar conditions. The effects of distortion were investigated by imposing distorted flow conditions taken from an actual inlet test to the inflow plane of the numerical simulation. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) based distortion study only showed the general trend in mass flow rate. The study used only total pressure as the upstream boundary condition, which was not enough to define the flow. A better simulation requires knowledge of the turbulence structure and a specific distortion pattern over a range of plug positions. It is recommended that future distortion studies utilize a rake with at least the same amount of pitot tubes as the AIP rake.

  14. Effect and cardiovascular safety of adding rosiglitazone to insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yu; Ma, Delin; Xu, Weijie; Shao, Shiying; Yu, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Recently, the use of rosiglitazone has been limited or withdrawn from the market as a result of cardiovascular risk. However, theoretically adding rosiglitazone to insulin could help insulin to decrease the glucose level. The present meta-analysis was designed to investigate the effect and safety of adding rosiglitazone to insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods We searched published and unpublished databases through to March 2012. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing rosiglitazone in combination with insulin (RSG + INS) vs insulin alone (INS) in type 2 diabetes with outcomes including glycated hemoglobin levels, insulin dose, lipid parameters, blood pressure, edema and cardiovascular adverse events were selected. Results Nine RCTs with durations of 24–26 weeks involving 1,916 patients were included. The RSG + INS group showed significantly decreased glycated hemoglobin levels by 0.89% (P < 0.00001) with an 8.48-U reduction in daily insulin dose (P <0.00001). However, the risks of hypoglycemia and edema were more frequent in the RSG+INS group (P < 0.0001; P = 0.03, respectively). Total cholesterol level was significantly increased in the RSG+INS group (P < 0.00001), but none of the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglyceride levels were significantly different between groups. There were no significant differences between groups with regard to the risks of myocardial infarction, heart failure, cardiovascular death or all-cause death. Conclusions Rosiglitazone could help type 2 diabetes patients with poorly controlled glucose with insulin therapy to decrease glucose levels and reduce their daily insulin dose, but at the cost of increased total cholesterol level, hypoglycemia and edema risk. Compared with insulin therapy, adding rosiglitazone to insulin did not increase the risks of myocardial infarction, heart failure

  15. Coset construction of AdS particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Martin; Jorjadze, George; Megrelidze, Luka

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of the AdSN+1 particle realized on the coset SO(2, N)/SO (1,N). Hamiltonian reduction provides the physical phase space in terms of the coadjoint orbit obtained by boosting a timelike element of 𝔰𝔬(2, N). We show equivalence of this approach to geometric quantization and to the SO(N) covariant oscillator description, for which the boost generators entail a complicated operator ordering. As an alternative scheme, we introduce dual oscillator variables and derive their algebra at the classical and the quantum levels. This simplifies the calculations of the commutators for the boost generators and leads to unitary irreducible representations of 𝔰𝔬(2, N) for all admissible values of the mass parameter. We furthermore discuss an SO(N) covariant supersymmetric extension of the oscillator quantization, with its realization for superparticles in AdS2 and AdS3 given by recent works.

  16. Adding irrelevant information to the content prime reduces the prime-induced unmasking effect on speech recognition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meihong; Li, Huahui; Gao, Yayue; Lei, Ming; Teng, Xiangbin; Wu, Xihong; Li, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Presenting the early part of a nonsense sentence in quiet improves recognition of the last keyword of the sentence in a masker, especially a speech masker. This priming effect depends on higher-order processing of the prime information during target-masker segregation. This study investigated whether introducing irrelevant content information into the prime reduces the priming effect. The results showed that presenting the first four syllables (not including the second and third keywords) of the three-keyword target sentence in quiet significantly improved recognition of the second and third keywords in a two-talker-speech masker but not a noise masker, relative to the no-priming condition. Increasing the prime content from four to eight syllables (including the first and second keywords of the target sentence) further improved recognition of the third keyword in either the noise or speech masker. However, if the last four syllables of the eight-syllable prime were replaced by four irrelevant syllables (which did not occur in the target sentence), all the prime-induced speech-recognition improvements disappeared. Thus, knowing the early part of the target sentence mainly reduces informational masking of target speech, possibly by helping listeners attend to the target speech. Increasing the informative content of the prime further improves target-speech recognition probably by reducing the processing load. The reduction of the priming effect by adding irrelevant information to the prime is not due to introducing additional masking of the target speech.

  17. Effect of added caffeic acid and tyrosol on the fatty acid and volatile profiles of camellia oil following heating.

    PubMed

    Haiyan, Zhong; Bedgood, Danny R; Bishop, Andrea G; Prenzler, Paul D; Robards, Kevin

    2006-12-13

    Camellia oil is widely used in some parts of the world partly because of its high oxidative stability. The effect of heating a refined camellia oil for 1 h at 120 degrees C or 2 h at 170 degrees C with exogenous antioxidant, namely, caffeic acid and tyrosol, was studied. Parameters used to assess the effect of heating were peroxide and K values, volatile formation, and fatty acid profile. Of these, volatile formation was the most sensitive index of change as seen in the number of volatiles and the total area count of volatiles in gas chromatograms. Hexanal was generally the dominant volatile in treated and untreated samples with a concentration of 2.13 and 5.34 mg kg(-1) in untreated oils heated at 120 and 170 degrees C, respectively. The hexanal content was significantly reduced in heated oils to which tyrosol and/or caffeic acid had been added. Using volatile formation as an index of oxidation, tyrosol was the more effective antioxidant of these compounds. This is contradictory to generally accepted antioxidant structure-activity relationships. Changes in fatty acid profiles after heating for up to 24 h at 180 degrees C were not significant.

  18. The Preventive Effects of Nanopowdered Peanut Sprout-added Caciocavallo Cheese on Collagen-induced Arthritic Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hwi; Chang, Yoon Hyuk; Kwak, Hae-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of nanopowdered peanut sprout-added Caciocavallo cheese (NPCC) on the prevention and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in DBA/IJ mice immunized with type II collagen. After the induction of arthritis, the mice were being divided into five groups: (1) normal, no immunization; (2) CIA, collagen-induced arthritis; (3) MTX, collagen-induced arthritis treated with methotrexate (0.3 mg/kg body weight); (4) CC, collagen-induced arthritis treated with Caciocavallo cheese (0.6 g/d); (5) NPCC, collagen-induced arthritis treated with nanopowdered peanut sprout-added Caciocavallo cheese (0.6 g/d). Nanopowdered peanut sprout was ranged from 300 to 350 nm, while regular powdered peanut sprouts were ranged from 50 to 150 μm. The NPCC group had considerable reductions of clinical scores and paw thicknesses at the end of experiment as compared to the CIA group. In the serum analysis, the TNF-α, IL-1β, IL- 6 and IgG1 levels in the NPCC group have decreased by 69.4, 75.9, 66.6, and 61.9%, respectively, when compared to the CIA group. The histological score and spleen index of the NPCC group were significantly lower than the CIA group. In conclusion, the feeding NPCC method could delay and/or prevent the rheumatoid arthritis in the collagen-induced arthritis mouse model. Based on this study, nanopowdered peanut sprouts could be applied to various functional cheeses.

  19. The Preventive Effects of Nanopowdered Peanut Sprout-added Caciocavallo Cheese on Collagen-induced Arthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoon Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the effects of nanopowdered peanut sprout-added Caciocavallo cheese (NPCC) on the prevention and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in DBA/IJ mice immunized with type II collagen. After the induction of arthritis, the mice were being divided into five groups: (1) normal, no immunization; (2) CIA, collagen-induced arthritis; (3) MTX, collagen-induced arthritis treated with methotrexate (0.3 mg/kg body weight); (4) CC, collagen-induced arthritis treated with Caciocavallo cheese (0.6 g/d); (5) NPCC, collagen-induced arthritis treated with nanopowdered peanut sprout-added Caciocavallo cheese (0.6 g/d). Nanopowdered peanut sprout was ranged from 300 to 350 nm, while regular powdered peanut sprouts were ranged from 50 to 150 μm. The NPCC group had considerable reductions of clinical scores and paw thicknesses at the end of experiment as compared to the CIA group. In the serum analysis, the TNF-α, IL-1β, IL- 6 and IgG1 levels in the NPCC group have decreased by 69.4, 75.9, 66.6, and 61.9%, respectively, when compared to the CIA group. The histological score and spleen index of the NPCC group were significantly lower than the CIA group. In conclusion, the feeding NPCC method could delay and/or prevent the rheumatoid arthritis in the collagen-induced arthritis mouse model. Based on this study, nanopowdered peanut sprouts could be applied to various functional cheeses. PMID:26760745

  20. Finding the Effective Mass and Spring Constant of a Force Probe from Simple Harmonic Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Nathaniel R.; Gill, Tom; Eyerly, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Force probes are versatile tools in the physics lab, but their internal workings can introduce artifacts when measuring rapidly changing forces. The Dual-Range Force Sensor by Vernier (Fig. 1) uses strain gage technology to measure force, based on the bending of a beam. Strain gages along the length of the beam change resistance as the beam bends (Fig. 2). The elasticity of the beam leads to oscillations that persist after being excited by an impulsive force. How quickly the force probe freely returns to zero is thus related to the rigidity of the beam and the total mass attached to it. By varying the added mass and measuring the resulting frequency of the probe's internal free oscillations, the effective mass and spring constant of the probe's moveable parts can be found. Weighing of the probe parts and conducting a Hooke's law experiment provide static verification of these parameters. Study of the force sensor's behavior helps students to learn about damped harmonic motion, mathematical modeling, and the limitations of measuring devices.

  1. Mass discharge assessment at a brominated DNAPL site: Effects of known DNAPL source mass removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, C. D.; Davis, G. B.; Bastow, T. P.; Woodbury, R. J.; Rao, P. S. C.; Annable, M. D.; Rhodes, S.

    2014-08-01

    Management and closure of contaminated sites is increasingly being proposed on the basis of mass flux of dissolved contaminants in groundwater. Better understanding of the links between source mass removal and contaminant mass fluxes in groundwater would allow greater acceptance of this metric in dealing with contaminated sites. Our objectives here were to show how measurements of the distribution of contaminant mass flux and the overall mass discharge emanating from the source under undisturbed groundwater conditions could be related to the processes and extent of source mass depletion. In addition, these estimates of mass discharge were sought in the application of agreed remediation targets set in terms of pumped groundwater quality from offsite wells. Results are reported from field studies conducted over a 5-year period at a brominated DNAPL (tetrabromoethane, TBA; and tribromoethene, TriBE) site located in suburban Perth, Western Australia. Groundwater fluxes (qw; L3/L2/T) and mass fluxes (Jc; M/L2/T) of dissolved brominated compounds were simultaneously estimated by deploying Passive Flux Meters (PFMs) in wells in a heterogeneous layered aquifer. PFMs were deployed in control plane (CP) wells immediately down-gradient of the source zone, before (2006) and after (2011) 69-85% of the source mass was removed, mainly by groundwater pumping from the source zone. The high-resolution (26-cm depth interval) measures of qw and Jc along the source CP allowed investigation of the DNAPL source-zone architecture and impacts of source mass removal. Comparable estimates of total mass discharge (MD; M/T) across the source zone CP reduced from 104 g day- 1 to 24-31 g day- 1 (70-77% reductions). Importantly, this mass discharge reduction was consistent with the estimated proportion of source mass remaining at the site (15-31%). That is, a linear relationship between mass discharge and source mass is suggested. The spatial detail of groundwater and mass flux distributions also

  2. The Combined Effect of Teacher Effectiveness Characteristics on Value-Added Student Achievement in Junior High School Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadleigh, Linda L.

    2013-01-01

    Student academic achievement in junior high mathematics is an ongoing mission for educational leaders. To achieve that undertaking, teacher effectiveness plays an important role. The purpose of this study was to examine the combined effects of teacher effectiveness on student achievement. The study was conducted in a suburban school district in…

  3. The effect of signal leakage and glacial isostatic rebound on GRACE-derived ice mass changes in Iceland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Louise Sandberg; Jarosch, Alexander H.; Aðalgeirsdóttir, Guðfinna; Barletta, Valentina R.; Forsberg, René; Pálsson, Finnur; Björnsson, Helgi; Jóhannesson, Tómas

    2017-01-01

    Monthly gravity field models from the GRACE satellite mission are widely used to determine ice mass changes of large ice sheets as well as smaller glaciers and ice caps. Here, we investigate in detail the ice mass changes of the Icelandic ice caps as derived from GRACE data. The small size of the Icelandic ice caps, their location close to other rapidly changing ice covered areas, and the low viscosity of the mantle below Iceland, makes this especially challenging. The mass balance of the ice caps is well constrained by field mass balance measurements, making this area ideal for such investigations. We find that the ice mass changes of the Icelandic ice caps derived from GRACE gravity field models are influenced by both the large gravity change signal resulting from ice mass loss in southeast Greenland, as well as by mass redistribution within the Earth mantle due to glacial isostatic adjustment since the Little Ice Age (˜1890 AD). To minimize the signal that leaks towards Iceland from Greenland, we employ an independent mass change estimate of the Greenland Ice Sheet derived from satellite laser altimetry. We also estimate the effect of post Little Ice Age glacial isostatic adjustment, from knowledge of the ice history and GPS network constrained crustal deformation data. We find that both the leakage from Greenland and the post Little Ice Age glacial isostatic adjustment are important to take into account, in order to correctly determine Iceland ice mass changes from GRACE, and when applying these an average mass balance of the Icelandic ice caps of -11.4 ± 2.2 Gt/yr for the period 2003-2010 is found. This number corresponds well with available mass balance measurements.

  4. Does Student Sorting Invalidate Value-Added Models of Teacher Effectiveness? An Extended Analysis of the Rothstein Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koedel, Cory; Betts, Julian R.

    2011-01-01

    Value-added modeling continues to gain traction as a tool for measuring teacher performance. However, recent research questions the validity of the value-added approach by showing that it does not mitigate student-teacher sorting bias (its presumed primary benefit). Our study explores this critique in more detail. Although we find that estimated…

  5. Impaired thermoregulation and beneficial effects of thermoneutrality in the 3×Tg-AD model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Vandal, Milene; White, Philip J; Tournissac, Marine; Tremblay, Cyntia; St-Amour, Isabelle; Drouin-Ouellet, Janelle; Bousquet, Melanie; Traversy, Marie-Thérèse; Planel, Emmanuel; Marette, Andre; Calon, Frederic

    2016-07-01

    The sharp rise in the incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) at an old age coincides with a reduction in energy metabolism and core body temperature. We found that the triple-transgenic mouse model of AD (3×Tg-AD) spontaneously develops a lower basal body temperature and is more vulnerable to a cold environment compared with age-matched controls. This was despite higher nonshivering thermogenic activity, as evidenced by brown adipose tissue norepinephrine content and uncoupling protein 1 expression. A 24-hour exposure to cold (4 °C) aggravated key neuropathologic markers of AD such as: tau phosphorylation, soluble amyloid beta concentrations, and synaptic protein loss in the cortex of 3×Tg-AD mice. Strikingly, raising the body temperature of aged 3×Tg-AD mice via exposure to a thermoneutral environment improved memory function and reduced amyloid and synaptic pathologies within a week. Our results suggest the presence of a vicious cycle between impaired thermoregulation and AD-like neuropathology, and it is proposed that correcting thermoregulatory deficits might be therapeutic in AD.

  6. A high resolution model of linear trend in mass variations from DMT-2: Added value of accounting for coloured noise in GRACE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahani, Hassan H.; Ditmar, Pavel; Inácio, Pedro; Didova, Olga; Gunter, Brian; Klees, Roland; Guo, Xiang; Guo, Jing; Sun, Yu; Liu, Xianglin; Zhao, Qile; Riva, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    We present a high resolution model of the linear trend in the Earth's mass variations based on DMT-2 (Delft Mass Transport model, release 2). DMT-2 was produced primarily from K-Band Ranging (KBR) data of the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE). It comprises a time series of monthly solutions complete to spherical harmonic degree 120. A novel feature in its production was the accurate computation and incorporation of stochastic properties of coloured noise when processing KBR data. The unconstrained DMT-2 monthly solutions are used to estimate the linear trend together with a bias, as well as annual and semi-annual sinusoidal terms. The linear term is further processed with an anisotropic Wiener filter, which uses full noise and signal covariance matrices. Given the fact that noise in an unconstrained model of the trend is reduced substantially as compared to monthly solutions, the Wiener filter associated with the trend is much less aggressive compared to a Wiener filter applied to monthly solutions. Consequently, the trend estimate shows an enhanced spatial resolution. It allows signals in relatively small water bodies, such as Aral sea and Ladoga lake, to be detected. Over the ice sheets, it allows for a clear identification of signals associated with some outlet glaciers or their groups. We compare the obtained trend estimate with the ones from the CSR-RL05 model using (i) the same approach based on monthly noise covariance matrices and (ii) a commonly-used approach based on the DDK-filtered monthly solutions. We use satellite altimetry data as independent control data. The comparison demonstrates a high spatial resolution of the DMT-2 linear trend. We link this to the usage of high-accuracy monthly noise covariance matrices, which is due to an accurate computation and incorporation of coloured noise when processing KBR data. A preliminary comparison of the linear trend based on DMT-2 with that computed from GSFC_global_mascons_v01 reveals, among

  7. The effect of extrusion on the functional components and in vitro lycopene bioaccessibility of tomato pulp added corn extrudates.

    PubMed

    Tonyali, Bade; Sensoy, Ilkay; Karakaya, Sibel

    2016-02-01

    The effect of processing on functional ingredients and their in vitro bioaccessibility should be investigated to develop better food products. Tomato pulp was added as a functional ingredient to extrudates. The effects of extrusion on the functional properties of the extrudates and the in vitro bioaccessibility of lycopene were investigated. Two different temperature sets were applied during extrusion: 80 °C, 90 °C, 100 °C and 130 °C and 80 °C, 100 °C, 130 °C and 160 °C. Screw speed and feed rate were kept constant at 225 rpm and 36 ± 1 g min(-1), respectively. The feed moisture content was adjusted to 30 ± 1% by mixing the tomato pulp to the corn grit. Antioxidant activity and the total phenolic content decreased after the extrusion process. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that the lycopene content decreased after the extrusion process when feed and extrudates were compared. In vitro bioaccessibility of lycopene for the extruded samples with 160 °C last zone treatment temperature was higher than the feed and extruded samples with 130 °C last zone treatment temperature. The results indicate that extrusion affects the food matrix and the release of functional components.

  8. TRIMS: Validating T2 Molecular Effects for Neutrino Mass Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying-Ting; Bodine, Laura; Enomoto, Sanshiro; Kallander, Matthew; Machado, Eric; Parno, Diana; Robertson, Hamish; Trims Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The upcoming KATRIN and Project 8 experiments will measure the model-independent effective neutrino mass through the kinematics near the endpoint of tritium beta-decay. A critical systematic, however, is the understanding of the molecular final-state distribution populated by tritium decay. In fact, the current theory incorporated in the KATRIN analysis framework predicts an observable that disagrees with an experimental result from the 1950s. The Tritium Recoil-Ion Mass Spectrometer (TRIMS) experiment will reexamine branching ratio of the molecular tritium (T2) beta decay to the bound state (3HeT+). TRIMS consists of a magnet-guided time-of-flight mass spectrometer with a detector located on each end. By measuring the kinetic energy and time-of-flight difference of the ions and beta particles reaching the detectors, we will be able to distinguish molecular ions from atomic ones and hence derive the ratio in question.We will give an update on simulation software, analysis tools, and the apparatus, including early commissioning results. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, Award Number DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  9. Hepatitis A outbreaks: the effect of a mass vaccination programme.

    PubMed

    Torner, N; Broner, S; Martinez, A; Godoy, P; Batalla, J; Dominguez, A

    2011-04-01

    A Hepatitis A vaccination programme of people belonging to risk groups begun in Catalonia in 1995 and a universal vaccination programme of pre-adolescents 12 years of age with the hepatitis A + B vaccine was added in 1998. The aim of the study was to investigate the characteristics of hepatitis A outbreaks occurring in Catalonia between 1991 and 2007 to determine the associated risk factors and optimize the use of vaccination. Incidence rates of outbreaks, cases and hospitalizations associated with outbreaks and the rate ratios (RR) of person-to-person transmission outbreaks between the periods before and after mass vaccination and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. A rate of 2.45 outbreaks per million persons per year was found. The rate of cases affected in these outbreaks was 1.28 per 10(5) persons per year and the rate of hospitalizations was 0.45 per million persons per year. In person-to-person outbreaks, the highest incidence rate (5.26 and 6.33 per million persons per year) of outbreaks according to the age of the index case was in the 5 to 14 year age group in both periods (RR:0.83; 95% CI:0.48-1.43). A significant increase was observed in the 25 to 44 year age group (RR: 0.35; 95% CI 0.14-0.77). Hepatitis A vaccination has made an important impact on burden and characteristics of outbreaks and could provide greater benefits to the community if the vaccine was administrated to children during their first years of life.

  10. Effective Mass of an Electron Bubble in Superfluid Helium-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yunhu; Maris, Humphrey J.

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of computer simulations of the motion of an electron bubble through superfluid helium-4 when acted upon by an electric field. The simulations are based on an extended version of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. The temperature is assumed to be sufficiently low for the drag exerted on the bubble by thermal excitations to be negligible, and the calculations are made for velocities below the critical velocitie for nucleation of vortices and roton production. We calculate the effective mass m* of the bubble and obtain results in excellent agreement with the measurements of Poitrenaud and Williams, and Ellis, McClintock, and Bowley.

  11. Degeneracy effects of neutrino mass ejection in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazurek, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    A neutrino mechanism is discussed in order to explain supernovae in massive stars. An argument is presented for supernova mass ejection through leptonic neutrino transport characteristics suppressed by the arbitrary zero chemical potential condition. Results show that lepton conservation effects may be important in supernova neutrino transport. At low temperature and density the diffusion approximation becomes less precise because of the long mean free paths of low energy neutrinos. The amount of equilibrium neutrino spectrum affected here is small over most of the collapsing supernova structure.

  12. Radial Dependence of the Nucleon Effective Mass in

    SciTech Connect

    L.J. de Bever; Henk Blok; Ross Hicks; Kees de Jager; N. Kalantar-Nayestanaki; James Kelly; L. Lapikas; Rory Miskimen; D. Van Neck; Gerald Peterson; G. van der Steenhoven; H. de Vries

    1998-05-04

    The dynamic properties of the atomic nucleus depend strongly on correlations between the nucleons. We present a combined analysis of inelastic electron-scattering data and electron-induced proton knockout measurements in an effort to obtain phenomenological information on nucleon-nucleon correlations. Our results indicate that the ration of radial wave functions extracted from precise B(e,e') and B(e, e'p) measurements evolve from an interior depression for small Em, characteristic of short-range correlations, to a surface-peaked enhancement for larger Em, characteristic of long-range correlations. This observation can be interpreted in terms of the nucleon effective mass.

  13. Violence and mass media: are laws and regulations effective?

    PubMed

    Wulff, Christian

    2007-10-01

    In Germany, there are several laws and legal and administrative regulations restricting presentation and propagation of violence in mass media. They have proven to be partly effective. Whilst control and supervision of public media is feasible, the containment of what is distributed over the internet proves to be very difficult. It is well recognized that laws and regulations can be only one part of protection for children and youngsters; school, kindergarten and above all the parents must be educated and held responsible for creating media competence in children and adolescents.

  14. Virologic and immunologic effects of adding maraviroc to suppressive ART in subjects with suboptimal CD4+ T-cell recovery

    PubMed Central

    Cillo, Anthony R.; Hilldorfer, Benedict B.; Lalama, Christina M.; McKinnon, John E.; Coombs, Robert W.; Tenorio, Allan R.; Fox, Lawrence; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Ribaudo, Heather; Currier, Judith S.; Gulick, Roy M.; Wilkin, Timothy J.; Mellors, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppresses HIV-1 replication, but does not restore CD4+ T-cell counts in all subjects. To investigate the effects of maraviroc on HIV-1 persistence and the relations between virologic and immunologic parameters in subjects with incomplete CD4+ T-cell recovery, we performed a prospective, open-label pilot trial in which maraviroc was added to a suppressive ART regimen for 24 weeks. Design A5256 was a single-arm trial in which subjects on suppressive ART with incomplete CD4+ T-cell recovery added maraviroc for 24 weeks. Methods We quantified low-level, residual viremia in plasma and total HIV-1 DNA and 2-LTR circles in peripheral blood mononuclear cells before and after maraviroc intensification. We also evaluated markers of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell immune activation (%CD38+HLA-DR+) and apoptosis (%caspase3+/Bcl-2−). Results No effect of maraviroc was found on the probability of detectable plasma viremia (≥1 copy/mL; n=31, exact McNemar p=1.0) or detectable 2-LTR circles (n=28, p=0.25) or on total HIV-1 DNA (n=28, 90% confidence interval: −0.1, +0.3 log10 copies/106 CD4+ T-cells). Pre-maraviroc HIV-1 DNA levels were inversely related to pre-maraviroc %CD38+HLA-DR+ CD4+ T-cells (Spearman=−0.52, p=0.004), and lower pre-maraviroc HIV-1 DNA levels were associated with larger decreases in %CD38+HLA-DR+ CD4+ T-cells during maraviroc intensification (Spearman=0.44, p=0.018). Conclusions In subjects on suppressive ART with incomplete CD4+ T-cell recovery, maraviroc intensification did not affect measures of HIV-1 persistence but did decrease persistent CD4+ T-cell immune activation especially in subjects with low pre-intensification levels of HIV-1 DNA. PMID:26544577

  15. Perseveration Augments the Effects of Cognitive Restraint on ad libitum Food Intake in Adults Seeking Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Alexis L.; Gluck, Marci E.; Votruba, Suzanne B.; Krakoff, Jonathan; Thearle, Marie S.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Differences in executive function have been associated with eating behaviors. Our aim was to determine whether measures of executive function predicted ad libitum food intake in subjects seeking weight loss. METHODS This cross-sectional study involved 78 obese, otherwise healthy, individuals (40 female /38 male; age 36±10y; BMI 37.8±7.2 kg/m2) enrolled in weight loss studies, but prior to any intervention. Participants completed the Iowa Gambling Task to evaluate decision making, the Stroop Word Color Task to assess attention, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST) to measure perseverative errors, and the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) to measure disinhibition and cognitive restraint. Ad libitum energy intake over 3-days was then collected using a validated vending paradigm. RESULTS Only results from the WCST and the TFEQ correlated with mean daily energy intake. When expressed as a percentage of an individual's calculated weight maintaining energy needs (%WMEN; [mean daily energy consumed/WMEN]*100), intake correlated positively with number of perseverative errors (r = 0.24, p = 0.03) and negatively with cognitive restraint (r2 = −0.51, p<0.0001). In a regression model of %WMEN (r2 = 0.59, p<0.0001) including age, sex, race, disinhibition, restraint, and perseverative error T-score, an interaction between perseveration and restraint was observed (p = 0.05). Greater numbers of perseverative errors intensified the effect of restraint such that subjects with both high restraint and high perseveration, per manual-defined cut-offs, ate the least (median (IQR) = 70 (62, 94) % WMEN), while those with low restraint and high perseveration ate the most (130 (102, 153) %WMEN). Subjects with low perseveration and high versus low restraint ate a median of 84 (70, 86) and 112 (98, 133) %WMEN, respectively. CONCLUSION In obese subjects seeking weight loss, the effects of perseveration on food intake are conditional on the level of dietary restraint, and

  16. Effect of Various Sodium Chloride Mass Fractions on Wheat and Rye Bread Using Different Dough Preparation Techniques.

    PubMed

    Ambrosewicz-Walacik, Marta; Tańska, Małgorzata; Rotkiewicz, Daniela; Piętak, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed the selected properties of bread with reduced amount of sodium chloride. The bread was made from white and wholemeal wheat flour and rye flour. The dough was prepared using three techniques: with yeast, natural sourdough or starter sourdough. Sodium chloride was added to the dough at 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% of the flour mass. The following bread properties were examined in the study: yield and volume of the loaf, moisture content, crumb firmness and porosity, and organoleptic properties. Reducing the mass fraction of added sodium chloride was not found to have considerable effect on bread yield, whereas it had a significant and variable effect on the loaf volume, and crumb firmness and porosity. Organoleptic assessment showed diverse effects of sodium chloride addition on sensory properties of bread, depending on the type of bread and the dough preparation method. Reduced mass fractions of sodium chloride changed the organoleptic properties of bread made with yeast and with starter sourdough to a greater extent than of bread prepared with natural sourdough.

  17. Effect of Various Sodium Chloride Mass Fractions on Wheat and Rye Bread Using Different Dough Preparation Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Tańska, Małgorzata; Rotkiewicz, Daniela; Piętak, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Summary This study assessed the selected properties of bread with reduced amount of sodium chloride. The bread was made from white and wholemeal wheat flour and rye flour. The dough was prepared using three techniques: with yeast, natural sourdough or starter sourdough. Sodium chloride was added to the dough at 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% of the flour mass. The following bread properties were examined in the study: yield and volume of the loaf, moisture content, crumb firmness and porosity, and organoleptic properties. Reducing the mass fraction of added sodium chloride was not found to have considerable effect on bread yield, whereas it had a significant and variable effect on the loaf volume, and crumb firmness and porosity. Organoleptic assessment showed diverse effects of sodium chloride addition on sensory properties of bread, depending on the type of bread and the dough preparation method. Reduced mass fractions of sodium chloride changed the organoleptic properties of bread made with yeast and with starter sourdough to a greater extent than of bread prepared with natural sourdough. PMID:27904407

  18. Stellar evolution at high mass including the effect of a stellar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R.; Chin, C.-W.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of a stellar wind on the evolution of stars in the mass range from 15 to 120 solar masses is investigated. All the stellar models are constructed with the use of Cox-Stewart opacities. Four possible cases of mass loss are considered: (1) no mass loss at all; (2) substantial mass loss from stars in all stages of evolution; (3) heavy mass loss from red supergiants only; and (4) sudden and very heavy mass loss from luminous yellow supergiants. The assumption of mass loss during the main-sequence phase of evolution is found to lead to a lowering of the luminosity and, unless the mass loss is extremely heavy, of the effective temperature as well. A comparison of the adopted mass-loss rates with observed rates suggests that stellar winds are probably not an important factor in the evolution of main-sequence stars and supergiants unless the initial masses are greater than about 30 solar masses.

  19. The Effects of Partial Ionization on Prominence Mass Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, J. T.; Olson, K.; DeVore, C. R.; Martinez Gomez, D.; Sokolov, I.

    2015-12-01

    The origin of the prominence mass has been an open question since this cool plasma suspended in the hot corona was first discovered. We have known for a long time that the mass must come from the chromosphere, but it is unclear whether this mass is lifted bodily through magnetic levitation, injected by reconnection-driven upflows, or driven from the chromosphere by evaporation and then condensed. One evaporation-condensation scenario, the thermal nonequilibrium (TNE) model, is the most fully developed, quantitative model for the prominence plasma to date. In the TNE scenario, localized heating concentrated at the coronal loop footpoints produces chromospheric evaporation, filling the flux tube with hot, dense plasma that subsequently collapses radiatively to form cool condensations. Thus far this model has been successful in explaining the key properties of the long, persistent threads and small, highly dynamic, transient blobs in prominences, the damping of large-amplitude field-aligned prominence oscillations, the appearance of horn-shaped features above the cool prominence in EUV images of coronal cavities, and coronal rain in the ambient corona. To date, all studies of TNE have assumed that the plasma is fully ionized, which is appropriate for the hot coronal gas but unrealistic for the cool plasma below ~30,000 K. The energetics, dynamics, and evolutionary time scales of the TNE process are expected to be altered when the effects of ionization and recombination are considered. We have modified ARGOS, our 1D hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement, to include an equation of state that accounts for the effects of partial ionization of the plasma over a wide range of temperatures and densities. We will discuss the results of these simulations and their comparison with our previous studies of TNE in typical filament-supporting flux tubes. This work was partially supported by NASA's LWS Strategic Capability program.

  20. [Effects of typical herbicides on soil respiration and N2O emissions from soil added with different nitrogen fertilizers].

    PubMed

    Sun, Qing; Shi, Chun-Xing; Shi, Kun; Yan, Ru-Bin; Jiang, Jing-Yan; Wu, Yi-Zhong

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the effects of typical herbicides on soil respiration and N2O emissions from soil added with different nitrogen fertilizers, a laboratory incubation experiment was carried out using a modified gas chromatograph (Agilent 4890D) method. The results showed that with (NH4)2SO4 amendment, soil respiration and N2O emissions from the Atrazine and Paraquat treatments had no significant difference in comparison to the control (P > 0.05). Glyphosate significantly inhibited soil respiration by 21.5% (P < 0.05) and had no obvious influence on N2O emissions (P > 0.05). Tribenuron-methyl significantly promoted soil respiration with the increase of 14.3% (P < 0.05) and also had no obvious influence on N2O emissions (P > 0.05). Acetochlor significantly increased soil respiration and N2O emissions (P < 0.05) with the increase of 6.1% and 45.1%, respectively. With urea application, Atrazine and Acetochlor had no significant influence on soil respiration and N2O emissions (P > 0.05). Paraquat increased N2O emissions significantly (P < 0.05)with the increase of 43.5% and had no significant influence on soil respiration ( P > 0.05). Glyphosate significantly inhibited soil respiration by 17.5% (P < 0.05), and had no significant influence on N2O emissions (P > 0.05). Tribenuron-methyl enhanced soil respiration and N2O emissions significantly (P < 0.05), and its soil respiration and N2O emissions were 1.3 and 1.6 times higher than those from the control. Due to the complexity of effects of different herbicides on microbial physiological metabolism, long-term in-situ studies need to be carried out to better understand the effect of various herbicides on greenhouse gas emissions.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of Canagliflozin versus Sitagliptin When Added to Metformin and Sulfonylurea in Type 2 Diabetes in Canada.

    PubMed

    Sabapathy, Suthakar; Neslusan, Cheryl; Yoong, Kim; Teschemaker, Anna; Johansen, Pierre; Willis, Michael

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundCanagliflozin, an agent that inhibits sodium glucose co-transporter 2, is approved as add-on to metformin plus sulfonylurea for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in Canada. Canagliflozin offers greater glycemic control, as well as important additional benefits such as weight loss and blood pressure reductions, versus dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors such as sitagliptin.  ObjectiveThis analysis evaluated the cost-effectiveness of canagliflozin 300 mg and canagliflozin 100 mg versus sitagliptin 100 mg in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on metformin plus sulfonylurea from the perspective of the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health. MethodsA 40-year cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using the validated Economic and Health Outcomes Model of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (ECHO-T2DM). Patient characteristics, treatment effects, and rates of hypoglycemia and adverse events were sourced from the canagliflozin clinical program. Canada-specific costs and utilities were applied. Sensitivity analyses were conducted using alternative values for key model inputs. ResultsBoth canagliflozin 300 and 100 mg dominated sitagliptin 100 mg over 40 years, providing quality-adjusted life-year gains of 0.31 and 0.28, and cost offsets of $2,217 and $2,560, respectively. Both canagliflozin doses dominated sitagliptin in each of the sensitivity analyses. ConclusionsSimulation results suggested that canagliflozin 300 and 100 mg provided better health outcomes and lower costs than sitagliptin 100 mg as a third-line therapy added-on to metformin and sulfonylurea in patients with type 2 diabetes in Canada.

  2. Segmented strings in AdS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callebaut, Nele; Gubser, Steven S.; Samberg, Andreas; Toldo, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    We study segmented strings in flat space and in AdS 3. In flat space, these well known classical motions describe strings which at any instant of time are piecewise linear. In AdS 3, the worldsheet is composed of faces each of which is a region bounded by null geodesics in an AdS 2 subspace of AdS 3. The time evolution can be described by specifying the null geodesic motion of kinks in the string at which two segments are joined. The outcome of collisions of kinks on the worldsheet can be worked out essentially using considerations of causality. We study several examples of closed segmented strings in AdS 3 and find an unexpected quasi-periodic behavior. We also work out a WKB analysis of quantum states of yo-yo strings in AdS 5 and find a logarithmic term reminiscent of the logarithmic twist of string states on the leading Regge trajectory.

  3. Microbial polychlorinated biphenyl dechlorination in sediments by electrical stimulation: The effect of adding acetate and nonionic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Wan, Hui; Feng, Chunhua; Yi, Xiaoyun; Liu, Xiaoping; Ren, Yuan; Wei, Chaohai

    2017-02-15

    The necessity for developing an efficient and cost-effective in situ bioremediation technology for sediments contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has prompted the application of low-voltage electrical fields to anaerobic digestion systems. Here we show that the use of a sediment-based bio-electrochemical reactor (BER) poised at a potential of -0.50V (vs. a standard calomel electrode, SCE) substantially enhanced the reduction of 2,3,4,5-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB 61) when acetate was added as a carbon source. The addition of surfactant Tween 80 to the BER further accelerated the PCB 61 transformation. The comparative study of closed- and open-circuit reactors demonstrated the enrichment conditions affecting the bacterial community structure, the dominant dechlorination metabolisms, and thus the extent, the rate and the products of the reduction of PCBs. The dominant bacterial dechlorinators detected in the BERs in the presence of acetate and Tween 80 are Dehalogenimonas, Dehalobacter, Sulfuricurvum, Dechloromonas and Geobacter, which should be responsible for PCB dechlorination. This study improves understanding of the key factors influencing dechlorination activity in sediment-based BERs polarized at a low potential, as well as the metabolic mechanisms dominating in the PCB dechlorination process.

  4. The Effects of Adding Elements of Zinc and Magnesium on Ag-Cu Eutectic Alloy for Warming Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Park, Il Song; Kim, Keun Sik; Lee, Min Ho

    2013-01-01

    The warming acupuncture for hyperthermia therapy is made of STS304. However, its needle point cannot be reached to a desirable temperature due to heat loss caused by low thermal conductivity, and the quantification of stimulation condition and the effective standard establishment of warming acupuncture are required as a heat source. Accordingly, in this study, after Ag-Cu alloys with different composition ratios were casted and then mixed with additives to improve their physical and mechanical properties, the thermal conductivity and biocompatibility of the alloy specimens were evaluated for selecting suitable material. Ag-Cu binary alloys and ternary alloys added 5 wt% Zn or 2 wt% Mg were casted and then cold drawn to manufacture needles for acupuncture, and their physical properties, thermal conductivity, and biocompatibility were evaluated for their potential use in warming acupuncture. The results of this study showed that the physical and mechanical properties of the Ag-Cu alloys were improved by additives and that the thermal conductivity, machinability, and biocompatibility of the Ag-Cu alloys were improved by Mg addition. PMID:24078827

  5. Effect of added citrus fibre and spice essential oils on quality characteristics and shelf-life of mortadella.

    PubMed

    Viuda-Martos, M; Ruiz-Navajas, Y; Fernández-López, J; Pérez-Alvarez, J A

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of adding orange dietary fibre (1%), rosemary essential oil (0.02%) or thyme essential oil (0.02%) and the storage conditions on the quality characteristics and the shelf-life of mortadella, a bologna-type sausage. The moisture, fat, ash content and colour coordinates lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) were affected by the fibre content. The treatments analysed lowered the levels of residual nitrite (57.56% and 57.61%) and the extent of lipid oxidation, while analysis of the samples revealed the presence of the flavonoids, hesperidin and narirutin. No enterobacteria or psychotropic bacteria were found in any of the treatments. The treated samples stored in vacuum packaging showed the lowest aerobic and lactic acid bacteria counts. Sensorially, the most appreciated sample was the one containing orange dietary fibre and rosemary essential oil, stored in vacuum packaging. Orange dietary fibre and spice essential oils could find a use in the food industry to improve the shelf-life of meat products.

  6. Effect of baking process on added folic acid and endogenous folates stability in wheat and rye breads.

    PubMed

    Gujska, Elzbieta; Majewska, Katarzyna

    2005-06-01

    In Poland bread as a staple food both made from wheat and rye flour can be a potential product for future fortification with folic acid. The objective of the study was to examine the effect of fermentation and baking on added folic acid and some endogenous folates stability during breadmaking of rye and wheat breads. Breads were produced using the formulation containing enriched flour with 0.2 mg folic acid/100 g product, baker's yeast and additionally ascorbic acid for wheat bread and lactic acid for rye bread. Folates were extracted with Hepes/Ches buffer (pH = 7.85) followed by destruction of matrix by amylase and protease and deconjugation with rat serum conjugase. Affinity chromatography (FBP bovine milk) was used to purify and concentrate samples. The folates were separated by HPLC with C18 column and with a combination of fluorescence and UV detection. For both rye and wheat breads there was a decrease of folic acid from flour to bread stage. The total losses depend on baking process and ranged from 12 to 21%. Some changes in the level of different native folate forms during the stage of baking process were also observed.

  7. Effects of adding bulking agent, inorganic nutrient and microbial inocula on biopile treatment for oil-field drilling waste.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Yang, Yongqi; Dai, Xiaoli; Chen, Yetong; Deng, Hanmei; Zhou, Huijun; Guo, Shaohui; Yan, Guangxu

    2016-05-01

    Contamination from oil-field drilling waste is a worldwide environmental problem. This study investigated the performance of four bench-scale biopiles in treating drilling waste: 1) direct biopile (DW), 2) biopile plus oil-degrading microbial consortium (DW + M), 3) biopile plus microbial consortium and bulking agents (saw dust) (DW + M + BA), 4) biopile plus microbial consortium, bulking agents, and inorganic nutrients (Urea and K2HPO4) (DW + M + BA + N). Ninety days of biopiling removed 41.0%, 44.0%, 55.7% and 87.4% of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) in the pile "DW", "DW + M", "DW + M + BA", and "DW + M + BA + N" respectively. Addition of inorganic nutrient and bulking agents resulted in a 56.9% and 26.6% increase in TPH removal efficiency respectively. In contrast, inoculation of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms only slightly enhanced the contaminant removal (increased 7.3%). The biopile with stronger contaminant removal also had higher pile temperature and lower pile pH (e.g., in "DW + M + BA + N"). GC-MS analysis shows that biopiling significantly reduced the total number of detected contaminants and changed the chemical composition. Overall, this study shows that biopiling is an effective remediation technology for drilling waste. Adding inorganic nutrients and bulking agents can significantly improve biopile performance while addition of microbial inocula had minimal positive impacts on contaminant removal.

  8. Tunable band structure and effective mass of disordered chalcopyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ze-Lian; Xie, Wen-Hui; Zhao, Yong-Hong

    2017-02-01

    The band structure and effective mass of disordered chalcopyrite photovoltaic materials Cu1- x Ag x Ga X 2 ( X = S, Se) are investigated by density functional theory. Special quasirandom structures are used to mimic local atomic disorders at Cu/Ag sites. A local density plus correction method is adopted to obtain correct semiconductor band gaps for all compounds. The bandgap anomaly can be seen for both sulfides and selenides, where the gap values of Ag compounds are larger than those of Cu compounds. Band gaps can be modulated from 1.63 to 1.78 eV for Cu1- x Ag x Ga Se 2, and from 2.33 to 2.64 eV for Cu1- x Ag x Ga S 2. The band gap minima and maxima occur at around x = 0:5 and x = 1, respectively, for both sulfides and selenides. In order to show the transport properties of Cu1- x Ag x Ga X 2, the effective mass is shown as a function of disordered Ag concentration. Finally, detailed band structures are shown to clarify the phonon momentum needed by the fundamental indirect-gap transitions. These results should be helpful in designing high-efficiency photovoltaic devices, with both better absorption and high mobility, by Ag-doping in CuGa X 2.

  9. Effects of alginate and resistant starch on feeding patterns, behaviour and performance in ad libitum-fed growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Souza da Silva, C; Bosch, G; Bolhuis, J E; Stappers, L J N; van Hees, H M J; Gerrits, W J J; Kemp, B

    2014-12-01

    This study assessed the long-term effects of feeding diets containing either a gelling fibre (alginate (ALG)), or a fermentable fibre (resistant starch (RS)), or both, on feeding patterns, behaviour and growth performance of growing pigs fed ad libitum for 12 weeks. The experiment was set up as a 2×2 factorial arrangement: inclusion of ALG (yes or no) and inclusion of RS (yes or no) in the control diet, resulting in four dietary treatments, that is, ALG-RS- (control), ALG+RS-, ALG-RS+, and ALG+RS+. Both ALG and RS were exchanged for pregelatinized potato starch. A total of 240 pigs in 40 pens were used. From all visits to an electronic feeding station, feed intake and detailed feeding patterns were calculated. Apparent total tract digestibility of energy, dry matter (DM), and CP was determined in week 6. Pigs' postures and behaviours were scored from live observations in weeks 7 and 12. Dietary treatments did not affect final BW and average daily gain (ADG). ALG reduced energy and DM digestibility (P<0.01). Moreover, ALG increased average daily DM intake, and reduced backfat thickness and carcass gain : digestible energy (DE) intake (P<0.05). RS increased feed intake per meal, meal duration (P<0.05) and inter-meal intervals (P=0.05), and reduced the number of meals per day (P<0.01), but did not affect daily DM intake. Moreover, RS reduced energy, DM and CP digestibility (P<0.01). Average daily DE intake was reduced (P<0.05), and gain : DE intake tended to be increased (P=0.07), whereas carcass gain : DE intake was not affected by RS. In week 12, ALG+RS- increased standing and walking, aggressive, feeder-directed, and drinking behaviours compared with ALG+RS+ (ALG×RS interaction, P<0.05), with ALG-RS- and ALG-RS+ in between. No other ALG×RS interactions were found. In conclusion, pigs fed ALG compensated for the reduced dietary DE content by increasing their feed intake, achieving similar DE intake and ADG as control pigs. Backfat thickness and carcass efficiency

  10. The effect of volcanic eruptions on the North Atlantic ocean temperatures over the past millennium (800-2000 AD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyrina, M.; Wagner, S.; Zorita, E.

    2014-12-01

    Several studies suggest that the North Atlantic Ocean is of particular importance for the climate variability, especially that of western Europe (Schlesinger M. E. & Ramankutty 1994, Knight J., Folland C. K. & Scaife A. 2006). The changes in North Atlantic sea surface temperatures are related to the thermohaline's circulation strength (Kushnir Y., 1994) and affected by volcanic eruptions (Church J.A, White N.J. & Arblaster J.M. 2005), due to their release of aerosols into the stratosphere. In this study we examine the signal of tropical volcanic eruptions in the temperatures of the North Atlantic Ocean in various depths (6, 100, 560 and 3070 m from the sea surface), for the past millennium. The temperatures are derived from the comprehensive COSMOS Earth System Model (ECHAM5-OM at T30 spatial resolution) and are presented for a control run and for three fully forced ensemble simulations including changes in orbital, solar, volcanic, land use and greenhouse gas changes. The model shows a response in the years following volcanic eruptions, being mostly pronounced after the large eruptions that took place between 1200 and 1300 AD, as well as at the beginning of the 19thcentury. The strongest impact on the ocean temperatures, due to the increased atmospheric optical depth, is evident in the uppermost level, especially for two out of the three ensemble simulations. In these simulations a pronounced decrease in the ocean temperature between 1400 and 1500 AD is observed due to the increase of the aerosol effective radius. In the mixed ocean layers the response to volcanic aerosols is more obvious in the third ensemble simulation, whereas in the deep ocean the temperatures do not seem to be strongly affected by volcanic eruptions. Schlesinger, M. E. & Ramankutty, N. An oscillation in the global climate system of period 65-70 years. Nature 367, 723-726 (1994). Kushnir, Y. Interdecadal variations in North Atlantic sea surface temperature and associated atmospheric conditions

  11. The Protective Effect of Icariin on Mitochondrial Transport and Distribution in Primary Hippocampal Neurons from 3× Tg-AD Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yijing; Han, Shuangxue; Huang, Xiuxian; Ni, Jiazuan; He, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-27

    Icariin, a pharmacologically active component isolated from the Chinese herb Epimedium, has been shown to improve spatial learning and memory abilities in Alzheimer's disease (AD) rats through inhibition of Aβ production and tau protein hyperphosphorylation. However, the potential mechanism of icariin-induced protective effects against mitochondrial dysfunctions in AD still remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effect of icariin on the modulation of mitochondrial transport and distribution in primary hippocampal cultures from triple-transgenic (3× Tg) AD mice. The results showed that icariin enhanced mitochondrial motility and increased mitochondrial index and mitochondrial length and size in the diseased neurons. Additionally, the expression of the key mitochondrial enzyme, pyruvate dehydrogenase-E1α (PDHE1α), and the post synaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), was preserved in AD neurons after icariin treatment, accompanied by a downregulation of Aβ and phosphorylated tau expression in the corresponding areas. Further study showed that icariin treatment resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and an increase in fusion protein Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2). These data indicate that icariin can promote mitochondrial transport, protect mitochondria against fragmentation and preserve the expression of mitochondrial and synaptic functional proteins in AD neurons. Thus, icariin may be a potential therapeutic complement for AD and other mitochondrial malfunction-related neuronal degenerative diseases.

  12. Cost-effectiveness of adding rituximab to fludarabine and cyclophosphamide for treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in Ukraine

    PubMed Central

    Mandrik, Olena; Corro Ramos, Isaac; Knies, Saskia; Al, Maiwenn; Severens, Johan L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness, from a health care perspective, of adding rituximab to fludarabine and cyclophosphamide scheme (FCR versus FC) for treatment-naïve and refractory/relapsed Ukrainian patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. A decision-analytic Markov cohort model with three health states and 1-month cycle time was developed and run within a life time horizon. Data from two multinational, prospective, open-label Phase 3 studies were used to assess patients’ survival. While utilities were generalized from UK data, local resource utilization and disease-associated treatment, hospitalization, and side effect costs were applied. The alternative scenario was performed to assess the impact of lower life expectancy of the general population in Ukraine on the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for treatment-naïve patients. One-way, two-way, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess the robustness of the results. The ICER (in US dollars) of treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with FCR versus FC is US$8,704 per quality-adjusted life year gained for treatment-naïve patients and US$11,056 for refractory/relapsed patients. When survival data were modified to the lower life expectancy of the general population in Ukraine, the ICER for treatment-naïve patients was higher than US$13,000. This value is higher than three times the current gross domestic product per capita in Ukraine. Sensitivity analyses have shown a high impact of rituximab costs and a moderate impact of differences in utilities on the ICER. Furthermore, probabilistic sensitivity analyses have shown that for refractory/relapsed patients the probability of FCR being cost-effective is higher than for treatment-naïve patients and is close to one if the threshold is higher than US$15,000. State coverage of rituximab treatment may be considered a cost-effective treatment for the Ukrainian population under conditions of economic

  13. Hydromagnetic free convection flow with Hall effect and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Prasan Kumar

    2016-02-01

    The study of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) deals with the flow of an electrically conducting fluid in the presence of an electromagnetic field, which has many applications in astrophysics, geophysics and engineering. Objective of the present study in this paper is to consider the effect of dissipation and Hall current on the MHD free convection flow with mass transfer in a porous vertical channel. An exact solution of the governing equations is obtained by solving the complex variables. The effect of Hall parameter (m), Hartmann number (M), and Concentration parameter (Sc) on the velocity and temperature of the fluid is studied. Simulation results show that the shear stress of primary and secondary velocity for the lower plate increases with increase in the strength of Hall parameter (m) and decreases with increase in Hartmann number (M) and concentration parameter (Sc).

  14. Professional sport activity and micronutrients: effects on bone mass.

    PubMed

    Nuti, R; Martini, G; Merlotti, D; Valleggi, F; De Paola, V; Gennari, L

    2005-01-01

    Osteoporosis is the most prevalent metabolic bone disease among developed countries. Although bone mass and density are certainly determined by various concurrent factors such as genetics, hormones, life-style and the environment, and although the genetic program has a critical role in growth and in bone peak development, for their realization an adequate nutritional intake of nutrients and regular exercise are always necessary and may represent a way to prevent osteoporosis and fractures. Exercise and especially high-impact sport activity during growth and adolescence increases bone mineral density (BMD) in weight-loaded skeletal regions. Aerobics, weight bearing and resistance exercises may also be effective in increasing BMD in post-menopausal women. Even though most of the research on nutritional components has focused almost exclusively on calcium and vitamin D, there is now considerable interest in the effects of a variety of other nutrients on bone status.

  15. Effects of adding supplemental tallow to diets containing distillers dried grains with solubles on fatty acid digestibility in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Davis, J M; Urriola, P E; Baidoo, S K; Johnston, L J; Shurson, G C

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to measure the apparent ileal digestibility (AID) and apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of fatty acids in diets containing 0 or 30% corn distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) and 0, 5, or 10% tallow. Barrows (n = 24; initial BW = 25 kg) were surgically fitted with a T-cannula at the distal ileum. Pigs (n = 4/diet) were randomly assigned to diets: corn-soybean meal control (CON), CON plus 5% tallow (5T0D), CON plus 10% tallow (10T0D), CON plus 30% DDGS (0T30D), CON plus 5% tallow and 30% DDGS (5T30D), and CON plus 10% tallow and 30% DDGS (10T30D). Eight replicates per treatment were achieved by randomizing diets among pigs for a second collection period. Each pig was fed their respective diet for a 5-d adaptation period followed by 3-d fecal collection and 2-d ileal digesta collection periods. The AID and ATTD of fatty acids was calculated using the index method and acid-insoluble ash as an indigestible marker. When tallow was added to diets with 0% DDGS, there was no effect on AID of palmitic acid (C16:0) or SFA, while AID of stearic acid (C18:0) was increased (66.87% for CON, 72.06% for 5T0D, and 76.81% for 10T0D; P < 0.01). However, when diets contained 30% DDGS, the AID of all SFA was reduced as levels of tallow increased C16:0 (77.62% for 0T30D, 69.66% for 5T30D, and 68.43% for 10T30D), C18:0 (85.87% for 0T30D, 64.08% for 5T30D, and 61.25% for 10T30D), and SFA (79.88% for 0T30D, 68.23% for 5T30D, and 66.29% for 10T30D). The AID of MUFA was not affected when tallow was added to diets with 30% DDGS but actually increased in 5T0D and 10T0D. The amount of apparent ileal digested fatty acids increased with the addition of DDGS and tallow regardless of their digestibility. Amounts of ileal digested MUFA and PUFA increased when both DDGS (P < 0.01) and tallow (P < 0.01) were included in the diet compared to when either ingredient was excluded. For ileal digestible SFA, an interaction (P < 0.01) between DDGS and tallow was

  16. The effects of added hydrogen on a helium atmospheric-pressure plasma jet ambient desorption/ionization source.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jonathan P; Heywood, Matthew S; Thurston, Glen K; Farnsworth, Paul B

    2013-03-01

    We present mass spectrometric data demonstrating the effect that hydrogen has on a helium-based dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) atmospheric-pressure plasma jet used as an ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source. The addition of 0.9 % hydrogen to the helium support gas in a 35-W plasma jet increased signals for a range of test analytes, with enhancement factors of up to 68, without proportional increases in background levels. The changes in signal levels result from a combination of changes in the desorption kinetics from the surface and increased ion production in the gas phase. The enhancement in ADI-MS performance despite the quenching of key plasma species reported in earlier studies suggests that ionization with a H2/He plasma jet is the result of an alternate mechanism involving the direct generation of ionized hydrogen.

  17. The effects of adding xylanase, vitamin C and copper sulphate to wheat-based diets on broiler performance.

    PubMed

    Marron, L; Bedford, M R; McCracken, K J

    2001-09-01

    1. The study used a 3 x 3 factorial design to evaluate the effects of 3 additives (none; vitamin C [250 mg/kg]; copper sulphate [250 mg/kg]) and 3 enzyme additions (none; Avizyme 1300 [Finnfeeds Ltd, 1 g/kg in food]; Avizyme 1310 [liquid spray, post-pelleting, 0.5 g/kg]). All experimental diets were mixed, heat-conditioned (80 degrees C for 2 min) and pelleted. Copper sulphate (diets NCu; DCu; LCu) and Avizyme 1300 (diets DN; DC; DCu) were added during mixing. Vitamin C was sprayed at 10 ml per kg (diets NC; DC; LC) and the liquid enzyme was diluted 20-fold and sprayed at the same rate (diets LN; LC; LCu), post-pelleting. 2. Additive or enzyme addition did not significantly affect DM intake or liveweight gain (LWG). Enzyme addition improved gain:food (P=0.014), AME:GE (P<0.001), ileal apparent digestibility of DM (P=0.008) and starch (P<0.001), faecal apparent digestibility of starch, crude fat and NDF (P=0.008; <0.001; <0.001 respectively) and reduced in vivo viscosity (P<0.001). 3. Copper sulphate addition depressed gain:food (P=0.047), AME:GE (P=0.002), ileal apparent digestibility of starch (P<0.001) and faecal apparent digestibility of starch (P=0.003) and crude fat (P<0.001) due to a negative additive x enzyme interaction when copper sulphate and dry enzyme were included together. 4. Vitamin C decreased in vivo viscosity by 20% but failed to have any effect on performance. Both enzyme forms gave similar improvements in performance in the absence of copper sulphate.

  18. Defensive effect of lansoprazole in dementia of AD type in mice exposed to streptozotocin and cholesterol enriched diet.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Rupinder K; Singh, Nirmal

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the potential of lansoprazole (a proton pump inhibitor and agonist of liver x receptors) in experimental dementia of AD type. Streptozotocin [STZ, 3 mg/kg, injected intracerebroventricular (i.c.v), and high fat diet (HFD, administered for 90 days)] were used to induce dementia in separate groups of Swiss mice. Morris water maze (MWM) test was performed to assess learning and memory of the animals. A battery of biochemical and histopathological studies were also performed. Extent of oxidative stress was measured by estimating the levels of brain reduced glutathione (GSH) and thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS). Brain acetylcholinestrase (AChE) activity and serum cholesterol levels were also estimated. The brain level of myeloperoxidase (MPO) was measured as a marker of inflammation. STZ and HFD produced a marked decline in MWM performance of the animals, reflecting impairment of learning and memory. STZ/HFD treated mice exhibited a marked accentuation of AChE activity, TBARS and MPO levels along with a fall in GSH levels. Further, the stained micrographs of STZ/HFD treated mice indicated pathological changes, severe neutrophilic infiltration and amyloid deposition. Lansoprazole treatment significantly attenuated STZ and HFD -induced memory deficits, biochemical and histopathological alterations. It also prevented HFD-induced rise in the cholesterol level. Therefore, the findings demonstrate potential of lansoprazole in memory dysfunctions which may probably be attributed to its anti-cholinesterase, anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. Moreover, both cholesterol-dependent as well as cholesterol-independent effects of lansoprazole appear to play a role. In addition study indicates the role of liver x receptors in dementia.

  19. Drying temperature effects on fish dry mass measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lantry, B.F.; O'Gorman, R.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of tissue composition in fish often requires dry samples. Time needed to dry fish decreases as temperature is increased, but additional volatile material may be lost. Effects of 10??C temperature increases on percentage dry mass (%DM) were tested against 60??C controls for groups of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush, rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax, slimy sculpin Cottus cognatus, and alewife Alosa pseudoharengus. Lake trout %DMs were lower at greater temperatures, but not significantly different from 60??C controls. Rainbow smelt and slimy sculpin %DMs were lower at greater temperatures and differences were significant when test temperatures reached 90??C. Significant differences were not found in tests using alewives because variability in %DM was high between fish. To avoid inter-fish variability, 30 alewives were each dried successively at 60, 70, 80, and then 90??C and for all fish %DM declined at each higher temperature. In general, %DMs were lower at greater temperatures and after reaching a stable dry weight, fish did not lose additional mass if temperature remained constant. Results indicate that caution should be used when comparing dry mass related indices from fish dried at different temperatures because %DM was negatively related to temperature. The differences in %DM observed with rising temperature could account for substantial portions of the variability in reported energy values for the species tested. Differences in %DM means for the 60 vs. 80??C and 60 vs. 90??C tests for rainbow smelt and alewife could represent of from 8 to 38% of observed annual energy cycles for Lakes Ontario and Michigan.

  20. Restricted mass transport effects on free radical reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Thomas, K.B.

    1994-09-01

    Coal possesses a complex chemical and physical structure. The cross-linked, network structure can lead to alterations in normal thermally-induced, free-radical decay pathways as a consequence of restrictions on mass transport. Moreover, in coal liquefaction, access of an external hydrogen donor to a reactive radical site can be hindered by the substantial domains of microporosity present in coals. However, previous work indicates that diffusion effects do not appear to be playing an important role in this coal conversion chemistry. Several possible explanations for this phenomenon were advanced including the potential involvement of a hydrogen hopping/radical relay mechanism recently discovered model systems in the authors laboratories. The authors have employed silica-anchored compounds to explore the effects of restricted mass transport on the pyrolysis mechanisms of coal model compounds. In studies of two-component systems, cases have been discovered where radical centers can be rapidly relocated in the diffusionally constrained environment as a consequence of rapid serial hydrogen atom transfers. This chemistry can have substantial effects on thermal decomposition rates and on product selectivities. In this study, the authors examine additional surfaces to systematically investigate the impact of molecular structure on the hydrogen atom transfer promoted radical relay mechanism. Silica-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane ({approx}Ph(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}Ph, or {approx}DPP) was chosen as the thermally reactive component, since it can be considered prototypical of linkages in coal that do not contain weak bonds easily cleaved at coal liquefaction temperatures (ca. 4000 {degrees}C), but which crack at reasonable rates if benzylic radicals can be generated by hydrogen abstraction. The rate of such hydrogen transfers under restricted diffusion will be highly dependent on the structure and proximity of neighboring molecules.

  1. Restricted mass transport effects on free radical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, A. C., III; Britt, P. F.; Thomas, K. B.

    Coal possesses a complex chemical and physical structure. The cross-linked, network structure can lead to alterations in normal thermally-induced, free-radical decay pathways as a consequence of restrictions on mass transport. Moreover, in coal liquefaction, access of an external hydrogen donor to a reactive radical site can be hindered by the substantial domains of microporosity present in coals. However, previous work indicates that diffusion effects do not appear to be playing an important role in this coal conversion chemistry. Several possible explanations for this phenomenon were advanced including the potential involvement of a hydrogen hopping/radical relay mechanism recently discovered model systems in the authors' laboratories. The authors have employed silica-anchored compounds to explore the effects of restricted mass transport on the pyrolysis mechanisms of coal model compounds. In studies of two-component systems, cases have been discovered where radical centers can be rapidly relocated in the diffusionally constrained environment as a consequence of rapid serial hydrogen atom transfers. This chemistry can have substantial effects on thermal decomposition rates and on product selectivities. In this study, the authors examine additional surfaces to systematically investigate the impact of molecular structure on the hydrogen atom transfer promoted radical relay mechanism. Silica-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane (approximately Ph(CH2)3Ph, or approximately DPP) was chosen as the thermally reactive component, since it can be considered prototypical of linkages in coal that do not contain weak bonds easily cleaved at coal liquefaction temperatures (ca. 4000 C), but which crack at reasonable rates if benzylic radicals can be generated by hydrogen abstraction. The rate of such hydrogen transfers under restricted diffusion will be highly dependent on the structure and proximity of neighboring molecules.

  2. Effective photon mass by Super and Lorentz symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Luca; dos Santos Filho, Luís R.; Helayël-Neto, José A.; Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    In the context of Standard Model Extensions (SMEs), we analyse four general classes of Super Symmetry (SuSy) and Lorentz Symmetry (LoSy) breaking, leading to observable imprints at our energy scales. The photon dispersion relations show a non-Maxwellian behaviour for the CPT (Charge-Parity-Time reversal symmetry) odd and even sectors. The group velocities exhibit also a directional dependence with respect to the breaking background vector (odd CPT) or tensor (even CPT). In the former sector, the group velocity may decay following an inverse squared frequency behaviour. Thus, we extract a massive Carroll-Field-Jackiw photon term in the Lagrangian and show that the effective mass is proportional to the breaking vector and moderately dependent on the direction of observation. The breaking vector absolute value is estimated by ground measurements and leads to a photon mass upper limit of 10-19 eV or 2 ×10-55 kg, and thereby to a potentially measurable delay at low radio frequencies.

  3. Effect of Body Mass Index on Left Ventricular Mass in Career Male Firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Korre, Maria; Porto, Luiz Guilherme G.; Farioli, Andrea; Yang, Justin; Christiani, David C.; Christophi, Costas A.; Lombardi, David A.; Kovacs, Richard J.; Mastouri, Ronald; Abbasi, Siddique; Steigner, Michael; Moffatt, Steven; Smith, Denise; Kales, Stefanos N.

    2017-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) mass is a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events; increased LV mass is common among US firefighters and plays a major role in firefighter sudden cardiac death. We aim to identify significant predictors of LV mass among firefighters. Cross-sectional study of 400 career male firefighters selected by an enriched randomization strategy. Weighted analyses were performed based on the total number of risk factors per subject with inverse probability weighting. LV mass was assessed by echocardiography (ECHO) and cardiac magnetic resonance, and normalized (indexed) for height. CVD risk parameters included vital signs at rest, body mass index (BMI)–defined obesity, obstructive sleep apnea risk, low cardiorespiratory fitness, and physical activity. Linear regression models were performed. In multivariate analyses, BMI was the only consistent significant independent predictor of LV mass indexes (all, p <0.001). A 1-unit decrease in BMI was associated with 1-unit (g/m1.7) reduction of LV mass/height1.7 after adjustment for age, obstructive sleep apnea risk, and cardiorespiratory fitness. In conclusion, after height-indexing ECHO-measured and cardiac magnetic resonance–measured LV mass, BMI was found to be a major driver of LV mass among firefighters. Our findings taken together with previous research suggest that reducing obesity will improve CVD risk profiles and decrease on-duty CVD and sudden cardiac death events in the fire service. Our results may also support targeted noninvasive screening for LV hypertrophy with ECHO among obese firefighters. PMID:27687051

  4. Long-term Ameliorative Effects of the Antidepressant Fluoxetine Exposure on Cognitive Deficits in 3 × TgAD Mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Li; Gao, Li-Feng; Sun, Dong-Sheng; Wu, Hao; Wang, Qun; Ke, Dan; Lei, Hao; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2016-06-21

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is neuroprotective; therefore, it has been applied to treat some neurodegenerative disorders. For instance, chronic fluoxetine exposure has short-term effects on Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the long-term ameliorative effects of fluoxetine exposure on AD have not been reported. In the present study, 6-month-old 3 × TgAD mice were treated with fluoxetine for 15 days, and then the influence of fluoxetine was detected at 20 days after the drug withdrawal. We found that chronic fluoxetine treatment ameliorated cognitive deficits of 3 × TgAD mice and increased the volume of the hippocampal CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) with increased neuron number and dendritic spine density. Meanwhile, fluoxetine exposure also stimulated the long-term potentiation (LTP) in hippocampal DG. The synaptic-related protein expression increased via activation of the cyclic AMP response element binding (CREB) protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling pathway induced by fluoxetine exposure. Lastly, we found that fluoxetine treatment decreased beta-amyloid (Aβ) levels. These results further certified that fluoxetine may be a potent effective drug for AD.

  5. Mass-dependent and non-mass-dependent isotope effects in ozone photolysis: Resolving theory and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Amanda S.; Boering, Kristie A.

    2006-11-14

    In addition to the anomalous {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O isotope effects in the three-body ozone formation reaction O+O{sub 2}+M, isotope effects in the destruction of ozone by photolysis may also play a role in determining the isotopic composition of ozone and other trace gases in the atmosphere. While previous experiments on ozone photolysis at 254 nm were interpreted as evidence for preferential loss of light ozone that is anomalous (or 'non-mass-dependent'), recent semiempirical theoretical calculations predicted a preferential loss of heavy ozone at that wavelength that is mass dependent. Through photochemical modeling results presented here, we resolve this apparent contradiction between experiment and theory. Specifically, we show that the formation of ozone during the UV photolysis experiments is not negligible, as had been assumed, and that the well-known non-mass-dependent isotope effects in ozone formation can account for the non-mass-dependent enrichment of the heavy isotopologs of ozone observed in the experiment. Thus, no unusual non-mass-dependent fractionation in ozone photolysis must be invoked to explain the experimental results. Furthermore, we show that theoretical predictions of a mass-dependent preferential loss of the heavy isotopologs of ozone during UV photolysis are not inconsistent with the experimental data, particularly if mass-dependent isotope effects in the chemical loss reactions of ozone during the photolysis experiments or experimental artifacts enrich the remaining ozone in {sup 17}O and {sup 18}O. Before the calculated fractionation factors can be quantitatively evaluated, however, further investigation of possible mass-dependent isotope effects in the reactions of ozone with O({sup 1}D), O({sup 3}P), O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}), and O{sub 2}({sup 1}{sigma}) is needed through experiments we suggest here.

  6. Low frequency anomalies of the effective mass of charged clusters in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikin, V.

    2013-10-01

    The dynamic behavior of charged clusters in liquid helium is discussed in detail. The matter is their added mass which has ideal, Msass, and normal, Mnass, components. The normal component has a number of interesting features of viscous origin. Some of them were found in recent experiments.

  7. Technical note: Effects of adding shade and fans to a feedbunk sprinkler system for preparturient cows on health and performance.

    PubMed

    Urdaz, J H; Overton, M W; Moore, D A; Santos, J E P

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of adding shades and fans to a feedbunk-mounted sprinkler system on preparturient Holstein cows during summer heat stress. Outcome variables included postpartum milk production, changes in body condition score, changes in serum concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and incidence of postparturient disorders. Four hundred and seventy-five prepartum multiparous cows, 250 to 257 d pregnant, were randomly allocated to 2 study pens. Treatments consisted of sprinklers over the feed bunk (n = 236); and sprinklers, fans, and shades over the feed bunk (n = 239). Data were used from cows spending a minimum of 14 d in their assigned pen. After parturition, all cows were housed and managed under identical conditions. Data recorders in each pen recorded environmental temperature and humidity every 30 min. Body condition scores were taken at study enrollment, parturition, and 60 d in lactation. Following parturition, the presence of retained placenta, metritis, milk fever, and displaced abomasum were recorded for the length of the study. Milk production was measured using twice-monthly Dairy Herd Improvement Association tests for the first 60 d in lactation. Blood was sampled twice weekly in 98 cows and analyzed for serum NEFA during the last 3 wk before parturition. Cows spent approximately 28 d in their respective treatments. Average daily environmental temperature (+/- SD) in the sprinkler only treatment was 26.4 +/- 7.2 vs. 25.1 +/- 8.6 degrees C in the shade, fans, and sprinkler treatment during the length of the trial. There was no difference in body condition score changes, incidence of postparturient disorders, or serum NEFA concentrations. There was a significant difference in total 60-d milk production, and an economic benefit over the preexisting cooling system.

  8. Mass transfer effects on the transmission of bubble screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuster, Daniel; Bergamasco, Luca

    2016-11-01

    In this work we investigate, theoretically and numerically, the reflection and transmission properties of bubble screens excited by pressure wave pulses. We use modified expressions for the bubble resonance frequency and the damping factor in order to capture the influence of mass transfer on the reflection-transmission coefficients. In addition to the influence of variables such as the bubble radius and the averaged inter-bubble distance, the analysis reveals that in conditions close to the saturation line there exists a regime where the heat transport surrounding the bubble plays an important role on the bubble's response also influencing the reflection properties of the bubble screen. The linear analysis allows us to predict the critical vapor content beyond which liquid heat's transport controls the dynamic response of the bubbles. Numerical simulations show that these effects become especially relevant in the nonlinear regime. ANR Cachmap.

  9. Effects of different yeast cell wall supplements added to maize- or wheat-based diets for broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Morales-López, R; Auclair, E; Van Immerseel, F; Ducatelle, R; García, F; Brufau, J

    2010-06-01

    1. Three experiments were carried out to study the effects of two experimental yeast cell wall (YCW) supplements, one from the yeast extract industry and the other from the brewery industry, added to maize or wheat based-diets, on performance and intestinal parameters of broiler chickens (Ross 308). 2. In the first and second experiments, a completely randomised block design with 4 experimental treatments was used: T-1) Negative control, no additives T-2) Positive control, avilamycin group (10 mg/kg feed), T-3) Yeast extract-YCW (500 mg/kg), and T-4) Brewery-YCW (500 mg/kg feed). There were 6 replicates of 20 (experiment 1) and 22 (experiment 2) chicks per treatment. 3. In experiment 1 (wheat based diets), yeast extract-YCW increased BW and daily feed intake (42 d). The effects were comparable to those of avilamycin. In experiment 2 (maize based diet), avilamycin, yeast extract-YCW and brewery-YCW treatments improved the feed conversion ratio with respect to the negative control group (0 to 14 d). 4. At 24 d, in both experiments, the ileal nutrient digestibility and ileal bacterial counts were not affected by any experimental treatment. In maize diets, lower intestinal viscosity was obtained with avilamycin, yeast extract-YCW and brewery-YCW than with the negative control. In wheat diets, yeast extract-YCW and brewery-YCW reduced intestinal viscosity. 5. A third experiment was conducted to study the effect of yeast extract-YCW on animal performance, intestinal mucosa morphology and intestinal viscosity. A 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments was used; one factor was the dietary yeast extract-YCW supplementation (0 or 500 mg/kg feed) and the other the cereal in the diet (maize or wheat). 6. At 43 d, the heaviest BW was in chickens fed on yeast extract-YCW compared to those given the negative control. At 22 d, yeast extract-YCW increased villus height, mucus thickness and number of goblet cells with respect to negative control. 7. Results of these experiments

  10. Use of an autosampler for dynamic headspace extraction of volatile compounds from grains and effect of added water on the extraction.

    PubMed

    Ram, M S; Seitz, L M; Rengarajan, R

    1999-10-01

    An autosampler attached to a purge and trap instrument was used to aid routine analyses of grain samples for volatile compounds associated with off-odors. Trapped volatiles were transferred to a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer instrument for separation and detection. Dynamic extraction of volatiles from approximately 18 g of whole grain at 80 degrees C was accomplished by purging helium through a sample vial with a Teflon-lined septum on each end. The autosampler automatically added internal standard to the sample before purging began, which required the addition of 1 mL of water for complete transfer of the standard to the sample. The added water enhanced extraction of 1-octen-3-ol, 1-octen-3-one, and some other compounds from soybeans but not from starchy grains such as corn and wheat. Addition of a free radical scavenger, such as citric acid, greatly diminished the recovery of 1-octen-3-ol and 1-octen-3-one from soybeans.

  11. MASS SPECTROMETRY

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, L.

    1962-01-01

    method is described for operating a mass spectrometer to improve its resolution qualities and to extend its period of use substantially between cleanings. In this method, a small amount of a beta emitting gas such as hydrogen titride or carbon-14 methane is added to the sample being supplied to the spectrometer for investigation. The additive establishes leakage paths on the surface of the non-conducting film accumulating within the vacuum chamber of the spectrometer, thereby reducing the effect of an accumulated static charge on the electrostatic and magnetic fields established within the instrument. (AEC)

  12. Cognitive and emotional profiles of aged Alzheimer's disease (3×TgAD) mice: effects of environmental enrichment and sexual dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Blázquez, Gloria; Cañete, Toni; Tobeña, Adolf; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2014-07-15

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with age which represents the most common cause of dementia. It is characterized by an accelerated memory loss compared to normal aging, and deterioration of other cognitive abilities that interfere with mood, reason, judgment and language. The main neuropathological hallmarks of the disorder are β-amyloid (βA) plaques and neurofibrillary Tau tangles. Triple transgenic 3×TgAD mouse model develops βA and Tau pathologies in a progressive manner, with a specific temporal and anatomic profile mimicking the pattern that takes place in the human brain with AD, and showing cognitive alterations characteristic of the disease. Environmental enrichment treatment in mice induces behavioral and emotional reactivity changes, including cognitive improvements in some AD-related transgenic mice. The present work intended to characterize the behavioral profile of 3×TgAD mice at advanced stages of neuropathological development (12 and 15 months of age) and to investigate whether environmental enrichment administered during adulthood was able to modify some of their behavioral and cognitive alterations. Results show that, at advanced stages of the disease 3×TgAD mice show deficits of spatial learning acquisition, as well as short-term and working memory deficits, while displaying increased levels of anxiety/fearfulness and normal sensorimotor functions. 3×TgAD mice also show sexual dimorphism, as reflected by increased cognitive deficits in females and increased levels of novelty-induced behavioral inhibition in males. Environmental enrichment exerts some slight positive effects, by mainly improving the initial acquisition of the spatial learning and working memory in 12-month-old 3×TgAD mice. Such effects vary depending on the gender.

  13. Nonclassical properties and purity of a qubit system in photon-added squeezed thermal states with time-dependent coupling effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrada, K.; Abdel-Khalek, S.

    2016-10-01

    The degree of purity and nonclassical properties for a two-level system interacting with a photon-added squeezed thermal field (PASTF) are described in terms of the physical parameters involved in the whole system state with and without time-dependent coupling effect. Specially, we investigate the influence of the squeezed parameter and photon-added number on the behavior of the linear entropy and the Mandel's parameter. We find that for each value of the photon-added number, there exist critical value of the squeezed parameter for which the linear entropy is maximal and the statistical properties get farther from the trivial case. Moreover, we show that the presence of the time-dependent coupling effect may increase the periodicity time and lead to quench oscillations of the Mandel's parameter during the evolution. Finally, we exploit an interesting relationship between the linear entropy and the Mandel's parameter in terms of the physical parameters.

  14. Conserved charges in timelike warped AdS3 spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnay, L.; Fernández-Melgarejo, J. J.; Giribet, G.; Goya, A.; Lavia, E.

    2015-06-01

    We consider the timelike version of warped anti-de Sitter space (WAdS), which corresponds to the three-dimensional section of the Gödel solution of four-dimensional cosmological Einstein equations. This geometry presents closed timelike curves (CTCs), which are inherited from its four-dimensional embedding. In three dimensions, this type of solution can be supported without matter provided the graviton acquires mass. Here, among the different ways to consistently give mass to the graviton in three dimensions, we consider the parity-even model known as new massive gravity (NMG). In the bulk of timelike WAdS3 space, we introduce defects that, from the three-dimensional point of view, represent spinning massive particlelike objects. For this type of source, we investigate the definition of quasilocal gravitational energy as seen from infinity, far beyond the region where the CTCs appear. We also consider the covariant formalism applied to NMG to compute the mass and the angular momentum of spinning particlelike defects and compare the result with the one obtained by means of the quasilocal stress tensor. We apply these methods to special limits in which the WAdS3 solutions coincide with locally AdS3 and locally AdS2×R spaces. Finally, we make some comments about the asymptotic symmetry algebra of asymptotically WAdS3 spaces in NMG.

  15. Negative muon chemistry: the quantum muon effect and the finite nuclear mass effect.

    PubMed

    Posada, Edwin; Moncada, Félix; Reyes, Andrés

    2014-10-09

    The any-particle molecular orbital method at the full configuration interaction level has been employed to study atoms in which one electron has been replaced by a negative muon. In this approach electrons and muons are described as quantum waves. A scheme has been proposed to discriminate nuclear mass and quantum muon effects on chemical properties of muonic and regular atoms. This study reveals that the differences in the ionization potentials of isoelectronic muonic atoms and regular atoms are of the order of millielectronvolts. For the valence ionizations of muonic helium and muonic lithium the nuclear mass effects are more important. On the other hand, for 1s ionizations of muonic atoms heavier than beryllium, the quantum muon effects are more important. In addition, this study presents an assessment of the nuclear mass and quantum muon effects on the barrier of Heμ + H2 reaction.

  16. Understanding ligand effects in gold clusters using mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes recent research on the influence of phosphine ligands on the size, stability, and reactivity of gold clusters synthesized in solution. Sub-nanometer clusters exhibit size- and composition-dependent properties that are unique from those of larger nanoparticles. The highly tunable properties of clusters and their high surface-to-volume ratio make them promising candidates for a variety of technological applications. However, because “each-atom-counts” toward defining cluster properties it is critically important to develop robust synthesis methods to efficiently prepare clusters of predetermined size. For decades phosphines have been known to direct the size-selected synthesis of gold clusters. Despite the preparation of numerous species it is still not understood how different functional groups at phosphine centers affect the size and properties of gold clusters. Using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) it is possible to characterize the effect of ligand substitution on the distribution of clusters formed in solution at defined reaction conditions. In addition, ligand exchange reactions on preformed clusters may be monitored using ESI-MS. Collision induced dissociation (CID) may also be employed to obtain qualitative insight into the fragmentation of mixed ligand clusters and the relative binding energies of differently substituted phosphines. Quantitative ligand binding energies and cluster stability may be determined employing surface induced dissociation (SID) in a custom-built Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS). Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) based modeling of the SID data allows dissociation energies and entropy values to be extracted that may be compared with the results of high-level theoretical calculations. The charge reduction and reactivity of atomically precise gold clusters, including partially ligated species generated in the gas-phase by in source CID, on well

  17. Changes in Kicking Pattern: Effect of Experience, Speed, Accuracy, and Effective Striking Mass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southard, Dan L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to: (a) examine the effect of experience and goal constraints (speed, accuracy) on kicking patterns; (b) determine if effective striking mass was independent of ankle velocity at impact; and (c) determine the accuracy of kicks relative to independent factors. Method: Twenty participants were recruited to…

  18. The Effect of Comorbid AD/HD and Learning Disabilities on Parent-Reported Behavioral and Academic Outcomes of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Thomas J.; Adams, Gail

    2006-01-01

    Data from the 2001 National Household Education Survey were examined to estimate the prevalence of comorbid AD/HD and LD among school-aged children in the United States and assess how this comorbidity was associated with selected parent-reported behavioral and academic outcomes. The observed prevalence of comorbidity coincided with estimates in…

  19. Intramedium Interaction and the Third-Person Effect: How Partisans Respond to YouTube Ads and Comments.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Aaron S; Park, Chang Sup; Lyons, Benjamin A; Kang, Cheeyoun Stephanie; Iyer, Narayanan

    2015-07-01

    As digital media technologies have evolved and become more powerful, the prevalence of mixed-media content-that is, content that mixes multiple media such as text and video-has increased considerably. Perhaps nowhere is this more apparent than YouTube, now the Web's third most trafficked site. YouTube provides for video sharing in an environment otherwise dominated by textual titles, descriptions, and comments. As such, it is an ideal venue in which to examine the impact of intramedium interaction on message evaluation. This study uses a survey experiment to test first-person and third-person evaluations of campaign ads from the Obama and Romney campaigns, and the comments posted about them on YouTube, using two real ads and one set of fake comments. Findings suggest that partisan perceptions of the manipulated ads transfer to the constant comments, and that the contextual cue of the YouTube environment reciprocally impacts partisan evaluation of the ads themselves.

  20. Evidence for the Need to More Closely Examine School Effects in Value-Added Modeling and Related Accountability Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franco, M. Suzanne; Seidel, Kent

    2014-01-01

    Value-added approaches for attributing student growth to teachers often use weighted estimates of building-level factors based on "typical" schools to represent a range of community, school, and other variables related to teacher and student work that are not easily measured directly. This study examines whether such estimates are likely…

  1. The mass media alone are not effective change agents.

    PubMed

    Ruijter, J M

    1991-01-01

    Social mobilization programs for immunization have been used by African leaders, however, coverage from 20% to 70% in capitals like Mogadishu, Maputo, and Dakar were the result of short campaigns rather than the consequence of knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) improvement. One-party states relied on their network of cadres issuing decrees from the top down to enforce completion of these immunization campaigns. Sometimes resistance developed against these programs, as the military mobilized people (e.g., Somalia). These efforts became rather superficial once the temporary pressure evaporated. In Mogadishu coverage increased from 22% to 70% in 1985, and within a year it dropped back to 8% above the original level. Nigeria, Senegal, and Togo where they used regular mini campaigns had better results. Research data from Botswana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, and Zambia were analyzed. In 1983 in Kenya 73% of health workers never advised their clients, and 82% were incompetent to do so. Data also showed that clinics provided the bulk of information to women aged 15-45 in lower income groups, but they rarely consulted village health workers. Radio and TV programs were not reaching people because radio ownership was not universal (47% in Zambia and 30% in Zimbabwe), and batteries were often not available. In addition, most people turned to the radio for entertainment. In 1989, vaccination coverage was 19% in Luanda, Angola, but only 5% of 232 respondents to an evaluation could name the immunizable diseases. An identical percentage was familiar with these diseases in a Zambian study in 1986. Media experts proposed dramas to raise interest, but innovative mass media programs of dissemination of the message advocated in the 1960s did not prove effective to bring about KAP changes. Training of health and paramedical personnel by mass organizations as initiated in Ethiopia may prove to be worthwhile.

  2. The effect of flow and mass transport in thrombogenesis.

    PubMed

    Basmadjian, D

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents a mathematical analysis of the contributions of flow and mass transport to a single reactive event at a blood vessel wall. The intent is to prepare the ground for a comprehensive study of the intertwining of these contributions with the reaction network of the coagulation cascade. We show that in all vessels with local mural activity, or in "large" vessels (d greater than 0.1 mm) with global reactivity, events at the tubular wall can be rigorously described by algebraic equations under steady conditions, or by ordinary differential forms (ODEs) during transient conditions. This opens up important ways for analyzing the combined roles of flow, transport, and coagulation reactions in thrombosis, a task hitherto considered to be completely intractable. We report extensively on the dependence of transport coefficient kL and mural coagulant concentration Cw on flow, vessel geometry, and reaction kinetics. It is shown that for protein transport, kL varies only weakly with shear rate gamma in large vessels, and not at all in the smaller tubes (d less than 10(-2) mm). For a typical protein, kL approximately 10(-3) cm s-1 within a factor of 3 in most geometries, irrespective of the mural reaction kinetics. Significant reductions in kL (1/10-1/1,000) leading to high-coagulant accumulation are seen mainly in stagnant zones vicinal to abrupt expansions and in small elliptical tubules. This is in accord with known physical observations. More unexpected are the dramatic increases in accumulation which can come about through the intervention of an autocatalytic reaction step, with Cw rising sharply toward infinity as the ratio of reaction to transport coefficient approaches unity. Such self-catalyzed reactions have the ability to act as powerful amplifiers of an otherwise modest influence of flow and transport on coagulant concentration. The paper considers as well the effect on mass transport of transient conditions occasioned by coagulation initiation or

  3. Effects of body mass on nicotine-induced thermogenesis and catecholamine release in male smokers.

    PubMed

    Walker, J F; Kane, C J

    2002-10-25

    The aims of this study were to examine the effects of nicotine on resting energy expenditure (REE) and plasma catecholamine release following ad libitum smoking in fasted, middle-aged males; and, to determine if the acute responses in REE and catecholamine release to smoking differ between normal weight (< or = 25 kg/m(2)) and overweight (> 25 kg/m(2)) smoker groups. REE was measured by indirect calorimetry in 32 fasted male smokers prior to, and 30 minutes after, consuming either two 0.16 mg nicotine (low yield) or two 1.74 mg nicotine (high yield) cigarettes. Plasma nicotine and norepinephrine levels were simultaneously measured. There was no thermic effect of nicotine or catecholamine response after smoking low yield cigarettes in both groups, nor after smoking high yield cigarettes in the overweight group. In contrast, REE increased 7.2%, which was accompanied by an increase in plasma norepinephrine release, after smoking high yield cigarettes in the normal weight group. Controlling plasma nicotine level ablated these increases. In conclusion, body mass interacts with the thermic effect of nicotine and neuroendocrine function in male smokers. Smoking-induced increase in the plasma nicotine level accounts for the observed responses, which are blunted in overweight smokers. This finding may have implications for potential weight gain following smoking cessation by normal weight individuals, related to lost smoking-induced thermogenesis.

  4. 77 FR 19033 - Effect of Adding References to HS 6104.32 To Correct the U.S.-Korea FTA Product-Specific Rules of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2012-7566] INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. Korea FTA-103-026] Effect of Adding References to HS 6104.32 To Correct the U.S.- Korea FTA Product-Specific Rules of Origin AGENCY... 104 of the United States-Korea Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act (19 U.S.C. 3805 note),...

  5. Effects of adding saturated fat to diets with sorghum-based distiller's dried grains with solubles on growth performance and carcass characteristics in finishing pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A total of 112 barrows (avg BW of 72 kg) was used in a 65-day growth assay to determine the effects of adding a source of saturated fat (beef tallow) into diets with sorghum-based distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS). The pigs were sorted by ancestry and blocked by BW with seven pigs/pen an...

  6. Effects of adding protein, condensed tannins, and polyethylene glycol to diets of sheep and goats fed one-seed juniper and low quality roughage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biochemical mechanisms that limit voluntary intake of one-seed juniper by browsing ruminants are not well understood. Twelve Rambouillet ewes (78 ± 2.3 kg BW) and 12 Boer-Spanish does (54 ± 1.4 kg BW) were used in a split-plot sequence design to investigate the effects of adding protein, quebrac...

  7. Effects of sitagliptin or metformin added to pioglitazone monotherapy in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Derosa, Giuseppe; Maffioli, Pamela; Salvadeo, Sibilla A T; Ferrari, Ilaria; Ragonesi, Pietro D; Querci, Fabrizio; Franzetti, Ivano G; Gadaleta, Gennaro; Ciccarelli, Leonardina; Piccinni, Mario N; D'Angelo, Angela; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effects of the addition of sitagliptin or metformin to pioglitazone monotherapy in poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus patients on body weight, glycemic control, beta-cell function, insulin resistance, and inflammatory state parameters. One hundred fifty-one patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus (glycated hemoglobin [HbA(1c)] >7.5%) in therapy with pioglitazone 30 mg/d were enrolled in this study. We randomized patients to take pioglitazone 30 mg plus sitagliptin 100 mg once a day, or pioglitazone 15 mg plus metformin 850 mg twice a day. We evaluated at baseline and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months these parameters: body weight, body mass index, HbA(1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), postprandial plasma glucose (PPG), fasting plasma insulin (FPI), homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), homeostasis model assessment beta-cell function index, fasting plasma proinsulin (Pr), Pr/FPI ratio, adiponectin, resistin (R), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. A decrease of body weight and body mass index was observed with metformin, but not with sitagliptin, at the end of the study. We observed a comparable significant decrease of HbA(1c), FPG, and PPG and a significant increase of homeostasis model assessment beta-cell function index compared with baseline in both groups without any significant differences between the 2 groups. Fasting plasma insulin, fasting plasma Pr, Pr/FPI ratio, and HOMA-IR values were decreased in both groups even if the values obtained with metformin were significantly lower than the values obtained with sitagliptin. There were no significant variations of ADN, R, or TNF-alpha with sitagliptin, whereas a significant increase of ADN and a significant decrease of R and TNF-alpha values were recorded with metformin. A significant decrease of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein value was obtained in both groups without any

  8. The effects of analyte mass and collision gases on ion beam formation in an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jessica J.; Edmund, Alisa J.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-11-01

    Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to evaluate the effect of matrix components on the formation and focusing of a Ba ion beam in a commercial inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Cross sections of the ion beams were taken in the second vacuum stage, in front of the entrance to the mass analyzer. Under normal operating conditions, the addition of Pb shifted the position of the Ba ion beam to the right. PLIF was also used to evaluate the effect of a collision reaction interface (CRI) on Ca and Ba ion beams. A wider velocity distribution of ions and a decrease in overall intensity were observed for the CRI images. The fluorescence and mass spectrometer signals decreased with increased CRI flow rates. These effects were most obvious for Ca ions with He gas.

  9. Effects of mass on aircraft sidearm controller characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Charles A.

    1994-01-01

    When designing a flight simulator, providing a set of low mass variable-characteristic pilot controls can be very difficult. Thus, a strong incentive exists to identify the highest possible mass that will not degrade the validity of a simulation. The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has conducted a brief flight program to determine the maximum acceptable mass (system inertia) of an aircraft sidearm controller as a function of force gradient. This information is useful for control system design in aircraft as well as development of suitable flight simulator controls. A modified Learjet with a variable-characteristic sidearm controller was used to obtain data. A boundary was defined between mass considered acceptable and mass considered unacceptable to the pilot. This boundary is defined as a function of force gradient over a range of natural frequencies. This investigation is limited to a study of mass-frequency characteristics only. Results of this investigation are presented in this paper.

  10. Effects of Adding Corn Dried Distiller Grains with Solubles (DDGS) to the Dairy Cow Diet and Effects of Bedding in Dairy Cow Slurry on Fugitive Methane Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Massé, Daniel I.; Jarret, Guillaume; Benchaar, Chaouki; Hassanat, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary The objectives of this experiment were to investigate the effects of adding corn DDGS to the dairy cow diet as well as the bedding types (wood shavings, straw or peat moss) on manure fugitive CH4 emissions. The incorporation of DDGS in the diet has increased manure methane emission by 15% and the use of peat moss as bedding has increased manure methane emission by 27%. Abstract The specific objectives of this experiment were to investigate the effects of adding 10% or 30% corn dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) to the dairy cow diet and the effects of bedding type (wood shavings, straw or peat moss) in dairy slurry on fugitive CH4 emissions. The addition of DDGS10 to the dairy cow diet significantly increased (29%) the daily amount of fat excreted in slurry compared to the control diet. The inclusion of DDGS30 in the diet increased the daily amounts of excreted DM, volatile solids (VS), fat, neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF) and hemicellulose by 18%, 18%, 70%, 30%, 15% and 53%, respectively, compared to the control diet. During the storage experiment, daily fugitive CH4 emissions showed a significant increase of 15% (p < 0.05) for the slurry resulting from the corn DDGS30 diet. The addition of wood shavings and straw did not have a significant effect on daily fugitive CH4 emissions relative to the control diet, whereas the addition of peat moss caused a significant increase of 27% (p < 0.05) in fugitive CH4 emissions. PMID:26479012

  11. Effects of Adding Essential Oil to the Diet of Weaned Pigs on Performance, Nutrient Utilization, Immune Response and Intestinal Health

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pengfei; Piao, Xiangshu; Ru, Yingjun; Han, Xu; Xue, Lingfeng; Zhang, Hongyu

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of adding essential oils to the diet of weaned pigs on performance, nutrient utilization, immune response and intestinal health. A total of 96 weaning pigs (8.37±1.58 kg) were allotted to one of three dietary treatments. The treatments consisted of an unsupplemented basal diet (negative control, NC) or similar diets supplemented with 0.01% of an essential oil product which contained 18% thymol and cinnamaldehyde (EOD) as well as a diet supplemented with 0.19% of an antibiotic mixture which provided 150 ppm chlortetracycline, 80 ppm colistin sulfate and 50 ppm kitasamycin (positive control, PC). Each treatment was provided to eight pens of pigs with four pigs per pen. Over the entire 35 d experiment, ADG and fecal score were improved (p<0.05) for pigs fed the PC and EOD compared with the NC. Dry matter and crude protein digestibility as well as lymphocyte proliferation for pigs fed the PC and EOD diets were increased significantly compared with NC (p<0.05). IGF-I levels in plasma were significantly increased (p<0.05) in pigs fed the PC diet compared with pigs fed the NC diet. Interleukin-6 concentration was lower (p<0.05) and the tumor necrosis factor-α level was higher (p<0.05) in the plasma of pigs fed the EOD diet than the NC diet. Plasma total antioxidant capacity level increased (p<0.05) in pigs fed the EOD diet compared with pigs fed the NC. Villus height to crypt depth ratio in the jejunum was greater (p<0.05) in pigs fed the PC and EOD diets than the NC. The numbers of E. coli in the cecum, colon and rectum were reduced (p<0.05) in pigs fed the PC and EOD diets compared with the control. In the colon, the ratio of Lactobacilli to E. coli was increased (p<0.05) in pigs fed the EOD diet compared with NC diet. Total aerobe numbers in the rectum were decreased (p<0.05) in pigs fed the PC and EOD diets compared with the control. Collectively, these results indicate that blends of essential oils could be a

  12. Effects of adding essential oil to the diet of weaned pigs on performance, nutrient utilization, immune response and intestinal health.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Piao, Xiangshu; Ru, Yingjun; Han, Xu; Xue, Lingfeng; Zhang, Hongyu

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of adding essential oils to the diet of weaned pigs on performance, nutrient utilization, immune response and intestinal health. A total of 96 weaning pigs (8.37±1.58 kg) were allotted to one of three dietary treatments. The treatments consisted of an unsupplemented basal diet (negative control, NC) or similar diets supplemented with 0.01% of an essential oil product which contained 18% thymol and cinnamaldehyde (EOD) as well as a diet supplemented with 0.19% of an antibiotic mixture which provided 150 ppm chlortetracycline, 80 ppm colistin sulfate and 50 ppm kitasamycin (positive control, PC). Each treatment was provided to eight pens of pigs with four pigs per pen. Over the entire 35 d experiment, ADG and fecal score were improved (p<0.05) for pigs fed the PC and EOD compared with the NC. Dry matter and crude protein digestibility as well as lymphocyte proliferation for pigs fed the PC and EOD diets were increased significantly compared with NC (p<0.05). IGF-I levels in plasma were significantly increased (p<0.05) in pigs fed the PC diet compared with pigs fed the NC diet. Interleukin-6 concentration was lower (p<0.05) and the tumor necrosis factor-α level was higher (p<0.05) in the plasma of pigs fed the EOD diet than the NC diet. Plasma total antioxidant capacity level increased (p<0.05) in pigs fed the EOD diet compared with pigs fed the NC. Villus height to crypt depth ratio in the jejunum was greater (p<0.05) in pigs fed the PC and EOD diets than the NC. The numbers of E. coli in the cecum, colon and rectum were reduced (p<0.05) in pigs fed the PC and EOD diets compared with the control. In the colon, the ratio of Lactobacilli to E. coli was increased (p<0.05) in pigs fed the EOD diet compared with NC diet. Total aerobe numbers in the rectum were decreased (p<0.05) in pigs fed the PC and EOD diets compared with the control. Collectively, these results indicate that blends of essential oils could be a

  13. Binding Energies, Effective Masses and Screenings Effects of Fröhlich Bipolarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataudella, V.; Iadonisi, G.; Ninno, D.

    1991-01-01

    The bipolaron ground state binding energy and the effective masses are calculated self-consistently in a scheme where the electron-phonon interaction is described by the Fröhlich interaction. We explicitly use the total linear momentum conservation and both two-and three-dimensional systems are considered. We review results for binding energies and show that the bipolaron effective mass increases with the electron-phonon coupling constant α more rapidly than two free polaron masses. As expected, the increase is greater in two than in three dimensions. We estimate the screening effects due to an electronic or hole density n in a range of values such that nR2b ll 1 (here Rb is the bipolaron radius). We find that the bipolaron binding energy decreases with n and eventually becomes positive indicating the existence of a metastable bipolaron state. Finally we discuss the possible connections between our results and high Tc superconductivity.

  14. Effective mass of a charged carrier in a nonpolar liquid: Snowball effect in superfluid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikina, I.; Shikin, V.; Varlamov, A. A.

    2007-05-01

    The problem of a correct definition of the charged carrier effective mass in superfluid helium is revised. It is shown that the effective mass of such a quasiparticle can be introduced without Atkins’s idea about the solidification of liquid He4 in the close vicinity of an ion (the so-called “snowball” model). Moreover, in addition to the generalization of Atkins’s model, the charged carrier effective mass formation is considered within the framework of the two-fluid scenario. The physical reasons of the normal-fluid contribution divergency and the way of the corresponding regularization procedure are discussed. Agreement between the theory and the available experimental data is found in a wide range of temperatures.

  15. Effective mass of a charged carrier in a nonpolar liquid: Snowball effect in superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Chikina, I.; Varlamov, A. A.

    2007-05-01

    The problem of a correct definition of the charged carrier effective mass in superfluid helium is revised. It is shown that the effective mass of such a quasiparticle can be introduced without Atkins's idea about the solidification of liquid He{sup 4} in the close vicinity of an ion (the so-called ''snowball'' model). Moreover, in addition to the generalization of Atkins's model, the charged carrier effective mass formation is considered within the framework of the two-fluid scenario. The physical reasons of the normal-fluid contribution divergency and the way of the corresponding regularization procedure are discussed. Agreement between the theory and the available experimental data is found in a wide range of temperatures.

  16. Effects of fore-aft body mass distribution on acceleration in dogs.

    PubMed

    Walter, Rebecca M; Carrier, David R

    2011-05-15

    The ability of a quadruped to apply propulsive ground reaction forces (GRF) during rapid acceleration may be limited by muscle power, foot traction or the ability to counteract the nose-up pitching moment due to acceleration. Because the biomechanics of acceleration change, both throughout the stride cycle and over subsequent strides as velocity increases, the factors limiting propulsive force production may also change. Depending on which factors are limiting during each step, alterations in fore-aft body mass distribution may either increase or decrease the maximum propulsive GRF produced. We analyzed the effects of experimental alterations in the fore-aft body mass distribution of dogs as they performed rapid accelerations. We measured the changes in trunk kinematics and GRF as dogs accelerated while carrying 10% body mass in saddlebags positioned just in front of the shoulder girdle or directly over the pelvic girdle. We found that dogs applied greater propulsive forces in the initial hindlimb push-off and first step by the lead forelimb in both weighted conditions. During these steps dogs appear to have been limited by foot traction. For the trailing forelimb, propulsive forces and impulses were reduced when dogs wore caudally placed weights and increased when dogs wore cranially placed weights. This is consistent with nose-up pitching or avoidance thereof having limited propulsive force production by the trailing forelimb. By the second stride, the hindlimbs appear to have been limited by muscle power in their ability to apply propulsive force. Adding weights decreased the propulsive force they applied most in the beginning of stance, when limb retractor muscles were active in supporting body weight. These results suggest that all three factors: foot traction, pitching of the body, and muscle power play roles in limiting quadrupedal acceleration. Digging in to the substrate with claws or hooves appears to be necessary for maximizing propulsion in the initial

  17. Effects of diet on rate of body mass gain by wintering canvasbacks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jorde, D.G.; Haramis, G.M.; Bunck, C.M.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1995-01-01

    Because habitat degradation has led to the loss of submerged vegetation in Chesapeake Bay, wintering canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria) have shifted from a plant diet of American wildcelery (Vallisneria americana) to an animal diet of Baltic clams (Macoma balthica). We conducted experiments with pen-reared canvasbacks (n = 32, 1990; n = 32, 1991) to assess the effect of this diet change on mass recovery rate following a simulated period of food deprivation. During the recovery phase, canvasbacks were fed ad libitum either (1) Baltic clams (1991 only), (2) tubers of wildcelery, 3) corn, or (4) commercial control diet. Initial body mass of ducks did not differ between years (P = 0.754) or among pens (P > 0.264) or diets within years (1990, P = 0.520; 1991, P = 0.684). Body mass decline during food deprivation (x super(-) = 26.0 g/day plus or minus 0.6 SE) did not differ among diets (1990, P = 0.239; 1991, P = 0.062) or between sexes in 1990 (P = 0.197), but was greater (P = 0.039) for males (x super(-) = 28 g/day plus or minus 0.8 SE) than females (x super(-) = 25 g/day plus or minus 0.9) in 1991. Mass recovery rate differed between diets (clams excluded) in 1990 (P = 0.003) and 1991 (clams included) (P = 0.011); mean = 42 g/bird super(-1)/day super(-1) plus or minus 3.8 (SE) control diet, mean = 32 g/bird super(-1)/day super(-1) plus or minus 2.8 wildcelery tubers, mean = 24 g/bird super(-1)/day super(-1) plus or minus 4.9 whole corn, and mean = 23 g/bird super(-1)/day super(-1) plus or minus 1.0 Baltic clams. Canvasbacks consumed an average of 2,169 g/bird super(-1)/day super(-1) of Baltic clams, 1,158 g/bird super(-1)/day super(-1) of wildcelery tubers, 152 g/bird super(-1)/day super(-1) whole corn, and 208 g/bird super(-1)/day super(-1) (dry mass) control diet during recovery. Managers should restore and maintain aquatic plant foods that enhance winter survival of canvasbacks and other waterfowl in response to declining habitat quality.

  18. Vehicle surge detection and pathway discrimination by pedestrians who are blind: Effect of adding an alert sound to hybrid electric vehicles on performance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Shik; Emerson, Robert Wall; Naghshineh, Koorosh; Pliskow, Jay; Myers, Kyle

    2012-05-01

    This study examined the effect of adding an artificially generated alert sound to a quiet vehicle on its detectability and localizability with 15 visually impaired adults. When starting from a stationary position, the hybrid electric vehicle with an alert sound was significantly more quickly and reliably detected than either the identical vehicle without such added sound or the comparable internal combustion engine vehicle. However, no significant difference was found between the vehicles in respect to how accurately the participants could discriminate the path of a given vehicle (straight vs. right turn). These results suggest that adding an artificial sound to a hybrid electric vehicle may help reduce delay in street crossing initiation by a blind pedestrian, but the benefit of such alert sound may not be obvious in determining whether the vehicle in his near parallel lane proceeds straight through the intersection or turns right in front of him.

  19. Matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoshan

    1995-07-07

    The inductively coupled plasma is an electrodeless discharge in a gas (usually Ar) at atmospheric pressure. Radio frequency energy generated by a RF power source is inductively coupled to the plasma gas through a water cooled load coil. In ICP-MS the "Fassel" TAX quartz torch commonly used in emission is mounted horizontally. The sample aerosol is introduced into the central flow, where the gas kinetic temperature is about 5000 K. The aerosol is vaporized, atomized, excited and ionized in the plasma, and the ions are subsequently extracted through two metal apertures (sampler and skimmer) into the mass spectrometer. In ICP-MS, the matrix effects, or non-spectroscopic interferences, can be defined as the type of interferences caused by dissolved concomitant salt ions in the solution. Matrix effects can be divided into two categories: (1) signal drift due to the deposition of solids on the sampling apertures; and/or (2) signal suppression or enhancement by the presence of the dissolved salts. The first category is now reasonably understood. The dissolved salts, especially refractory oxides, tend to deposit on the cool tip of the sampling cone. The clogging of the orifices reduces the ion flow into the ICP-MS, lowers the pressure in the first stage of ICP-MS, and enhances the level of metal oxide ions. Because the extent of the clogging increases with the time, the signal drifts down. Even at the very early stage of the development of ICP-MS, matrix effects had been observed. Houk et al. found out that the ICP-MS was not tolerant to solutions containing significant amounts of dissolved solids.

  20. Multiple novel gene-by-environment interactions modify the effect of FTO variants on body mass index.

    PubMed

    Young, Alexander I; Wauthier, Fabian; Donnelly, Peter

    2016-09-06

    Genetic studies have shown that obesity risk is heritable and that, of the many common variants now associated with body mass index, those in an intron of the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene have the largest effect. The size of the UK Biobank, and its joint measurement of genetic, anthropometric and lifestyle variables, offers an unprecedented opportunity to assess gene-by-environment interactions in a way that accounts for the dependence between different factors. We jointly examine the evidence for interactions between FTO (rs1421085) and various lifestyle and environmental factors. We report interactions between the FTO variant and each of: frequency of alcohol consumption (P=3.0 × 10(-4)); deviations from mean sleep duration (P=8.0 × 10(-4)); overall diet (P=5.0 × 10(-6)), including added salt (P=1.2 × 10(-3)); and physical activity (P=3.1 × 10(-4)).

  1. Effect of pretreatment and drying methods on quality of value-added dried aonla (Emblica officinalis Gaertn) shreds.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, V K; Nema, Prabhat K; Rathore, S S

    2011-02-01

    Value added dried Indian gooseberry (aonla) shreds were prepared using aonla fruits of cv. 'NA-7'. Two blanching methods (hot water and potassium metabisulphite (KMS) at 0.1%) and two drying methods (solar and hot air oven drying) were tried for the production of aonla shreds. Common salt, black salt and ginger juice were mixed for enhancing sensory quality of the product. The best product was obtained with KMS blanching and drying in solar dryer with added common salt at 3%. The most acceptable product had ascorbic acid content 298.3 mg/100 g, tannin 2.4%, acidity 2.6%, reducing sugar 3.0%, non-reducing sugar 21.0% and total sugar 24.0%. The recovery was 8.0-8.5%.

  2. Effect of unmodulated laser light on the nanostructure of a thin solid AD-1 azo dye film

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovkin, A M; Ezhov, A A; Kozenkov, V M; Magnitskiy, Sergey A; Nagorskiy, Nikolay M; Panov, Vladimir I

    2010-06-23

    Exposure to light uniform in intensity and polarisation causes marked changes in the surface topography of a thin (320 nm) nanostructured AD-1 low molecular weight azo dye film. Linearly polarised incoherent light with a wavelength of 470 nm and intensity of 1 mW cm{sup -2} produces numerous teardrop-shaped hillocks of the order of 200 nm in radius over most of the film surface. (letters)

  3. Effect of vapor-phase mass transfer on aquifer restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.T.; Staes, E.G.

    1992-02-01

    Volatile organic chemicals (VOC) are a frequent source of groundwater contamination in North Carolina and throughout the United States and other developed countries. The work is considered a subset of the general multiphase flow and transport problem: fluid flow and contaminant transport in the gas phase of the unsaturated zone. The specific purpose of the work was to investigate gas-phase (VOC) transport phenomena at the field scale to assess the relative importance of operative transport phenomena. A field research site was established at an active fire training area on Pope Air Force Base. Monitoring of groundwater flow and gas-phase contaminant distributions was accomplished as a function of three spatial dimensions and time. These distributions are reported and interpreted with respect to the current level of understanding of gas-phase transport phenomena. Consideration is given to advective transport, diffusive transport, interphase mass transfer, and multicomponent effects. Numerical modeling is used to evaluate expected steady-state contaminant distributions in the unsaturated zone and to assess relative time scales of operative transport processes. Reasonable agreement is achieved between model simulations and observed concentration distributions in the field, with a dominant vertical transport component shown in both predicted and observed contaminant distributions.

  4. Device-Level Models Using Multi-Valley Effective Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baczewski, Andrew D.; Frees, Adam; Gamble, John King; Gao, Xujiao; Jacobson, N. Tobias; Mitchell, John A.; Montaño, Inès; Muller, Richard P.; Nielsen, Erik

    2015-03-01

    Continued progress in quantum electronics depends critically on the availability of robust device-level modeling tools that capture a wide range of physics and effective mass theory (EMT) is one means of building such models. Recent developments in multi-valley EMT show quantitative agreement with more detailed atomistic tight-binding calculations of phosphorus donors in silicon (Gamble, et. al., arXiv:1408.3159). Leveraging existing PDE solvers, we are developing a framework in which this multi-valley EMT is coupled to an integrated device-level description of several experimentally active qubit technologies. Device-level simulations of quantum operations will be discussed, as well as the extraction of process matrices at this level of theory. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from the Sandia National Laboratories Truman Fellowship Program, which is funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Effects of intermediate mass black holes on nuclear star clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra; Perets, Hagai B.; Loeb, Abraham

    2014-11-20

    Nuclear star clusters (NSCs) are dense stellar clusters observed in galactic nuclei, typically hosting a central massive black hole. Here we study the possible formation and evolution of NSCs through the inspiral of multiple star clusters hosting intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs). Using an N-body code, we examine the dynamics of the IMBHs and their effects on the NSC. We find that IMBHs inspiral to the core of the newly formed NSC and segregate there. Although the IMBHs scatter each other and the stars, none of them is ejected from the NSC. The IMBHs are excited to high eccentricities and their radial density profile develops a steep power-law cusp. The stars also develop a power-law cusp (instead of the central core that forms in their absence), but with a shallower slope. The relaxation rate of the NSC is accelerated due to the presence of IMBHs, which act as massive perturbers. This in turn fills the loss cone and boosts the tidal disruption rate of stars both by the MBH and the IMBHs to a value excluded by rate estimates based on current observations. Rate estimates of tidal disruptions can therefore provide a cumulative constraint on the existence of IMBHs in NSCs.

  6. Does Taste Perception Effect Body Mass Index in Preschool Children?

    PubMed Central

    Markam, Vandana; Singh, Garima; Chakravarthy, Kalyan; Gupta, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Eating trends established early in life leads to chronic life style disorders such as obesity, which is hard to overcome as child comes of age. Energy expenditure is less but caloric intake is high leading to disparity of energy balance in turn leading to obesity. Obesity is the outcome of a disparity between energy expenditure and caloric intake. Genes play a role in establishing eating habits, which is termed as genetic sensitivity to taste. Aim To determine taste perception effect on body mass index (BMI) in preschool central Indian urban children. Materials and Methods A total of 500 children of 3-6 years were selected and genetic taste perception was assessed using PROP sensitivity test. Anthropometric measurements were recorded to obtain BMI value. Categorical variables were analysed using Pearson’s Chi square test. Results Non tasters were mostly in overweight category i.e. 73.30% where as more number of tasters i.e. 59.70% were in underweight category. A significant correlation is seen between BMI and taste perception. No statistically significant correlation was seen between oral hygiene and taste perception. Females were predominant in both the tasters and non tasters categories. Conclusion Taste perception showed significant relationship with BMI of children between 3-6-year-old children. PMID:26816983

  7. A cumulus parameterization including mass fluxes, vertical momentum dynamics, and mesoscale effects

    SciTech Connect

    Donner, L.J. )

    1993-03-15

    A formulation for parameterizing cumulus convection, which treats cumulus vertical momentum dynamics and mass fluxes consistently, is presented. This approach predicts the penetrative extent of cumulus updrafts on the basis of their vertical momentum and provides a basis for treating cumulus microphysics using formulations that depend on vertical velocity. Treatments for cumulus microphysics are essential if the water budgets of convective systems are to be evaluated for treating mesoscale stratiform processes associated with convection, which are important for radiative interactions influencing climate. The water budget of the cumulus updrafts is used to drive a semi-empirical parameterization for the large-scale effects of the mesoscale circulations associated with deep convection. The parameterization was applied to two tropical thermodynamic profiles whose diagnosed forcing by convective systems differed significantly. The deepest of the updrafts penetrated the upper troposphere, while the shallower updrafts penetrated into the region of the mesoscale anvil. The relative numbers of cumulus updrafts of characteristic vertical velocities comprising the parameterized ensemble corresponded well with available observations. The large-scale heating produced by the ensemble without mesoscale circulations was concentrated at lower heights than observed or was characterized by excessive peak magnitudes. An unobserved large-scale source of water vapor was produced in the middle troposphere. When the parameterization for mesoscale effects was added, the large-scale thermal and moisture forcing predicted by the parameterization agreed well with observations for both cases. The significance of mesoscale processes suggests that future cumulus parameterization development will need to treat some radiative processes.

  8. The effect of body mass index on perioperative thermoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Özer, Ayşe Belin; Yildiz Altun, Aysun; Erhan, Ömer Lütfi; Çatak, Tuba; Karatepe, Ümit; Demirel, İsmail; Çağlar Toprak, Gonca

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the effects of body mass index (BMI) on thermoregulation in obese patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic abdominal surgery. Methods Sixty patients scheduled to undergo laparoscopic abdominal surgery with no pre-medication were included in the study. The patients were classified into 4 groups according to BMI <24.9, 25–39.9, 40–49.9, and >50. Anesthesia was provided with routine techniques. Tympanic and peripheral temperatures were recorded every 5 minutes starting with the induction of anesthesia. The mean skin temperature (MST), mean body temperature (MBT), vasoconstriction time, and vasoconstriction threshold that triggers core warming were calculated with the following formulas: MST = 0.3 (Tchest + Tarm) + 0.2 (Tthigh + Tcalf). MBT was calculated using the equation 0.64Tcore+0.36Tskin, and vasoconstriction was determined by calculating Tforearm−Tfinger. Results There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of age, gender, duration of operation, and room temperature. Compared to those with BMI <24.9, the tympanic temperature was significantly higher in those with BMI =25–39.9 in the 10th, 15th, 20th, and 50th minutes. In addition, BMI =40–49.9 in the 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th, 30th, 40th, 45th, 50th, and 55th minutes and BMI >50 in the 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th, 30th, 50th, and 55th minutes were less than those with BMI <24.9 (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in terms of MST and MBT. Vasoconstriction occurred later, and that vasoconstriction threshold was significantly higher in patients with higher BMIs. Conclusion Under anesthesia, the core temperature was protected more easily in obese patients as compared to nonobese patients. Therefore, obesity decreases the negative effects of anesthesia on thermoregulation. PMID:27920541

  9. An isotopic mass effect on the intermolecular potential

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, Michael F.; Currier, Robert Patrick; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2015-09-28

    The impact of isotopic variation on the electronic energy and intermolecular potentials is often suppressed when calculating isotopologue thermodynamics. Intramolecular potential energy surfaces for distinct isotopologues are in fact equivalent under the Born–Oppenheimer approximation, which is sometimes used to imply that the intermolecular interactions are independent of isotopic mass. In this paper, the intermolecular dipole–dipole interaction between hetero-nuclear diatomic molecules is considered. It is shown that the intermolecular potential contains mass-dependent terms even though each nucleus moves on a Born–Oppenheimer surface. Finally, the analysis suggests that mass dependent variations in intermolecular potentials should be included in comprehensive descriptions of isotopologue thermodynamics.

  10. On information loss in AdS3/CFT2

    DOE PAGES

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Li, Daliang; ...

    2016-05-18

    We discuss information loss from black hole physics in AdS3, focusing on two sharp signatures infecting CFT2 correlators at large central charge c: ‘forbidden singularities’ arising from Euclidean-time periodicity due to the effective Hawking temperature, and late-time exponential decay in the Lorentzian region. We study an infinite class of examples where forbidden singularities can be resolved by non-perturbative effects at finite c, and we show that the resolution has certain universal features that also apply in the general case. Analytically continuing to the Lorentzian regime, we find that the non-perturbative effects that resolve forbidden singularities qualitatively change the behavior ofmore » correlators at times t ~SBH, the black hole entropy. This may resolve the exponential decay of correlators at late times in black hole backgrounds. By Borel resumming the 1/c expansion of exact examples, we explicitly identify ‘information-restoring’ effects from heavy states that should correspond to classical solutions in AdS3. Lastly, our results suggest a line of inquiry towards a more precise formulation of the gravitational path integral in AdS3.« less

  11. Whole body exposure to 2.4 GHz WIFI signals: effects on cognitive impairment in adult triple transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (3xTg-AD).

    PubMed

    Banaceur, Sana; Banasr, Sihem; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2013-03-01

    The present investigation aimed at evaluating the effects of long-term exposure to WIFI type radiofrequency (RF) signals (2.40 GHz), two hours per day during one month at a Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) of 1.60 W/kg. The effects of RF exposure were studied on wildtype mice and triple transgenic mice (3xTg-AD) destined to develop Alzheimer's-like cognitive impairment. Mice were divided into four groups: two sham groups (WT, TG; n=7) and two exposed groups (WTS, TGS; n=7). The cognitive interference task used in this study was designed from an analogous human cognitive interference task including the Flex field activity system test, the two-compartment box test and the Barnes maze test. Our data demonstrate for the first time that RF improves cognitive behavior of 3xTg-AD mice. We conclude that RF exposure may represent an effective memory-enhancing approach in Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Exenatide promotes cognitive enhancement and positive brain metabolic changes in PS1-KI mice but has no effects in 3xTg-AD animals

    PubMed Central

    Bomba, M; Ciavardelli, D; Silvestri, E; Canzoniero, L MT; Lattanzio, R; Chiappini, P; Piantelli, M; Di Ilio, C; Consoli, A; Sensi, S L

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a risk factor for cognitive dysfunction or dementia. Insulin resistance is often associated with T2DM and can induce defective insulin signaling in the central nervous system as well as increase the risk of cognitive impairment in the elderly. Glucagone like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone and, like GLP-1 analogs, stimulates insulin secretion and has been employed in the treatment of T2DM. GLP-1 and GLP-1 analogs also enhance synaptic plasticity and counteract cognitive deficits in mouse models of neuronal dysfunction and/or degeneration. In this study, we investigated the potential neuroprotective effects of long-term treatment with exenatide, a GLP-1 analog, in two animal models of neuronal dysfunction: the PS1-KI and 3xTg-AD mice. We found that exenatide promoted beneficial effects on short- and long-term memory performances in PS1-KI but not in 3xTg-AD animals. In PS1-KI mice, the drug increased brain lactate dehydrogenase activity leading to a net increase in lactate levels, while no effects were observed on mitochondrial respiration. On the contrary, exenatide had no effects on brain metabolism of 3xTg-AD mice. In summary, our data indicate that exenatide improves cognition in PS1-KI mice, an effect likely driven by increasing the brain anaerobic glycolysis rate. PMID:23640454

  13. Bose polaron problem: Effect of mass imbalance on binding energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardila, L. A. Peña; Giorgini, S.

    2016-12-01

    By means of quantum Monte Carlo methods we calculate the binding energy of an impurity immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate at T =0 . The focus is on the attractive branch of the Bose polaron and on the role played by the mass imbalance between the impurity and the surrounding particles. For an impurity resonantly coupled to the bath, we investigate the dependence of the binding energy on the mass ratio and on the interaction strength within the medium. In particular, we determine the equation of state in the case of a static (infinite mass) impurity, where three-body correlations are irrelevant and the result is expected to be a universal function of the gas parameter. For the mass ratio corresponding to 40K impurities in a gas of 87Rb atoms, we provide an explicit comparison with the experimental findings of a recent study carried out at JILA.

  14. Effect of bread baking on the bioavailability of hydrogen-reduced iron powder added to unenriched refined wheat flour.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Atsushi A; Glahn, Raymond P; Lei, Xin Gen; Miller, Dennis D

    2006-10-18

    Elemental iron powders are widely used to fortify flour and other cereal products. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that baking enhances the bioavailability of elemental iron powders by oxidizing Fe(0) to Fe(2+) or Fe(3+). An in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell culture model and a piglet model were used to measure bioavailability. Bread flour, either unfortified or fortified with hydrogen-reduced (HR) iron powder or FeSO(4) (300 mg Fe/kg flour), was baked into bread. For the in vitro studies, bread samples were treated with pepsin at pH 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7 and subsequently incubated with pancreatic enzymes at pH 7 in a chamber positioned above monolayers of cultured Caco-2 cells. Ferritin formation in the cells was used as an index of iron bioavailability. Ferritin formation in cells fed HR Fe bread was similar to cells fed FeSO(4) bread when the peptic digestion was conducted at a pH 2 but lower when the peptic phase was conducted at pH 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7 (P < 0.05). Pig diets containing 35% dried bread were prepared and fed to cross-bred (Hampshire x Landrace x Yorkshire) anemic pigs in two studies. The rate of increase in hemoglobin Fe over the feeding period was used to calculate relative biological value (RBV), an index of iron bioavailability. In the first pig study, RBV of HR Fe added to flour prior to baking was 47.9% when compared to FeSO(4) fortified flour (P < 0.05). In the second pig study, a third treatment consisting of unfortified bread with HR iron added during diet mixing (after bread baking) was included. RBVs of the HR Fe diet (Fe added after baking) and HR Fe diet (Fe added before baking) were 40.1% and 53.5%, respectively, compared to the FeSO(4) diet. Differences in RBV between the HR Fe (before and after baking) and FeSO(4) (before baking) treatment groups were significant, but the difference between the before and after HR treatment groups was not significant. We conclude that bread baking does not enhance the bioavailability of elemental

  15. Atmospheric pressure gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry as a powerful tool for identification of non intentionally added substances in acrylic adhesives used in food packaging materials.

    PubMed

    Canellas, E; Vera, P; Domeño, C; Alfaro, P; Nerín, C

    2012-04-27

    Acrylic adhesives are used to manufacture multilayer laminates that are used in food packaging to form the geometric shape of the package as well as to stick labels on the packages. Once applied on the packaging adhesives can supply potential migrants that could endanger the packaged food. Adhesives are complex matrices where intentionally and non intentionally added substances are present, but the identification of the migrants is required by law. In this study atmospheric pressure gas chromatography coupled to a quadrupole hyphenated to a time of flight mass spectrometer (APGC-MS/Q-TOF) has been explored for identification of unknowns coming from three different acrylic adhesives. The results are compared to those obtained by conventional GC-MS-Q (quadrupole). Sixteen compounds were identified by GC-MS/Q and five of them were confirmed by APGC-MS/Q-TOF as their molecular ions were found. Moreover, additional three new compounds were identified and their structure was elucidated working with the spectra obtained by APGC-MS/Q-TOF. This finding was very relevant as these compounds were biocides suspected to be allergenic and cytotoxic in humans. Migration studies were carried out using Tenax as solid food simulant and the results showed that the three acrylic adhesives tested in this work were safe for being used in food packaging materials since the migration of compounds previously identified was below the limit established in the current legislation.

  16. Developing crash modification functions to assess safety effects of adding bike lanes for urban arterials with different roadway and socio-economic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Park, Juneyoung; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Lee, Jaeyoung; Lee, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Although many researchers have estimated crash modification factors (CMFs) for specific treatments (or countermeasures), there is a lack of studies that explored the heterogeneous effects of roadway characteristics on crash frequency among treated sites. Generally, the CMF estimated by before-after studies represents overall safety effects of the treatment in a fixed value. However, as each treated site has different roadway characteristics, there is a need to assess the variation of CMFs among the treated sites with different roadway characteristics through crash modification functions (CMFunctions). The main objective of this research is to determine relationships between the safety effects of adding a bike lane and the roadway characteristics through (1) evaluation of CMFs for adding a bike lane using observational before-after with empirical Bayes (EB) and cross-sectional methods, and (2) development of simple and full CMFunctions which are describe the CMF in a function of roadway characteristics of the sites. Data was collected for urban arterials in Florida, and the Florida-specific full SPFs were developed. Moreover, socio-economic parameters were collected and included in CMFunctions and SPFs (1) to capture the effects of the variables that represent volume of bicyclists and (2) to identify general relationship between the CMFs and these characteristics. In order to achieve better performance of CMFunctions, data mining techniques were used. The results of both before-after and cross-sectional methods show that adding a bike lane on urban arterials has positive safety effects (i.e., CMF<1) for all crashes and bike crashes. It was found that adding a bike lane is more effective in reducing bike crashes than all crashes. It was also found that the CMFs vary across the sites with different roadway characteristics. In particular, annual average daily traffic (AADT), number of lanes, AADT per lane, median width, bike lane width, and lane width are significant

  17. Effects of adding liquid DL-methionine hydroxy analogue-free acid to drinking water on growth performance and small intestinal morphology of nursery pigs.

    PubMed

    Kaewtapee, C; Krutthai, N; Poosuwan, K; Poeikhampha, T; Koonawootrittriron, S; Bunchasak, C

    2010-06-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of adding liquid DL-methionine hydroxy analogue free acid (LMA) to drinking water on growth performance, small intestinal morphology and volatile fatty acids in the caecum of nursery pigs. Twenty-four crossbred pigs (Large White x Landrace, BW approximately 18 kg) were divided into three groups with four replications of two piglets each. The piglets received drinking water without (control), with 0.05 or 0.10% LMA. The results indicated that adding LMA at 0.10% to drinking water significantly increased their weight gain, average daily feed intake (p < 0.05) and tended to improve the feed conversion ratio. Adding LMA to drinking water significantly increased their water intake and significantly reduced the pH of drinking water (p < 0.01), thus total plate count (p < 0.01) and Escherichia coli in drinking water was reduced (p < 0.05), while the total number of bacteria in the caecum was not significantly affected. Liquid DL-methionine hydroxy analogue free acid supplementation in drinking water tended to decrease pH in the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, colon and rectum. Furthermore, adding LMA at 0.10% significantly increased villous height in the duodenum, jejunum and ileum (p < 0.05), and the villous height:crypt depth ratio in the jejunum and ileum (p < 0.01) was higher, whereas acetic acid concentration in the caecum was significantly lower than in the control group. It could be concluded that adding LMA to drinking water improved growth performance of the nursery pigs because of high water quality and high nutrient utilization caused by an improvement of small intestinal morphology (not from nutritional effect of methionine source).

  18. Lorentzian AdS geometries, wormholes, and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Raul E.; Silva, Guillermo A.; Botta Cantcheff, Marcelo

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the structure of two-point functions for the quantum field theory dual to an asymptotically Lorentzian Anti de Sitter (AdS) wormhole. The bulk geometry is a solution of five-dimensional second-order Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity and causally connects two asymptotically AdS spacetimes. We revisit the Gubser-Klebanov-Polyakov-Witten prescription for computing two-point correlation functions for dual quantum field theories operators O in Lorentzian signature and we propose to express the bulk fields in terms of the independent boundary values {phi}{sub 0}{sup {+-}} at each of the two asymptotic AdS regions; along the way we exhibit how the ambiguity of normalizable modes in the bulk, related to initial and final states, show up in the computations. The independent boundary values are interpreted as sources for dual operators O{sup {+-}} and we argue that, apart from the possibility of entanglement, there exists a coupling between the degrees of freedom living at each boundary. The AdS{sub 1+1} geometry is also discussed in view of its similar boundary structure. Based on the analysis, we propose a very simple geometric criterion to distinguish coupling from entanglement effects among two sets of degrees of freedom associated with each of the disconnected parts of the boundary.

  19. A simulated insect diet as a water source for quail: effects on body mass and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, W M; Lutz, R S; Patiño, R

    1995-06-01

    Compared with control birds receiving ad libitum free-water, the total water intake of male and female northern bobwhite declined when only mealworms were available as a source of water. Male northern bobwhite sustained tissue mass and reproductive function with mealworms as their only source of water. Female northern bobwhite could not sustain body, ovary, and oviduct mass, and rate of egg production with mealworms as their only source of water. We suggest that, without free-water, breeding females require a diet with a water:dry matter ratio of greater than 1:1.29 (> 44% water).

  20. A comparison of the anticipated and pharmacological effects of alcohol on cognitive bias, executive function, craving and ad-lib drinking.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Paul; Rose, Abigail K; Cole, Jon C; Field, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Acute alcohol administration alters automatic processing of alcohol-related cues, impairs executive functions and increases alcohol seeking. Few studies have investigated the effects of expecting to receive alcohol on these measures. Thirty-one social drinkers completed three experimental sessions receiving either 0.65 g/kg alcohol, a placebo and a control beverage (which they knew was not alcoholic) before reporting craving and completing a test battery including a measure of automatic alcohol-approach tendencies (stimulus response compatibility task), a measure of executive function (Controlled Oral Word Association Task (COWAT)) and a taste test assessing ad-lib drinking. Results indicated that alcohol administration impaired performance on the COWAT and increased ad-lib drinking; however, there were no significant differences on these measures after administration of placebo versus control beverages. Craving was increased after alcohol and (to a lesser extent) after placebo. Automatic alcohol-approach tendencies were pronounced after both alcohol and placebo compared to the control beverage, with no difference between alcohol and placebo. Results suggest craving is sensitive to the anticipated and pharmacological effects of alcohol, alcohol-approach tendencies are particularly sensitive to the anticipated effects of alcohol, and measures of executive function and ad-lib drinking are affected by the pharmacological, but not the anticipated, effects of alcohol.

  1. Individual Differences in Approach and Avoidance Inclinations Moderate the Effect of Self-Control Depletion on Ad-Lib Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Schlauch, Robert C.; Christensen, Rita L.; Derrick, Jaye L.; Crane, Cory A.; Collins, R. Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Background The current study sought to examine how exerting self-control to inhibit stereotype use affects alcohol consumption. In addition, we sought to expand previous findings via examination of how individual differences in motivations to approach or avoid alcohol consumption interact with self-control depletion to determine the regulation of ad-lib drinking behavior. Methods Sixty-one social drinkers (31 female) were recruited to participate in a socially relevant self-control depletion task in which they were randomly assigned to one of two creative writing conditions: 1) the self-control depletion condition with explicit instructions to refrain from using stereotypes, or 2) the non-depletion condition in which no instructions were given regarding the use of stereotypes. Participants then completed an ad-lib drinking task and self-report questionnaires pertaining to their motivation to consume alcohol. Results As predicted, results indicated a significant three-way interaction between depletion condition, approach inclinations, and avoidance inclinations. Specifically, self-control depletion predicted greater drinking disinhibition (i.e., mean sip size, total alcohol consumption) only among participants high in both approach and avoidance. Conclusions Taken together, results from the current study highlight the importance of both approach and avoidance inclinations in the failure to regulate alcohol consumption following a routine, socially relevant form of self-control depletion. Our results also suggest that the high approach / high avoidance motivational profile may predict the greatest risk among those actively trying to regulate their drinking. PMID:26756800

  2. Effects of bilingualism on the age of onset and progression of MCI and AD: evidence from executive function tests.

    PubMed

    Bialystok, Ellen; Craik, Fergus I M; Binns, Malcolm A; Ossher, Lynn; Freedman, Morris

    2014-03-01

    Previous articles have reported that bilingualism is associated with a substantial delay in the onset of both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). The present study reports results from 74 MCI patients and 75 AD patients; approximately half of the patients in each group were bilingual. All patients were interviewed to obtain details of their language use, onset of their condition, and lifestyle habits. Patients performed three executive function (EF) tests from the D-KEFS battery (Trails, Color-Word Interference, Verbal Fluency) on 3 occasions over a period of approximately 1 year. Results replicated the finding that bilingual patients are several years older than comparable monolinguals at both age of symptom onset and date of first clinic visit. This result could not be attributed to language group differences in such lifestyle variables as diet, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, or social activity. On the first testing occasion, performance on the EF tasks was generally comparable between the language groups, contesting arguments that bilinguals wait longer before attending the clinic. Finally, EF performance tended to decline over the 3 sessions, but no differences were found between monolinguals and bilinguals in the rate of decline.

  3. Effects of adding Braun jejunojejunostomy to standard Whipple procedure on reduction of afferent loop syndrome — a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kakaei, Farzad; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Nejatollahi, Seyed Moahammad Reza; Rashidi, Iqbal; Asvadi, Touraj; Habibzadeh, Afshin; Oliaei-Motlagh, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Whipple surgery (pancreaticodeudenectomy) has a high complication rate. We aimed to evaluate whether adding Braun jejunojejunostomy (side-to-side anastomosis of afferent and efferent loops distal to the gastrojejunostomy site) to a standard Whipple procedure would reduce postoperative complications. Methods We conducted a randomized clinical trial comparing patients who underwent standard Whipple surgery (standard group) and patients who underwent standard Whipple surgery with Braun jejunojejunostomy (Braun group). Patients were followed for 1 month after the procedure and postoperative complications were recorded. Results Our study included 30 patients: 15 in the Braun and 15 in the standard group. In the Braun group, 4 (26.7%) patients experienced 6 complications, whereas in the standard group, 7 (46.7%) patients experienced 11 complications (p = 0.14). Complications in the Braun group were gastrointestinal bleeding and wound infection (n = 1 each) and delayed gastric emptying and pulmonary infection (n = 2 each). Complications in the standard group were death, pancreatic anastomosis leak and biliary anastomosis leak (n = 1 each); gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 2); and afferent loop syndrome and delayed gastric emptying (n = 3 each). There was no significant difference between groups in the subtypes of complications. Conclusion Our results showed that adding Braun jejunojejunostomy to standard Whipple procedure was associated with lower rates of afferent loop syndrome and delayed gastric emptying. However, more studies are needed to define the role of Braun jejunojejunostomy in this regard. Trial registration IRCT2014020316473N1 (www.irct.ir) PMID:26574829

  4. Size effect of added LaB{sub 6} particles on optical properties of LaB{sub 6}/Polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan Yifei; Zhang Lin; Hu Lijie; Wang Wei; Min Guanghui

    2011-12-15

    Modified LaB{sub 6} particles with sizes ranging from 50 nm to 400 nm were added into polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) matrix in order to investigate the effect of added LaB{sub 6} particles on optical properties of LaB{sub 6}/PMMA composites. Method of in-situ polymerization was applied to prepare PMMA from raw material-methyl methacrylate (MMA), a process during which LaB{sub 6} particles were dispersed in MMA. Ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-vis-NIR) absorption spectrum was used to study optical properties of the as-prepared materials. The difference in particle size could apparently affect the composites' absorption of visible light around wavelength of 600 nm. Added LaB{sub 6} particles with size of about 70 nm resulted in the best optical properties among these groups of composites. - Graphical abstract: 70 nm LaB{sub 6} particles resulted in the best performance on absorption of VIS and NIR, which could not be apparently achieved by LaB{sub 6} particles beyond nano-scale. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LaB{sub 6}/PMMA composites were prepared using the method of in-situ polymerization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LaB{sub 6} particles added in MMA prolonged the time needed for its pre-polymerization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanosized LaB{sub 6} particles could obviously absorb much NIR but little VIS.

  5. The effects of variability in Antarctic krill ( Euphausia superba) spawning behavior and sex/maturity stage distribution on Adélie penguin ( Pygoscelis adeliae) chick growth: A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Erik W.; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Patterson, Donna L.; Fraser, William R.

    2010-04-01

    Factors that control variability in energy density of Antarctic krill ( Euphausia superba) populations, and the consequences of this variability for growth and fledging mass of Adélie penguin ( Pygoscelis adeliae) chicks, were investigated using an individual-based energetics model. Lipid content as a function of sex/maturity stage and season was used to calculate the energy density of krill ingested by chicks. Simulations tested the influence of variability in krill size-class distribution, sex-ratio, length-at-maturity, and the timing of spawning on krill population energy density and penguin chick fledging mass. Of the parameters included in simulations, variability in the timing of krill spawning had the greatest influence on predicted Adélie penguin fledging mass, with fledging mass decreasing from 3.30 to 2.92 kg when peak spawning was shifted from early December to early March. Adélie penguin chicks that fledge from colonies along the western Antarctic Peninsula (wAP) and survive to recruit into the breeding population are 0.117 kg heavier than those that do not survive to breed. Thus, it appears that small differences in fledging mass potentially have significant implications for Adélie penguin chick survivorship. Therefore, the timing of krill spawning may have important consequences for Adélie penguins, and other top-predator species, that may time critical activities to coincide with a period of dependable prey availability with maximum energy density.

  6. An AdS Crunch in Supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertog, Thomas

    2004-12-01

    We review some properties of N=8 gauged supergravity in four dimensions with modified, but AdS invariant boundary conditions on the m2 = -2 scalars. There is a one-parameter class of asymptotic conditions on these fields and the metric components, for which the full AdS symmetry group is preserved. The generators of the asymptotic symmetries are finite, but acquire a contribution from the scalar fields. For a large class of such boundary conditions, we find there exist black holes with scalar hair that are specified by a single conserved charge. Since Schwarschild-AdS is a solution too for all boundary conditions, this provides an example of black hole non-uniqueness. We also show there exist solutions where smooth initial data evolve to a big crunch singularity. This opens up the possibility of using the dual conformal field theory to obtain a fully quantum description of the cosmological singularity, and we report on a preliminary study of this.

  7. Warping, extra dimensions, and a slice of AdSd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Kristian L.

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by the Randall-Sundrum framework we consider a number of phenomenologically relevant model-building questions on a slice of compactified AdSd for d>5. Such spaces are interesting as they enable one to realize the weak scale via warping. We perform the Kaluza-Klein (KK) reduction for gravitons and bulk vectors in these spaces, and for the case of AdS6 consider the KK spectrum of gauge scalars. We further obtain the KK towers for bulk fermions on a slice of AdS7 and AdS9 and show that the Randall-Sundrum approach to flavor generalizes to these spaces with the localization of chiral zero-mode fermions controlled by their bulk Dirac mass parameters. However, for the phenomenologically interesting case where the transverse radius is R-1˜TeV, we show that bulk standard model fields are not viable due to a resulting volume suppression of the gauge-coupling constants. A similar suppression occurs for the case of UV localization. Thus it seems that the standard model fields should be confined to the infrared brane in such spaces. Sterile fields and extended gauge sectors may propagate in the bulk, with the gauge-coupling volume suppression experienced by the latter motivating a weak coupling to standard model fields. We also discuss some issues regarding the effective 4D theory description in these spaces.

  8. Effects of mass density enhancements on VLF transmitter signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Lammer, Helmut; Al-Haddad, Eimad; Leitzinger, Martin; Krauss, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    We study the variation of the electric field measurements recorded by DEMETER micro-satellite above specific very low frequency (VLF) transmitters. The investigated period starts from August 2004 to December 2010. The VLF signals are combined with the mass density measurements recorded, in the same time interval, by GRACE and CHAMP satellites. Particular enhancements of the mass densities were observed at polar and sub-polar regions by both satellites. Those mass density enhancements are found to propagate from the northern or southern hemisphere to the equator region. We attempt in this study to analyse the VLF signal variations in the time interval where the mass density enhancements are recorded. Such disturbances of the atmosphere can probably affect the Earth's ionosphere. The VLF signal may be attenuated and then not detected by DEMETER. We find that it is the case at some specific occasions. Nevertheless we show that several parameters have to be taken into consideration: (a) the origin of the mass density enhancement in the polar region (e.g. solar particles), (b) its phase speed from the pole to the equator and (c) the satellite (CHAMP, DEMETER, GRACE) local time.

  9. An isotopic mass effect on the intermolecular potential

    DOE PAGES

    Herman, Michael F.; Currier, Robert Patrick; Clegg, Samuel M.

    2015-09-28

    The impact of isotopic variation on the electronic energy and intermolecular potentials is often suppressed when calculating isotopologue thermodynamics. Intramolecular potential energy surfaces for distinct isotopologues are in fact equivalent under the Born–Oppenheimer approximation, which is sometimes used to imply that the intermolecular interactions are independent of isotopic mass. In this paper, the intermolecular dipole–dipole interaction between hetero-nuclear diatomic molecules is considered. It is shown that the intermolecular potential contains mass-dependent terms even though each nucleus moves on a Born–Oppenheimer surface. Finally, the analysis suggests that mass dependent variations in intermolecular potentials should be included in comprehensive descriptions of isotopologuemore » thermodynamics.« less

  10. Supersymmetric AdS_6 solutions of type IIB supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyojoong; Kim, Nakwoo; Suh, Minwoo

    2015-10-01

    We study the general requirement for supersymmetric AdS_6 solutions in type IIB supergravity. We employ the Killing spinor technique and study the differential and algebraic relations among various Killing spinor bilinears to find the canonical form of the solutions. Our result agrees precisely with the work of Apruzzi et al. (JHEP 1411:099, 2014), which used the pure spinor technique. Hoping to identify the geometry of the problem, we also computed four-dimensional theory through the dimensional reduction of type IIB supergravity on AdS_6. This effective action is essentially a non-linear sigma model with five scalar fields parametrizing {SL}(3,{R})/{SO}(2,1), modified by a scalar potential and coupled to Einstein gravity in Euclidean signature. We argue that the scalar potential can be explained by a subgroup CSO(1,1,1) subset {SL}(3,{R}) in a way analogous to gauged supergravity.

  11. = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories in AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzenko, Sergei M.; Tartaglino-Mazzucchelli, Gabriele

    2014-05-01

    For all types of = 4 anti-de Sitter (AdS) supersymmetry in three dimensions, we construct manifestly supersymmetric actions for Abelian vector multiplets and explain how to extend the construction to the non-Abelian case. Manifestly = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) actions are explicitly given in the cases of (2,2) and critical (4,0) AdS supersymmetries. The = 4 vector multiplets and the corresponding actions are then reduced to (2,0) AdS superspace, in which only = 2 supersymmetry is manifest. Using the off-shell structure of the = 4 vector multiplets, we provide complete = 4 SYM actions in (2,0) AdS superspace for all types of = 4 AdS supersymmetry. In the case of (4,0) AdS supersymmetry, which admits a Euclidean counterpart, the resulting = 2 action contains a Chern-Simons term proportional to q/r, where r is the radius of AdS 3 and q is the R-charge of a chiral scalar superfield. The R-charge is a linear inhomogeneous function of X, an expectation value of the = 4 Cotton superfield. Thus our results explain the mysterious structure of = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories on S 3 discovered in arXiv:1401.7952. In the case of (3,1) AdS supersymmetry, which has no Euclidean counterpart, the SYM action contains both a Chern-Simons term and a chiral mass-like term. In the case of (2,2) AdS supersymmetry, which admits a Euclidean counterpart, the SYM action has no Chern-Simons and chiral mass-like terms.

  12. Effects of cadmium in herbage on the apparent absorption of elements by sheep in comparison with inorganic cadmium added to their diet

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, C.J.C. . E-mail: c.phillips@uq.edu.au; Chiy, P.C.; Zachou, E.

    2005-10-01

    A meta-analysis of existing scientific literature recently suggested that Cd is absorbed more efficiently by sheep if it is in the organic form in grass, than if it is added as an inorganic supplement to the diet. We tested this experimentally by feeding sheep grass from contaminated soil, compared with uncontaminated grass and with Cd added to the diet. To produce contaminated herbage, Cd nitrate was added to soil in 11 lysimeters sown with perennial ryegrass, with a further 11 lysimeters receiving no Cd to produce uncontaminated herbage. In the Cd-treated lysimeters, soil had increased exchangeable K, Mg, and Ca, leachate had increased K, Mg, Ca, Na, and P, grass had increased Cd and reduced Mg, Na, P, Mn, Fe, Cr, Al, and Ni, and there was some reduction in grass yield compared with untreated lysimeters. Grass from Cd-treated or untreated lysimeters was fed to groups of 12 ewes for 2 days, with Cd intake equated by adding Cd nitrate to the concentrate feed of ewes receiving the uncontaminated grass. The apparent absorption of Cd, Zn, Mo, Cr, and Al was increased for ewes receiving Cd-enriched grass, and apparent absorption of Cu was reduced, compared to those receiving supplementary inorganic Cd. Most of the unabsorbed Cd was excreted in feces within 4 days of feeding. The ewes consuming Cd in grass had increased B concentrations in their urine, possibly due to adverse effects of Cd on kidney function. Finally, the ewes were offered a choice of the two herbages and they ate significantly more of the uncontaminated grass. It is concluded that the apparent absorption of Cd and other heavy metals by sheep in a short-term experiment was greater when Cd was in the grass than when the Cd was added in in an inorganic form and that sheep partially avoided herbage with a high Cd concentration.

  13. Neutron-proton effective mass splitting in terms of symmetry energy and its density slope

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, S.; Sahoo, B.; Sahoo, S.

    2015-01-15

    Using a simple density-dependent finite-range effective interaction having Yukawa form, the density dependence of isoscalar and isovector effective masses is studied. The isovector effective mass is found to be different for different pairs of like and unlike nucleons. Using HVH theorem, the neutron-proton effective mass splitting is represented in terms of symmetry energy and its density slope. It is again observed that the neutron-proton effective mass splitting has got a positive value when isoscalar effective mass is greater than the isovector effective mass and has a negative value for the opposite case. Furthermore, the neutron-proton effective mass splitting is found to have a linear dependence on asymmetry β. The second-order symmetry potential has a vital role in the determination of density slope of symmetry energy but it does not have any contribution on neutron-proton effective mass splitting. The finite-range effective interaction is compared with the SLy2, SKM, f{sub −}, f{sub 0}, and f{sub +} forms of interactions.

  14. Effects of Plinian Eruptions of Somma-vesuvius On People, Animals, Structures and Objects: Inferences From Avellino (3760 Yr B.p.) and Pompei (79 A.d.) Events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastrolorenzo, G.; Petrone, P. P.; Geraci, G.; Guarino, F.; Incoronato, A.

    An interdisciplinary approach to the archaeological sites affected by Avellino (3750 yr. B.P.) and Pompei (79 A.D.) plinian eruptions of Somma-Vesuvius provides new data relative to the depositional mechanisms. Large scale stratigraphy and local evi- dences provide new informations about the physical conditions at the emplacement of PDCs and their effects on structures, people and environment. Field evidences indicate that fine grained pyroclastic deposits related to the column collapses propagate up to a distance of about 15 km from the crater and emplaced with conspicuous thickness. In both Avellino and Pompei eruptions, direct evidences from archaeological sites in- dicate that the emplacement in intermediate and distal areas was relatively quite (low mechanical energy). The recognition of thin, continuous, fine grained surge deposits up to a distance of ca. 15 km from the crater suggests that turbulence was important and the PDCs advanced as a relatively thick dilute current, very poorly controlled by the topography. Furthermore, due to the very small sizes, the particles were always transported in suspension, even at very low current velocity, thus avoiding vertical grading to occur. However, due to the very high depositional mass rate, the emplace- ment was very rapid causing buildings and hut, objects, animals and people to be engulfed within the ash deposits thus preserving their original position, as seen at Herculaneum, Oplontis, Pompeii (79 AD) and Nola (3760 bp). The skeletons of hu- man as well animal victims show high temperature effects. In particular, microscopic bones texture of the victims in the sites affected by the 79 A.D are consistent with very high temperatures, which are anomalous in pyroclastic surge clouds.

  15. The effectiveness of mass communication to change public behavior.

    PubMed

    Abroms, Lorien C; Maibach, Edward W

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the ways in which mass communication has been used -- or can be used -- to promote beneficial changes in behavior among members of populations. We use an ecological perspective to examine the ways in which mass media interventions can be used to influence public behavior both directly and indirectly. Mass media interventions that seek to influence people directly -- by directly targeting the people burdened by the public health problem of concern and/or the people who influence them -- have a long basis in public health history, and recent reviews have clarified our expectations about what can be expected from such approaches. Mass media interventions that seek to influence people indirectly -- by creating beneficial changes in the places (or environments) in which people live and work -- have equal if not greater potential to promote beneficial changes in population health behaviors, but these are currently less explored options. To have the greatest possible beneficial influence on public behavior with the public health resources available, we recommend that public health program planners assess their opportunities to use media to target both people and places in a manner that complements and extends other investments being made in population health enhancement.

  16. Intergenerational Educational Effects of Mass Imprisonment in America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagan, John; Foster, Holly

    2012-01-01

    In some American schools, about a fifth of the fathers have spent time in prison during their child's primary education. We examine how variation across schools in the aggregation and concentration of the mass imprisonment of fathers is associated with their own children's intergenerational educational outcomes and "spills over" into the…

  17. Finite volume effects in the chiral extrapolation of baryon masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, M. F. M.; Bavontaweepanya, R.; Kobdaj, C.; Schwarz, K.

    2014-09-01

    We perform an analysis of the QCD lattice data on the baryon octet and decuplet masses based on the relativistic chiral Lagrangian. The baryon self-energies are computed in a finite volume at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO), where the dependence on the physical meson and baryon masses is kept. The number of free parameters is reduced significantly down to 12 by relying on large-Nc sum rules. Altogether we describe accurately more than 220 data points from six different lattice groups, BMW, PACS-CS, HSC, LHPC, QCDSF-UKQCD and NPLQCD. Values for all counterterms relevant at N3LO are predicted. In particular we extract a pion-nucleon sigma term of 39-1+2 MeV and a strangeness sigma term of the nucleon of σsN=84-4+28 MeV. The flavor SU(3) chiral limit of the baryon octet and decuplet masses is determined with (802±4) and (1103±6) MeV. Detailed predictions for the baryon masses as currently evaluated by the ETM lattice QCD group are made.

  18. Joule-Thomson expansion of the charged AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ökcü, Özgür; Aydıner, Ekrem

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we study Joule-Thomson effects for charged AdS black holes. We obtain inversion temperatures and curves. We investigate similarities and differences between van der Waals fluids and charged AdS black holes for the expansion. We obtain isenthalpic curves for both systems in the T- P plane and determine the cooling-heating regions.

  19. Effects of mass transfer between Martian satellites on surface geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Michael; Nimmo, Francis; Udrea, Bogdan

    2016-03-01

    Impacts on planetary bodies can lead to both prompt secondary craters and projectiles that reimpact the target body or nearby companions after an extended period, producing so-called "sesquinary" craters. Here we examine sesquinary cratering on the moons of Mars. We model the impact that formed Voltaire, the largest crater on the surface of Deimos, and explore the orbital evolution of resulting high-velocity ejecta across 500 years using four-body physics and particle tracking. The bulk of mass transfer to Phobos occurs in the first 102 years after impact, while reaccretion of ejecta to Deimos is predicted to continue out to a 104 year timescale (cf. Soter, S. [1971]. Studies of the Terrestrial Planets. Cornell University). Relative orbital geometry between Phobos and Deimos plays a significant role; depending on the relative true longitude, mass transfer between the moons can change by a factor of five. Of the ejecta with a velocity range capable of reaching Phobos, 25-42% by mass reaccretes to Deimos and 12-21% impacts Phobos. Ejecta mass transferred to Mars is <10%. We find that the characteristic impact velocity of sesquinaries on Deimos is an order of magnitude smaller than those of background (heliocentric) hypervelocity impactors and will likely result in different crater morphologies. The time-averaged flux of Deimos material to Phobos can be as high as 11% of the background (heliocentric) direct-to-Phobos impactor flux. This relatively minor contribution suggests that spectrally red terrain on Phobos (Murchie, S., Erard, S. [1996]. Icarus 123, 63-86) is not caused by Deimos material. However the high-velocity ejecta mass reaccreted to Deimos from a Voltaire-sized impact is comparable to the expected background mass accumulated on Deimos between Voltaire-size events. Considering that the high-velocity ejecta contains only 0.5% of the total mass sent into orbit, sesquinary ejecta from a Voltaire-sized impact could feasibly resurface large parts of the Moon

  20. Uncertainties and Systematic Effects on the estimate of stellar masses in high z galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimbeni, S.; Fontana, A.; Giallongo, E.; Grazian, A.; Menci, N.; Pentericci, L.; Santini, P.

    2009-05-01

    We discuss the uncertainties and the systematic effects that exist in the estimates of the stellar masses of high redshift galaxies, using broad band photometry, and how they affect the deduced galaxy stellar mass function. We use at this purpose the latest version of the GOODS-MUSIC catalog. In particular, we discuss the impact of different synthetic models, of the assumed initial mass function and of the selection band. Using Chariot & Bruzual 2007 and Maraston 2005 models we find masses lower than those obtained from Bruzual & Chariot 2003 models. In addition, we find a slight trend as a function of the mass itself comparing these two mass determinations with that from Bruzual & Chariot 2003 models. As consequence, the derived galaxy stellar mass functions show diverse shapes, and their slope depends on the assumed models. Despite these differences, the overall results and scenario is observed in all these cases. The masses obtained with the assumption of the Chabrier initial mass function are in average 0.24 dex lower than those from the Salpeter assumption, at all redshifts, causing a shift of galaxy stellar mass function of the same amount. Finally, using a 4.5 μm-selected sample instead of a Ks-selected one, we add a new population of highly absorbed, dusty galaxies at z~=2-3 of relatively low masses, yielding stronger constraints on the slope of the galaxy stellar mass function at lower masses.

  1. Quantum systems with effective and time-dependent masses: form-preserving transformations and reality conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze-Halberg, Axel

    2005-12-01

    We study the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) with an effective (position-dependent) mass, relevant in the context of transport phenomena in semiconductors. The most general form-preserving transformation between two TDSEs with different effective masses is derived. A condition guaranteeing the reality of the potential in the transformed TDSE is obtained. To ensure maximal generality, the mass in the TDSE is allowed to depend on time also.

  2. Extending an In Vitro Panel for Estrogenicity Testing: The Added Value of Bioassays for Measuring Antiandrogenic Activities and Effects on Steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Si; Rijk, Jeroen C.W.; Besselink, Harrie T.; Houtman, René; Peijnenburg,  Ad A.C.M.; Brouwer, Abraham; Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.; Bovee,  Toine F.H.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a previously established integrated testing strategy (ITS) for in vitro estrogenicity testing was extended with additional in vitro assays in order to broaden its sensitivity to different modes of action resulting in apparent estrogenicity, i.e., other than estrogen receptor (ER) binding. To this end, an extra set of 10 estrogenic compounds with modes of action in part different from ER binding, were tested in the previously defined ITS, consisting of a yeast estrogen reporter gene assay, an U2OS ERα CALUX reporter gene assay and a cell-free coregulator binding assay. Two androgen reporter gene assays and the enhanced H295R steroidogenesis assay were added to that previous defined ITS. These assays had added value, as several estrogenic model compounds also elicited clear and potent antiandrogenic properties and in addition also showed effects on steroidogenesis that might potentiate their apparent estrogenic effects in vivo. Adding these assays, examining mechanisms of action for estrogenicity apart from ERα binding, gives a more complete and comprehensive assessment of the ability of test compounds to interfere with endocrine signaling. It was concluded that the extended ITS will go beyond in vivo estrogenicity testing by the uterotrophic assay, thereby contributing to the 3R-principles. PMID:24928889

  3. Wholegrain vs. refined wheat bread and pasta. Effect on postprandial glycemia, appetite, and subsequent ad libitum energy intake in young healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Mette; Jensen, Morten G; Riboldi, Giancarlo; Petronio, Michela; Bügel, Susanne; Toubro, Søren; Tetens, Inge; Astrup, Arne

    2010-02-01

    Wholegrain foods have received much attention in recent years, and have been proposed to play a role in energy regulation through lowering of postprandial glycemia and appetite. This randomized crossover single meal study in 16 young adults was conducted to test the effect of iso-caloric meals based on wholemeal wheat breads and pasta in comparison to similar refined wheat products on postprandial glycemia, appetite and ad libitum energy intake (EI). Test meals (50 g carbohydrates; 2MJ) consisted of refined wheat bread (RWB), wholegrain wheat bread (WWB), refined wheat pasta (RWP) and wholegrain wheat pasta (WWP) and were served after an overnight fast. Appetite ratings and blood glucose were assessed for 180 min after which an ad libitum lunch meal was served and EI measured. The 180 min glucose responses were similar for wholemeal and refined products, but pasta meals gave significantly lower glucose responses. Only RWP had a lower glycemic index compared to RWB. WWB, but not WWP, resulted in increased satiety and reduced hunger compared to RWB. Ad libitum EI did not differ. In conclusion, the results show that wholemeal breads increased satiety measures compared to their refined counterparts; however no significant effect on subsequent EI was observed.

  4. The AdS/QCD Correspondence and Exclusive Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; Deur, Alexandre; /Jefferson Lab

    2010-08-25

    The AdS/CFT correspondence between theories in AdS space and conformal field theories in physical space-time provides an analytic, semi-classical, color-confining model for strongly-coupled QCD. The soft-wall AdS/QCD model modified by a positive-sign dilaton metric leads to a remarkable one-parameter description of nonperturbative hadron dynamics at zero quark mass, including a zero-mass pion and a Regge spectrum of linear trajectories with the same slope in orbital angular momentum L and radial quantum number n for both mesons and baryons. One also predicts the form of the non-perturbative effective coupling {alpha}{sub s}{sup AdS}(q) and its {beta}-function which agrees with the effective coupling {alpha}{sub ga} extracted from the Bjorken sum rule. Light-front holography, which connects the fifth-dimensional coordinate of AdS space z to an invariant impact separation variable {zeta}, allows one to compute the analytic form of the frame-independent light-front wavefunctions, the fundamental entities which encode hadron properties as well as decay constants, form factors, deeply virtual Compton scattering, exclusive heavy hadron decays and other exclusive scattering amplitudes. One thus obtains a relativistic description of hadrons in QCD at the amplitude level with dimensional counting for hard exclusive reactions at high momentum transfer. As specific examples we discuss the behavior of the pion and nucleon form factors in the space-like and time-like regions. We also review the phenomenology of exclusive processes including some anomalous empirical results.

  5. Shock Wave Collisions and Thermalization in AdS_5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovchegov, Y. V.

    We study heavy ion collisions at strong 't Hooft coupling usingAdS/CFT correspondence. According to the AdS/CFT dictionary heavy ion collisions correspond to gravitational shock wave collisions in AdS_5. We construct the metric in the forward light cone after the collision perturbatively through expansion of Einstein equations in graviton exchanges. We obtain an analytic expression for the metric including all-order graviton exchanges with one shock wave, while keeping the exchanges with another shock wave at the lowest order. We read off the corresponding energy-momentum tensor of the produced medium. Unfortunately this energy-momentum tensor does not correspond to ideal hydrodynamics, indicating that higher order graviton exchanges are needed to construct the full solution of the problem. We also show that shock waves must completely stop almost immediately after the collision in AdS_5, which, on the field theory side, corresponds to complete nuclear stopping due to strong coupling effects, likely leading to Landau hydrodynamics. Finally, we perform trapped surface analysis of the shock wave collisions demonstrating that a bulk black hole, corresponding to ideal hydrodynamics on the boundary, has to be created in such collisions, thus constructing a proof of thermalization in heavy ion collisions at strong coupling.

  6. Effective-mass analysis of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical lattices: Stabilization and levitation

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, H.; Zhang, W.; Meystre, P.; Baksmaty, L.O.; Bigelow, N.P.

    2003-04-01

    We investigate the time evolution of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a periodic optical potential. Using an effective mass formalism, we study the equation of motion for the envelope function modulating the Bloch states of the lattice potential. In particular, we show how the negative effective-mass affects the dynamics of the condensate.

  7. Magnetic Field Modulated Photoreflectance Study of the Electron Effective Mass in Dilute Nitride Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, N.; Hiejima, K.; Kubo, H.; Patane, A.; Eaves, L.

    2011-12-23

    Magnetic field modulated photoreflectance measurements are performed on the dilute nitride semiconductor Ga(AsN) in quantizing magnetic fields. From the measured cyclotron energies, the conduction band effective mass and its dependence on the nitrogen content are determined. The effective mass is found to become significantly heavier in samples with high nitrogen composition (>0.1%).

  8. Critical Values of Porosity in Rice Cultures of Isaria fumosorosea by Adding Water Hyacinth: Effect on Conidial Yields and Quality.

    PubMed

    Angel-Cuapio, Alejandro; Figueroa-Montero, Arturo; Favela-Torres, Ernesto; Viniegra-González, Gustavo; Perraud-Gaime, Isabelle; Loera, Octavio

    2015-09-01

    Conidia of the entomopathogenic fungus Isaria fumosorosea are used to control insect pests in crops. Commercially available mycoinsecticides manufactured with this fungus are produced on a large scale via solid-state cultures (SSC). In order to favour gaseous exchange in SCC, texturizers can be added to increase porosity fraction (ε). This work presents results of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) as a novel texturizer. A mixture of parboiled rice (PR), with a ε = 0.23, was used as a substrate, which was then mixed with water hyacinth (WH amendment) as a texturizer at different proportions affecting ε. Strains CNRCB1 and ARSEF3302 of I. fumosorosea yielded 1.6 (1.49-1.71) × 10(9) and 7.3 (7.02-7.58) × 10(9) conidia per gram of initial dry rice after 8 days, at ε values of 0.34 and 0.36, respectively. Improvement of conidial yields corresponded to 1.33 and 1.55 times, respectively, compared to rice alone using WH amendment in the mixtures PR:WH (%) at 90-10 and 80-20. In addition, infectivity against Galleria mellonella larvae was maintained. This is the first report of the use of water hyacinth as a texturizer in SSC, affecting ε, which is proposed a key parameter in conidia production by I. fumosorosea, without affecting conidial infectivity.

  9. Effect of added alpha-lactalbumin protein on the phase behavior of AOT-brine-isooctane systems.

    PubMed

    Rohloff, Catherine M; Shimek, Justin W; Dungan, Stephanie R

    2003-05-15

    We have found that the presence of <1 wt% of the globular protein alpha-lactalbumin has a significant impact on the equilibrium phase behavior of dilute sodium bis(ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT)/brine/isooctane systems. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Karl Fischer titration, and ultraviolet spectroscopy were used to determine the surfactant, oil, water, and protein content of the organic and aqueous phases as a function of the total surfactant and protein present. As a small amount of alpha-lactalbumin is added to the mixture, there is a substantial increase (up to 80%) in the maximum water solubility in the water-in-oil microemulsion phase. Dynamic light scattering measurements indicate that this increase is due to a decrease in the magnitude of the (negative) spontaneous curvature of the surfactant monolayer, as droplets swell in size. As the molar ratio of alpha-lactalbumin to AOT surpasses approximately 1:300, the partitioning of water, protein, and surfactant shifts to the excess aqueous phase, where soluble assemblies with positive curvature are detected by dynamic light scattering. Significant amounts of isooctane are solubilized in these aggregates, consistent with the formation of oil-in-water microemulsion droplets. Circular dichroism studies showed that the tertiary structure of the protein in the microemulsion is disrupted while the secondary structure is increased. In light of these findings, the protein most likely expands to a molten-globule type conformation in the AOT interfacial environment, but does not substantially unfold to become an extended chain.

  10. Effect of Adding Plasticizer on Ionic Conductivity and Glass Transition Temperature of PMMA+Lithium Iodide Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkepely, N. R.; Majid, S. R.; Osman, Z.

    2010-07-01

    Polymer electrolyte films based on poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) have been prepared using the solution casting technique. Ethylene carbonate (EC) was used as a plasticizer and lithium iodide (LiI) as a doping salt. The ionic conductivity of the films was analyzed using ac impedance spectroscopy. It can be observed that the ionic conductivity of PMMA+LiI film increased when the plasticizer was added. The conductivity-temperature dependence studies were carried out in the temperature range between 303 and 393 K. The results indicate that the conductivity is increased when the temperature is increased. The glass transition temperature, Tg of the polymer electrolyte films was measured using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The Tg of the pure PMMA film is ˜125 °C. On addition of plasticizer, it can be observed that the Tg of PMMA+LiI film is decreased. This reveals that the plasticizer, EC has reduced the Tg of the polymer electrolyte film by increasing segmental motion of the polymer resulting in conductivity enhancement.

  11. A highly cost effective method of mass screening for thalassaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Silvestroni, E; Bianco, I

    1983-01-01

    A simple, fast, and reliable two step procedure for the detection of non-alpha-thalassaemias in mass screening programmes is presented. Step 1 consists of a study of red cell morphology and a one tube red cell osmotic fragility tests. This step eliminates the non-thalassaemic samples; the rest are processed through step 2, consisting of determination of red cell indices and haemoglobin studies. Over the past seven years this procedure has been used at this centre in mass screening secondary school students in Latium. Blood samples from 289 763 students were examined, and 6838 cases of thalassaemia detected. It is estimated that 0.35 +/- 0.25% of subjects with thalassaemia escaped detection by this procedure. PMID:6403170

  12. The effect of gas physics on the halo mass function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanek, R.; Rudd, D.; Evrard, A. E.

    2009-03-01

    Cosmological tests based on cluster counts require accurate calibration of the space density of massive haloes, but most calibrations to date have ignored complex gas physics associated with halo baryons. We explore the sensitivity of the halo mass function to baryon physics using two pairs of gas-dynamic simulations that are likely to bracket the true behaviour. Each pair consists of a baseline model involving only gravity and shock heating, and a refined physics model aimed at reproducing the observed scaling of the hot, intracluster gas phase. One pair consists of billion-particle resimulations of the original 500h-1Mpc Millennium Simulation of Springel et al., run with the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code GADGET-2 and using a refined physics treatment approximated by pre-heating (PH) at high redshift. The other pair are high-resolution simulations from the adaptive-mesh refinement code ART, for which the refined treatment includes cooling, star formation and supernova feedback (CSF). We find that, although the mass functions of the gravity-only (GO) treatments are consistent with the recent calibration of Tinker et al. (2008), both pairs of simulations with refined baryon physics show significant deviations. Relative to the GO case, the masses of ~1014h-1Msolar haloes in the PH and CSF treatments are shifted by the averages of -15 +/- 1 and +16 +/- 2 per cent, respectively. These mass shifts cause ~30 per cent deviations in number density relative to the Tinker function, significantly larger than the 5 per cent statistical uncertainty of that calibration.

  13. Effective Planck mass and the scale of inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kleban, Matthew; Porrati, Massimo; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad E-mail: mehrdadm@ias.edu

    2016-01-01

    A recent paper argued that it is not possible to infer the energy scale of inflation from the amplitude of tensor fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave Background, because the usual connection is substantially altered if there are a large number of universally coupled fields present during inflation, with mass less than the inflationary Hubble scale. We give a simple argument demonstrating that this is incorrect.

  14. The Relative Effectiveness of Massed Versus Spaced Film Presentation. Rapid Mass Learning. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Philip

    In presenting material to be learned in a film, is a single, long session, dealing with the subject in depth, as effective as the same content divided into several short sessions? In other words, is a long presentation more tiring than a short one? Groups of psychology students and Navy recruits were given equivalent amounts of instruction time,…

  15. THE EFFECTS OF VIEWING ANGLE ON THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, S.; Jenkins, J. S.

    2012-09-10

    We present a mathematical method to statistically decouple the effects of unknown inclination angles on the mass distribution of exoplanets that have been discovered using radial-velocity (RV) techniques. The method is based on the distribution of the product of two random variables. Thus, if one assumes a true mass distribution, the method makes it possible to recover the observed distribution. We compare our prediction with available RV data. Assuming that the true mass function is described by a power law, the minimum mass function that we recover proves a good fit to the observed distribution at both mass ends. In particular, it provides an alternative explanation for the observed low-mass decline, usually explained as sample incompleteness. In addition, the peak observed near the low-mass end arises naturally in the predicted distribution as a consequence of imposing a low-mass cutoff in the true distribution. If the low-mass bins below 0.02 M{sub J} are complete, then the mass distribution in this regime is heavily affected by the small fraction of lowly inclined interlopers that are actually more massive companions. Finally, we also present evidence that the exoplanet mass distribution changes form toward low mass, implying that a single power law may not adequately describe the sample population.

  16. Scale effects and morphological diversification in hindlimb segment mass proportions in neognath birds

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In spite of considerable work on the linear proportions of limbs in amniotes, it remains unknown whether differences in scale effects between proximal and distal limb segments has the potential to influence locomotor costs in amniote lineages and how changes in the mass proportions of limbs have factored into amniote diversification. To broaden our understanding of how the mass proportions of limbs vary within amniote lineages, I collected data on hindlimb segment masses – thigh, shank, pes, tarsometatarsal segment, and digits – from 38 species of neognath birds, one of the most speciose amniote clades. I scaled each of these traits against measures of body size (body mass) and hindlimb size (hindlimb length) to test for departures from isometry. Additionally, I applied two parameters of trait evolution (Pagel’s λ and δ) to understand patterns of diversification in hindlimb segment mass in neognaths. Results All segment masses are positively allometric with body mass. Segment masses are isometric with hindlimb length. When examining scale effects in the neognath subclade Land Birds, segment masses were again positively allometric with body mass; however, shank, pedal, and tarsometatarsal segment masses were also positively allometric with hindlimb length. Methods of branch length scaling to detect phylogenetic signal (i.e., Pagel’s λ) and increasing or decreasing rates of trait change over time (i.e., Pagel’s δ) suffer from wide confidence intervals, likely due to small sample size and deep divergence times. Conclusions The scaling of segment masses appears to be more strongly related to the scaling of limb bone mass as opposed to length, and the scaling of hindlimb mass distribution is more a function of scale effects in limb posture than proximo-distal differences in the scaling of limb segment mass. Though negative allometry of segment masses appears to be precluded by the need for mechanically sound limbs, the positive allometry of

  17. The Massive Wave Equation in Asymptotically AdS Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnick, C. M.

    2013-07-01

    We consider the massive wave equation on asymptotically AdS spaces. We show that the timelike F behaves like a finite timelike boundary, on which one may impose the equivalent of Dirichlet, Neumann or Robin conditions for a range of (negative) mass parameter which includes the conformally coupled case. We demonstrate well posedness for the associated initial-boundary value problems at the H 1 level of regularity. We also prove that higher regularity may be obtained, together with an asymptotic expansion for the field near F. The proofs rely on energy methods, tailored to the modified energy introduced by Breitenlohner and Freedman. We do not assume the spacetime is stationary, nor that the wave equation separates.

  18. Well Ordered Melts from Low Molar Mass Pluronic Copolymers Blended with Poly (acrylic acid): Effect of Homopolymer Molar Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daga, Vikram; Tirumala, Vijay; Romang, Alvin; Lin, Eric; Watkins, James

    2008-03-01

    The use of short chain block copolymer melts as nanostructured templates is often limited by their low segregation strength (χN). Since increasing molar mass to strengthen segregation also increases the interdomain spacing, it is more desirable to increase the segment-segment interaction parameter, χ to produce strong segregation. We have recently shown that block copolymer melts with a molar mass less than 15 kg/mol undergo disorder-to-order transition without a significant increase in interdomain spacing when blended with a selectively associating homopolymer, due to an apparent increase in effective χ. Here, we study the effect of homopolymer molar mass on the segregation of a disordered poly (oxyethylene-oxypropylene-oxyethylene) copolymer melt that forms lamellar microstructure in the ordered phase. Based on small-angle scattering measurements, we find that the melts remain ordered over a broad range of homopolymer chain lengths, ranging up to ten times that of the copolymer. This approach has many implications for the use of commodity block copolymer surfactants as inexpensive nanostructured templates for commercial applications.

  19. Effect of neutrino rest mass on ionization equilibrium freeze-out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grohs, E.; Fuller, G. M.; Kishimoto, C. T.; Paris, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    We show how small neutrino rest masses can increase the expansion rate near the photon decoupling epoch in the early Universe, causing an earlier, higher temperature freeze-out for ionization equilibrium compared to the massless neutrino case. This yields a larger free-electron fraction, thereby affecting the photon diffusion length differently than the sound horizon at photon decoupling. This neutrino-mass and recombination effect depends strongly on the neutrino rest masses. Though below current sensitivity, this effect could be probed by next-generation cosmic microwave background experiments, giving another observational handle on neutrino rest mass.

  20. Effect of neutrino rest mass on ionization equilibrium freeze-out

    SciTech Connect

    Grohs, Evan Bradley; Fuller, George M.; Kishimoto, Chad T.; Paris, Mark W.

    2015-12-23

    We show how small neutrino rest masses can increase the expansion rate near the photon decoupling epoch in the early Universe, causing an earlier, higher temperature freeze-out for ionization equilibrium compared to the massless neutrino case. This yields a larger free-electron fraction, thereby affecting the photon diffusion length differently than the sound horizon at photon decoupling. This neutrino-mass and recombination effect depends strongly on the neutrino rest masses. Ultimately, though below current sensitivity, this effect could be probed by next-generation cosmic microwave background experiments, giving another observational handle on neutrino rest mass.

  1. AdS3: the NHEK generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Heurtier, Lucien; Puhm, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    It was argued in [1] that the five-dimensional near-horizon extremal Kerr (NHEK) geometry can be embedded in String Theory as the infrared region of an infinite family of non-supersymmetric geometries that have D1, D5, momentum and KK monopole charges. We show that there exists a method to embed these geometries into asymptotically- {AdS}_3× {S}^3/{{Z}}_N solutions, and hence to obtain infinite families of flows whose infrared is NHEK. This indicates that the CFT dual to the NHEK geometry is the IR fixed point of a Renormalization Group flow from a known local UV CFT and opens the door to its explicit construction.

  2. Effect of Turbulent-Flow Pasteurization on Survival of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Added to Raw Milk

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Lindsay E.; Truong, H. Tuan; Crawford, Robert A.; Yates, Gary F.; Cavaignac, Sonia; de Lisle, Geoffrey W.

    2001-01-01

    A pilot-scale pasteurizer operating under validated turbulent flow (Reynolds number, 11,050) was used to study the heat sensitivity of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis added to raw milk. The ATCC 19698 type strain, ATCC 43015 (Linda, human isolate), and three bovine isolates were heated in raw whole milk for 15 s at 63, 66, 69, and 72°C in duplicate trials. No strains survived at 72°C for 15 s; and only one strain survived at 69°C. Means of pooled D values (decimal reduction times) at 63 and 66°C were 15.0 ± 2.8 s (95% confidence interval) and 5.9 ± 0.7 s (95% confidence interval), respectively. The mean extrapolated D72°C was <2.03 s. This was equivalent to a >7 log10 kill at 72°C for 15 s (95% confidence interval). The mean Z value (degrees required for the decimal reduction time to traverse one log cycle) was 8.6°C. These five strains showed similar survival whether recovery was on Herrold's egg yolk medium containing mycobactin or by a radiometric culture method (BACTEC). Milk was inoculated with fresh fecal material from a high-level fecal shedder with clinical Johne's disease. After heating at 72°C for 15 s, the minimum M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis kill was >4 log10. Properly maintained and operated equipment should ensure the absence of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in retail milk and other pasteurized dairy products. An additional safeguard is the widespread commercial practice of pasteurizing 1.5 to 2° above 72°C. PMID:11525992

  3. Cost-effectiveness of extended-release niacin/laropiprant added to a stable simvastatin dose in secondary prevention patients not at cholesterol goal in Germany.

    PubMed

    Michailov, Galin V; Davies, Glenn M; Krobot, Karl J

    2012-06-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) remains the leading cause of death in Germany despite statin use to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels; improving lipids beyond LDL-C may further reduce cardiovascular risk. A fixed-dose combination of extended-release niacin (ERN) with laropiprant (LRPT) provides comprehensive lipid management. We adapted a decision-analytic model to evaluate the economic value (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio [ICER] in terms of costs per life-years gained [LYG]) of ERN/LRPT 2 g over a lifetime in secondary prevention patients in a German setting. Two scenarios were modelled: (1) ERN/LRPT 2 g added to simvastatin 40 mg in patients not at LDL-C goal with simvastatin 40 mg; (2) adding ERN/LRPT 2 g compared with titration to simvastatin 40 mg in patients not at LDL-C goal with simvastatin 20 mg. In both scenarios, adding ERN/LRPT was cost-effective relative to simvastatin monotherapy at a commonly accepted threshold of €30,000 per LYG; ICERs for ERN/LRPT were €13,331 per LYG in scenario 1 and €17,684 per LYG in scenario 2. Subgroup analyses showed that ERN/LRPT was cost-effective in patients with or without diabetes, patients aged ≤ 65 or >65 years and patients with low baseline high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels; ICERs ranged from €10,342 to €15,579 in scenario 1, and from €14,081 to €20,462 in scenario 2. In conclusion, comprehensive lipid management with ERN/LRPT 2 g is cost-effective in secondary prevention patients in Germany who have not achieved LDL-C goal with simvastatin monotherapy.

  4. Boundary conditions for conformally coupled scalar in AdS4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jae-Hyuk

    2015-06-01

    We consider conformally coupled scalar with ɸ4 coupling in AdS4 and study its various boundary conditions on AdS boundary. We have obtained perturbative solutions of equation of motion of the conformally coupled scalar with power expansion order by order in ɸ4 coupling λ up to λ2 order. In its dual CFT, we get 2, 4 and 6 point functions by using this solution with Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions via AdS/CFT dictionary. We also consider marginal deformation on AdS boundary and get its on-shell and boundary effective actions.

  5. Soy versus whey protein bars: Effects on exercise training impact on lean body mass and antioxidant status

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Erin C; DiSilvestro, Robert A; Babaknia, Ari; Devor, Steven T

    2004-01-01

    Background Although soy protein may have many health benefits derived from its associated antioxidants, many male exercisers avoid soy protein. This is due partly to a popular, but untested notion that in males, soy is inferior to whey in promoting muscle weight gain. This study provided a direct comparison between a soy product and a whey product. Methods Lean body mass gain was examined in males from a university weight training class given daily servings of micronutrient-fortified protein bars containing soy or whey protein (33 g protein/day, 9 weeks, n = 9 for each protein treatment group). Training used workouts with fairly low repetition numbers per set. A control group from the class (N = 9) did the training, but did not consume either type protein bar. Results Both the soy and whey treatment groups showed a gain in lean body mass, but the training-only group did not. The whey and training only groups, but not the soy group, showed a potentially deleterious post-training effect on two antioxidant-related related parameters. Conclusions Soy and whey protein bar products both promoted exercise training-induced lean body mass gain, but the soy had the added benefit of preserving two aspects of antioxidant function. PMID:15588291

  6. EFFECTS OF ROTATION ON THE MINIMUM MASS OF PRIMORDIAL PROGENITORS OF PAIR-INSTABILITY SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzopoulos, E.; Craig Wheeler, J.

    2012-03-20

    The issue of which stars may reach the conditions of electron/positron pair-formation instability is of importance to understand the final evolution both of the first stars and of contemporary stars. The criterion to enter the pair-instability regime in density and temperature is basically controlled by the mass of the oxygen core. The main-sequence masses that produce a given oxygen core mass are, in turn, dependent on metallicity, mass loss, and convective and rotationally induced mixing. We examine the evolution of massive stars to determine the minimum main-sequence mass that can encounter pair-instability effects, either a pulsational pair-instability supernova (PPISN) or a full-fledged pair-instability supernova (PISN). We concentrate on zero-metallicity stars with no mass-loss subject to the Schwarzschild criterion for convective instability, but also explore solar metallicity and mass loss and the Ledoux criterion. As expected, for sufficiently strong rotationally induced mixing, the minimum main-sequence mass is encountered for conditions that induce effectively homogeneous evolution such that the original mass is converted almost entirely to helium and then to oxygen. For this case, we find that the minimum main-sequence mass is about 40 M{sub Sun} to encounter PPISN and about 65 M{sub Sun} to encounter a PISN. The implications of these results for the first stars and for contemporary supernovae are discussed.

  7. Clearing the fog: a review of the effects of dietary omega-3 fatty acids and added sugars on chemotherapy-induced cognitive deficits.

    PubMed

    Orchard, Tonya S; Gaudier-Diaz, Monica M; Weinhold, Kellie R; Courtney DeVries, A

    2017-02-01

    Cancer treatments such as chemotherapy have been an important part of extending survival in women diagnosed with breast cancer. However, chemotherapy can cause potentially toxic side effects in the brain that impair memory, verbal fluency, and processing speed in up to 30% of women treated. Women report that post-chemotherapy cognitive deficits negatively impact quality of life and may last up to ten years after treatment. Mechanisms underlying these cognitive impairments are not fully understood, but emerging evidence suggests that chemotherapy induces structural changes in the brain, produces neuroinflammation, and reduces adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Dietary approaches that modify inflammation and neurogenesis are promising strategies for reducing chemotherapy-induced cognitive deficits in breast cancer survivors. In this review, we describe the cognitive and neuronal side effects associated with commonly used chemotherapy treatments for breast cancer, and we focus on the often opposing actions of omega-3 fatty acids and added sugars on cognitive function, neuroinflammation, and adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Omega-3 fatty acids administered concurrently with doxorubicin chemotherapy have been shown to prevent depressive-like behaviors and reduce neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and neural apoptosis in rodent models. In contrast, diets high in added sugars may interact with n-3 FAs to diminish their anti-inflammatory activity or act independently to increase neuroinflammation, reduce adult hippocampal neurogenesis, and promote cognitive deficits. We propose that a diet rich in long-chain, marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids and low in added sugars may be an ideal pattern for preventing or alleviating neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, thereby protecting neurons from the toxic effects of chemotherapy. Research testing this hypothesis could lead to the identification of modifiable dietary choices to reduce the long-term impact of chemotherapy on the

  8. Exercise Does Not Protect against Peripheral and Central Effects of a High Cholesterol Diet Given Ad libitum in Old ApoE−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Di Cataldo, Vanessa; Géloën, Alain; Langlois, Jean-Baptiste; Chauveau, Fabien; Thézé, Benoît; Hubert, Violaine; Wiart, Marlène; Chirico, Erica N.; Rieusset, Jennifer; Vidal, Hubert; Pialoux, Vincent; Canet-Soulas, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Advanced atherosclerosis increases inflammation and stroke risk in the cerebral vasculature. Exercise is known to improve cardio-metabolic profiles when associated with a caloric restriction, but it remains debated whether it is still beneficial without the dietary control. The aim of this study was to determine both the peripheral and central effects of exercise training combined with a cholesterol-rich diet given ad libitum in old ApoE−/− mice. Methods: Forty-five-weeks old obese ApoE−/− mice fed with a high cholesterol diet ad libitum were divided into Exercise-trained (EX; running wheel free access) and Sedentary (SED) groups. Insulin tolerance and brain imaging were performed before and after the twelve-weeks training. Tissue insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and inflammation markers in plasma, aorta, and brain were then assessed. Results: In EX ApoE−/− mice, no beneficial effect of exercise was observed on weight, abdominal fat, metabolic parameters, oxidative stress, or inflammation compared to SED. Despite the regular exercise training in ApoE−/− EX mice (mean of 12.5 km/week during 12 weeks), brain inflammation imaging score was significantly associated with increased blood brain barrier (BBB) leakage evaluated by imaging follow-up (r2 = 0.87; p = 0.049) with a faster evolution compared to SED ApoE−/−mice. Conclusion: We conclude that in a context of high cardio-metabolic risk, exercise does not provide any protective effect in old ApoE−/− animals under high cholesterol diet given ad libitum. Peripheral (insulin sensitivity and oxidative/inflammatory status) but also central features (BBB preservation and protection against inflammation) did not show any benefits of exercise. Indeed, there was a fast induction of irreversible brain damage that was more pronounced in exercise-trained ApoE−/− mice. PMID:27766082

  9. The effect of Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolutionary masses of RR Lyrae stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Sukyoung; Lee, Young-Wook; Demarque, Pierre

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of the new Livermore OPAL opacities on the evolution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars. This work was motivated by the recent stellar pulsation calculations using the new Livermore opacities, which suggest that the masses of double-mode RR Lyrae stars are 0.1-0.2 solar mass larger than those based on earlier opacities. Unlike the pulsation calculations, we find that the effect of opacity change on the evolution of HB stars is not significant. In particular, the effect of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars is very small, showing a decrease of only 0.01-0.02 solar mass compared to the models based on old Cox-Stewart opacities. Consequently, with the new Livermore OPAL opacities, both the stellar pulsation and evolution models now predict approximately the same masses for the RR Lyrae stars. Our evolutionary models suggest that the mean masses of the RR Lyrae stars are about 0.76 and about 0.71 solar mass for M15 (Oosterhoff group II) and M3 (group I), respectively. If (alpha/Fe) = 0.4, these values are decreased by about 0.03 solar mass. Variations of the mean masses of RR Lyrae stars with HB morphology and metallicity are also presented.

  10. The electrooxidation mechanism of formic acid on platinum and on lead ad-atoms modified platinum studied with the kinetic isotope effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bełtowska-Brzezinska, M.; Łuczak, T.; Stelmach, J.; Holze, R.

    2014-04-01

    Kinetics and mechanism of formic acid (FA) oxidation on platinum and upd-lead ad-atoms modified platinum electrodes have been studied using unlabelled and deuterated compounds. Poisoning of the electrode surface by CO-like species was prevented by suppression of dissociative chemisorption of FA due to a fast competitive underpotential deposition of lead ad-atoms on the Pt surface from an acidic solution containing Pb2+ cations. Modification of the Pt electrode with upd lead induced a catalytic effect in the direct electrooxidation of physisorbed FA to CO2. With increasing degree of H/D substitution, the rate of this reaction decreased in the order: HCOOH > DCOOH ≥ HCOOD > DCOOD. HCOOH was oxidized 8.5-times faster on a Pt/Pb electrode than DCOOD. This primary kinetic isotope effect proves that the C-H- and O-H-bonds are simultaneously cleaved in the rate determining step. A secondary kinetic isotope effect was found in the dissociative chemisorption of FA in the hydrogen adsorption-desorption range on a bare Pt electrode after H/D exchange in the C-H bond, wherein the influence of deuterium substitution in the O-H group was negligibly small. Thus the C-H bond cleavage is accompanied by the C-OH and not the O-H bond split in the FA decomposition, producing CO-like species on the Pt surface sites.

  11. Historical Earthquake Scenarios and Effects on the Ancient City of İstanbul (A.D. 478 - 1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Murat; Elitez, İrem; Özmen, Aybars; Yaltırak, Cenk

    2016-04-01

    Active fault mapping is one of the most important subject in the active tectonic studies. The consistency of the active fault maps with the reality is curial for the settlements and socio-economic conditions. The Marmara region is one of the precious area where the longest duration settlement and civilization are observed along a fault system. The Marmara Sea and its surrounding area are unique on the earth which has the remarkable history of 1500 years in non-instrumental period. Because, İstanbul was the capital city of both Byzantium and Ottoman Empire and the historical records of İstanbul are reliable for this environment such as A.D. 1509 earthquake known as 'little apocalypse'. Although the active faults of the Marmara Sea have studied and mapped by many researchers, there are only three different main fault model suggested for the Marmara Sea. These are single fault model (Le Pichon et al., 2001), pull-apart model (Armijo et al., 2005) and horsetail model (Yaltırak, 2002; 2015). Yaltırak (2015) grouped the 38 destructive historical earthquakes according to their felt area for these three fault models in the Marmara region. In this study we have modelled the Modified Mercalli Intensities (MMI) of historical buildings and cross checked with damages on the related structure in order to investigate the consistency of fault pattern with historical earthquakes. In this study three-stage evaluation has been made. In the first stage, three models that differ from each other were prepared on a database in commercial ArcGIS software. Mw values were calculated for each segment according to their lengths, seismogenic depths and 18 mm/yr accumulation by using the equation of Kanamori (1977). In the second stage, the 1:25000-scale geological map of the ancient city of İstanbul was revised according to Vs30 data of the İstanbul Metropolitan Municipality. The exact location of the historical constructions in the İstanbul have been plotted by using non

  12. Rack Distribution Effects on MPLM Center of Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tester, John T.

    2005-01-01

    This research was in support of exploring the need for more flexible "center of gravity (CG) specifications than those currently established by NASA for the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MPLM). The MPLM is the cargo carrier for International Space Station (ISS) missions. The MPLM provides locations for 16 standard racks, as shown in Figure 1; not all positions need to be filled in any given flight. The MPLM coordinate system (X(sub M), Y(sub M), Z(sub M)) is illustrated as well. For this project, the primary missions of interest were those which supply the ISS and remove excess materials on the return flights. These flights use a predominate number of "Resupply Stowage Racks" (RSR) and "Resupply Stowage Platforms" (RSP). In these two types of racks, various smaller items are stowed. Hence, these racks will exhibit a considerable range of mass values as well as a range as to where their individual CG are located.

  13. Mass Transfer and Light Time Effect Studies for AU Serpentis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, S. M.

    2015-02-01

    The orbital period changes of theWUMa eclipsing binary AU Ser are studied using the (O-C) method. We conclude that the period variation is due to mass transfer from the primary star to the secondary one at a very low and decreasing rate dP/dt = -8.872 × 10-8, superimposed on the sinusoidal variation due to a third body orbiting the binary with period 42.87 ± 3.16 years, orbital eccentricity e = 0.52±0.12 and a longitude of periastron passage ! = 133.7±15. On studying the magnetic activity, we have concluded that the Applegate mechanism failed to describe the cycling variation of the (O-C) diagram of AU Ser.

  14. Thermodynamics and Stability of Five Dimensional AdS Reissner-Nordstrom Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadat, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we consider five dimensional AdS Reissner-Nordstrom black hole and calculate thermodynamical variables such as entropy, specific heat and free energy. In that case we can obtain stability conditions of the black hole and fix black hole charge and mass for phase transition.

  15. Hybrid exotic mesons in soft-wall AdS/QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellantuono, Loredana

    2014-11-01

    Hybrid mesons with exotic quantum numbers JPC = 1-+ are examined in soft-wall AdS/QCD. The predicted mass spectrum is compared to the measured values of the candidates π1(1400), π1(1600) and π1(2015). Thermal effects are analysed through the spectral function in the AdS-Black Hole model, and the differences with the Hawking-Page description are discussed.

  16. Closed Timelike Curves in (2+1)-AdS Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valtancoli, P.

    We build the (2+1)-AdS gravity generalization of the Gott time machine using a first-order formalism for solving the scattering of point sources. The two-body dynamics is solved by two invariant masses, whose difference is simply related to the total angular momentum of the system. We show how to build a time machine when at least one of the two invariant masses is no more real but acquires an imaginary part.

  17. THE EFFECT OF MASS LOSS ON THE TIDAL EVOLUTION OF EXTRASOLAR PLANET

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J. H.

    2010-04-01

    By combining mass loss and tidal evolution of close-in planets, we present a qualitative study on their tidal migrations. We incorporate mass loss in tidal evolution for planets with different masses and find that mass loss could interfere with tidal evolution. In an upper limit case (beta = 3), a significant portion of mass may be evaporated in a long evolution timescale. Evidence of greater modification of the planets with an initial separation of about 0.1 AU than those with a = 0.15 AU can be found in this model. With the assumption of a large initial eccentricity, the planets with initial mass <=1 M{sub J} and initial distance of about 0.1 AU could not survive. With the supposition of beta = 1.1, we find that the loss process has an effect on the planets with low mass at a {approx} 0.05 AU. In both cases, the effect of evaporation on massive planets can be neglected. Also, heating efficiency and initial eccentricity have significant influence on tidal evolution. We find that even low heating efficiency and initial eccentricity have a significant effect on tidal evolution. Our analysis shows that evaporation on planets with different initial masses can accelerate (decelerate) the tidal evolution due to the increase (decrease) in tide of the planet (star). Consequently, the effect of evaporation cannot be neglected in evolutionary calculations of close-in planets. The physical parameters of HD 209458b can be fitted by our model.

  18. Introduction to Chemistry and Applications in Nature of Mass Independent Isotope Effects Special Feature

    PubMed Central

    Thiemens, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotope ratio variations are regulated by physical and chemical laws. These rules depend on a relation with mass differences between isotopes. New classes of isotope variation effects that deviate from mass dependent laws, termed mass independent isotope effects, were discovered in 1983 and have a wide range of applications in basic chemistry and nature. In this special edition, new applications of these effects to physical chemistry, solar system origin models, terrestrial atmospheric and biogenic evolution, polar paleo climatology, snowball earth geology, and present day atmospheric sciences are presented. PMID:24167299

  19. Introduction to chemistry and applications in nature of mass independent isotope effects special feature.

    PubMed

    Thiemens, Mark H

    2013-10-29

    Stable isotope ratio variations are regulated by physical and chemical laws. These rules depend on a relation with mass differences between isotopes. New classes of isotope variation effects that deviate from mass dependent laws, termed mass independent isotope effects, were discovered in 1983 and have a wide range of applications in basic chemistry and nature. In this special edition, new applications of these effects to physical chemistry, solar system origin models, terrestrial atmospheric and biogenic evolution, polar paleo climatology, snowball earth geology, and present day atmospheric sciences are presented.

  20. OAS and PKR are not required for the antiviral effect of Ad:IFN-gamma against acute HSV-1 in primary trigeminal ganglia cultures.

    PubMed

    Austin, Bobbie Ann; Halford, William; Silverman, Robert H; Williams, Bryan R G; Carr, Daniel J J

    2006-04-01

    Three interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-induced antiviral pathways have been reported. Involved antiviral proteins include: Mx, RNase L/2',5'-OAS, and protein kinase R (PKR). Involvement of OAS and PKR in IFN-gamma-induced anti-herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) pathways has not been reported previously, but IFN-gamma induces OAS and PKR when other viruses invade the nervous system. The aim of the current study was to determine if the absence of intact OAS and PKR antiviral pathways affects the antiviral activity of IFN-gamma during acute HSV-1 infection within the trigeminal ganglia (TG). To investigate this, primary TG cultures were established using TGs removed from C57BL/6 (wild-type), RNase L knockout, and RNase L/PKR double knockout mice. Each dissociated TG was transduced with an adenoviral vector containing an IFN-gamma transgene or vector alone. Viral titers after HSV-1 infection of primary TG cell cultures were determined. Significant differences in viral titer for Ad:Null-transduced vs. Ad:IFN-gamma-tranduced TG were found in each genotype. However, the effectiveness of Ad:IFN-gamma was not reduced in the absence of both OAS and PKR pathways or OAS alone. Recombinant IFN-gamma also exhibited anti-HSV-1 activity. The effectiveness of the IFN-gamma transgene was lost in primary TG cells from IFN-gamma receptor knockout mice. The data suggest that novel anti-HSV-1 mechanisms are induced by IFN-gamma.

  1. Combining Multilevel Analysis with National Value-Added Data Sets - A Case Study to Explore the Effects of School Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schagen, Ian; Schagen, Sandie

    2005-01-01

    The advent of large-scale matched data sets, linking pupils' attainment across key stages, gives new opportunities to explore the effects of school organisational factors on pupil performance. Combined with currently available sophisticated and efficient software for multilevel analysis, it offers educational researchers the chance to develop…

  2. Many-Body Effects in Iron Pnictides and Chalcogenides: Nonlocal Versus Dynamic Origin of Effective Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczak, Jan M.; van Schilfgaarde, M.; Kotliar, G.

    2012-12-01

    We apply the quasiparticle self-consistent GW approximation (QSGW) to some of the iron pnictide and chalcogenide superconductors. We compute Fermi surfaces and density of states, and find excellent agreement with experiment, substantially improving over standard band-structure methods. Analyzing the QSGW self-energy we discuss nonlocal and dynamic contributions to effective masses. We present evidence that the two contributions are mostly separable, since the quasiparticle weight is found to be essentially independent of momentum. The main effect of nonlocality is captured by the static but nonlocal QSGW effective potential. Moreover, these nonlocal self-energy corrections, absent in, e.g., dynamical mean field theory, can be relatively large. We show, on the other hand, that QSGW only partially accounts for dynamic renormalizations at low energies. These findings suggest that QSGW combined with dynamical mean field theory will capture most of the many-body physics in the iron pnictides and chalcogenides.

  3. Extracting the effective mass of electrons in transparent conductive oxide thin films using Seebeck coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yaqin; Zhu, Junhao; Tang, Wu

    2014-05-26

    A method is proposed that combines Seebeck coefficient and carrier concentration to determine the electron effective mass of transparent conductive oxide (TCO) thin films. Experiments were conducted to test the validity of this approach on the transparent conductive Ga-doped ZnO thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering. An evident agreement of the calculated electron effective mass of the films is observed between the proposed approach and the previous studies. Besides, the optical carrier concentration and mobility derived from the calculated electron effective mass and spectroscopic ellipsometry using a complex dielectric function are consistent with those from direct Hall-effect measurement. The agreements suggest that Seebeck coefficient can serve as an alternative tool for extracting the effective mass of electrons in TCO films.

  4. Acute effects of mustard, horseradish, black pepper and ginger on energy expenditure, appetite, ad libitum energy intake and energy balance in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, N T; Belza, A; Jensen, M G; Ritz, C; Bitz, C; Hels, O; Frandsen, E; Mela, D J; Astrup, A

    2013-02-14

    Chilli peppers have been shown to enhance diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) and reduce energy intake (EI) in some studies, but there are few data on other pungent spices. The primary aim of the present study was to test the acute effects of black pepper (pepper), ginger, horseradish and mustard in a meal on 4 h postprandial DIT. The secondary aim was to examine the effects on subjective appetite measures, ad libitum EI and energy balance. In a five-way placebo-controlled, single-blind, cross-over trial, twenty-two young (age 24·9 (SD 4·6) years), normal-weight (BMI 21·8 (SD 2·1) kg/m²) males were randomly assigned to receive a brunch meal with either pepper (1·3 g), ginger (20 g), horseradish (8·3 g), mustard (21 g) or no spices (placebo). The amounts of spices were chosen from pre-testing to make the meal spicy but palatable. No significant treatment effects were observed on DIT, but mustard produced DIT, which tended to be larger than that of placebo (14 %, 59 (SE 3) v. 52 (SE 2) kJ/h, respectively, P=0·08). No other spice induced thermogenic effects approaching statistical significance. Subjective measures of appetite (P>0·85), ad libitum EI (P=0·63) and energy balance (P=0·67) also did not differ between the treatments. Finally, horseradish decreased heart rate (P=0·048) and increased diastolic blood pressure (P= 0·049) compared with placebo. In conclusion, no reliable treatment effects on appetite, EI or energy balance were observed, although mustard tended to be thermogenic at this dose. Further studies should explore the possible strength and mechanisms of the potential thermogenic effect of mustard actives, and potential enhancement by, for example, combinations with other food components.

  5. The effects of excitation waveforms and shaker moving mass on the measured modal characteristics of a 2- by 5-foot aluminum plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voracek, David F.; Morales, Adolfo M.

    1988-01-01

    Ground vibration tests were conducted to compare and to investigate the effects of five excitation waveforms and the shaker moving mass (equipment and armature used to attach the shaker to the structure) on the experimental modal characteristics of a 2- by 5-ft aluminum plate using fast Fourier transform techniques. The five types of excitation waveforms studied were sine dwell, random, impact, sine sweep, and impulsive sine. The results showed that the experimental modal frequencies for all types of excitation were within 3 percent, while the modal damping data exhibited greater scatter. The sets of mode shapes obtained by the five types of excitation were consistent. The results of the shaker moving mass investigation on the 2- by 5-ft aluminum plate showed that modal frequency decreases and modal damping remains relatively constant with an increase in shaker moving mass. The generalized mass of the structure appears to decrease with an increase in shaker moving mass. In addition, it was seen that having a shaker near a node line can reduce some of the effects of the added shaker moving mass on the frequencies and the damping.

  6. Effects of maternal characteristics and climatic variation on birth masses of Alaskan caribou

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence birth mass of mammals provides insights to nutritional trade-offs made by females to optimize their reproduction, growth, and survival. I evaluated variation in birth mass of caribou (Rangifer tarandus) in central Alaska relative to maternal characteristics (age, body mass, cohort, and nutritional condition as influenced by winter severity) during 11 years with substantial variation in winter snowfall. Snowfall during gestation was the predominant factor explaining variation in birth masses, influencing birth mass inversely and through interactions with maternal age and lactation status. Maternal age effects were noted for females ??? 5 years old, declining in magnitude with each successive age class. Birth mass as a proportion of autumn maternal mass was inversely related to winter snowfall, even though there was no decrease in masses of adult females in late winter associated with severe winters. I found no evidence of a hypothesized intergenerational effect of lower birth masses for offspring of females born after severe winters. Caribou produce relatively small offspring but provide exceptional lactation support for those that survive. Conservative maternal investment before parturition may represent an optimal reproductive strategy given that caribou experience stochastic variation in winter severity during gestation, uncertainty of environmental conditions surrounding the birth season, and intense predation on neonates. ?? 2005 American Society of Mammalogists.

  7. Effects of added dopants on various triboluminescent properties of europium dibenzoylmethide triethylammonium (EuD4TEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Constance; Fontenot, Ross S.; Bhat, Kamala N.; Aggarwal, Mohan D.

    2014-03-01

    A triboluminescent (TL) material is one that emits light upon pressure, impact, friction, or mechanical shock. TL materials are desirable for investigation because they have the potential to be used as the active element for smart impact sensors. While the material europium dibenzoylmethide triethylammonium (EuD4TEA) produces a TL emission yield that can be observed by the naked eye, it is still not sufficiently bright for use in smart sensor devices. Previous studies have shown that additional materials can be combined with EuD4TEA in order to improve the TL emission yield. In this paper, we discuss the effects of doping on EuD4TEA at different concentrations with a variety of materials on the TL emission yield and decay times. The dopants that were used in this study were nicotine, dibutyl phosphate (DBP), and magnesium. We also discuss both the effects of pH on EuD4TEA, and the doping effects on impact energy. For testing triboluminescent properties, we use a custom-built drop tower that generates triboluminescence by fracturing compounds through impact. Collected data is analyzed using specially written LabVIEW programs.

  8. Nonlinear Ion Harmonics in the Paul Trap with Added Octopole Field: Theoretical Characterization and New Insight into Nonlinear Resonance Effect.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Caiqiao; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Ning; Zhan, Lingpeng; Chen, Yongtai; Nie, Zongxiu

    2016-02-01

    The nonlinear harmonics within the ion motion are the fingerprint of the nonlinear fields. They are exclusively introduced by these nonlinear fields and are responsible to some specific nonlinear effects such as nonlinear resonance effect. In this article, the ion motion in the quadrupole field with a weak superimposed octopole component, described by the nonlinear Mathieu equation (NME), was studied by using the analytical harmonic balance (HB) method. Good accuracy of the HB method, which was comparable with that of the numerical fourth-order Runge-Kutta (4th RK), was achieved in the entire first stability region, except for the points at the stability boundary (i.e., β = 1) and at the nonlinear resonance condition (i.e., β = 0.5). Using the HB method, the nonlinear 3β harmonic series introduced by the octopole component and the resultant nonlinear resonance effect were characterized. At nonlinear resonance, obvious resonant peaks were observed in the nonlinear 3β series of ion motion, but were not found in the natural harmonics. In addition, both resonant excitation and absorption peaks could be observed, simultaneously. These are two unique features of the nonlinear resonance, distinguishing it from the normal resonance. Finally, an approximation equation was given to describe the corresponding working parameter, q nr , at nonlinear resonance. This equation can help avoid the sensitivity degradation due to the operation of ion traps at the nonlinear resonance condition.

  9. Adverse effects of smoking on peak bone mass may be attenuated by higher body mass index in young female smokers.

    PubMed

    Callréus, Mattias; McGuigan, Fiona; Akesson, Kristina

    2013-12-01

    Smoking is associated with postmenopausal bone loss and fracture, but the effect of smoking on bone in younger women is unclear. Peak bone mass is an important determinant for fracture risk; therefore, our aim was to evaluate the association between smoking and bone mass in 25-year-old women, specifically the influence of daily cigarette consumption and total exposure, duration, age at starting smoking, and time since smoking cessation on bone density and fracture risk. Smoking and bone mineral density (BMD) data were available for 1,054 women from the PEAK-25 cohort. Analyses comparing current smokers with women who never smoked were performed using number of cigarettes per day, pack-years, smoking duration, age smoking started, and, for former smokers, age at quitting. BMD did not differ between never, former, and current smokers; and the relative fracture risk in smokers was not significant (relative risk [RR] = 1.2, 95 % confidence interval 0.8-1.9). Among current smokers, BMD decreased with a dose response as cigarette consumption increased (femoral neck p = 0.037). BMD was not significantly lower in young women who had smoked for long duration or started smoking early (p = 0.07-0.64); long duration and early start were associated with higher body mass index (BMI; p = 0.038). Lower BMD persisted up to 24 months after smoking cessation (p = 0.027-0.050), becoming comparable to never-smokers after 24 months. Hip BMD was negatively associated with smoking and dose-dependent on cigarette consumption. Smoking duration was not associated with BMD, although young women with a long smoking history had higher BMI, which might attenuate the adverse effects from smoking.

  10. Effect of temperature on high shear-induced gelation of charge-stabilized colloids without adding electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hua; Tsoutsoura, Aikaterini; Lattuada, Marco; Zaccone, Alessio; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2010-02-16

    We demonstrated previously (Wu, H.; Zaccone, A.; Tsoutsoura, A.; Lattuada, M.; Morbidelli, M. Langmuir 2009, 25, 4715) that, for a colloid stabilized by charges from both polymer chain-end groups and adsorbed sulfonate surfactants, when the surfactant surface density reaches a certain critical value, the shear-induced gelation becomes unachievable at room temperature, even at an extremely large Peclet number, Pe = 4.6 x 10(4). This is due to the presence of the short-range, repulsive hydration force generated by the adsorbed surfactant. In this work, we investigate how such hydration force affects the shear-induced gelation at higher temperatures, in the range between 303 and 338 K. It is found that a colloidal system, which does not gel at room temperature in a microchannel at a fixed Pe = 3.7 x 10(4), does gel when temperature increases to a certain value. The critical initial particle volume fraction for the gelation to occur decreases as temperature increases. These results indicate that the effect of the hydration force on the gelation decreases as temperature increases. Moreover, we have observed that at the criticality only part of the primary particles is converted to the gel network and the effective particle volume fraction forming the gel network does not change significantly with temperature. The effective particle volume fraction is also independent of the surfactant surface coverage. Since the effective particle volume fraction corresponds to space filling requirement of a standing gel network, which is mainly related to the clusters structure, this result indicates that at a given shear rate the cluster structure does not change significantly with the surfactant surface coverage. On the other hand, since the cluster morphology is a strong function of the shear rate, we have observed that when the Peclet number is lowered from Pe = 3.7 x 10(4) to 1.7 x 10(4), the effective particle volume fraction reduces from 0.19 to 0.12 at 313 K.

  11. Advertising health: the case for counter-ads.

    PubMed Central

    Dorfman, L; Wallack, L

    1993-01-01

    Public service advertisements have been used by many in hopes of "selling" good health behaviors. But selling good behavior--even if it could be done more effectively--is not the best goal for using mass media to prevent health problems. Personal behavior is only part of what determines health status. Social conditions and the physical environment are important determinants of health that are usually ignored by health promotion advertising. Public service advertising may be doing more harm than good if it is diverting attention from more effective socially based health promotion strategies. Counter-ads are one communications strategy that could be used to promote a broader responsibility for rectifying health problems. In the tradition of advocacy advertising directly promoting policy rather than products, counter-ads promote views consistent with a public health perspective. Counter-ads set the agenda for health issues, conferring status on policy-oriented strategies for addressing health problems. The primary purpose of counter-ads is to challenge the dominant view that public health problems reflect personal health habits. They are controversial because they place health issues in a social and political context. Advertising strategies for health promotion range over a spectrum from individually oriented public service advertising to socially oriented counter-advertising. The recent anti-tobacco campaign from the California Department of Health Services represents advertisements across the spectrum. Counter-ads that focus on a politically controversial definition for health problems are an appropriate and necessary alternative to public service advertising. PMID:8265756

  12. Advertising health: the case for counter-ads.

    PubMed

    Dorfman, L; Wallack, L

    1993-01-01

    Public service advertisements have been used by many in hopes of "selling" good health behaviors. But selling good behavior--even if it could be done more effectively--is not the best goal for using mass media to prevent health problems. Personal behavior is only part of what determines health status. Social conditions and the physical environment are important determinants of health that are usually ignored by health promotion advertising. Public service advertising may be doing more harm than good if it is diverting attention from more effective socially based health promotion strategies. Counter-ads are one communications strategy that could be used to promote a broader responsibility for rectifying health problems. In the tradition of advocacy advertising directly promoting policy rather than products, counter-ads promote views consistent with a public health perspective. Counter-ads set the agenda for health issues, conferring status on policy-oriented strategies for addressing health problems. The primary purpose of counter-ads is to challenge the dominant view that public health problems reflect personal health habits. They are controversial because they place health issues in a social and political context. Advertising strategies for health promotion range over a spectrum from individually oriented public service advertising to socially oriented counter-advertising. The recent anti-tobacco campaign from the California Department of Health Services represents advertisements across the spectrum. Counter-ads that focus on a politically controversial definition for health problems are an appropriate and necessary alternative to public service advertising.

  13. Effect of Added Salts or Polyols on the Cloud Point and the Liquid-Crystalline Structures of Polyoxyethylene-Modified Silicone.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga; Kunieda

    2000-07-15

    The effect of added salts (NaCl, Na(2)SO(4), and NaSCN) or polyols (glycerin (Gly), 1,3-butanediol (1,3-BD), ethylene glycol (EG), and polyethylene glycol (PEG400)) on the hexagonal liquid-crystalline structure of polyoxyethylene-modified silicone was investigated by means of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The effective cross-sectional area of the lipophilic part of the aggregate, a(s), in the hexagonal phase decreases upon the addition of salts, on one hand, lowering the cloud point in the dilute aqueous siloxane surfactant solutions. On the other hand, if added salt raises the cloud point, the a(s) increases. Similar results were obtained in the case of the addition of polyols. Since the a(s) mainly depends on the EO chain length, the above results are direct evidence that the hydration or dehydration of the EO chain is affected by these additives. The static fluorescence probe method was applied to the Gly and 1,3-BD systems using 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonic acid, ANS, to know the change in hydration of the EO chains. In the Gly system, the hydration of the EO chain monotonically decreases whereas 1,3-BD first increases the hydration and then decreases it at high 1,3-BD content. These results are very consistent with the SAXS and cloud temperature results. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  14. High-fat Diet Decreases Cancellous Bone Mass But Has No Effect on Cortical Bone Mass in the Tibia in Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Body mass has a positive effect on bone mineral density and the strength. Whether mass derived from an obesity condition is beneficial to bone has not been established; neither have the mechanism by which obesity affects bone metabolism. The aim of this study was to examine the effects...

  15. Stability of charged global AdS4 spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Raúl; Mas, Javier; Serantes, Alexandre

    2016-09-01

    We study linear and nonlinear stability of asymptotically AdS4 solutions in Einstein-Maxwell-scalar theory. After summarizing the set of static solutions we first examine thermodynamical stability in the grand canonical ensemble and the phase transitions that occur among them. In the second part of the paper we focus on nonlinear stability in the microcanonical ensemble by evolving radial perturbations numerically. We find hints of an instability corner for vanishingly small perturbations of the same kind as the ones present in the uncharged case. Collapses are avoided, instead, if the charge and mass of the perturbations come to close the line of solitons. Finally we examine the soliton solutions. The linear spectrum of normal modes is not resonant and instability turns on at extrema of the mass curve. Linear stability extends to nonlinear stability up to some threshold for the amplitude of the perturbation. Beyond that, the soliton is destroyed and collapses to a hairy black hole. The relative width of this stability band scales down with the charge Q, and does not survive the blow up limit to a planar geometry.

  16. Effects of body mass index on plantar pressure and balance

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Se-Won; Park, Woong-Sik; Lee, Jeong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To suggest physiotherapy programs and to determine foot stability based on the results of plantar pressure and spontaneity balance in the normal group and in the obesity group according to the body mass index (BMI). [Subjects and Methods] The plantar pressure and balance of 20 females college students in their 20s were measured according to their BMI. BMI was measured by using BMS 330. The peak plantar pressure was measured in a static position in the forefoot and hind-foot areas. To study balance, the spontaneity balance of each foot was measured on both stable and unstable surfaces. [Results] In terms of plantar pressure, no significant change was observed in the forefoot and hind-foot peak pressure. In terms of spontaneity balance, no significant difference in foot position interaction was observed on both stable and unstable surfaces, while a significant difference was observed in the foot position between the groups. [Conclusion] The index of hind-foot spontaneity balance was low, particularly in the obesity group. This meant significant hind-foot swaying. The forefoot body weight support percentage increased to reinforce the reduced spontaneity balance index. PMID:27942127

  17. Effects of body mass index on plantar pressure and balance.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Se-Won; Park, Woong-Sik; Lee, Jeong-Woo

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] To suggest physiotherapy programs and to determine foot stability based on the results of plantar pressure and spontaneity balance in the normal group and in the obesity group according to the body mass index (BMI). [Subjects and Methods] The plantar pressure and balance of 20 females college students in their 20s were measured according to their BMI. BMI was measured by using BMS 330. The peak plantar pressure was measured in a static position in the forefoot and hind-foot areas. To study balance, the spontaneity balance of each foot was measured on both stable and unstable surfaces. [Results] In terms of plantar pressure, no significant change was observed in the forefoot and hind-foot peak pressure. In terms of spontaneity balance, no significant difference in foot position interaction was observed on both stable and unstable surfaces, while a significant difference was observed in the foot position between the groups. [Conclusion] The index of hind-foot spontaneity balance was low, particularly in the obesity group. This meant significant hind-foot swaying. The forefoot body weight support percentage increased to reinforce the reduced spontaneity balance index.

  18. Neuroprotective effect of novel cognitive enhancer noopept on AD-related cellular model involves the attenuation of apoptosis and tau hyperphosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Noopept (N-phenyl-acetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester) was constructed as a dipeptide analog of the standard cognition enhancer, piracetam. Our previous experiments have demonstrated the cognition restoring effect of noopept in several animal models of Alzheimer disease (AD). Noopept was also shown to prevent ionic disbalance, excitotoxicity, free radicals and pro-inflammatory cytokines accumulation, and neurotrophine deficit typical for different kinds of brain damages, including AD. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective action of noopept on cellular model of AD, Aβ25–35-induced toxicity in PC12 cells and revealed the underlying mechanisms. Results The neuroprotective effect of noopept (added to the medium at 10 μM concentration, 72 hours before Аβ25–35) was studied on Аβ25–35-induced injury (5 μM for 24 h) in PC12 cells. The ability of drug to protect the impairments of cell viability, calcium homeostasis, ROS level, mitochondrial function, tau phosphorylation and neurite outgrowth caused by Аβ25–35 were evaluated. Following the exposure of PC12 cells to Аβ25–35 an increase of the level of ROS, intracellular calcium, and tau phosphorylation at Ser396 were observed; these changes were accompanied by a decrease in cell viability and an increase of apoptosis. Noopept treatment before the amyloid-beta exposure improved PC12 cells viability, reduced the number of early and late apoptotic cells, the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species and calcium and enhanced the mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, pretreatment of PC12 cell with noopept significantly attenuated tau hyperphosphorylation at Ser396 and ameliorated the alterations of neurite outgrowth evoked by Аβ25–35. Conclusions Taken together, these data provide evidence that novel cognitive enhancer noopept protects PC12 cell against deleterious actions of Aβ through inhibiting the oxidative damage and calcium overload as well as suppressing

  19. The effect of pair-instability mass loss on black-hole mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belczynski, K.; Heger, A.; Gladysz, W.; Ruiter, A. J.; Woosley, S.; Wiktorowicz, G.; Chen, H.-Y.; Bulik, T.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Holz, D. E.; Fryer, C. L.; Berti, E.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Mergers of two stellar-origin black holes are a prime source of gravitational waves and are under intensive investigation. One crucial ingredient in their modeling has been neglected: pair-instability pulsation supernovae with associated severe mass loss may suppress the formation of massive black holes, decreasing black-hole-merger rates for the highest black-hole masses. Aims: We demonstrate the effects of pair-instability pulsation supernovae on merger rate and mass using populations of double black-hole binaries formed through the isolated binary classical evolution channel. Methods: The mass loss from pair-instability pulsation supernova is estimated based on existing hydrodynamical calculations. This mass loss is incorporated into the StarTrack population synthesis code. StarTrack is used to generate double black-hole populations with and without pair-instability pulsation supernova mass loss. Results: The mass loss associated with pair-instability pulsation supernovae limits the Population I/II stellar-origin black-hole mass to 50 M⊙, in tension with earlier predictions that the maximum black-hole mass could be as high as 100 M⊙. In our model, neutron stars form with mass 1-2 M⊙. We then encounter the first mass gap at 2-5 M⊙ with the compact object absence due to rapid supernova explosions, followed by the formation of black holes with mass 5-50 M⊙, with a second mass gap at 50-135 M⊙ created by pair-instability pulsation supernovae and by pair-instability supernovae. Finally, black holes with masses above 135 M⊙ may potentially form to arbitrarily high mass limited only by the extent of the initial mass function and the strength of stellar winds. Suppression of double black-hole-merger rates by pair-instability pulsation supernovae is negligible for our evolutionary channel. Our standard evolutionary model, with the inclusion of pair-instability pulsation supernovae and pair-instability supernovae, is fully consistent with the Laser

  20. Evaluating the effectiveness of adding magnesium chloride to conventional protocol of citrate alkali therapy on kidney stone size

    PubMed Central

    Niroomand, Hassan; Ziaee, Amin; Ziaee, Keivan; Gheissari, Alaleh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Potassium citrate (K-Cit) is one of the therapeutic solutions broadly used in patients with urolithiasis. However, recent studies have shown that it is not so effective. Therefore, the goal of our study was to evaluate the effect of a combination of K-Cit - MgCl2 oral supplements, on urinary stone size. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 70 asymptomatic urolithiasis cases. The supplements included K-Cit and magnesium chloride (MgCl2), purchased from (Merck Company, Germany). The patients were randomly divided into two groups. The urinary stone size was measured in the control group after prescribing K-Cit alone and the treated group with combination of K-Cit and MgCl2 for 4 weeks by ultrasonography and also urinary parameter was measured in each groups. Results: The mean age of patients was 16.26 ± 5.70 years. Hyperoxaluria and hypercalciuria were seen in 70% and 52% of patients, respectively. Initially, the mean urinary stone size was measured in each groups and there is not any significant different. However, we find a significant decrease in urinary stone size in group which is treated with combination of K-Cit and MgCl2 for 4 weeks in comparison with control group treated with K-Cit alone in the same duration of therapeutic course (5.1 ± 0.8 vs. 2.5 ± 1.2, P < 0.05). All ultrasonography were performed by one radiologist and device. Conclusion: Our results suggested that a combination of K-Cit and MgCl2 chloride is more effective on decreasing urinary stone size than K-Cit alone. PMID:27995107

  1. Simply adding the word "fruit" makes sugar healthier: The misleading effect of symbolic information on the perceived healthiness of food.

    PubMed

    Sütterlin, Bernadette; Siegrist, Michael

    2015-12-01

    People may use simple heuristics to assess the healthiness of food products. For instance, the information that a product contains "fruit sugar" (in German, "fruit sugar" is the colloquial term for fructose) could be interpreted as a cue that the product is relatively healthy, since the term "fruit" symbolizes healthiness. This can have a misleading effect on the perceived healthiness of a product. In Experiment 1, participants (N = 164) were asked to evaluate the healthiness of one of two breakfast cereals based on the information provided in a nutrition table. For one group, the label "fruit sugar" was used; for the other, the label "sugar" was used. Results suggest that the phrase "fruit sugar" listed as an ingredient of the breakfast cereal resulted in a more positive perception of the healthiness of the cereal compared with the ingredient labeled "sugar." In Experiment 2 (N = 202), the results of Experiment 1 were replicated with a within-subjects design in which participants evaluated the two products simultaneously. Experiment 3 (N = 251) ruled out the alternative explanation that the effect could be due to differing inferences about the product's ingredients based on the label used, that is, that the product labeled with "fruit sugar" contains fruit. Finally, in Experiment 4 (N = 162), the results show that the healthiness associated with the labeling of the ingredient "sugar" ("fruit sugar" vs. "sugar") mediates the observed effect. Results of the four experiments indicate that symbolic information is an important factor that can influence people's health perceptions of food. These findings have implications for marketing and public health.

  2. Light-Front Quantization and AdS/QCD: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-19

    We give an overview of the light-front holographic approach to strongly coupled QCD, whereby a confining gauge theory, quantized on the light front, is mapped to a higher-dimensional anti de Sitter (AdS) space. The framework is guided by the AdS/CFT correspondence incorporating a gravitational background asymptotic to AdS space which encodes the salient properties of QCD, such as the ultraviolet conformal limit at the AdS boundary at z {yields} 0, as well as modifications of the geometry in the large z infrared region to describe confinement and linear Regge behavior. There are two equivalent procedures for deriving the AdS/QCD equations of motion: one can start from the Hamiltonian equation of motion in physical space time by studying the off-shell dynamics of the bound state wavefunctions as a function of the invariant mass of the constituents. To a first semiclassical approximation, where quantum loops and quark masses are not included, this leads to a light-front Hamiltonian equation which describes the bound state dynamics of light hadrons in terms of an invariant impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the partons within the hadron at equal light-front time. Alternatively, one can start from the gravity side by studying the propagation of hadronic modes in a fixed effective gravitational background. Both approaches are equivalent in the semiclassical approximation. This allows us to identify the holographic variable z in AdS space with the impact variable {zeta}. Light-front holography thus allows a precise mapping of transition amplitudes from AdS to physical space-time. The internal structure of hadrons is explicitly introduced and the angular momentum of the constituents plays a key role.

  3. Metastability in bubbling AdS space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massai, Stefano; Pasini, Giulio; Puhm, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    We study the dynamics of probe M5 branes with dissolved M2 charge in bubbling geometries with SO(4) × SO(4) symmetry. These solutions were constructed by Bena-Warner and Lin-Lunin-Maldacena and correspond to the vacua of the maximally supersymmetric mass-deformed M2 brane theory. We find that supersymmetric probe M2 branes polarize into M5 brane shells whose backreaction creates an additional bubble in the geometry. We explicitly check that the supersymmetric polarization potential agrees with the one found within the Polchinski-Strassler approximation. The main result of this paper is that probe M2 branes whose orientation is opposite to the background flux can polarize into metastable M5 brane shells. These decay to a supersymmetric configuration via brane-flux annihilation. Our findings suggest the existence of metastable states in the mass-deformed M2 brane theory.

  4. Exploring the Value Added of a Guided, Silent Reading Intervention: Effects on Struggling Third-Grade Readers’ Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Reutzel, D. Ray; Spichtig, Alexandra N.; Petscher, Yaacov

    2015-01-01

    The authors’ purpose was to explore the effects of a supplementary, guided, silent reading intervention with 80 struggling third-grade readers who were retained at grade level as a result of poor performance on the reading portion of a criterion referenced state assessment. The students were distributed in 11 elementary schools in a large, urban school district in the state of Florida. A matched, quasi-experimental design was constructed using propensity scores for this study. Students in the guided, silent reading intervention, Reading Plus, evidenced higher, statistically significant mean scores on the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test criterion assessment measure of reading at posttest. The effect size, favoring the guided, silent reading intervention group was large, 1 full standard deviation, when comparing the 2 comparison groups’ mean posttest scores. As such, the results indicate a large advantage for providing struggling third-grade readers guided silent reading fluency practice in a computer-based practice environment. No significant difference was found between the treatment and control group on the Stanford Achievement Test–10 (SAT-10) posttest scores, although posttest scores for the treatment group trended higher than the control. After conducting a power analysis, it was determined that the sample size (n = 80) was too small to provide sufficient statistical power to detect a difference in third-grade students’ SAT-10 scores. PMID:26346539

  5. Therapeutic Effects of Microbubbles Added to Combined High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Chemotherapy in a Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mi Hye; Kim, Hae Ri; Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun-Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. Materials and Methods A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. Results The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. Conclusion High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model. PMID:27587968

  6. The effect of sex on risk of mortality during the Black Death in London, A.D. 1349-1350.

    PubMed

    DeWitte, Sharon N

    2009-06-01

    The Black Death of 1347-1351 was one of the most devastating epidemics in human history, and though it is frequently assumed that the epidemic killed indiscriminately, recent research suggests that the disease was selective, at least with respect to frailty. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the Black Death was similarly selective with respect to biological sex-that is, did either sex face an elevated risk during the epidemic or were men and women at equal risk of dying? A sample of 298 victims of the Black Death, from the East Smithfield cemetery in London, is compared to a pre-Black Death normal mortality sample of 194 individuals from two Danish urban cemeteries, St Mikkel Church (Viborg) and St Albani Church (Odense). To assess the effect of sex on risk of death, sex is modeled as a covariate affecting the Gompertz-Makeham model of adult mortality. The results suggest that sex did not strongly affect risk of death in either the normal mortality or Black Death samples. These results are important for improving our understanding of Black Death mortality patterns. This is essential for understanding the effects the Black Death had on European populations, and the methods used here can potentially be informatively applied to investigations of other episodes of epidemic diseases in past populations.

  7. Effect of added phosphate and type of cooking method on physico-chemical and sensory features of cooked lamb loins.

    PubMed

    Roldán, Mar; Antequera, Teresa; Pérez-Palacios, Trinidad; Ruiz, Jorge

    2014-05-01

    This study evaluated the effect of brining with phosphates on the physico-chemical and sensory features of sous-vide and roasted cooked lamb. Lamb loins (n=48) were injected with either 10% w/w of distilled water or a solution containing 0.2% or 0.4% (w/v) of a mixture of phosphate salts. After injection, samples were either sous-vide cooked (12h-60°C) or oven roasted (180°C until 73°C of core temp.). Expressible moisture, cooking loss, instrumental color, pH, water holding capacity, instrumental texture and sensory properties were evaluated. Brining with phosphates led to lower cooking loss in both sous-vide and oven roasted samples, but only the former showed significantly higher moisture content. Phosphates increased instrumental hardness and shear force values in sous-vide samples, while this effect was not as evident in roasted ones. Toughness was reduced and juiciness was improved as a consequence of phosphate addition. Overall, injection of a phosphate solution appears as a potential procedure for improving sensory textural features of cooked lamb whole cuts.

  8. Enhancing the mass sensitivity of graphene nanoresonators via nonlinear oscillations: the effective strain mechanism.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jin-Wu; Park, Harold S; Rabczuk, Timon

    2012-11-30

    We perform classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the enhancement of the mass sensitivity and resonant frequency of graphene nanomechanical resonators that is achieved by driving them into the nonlinear oscillation regime. The mass sensitivity as measured by the resonant frequency shift is found to triple if the actuation energy is about 2.5 times the initial kinetic energy of the nanoresonator. The mechanism underlying the enhanced mass sensitivity is found to be the effective strain that is induced in the nanoresonator due to the nonlinear oscillations, where we obtain an analytic relationship between the induced effective strain and the actuation energy that is applied to the graphene nanoresonator. An important implication of this work is that there is no need for experimentalists to apply tensile strain to the resonators before actuation in order to enhance the mass sensitivity. Instead, enhanced mass sensitivity can be obtained by the far simpler technique of actuating nonlinear oscillations of an existing graphene nanoresonator.

  9. Hole effective masses and subband splitting in type-II superlattice infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, David Z.; Soibel, Alexander; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2016-05-01

    We explore band structure effects to help determine the suitability of n-type type-II superlattice (T2SL) absorbers for infrared detectors. It is often assumed that the exceedingly large growth-direction band-edge curvature hole effective mass in n-type long wavelength infrared (LWIR) T2SL would lead to low hole mobility and therefore low detector collection quantum efficiency. We computed the thermally averaged conductivity effective mass and show that the LWIR T2SL hole conductivity effective mass along the growth direction can be orders of magnitude smaller than the corresponding band-edge effective mass. LWIR InAs/GaSb T2SL can have significantly smaller growth-direction hole conductivity effective mass than its InAs/InAsSb counterpart. For the InAs/InAsSb T2SL, higher Sb fraction is more favorable for hole transport. Achieving long hole diffusion length becomes progressively more difficult for the InAs/InAsSb T2SL as the cutoff wavelength increases, since its growth-direction hole conductivity effective mass increases significantly with decreasing band gap. However, this is mitigated by the fact that the splitting between the top valence subbands also increases with the cutoff wavelength, leading to reduced inter-subband scattering and increased relaxation time.

  10. AD(H)D.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christopher; Charles, Janice; Britt, Helena

    2008-06-01

    The BEACH program (Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health) shows that management of attention deficit (hyperactivity) disorder (AD(H)D) was rare in general practice, occurring only six times per 1,000 encounters with children aged 5-17 years, between April 2000 and December 2007. This suggests that general practitioners manage AD(H)D about 46,000 times for this age group nationally each year.

  11. ADS pilot program Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauson, J.; Heuser, J.

    1981-01-01

    The Applications Data Service (ADS) is a system based on an electronic data communications network which will permit scientists to share the data stored in data bases at universities and at government and private installations. It is designed to allow users to readily locate and access high quality, timely data from multiple sources. The ADS Pilot program objectives and the current plans for accomplishing those objectives are described.

  12. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: a rare cause of cerebellar edema and atypical mass effect. A case report.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Chris; Assina, Rachid; Barry, Maureen; Baisre, Ada; Gandhi, Chirag

    2014-06-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is an opportunistic demyelinating disease of the CNS caused by the JC papovavirus (JCV). Demyelination due to oligodendrocyte death leads to multifocal, asymmetric lesions. MRI is a valuable tool for detecting and differentiating PML from other neuropathies. Radiographically, PML classically presents as bilateral, subcortical white matter lesions with a lack of brain atrophy. As the disease progresses, lesions become larger and coalesce to become confluent. Minor edema and mass effect are infrequently described and the presence of significant mass effect suggests an alternative diagnosis. In our case, a patient demonstrated atypical marked infratentorial mass effect. Bilaterally, cerebellar lesions with associated mass effect were observed, as well as effacement of cerebellar folia and partial effacement of the fourth ventricle. The diagnosis of PML was confirmed with a biopsy of the right cerebellar lesion showing classic PML histology, with JCV DNA detection by polymerase chain reaction in the biopsy material.

  13. Tuning the tetrahedrality of the hydrogen-bonded network of water: Comparison of the effects of pressure and added salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Saurav; Chakravarty, Charusita

    2016-06-01

    Experiments and simulations demonstrate some intriguing equivalences in the effect of pressure and electrolytes on the hydrogen-bonded network of water. Here, we examine the extent and nature of equivalence effects between pressure and salt concentration using relationships between structure, entropy, and transport properties based on two key ideas: first, the approximation of the excess entropy of the fluid by the contribution due to the atom-atom pair correlation functions and second, Rosenfeld-type excess entropy scaling relations for transport properties. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of LiCl-H2O and bulk SPC/E water spanning the concentration range 0.025-0.300 molefraction of LiCl at 1 atm and pressure range from 0 to 7 GPa, respectively. The temperature range considered was from 225 to 350 K for both the systems. To establish that the time-temperature-transformation behaviour of electrolyte solutions and water is equivalent, we use the additional observation based on our simulations that the pair entropy behaves as a near-linear function of pressure in bulk water and of composition in LiCl-H2O. This allows for the alignment of pair entropy isotherms and allows for a simple mapping of pressure onto composition. Rosenfeld-scaling implies that pair entropy is semiquantitatively related to the transport properties. At a given temperature, equivalent state points in bulk H2O and LiCl-H2O (at 1 atm) are defined as those for which the pair entropy, diffusivity, and viscosity are nearly identical. The microscopic basis for this equivalence lies in the ability of both pressure and ions to convert the liquid phase into a pair-dominated fluid, as demonstrated by the O-O-O angular distribution within the first coordination shell of a water molecule. There are, however, sharp differences in local order and mechanisms for the breakdown of tetrahedral order by pressure and electrolytes. Increasing pressure increases orientational disorder within the first

  14. Acute effects of protein composition and fibre enrichment of yogurt consumed as snacks on appetite sensations and subsequent ad libitum energy intake in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Caroline Y; Tremblay, Angelo; Rioux, Laurie-Eve; Rhéaume, Caroline; Cianflone, Katherine; Poursharifi, Pegah; Turgeon, Sylvie L

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the impact of protein composition and/or fibre enrichment of yogurt on appetite sensations and subsequent energy intake. In this double-blind crossover study, 20 healthy men (aged 32.4 ± 9.1 years) were submitted to 5 randomized testing sessions, during which they had to consume 5 isocaloric and isonproteinemic yogurt snacks (120-g servings, ∼230 kJ, ∼4.5 g protein) differing by their casein-to-whey protein ratio (C:W) or dietary fibre content: (i) control C:W = 2.8:1; (ii) high whey (HW) C:W = 1.5:1, and fibre-enriched formulations using control; (iii) 2.4 g of inulin; (iv) 1.9 g of inulin and 0.5 g of β-glucan (+IN-βG); and (v) 0.5 g of β-glucan. Appetite sensations were assessed using 150-mm visual analog scales. Plasma variables (glucose, insulin, ghrelin) were measured at 30-min intervals post-yogurt consumption for 2 h. Finally, energy intakes during ad libitum lunches offered 2 h after yogurt snacks were recorded. None of the yogurts impacted appetite sensations. Ad libitum energy intake was significantly different only between HW and control yogurts (-812 kJ; p = 0.03). Regarding post-yogurt plasma variables, a significant difference was found only between ghrelin area under the curve of the +IN-βG and the HW yogurts (-15 510 pmol/L per 120 min, p = 0.04). In conclusion, although appetite sensations were not influenced by variations in yogurts' protein compositions, a reduced energy intake was observed during the ad libitum lunch after the HW yogurt that may be attributable to its lower C:W. Surprisingly, the fibre enrichments studied did not exert effect on appetite sensations and energy intake.

  15. Effect of adding intrathecal morphine to a multimodal analgesic regimen for postoperative pain management after laparoscopic bariatric surgery: a prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    El Sherif, Fatma Adel; Othman, Ahmed Hassan; Abd El-Rahman, Ahmad Mohammad; Taha, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pain control after bariatric surgery is a major challenge. Our objective was to study the efficacy and safety of intrathecal (IT) morphine 0.3 mg added to bupivacaine 0.5% for postoperative pain after laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Methods: After local ethics committee approval, 100 morbidly obese patients scheduled for laparoscopic bariatric surgery were enrolled in this study. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups: Group I received IT 0.3 mg morphine (0.3 mL) added to 1.2 mL of bupivacaine 0.5%; Group II received IT 0.3 mL saline added to 1.2 mL of bupivacaine 0.5%, immediately before induction of general anaesthesia. For both groups, 60 mg ketorolac and 1000 mg paracetamol were infused 30 minutes before the end of surgery. After wound closure, 20 mL bupivacaine 0.25% was infiltrated at wound edges. Results: Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score was significantly lower in group I immediately, 30 minutes and 1 hour postoperatively. Time to first ambulation, return of intestinal sounds and hospital stay were shorter in group I than group II (p < 0.05); total morphine consumption was significantly lower in group I than group II (p < 0.05). Sedation score was significantly higher in group I immediately postoperatively, while at 30 minutes, 1, 2 and 6 hours postoperatively sedation scores were significantly higher in group II. Itching was significantly higher in group I. Conclusion: The addition of IT morphine to a multimodal analgesic regimen after laparoscopic bariatric surgery was an effective and safe method that markedly reduced postoperative pain, systemic opioid consumption and length of hospital stay. PMID:27867510

  16. [Effects of aging time on the form transformation and eco-toxicity threshold (ECx) of added Zn in typical China soils].

    PubMed

    Lin, Lei; Chen, Shi-Bao; Liu, Ji-Fang; Ma, Yi-Bing

    2013-07-01

    Six typical China soils with different properties were selected and added with seven concentrations of ZnCl2 to study the effects of different aging time (14, 90, 180, 360, and 540 days) on the form transformation and eco-toxicity threshold (ECx) of added Zn in the soils, with the main affecting factors analyzed. The results indicated that with the increase of aging time, the fraction of 0.01 mol x L(-1) CaCl2-extracted Zn in the soils decreased sharply initially, then slowed down, and reached the dynamic balance after 540 d incubation. The eco-toxicity thresholds (ECx, x = 10, 50) of Zn to bok choy increased significantly with aging time (P < 0.05), which implied the marked decrease of the phyto-toxicity of Zn. The measured aging factors AF10 and AF50 of Zn ra