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Sample records for addendum modified gear

  1. Lubricant Jet Flow Phenomena in Spur and Helical Gears with Modified Addendums; for Radially Directed Individual Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, Lee S.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper develops the mathematical relations for the Virtual Kinetic Model as an improvement over the vectorial model developed earlier. The model solution described provides the most energy efficient means of cooling gears, i.e., it requires the least pressure or pumping power to distribute the coolant onto the tooth surface. Further, this nozzle orientation allows impingement to the root of the tooth if needed and provides the most cooling control when compared to into-mesh and out-of-mesh cooling.

  2. Topology of modified helical gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Zhang, J.; Handschuh, R. F.; Coy, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    The topology of several types of modified surfaces of helical gears is proposed. The modified surfaces allow absorption of a linear or almost linear function of transmission errors. These errors are caused by gear misalignment and an improvement of the contact of gear tooth surfaces. Principles and corresponding programs for computer aided simulation of meshing and contact of gears have been developed. The results of this investigation are illustrated with numerical examples.

  3. Influence of the addendum modification on spur gear back-side mesh stiffness and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wennian; Mechefske, Chris K.; Timusk, Markus

    2017-02-01

    This paper analytically investigates the relationship between the drive-side and back-side mesh stiffness for spur gear pairs with various addendum modifications. A time-varying asymmetric mesh stiffness model was built and employed in two typical gear dynamic models to simulate the effect of the addendum modification on gear dynamics. The results reveal that correlation of the back-side mesh stiffness with drive-side mesh stiffness is mainly affected by the tooth thickness at the pitch circle. Since tooth addendum modification directly determines the tooth thickness at the pitch circle, it significantly influences gear back-side tooth impact as it can alter the phase shift of the back-side mesh stiffness with regard to the drive-side mesh stiffness. Therefore, a precise time-varying asymmetric mesh stiffness model should be used to analyze gear dynamics when the gears are working under light load or idling conditions where back-side tooth impact is most likely to happen.

  4. Contact Stress of Modified Curvilinear Gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Cheng; Gu, Ming-Lune

    2010-10-01

    The contact characteristics of a modified curvilinear gear set were investigated based on finite element analysis in this study. Firstly, the mathematical model of the modified curvilinear gears was developed based on the theory of gearing. Then a solid model of a modified curvilinear gear set was built by utilizing computer-aided design software. Finite element analysis enabled us to investigate the contact stress of a contact teeth pair. The variation and distribution of the contact stresses and bending stresses are also studied under different gear design parameters. Finally, illustrative examples were presented to demonstrate the contact characteristics of the modified curvilinear gears.

  5. Selection criteria of the addendum modification coefficients of spur gear pairs with smaller number of pinion teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasiu, V.; Oprişan, C.; Leohchi, D.

    2016-08-01

    A design procedure for the optimum distribution of the addendum modification coefficients of spur gear pairs with smaller number of pinion teeth is presented for the case of a fixed centred distance. The geometrical, kinematics and load capacity criteria are considered in the design analysis. The geometric and kinematics criteria are used to prevent the negative phenomena of the generating and engagement processes. The relation between the contact pressure of meshing teeth and specific sliding are analysed in relation with addendum modification coefficients. A dynamic model is developed to simulate the load sharing characteristics through a mesh cycle. The specific phenomenon of contact tooth pairs alternation during mesh cycle is integrated in this dynamic load modelling. A comparative study is included, which shows the effects of the distribution factor of the addendum modification coefficients on the contact surface characteristics of the gear pairs.

  6. A study of the optimum configuration of injection molded plastic gear by modification of gear tooth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Suep; Kwon, Young-Doo; Doc, Jin-Uk; Leed, Jun-Hyuk

    2009-07-01

    In this study, the gear system is optimized by modifying the tooth configuration of the plastic gears. Plastic gear is widely used as a machine element in industries of electric and electronic parts, automotive parts etc. Unlike the steel gear, the plastic gear has low load- transmission, durability and reliability. On the other hand, it is light-weight, low-noise, operable without a lubricant, shock absorptive, and anti-corrosive. The gear characteristics are calculated and analyzed by Hexagon and FEM (Finite Element Method) tools, and the characteristics of the standard gear and the addendum modified gear of the steel gear and the plastic gear are compared. When torque is applied to these gear systems, the system using the addendum modified gear can realize soft contact between gears. So, the noise of the addendum modified gear system was less than that of the common normal gear system. However, this is not applicable to any material, such as steel which is governed by DIN (Deuteshe Industrie Norm) recommendation. This study adopted the narrow tip tooth plastic gear, and proposed the optimum addendum modified gear with respect to stress, noise and contact ratio. To calculate and analyze the simulation of gear matching, we used commercial tools like CATIA, Auto-CAD, MARC for simulation and Hexagon for calculation.

  7. Helical Gears Modified To Decrease Transmission Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, R. F.; Coy, J. J.; Litvin, F. L.; Zhang, J.

    1993-01-01

    Tooth surfaces of helical gears modified, according to proposed design concept, to make gears more tolerant of misalignments and to improve distribution of contact stresses. Results in smaller transmission errors, with concomitant decreases in vibrations and noise and, possibly, increases in service lives.

  8. A method for static and dynamic load analysis of standard and modified spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasuba, R.

    1983-01-01

    The mesh stiffness and dynamic load characteristics for several cases of the Normal Contract Ratio and High Contact ratio gearing. The considered contact ratios were grouped in the general range of 1.7,2.0, and 2.3. The HCR gearing is defined by contact ratios equal to or greater than 2.0. The HCR gearing is represented by a group of small pressure angle, fine pitch, and long addendum gearing.

  9. Efficiency of nonstandard and high contact ratio involute spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, N. E.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    A power loss prediction was extended to include involute spur gears of nonstandard proportions. The method is used to analyze the effects of modified addendum, tooth thickness, and gear center distance in addition to the parameters previously considered which included gear diameter, pitch, pressure angle, face width, oil viscosity, speed, and torque. Particular emphasis was placed on high contact ratio gearing (contact ratios greater than two). Despite their higher sliding velocities, high contact ratio gears are designed to levels of efficiency comparable to those of conventional gears while retaining their advantages through proper selection of gear geometry.

  10. Efficiency of nonstandard and high contact ratio involute spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, N. E.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1986-01-01

    A power loss prediction was extended to include involute spur gears of nonstandard proportions. The method is used to analyze the effects of modified addendum, tooth thickness, and gear center distance in addition to the parameters previously considered which included gear diameter, pitch, pressure angle, face width, oil viscosity, speed, and torque. Particular emphasis was placed on high contact ratio gearing (contact ratios greater than two). Despite their higher sliding velocities, high contact ratio gears are designed to levels of efficiency comparable to those of conventional gears while retaining their advantages through proper selection of gear geometry.

  11. 50 CFR Figure 26 to Part 679 - Modified Nonpelagic Trawl Gear

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Modified Nonpelagic Trawl Gear 26 Figure... ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 26 Figure 26 to Part 679—Modified Nonpelagic Trawl Gear This figure shows the location of elevating devices in the elevated section of modified nonpelagic trawl gear, as specified...

  12. 50 CFR Table 51 to Part 679 - Modified Gear Trawl Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Modified Gear Trawl Zone 51 Table 51 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC..., Table 51 Table 51 to Part 679—Modified Gear Trawl Zone Longitude Latitude 171 45.00 W 61 00.00 N 169...

  13. 50 CFR Figure 26 to Part 679 - Modified Nonpelagic Trawl Gear

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Modified Nonpelagic Trawl Gear 26 Figure 26 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 26 Figure 26 to Part 679—Modified Nonpelagic Trawl Gear ER06OC10.050...

  14. 50 CFR Figure 26 to Part 679 - Modified Nonpelagic Trawl Gear

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Modified Nonpelagic Trawl Gear 26 Figure 26 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 26 Figure 26 to Part 679—Modified Nonpelagic Trawl Gear ER06OC10.050...

  15. 50 CFR Table 51 to Part 679 - Modified Gear Trawl Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Modified Gear Trawl Zone 51 Table 51 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC..., Table 51 Table 51 to Part 679—Modified Gear Trawl Zone Longitude Latitude 171 45.00 W 61 00.00 N 169...

  16. 50 CFR Figure 26 to Part 679 - Modified Nonpelagic Trawl Gear

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Modified Nonpelagic Trawl Gear 26 Figure 26 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... ALASKA Pt. 679, Fig. 26 Figure 26 to Part 679—Modified Nonpelagic Trawl Gear ER06OC10.050...

  17. 50 CFR Table 51 to Part 679 - Modified Gear Trawl Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Modified Gear Trawl Zone 51 Table 51 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC..., Table 51 Table 51 to Part 679—Modified Gear Trawl Zone Longitude Latitude 171 45.00 W 61 00.00 N 169...

  18. 50 CFR Table 51 to Part 679 - Modified Gear Trawl Zone

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Modified Gear Trawl Zone 51 Table 51 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC..., Table 51 Table 51 to Part 679—Modified Gear Trawl Zone Longitude Latitude 171 45.00 W 61 00.00 N 169...

  19. Gearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, J. J.; Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Gearing technology in its modern form has a history of only 100 years. However, the earliest form of gearing can probably be traced back to fourth century B.C. Greece. Current gear practice and recent advances in the technology are drawn together. The history of gearing is reviewed briefly in the Introduction. Subsequent sections describe types of gearing and their geometry, processing, and manufacture. Both conventional and more recent methods of determining gear stress and deflections are considered. The subjects of life prediction and lubrication are additions to the literature. New and more complete methods of power loss predictions as well as an optimum design of spur gear meshes are described. Conventional and new types of power transmission systems are presented.

  20. Modified Involute Helical Gears: Computerized Design, Simulation of Meshing, and Stress Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert (Technical Monitor); Litvin, Faydor L.; Gonzalez-Perez, Ignacio; Carnevali, Luca; Kawasaki, Kazumasa; Fuentes-Aznar, Alfonso

    2003-01-01

    The computerized design, methods for generation, simulation of meshing, and enhanced stress analysis of modified involute helical gears is presented. The approaches proposed for modification of conventional involute helical gears are based on conjugation of double-crowned pinion with a conventional helical involute gear. Double-crowning of the pinion means deviation of cross-profile from an involute one and deviation in longitudinal direction from a helicoid surface. Using the method developed, the pinion-gear tooth surfaces are in point-contact, the bearing contact is localized and oriented longitudinally, and edge contact is avoided. Also, the influence of errors of aligment on the shift of bearing contact, vibration, and noise are reduced substantially. The theory developed is illustrated with numerical examples that confirm the advantages of the gear drives of the modified geometry in comparison with conventional helical involute gears.

  1. Modified Involute Helical Gears: Computerized Design, Simulation of Meshing and Stress Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The computerized design, methods for generation, simulation of meshing, and enhanced stress analysis of modified involute helical gears is presented. The approaches proposed for modification of conventional involute helical gears are based on conjugation of double-crowned pinion with a conventional helical involute gear. Double-crowning of the pinion means deviation of cross-profile from an involute one and deviation in longitudinal direction from a helicoid surface. Using the method developed, the pinion-gear tooth surfaces are in point-contact, the bearing contact is localized and oriented longitudinally, and edge contact is avoided. Also, the influence of errors of alignment on the shift of bearing contact, vibration, and noise are reduced substantially. The theory developed is illustrated with numerical examples that confirm the advantages of the gear drives of the modified geometry in comparison with conventional helical involute gears.

  2. Computerized Design and Generation of Low-noise Helical Gears with Modified Surface Topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Chen, N. X.; Lu, J.; Handschuh, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    An approach for design and generation of low-noise helical gears with localized bearing contact is proposed. The approach is applied to double circular arc helical gears and modified involute helical gears. The reduction of noise and vibration is achieved by application of a predesigned parabolic function of transmission errors that is able to absorb a discontinuous linear function of transmission errors caused by misalignment. The localization of the bearing contact is achieved by the mismatch of pinion-gear tooth surfaces. Computerized simulation of meshing and contact of the designed gears demonstrated that the proposed approach will produce a pair of gears that has a parabolic transmission error function even when misalignment is present. Numerical examples for illustration of the developed approach are given.

  3. Gearing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    earliest written descriptions of gears are said to (ref. 3), appear in the sketchbooks of Leonardo da Vinci , . . - have been made by Aristotle in the fourth... Vinci , Leonardo (L. Reti, transl.): The Madrid Codices. American Gear Manufacturers Association, Aug. 1966. McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc., 1974. 33... Leonardo da Vinci’s manuscripts, lost in the "’ ppassage attributed by some to Aristotle, in "Mechanical National Library in Madrid since 1830., were

  4. Generation and Computerized Simulation of Meshing and Contact of Modified Involute Helical Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Chen, Ningxin; Lu, Jian

    1995-01-01

    The design and generation of modified involute helical gears that have a localized and stable bearing contact, and reduced noise and vibration characteristics are described. The localization of the bearing contact is achieved by the mismatch of the two generating surfaces that are used for generation of the pinion and the gear. The reduction of noise and vibration will be achieved by application of a parabolic function of transmission errors that is able to absorb the almost linear function of transmission errors caused by gear misalignment. The meshing and contact of misaligned gear drives can be analyzed by application of computer programs that have been developed. The computations confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed modification of the gear geometry. A numerical example that illustrates the developed theory is provided.

  5. Endurance and failure characteristics of modified Vasco X-2, CBS 600 and AISI 9310 spur gears. [aircraft construction materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1980-01-01

    Gear endurance tests and rolling-element fatigue tests were conducted to compare the performance of spur gears made from AISI 9310, CBS 600 and modified Vasco X-2 and to compare the pitting fatigue lives of these three materials. Gears manufactured from CBS 600 exhibited lives longer than those manufactured from AISI 9310. However, rolling-element fatigue tests resulted in statistically equivalent lives. Modified Vasco X-2 exhibited statistically equivalent lives to AISI 9310. CBS 600 and modified Vasco X-2 gears exhibited the potential of tooth fracture occurring at a tooth surface fatigue pit. Case carburization of all gear surfaces for the modified Vasco X-2 gears results in fracture at the tips of the gears.

  6. Comparisons of modified Vasco X-2 and AISI 9310 gear steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1980-01-01

    Endurance tests were conducted with four groups of spur gears manufactured from three heats of consumable electrode vacuum melted (CVM) modified Vasco X-2. Endurance tests were also conducted with gears manufactured from CVM AISI 9310. Bench type rolling element fatigue tests were conducted with both materials. Hardness measurements were made to 811 K. There was no statistically significant life difference between the two materials. Life differences between the different heats of modified Vasco X-2 can be attributed to heat treat variation and resultant hardness. Carburization of gear flanks only can eliminate tooth fracture as a primary failure mode for modified Vasco X-2. However, a tooth surface fatigue spall can act as a nucleus of a tooth fracture failure for the modified Vasco X-2.

  7. Models for low-energy Lorentz violation in the photon sector: Addendum to 'Consistency of isotropic modified Maxwell theory'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinkhamer, F. R.; Schreck, M.

    2012-03-01

    In a previous article, Klinkhamer and Schreck (2011) [1], we established the consistency of isotropic modified Maxwell theory for a finite range of the Lorentz-violating parameter κ, which includes both positive and negative values of κ. As an aside, we mentioned the existence of a physical model which, for low-energy photons, gives rise to isotropic modified Maxwell theory with a positive parameter κ (corresponding to a "slow" photon). Here, we present a related model which gives rise to isotropic modified Maxwell theory with a negative parameter κ (corresponding to a "fast" photon). Both models have an identical particle content, photon and Dirac particles, but differ in the type of spacetime manifold considered.

  8. The optimal design of involute gear teeth with unequal addenda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Coy, J. J.; Townsend, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    The design of a gear mesh is treated with the objective of minimizing the gear size for a given gear ratio, pinion torque, pressure angle, and allowable tooth lengths. Tooth strengths considered include scoring, pitting fatigue, and bending fatigue. Kinematic involute interference is avoided. The design variation on standard spur gear teeth called the long and short addendum system, is considered. In this system the mesh center distance and pressure angle are maintained as is the ability to manufacture the teeth with standard tooling. However, the pinion and gear tooth proportions are altered in order to obtain fewer teeth numbers for the same ratio as standard gears without kinematic involute interference. The effect of this nonstandard gearing geometry with on tooth strengths and gear mesh size are studied. For a 2:1 gearing ratio, the optimal nonstandard gear design is compared with the optimal standard gear design.

  9. Topology of modified helical gears and Tooth Contact Analysis (TCA) program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Zhang, Jiao

    1989-01-01

    The contents of this report covers: (1) development of optimal geometries for crowned helical gears; (2) a method for their generation; (3) tooth contact analysis (TCA) computer programs for the analysis of meshing and bearing contact of the crowned helical gears; and (4) modelling and simulation of gear shaft deflection. The developed method for synthesis was used to determine the optimal geometry for a crowned helical pinion surface and was directed to localize the bearing contact and guarantee favorable shape and a low level of transmission errors. Two new methods for generation of the crowned helical pinion surface are proposed. One is based on the application of a tool with a surface of revolution that slightly deviates from a regular cone surface. The tool can be used as a grinding wheel or as a shaver. The other is based on a crowning pinion tooth surface with predesigned transmission errors. The pinion tooth surface can be generated by a computer-controlled automatic grinding machine. The TCA program simulates the meshing and bearing contact of the misaligned gears. The transmission errors are also determined. The gear shaft deformation was modelled and investigated. It was found that the deflection of gear shafts has the same effect as gear misalignment.

  10. Design, Generation and Tooth Contact Analysis (TCA) of Asymmetric Face Gear Drive With Modified Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Fuentes, Alfonso; Hawkins, J. M.; Handschuh, Robert F.

    2001-01-01

    A new type of face gear drive for application in transmissions, particularly in helicopters, has been developed. The new geometry differs from the existing geometry by application of asymmetric profiles and double-crowned pinion of the face gear mesh. The paper describes the computerized design, simulation of meshing and contact, and stress analysis by finite element method. Special purpose computer codes have been developed to conduct the analysis. The analysis of this new type of face gear is illustrated with a numerical example.

  11. Gear tooth topological modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kish, Jules G. (Inventor); Isabelle, Charles (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The topology of parallel axis gears, such as spur and helical gears is modified to produce quieter and more smoothly operating gear sets with more uniform load distribution. A finite element analysis of the gear in its operating mode is made to produce a plot of radial and tangential deflections of the pinion and gear tooth surfaces which will occur when the gears are loaded during operation. The resultant plot is then inverted to produce a plot, or set of coordinates, which will define the path of travel of the gear tooth grinding wheel, which path is a mirror image of the plot of the finite element analysis. The resulting gears, when subjected to operating loads, will thus be deflected tangentially and radially to their optimum operating, or theoretical true involute, positions so as to produce quieter, smoother, and more evenly loaded gear trains.

  12. Gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A gear bearing having a first gear and a second gear, each having a plurality of teeth. Each gear operates on two non-parallel surfaces of the opposing gear teeth to perform both gear and bearing functions simultaneously. The gears are moving at substantially the same speed at their contact points. The gears may be roller gear bearings or phase-shifted gear bearings, and may be arranged in a planet/sun system or used as a transmission.

  13. Effects of lubrication on the performance of high speed spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizutani, H.; Isikawa, Y.; Townsend, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental analysis was conducted to determine power loss and gear noise of high speed spur gears with long addendum under various conditions of load, speed, and oil jet pressure for into mesh lubrication. Power losses were calculated from temperature measurements of lubricating oil, gears, gear box, and oil flow rate. Furthermore, power loss was divided into windage loss, friction loss and churning loss. The results show that windage loss and churning loss were the main components of gear power loss of high gear speed. In addition, lubricating conditions had some influences on gear noise especially under low oil temperature or high viscosity.

  14. Effects of lubrication on the performance of high speed spur gears

    SciTech Connect

    Mizutani, Hachiro; Isikawa, Yuuichi; Townsend, D.P.

    1989-04-01

    An experimental analysis was conducted to determine power loss and gear noise of high speed spur gears with long addendum under various conditions of load, speed, and oil jet pressure for into mesh lubrication. Power losses were calculated from temperature measurements of lubricating oil, gears, gear box, and oil flow rate. Furthermore, power loss was divided into windage loss, friction loss and churning loss. The results show that windage loss and churning loss were the main components of gear power loss of high gear speed. In addition, lubricating conditions had some influences on gear noise especially under low oil temperature or high viscosity.

  15. Revolutionary opportunities for materials and structures study, addendum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feig, P. D.

    1987-01-01

    This report is an addendum to the Revolutionary Opportunities for Materials and Structures Study (ROMS), modifying the original by the addition of two tasks. The primary purpose of these tasks was to conduct additional aircraft/engine sizing and mission analysis to obtain contributory aircraft performance data such as fuel burns and direct operating costs for both the subsonic and supersonic engines.

  16. Addendum to the 1996 Gunnison Monitoring Report for the Gunnison, Colorado Wetlands Mitigation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    This document is an addendum to the 1996 Gunnison Monitoring Report for the Gunnison, Colorado, Wetlands Mitigation Report, dated July 1997. The purpose of this addendum is to: (1) modify how information on plant height and plant species criteria are presented; and (2) provide more detailed information regarding the evaluation of the bare ground criteria at the Camp Ketle site. The information in this addendum is provided at the request of the Bureau of Land Management to aid in future monitoring and evaluation of the wetland mitigation sites.

  17. A Program for Gear Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisbee, Kolak K.; Hawkins, Harry M.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a microcomputer program (designed for Apple II but it can be modified) used to calculate various dimensions relative to a spur gear. Basic terms are identified and a program listing for gear calculations is included. (CT)

  18. Missisquoi Bay Phosphorus Model Addendum

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This technical memorandum provides results of an extended load reduction simulation. The memorandum serves as an addendum to the main Missisquoi Bay Phosphorus Mass Balance Model report prepared for the Lake Champlain Basin Program by LimnoTech in 2012

  19. Effect of contact ratio on spur gear dynamic load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Chuen-Huei; Lin, Hsiang Hsi; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    1992-01-01

    A computer simulation is presented which shows how the gear contact ratio affects the dynamic load on a spur gear transmission. The contact ratio can be affected by the tooth addendum, the pressure angle, the tooth size (diametral pitch), and the center distance. The analysis presented was performed using the NASA gear dynamics code, DANST. In the analysis, the contact ratio was varied over the range 1.20 to 2.40 by changing the length of the tooth addendum. In order to simplify the analysis, other parameters related to contact ratio were held constant. The contact ratio was found to have a significant influence on gear dynamics. Over a wide range of operating speeds, a contact ratio close to 2.0 minimized dynamic load. For low contact ratio gears (contact ratio less than 2.0), increasing the contact ratio reduced the gear dynamic load. For high contact ratio gears (contact ratio = or greater than 2.0), the selection of contact ratio should take into consideration the intended operating speeds. In general, high contact ratio gears minimized dynamic load better than low contact ratio gears.

  20. Effect of contact ratio on spur gear dynamic load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Chuen-Huei; Lin, Hsiang Hsi; Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.

    A computer simulation is presented which shows how the gear contact ratio affects the dynamic load on a spur gear transmission. The contact ratio can be affected by the tooth addendum, the pressure angle, the tooth size (diametral pitch), and the center distance. The analysis presented was performed using the NASA gear dynamics code, DANST. In the analysis, the contact ratio was varied over the range 1.20 to 2.40 by changing the length of the tooth addendum. In order to simplify the analysis, other parameters related to contact ratio were held constant. The contact ratio was found to have a significant influence on gear dynamics. Over a wide range of operating speeds, a contact ratio close to 2.0 minimized dynamic load. For low contact ratio gears (contact ratio less than 2.0), increasing the contact ratio reduced the gear dynamic load. For high contact ratio gears (contact ratio = or greater than 2.0), the selection of contact ratio should take into consideration the intended operating speeds. In general, high contact ratio gears minimized dynamic load better than low contact ratio gears.

  1. LSRA with Shuttle main gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A space shuttle landing gear system is visible between the two main landing gear components on this NASA CV-990, modified as a Landing Systems Research Aircraft. The space shuttle landing gear test unit, operated by a high-pressure hydraulic system, allowed engineers to assess and document the performance of space shuttle main and nose landing gear systems, tires and wheel assemblies, plus braking and nose wheel steering performance.

  2. Hybrid Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F. (Inventor); Roberts, Gary D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid gear consisting of metallic outer rim with gear teeth and metallic hub in combination with a composite lay up between the shaft interface (hub) and gear tooth rim is described. The composite lay-up lightens the gear member while having similar torque carrying capability and it attenuates the impact loading driven noise/vibration that is typical in gear systems. The gear has the same operational capability with respect to shaft speed, torque, and temperature as an all-metallic gear as used in aerospace gear design.

  3. Performances of a balanced hydraulic motor with planetary gear train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongying; Luo, Changjie; Wang, Huimin

    2012-07-01

    The current research of a balanced hydraulic motor focuses on the characteristics of the motor with three planet gears. References of a balanced hydraulic motor with more than three planet gears are hardly found. In order to study the characteristics of a balanced hydraulic motor with planetary gear train that includes more than three planet gears, on the basis of analysis of the structure and working principle of a balanced hydraulic motor with planetary gear train, formulas are deduced for calculating the hydraulic motor's primary performance indexes such as displacement, unit volume displacement, flowrate fluctuation ratio, etc. Influences of the gears' tooth number on displacement and flowrate characteristics are analyzed. In order to guarantee the reliability of sealing capability, the necessary conditions that tooth number of the sun gear and the planet gears should satisfy are discussed. Selecting large unit volume displacement and small displacement fluctuation ratio as designing objectives, a balanced hydraulic motor with three planet gears and a common gear motor are designed under the conditions of same displacement, tooth addendum coefficien and clearance coefficient. By comparing the unit volume displacement and fluctuation ratio of the two motors, it can be seen that the balanced hydraulic motor with planetary gear train has the advantages of smaller fluctuation ratio and larger unit volume displacement. The results provide theoretical basis for choosing gear tooth-number of this kind of hydraulic motor.

  4. Bending strength model for internal spur gear teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Michael; Rubadeux, K. L.; Coe, H. H.

    1995-01-01

    Internal spur gear teeth are normally stronger than pinion teeth of the same pitch and face width since external teeth are smaller at the base. However, ring gears which are narrower have an unequal addendum or are made of a material with a lower strength than that of the meshing pinion may be loaded more critically in bending. In this study, a model for the bending strength of an internal gear tooth as a function of the applied load pressure angle is presented which is based on the inscribed Lewis constant strength parabolic beam. The bending model includes a stress concentration factor and an axial compression term which are extensions of the model for an external gear tooth. The geometry of the Lewis factor determination is presented, the iteration to determine the factor is described, and the bending strength J factor is compared to that of an external gear tooth. This strength model will assist optimal design efforts for unequal addendum gears and gears of mixed materials.

  5. A Parametric Study of Spur Gear Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Hsiang Hsi; Liou, Chuen-Huei

    1998-01-01

    A parametric study of a spur gear system was performed through a numerical analysis approach. This study used the gear dynamic program DANST, a computer simulator, to determine the dynamic behavior of a spur gear system. The analytical results have taken the deflection of shafts and bearings into consideration for static analysis, and the influence of these deflections on gear dynamics was investigated. Damping in the gear system usually is an unknown quantity, but it has an important effect in resonance vibration. Typical values as reported in the literature were used in the present analysis. The dynamic response due to different damping factors was evaluated and compared. The effect of the contact ratio on spur gear dynamic load and dynamic stress was investigated through a parameter study. The contact ratio was varied over the range of 1.26 to 2.46 by adjusting the tooth addendum. Gears with contact ratio near 2.0 were found to have the most favorable dynamic performance.

  6. Differential gearing

    SciTech Connect

    Tamiya, S.

    1986-07-29

    A differential for motor vehicles is described and the like comprising, an input drive shaft, a pair of coaxially spaced drive gears simultaneously driven by the input shaft in a same direction at a same speed of rotation about a common axis of rotation, a driven gear driven peripherally by the pair of drive gears for transmission of power from the input drive shaft, two coaxial opposed bevel sun gears having an axis of rotation concentric with an axis of rotation of the driven gear, two planetary gears disposed between the sun gears for differential driving thereof during turns of the vehicle to the right and to the left of each meshing with the sun gears for driving the suns gears. Each planetary gear has a separate axis of rotation carried by the driven gear disposed therein radially and symmetrically relative to the axis of rotation of the sun gears, and each sun gear having a respective power output shaft connected thereto for rotation therewith.

  7. Separation distance and static transmission error of involute spur gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, David K.; Lin, Hsiang H.

    1992-07-01

    The effects of separation distance and deflection of gear teeth on the static transmission error of involute spur gears are investigated. In this paper, only low-contact-ratio gears with true involute profile are studied. Gear ratio and tooth addendum are varied to examine their effects on the separation distance and static transmission error. Results obtained from the investigation shows that the contact ratio and static transmission error are affected significantly if considering the separation distance. In general, the magnitude of contact ratio has been increased and the variation of static transmission error has been smoothed. The most significant change occurs for a gear pair with a theoretical contact ratio close to 1.95.

  8. Separation distance and static transmission error of involute spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tse, David K.; Lin, Hsiang H.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of separation distance and deflection of gear teeth on the static transmission error of involute spur gears are investigated. In this paper, only low-contact-ratio gears with true involute profile are studied. Gear ratio and tooth addendum are varied to examine their effects on the separation distance and static transmission error. Results obtained from the investigation shows that the contact ratio and static transmission error are affected significantly if considering the separation distance. In general, the magnitude of contact ratio has been increased and the variation of static transmission error has been smoothed. The most significant change occurs for a gear pair with a theoretical contact ratio close to 1.95.

  9. Gear Tooth Scoring Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    C. Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication 20 D. Boundary Lubrication 23 E. Lubrication-Limited Gear Performance 24 F. Impact of Gear Mechanics 25...III. SPUR GEAR MECHANICS 28 A. Spur Gear Kinematics 28 B. Spur Gear Statics 31 C. Spur Gear Dynamics 38 IV. HELICAL GEAR MECHANICS 46 A...Helical Gear Kinematics 46 B. Helical Gear Statics 48 C. Helical Gear Dynamics 50 V. SPIRAL BEVEL GEAR MECHANICS 53 A. Spiral Bevel Gear

  10. Scoring of precision spur gears

    SciTech Connect

    Budinski, K.G. )

    1994-09-01

    A group of manufacturing machines employed precision spur gears as the timing mechanism for machine operations. These machines had worked successfully for about ten years with little or no problems with gear wear or deterioration. When new machines were brought on line with recently made gears there were immediate problems with gear tooth scoring. A laboratory study was conducted to determine if metallurgical conditions were related to the gear scoring. Recent gears were made from a modification of the alloy used in early gears. The new alloy has been modified to make it more resistant to softening in coating operations. Reciprocating wear tests and galling tests were conducted to compare the tribological characteristics of the old and new gear steels. It was determined that the threshold galling stress of the gear steels was strongly dependent on the hardness. The reciprocating wear tests indicated that the wear resistance was affected by the volume fraction of hard phases in the steels. The recommended short-term solution was to alter the tempering procedure for the steel to keep Rockwell C hardness above 60; the long-term solution was to change the gear material and lubrication.

  11. 10 CFR 1045.41 - Use of classified addendums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... whenever practical. When RD or FRD is segregated into an addendum, the originator shall acknowledge the...) When segregation of RD or FRD into an addendum is not practical, document originators are encouraged...

  12. Differential gear

    SciTech Connect

    Shibuya, K.; Hamada, T.; Masuda, K.; Shimada, K.

    1989-05-02

    A differential gear for permitting a difference in rotational speed between two output shafts is described, the differential gear including an input shaft and two output shafts. The improvement consists of means for limiting the difference in rotational speed between the two output shafts in response to the rotational speed of the input shaft, the rotational speed limiting means comprising a differential casing coupled to the input shaft and adapted to be rotated by the input shaft, a differential pinion shaft radially extending within the differential casing and rotatably mounted at its opposite ends in the differential casing. A plurality of differential pinion gears rotatably mounted on the differential pinion shaft is also included, and also a pair of side gears having a rotational axis common to that of the differential casing, wherein the side gears mesh with the differential pinion gears and the two output shafts are fixed to the side gears, the means for limiting the difference in rotational speed between the two output shafts comprising a weight means radially movable in the differential casing, the weight means limiting the difference in rotational speed between the two output shafts in response to the centrifugal force applied to the weight means, the weight means being slidably mounted on the differential pinion shaft and being biased radially inwardly.

  13. 76 FR 53942 - Notice of Lodging of First Addendum to Consent Decree Under the Emergency Planning and Community...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... Addendum to Consent Decree modifies deadlines for benzene waste NESHAP program enhancements at two INVISTA... two options for further benzene emission reductions and extends the time to implement the selected option. INVISTA will continue to comply with the benzene NESHAP throughout this period. The Department...

  14. Geared power transmission technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    The historical path of the science and art of gearing is reviewed. The present state of gearing technology is discussed along with examples of some of the NASA-sponsored contributions to gearing technology. Future requirements in gearing are summarized.

  15. 75 FR 61642 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Modified Nonpelagic Trawl Gear and Habitat...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... 94 also changes the boundaries of the Northern Bering Sea Research Area to establish the Modified.... It also changes the boundaries of the Northern Bering Sea Research Area (NBSRA) to establish the MGTZ... the extension of the eastern boundary to the 12-nm Territorial Sea. This revision is necessary...

  16. Transmission gearing arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Klemen, D.

    1987-08-04

    A gearing arrangement is described for an automotive power transmission comprising: an input shaft and an output shaft; first, second, and third simple planetary gear sets. Each has a sun gear, a ring gear, and a planet gears meshing with the sun and the ring gears and rotatably supported on a planet carrier; means rigidly interconnecting the ring gear of the third gear set and the carrier of the second gear set; means rigidly interconnecting the ring gear of the second gear set and the carrier of the first gear set; means rigidly connecting the output shaft and the carrier of the third gear set; a first intermediate shaft rigidly interconnecting the sun gears of the second and the third gear sets for unitary rotation; a second intermediate shaft rigidly connected to the carrier of the second gear set; a third intermediate shaft continuously connected to the input shaft and to the sun gear of the first gear set; first, second, and third brake means operative to selectively brake rotation of the ring gears of the first, the second, and the third gear sets, respectively; a first rotating clutch selectively operable to connect the input shaft and the first intermediate shaft for unitary rotation; a second rotating clutch selectively operable to connect the input shaft and the second intermediate shaft for unitary rotation; a fourth simple planetary gear set including a sun gear and a ring gear and planet gears meshing with the sun and the ring gears and rotatably supported on a planet carrier; means rigidly connecting the sun gear of the fourth gear set to the third intermediate shaft; means rigidly connecting the ring gear of the fourth gear set to the carrier of the first gear set; and a fourth brake means selectively operable to brake the carrier of the fourth gear set. The nine forward ratios are obtainable while preserving a single transition shifting over the entire nine forward ratios.

  17. Gear optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Ning-Tian

    1988-01-01

    The use of formal numerical optimization methods for the design of gears is investigated. To achieve this, computer codes were developed for the analysis of spur gears and spiral bevel gears. These codes calculate the life, dynamic load, bending strength, surface durability, gear weight and size, and various geometric parameters. It is necessary to calculate all such important responses because they all represent competing requirements in the design process. The codes developed here were written in subroutine form and coupled to the COPES/ADS general purpose optimization program. This code allows the user to define the optimization problem at the time of program execution. Typical design variables include face width, number of teeth and diametral pitch. The user is free to choose any calculated response as the design objective to minimize or maximize and may impose lower and upper bounds on any calculated responses. Typical examples include life maximization with limits on dynamic load, stress, weight, etc. or minimization of weight subject to limits on life, dynamic load, etc. The research codes were written in modular form for easy expansion and so that they could be combined to create a multiple reduction optimization capability in future.

  18. LSRA with Shuttle main gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A space shuttle landing gear system is visible between the two main landing gear components on this NASA CV-990, modified as a Landing Systems Research Aircraft (LSRA). The space shuttle landing gear test unit, operated by a high-pressure hydraulic system, allowed engineers to assess and document the performance of space shuttle main and nose landing gear systems, tires and wheel assemblies, plus braking and nose wheel steering performance. The series of 155 test missions for the space shuttle program, conducted at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, provided extensive data about the life and endurance of the shuttle tire systems and helped raise the shuttle crosswind landing limits at Kennedy.

  19. Action Plan for Florida's Public Libraries. Addendum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Library Study Commission, Tallahassee.

    The introduction to this addendum (the Action Plan is LI 004 521) discusses the present use by libraries of information-handling technology and identifies some of the trends taking place in performing essential library services. While some limited inroads have been made in automating certain public library functions, the bulk of services is still…

  20. Flex-Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Lung-Wen; Peritt, Jonathan

    1993-01-01

    Flex-Gears are being developed as an alternative to brushes and slip rings to conduct electricity across a rotating joint. Flex-Gears roll in the annulus of sun and ring gears for electrical contact while maintaining their position by using a novel application of involute gears. A single Flex-Gear is predicted to transfer up to 2.8 amps, thereby allowing a six inch diameter device, holding 30 Flex-Gears, to transfer over 80 amps. Semi-rigid Flex-Gears are proposed to decrease Flex-Gear stress and insure proper gear meshing.

  1. Effects of a modified through-mask drinking system (MDS) on fluid intake during exercise in chemical protective gear. Report for January-May 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Szlyk, P.C.; Sils, I.V.; Tharion, W.J.; Francesconi, R.P.; Mahnke, R.B.

    1989-10-12

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of a modified through-mask drinking system (MDS) on voluntary fluid consumption. Eighteen male volunteers walked on a treadmill (4.02 km/hr, 0 deg. grade, 50 min/hr for 6 hr) in a climatic chamber (dry bulb=32.6 deg C, wet bulb=17.5 deg C, 20.4% relative humidity, and windspeed=8.05 km/hr, producing a WBGT of 22.1 deg C). Subjects wore chemical protective gear (trousers, jacket, boots, gloves, and M17A1 protective mask) and were randomly assigned one of two through-mask and were randomly assigned one of two through-mask drinking systems: CS (n=9), the current gravity fed system or MDS (n=9), a prototype hand-pump drinking system. Because decontamination of the mask and drinking connections was performed prior to drinking, the overall use of the CS was rated significantly more difficult during both work and rest than the MDS. Failure to decontaminate connections prior to drinking was noted early in the trial in 2 soldiers using the CS suggesting an increase risk of accidental contamination associated with this system. Drinking with the MDS had no measurable adverse effect on hydration status of the test subjects: water intake rate, 0.36 L/hr (CS) and 0.42 L/hr (MDS); sweat rate, 0.63 L/hr (CS) and 0.67 L/hr (MDS); body weight loss, 0.32 %/hr (CS) and 0.31 %/hr (MDS).

  2. New Design and Improvement of Planetary Gear Trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert (Technical Monitor); Litvin, Faydor L.; Fuentes, Alfonso; Vecchiato, Daniele; Gonzalez-Perez, Ignacio

    2004-01-01

    The development of new types of planetary and planetary face-gear drives is proposed. The new designs are based on regulating backlash between the gears and modifying the tooth surfaces to improve the design. The goal of this work is to obtain a nearly uniform distribution of load between the planet gears. In addition, a new type of planetary face-gear drive was developed in this project.

  3. Gear box assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Harrod, L.R.; Siebern, M.R.

    1989-04-25

    This patent describes a gearbox assembly for a vehicle which includes a driven axle shaft extending transversely of the vehicle having wheels secured thereto: a drive gear concentric with the axle shaft nonrotatably connected to the shaft, the drive gear having an integral hub on each of opposite sides thereof, a pinion gear shiftably mounted above the drive gear having one position engaging the drive gear and shiftable laterally to disengage from the drive gear, a shift lever mounted in a position projecting upwardly from the pinion gear actuatable to shift the pinion gear, an electric motor with output shaft mounted with the output shaft paralleling the axle shaft and having a driving gear mounted thereon, a multiple gear gear train mounted so as to establish a driving connection between the driving gear and the pinion gear, and a transmission housing enclosing the driving gar, gear train, pinion gear and drive gear, the housing including sleeve portions rotatably receiving the hubs of the drive gear and thus rotatably mounting the drive gear and the axle shaft connected to the drive gear.

  4. 48 CFR 1352.239-70 - Software license addendum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Software license addendum. 1352.239-70 Section 1352.239-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CLAUSES... Software license addendum. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1339.107, insert the following clause: Software...

  5. 48 CFR 1352.239-70 - Software license addendum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Software license addendum. 1352.239-70 Section 1352.239-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CLAUSES... Software license addendum. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1339.107, insert the following clause: Software...

  6. 48 CFR 1352.239-70 - Software license addendum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Software license addendum. 1352.239-70 Section 1352.239-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CLAUSES... Software license addendum. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1339.107, insert the following clause: Software...

  7. 48 CFR 1352.239-70 - Software license addendum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Software license addendum. 1352.239-70 Section 1352.239-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CLAUSES... Software license addendum. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1339.107, insert the following clause: Software...

  8. 48 CFR 1352.239-70 - Software license addendum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Software license addendum. 1352.239-70 Section 1352.239-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CLAUSES... Software license addendum. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1339.107, insert the following clause: Software...

  9. General Electric Unattended Power System Study. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    Only minor, inexpensive changes in the fuel panel, portions of the electrical control panel, and type of burner are required to convert from one type of... converts chemical energy into electrical energy. The capacity of the fuel cell is limited only by the supply of fuel, commonly referred to as the...ESD-TR-80-124 MTR- 3844 GENERAL ELECTRIC UNATTENDED POWER SYSTEM STUDY ADDENDUM BY D.D. BREGENZER MAY 1980 dg:C Prepared for DEPUTY FOR SURVEILLANCE

  10. Planetary gear train

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraiwa, K.

    1988-10-04

    A planetary gear train is described comprising: an input member; an output member; a first planetary gear set including a first sun gear, a first ring gear, and a first pinion carrier rotatably supporting first planet pinions; a secondary planetary gear set including a second sun gear, and second ring gear and a second pinion carrier rotatably supporting second planet pinions; first drive means for connecting the input member with the first ring gear; second drive means for connecting the input member with the first sun gear; third drive means for constantly connecting the first sun gear with the second sun gear and establishing a force transmitting positive drive from the first sun gear to the second sun gear, whereby the first sun gear rotates at a speed different from the second sun gear; first brake means for braking the second sun gear; second brake means for braking the second pinion carrier; fourth drive means for connecting the second ring gear with the output member and providing a first speed ratio therebetween; and fifth drive means for connecting the first pinion carrier with the output member and providing a second speed ratio therebetween, the second speed ratio being different from the first speed ratio.

  11. Maximum life spur gear design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Mackulin, M. J.; Coe, H. H.; Coy, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    Optimization procedures allow one to design a spur gear reduction for maximum life and other end use criteria. A modified feasible directions search algorithm permits a wide variety of inequality constraints and exact design requirements to be met with low sensitivity to initial guess values. The optimization algorithm is described, and the models for gear life and performance are presented. The algorithm is compact and has been programmed for execution on a desk top computer. Two examples are presented to illustrate the method and its application.

  12. Antibacklash gears including rack and pinion gears

    SciTech Connect

    Kerkoff, E.F.

    1989-11-14

    This patent describes a meshing gear construction comprising a first gear having a plurality of fixed teeth extending therefrom. The teeth alternatingly separated by a plurality of roots each having a radial centerline, faces on either side of each fixed tooth, each root being a continuation of a pair of faces of two adjacent teeth, a second gear having a plurality of rollers thereon rotatable relative to the second gear. The rollers meshing with the fixed teeth of the first gear. The meshing comprising rolling contact of at least two rollers with one first gear fixed tooth at all instants of motion. Wherein the rollers comprise cylindrical rollers and the faces of the fixed teeth comprise circular arcs in profile and wherein a radial centers of fixed tooth circular arc face lies outside a pitch circle of the first gear and between the circular arc face and the radial centerline of an adjacent root.

  13. An electric control for an electrohydraulic active control aircraft landing gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, I.; Edson, R.

    1979-01-01

    An electronic controller for an electrohydraulic active control aircraft landing gear was developed. Drop tests of a modified gear from a 2722 Kg (6000 lbm) class of airplane were conducted to illustrate controller performance. The results indicate that the active gear effects a force reduction, relative to that of the passive gear, from 9 to 31 percent depending on the aircraft sink speed and the static gear pressure.

  14. New Gear Transmission Error Measurement System Designed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.

    2001-01-01

    The prime source of vibration and noise in a gear system is the transmission error between the meshing gears. Transmission error is caused by manufacturing inaccuracy, mounting errors, and elastic deflections under load. Gear designers often attempt to compensate for transmission error by modifying gear teeth. This is done traditionally by a rough "rule of thumb" or more recently under the guidance of an analytical code. In order for a designer to have confidence in a code, the code must be validated through experiment. NASA Glenn Research Center contracted with the Design Unit of the University of Newcastle in England for a system to measure the transmission error of spur and helical test gears in the NASA Gear Noise Rig. The new system measures transmission error optically by means of light beams directed by lenses and prisms through gratings mounted on the gear shafts. The amount of light that passes through both gratings is directly proportional to the transmission error of the gears. A photodetector circuit converts the light to an analog electrical signal. To increase accuracy and reduce "noise" due to transverse vibration, there are parallel light paths at the top and bottom of the gears. The two signals are subtracted via differential amplifiers in the electronics package. The output of the system is 40 mV/mm, giving a resolution in the time domain of better than 0.1 mm, and discrimination in the frequency domain of better than 0.01 mm. The new system will be used to validate gear analytical codes and to investigate mechanisms that produce vibration and noise in parallel axis gears.

  15. Twenty First Century Space Propulsion Study Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    90265-7783 June 1991 Final Report DTIC ELECTE JUL15I9U ~> PHILLIPS LABOR.ATORY Propulsion Directorate ~ AIR FORCE SYSTEMS COMMAND EDWARDS AIR FORCE...Century Space Propulsion Study (Addendum) (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Forward, Robert L. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 113b. TIME COVERED 114. DATE OF REPORT...AL-TR-90-030, 21st Century Space Propulsion Study, October 1990, AD: A229279) evaluates a number of new space propulsion and sensor concepts. The major

  16. Safety assessment of DME fuel. Addendum

    SciTech Connect

    Paas, M.

    1998-12-31

    This report is an addendum to an earlier report that provided a general assessment of the use of dimethyl ether (DME) as an alternative to diesel fuel in compression ignition engines. The report reviews additional reference material submitted by Amoco Corporation and Azko Nobel as it relates to the safety, health, or environmental aspects of DME when used as a vehicle fuel. It includes new information on DME fuel properties, occupational exposure and health risks, environmental and operational factors, and issues relating to vehicle fuel systems and the dispensing of DME.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Jaffe, Richard; Deardorff, Glenn; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties and design space of molecular gears fashioned from carbon nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. One gear was powered by forcing the atoms near the end of the buckytube to rotate, and a second gear was allowed.to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its buckytube on a cylinder. The meshing aromatic gear teeth transfer angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. A number of gear and gear/shaft configurations were simulated. Cases in vacuum and with an inert atmosphere were examined. In an extension to molecular dynamics technology, some simulations used a thermostat on the atmosphere while the hydrocarbon gear's temperature was allowed to fluctuate. This models cooling the gears with an atmosphere. Results suggest that these gears can operate at up to 50-100 gigahertz in a vacuum or inert atmosphere at room temperature. The failure mode involves tooth slip, not bond breaking, so failed gears can be returned to operation by lowering temperature and/or rotation rate. Videos and atomic trajectory files in xyz format are presented.

  18. Modular gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A gearing system using modular gear bearing components. Each component is composed of a core, one or more modules attached to the core and two or more fastening modules rigidly attaching the modules to the core. The modules, which are attached to the core, may consist of gears, rollers or gear bearing components. The core orientation affects the orientation of the modules attached to the core. This is achieved via the keying arrangement of the core and the component modules that attach to the core. Such an arrangement will also facilitate the phase tuning of gear modules with respect to the core and other gear modules attached to the core.

  19. Anti-backlash gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A gear bearing having a first gear and a second gear, each having a plurality of teeth. Each gear operates on two non-parallel surfaces of the opposing gear teeth to perform both gear and bearing functions simultaneously. The gears are moving at substantially the same speed at their contact points. The gears may be roller gear bearings or phase-shifted gear bearings, and may be arranged in a planet/sun system or used as a transmission. One preferred embodiment discloses and describes an anti-backlash feature to counter ''dead zones'' in the gear bearing movement.

  20. Addendum to NuMI shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    The original safety assessment and the Safety Envelope for the NuMI beam line corresponds to 400 kW of beam power. The Main Injector is currently capable of and approved for producing 500 kW of beam power2. However, operation of the NuMI beam line at 400 kW of power brings up the possibility of an occasional excursion above 400 kW due to better than usual tuning in one of the machines upstream of the NuMI beam line. An excursion above the DOE approved Safety Envelope will constitute a safety violation. The purpose of this addendum is to evaluate the radiological issues and modifications required to operate the NuMI beam line at 500 kW. This upgrade will allow 400 kW operations with a reasonable safety margin. Configuration of the NuMI beam line, boundaries, safety system and the methodologies used for the calculations are as described in the original NuMI SAD. While most of the calculations presented in the original shielding assessment were based on Monte Carlo simulations, which were based on the design geometries, most of the results presented in this addendum are based on the measurements conducted by the AD ES&H radiation safety group.

  1. PAT-1 safety analysis report addendum.

    SciTech Connect

    Weiner, Ruth F.; Schmale, David T.; Kalan, Robert J.; Akin, Lili A.; Miller, David Russell; Knorovsky, Gerald Albert; Yoshimura, Richard Hiroyuki; Lopez, Carlos; Harding, David Cameron; Jones, Perry L.; Morrow, Charles W.

    2010-09-01

    The Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, is certified under Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) per Certificate of Compliance (CoC) USA/0361B(U)F-96 (currently Revision 9). The purpose of this SAR Addendum is to incorporate plutonium (Pu) metal as a new payload for the PAT-1 package. The Pu metal is packed in an inner container (designated the T-Ampoule) that replaces the PC-1 inner container. The documentation and results from analysis contained in this addendum demonstrate that the replacement of the PC-1 and associated packaging material with the T-Ampoule and associated packaging with the addition of the plutonium metal content are not significant with respect to the design, operating characteristics, or safe performance of the containment system and prevention of criticality when the package is subjected to the tests specified in 10 CFR 71.71, 71.73 and 71.74.

  2. Magnetic gear backup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shefke, R. A.

    1970-01-01

    Backup clutch for magnetic gear operates only in case of slippage. Contacting a pin arrangement in the driven gear, the clutch provides extra force for continuing output. It does not interfere with normal, noncontact action.

  3. Gear bearing drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Brian (Inventor); Mavroidis, Constantinos (Inventor); Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A gear bearing drive provides a compact mechanism that operates as an actuator providing torque and as a joint providing support. The drive includes a gear arrangement integrating an external rotor DC motor within a sun gear. Locking surfaces maintain the components of the drive in alignment and provide support for axial loads and moments. The gear bearing drive has a variety of applications, including as a joint in robotic arms and prosthetic limbs.

  4. Offset Compound Gear Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Mark A.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.

    2010-01-01

    The Offset Compound Gear Drive is an in-line, discrete, two-speed device utilizing a special offset compound gear that has both an internal tooth configuration on the input end and external tooth configuration on the output end, thus allowing it to mesh in series, simultaneously, with both a smaller external tooth input gear and a larger internal tooth output gear. This unique geometry and offset axis permits the compound gear to mesh with the smaller diameter input gear and the larger diameter output gear, both of which are on the same central, or primary, centerline. This configuration results in a compact in-line reduction gear set consisting of fewer gears and bearings than a conventional planetary gear train. Switching between the two output ratios is accomplished through a main control clutch and sprag. Power flow to the above is transmitted through concentric power paths. Low-speed operation is accomplished in two meshes. For the purpose of illustrating the low-speed output operation, the following example pitch diameters are given. A 5.0 pitch diameter (PD) input gear to 7.50 PD (internal tooth) intermediate gear (0.667 reduction mesh), and a 7.50 PD (external tooth) intermediate gear to a 10.00 PD output gear (0.750 reduction mesh). Note that it is not required that the intermediate gears on the offset axis be of the same diameter. For this example, the resultant low-speed ratio is 2:1 (output speed = 0.500; product of stage one 0.667 reduction and stage two 0.750 stage reduction). The design is not restricted to the example pitch diameters, or output ratio. From the output gear, power is transmitted through a hollow drive shaft, which, in turn, drives a sprag during which time the main clutch is disengaged.

  5. Transmission errors and bearing contact of spur, helical and spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Zhang, J.; Lee, H.-T.; Handschuh, R. F.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of transmission errors and bearing contact of spur, helical and spiral bevel gears was performed. Modified tooth surfaces for these gears have been proposed in order to absorb linear transmission errors caused by gear misalignment and localize the bearing contact. Numerical examples for spur, helical, and spiral bevel gears are presented to illustrate the behavior of the modified gear surfaces to misalignment and errors of assembly.The numerical results indicate that the modified surfaces will perform with a low level of transmission error in nonideal operating environment.

  6. Gear mesh stiffness and load sharing in planetary gearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasuba, R.; August, R.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive computerized analysis was developed for determining load sharing among planetary gears. The load sharing is established as a function of transmitted torque, degree of sun gear fixity, component flexibility, gear tooth quality, and phasing of individual planet gears. A nonlinear variable gear tooth mesh stiffness model was used to simulate the sun/plant and planet/ring gear meshes. The determined load sharing and gear mesh stiffness parameters then can be used for the subsequent assessment of dynamic load factors.

  7. Addendum to the Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This document is an addendum to the Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Clinch River Remedial Investigation (DOE 1993). The Department of Energy--Oak Ridge Operations (DOE-ORO) is proposing this addendum to the US Envianmental Protection Agency, Region IV (EPA-IV), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) as a reduced sampling program on the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir and on Poplar Creek. DOE-ORO is proposing to maximize the use of existing data and minimize the collection of new data for water, sediment, and biota during Phase 2 of the Clinch River Remedial Investigation. The existing data along with the additional data collected in Phase 2 would be used to perform a baseline risk assessment and make remedial decisions. DOE-ORO considers that the existing data, the additional data collected in Phase 2, and on-site remedial investigation data would be sufficient to understand the nature and extent of the contamination problem in the Clinch River, perform a baseline risk assessment,and make remedial decisions. This addendum is organized in three sections. The first section provides background information and describes a rationale for modifying the Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan. Section 2 presents a summary of the existing data for the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir and an evaluation of the sufficiency of this data for a baseline human health and ecological risk assessment. Section 3 describes the revised Phase 2 Sampling and Analysis Plan for surface water, sediment, and biota in the Clinch River OU and in the Poplar Creek OU.

  8. Landing gear noise attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  9. Phase-Oriented Gear Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Phase-oriented gear systems are differential planetary transmissions in which each planet gear has two sets of unequal numbers of teeth indexed at prescribed relative angles (phases). The figure illustrates an application of the phase-oriented gearing concept to a relatively simple speed-reducing differential planetary transmission that includes a sun gear, an idler gear, three identical planet gears, a ground internal ring gear, and an output internal ring gear. Typically, the ground internal ring gear and output internal ring gear have different numbers of teeth, giving rise to a progressive and periodic phase shift between the corresponding pairs of teeth engaged by each successive planet gear. To accommodate this phase shift, it is necessary to introduce a compensating phase shift between the ground-gear-engaging and output-gearengaging sections of each planet gear. This is done by individually orienting each planet gear

  10. Modelling polymer draft gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing; Yang, Xiangjian; Cole, Colin; Luo, Shihui

    2016-09-01

    This paper developed a new and simple approach to model polymer draft gears. Two types of polymer draft gears were modelled and compared with experimental data. Impact characteristics, in-train characteristics and frequency responses of these polymer draft gears were studied and compared with those of a friction draft gear. The impact simulations show that polymer draft gears can withstand higher impact speeds than the friction draft gear. Longitudinal train dynamics simulations show that polymer draft gears have significantly longer deflections than friction draft gears in normal train operations. The maximum draft gear working velocities are lower than 0.2 m/s, which are significantly lower than the impact velocities during shunting operations. Draft gears' in-train characteristics are similar to their static characteristics but are very different from their impact characteristics; this conclusion has also been reached from frequency response simulations. An analysis of gangway bridge plate failures was also conducted and it was found that they were caused by coupler angling behaviour and long draft gear deflections.

  11. Optimal design of compact spur gear reductions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Lattime, S. B.; Kimmel, J. A.; Coe, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    The optimal design of compact spur gear reductions includes the selection of bearing and shaft proportions in addition to gear mesh parameters. Designs for single mesh spur gear reductions are based on optimization of system life, system volume, and system weight including gears, support shafts, and the four bearings. The overall optimization allows component properties to interact, yielding the best composite design. A modified feasible directions search algorithm directs the optimization through a continuous design space. Interpolated polynomials expand the discrete bearing properties and proportions into continuous variables for optimization. After finding the continuous optimum, the designer can analyze near optimal designs for comparison and selection. Design examples show the influence of the bearings on the optimal configurations.

  12. An electronic control for an electrohydraulic active control landing gear for the F-4 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, I.

    1982-01-01

    A controller for an electrohydraulic active control landing gear was developed for the F-4 aircraft. A controller was modified for this application. Simulation results indicate that during landing and rollout over repaired bomb craters the active gear effects a force reduction, relative to the passive gear, or approximately 70%.

  13. X-38 Landing Gear Skid Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gafka, George K.; Daugherty, Robert H.

    2000-01-01

    NASA incorporates skid-equipped landing gear on its series of X-38 flight test vehicles. The X-38 test program is the proving ground for the Crew Return Vehicle (CRV) a gliding parafoil-equipped vehicle designed to land at relatively low speeds. The skid-equipped landing gear is designed to attenuate the vertical landing energy of the vehicle at touchdown using crushable materials within the struts themselves. The vehicle then slides out as the vehicle horizontal energy is dissipated through the skids. A series of tests was conducted at Edwards Airforce Base (EAFB) in an attempt to quantify the drag force produced while "dragging" various X-38 landing gear skids across lakebed regions of varying surface properties. These data were then used to calculate coefficients of friction for each condition. Coefficient of friction information is critical for landing analyses as well as for landing gear load and interface load analysis. The skid specimens included full- and sub-scale V201 (space test vehicle) nose and main gear designs, a V131/V 132 (atmospheric flight test vehicles) main gear skid (actual flight hardware), and a newly modified, full-scale V201 nose -ear skid with substantially increased edge curvature as compared to its original design. Results of the testing are discussed along with comments on the relative importance of various parameters that influence skid stability and other dynamic behavior.

  14. 12. TRANSMISSION GEARING SHOWING RELATION TO SEGMENT GEAR ON WATERWHEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. TRANSMISSION GEARING SHOWING RELATION TO SEGMENT GEAR ON WATERWHEEL william E. Barrett, photographer, 1973 (copy negative) - Thomas Shepherd's Grist Mill, High Street Vicinity, Shepherdstown, Jefferson County, WV

  15. Presto 4.20 user's guide : addendum for shock capabilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2011-06-01

    This is an addendum to the Presto 4.20 User's Guide to document additional capabilities that are available for use in the Presto{_}ITAR code that are not available for use in the standard version of Presto. Presto{_}ITAR is an enhanced version of Presto that provides capabilities that make it regulated under the U.S. Department of State's International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) export-control rules. This code is part of the Vivace product, and is only distributed to entities that comply with ITAR regulations. The enhancements primarily focus on material models that include an energy-dependent pressure response, appropriate for very large deformations and strain rates. Since this is an addendum to the standard Presto User's Guide, please refer to that document first for general descriptions of code capability and use. This addendum documents material models and element features that support energy-dependent material models.

  16. Liquid rocket engine turbopump gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Design and fabrication of gear drives for rocket engine turbopumps are described in the sequence encountered during the design process as follows: (1) selection of overall arrangement; (2) selection of gear type; (3) preliminary sizing; (4) lubrication system design; (5) detail tooth design; (6) selection of gear materials; and (7) gear fabrication and testing as it affects the design. The description is oriented towards the use of involute spur gears, although reference material for helical gears is also cited.

  17. Planetary gear train ring gear and support structure investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valco, Mark J.

    1992-01-01

    Most helicopter transmissions utilize a planetary gear train as the final speed reduction stage. Due to weight constraints these transmissions have high power-to-weight ratios and relatively flexible structures. This investigation addresses the analysis of planetary gear trains with the ring gear mounted on a flexible support structure. The approach utilizes recent advances in automated contact methods for nonlinear finite element analysis. Rather than using a line of action spring to model gear pair mesh stiffness, finite element models of complete gears are developed, and the elastic gear members are engaged and rolled through mesh. The procedure includes detailed gear tooth geometry with profile modifications. A nonlinear approach is required due to large displacements associated with gear rotation and nonlinear boundary conditions associated with the gear tooth surface contact. The updated Lagrangian formulation and the MARC K-4.1 automated contact features are applied in the analysis. The ring gear support structure is modeled by an elastic foundation linking the ring gear to a rigid support. Calculation of gear pair deflections, stresses, transmission error, and mesh stiffness through the gear meshing cycle are demonstrated for external and internal spur gear pairs and a planetary gear train. Issues relating to the accuracy of the nonlinear finite element contact method, gear mesh stiffness, transmission error, and the planetary gear train elastic support structure are discussed.

  18. Addendum to Environmental Monitoring Plan, Nevada Test Site and Support Facilities; Addendum 2

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-01

    This 1993 Addendum to the ``Environmental Monitoring Plan Nevada Test Site and Support Facilities -- 1991,`` Report No. DOE/NV/10630-28 (EMP) applies to the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) operations on the Continental US (including Amchitka Island, Alaska) that are under the purview of the DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). The primary purpose of these operations is the conduct of the nuclear weapons testing program for the DOE and the Department of Defense. Since 1951, these tests have been conducted principally at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. In accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, this 1993 Addendum to the EMP brings together, in one document, updated information and/or new sections to the description of the environmental activities conducted at the NTS by user organizations, operations support contractors, and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) originally published in the EMP. The EPA conducts both the offsite environmental monitoring program around the NTS and post-operational monitoring efforts at non-NTS test locations used between 1961 and 1973 in other parts of the continental US. All of these monitoring activities are conducted under the auspices of the DOE/NV, which has the stated policy of conducting its operations in compliance with both the letter and the spirit of applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards.

  19. Airplane landing gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiorca, Salvatore

    1931-01-01

    This report presents an investigation of the design and construction of various types of landing gears. Some of the items discussed include: chassises, wheels, shock absorbers (rubber disk and rubber cord), as well as oleopneumatic shock absorbers. Various types of landing gears are also discussed such as the Messier, Bendix, Vickers, and Bleriot.

  20. Gear Crack Propagation Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Reduced weight is a major design goal in aircraft power transmissions. Some gear designs incorporate thin rims to help meet this goal. Thin rims, however, may lead to bending fatigue cracks. These cracks may propagate through a gear tooth or into the gear rim. A crack that propagates through a tooth would probably not be catastrophic, and ample warning of a failure could be possible. On the other hand, a crack that propagates through the rim would be catastrophic. Such cracks could lead to disengagement of a rotor or propeller from an engine, loss of an aircraft, and fatalities. To help create and validate tools for the gear designer, the NASA Lewis Research Center performed in-house analytical and experimental studies to investigate the effect of rim thickness on gear-tooth crack propagation. Our goal was to determine whether cracks grew through gear teeth (benign failure mode) or through gear rims (catastrophic failure mode) for various rim thicknesses. In addition, we investigated the effect of rim thickness on crack propagation life. A finite-element-based computer program simulated gear-tooth crack propagation. The analysis used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, and quarter-point, triangular elements were used at the crack tip to represent the stress singularity. The program had an automated crack propagation option in which cracks were grown numerically via an automated remeshing scheme. Crack-tip stress-intensity factors were estimated to determine crack-propagation direction. Also, various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack-propagation life. Experiments were performed in Lewis' Spur Gear Fatigue Rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Gears with various backup ratios were tested to validate crack-path predictions. Also, test gears were installed with special crack-propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending-fatigue crack growth. From both predictions and tests, gears with backup ratios

  1. Final reduction gear apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Y.; Hori, H.

    1987-04-21

    A final reduction gear apparatus is described comprising: a differential carrier which houses a gear assembly; an oil seal attached to a side gear shaft opening in the differential carrier, the oil seal having a main lip which may contact a periphery of a side gear shaft; and a guide member located outside of the oil seal at the side gear shaft opening, the guide member being formed as a member separate from the oil seal, the guide member having a slightly larger inner diameter than that of the main lip of the oil seal, and having guide surface concentric to the main lip, wherein 1/2 of the difference between the inner diameter of the guide member and the inner diameter of the main lip of the oil seal is within the limit of the elastic deformability of the main lip.

  2. Partial tooth gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  3. Gear noise origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    Each pair of meshing gears in a transmission gives rise to a source of vibratory excitation that can result in the radiation of sound. Each such source is most conveniently characterized as a displacement form of excitation generally referred to as the static transmission error of the gear pair. Contributions to the frequency spectrum of the static transmission error of spur and helical gears arising from tooth and gear body elastic deformations and from deviations of tooth surfaces from perfect involute surfaces are considered. Tooth surface deviations are decomposed into contributions giving rise to tooth meshing harmonic excitations and rotational harmonic or sideband excitations. Various types of gear tooth errors are defined and the contributions of these errors to different parts of the frequency spectrum are described. The attenuating effect on the static transmission error spectrum arising from the smoothing action of multiple tooth contact is explained.

  4. Design of Gear Drives With High Gear Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Fuentes, Alfonso; Vecchiato, Daniele; Gonzalez-Perez, Ignacio

    2005-01-01

    A three part paper to describe the results of several gear drive types with a high gear ratio is presented. A single stage planetary gear train with double helical gears is described with methods to reduce transmission errors and improve load distribution by regulating backlash during assembly. A new arrangement for face gear is also described. This new mechanism can perform rotations between axes that are collinear and intersected. Finally the design and simulation of an isostatic planetary gear train is presented. Conditions that can lead to noise and vibration of the planetary gear drive are described.

  5. 10 CFR 1045.41 - Use of classified addendums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Use of classified addendums. 1045.41 Section 1045.41 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NUCLEAR CLASSIFICATION AND DECLASSIFICATION Generation and Review of Documents Containing Restricted Data and Formerly Restricted Data § 1045.41 Use...

  6. 10 CFR 1045.41 - Use of classified addendums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of classified addendums. 1045.41 Section 1045.41 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NUCLEAR CLASSIFICATION AND DECLASSIFICATION Generation and Review of Documents Containing Restricted Data and Formerly Restricted Data § 1045.41 Use...

  7. 10 CFR 1045.41 - Use of classified addendums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of classified addendums. 1045.41 Section 1045.41 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NUCLEAR CLASSIFICATION AND DECLASSIFICATION Generation and Review of Documents Containing Restricted Data and Formerly Restricted Data § 1045.41 Use...

  8. 10 CFR 1045.41 - Use of classified addendums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of classified addendums. 1045.41 Section 1045.41 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NUCLEAR CLASSIFICATION AND DECLASSIFICATION Generation and Review of Documents Containing Restricted Data and Formerly Restricted Data § 1045.41 Use...

  9. High-Ratio Gear Train

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lefever, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed arrangement of two connected planetary differentials results in gear ratio many times that obtainable in conventional series gear assembly of comparable size. Ratios of several thousand would present no special problems. Selection of many different ratios is available with substantially similar gear diameters. Very high gear ratios would be obtained from small mechanism.

  10. Gear assembly for automobile transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ikemoto, K.; Tera Kura, Y.; Miyake, T.

    1986-03-25

    This patent describes a gear assembly including a pair of driving and driven gears permanently in meshing engagement with each other to provide a torque transmission therebetween. The driven gear is formed at one side thereof with a boss portion, and an additional gear axially slidable and rotatable on the boss portion of the driven gear and is permanently in meshing engagement with the driving gear to rotate at a gear ratio different from that of the driving and driven gears, additional gear is also resiliently in contact with a synchronizer mechanism assembled adjaecnt to the additional gear and having a spline piece fixed to the boss portion of the driven gear. The improvement wherein a toothed portion of the driven gear is formed at one end thereof with an annual stepped portion for provision of a predetermined annular gap between the additional gear and the one end face of the toothed portion of the driven gear. The resilient means is a waveshaped ring spring arranged in surrounding relationship with the boss portion of the driven gear and is engaged at its one end face with the additional gear and at its other end face with the spline piece of the synchronizer mechanism.

  11. Addendum to the post-closure permit application for the Bear Creek hydrogeologic regime at the Y-12 plant: Walk-in pits

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    In June 1987, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure/Post-Closure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG) located at the Y-12 Plant on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee was submitted to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for review and approval.The Closure Plan has been modified and revised several times. This document is an addendum to the Post-Closure Permit Application submitted to TDEC in June, 1994. This addendum contains information on the Walk-In Pits of the BCBG which is meant to supplement the information provided in the Post-Closure Permit Application submitted for the BCBG. This document is not intended to be a stand-alone document.

  12. Aircraft landing gear systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, John A. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Topics presented include the laboratory simulation of landing gear pitch-plane dynamics, a summary of recent aircraft/ground vehicle friction measurement tests, some recent aircraft tire thermal studies, and an evaluation of critical speeds in high-speed aircraft. Also presented are a review of NASA antiskid braking research, titanium matrix composite landing gear development, the current methods and perspective of aircraft flotation analysis, the flow rate and trajectory of water spray produced by an aircraft tire, and spin-up studies of the Space Shuttle Orbiter main gear tire.

  13. Computing Stresses In Spur Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, F. B.; Lin, H. H.

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic Analysis of Spur Gear Transmissions (DANST) developed as easy-to-use program for static and dynamic analysis of spur-gear systems. Used for parametric studies to predict effects of operating speed, torque, stiffness, damping, inertia, and tooth profile on dynamic loads and tooth-bending stresses in spur gears. Performs geometric modeling and dynamic analysis for low- or high-contact-ratio spur gears. Simulates gear systems with contact ratios ranging from one to three. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  14. Gear Fatigue Diagnostics and Prognostics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    one for single gear tooth fatigue, and one for gear-on-gear dynamometer-based tester ) we have been collecting crack initiation and crack propagation...fatigue tester ); and torque, angular speed, vibration, temperature, and crack-propagation (gear-on-gear dynamometer-based tester ). The main outcome...Description The test consists of two set of tests on a dynamometer and one set of test on the fatigue tester and some additional activities. Fig

  15. 50 CFR 622.188 - Required gear, authorized gear, and unauthorized gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO..., sea bass pot, and spearfishing gear. (c) Unauthorized gear. All gear types other than those specified... unauthorized gear on board may not be transferred at sea, regardless of where such transfer takes place,...

  16. 50 CFR 622.188 - Required gear, authorized gear, and unauthorized gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO..., sea bass pot, and spearfishing gear. (c) Unauthorized gear. All gear types other than those specified... unauthorized gear on board may not be transferred at sea, regardless of where such transfer takes place,...

  17. Planetary gear unit

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.

    1986-10-07

    This patent describes a planetary gear unit for the transmission of a motor vehicle, comprising: a first planetary gear unit which includes a pinion shaft, a planet pinion rotatably mounted on the pinion shaft, a sun gear engaging the planet pinion, and an arm member supporting the pinion shaft and having an extending portion extending to a point adjacent the sun gear; a thrust washer contacting the arm member, the thrust washer having radiating conduit means formed on a contacting surface thereof so as to communicate an inner circumference of the extending portion of the arm member with the pinion shaft, the pinion shaft having a conduit formed therein so as to communicate with the radiating conduit means with an inner surface of the planet pinion wherein the radiating conduit means further comprises uniform spaced bevel surfaces and grooves in communication with the bevel surfaces.

  18. Communication: Molecular gears.

    PubMed

    Burnell, E Elliott; de Lange, Cornelis A; Meerts, W Leo

    2016-09-07

    The (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of hexamethylbenzene orientationally ordered in the nematic liquid crystal ZLI-1132 is analysed using covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy. The spectrum contains over 350 000 lines with many overlapping transitions, from which four independent direct dipolar couplings are obtained. The rotations of the six methyl groups appear to be correlated due to mutual steric hindrance. Adjacent methyl groups show counter-rotating or geared motion. Hexamethylbenzene thus behaves as a molecular hexagonal gear.

  19. Multi-mesh gear dynamics program evaluation and enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, L. S.; Pike, J.

    1985-01-01

    A multiple mesh gear dynamics computer program was continually developed and modified during the last four years. The program can handle epicyclic gear systems as well as single mesh systems with internal, buttress, or helical tooth forms. The following modifications were added under the current funding: variable contact friction, planet cage and ring gear rim flexibility options, user friendly options, dynamic side bands, a speed survey option and the combining of the single and multiple mesh options into one general program. The modified program was evaluated by comparing calculated values to published test data and to test data taken on a Hamilton Standard turboprop reduction gear-box. In general, the correlation between the test data and the analytical data is good.

  20. An investigation of the transient thermal analysis of spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Bayoumy, L. E.; Akin, L. S.; Townsend, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    A finite element computer program is developed for evaluating the transient behavior of surface temperature in high performance spur gears. The time dimension is implemented using two and three point finite difference schemes. The different schemes are provided for the purpose of numerical stability and convergence studies. A detailed explanation of the gear cooling process leading to the establishment of a modified Blok model is also included. Other conventional models for approximating the heat transfer coefficients are available for comparison. Preliminary results are given showing snap shots of gear temperature contours at the initial stages of tooth engagement.

  1. Evaluation of optimum profile modification curves of profile shifted spur gears based on vibration responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Pang, Xu; Feng, Ranjiao; Wen, Bangchun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a mesh stiffness model is developed for profile shifted gears with addendum modifications and tooth profile modifications (TPMs). The time-varying mesh stiffness (TVMS), load sharing factor (LSF), loaded static transmission error (LSTE) and non-loaded static transmission error (NLSTE) of a profile shifted spur gear pair with TPMs are obtained by the analytical model. The optimum profile modification curve under different amounts of TPM is determined by analyzing the LSTE first. Then, considering the effect of NLSTE, finite element (FE) model of a geared rotor system is established. The system vibration responses under different TPM curves are analyzed and the optimum modification curve is further evaluated by amplitude frequency responses. The results show that the optimum modification curve is related to the amount of TPM and modification coefficients. The comparison of the optimum profile modification curves is evaluated by LSTE and vibration responses, which shows that the optimum modification curve should be determined by evaluating the vibration response of the geared rotor system in the low mesh frequency range.

  2. LIME KILN BUILDING, KILN BOTTOM SHOWING ROTATOR GEAR. (GEAR IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LIME KILN BUILDING, KILN BOTTOM SHOWING ROTATOR GEAR. (GEAR IS POINTED DOWN FOR PROPER ORIENTATION). - Solvay Process Company, Lime Kiln Building, Between Willis & Milton Avenues, Solvay, Onondaga County, NY

  3. 77 FR 29665 - International Conference on Harmonisation; Addendum to International Conference on Harmonisation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... Harmonisation Guidance on S6 Preclinical Safety Evaluation of Biotechnology-Derived Pharmaceuticals... Evaluation of Biotechnology-Derived Pharmaceuticals'' (S6 addendum). The S6 addendum was prepared under the... Evaluation of Biotechnology-Derived Pharmaceuticals'' (ICH S6) and to clarify and provide greater detail...

  4. 77 FR 35699 - Proposed Information Collection; Request for Public Comment: Addendum to Declaration for Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-14

    ... control over, Indian children; and to conduct an investigation of the character of each individual who is...: Addendum to Declaration for Federal Employment, Child Care and Indian Child Care Worker Positions AGENCY... Collection: Title: Addendum to Declaration for Federal Employment, Child Care and Indian Child Care...

  5. Magnetic Gearing Versus Conventional Gearing in Actuators for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puchhammer, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic geared actuators (MGA) are designed to perform highly reliable, robust and precise motion on satellite platforms or aerospace vehicles. The design allows MGA to be used for various tasks in space applications. In contrast to conventional geared drives, the contact and lubrication free force transmitting elements lead to a considerable lifetime and range extension of drive systems. This paper describes the fundamentals of magnetic wobbling gears (MWG) and the deduced inherent characteristics, and compares conventional and magnetic gearing.

  6. Gear crack propagation investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Ballarini, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of gear rim thickness on crack propagation life. The FRANC (FRacture ANalysis Code) computer program was used to simulate crack propagation. The FRANC program used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, finite element modeling, and a unique re-meshing scheme to determine crack tip stress distributions, estimate stress intensity factors, and model crack propagation. Various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack propagation life based on the calculated stress intensity factors. Experimental tests were performed in a gear fatigue rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Test gears were installed with special crack propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending fatigue crack growth. Good correlation between predicted and measured crack growth was achieved when the fatigue crack closure concept was introduced into the analysis. As the gear rim thickness decreased, the compressive cyclic stress in the gear tooth fillet region increased. This retarded crack growth and increased the number of crack propagation cycles to failure.

  7. Some Thoughts on Stability in Nonlinear Periodic Focusing Systems [Addendum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    McMillan, Edwin M.

    1968-03-29

    Addendum to September 5, 1967 report with the same title and with the abstract: A brief discussion is given of the long-term stability of particle motions through periodic focusing structures containing lumped nonlinear elements. A method is presented whereby one can specify the nonlinear elements in such a way as to generate a variety of structures in which the motion has long-term stability.

  8. Generation of gear tooth surfaces by application of CNC machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Chen, N. X.

    1994-01-01

    This study will demonstrate the importance of application of computer numerically controlled (CNC) machines in generation of gear tooth surfaces with new topology. This topology decreases gear vibration and will extend the gear capacity and service life. A preliminary investigation by a tooth contact analysis (TCA) program has shown that gear tooth surfaces in line contact (for instance, involute helical gears with parallel axes, worm gear drives with cylindrical worms, etc.) are very sensitive to angular errors of misalignment that cause edge contact and an unfavorable shape of transmission errors and vibration. The new topology of gear tooth surfaces is based on the localization of bearing contact, and the synthesis of a predesigned parabolic function of transmission errors that is able to absorb a piecewise linear function of transmission errors caused by gear misalignment. The report will describe the following topics: description of kinematics of CNC machines with six degrees of freedom that can be applied for generation of gear tooth surfaces with new topology. A new method for grinding of gear tooth surfaces by a cone surface or surface of revolution based on application of CNC machines is described. This method provides an optimal approximation of the ground surface to the given one. This method is especially beneficial when undeveloped ruled surfaces are to be ground. Execution of motions of the CNC machine is also described. The solution to this problem can be applied as well for the transfer of machine tool settings from a conventional generator to the CNC machine. The developed theory required the derivation of a modified equation of meshing based on application of the concept of space curves, space curves represented on surfaces, geodesic curvature, surface torsion, etc. Condensed information on these topics of differential geometry is provided as well.

  9. Kinematic precision of gear trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Goldrich, R. N.; Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1982-01-01

    Kinematic precision is affected by errors which are the result of either intentional adjustments or accidental defects in manufacturing and assembly of gear trains. A method for the determination of kinematic precision of gear trains is described. The method is based on the exact kinematic relations for the contact point motions of the gear tooth surfaces under the influence of errors. An approximate method is also explained. Example applications of the general approximate methods are demonstrated for gear trains consisting of involute (spur and helical) gears, circular arc (Wildhaber-Novikov) gears, and spiral bevel gears. Gear noise measurements from a helicopter transmission are presented and discussed with relation to the kinematic precision theory.

  10. Kinematic precision of gear trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Goldrich, R. N.; Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1983-01-01

    Kinematic precision is affected by errors which are the result of either intentional adjustments or accidental defects in manufacturing and assembly of gear trains. A method for the determination of kinematic precision of gear trains is described. The method is based on the exact kinematic relations for the contact point motions of the gear tooth surfaces under the influence of errors. An approximate method is also explained. Example applications of the general approximate methods are demonstrated for gear trains consisting of involute (spur and helical) gears, circular arc (Wildhaber-Novikov) gears, and spiral bevel gears. Gear noise measurements from a helicopter transmission are presented and discussed with relation to the kinematic precision theory. Previously announced in STAR as N82-32733

  11. Vibro-acoustic propagation of gear dynamics in a gear-bearing-housing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yi; Eritenel, Tugan; Ericson, Tristan M.; Parker, Robert G.

    2014-10-01

    This work developed a computational process to predict noise radiation from gearboxes. It developed a system-level vibro-acoustic model of an actual gearbox, including gears, bearings, shafts, and housing structure, and compared the results to experiments. The meshing action of gear teeth causes vibrations to propagate through shafts and bearings to the housing radiating noise. The vibration excitation from the gear mesh and the system response were predicted using finite element and lumped-parameter models. From these results, the radiated noise was calculated using a boundary element model of the housing. Experimental vibration and noise measurements from the gearbox confirmed the computational predictions. The developed tool was used to investigate the influence of standard rolling element and modified journal bearings on gearbox radiated noise.

  12. Study of Effect of Quenching Deformation Influenced by 17CrNiMo6 Gear Shaft of Carburization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zirui; Yu, Shenjun; Xu, Jinwu

    The 17CrNiMo6 steel is mainly used for the gear shaft of large modulus in many fields of heavy industry such as mining, transit, hoist, forging and so on[1]. The size of addendum circle and common normal line is changed a lot beyond the tolerance because of the long time of carburizing process and the out-of-step structural stress and thermal stress during the quenching process. And thus the posterior grinding efficiency and quality are influenced. In the paper comparison and analysis of the deformation affected by solid and hollow gear shafts were done and the methods of simulation and practice were both used. The results are as follows: the deformation of gear shaft was small before and after carburizing while that of gear shaft was large before and after quenching because of different cooling velocity, structure and hardness of each position. And the deformation of hollow was much smaller than that of solid. Therefore, if the hollow gear shaft is used, the waste of material will be decreased, and finishing cost will be reduced, and thus the technology of heat treatment will be optimized.

  13. A superconducting magnetic gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A. M.

    2016-05-01

    A comparison is made between a magnetic gear using permanent magnets and superconductors. The objective is to see if there are any fundamental reasons why superconducting magnets should not provide higher power densities than permanent magnets. The gear is based on the variable permeability design of Attilah and Howe (2001 IEEE Trans. Magn. 37 2844-46) in which a ring of permanent magnets surrounding a ring of permeable pole pieces with a different spacing gives an internal field component at the beat frequency. Superconductors can provide much larger fields and forces but will saturate the pole pieces. However the gear mechanism still operates, but in a different way. The magnetisation of the pole pieces is now constant but rotates with angle at the beat frequency. The result is a cylindrical Halbach array which produces an internal field with the same symmetry as in the linear regime, but has an analytic solution. In this paper a typical gear system is analysed with finite elements using FlexPDE. It is shown that the gear can work well into the saturation regime and that the Halbach array gives a good approximation to the results. Replacing the permanent magnets with superconducting tapes can give large increases in torque density, and for something like a wind turbine a combined gear and generator is possible. However there are major practical problems. Perhaps the most fundamental is the large high frequency field which is inevitably present and which will cause AC losses. Also large magnetic fields are required, with all the practical problems of high field superconducting magnets in rotating machines. Nevertheless there are ways of mitigating these difficulties and it seems worthwhile to explore the possibilities of this technology further.

  14. ADDENDUM: Addendum to 'An innovation and policy agenda for commercially competitive plug-in hybrid electric vehicles'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, Derek M.; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2009-07-01

    This addendum adds to the analysis of 'An innovation and policy agenda for commercially competitive plug-in hybrid electric vehicles' (D M Lemoine et al 2008 Environ. Res. Lett. 3 014003) to the case of all-electric vehicles (EVs). We pay particular attention to grid impacts, break-even battery costs, and the three ways in which EVs could dramatically change the results we obtained for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs).

  15. Theory of gearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.

    1989-01-01

    Basic mathematical problems on the theory of gearing are covered in this book, such as the necessary and sufficient conditions of envelope existence, relations between principal curvatures and directions for surfaces of mating gears. Also included are singularities of surfaces accompanied by undercutting the process of generation, the phenomena of envelope of lines of contact, and the principles for generation of conjugate surfaces. Special attention is given to the algorithms for computer aided simulation of meshing and tooth contact. This edition was complemented with the results of research recently performed by the author and his doctoral students. The book contains sample problems and also problems for the reader to solve.

  16. Consideration of Moving Tooth Load in Gear Crack Propagation Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Spievak, Lisa E.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Ingraffea, Anthony R.

    2001-01-01

    Robust gear designs consider not only crack initiation, but crack propagation trajectories for a fail-safe design. In actual gear operation, the magnitude as well as the position of the force changes as the gear rotates through the mesh. A study to determine the effect of moving gear tooth load on crack propagation predictions was performed. Two-dimensional analysis of an involute spur gear and three-dimensional analysis of a spiral-bevel pinion gear using the finite element method and boundary element method were studied and compared to experiments. A modified theory for predicting gear crack propagation paths based on the criteria of Erdogan and Sih was investigated. Crack simulation based on calculated stress intensity factors and mixed mode crack angle prediction techniques using a simple static analysis in which the tooth load was located at the highest point of single tooth contact was validated. For three-dimensional analysis, however, the analysis was valid only as long as the crack did not approach the contact region on the tooth.

  17. Computerized Design and Generation of Low-Noise Gears with Localized Bearing Contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Chen, Ningxin; Chen, Jui-Sheng; Lu, Jian; Handschuh, Robert F.

    1995-01-01

    The results of research projects directed at the reduction of noise caused by misalignment of the following gear drives: double-circular arc helical gears, modified involute helical gears, face-milled spiral bevel gears, and face-milled formate cut hypoid gears are presented. Misalignment in these types of gear drives causes periodic, almost linear discontinuous functions of transmission errors. The period of such functions is the cycle of meshing when one pair of teeth is changed for the next. Due to the discontinuity of such functions of transmission errors high vibration and noise are inevitable. A predesigned parabolic function of transmission errors that is able to absorb linear discontinuous functions of transmission errors and change the resulting function of transmission errors into a continuous one is proposed. The proposed idea was successfully tested using spiral bevel gears and the noise was reduced a substantial amount in comparison with the existing design. The idea of a predesigned parabolic function is applied for the reduction of noise of helical and hypoid gears. The effectiveness of the proposed approach has been investigated by developed TCA (tooth contact analysis) programs. The bearing contact for the mentioned gears is localized. Conditions that avoid edge contact for the gear drives have been determined. Manufacturing of helical gears with new topology by hobs and grinding worms has been investigated.

  18. Electronic automatic gear transmission control apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Koshizawa, T.

    1989-04-25

    This patent describes an electronic automatic gear transmission control apparatus having a shift schedule map for commanding an optimum gear position based on a vehicle speed signal and an accelerator opening signal, the electronic automatic gear transmission control apparatus comprising: first means for comparing a gear position commanded by the shift schedule map with a present gear position; second means for effecting a gear shift to a gear position which is one gear position higher than the present gear position and for restraining a gear shift to the commanded gear position for a prescribed period of time, if the commanded gear position requires an upshift to a gear position which is two or more gear positions higher than the present gear position as a result of the comparison performed by the first means; and third means for holding the gear position which is one gear position higher than the present gear position until an accelerator pedal is depressed again, when the accelerator opening signal indicates an idling position while the gear shift up to the gear position which is one gear position higher than the present gear position, is being effected by the second means.

  19. Bacteria turn tiny gears

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Swarms of bacteria turn two 380-micron long gears, opening the possibility of building hybrid biological machines at the microscopic scale. Read more at Wired: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/12/bacterial-micro-machine/#more-15684 or Scientific American: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=brownian-motion-bacteria

  20. Side gear mounting for differential assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Pederson, H.

    1989-02-21

    A differential gear assembly is described of the type which includes a differential gear housing having means for receiving a pair of axle ends together with a pair of substantially axially aligned side gears coupled to the pair of axle ends for rotation therewith, the side gears having helix angles inclined in the same direction with respect to the axes of rotation thereof, characterized in that the gear assembly includes means for preventing axial thrust forces developed by one of the side gears from loading the other of the side gears. The preventing means includes means for separating the side gears such that there is no direct or indirect engagement between confronting end faces of the side gears when thrust forces of one of the side gears are directed toward the other of the side gears; and the means for axially separating the side gears includes a pair of overlapping elements associated with one of the side gears of the gear housing.

  1. Improve planetary gear vibration analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, M.S. )

    1993-05-01

    To diagnose problems in rotating machinery, an analyst must be able to identify the frequencies present in the data. In the case of two gears with fixed centerlines, the generated gearmesh frequency is simply calculated as the number of teeth on one gear times its rotational speed (in Hz, cpm, etc.) But when the shaft centerlines move relative to each other, as with a planet gear orbiting around a sun gear, gearmesh frequency is no longer equal to gear rotational sped times the gear's number of teeth. In this case, you must calculate the relative speed between planet carrier and gear with the fixed centerline to obtain gearmesh frequency. The paper presents the equations necessary to calculate gearmesh frequencies in order to diagnose problems.

  2. Displaceable Gear Torque Controlled Driver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph S., Jr. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are provided for a torque driver including a displaceable gear to limit torque transfer to a fastener at a precisely controlled torque limit. A biasing assembly biases a first gear into engagement with a second gear for torque transfer between the first and second gear. The biasing assembly includes a pressurized cylinder controlled at a constant pressure that corresponds to a torque limit. A calibrated gage and valve is used to set the desired torque limit. One or more coiled output linkages connect the first gear with the fastener adaptor which may be a socket for a nut. A gear tooth profile provides a separation force that overcomes the bias to limit torque at the desired torque limit. Multiple fasteners may be rotated simultaneously to a desired torque limit if additional output spur gears are provided. The torque limit is adjustable and may be different for fasteners within the same fastener configuration.

  3. Close-up of LSRA Shuttle main gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A space shuttle landing gear system is clearly seen between the two main landing gear components on this NASA CV-990, modified as a Landing Systems Research Aircraft. The space shuttle landing gear test unit, operated by a high-pressure hydraulic system, allowed engineers to assess and document the performance of space shuttle main and nose landing gear systems, tires and wheel assemblies, plus braking and nose wheel steering performance. The series of 155 test missions for the space shuttle program, conducted at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, provided extensive data about the life and endurance of the shuttle tire systems and helped raise the shuttle crosswind landing limits at Kennedy.

  4. The design of worm gear sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Razzaghi, Andrea I.

    1987-01-01

    A method is presented for designing worm gear sets to meet torque multiplication requirements. First, the fundamentals of worm gear design are discussed, covering worm gear set nomenclature, kinematics and proportions, force analysis, and stress analysis. Then, a suggested design method is discussed, explaining how to take a worm gear set application, and specify a complete worm gear set design. The discussions are limited to cylindrical worm gear sets that have a 90 deg shaft angle between the worm and the mating gear.

  5. Planetary gear train for automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraiwa, K.

    1987-04-28

    A planetary gear train is described for an automatic transmission, the planetary gear train having gear ratios including a first forward gear ratio and a reverse, the planetary gear train comprising: an input shaft; a basic planetary gearing including a first rotary element which is to be held stationary when the first gear ratio is established and also when the reverse is established, and a second rotary element which is to serve as an output member of the basic planetary gearing; an output planetary gear set including a ring gear, a sun gear and a pinion carrier; change speed means for establishing any desired one of the gear ratios; a clutch means for establishing a connection between the other one of the ring gear and the sun gear of the output planetary gear set and the first rotary element of the basic planetary gearing during operation with the first gear ratio and also during operation with the reverse, and a brake means for anchoring the other one of the ring gear and the sun gear of the output planetary gear set during operation with the reverse; and an output shaft connected to the pinion carrier of the output planetary gear set.

  6. Improvements in Spiral-Bevel Gears to Reduce Noise and Increase Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Henry, Zachary S.; Litvin, Faydor L.

    1994-01-01

    Advanced-design spiral-bevel gears were tested in an OH-58D helicopter transmission using the NASA 500 hp Helicopter Transmission Test Stand. Four different gear designs were tested. The four designs tested were the current design of the OH-58D transmission, a higher-strength design the same as the current but with an increased fillet radius to reduce gear tooth bending stress, and two versions of a lower-noise design the same as the high-strength but with modified tooth geometry to reduce transmission error and noise. Noise, vibration, and tooth strain tests were performed and significant gear stress and noise reductions were achieved.

  7. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Reverse gear. 230.89 Section 230.89 Transportation... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants... quadrant. Proper counterbalance shall be provided for the valve gear. (b) Air-operated power reverse...

  8. 46 CFR 28.885 - Cargo gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo gear. 28.885 Section 28.885 Shipping COAST GUARD... Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.885 Cargo gear. (a) The safe working load (SWL) for the assembled gear... the load the gear is approved to lift, excluding the weight of the gear itself. (b) All wire...

  9. 46 CFR 28.885 - Cargo gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo gear. 28.885 Section 28.885 Shipping COAST GUARD... Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.885 Cargo gear. (a) The safe working load (SWL) for the assembled gear... the load the gear is approved to lift, excluding the weight of the gear itself. (b) All wire...

  10. 46 CFR 28.885 - Cargo gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo gear. 28.885 Section 28.885 Shipping COAST GUARD... Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.885 Cargo gear. (a) The safe working load (SWL) for the assembled gear... the load the gear is approved to lift, excluding the weight of the gear itself. (b) All wire...

  11. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reverse gear. 230.89 Section 230.89 Transportation... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants... quadrant. Proper counterbalance shall be provided for the valve gear. (b) Air-operated power reverse...

  12. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Reverse gear. 230.89 Section 230.89 Transportation... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants... quadrant. Proper counterbalance shall be provided for the valve gear. (b) Air-operated power reverse...

  13. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reverse gear. 230.89 Section 230.89 Transportation... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants... quadrant. Proper counterbalance shall be provided for the valve gear. (b) Air-operated power reverse...

  14. 46 CFR 28.885 - Cargo gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo gear. 28.885 Section 28.885 Shipping COAST GUARD... Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.885 Cargo gear. (a) The safe working load (SWL) for the assembled gear... the load the gear is approved to lift, excluding the weight of the gear itself. (b) All wire...

  15. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reverse gear. 230.89 Section 230.89 Transportation... Reversing Gear § 230.89 Reverse gear. (a) General provisions. Reverse gear, reverse levers, and quadrants... quadrant. Proper counterbalance shall be provided for the valve gear. (b) Air-operated power reverse...

  16. 46 CFR 28.885 - Cargo gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo gear. 28.885 Section 28.885 Shipping COAST GUARD... Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.885 Cargo gear. (a) The safe working load (SWL) for the assembled gear... the load the gear is approved to lift, excluding the weight of the gear itself. (b) All wire...

  17. Gear Performance Improved by Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, Timothy L.

    2004-01-01

    Gears, bearings, and other mechanical elements transmit loads through contacting surfaces. Even if properly designed, manufactured, installed, and maintained, gears and bearings will eventually fail because of the fatigue of the working surfaces. Economical means for extending the fatigue lives of gears and bearings are highly desired, and coatings offer the opportunity to engineer surfaces to extend the fatigue lives of mechanical components. A tungsten-containing diamondlike-carbon coating exhibiting high hardness, low friction, and good toughness was evaluated for application to spur gears. Fatigue testing was done at the NASA Glenn Research Center on both uncoated and coated spur gears. The results showed that the coating extended the surface fatigue lives of the gears by a factor of about 5 relative to the uncoated gears. For the experiments, a lot of spur test gears made from AISI 9310 gear steel were case-carburized and ground to aerospace specifications. The geometries of the 28-tooth, 8-pitch gears were verified as meeting American Gear Manufacturing Association (AGMA) quality class 12. One-half of the gears were randomly selected for coating. The method of coating was selected to achieve desired adherence, toughness, hardness, and low-friction characteristics. First the gears to be coated were prepared by blasting (vapor honing) with Al2O3 particles and cleaning. Then, the gears were provided with a thin adhesion layer of elemental chromium followed by magnetron sputtering of the outer coating consisting of carbon (70 at.%), hydrogen (15 at.%), tungsten (12 at.%), and nickel (3 at.%) (atomic percent at the surface). In total, the coating thickness was about 2.5 to 3 microns. As compared with the steel substrate, the coated surface was harder by a factor of about 2 and had a smaller elastic modulus. All gears were tested using a 5-centistoke synthetic oil, a 10,000-rpm rotation speed, and a hertzian contact stress of at least 1.7 GPa (250 ksi). Tests were

  18. Communication Platform Payload Definition (CPPD) study. Volume 3: Addendum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, E. M.; Driggers, T.; Jorasch, R.

    1986-01-01

    This is Volume 3 (Addendum) of the Ford Aerospace & Communications Corporation Final Report for the Communication Platform Payload Definition (CPPD) Study Program conducted for NASA Lewis Research Center under contract No. NAS3-24235. This report presents the results of the study effort leading to five potential platform payloads to service CONUS and WARC Region 2 traffic demand as projected to the year 2008. The report addresses establishing the data bases, developing service aggregation scenarios, selecting and developing 5 payload concepts, performing detailed definition of the 5 payloads, costing them, identifying critical technology, and finally comparing the payloads with each other and also with non-aggregated equivalent services.

  19. Gear Drive Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Philadelphia Gear Corporation used two COSMIC computer programs; one dealing with shrink fit analysis and the other with rotor dynamics problems in computerized design and test work. The programs were used to verify existing in-house programs to insure design accuracy by checking its company-developed computer methods against procedures developed by other organizations. Its specialty is in custom units for unique applications, such as Coast Guard ice breaking ships, steel mill drives, coal crusher, sewage treatment equipment and electricity.

  20. Addendum to Composite Analysis for Low-Level Waste Disposal in the 200 Area Plateau of the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, Marcel P.; Freeman, Eugene J.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Kincaid, Charles T.; Coony, Mike M.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Eslinger, Paul W.

    2001-09-28

    This report summarizes efforts to complete an addendum analysis to the first iteration of the Composite Analysis for Low-Level Waste Disposal in the 200 Area Plateau of the Hanford Site (Composite Analysis). This document describes the background and performance objectives of the Composite Analysis and this addendum analysis. The methods used, results, and conclusions for this Addendum analysis are summarized, and recommendations are made for work to be undertaken in anticipation of a second analysis.

  1. Worm Gear With Hydrostatic Engagement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaiko, Lev I.

    1994-01-01

    In proposed worm-gear transmission, oil pumped at high pressure through meshes between teeth of gear and worm coil. Pressure in oil separates meshing surfaces slightly, and oil reduces friction between surfaces. Conceived for use in drive train between gas-turbine engine and rotor of helicopter. Useful in other applications in which weight critical. Test apparatus simulates and measures some loading conditions of proposed worm gear with hydrostatic engagement.

  2. High-performance magnetic gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atallah, Kais; Calverley, Stuart D.; Howe, David

    2004-05-01

    Magnetic gearing may offer significant advantages such as reduced maintenance and improved reliability, inherent overload protection, and physical isolation between input and output shafts. Despite these advantages, it has received relatively little attention, to date, probably due to the poor torque transmission capability of proposed magnetic gears. The paper describes a magnetic gear topology, which combines a significantly higher torque transmission capability and a very high efficiency.

  3. Concrete samples for organic samples, data package and 222-S validation summary report. Addendum 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, R.E.

    1994-11-01

    This document is in two parts: the first is the data package entitled ``Concrete Samples for Organic Samples`` and the second is entitled ``Concrete Samples for Organic Samples -- Addendum 1A`` which is the 222-S validation summary report.

  4. SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORT FOR PACKAGING, MODEL 9977, ADDENDUM 3, JUSTIFICATION FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITY CONTENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G.

    2011-10-31

    This Addendum establishes a new family of content envelopes consisting of small quantities of radioactive materials. These content envelopes and specific packing configurations are shown to be subcritical. However, the dose rates of some payloads must be measured and shown to comply with applicable radiation limits. Authorization for shipment of the content envelop requires acceptance of this Addendum by the DOE-HQ certifying official as a supplement to the 9977 SARP Revision 2 and DOE-HQ's subsequent revision of the CoC Revision 10 (which is based on SARP Addendum 2 and SARP Addendum 4) to authorize the additional content envelope. The Small Gram Quantity Content Envelopes and packing configurations will be incorporated in the next revision of the 9977 SARP.

  5. Comprehension monitoring program, groundwater, technical plan, version 3.3 (addendum). Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1990-09-01

    This addendum details modifications proposed for the CMP groundwater monitoring program. These modifications are based on previous CMP monitoring experience and are directed toward optimizing network efficiencies and maximizing data utility.

  6. Gears Based on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Deardorff, Glenn

    2005-01-01

    Gears based on carbon nanotubes (see figure) have been proposed as components of an emerging generation of molecular- scale machines and sensors. In comparison with previously proposed nanogears based on diamondoid and fullerene molecules, the nanotube-based gears would have simpler structures and are more likely to be realizable by practical fabrication processes. The impetus for the practical development of carbon-nanotube- based gears arises, in part, from rapid recent progress in the fabrication of carbon nanotubes with prescribed diameters, lengths, chiralities, and numbers of concentric shells. The shafts of the proposed gears would be made from multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The gear teeth would be rigid molecules (typically, benzyne molecules), bonded to the nanotube shafts at atomically precise positions. For fabrication, it may be possible to position the molecular teeth by use of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) or other related techniques. The capability to position individual organic molecules at room temperature by use of an STM tip has already been demonstrated. Routes to the chemical synthesis of carbon-nanotube-based gears are also under investigation. Chemical and physical aspects of the synthesis of molecular scale gears based on carbon nanotubes and related molecules, and dynamical properties of nanotube- based gears, have been investigated by computational simulations using established methods of quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics. Several particularly interesting and useful conclusions have been drawn from the dynamical simulations performed thus far: The forces acting on the gears would be more sensitive to local molecular motions than to gross mechanical motions of the overall gears. Although no breakage of teeth or of chemical bonds is expected at temperatures up to at least 3,000 K, the gears would not work well at temperatures above a critical range from about 600 to about 1,000 K. Gear temperature could probably be controlled by

  7. Precise low cost chain gears for heliostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedke, Phillip; Lewandowski, Arkadiusz; Pfahl, Andreas; Hölle, Erwin

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates the potential of chain gears as precise and low cost driving systems for rim drive heliostats. After explaining chain gear basics the polygon effect and chain lengthening are investigated. The polygon effect could be measured by a heliostat with chain rim gear and the chain lengthening with an accordant test set up. Two gear stages are scope of this work: a rim gear and an intermediate gear. Dimensioning, pretensioning and designing for both stages are explained.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Based Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Srivastava, Deepak; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties of a multi-walled carbon nanotube based gear. Previous work computationally suggested that molecular gears fashioned from (14,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes operate well at 50-100 gigahertz. The gears were formed from nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. The gear in this study was based on the smallest multi-walled nanotube supported by some experimental evidence. Each gear was a (52,0) nanotube surrounding a (37,10) nanotube with approximate 20.4 and 16,8 A radii respectively. These sizes were chosen to be consistent with inter-tube spacing observed by and were slightly larger than graphite inter-layer spacings. The benzyne teeth were attached via 2+4 cycloaddition to exterior of the (52,0) tube. 2+4 bonds were used rather than the 2+2 bonds observed by Hoke since 2+4 bonds are preferred by naphthalene and quantum calculations by Jaffe suggest that 2+4 bonds are preferred on carbon nanotubes of sufficient diameter. One gear was 'powered' by forcing the atoms near the end of the outside buckytube to rotate to simulate a motor. A second gear was allowed to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its outside buckytube on a cylinder. The ends of both gears were constrained to stay in an approximately constant position relative to each other, simulating a casing, to insure that the gear teeth meshed. The stiff meshing aromatic gear teeth transferred angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. The simulation was performed in a vacuum and with a software thermostat. Preliminary results suggest that the powered gear had trouble turning the driven gear without slip. The larger radius and greater mass of these gears relative to the (14,0) gears previously studied requires a

  9. High Pressure Angle Gears: Comparison to Typical Gear Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Zabrajsek, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    A preliminary study has been completed to determine the feasibility of using high-pressure angle gears in aeronautic and space applications. Tests were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Spur Gear Test Facility at speeds up to 10,000 rpm and 73 N*m (648 in.*lb) for 3.18, 2.12, and 1.59 module gears (8, 12, and 16 diametral pitch gears), all designed to operate in the same test facility. The 3.18 module (8-diametral pitch), 28 tooth, 20deg pressure angle gears are the GRC baseline test specimen. Also, 2.12 module (12-diametral pitch), 42 tooth, 25deg pressure angle gears were tested. Finally 1.59 module (16-diametral pitch), 56 tooth, 35deg pressure angle gears were tested. The high-pressure angle gears were the most efficient when operated in the high-speed aerospace mode (10,000 rpm, lubricated with a synthetic turbine engine oil), and produced the lowest wear rates when tested with a perfluoroether-based grease. The grease tests were conducted at 150 rpm and 71 N*m (630 in.*lb).

  10. 50 CFR 665.427 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Archipelago Fisheries § 665.427 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) Mariana coral reef ecosystem MUS may... vehicles/submersibles. (b) Mariana coral reef ecosystem MUS may not be taken by means of poisons... subpart who is established to be fishing for Mariana coral reef ecosystem MUS in the management area...

  11. 50 CFR 665.227 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Fisheries § 665.227 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) Hawaii coral reef ecosystem MUS may be taken.../submersibles. (b) Hawaii coral reef ecosystem MUS may not be taken by means of poisons, explosives, or... established to be fishing for Hawaii coral reef ecosystem MUS in the Hawaii management area is prohibited....

  12. 50 CFR 665.127 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Fisheries § 665.127 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) American Samoa coral reef ecosystem MUS may be.../submersibles. (b) American Samoa coral reef ecosystem MUS may not be taken by means of poisons, explosives, or... established to be fishing for coral reef ecosystem MUS in the management area is prohibited. (c) Existing...

  13. 50 CFR 665.127 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Fisheries § 665.127 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) American Samoa coral reef ecosystem MUS may be.../submersibles. (b) American Samoa coral reef ecosystem MUS may not be taken by means of poisons, explosives, or... established to be fishing for coral reef ecosystem MUS in the management area is prohibited. (c) Existing...

  14. 50 CFR 665.427 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Archipelago Fisheries § 665.427 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) Mariana coral reef ecosystem MUS may... vehicles/submersibles. (b) Mariana coral reef ecosystem MUS may not be taken by means of poisons... subpart who is established to be fishing for Mariana coral reef ecosystem MUS in the management area...

  15. 50 CFR 665.427 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Archipelago Fisheries § 665.427 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) Mariana coral reef ecosystem MUS may... vehicles/submersibles. (b) Mariana coral reef ecosystem MUS may not be taken by means of poisons... subpart who is established to be fishing for Mariana coral reef ecosystem MUS in the management area...

  16. 50 CFR 665.427 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Archipelago Fisheries § 665.427 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) Mariana coral reef ecosystem MUS may... vehicles/submersibles. (b) Mariana coral reef ecosystem MUS may not be taken by means of poisons... subpart who is established to be fishing for Mariana coral reef ecosystem MUS in the management area...

  17. 50 CFR 665.227 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Fisheries § 665.227 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) Hawaii coral reef ecosystem MUS may be taken.../submersibles. (b) Hawaii coral reef ecosystem MUS may not be taken by means of poisons, explosives, or... established to be fishing for Hawaii coral reef ecosystem MUS in the Hawaii management area is prohibited....

  18. 50 CFR 665.227 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Fisheries § 665.227 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) Hawaii coral reef ecosystem MUS may be taken.../submersibles. (b) Hawaii coral reef ecosystem MUS may not be taken by means of poisons, explosives, or... established to be fishing for Hawaii coral reef ecosystem MUS in the Hawaii management area is prohibited....

  19. 50 CFR 665.227 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Fisheries § 665.227 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) Hawaii coral reef ecosystem MUS may be taken.../submersibles. (b) Hawaii coral reef ecosystem MUS may not be taken by means of poisons, explosives, or... established to be fishing for Hawaii coral reef ecosystem MUS in the Hawaii management area is prohibited....

  20. 50 CFR 665.127 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Fisheries § 665.127 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) American Samoa coral reef ecosystem MUS may be.../submersibles. (b) American Samoa coral reef ecosystem MUS may not be taken by means of poisons, explosives, or... established to be fishing for coral reef ecosystem MUS in the management area is prohibited. (c) Existing...

  1. 50 CFR 665.127 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Fisheries § 665.127 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) American Samoa coral reef ecosystem MUS may be.../submersibles. (b) American Samoa coral reef ecosystem MUS may not be taken by means of poisons, explosives, or... established to be fishing for coral reef ecosystem MUS in the management area is prohibited. (c) Existing...

  2. 50 CFR 665.427 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Archipelago Fisheries § 665.427 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) Mariana coral reef ecosystem MUS may... vehicles/submersibles. (b) Mariana coral reef ecosystem MUS may not be taken by means of poisons... subpart who is established to be fishing for Mariana coral reef ecosystem MUS in the management area...

  3. 50 CFR 665.127 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Fisheries § 665.127 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) American Samoa coral reef ecosystem MUS may be.../submersibles. (b) American Samoa coral reef ecosystem MUS may not be taken by means of poisons, explosives, or... established to be fishing for coral reef ecosystem MUS in the management area is prohibited. (c) Existing...

  4. 50 CFR 665.227 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Fisheries § 665.227 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) Hawaii coral reef ecosystem MUS may be taken.../submersibles. (b) Hawaii coral reef ecosystem MUS may not be taken by means of poisons, explosives, or... established to be fishing for Hawaii coral reef ecosystem MUS in the Hawaii management area is prohibited....

  5. 50 CFR 665.627 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Island Area Fisheries § 665.627 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) Coral reef ecosystem MUS may be...) Hand net/dip net; (5) Hoop net for Kona crab; (6) Throw net; (7) Barrier net; (8) Surround/purse net....) in the U.S. EEZ waters around Howland Island, Baker Island, Jarvis Island, Wake Island, Kingman...

  6. 50 CFR 665.627 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Island Area Fisheries § 665.627 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) Coral reef ecosystem MUS may be...) Hand net/dip net; (5) Hoop net for Kona crab; (6) Throw net; (7) Barrier net; (8) Surround/purse net....) in the U.S. EEZ waters around Howland Island, Baker Island, Jarvis Island, Wake Island, Kingman...

  7. 50 CFR 665.627 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Island Area Fisheries § 665.627 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) Coral reef ecosystem MUS may be...) Hand net/dip net; (5) Hoop net for Kona crab; (6) Throw net; (7) Barrier net; (8) Surround/purse net....) in the U.S. EEZ waters around Howland Island, Baker Island, Jarvis Island, Wake Island, Kingman...

  8. 50 CFR 665.627 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Island Area Fisheries § 665.627 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) Coral reef ecosystem MUS may be...) Hand net/dip net; (5) Hoop net for Kona crab; (6) Throw net; (7) Barrier net; (8) Surround/purse net....) in the U.S. EEZ waters around Howland Island, Baker Island, Jarvis Island, Wake Island, Kingman...

  9. 50 CFR 665.627 - Allowable gear and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Island Area Fisheries § 665.627 Allowable gear and gear restrictions. (a) Coral reef ecosystem MUS may be...) Hand net/dip net; (5) Hoop net for Kona crab; (6) Throw net; (7) Barrier net; (8) Surround/purse net....) in the U.S. EEZ waters around Howland Island, Baker Island, Jarvis Island, Wake Island, Kingman...

  10. Double Helical Gear Performance Results in High Speed Gear Trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Ehinger, Ryan; Sinusas, Eric; Kilmain, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The operation of high speed gearing systems in the transmissions of tiltrotor aircraft has an effect on overall propulsion system efficiency. Recent work has focused on many aspects of high-speed helical gear trains as would be used in tiltrotor aircraft such as operational characteristics, comparison of analytical predictions to experimental data and the affect of superfinishing on transmission performance. Baseline tests of an aerospace quality system have been conducted in the NASA Glenn High-Speed Helical Gear Train Test Facility and have been described in earlier studies. These earlier tests had utilized single helical gears. The results that will be described in this study are those attained using double helical gears. This type of gear mesh can be configured in this facility to either pump the air-oil environment from the center gap between the meshing gears to the outside of tooth ends or in the reverse direction. Tests were conducted with both inward and outward air-oil pumping directions. Results are compared to the earlier baseline results of single helical gears.

  11. Double Helical Gear Performance Results in High Speed Gear Trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Ehinger, Ryan; Sinusas, Eric; Kilmain, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The operation of high speed gearing systems in the transmissions of tiltrotor aircraft has an effect on overall propulsion system efficiency. Recent work has focused on many aspects of high-speed helical gear trains as would be used in tiltrotor aircraft such as operational characteristics, comparison of analytical predictions to experimental data and the affect of superfinishing on transmission performance. Baseline tests of an aerospace quality system have been conducted in the NASA Glenn High-Speed Helical Gear Train Test Facility and have been described in earlier studies. These earlier tests had utilized single helical gears. The results that will be described in this study are those attained using double helical gears. This type of gear mesh can be configured in this facility to either pump the air-oil environment from the center gap between the meshing gears to the outside of tooth ends or in the reverse direction. Tests were conducted with both inward and outward air-oil pumping directions. Results are compared to the earlier baseline results of single helical gears.

  12. Planetary gear train for automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraiwa, K.

    1987-03-31

    A planetary gear train is described comprising: a first planetary gear set having rotary elements including a first sun gear, a first ring gear and a first pinion carrier rotatably supporting a plurality of first pinions meshing with the first sun gear and the first ring gear; a second planetary gear set having rotary elements including a second sun gear, a second ring gear and a second pinion carrier rotatably supporting a plurality of second pinions meshing with the second sun gear and the second ring gear; an input shaft drivingly-connected with the first ring gear; an output shaft; first drive connection establishing means for connecting the second ring gear with the output shaft; the first drive connection establishing means comprising: a third planetary gear set including a third sun gear constantly connected with the second ring gear, a third ring gear, and a third pinion carrier constantly connected with the output shaft. The third pinion carrier rotatably supports third pinions meshing with the third sun and ring gears.

  13. Materials for helicopter gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Some of the power train transmission gears in helicopter drive systems can become critical components as performance requirements are increased; accordingly, increasing attention must be paid to new alloys in order to obtain required performance reliability and survivability. Candidate advanced alloys, with improved high temperature properties, while increasing the resistance to scoring and scuffing, tend to have lower ductility and fracture toughness. An attempt is made to identify design materials, and process problems and requirements. In addition, it is recommended that the characterization of candidate steels be accelerated; preliminary investigation indicates that new alloys may provide improved capability against surface distress.

  14. Torque-Splitting Gear Drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kish, J.

    1991-01-01

    Geared drive train transmits torque from input shaft in equal parts along two paths in parallel, then combines torques in single output shaft. Scheme reduces load on teeth of meshing gears while furnishing redundancy to protect against failures. Such splitting and recombination of torques common in design of turbine engines.

  15. Investigating Vibration Properties of a Planetary Gear Set with a Cracked Tooth in a Planet Gear

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-23

    Investigating Vibration Properties of a Planetary Gear Set with a Cracked Tooth in a Planet Gear Xihui Liang 1 and Ming J. Zuo 2 1,2...rotation of the carrier. To facilitate fault detection of a planetary gearbox and avoid catastrophic consequences caused by gear failures, it is...properties of a planetary gear set when there is a cracked tooth in a planet gear . Displacement signals of the sun gear and the planet gear , and

  16. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 398: Area 25 Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the April 2003, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 398: Area 25 Spill Sites as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 25-25-17, Subsurface Hydraulic Oil Spill. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above

  17. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the September 2006, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 25-23-01, Contaminated Materials • CAS 25-23-19, Radioactive Material Storage These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove

  18. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 403: Second Gas Station, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, September 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 03-02-004-0360, Underground Storage Tanks. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR

  19. Reliability model for planetary gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Paridon, C. A.; Coy, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    A reliability model is presented for planetary gear trains in which the ring gear is fixed, the Sun gear is the input, and the planet arm is the output. The input and output shafts are coaxial and the input and output torques are assumed to be coaxial with these shafts. Thrust and side loading are neglected. This type of gear train is commonly used in main rotor transmissions for helicopters and in other applications which require high reductions in speed. The reliability model is based on the Weibull distribution of the individual reliabilities of the transmission components. The transmission's basic dynamic capacity is defined as the input torque which may be applied for one million input rotations of the Sun gear. Load and life are related by a power law. The load life exponent and basic dynamic capacity are developed as functions of the component capacities.

  20. Installing and maintaining gear pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmire, K.

    1996-03-01

    While not as common as centrifugal pumps in the CPI, gear pumps play important roles in handling many of today`s more difficult-to-pump fluids. Because they operate at lower speeds -- generally, 900 rpm or less -- their seals and bearings tend to last longer than those of centrifugal models. In addition, unlike centrifugal pumps, gear pumps` flows are independent of their systems` pressure curves, and they can handle a wider range of viscosities. Although high-flow, low-head applications remain the domain of centrifugal pumps, the use of gear pumps is increasing in the chemical process industries (CPI). While some application boundaries between gears and centrifugals are blurring, there are some crucial differences between the way the two are operated and maintained -- for example, where pressure relief is concerned. This article provides a general summary of gear pump characteristics and applications, highlighting critical aspects of installation, operation and maintenance.

  1. Dynamic gearing in running dogs.

    PubMed

    Carrier, D R; Gregersen, C S; Silverton, N A

    1998-12-01

    Dynamic gearing is a mechanism that has been suggested to enhance the performance of skeletal muscles by maintaining them at the shortening velocities that maximize their power or efficiency. We investigated this hypothesis in three domestic dogs during trotting and galloping. We used ground force recordings and kinematic analysis to calculate the changes in gear ratio that occur during the production of the external work of locomotion. We also monitored length changes of the vastus lateralis muscle, an extensor muscle of the knee, using sonomicrometry in four additional dogs to determine the nature and rate of active shortening of this muscle. During both trotting and galloping, the gear ratios of the extensor muscles of the elbow, wrist and ankle joints were relatively constant early in limb support, but decreased rapidly during the second half of support. The gear ratio at the hip exerted an extensor moment initially, but decreased throughout limb support and became negative midway through support. This pattern of decreasing gear ratio during the second half of support indicates that dynamic gearing does not maximize muscle power or efficiency at the elbow, wrist, hip and ankle joints. In contrast, the extensor muscles of the shoulder and knee joints exhibited an increase in gear ratio during limb support. In two dogs, the vastus lateralis muscle shortened at a relatively constant rate of 3.7-4 lengths s-1 during intermediate-speed galloping. This pattern of increasing gear ratio and constant velocity of muscle shortening at the knee joint is consistent with the hypothesis of dynamic gearing. Given the amount of work done at the knee and shoulder joints of running dogs, dynamic gearing may contribute to the economy of constant-speed running and may be important to integrated limb function.

  2. Performance Investigation of a Full-Scale Hybrid Composite Bull Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaBerge, Kelsen; Handschuh, Robert; Roberts, Gary; Thorp, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid composite gears have been investigated as a weight saving technology for rotorcraft transmissions. These gears differ from conventional steel gears in that the structural material between the shaft interface and the gear rim is replaced with a lightweight carbon fiber composite. The work discussed here is an extension of previous coupon level hybrid gear tests to a full-scale bull gear. The NASA Glenn Research Center High-Speed Helical Gear Rig was modified for this program allowing several hybrid gear web configurations to be tested while utilizing the same gear rim. Testing was performed on both a baseline (steel) web configuration and a hybrid (steel-composite)configuration. Vibration, orbit and temperature data were recorded and compared between configurations. Vibration levels did not differ greatly between the hybrid and steel configurations, nor did temperature differential between inlet and outlet. While orbit shape displayed differences between the hybrid and baseline configurations, the general overall amplitude was comparable. The hybrid configuration discussed here successfully ran at 3300 hp(2,460 kW), however, progressive growth of the orbit while running at this test condition discontinued the test. Researchers continue to search for the cause of this orbit shift.

  3. Performance Investigation of a Full-Scale Hybrid Composite Bull Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laberge, Kelsen E.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Roberts, Gary; Thorp, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid composite gears have been investigated as a weight saving technology for rotorcraft transmissions. These gears differ from conventional steel gears in that the structural material between the shaft interface and the gear rim is replaced with a lightweight carbon fiber composite. The work discussed here is an extension of previous coupon level hybrid gear tests to a full-scale bull gear. The NASA Glenn Research Center High-Speed Helical Gear Rig was modified for this program, allowing several hybrid gear web configurations to be tested while utilizing the same gear rim. Testing was performed on both a baseline (steel) web configuration and a hybrid (steel-composite) configuration. Vibration, orbit and temperature data were recorded and compared between configurations. Vibration levels did not differ greatly between the hybrid and steel configurations, nor did temperature differential between inlet and outlet. While orbit shape displayed differences between the hybrid and baseline configurations, the general overall amplitude was comparable. The hybrid configuration discussed here successfully ran at 3300 hp (2,460 kW), however, progressive growth of the orbit while running at this test condition discontinued the test. Further studies are planned to determine the cause of this behavior.

  4. Generation of noncircular gears for variable motion of the crank-slider mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niculescu, M.; Andrei, L.; Cristescu, A.

    2016-08-01

    The paper proposes a modified kinematics for the crank-slider mechanism of a nails machine. The variable rotational motion of the driven gear allows to slow down the velocity of the slider in the head forming phase and increases the period for the forming forces to be applied, improving the quality of the final product. The noncircular gears are designed based on a hybrid function for the gear transmission ratio whose parameters enable multiple variations of the noncircular driven gears and crack-slider mechanism kinematics, respectively. The AutoCAD graphical and programming facilities are used (i) to analyse and optimize the slider-crank mechanism output functions, in correlation with the predefined noncircular gears transmission ratio, (ii) to generate the noncircular centrodes using the kinematics hypothesis, (iii) to generate the variable geometry of the gear teeth profiles, based on the rolling method, and (iv) to produce the gears solid virtual models. The study highlights the benefits/limits that the noncircular gears transmission ratio defining hybrid functions have on both crank-slider mechanism kinematics and gears geometry.

  5. Local Synthesis and Tooth Contact Analysis of Face-Milled Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Zhang, Yi

    1991-01-01

    Computerized simulation of meshing and bearing contact for spiral bevel gears and hypoid gears is a significant achievement that could substantially improve the technology and the quality of the gears. An approach to the synthesis of face-milled spiral bevel gears and their tooth contact analysis is presented. The proposed approach is based on the following ideas: application of the principle of local synthesis that provides optimal conditions of meshing and contact at the mean contact point, M, and in the neighborhood of M; and application of relations between principle directions and curvatures for surfaces being in line contact or in point contact. The developed local synthesis of gears provides the following: (1) the required gear ratio at M; (2) a localized bearing contact with the desired direction of the tangent to the contact path on gear tooth surface and the desired length of the major axis of contact ellipse at M; (3) a predesigned parabolic function of a controlled level for transmission errors which enables absorption of linear functions of transmission errors caused by misalignment and reduces the level of vibrations. The proposed approach does not require either the tilt of the head-cutter for the process of generation or modified roll for the pinion generation. Improved conditions of meshing and contact of the gears can be achieved without the above mentioned parameters. A computer program for determination of basic machine-tool settings and tooth contact analysis for the designed gears is presented. The approach is illustrated with a numerical example.

  6. Improved Gear Shapes for Face Worm Gear Drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Nava, Alessandro; Fan, Qi; Fuentes, Alfonso

    2005-01-01

    Shapes different from the traditional ones have been proposed for face worm gears and for conical and cylindrical worms that mesh with them. The proposed shapes are based on the concept of generating a face worm gear surface by use of a tilted head cutter instead of by the traditional use of a hob. (As used here, head cutter is also meant to signify, alternatively, a head grinding tool.) The gear-surface-generation equipment would be similar to that used for generation of spiral bevel and hypoid gears. In comparison with the corresponding traditional hob, a tilted head cutter according to the proposal would be larger, could be fabricated with greater precision, and would enable the generation of gear surfaces with greater precision and greater productivity. A face worm gear would be generated (see figure) by use of a tilted head cutter, the blades or grinding surfaces of which would have straight-line profiles. The tilt of the head cutter would prevent interference with teeth adjacent to the groove being cut or ground. A worm to mesh with the face worm gear would be generated by use of a tilted head cutter mounted on the cradle of a generating machine. The blades or grinding surfaces of the head cutter would have a parabolic profile and would deviate from the straight-line profiles of the head cutter for the face worm gear. The shortest distance between the worm and the cradle would follow a parabolic function during the cycle of meshing in the generating process to provide a parabolic function of transmission errors to the gear drive. The small mismatch between the profiles of the face-worm-gear and worm head cutters would make it possible to localize the bearing contact in the worm gear drive. The parabolic function of transmission errors could absorb discontinuous linear functions of transmission errors caused by errors of alignment; this could afford a significant benefit, in that such errors are main sources of noise and vibration in gear drives. The main

  7. Minimizing Load Effects on NA4 Gear Vibration Diagnostic Parameter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Paula J.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    2001-01-01

    NA4 is a vibration diagnostic parameter, developed by researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center, for health monitoring of gears in helicopter transmissions. The NA4 reacts to the onset of gear pitting damage and continues to react to the damage as it spreads. This research also indicates NA4 reacts similarly to load variations. The sensitivity of NA4 to load changes will substantially affect its performance on a helicopter gearbox that experiences continuously changing load throughout its flight regimes. The parameter NA4 has been used to monitor gear fatigue tests at constant load. At constant load, NA4 effectively detects the onset of pitting damage and tracks damage severity. Previous research also shows that NA4 reacts to changes in load applied to the gears in the same way it reacts to the onset of pitting damage. The method used to calculate NA4 was modified to minimize these load effects. The modified NA4 parameter was applied to four sets of experimental data. Results indicate the modified NA4 is no longer sensitive to load changes, but remains sensitive to pitting damage.

  8. 50 CFR 648.84 - Gear-marking requirements and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gear-marking requirements and gear... Management Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.84 Gear-marking requirements and gear restrictions. (a) Bottom-tending fixed gear, including, but not limited to, gillnets and...

  9. 50 CFR 648.84 - Gear-marking requirements and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear-marking requirements and gear... Management Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.84 Gear-marking requirements and gear restrictions. (a) Bottom-tending fixed gear, including, but not limited to, gillnets and...

  10. 50 CFR 648.84 - Gear-marking requirements and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear-marking requirements and gear... Management Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.84 Gear-marking requirements and gear restrictions. (a) Bottom-tending fixed gear, including, but not limited to, gillnets and...

  11. 50 CFR 648.84 - Gear-marking requirements and gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gear-marking requirements and gear... Management Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.84 Gear-marking requirements and gear restrictions. (a) Bottom-tending fixed gear, including, but not limited to, gillnets and...

  12. Gear shift controller for automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, M.; Sakai, S.; Sakurai, T.

    1987-01-20

    A gear shift controller is described for an automatic transmission having a gear shift, comprising: a hydraulic torque converter; a gear change group, having a plurality of gears, each gear providing a different transmission ratio for the transmission of power from the hydraulic torque converter to the output of the transmission, each of the gears comprising a gear train; a one-way clutch interposed in at least one of the gear trains; a plurality of clutch means operatively connected with the gear trains for actuating each of the gear trains selectively; a gear change determination circuit operatively connected with the clutch means to control the operation of each of the clutch means according to a predetermined gear shifting program for engaging a gear train selected by the program; a coasting detection circuit for detecting a car in the coasting state; a gear shift limiting circuit, operatively connected with the gear change determination circuit and with the coasting detection circuit. The circuit is for actuating only the gear train in which the one-way clutch is interposed immediately, regardless of the selected gear train and of the operation of the gear change determination circuit, when the coasting detection circuit has determined the car to be coasting; and an operation transfer control system including a brake operation detecting means and a mode selector switch means for transferring the operation of the gear shift limiting circuit. The operation transfer control system is adapted to stop, upon detection of one of the brake operation and a reset state of the mode selector switch, the operation of the gear shift limiting circuit and to place the plurality of clutch means under the control of the gear change determination circuit.

  13. 78 FR 57873 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: HUD-Owned Real Estate-Sales Contract and Addendums

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... information consists of the sales contracts and addenda that will be used in binding contracts between... Contract and Addendums AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Housing, Office of Single Family Asset...-Owned Real Estate--Sales Contract and Addendums. OMB Approval Number: 2502-0306. Type of Request...

  14. 78 FR 64145 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: HUD-Owned Real Estate-Sales Contract and Addendums

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... will be used in binding contracts between purchasers of acquired single-family assets and HUD... Contract and Addendums AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: HUD... Collection: HUD-Owned Real Estate--Sales Contract and Addendums. OMB Approval Number: 2502-0306. Type...

  15. Addendum to the performance assessment analysis for low-level waste disposal in the 200 west area active burial grounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, M.I., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-20

    An addendum was completed to the performance assessment (PA) analysis for the active 200 West Area low-level solid waste burial grounds. The addendum includes supplemental information developed during the review of the PA analysis, an ALARA analysis, a comparison of PA results with the Hanford Groundwater Protection Strategy, and a justification for the assumption of 500 year deterrence to the inadvertent intruder.

  16. Functioning of reduction gears on airplane engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteucci, Raffaelli

    1926-01-01

    In undertaking to analyze the functioning conditions of a reduction gear on an aviation engine, we will consider an ordinary twelve-cylinder V-engine. The reduction gear employed consists either of a pair of spur gears, one of which is integral with the engine shaft and the other with the propeller shaft, or of a planetary system of gears.

  17. Automated Inspection And Precise Grinding Of Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frint, Harold; Glasow, Warren

    1995-01-01

    Method of precise grinding of spiral bevel gears involves automated inspection of gear-tooth surfaces followed by adjustments of machine-tool settings to minimize differences between actual and nominal surfaces. Similar to method described in "Computerized Inspection of Gear-Tooth Surfaces" (LEW-15736). Yields gears of higher quality, with significant reduction in manufacturing and inspection time.

  18. Computerized Inspection Of Gear-Tooth Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, R. F.; Litvin, F. L.; Zhang, Y.; Kuan, C.

    1994-01-01

    Method of manufacturing gears with precisely shaped teeth involves computerized inspection of gear-tooth surfaces followed by adjustments of machine-tool settings to minimize deviations between real and theoretical versions of surfaces. Thus, iterated cycles of cutting gear teeth, inspection, and adjustments help increase and/or maintain precision of subsequently manufactured gears.

  19. 29 CFR 1918.54 - Rigging gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rigging gear. 1918.54 Section 1918.54 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.54 Rigging gear. (a... other alternate device shall be provided to allow trimming of the gear and to prevent employees...

  20. 29 CFR 1918.54 - Rigging gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rigging gear. 1918.54 Section 1918.54 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.54 Rigging gear. (a... other alternate device shall be provided to allow trimming of the gear and to prevent employees...

  1. 29 CFR 1918.54 - Rigging gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rigging gear. 1918.54 Section 1918.54 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.54 Rigging gear. (a... other alternate device shall be provided to allow trimming of the gear and to prevent employees...

  2. 29 CFR 1918.54 - Rigging gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rigging gear. 1918.54 Section 1918.54 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.54 Rigging gear. (a... other alternate device shall be provided to allow trimming of the gear and to prevent employees...

  3. 50 CFR 622.248 - Authorized gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Authorized gear. 622.248 Section 622.248... the South Atlantic Region § 622.248 Authorized gear. (a) Traps. Traps are the only fishing gear... Atlantic EEZ may not be retained on board a vessel possessing or using unauthorized gear. (b) Buoy line...

  4. 50 CFR 648.203 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 648.203 Section 648.203... Herring Fishery § 648.203 Gear restrictions. (a) Midwater trawl gear may only be used by a vessel issued a... Lightship Area as described in § 648.81(c)(1), provided it complies with the midwater trawl gear...

  5. 50 CFR 622.248 - Authorized gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Authorized gear. 622.248 Section 622.248... the South Atlantic Region § 622.248 Authorized gear. (a) Traps. Traps are the only fishing gear... Atlantic EEZ may not be retained on board a vessel possessing or using unauthorized gear. (b) Buoy line...

  6. 29 CFR 1918.54 - Rigging gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rigging gear. 1918.54 Section 1918.54 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR LONGSHORING Vessel's Cargo Handling Gear § 1918.54 Rigging gear. (a... other alternate device shall be provided to allow trimming of the gear and to prevent employees...

  7. Variable gearing in pennate muscles.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Emanuel; Brainerd, Elizabeth L; Roberts, Thomas J

    2008-02-05

    Muscle fiber architecture, i.e., the physical arrangement of fibers within a muscle, is an important determinant of a muscle's mechanical function. In pennate muscles, fibers are oriented at an angle to the muscle's line of action and rotate as they shorten, becoming more oblique such that the fraction of force directed along the muscle's line of action decreases throughout a contraction. Fiber rotation decreases a muscle's output force but increases output velocity by allowing the muscle to function at a higher gear ratio (muscle velocity/fiber velocity). The magnitude of fiber rotation, and therefore gear ratio, depends on how the muscle changes shape in the dimensions orthogonal to the muscle's line of action. Here, we show that gear ratio is not fixed for a given muscle but decreases significantly with the force of contraction (P < 0.0001). We find that dynamic muscle-shape changes promote fiber rotation at low forces and resist fiber rotation at high forces. As a result, gearing varies automatically with the load, to favor velocity output during low-load contractions and force output for contractions against high loads. Therefore, muscle-shape changes act as an automatic transmission system allowing a pennate muscle to shift from a high gear during rapid contractions to low gear during forceful contractions. These results suggest that variable gearing in pennate muscles provides a mechanism to modulate muscle performance during mechanically diverse functions.

  8. Numerical Simulation Of Cutting Of Gear Teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Huston, Ronald L.; Mavriplis, Dimitrios

    1994-01-01

    Shapes of gear teeth produced by gear cutters of specified shape simulated computationally, according to approach based on principles of differential geometry. Results of computer simulation displayed as computer graphics and/or used in analyses of design, manufacturing, and performance of gears. Applicable to both standard and non-standard gear-tooth forms. Accelerates and facilitates analysis of alternative designs of gears and cutters. Simulation extended to study generation of surfaces other than gears. Applied to cams, bearings, and surfaces of arbitrary rolling elements as well as to gears. Possible to develop analogous procedures for simulating manufacture of skin surfaces like automobile fenders, airfoils, and ship hulls.

  9. Development in Geared Turbofan Aeroengine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Tobi, A. L.; Ismail, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    This paper looks into the implementation of epicyclic gear system to the aeroengine in order to increase the efficiency of the engine. The improvement made is in the direction of improving fuel consumption, reduction in pollutant gasses and perceived noise. Introduction of epicyclic gear system is capable to achieve bypass ratio of up to 15:1 with the benefits of weight and noise reduction. Radical new aircraft designs and engine installation are being studied to overcome some of the challenges associated with the future geared turbofan and open-rotor engine.

  10. Bearing, gearing, and lubrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results of selected NASA research programs on rolling-element and fluid-film bearings, gears, and elastohydrodynamic lubrication are reported. Advances in rolling-element bearing material technology, which have resulted in a significant improvement in fatigue life, and which make possible new applications for rolling bearings, are discussed. Research on whirl-resistant, fluid-film bearings, suitable for very high-speed applications, is discussed. An improved method for predicting gear pitting life is reported. An improved formula for calculating the thickness of elastohydrodynamic films (the existence of which help to define the operating regime of concentrated contact mechanisms such as bearings, gears, and cams) is described.

  11. Parallel axes gear set optimization in two-parameter space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theberge, Y.; Cardou, A.; Cloutier, L.

    1991-05-01

    This paper presents a method for optimal spur and helical gear transmission design that may be used in a computer aided design (CAD) approach. The design objective is generally taken as obtaining the most compact set for a given power input and gear ratio. A mixed design procedure is employed which relies both on heuristic considerations and computer capabilities. Strength and kinematic constraints are considered in order to define the domain of feasible designs. Constraints allowed include: pinion tooth bending strength, gear tooth bending strength, surface stress (resistance to pitting), scoring resistance, pinion involute interference, gear involute interference, minimum pinion tooth thickness, minimum gear tooth thickness, and profile or transverse contact ratio. A computer program was developed which allows the user to input the problem parameters, to select the calculation procedure, to see constraint curves in graphic display, to have an objective function level curve drawn through the design space, to point at a feasible design point and to have constraint values calculated at that point. The user can also modify some of the parameters during the design process.

  12. Enhanced Automated Spiral Bevel Gear Inspection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    in excessive wear, scoring, or even tooth breakage. This is as true for spiral bevel gears as it is for spur and helical gears. The elemental...conformity inspection of tooth profiles that is commonly performed on spur and helical gears, however, is not practical for spiral bevel gears because the size...AD-A250 770 NASA AVSCOM Contractor Report 189125 Technical Report 91-C-048 Enhanced Automated Spiral Bevel Gear Inspection DTIC Harold K. Frint and

  13. 78 FR 24707 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone off Alaska: Fixed-Gear Commercial Halibut and Sablefish...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Economic Zone off Alaska: Fixed-Gear Commercial Halibut and Sablefish Fisheries; Limitations on Use of... Program (IFQ Program) for the fixed-gear commercial Pacific halibut and sablefish fisheries in the Bering... proposes to modify the hired master regulations for management of the IFQ Program for the...

  14. On the identification of the angular position of gears for the diagnostics of planetary gearboxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Elia, G.; Mucchi, E.; Cocconcelli, M.

    2017-01-01

    Generally, in planetary gearbox diagnostics, vibration transducers are placed on the gearbox case near the ring gear. The relative angular position of the planet gears with respect to the transducer is a useful information for the evaluation of vibration signals related to planet/sun gears. This angular position is usually unknown, or it is known with a large tolerance causing serious difficulties in both gears and bearing diagnostics. In fact, noise and spurious component from healthy planets could overhang the informative content about incipient faults. The present work seeks to propose two alternative methods for the identification of the angular position of the planet gears with respect to the transducer. The first one is based on the study of how the power flows inside the Time Synchronous Average of the ring gear, whilst the second method is based on a modified statistical parameter such as the Crest Factor. The effectiveness of these methods is assessed on the basis of actual vibration signals acquired from a faulty planetary gearbox. The knowledge of the exact angular position of the planet gears allows the diagnostics of both gears and bearings, as proven by extensive experimental activities reported in the paper.

  15. Dynamic tooth loads and stressing for high contact ratio spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornell, R. W.; Westervelt, W. W.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis and computer program were developed for calculating the dynamic gear tooth loading and root stressing for high contact ratio gearing (HCRG) as well as LCRG. The analysis includes the effects of the variable tooth stiffness during the mesh, tooth profile modification, and gear errors. The calculation of the tooth root stressing caused by the dynamic gear tooth loads is based on a modified Heywood gear tooth stress analysis, which appears more universally applicable to both LCRG and HCRG. The computer program is presently being expanded to calculate the tooth contact stressing and PV values. Sample application of the gear program to equivalent LCRG (1.566 contact ratio) and HCRG (2.40 contact ratio) revealed the following: (1) the operating conditions and dynamic characteristics of the gear system an affect the gear tooth loading and root stressing, and therefore, life significantly; (2) the length of the profile modification affect the tooth loading and root stressing significantly, the amount depending on the applied load, speed, and contact ratio; and (3) the effect of variable tooth stiffness is small, shifting and increasing the response peaks slightly from those for constant tooth stiffness.

  16. Analysis and modification of a single-mesh gear fatigue rig for use in diagnostic studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, James J.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Oswald, Fred B.; Decker, Harry J.

    1992-01-01

    A single-mesh gear fatigue rig was analyzed and modified for use in gear mesh diagnostic research. The fatigue rig allowed unwanted vibration to mask the test-gear vibration signal, making it difficult to perform diagnostic studies. Several possible sources and factors contributing to the unwanted components of the vibration signal were investigated. Sensor mounting location was found to have a major effect on the content of the vibration signal. In the presence of unwanted vibration sources, modal amplification made unwanted components strong. A sensor location was found that provided a flatter frequency response. This resulted in a more useful vibration signal. A major network was performed on the fatigue rig to reduce the influence of the most probable sources of the noise in the vibration signal. The slave gears were machined to reduce weight and increase tooth loading. The housing and the shafts were modified to reduce imbalance, looseness, and misalignment in the rotating components. These changes resulted in an improved vibration signal, with the test-gear mesh frequency now the dominant component in the signal. Also, with the unwanted sources eliminated, the sensor mounting location giving the most robust representation of the test-gear meshing energy was found to be at a point close to the test gears in the load zone of the bearings.

  17. Gear shift control mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Janson, D.A.

    1987-03-10

    A gear shift control mechanism is described comprising: multiple shift rods directed substantially parallel to one another, each rod carrying a shift fork for axial movement; a shift lever supported for pivotal movement about a first axis directed parallel to the axes of the shift rods and for pivotal movement about a second axis directed substantially perpendicular to the axes of the shift rods. The lever is moveable about the first axis and the second axis into engagement with a selected shift fork; interlock means located on each lateral side of the shift lever and mounted for pivotal movement about the first axis for blocking engagement with the shift forks; detent means for holding the shift lever in multiple predetermined angular positions about the second axis; and spring means located on a lateral side of the shift lever and mounted for pivotal movement about the first axis into interference contact with the shift forks for producing a force tending to resiliently bias the shift lever out of engagement with the selected shift fork.

  18. Molecular gearing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bryan, Jeff C.

    1997-11-01

    The race to create smaller devices is fueling much of the research in electronics. The competition has intensified with the advent of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), in which miniaturization is already reaching the dimensional limits imposed by physics of current lithographic techniques. Also, in the realm of biochemistry, evidence is accumulating that certain enzyme complexes are capable of very sophisticated modes of motion. Complex synergistic biochemical complexes driven by sophisticated biomechanical processes are quite common. Their biochemical functions are based on the interplay of mechanical and chemical processes, including allosteric effects. In addition, the complexity of this interplay far exceeds that of typical chemical reactions. Understanding the behavior of artificial molecular devices as well as complex natural molecular biomechanical systems is difficult. Fortunately, the problem can be successfully resolved by direct molecular engineering of simple molecular systems that can mimic desired mechanical or electronic devices. These molecular systems are called technomimetics (the name is derived, by analogy, from biomimetics). Several classes of molecular systems that can mimic mechanical, electronic, or other features of macroscopic devices have been successfully synthesized by conventional chemical methods during the past two decades. In this article we discuss only one class of such model devices: molecular gearing systems.

  19. Molecular gearing systems

    DOE PAGES

    Gakh, Andrei A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bryan, Jeff C.

    1997-11-01

    The race to create smaller devices is fueling much of the research in electronics. The competition has intensified with the advent of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), in which miniaturization is already reaching the dimensional limits imposed by physics of current lithographic techniques. Also, in the realm of biochemistry, evidence is accumulating that certain enzyme complexes are capable of very sophisticated modes of motion. Complex synergistic biochemical complexes driven by sophisticated biomechanical processes are quite common. Their biochemical functions are based on the interplay of mechanical and chemical processes, including allosteric effects. In addition, the complexity of this interplay far exceeds thatmore » of typical chemical reactions. Understanding the behavior of artificial molecular devices as well as complex natural molecular biomechanical systems is difficult. Fortunately, the problem can be successfully resolved by direct molecular engineering of simple molecular systems that can mimic desired mechanical or electronic devices. These molecular systems are called technomimetics (the name is derived, by analogy, from biomimetics). Several classes of molecular systems that can mimic mechanical, electronic, or other features of macroscopic devices have been successfully synthesized by conventional chemical methods during the past two decades. In this article we discuss only one class of such model devices: molecular gearing systems.« less

  20. Flex-gear power transmission system for transmitting EMF between Sun and ring gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A plurality of flexible cylindrical members, termed flex-gears and having gear tooth type perimeters are located in an annular space between two concentric rotating gear members, one an inner gear member and the other an outer ring gear member, both of which have mutually facing toothed surfaces which engage the flex-gears. The flex-gears rotate and orbit around the annular space as planetary gears when the inner and outer gear members rotate with respect to one another. Pairs of these elements located in two mutually parallel planes and separated by insulators provide two electrical conductor paths across which an electrical signal source, AC or DC, can be connected and coupled to an electrical device. Alternatively, one set of elements including outer gears segmented into mutually insulated semicircles and inner gears segmented into mutually insulated quadrants can be used.

  1. Advanced Face Gear Surface Durability Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Heath, Gregory F.

    2016-01-01

    The surface durability life of helical face gears and isotropic super-finished (ISF) face gears was investigated. Experimental fatigue tests were performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Endurance tests were performed on 10 sets of helical face gears in mesh with tapered involute helical pinions, and 10 sets of ISF-enhanced straight face gears in mesh with tapered involute spur pinions. The results were compared to previous tests on straight face gears. The life of the ISF configuration was slightly less than that of previous tests on straight face gears. The life of the ISF configuration was slightly greater than that of the helical configuration.

  2. Proposal of an Axial Gap Magnetic Gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Muramatsu, Masari

    Magnetic gears have some benefits such as low noise, low vibration, and they are maintenance free as opposed to mechanical gears. In the view of these advantages, some high-performance magnetic gears have been proposed; however, these gears have a complex structure because they require several magnets. In this paper, we propose a new magnetic gear with a high reduction ratio comprising only two magnets. From the result of 3D-FE analysis, it was found that our model generated large transmitted torque and less cogging torque despite its thin compact size. This result shows the possibility of the application of the proposed gear in various industries.

  3. Human Exploration of Mars Design Reference Architecture 5.0, Addendum #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Bret G. (Editor); Watts Kevin D. (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    This report serves as the second Addendum to NASA-SP-2009-566, "Human Exploration of Mars Design Reference Architecture 5.0." The data and descriptions contained within this Addendum capture some of the key assessments and studies produced since publication of the original document, predominately covering those conducted from 2009 through 2012. The assessments and studies described herein are for the most part independent stand-alone contributions. Effort has not been made to assimilate the findings to provide an updated integrated strategy. That is a recognized future effort. This report should not be viewed as constituting a formal plan for the human exploration of Mars.

  4. 32. DETAIL VIEW OF PIVOT SPAN TURNTABLE, SHOWING MORTISE GEAR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. DETAIL VIEW OF PIVOT SPAN TURNTABLE, SHOWING MORTISE GEAR, GEAR SHAFT, DRIVE GEAR AND BULL GEAR, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Alton Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River between IL & MO, Alton, Madison County, IL

  5. Transmission with two parallel driving shafts bearing two driving gears each meshed with same driven gear on parallel driven shaft

    SciTech Connect

    Akashi, T.; Ito, H.; Yamada, S.

    1986-06-17

    A transmission mechanism for a vehicle is described for receiving input of rotational power from a power supply member which rotates in a particular rotational direction and for outputting rotational power to a power receiving member which includes: an input member connected to the power supply member and which is rotatably mounted and receives supplying of the rotational power from the power supply member; a first driving gear wheel shaft; a second driving gear wheel shaft mounted generally parallel to the first driving gear wheel shaft; a driven gear wheel shaft mounted generally parallel to the first and second driving gear wheel shafts, the driven gear wheel shaft being rotationally connected to the power receiving member; a first driven gear wheel fixedly mounted on the driven gear wheel shaft; a first driving gear wheel which is rotatably mounted on the first driving gear wheel shaft and is constant mesh with the driven gear wheel, the first driving and driven gear wheels providing a first reduction gear ratio from the first driving gear wheel shaft to the driven gear wheel shaft; a second driven gear wheel fixedly mounted on the driven gear wheel shaft; a second driving gear wheel which is rotatably mounted on the second driving gear wheel shaft and is in constant mesh with the first driven gear wheel, the second driving and the first driven gear wheels providing a second reduction gear ratio smaller than the first reduction gear ratio from the second driving gear wheel shaft to the driven gear wheel shaft; a third driving gear wheel which is rotatably mounted on the first driving gear wheel shaft and is in constant mesh with the second driven gear wheel, the third driving and the second driven gear wheels providing a third reduction gear ratio smaller than the second reduction gear ratio from the first driving gear wheel shaft to the driven gear wheel shaft.

  6. Planetary gear train of automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraiwa, K.

    1987-03-31

    A planetary gear train is described for an automatic transmission having input and output shafts, comprising: a first planetary gear unit including a first sun gear, a first internal gear and a first pinion carrier; a second planetary gear unit including a second sun gear, a second internal gear and a second pinion carrier, the first internal gear and the second pinion carrier being constantly connected to the output shaft; a first brake unit capable of braking the first and second sun gears which are connected to each other to rotate together; a clutch through which the first pinion carrier is connectable to the input shaft; a second brake unit capable of braking the first pinion carrier; a third brake unit capable of braking the second internal gear; and first and second groups of one-way means which are parallelly interposed between the input shaft and the first sun gear and arranged in a mutually reversed relationship so that the power transmission from the input shaft to the first sun gear and that from the first sun gear to the input shaft are respectively carried out by the first and second groups of one-way means.

  7. Investigation into nitrided spur gears

    SciTech Connect

    Yilbas, B.S.; Coban, A.; Nickel, J.; Sunar, M.; Sami, M.; Abdul Aleem, B.J.

    1996-12-01

    The cold forging method has been widely used in industry to produce machine parts. In general, gears are produced by shaping or hobbing. One of the shaping techniques is precision forging, which has several advantages over hobbing. In the present study, cold forging of spur gears from Ti-6Al-4V material is introduced. To improve the surface properties of the resulting gears, plasma nitriding was carried out. Nuclear reaction analysis was carried out to obtain the nitrogen concentration, while the micro-PIXE technique was used to determine the elemental distribution in the matrix after forging and nitriding processes. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray powder diffraction were used to investigate the metallurgical changes and formation of nitride components in the surface region. Microhardness and friction tests were carried out to measure the hardness depth profile and friction coefficient at the surface. Finally, scoring failure tests were conducted to determine the rotational speed at which the gears failed. Three distinct regions were obtained in the nitride region, and at the initial stages of the scoring tests, failure in surface roughness was observed in the vicinity of the tip of the gear tooth. This occurred at a particular rotational speed and work input.

  8. Conceptual Design Report: Fermilab Main Injector - Technical Components and Civil Construction, March 1991 ( Revision 2.3 Addendum )

    SciTech Connect

    Fermilab,

    1991-03-01

    This addendum contains a description of Fermilab Main Injector (FMI) design, cost estimate, and schedule changes which have been implemented since the release of the most recent Conceptual Design Report, Revision 2.3 (CDR 2.3), in April 1990. The organization of this addendum parallels that of CDR 2.3, with only those sections which reflect changes to CDR 2.3 being incorporated into this document. It is intended that this addendum accompany CDR 2.3. A new Conceptual Design Report (Rev. 3.0) is in preparation with a tentative release date of May 1, 1991.

  9. Development of a gear vibration indicator and its application in gear wear monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chongqing; Smith, Wade A.; Randall, Robert B.; Peng, Zhongxiao

    2016-08-01

    Gear tooth wear is an inevitable phenomenon and has a significant influence on gear dynamic features. Although vibration analysis has been widely used to diagnose localised gear tooth faults, its techniques for gear wear monitoring have not been well-established. This paper aims at developing a vibration indicator to evaluate the effects of wear on gear performance. For this purpose, a gear state vector is extracted from time synchronous averaged gear signals to describe the gear state. This gear state vector consists of the sideband ratios obtained from a number of tooth meshing harmonics and their sidebands. Then, two averaged logarithmic ratios, ALR and mALR, are defined with fixed and moving references, respectively, to provide complementary information for gear wear monitoring. Since a fixed reference is utilised in the definition of ALR, it reflects the cumulated wear effects on the gear state. An increase in the ALR value indicates that the gear state deviates further from its reference condition. With the use of a moving reference, the indicator mALR shows changes in the gear state within short time intervals, making it suitable for wear process monitoring. The efficiency of these vibration indicators is demonstrated using experimental results from two sets of tests, in which the gears experienced different wear processes. In addition to gear wear monitoring, the proposed indicators can be used as general parameters to detect the occurrence of other faults, such as a tooth crack or shaft misalignment, because these faults would also change the gear vibrations.

  10. School Counseling Programs: Comparing GEAR UP Schools with Non-GEAR UP Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorngren, Jill M.; Nelson, Mark D.; Baker, Larry J.

    2004-01-01

    A survey was conducted using qualitative means to assess school counseling programs in Montana. Schools that were demonstration schools in a federal initiative, Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) were compared to non-GEAR UP schools. Several differences between GEAR UP and non-GEAR UP schools are noted and…

  11. Speed reducing or increasing planetary gear apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Minegishi, K.; Ishida, T.

    1989-07-04

    This patent describes a planetary gear apparatus. It includes: an external gear mounted on an input shaft with an eccentric member and a bearing fitted onto the eccentric member therebetween; an internal gear engaging with the external gear, the internal gear being coaxial with respect to the input shaft; an output shaft for outputting a reduced rotational force; and a drive for coupling the external gear and the output shaft, the planetary gear apparatus being adapted to transmit the rotational force of the input shaft to the output shaft after it has reduced the speed of the rotational force, or to transmit the rotational force of the output shaft to the input shaft after it has increased the speed of the rotational force by fixing the internal gear.

  12. Swimming bacteria power microscopic gears.

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, A.; Apodaca, M. M.; Grzybowski, B. A.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Princeton Univ.; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-01-19

    Whereas the laws of thermodynamics prohibit extraction of useful work from the Brownian motion of particles in equilibrium, these motions can be 'rectified' under nonequilibrium conditions, for example, in the presence of asymmetric geometrical obstacles. Here, we describe a class of systems in which aerobic bacteria Bacillus subtilis moving randomly in a fluid film power submillimeter gears and primitive systems of gears decorated with asymmetric teeth. The directional rotation is observed only in the regime of collective bacterial swimming and the gears angular velocities depend on and can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to the bacteria. The ability to harness and control the power of collective motions appears an important requirement for further development of mechanical systems driven by microorganisms.

  13. Swimming bacteria power microscopic gears.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Andrey; Apodaca, Mario M; Grzybowski, Bartosz A; Aranson, Igor S

    2010-01-19

    Whereas the laws of thermodynamics prohibit extraction of useful work from the Brownian motion of particles in equilibrium, these motions can be "rectified" under nonequilibrium conditions, for example, in the presence of asymmetric geometrical obstacles. Here, we describe a class of systems in which aerobic bacteria Bacillus subtilis moving randomly in a fluid film power submillimeter gears and primitive systems of gears decorated with asymmetric teeth. The directional rotation is observed only in the regime of collective bacterial swimming and the gears' angular velocities depend on and can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to the bacteria. The ability to harness and control the power of collective motions appears an important requirement for further development of mechanical systems driven by microorganisms.

  14. Sequencing device utilizing planetary gear set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleberry, W. T. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A planetary (epicyclic) gear set is provided with a reversible rotating input shaft and individual outputs shafts actuated, respectively, by the ring gear and planet gear carrier. Latch means is positioned to selectively and automatically stop the ring gear or carrier member while releasing the other to provide the desired sequential output operation. The output shafts are reversed in sequence and direction of rotation by reversing rotational direction of the input shaft.

  15. Avoiding troubles in large gear boxes

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Haidar, A.N.

    1995-05-08

    This article describes how attention to details such as moisture, contamination, and mechanical loading pays off in troublefree service. Most problems in large gear boxes occur with gears and bearings. Their failure modes and causes should be carefully analyzed to determine the proper corrective action. If gears are selected properly and maintained while in operation, they should last 20 or 30 yr. Gears usually fail because an interruption in operation causes wear and surface fatigue.

  16. Computer simulation of gear tooth manufacturing processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri; Huston, Ronald L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of computer graphics to simulate gear tooth manufacturing procedures is discussed. An analytical basis for the simulation is established for spur gears. The simulation itself, however, is developed not only for spur gears, but for straight bevel gears as well. The applications of the developed procedure extend from the development of finite element models of heretofore intractable geometrical forms, to exploring the fabrication of nonstandard tooth forms.

  17. Air cushion landing gear applications study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Earl, T. D.

    1979-01-01

    A series of air cushion landing gear (ACLG) applications was studied and potential benefits analyzed in order to identify the most attractive of these. The selected applications are new integrated designs (not retrofits) and employ a modified design approach with improved characteristics and performance. To aid the study, a survey of potential users was made. Applications were evaluated in the light of comments received. A technology scenario is developed, with discussion of problem areas, current technology level and future needs. Feasible development timetables are suggested. It is concluded that near-term development of small-size ACLG trunks, exploration of flight effects and braking are key items. The most attractive applications are amphibious with very large cargo aircraft and small general aviation having the greatest potential.

  18. 50 CFR 622.272 - Authorized gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Dolphin and Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.272 Authorized gear. (a) Atlantic dolphin and wahoo—(1) Authorized gear. The following are the only authorized gear types in the fisheries for dolphin and wahoo in...

  19. 50 CFR 622.272 - Authorized gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE CARIBBEAN, GULF OF MEXICO, AND SOUTH ATLANTIC Dolphin and Wahoo Fishery Off the Atlantic States § 622.272 Authorized gear. (a) Atlantic dolphin and wahoo—(1) Authorized gear. The following are the only authorized gear types in the fisheries for dolphin and wahoo in...

  20. Modification Of Gear Teeth To Reduce Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Dennis P.; Oswald, Fred B.; Lin, Hsiang Hsi

    1990-01-01

    Computer simulations yield data useful in designing for low noise. Effects of modifications in shape of gear teeth upon static transmission error and dynamic loading of gears now analyzed systematically. Design curves generated by conducting numerical simulations of dynamic effects at successive incremental modifications of gear systems operated at various applied loads. Modifications that result in minimum dynamic effect determined from design curves.

  1. 50 CFR 665.804 - Gear identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear identification. 665.804 Section 665... Fisheries § 665.804 Gear identification. (a) Identification. The operator of each permitted vessel in the... action. Longline gear not marked in compliance with paragraph (a) of this section and found deployed...

  2. 50 CFR 660.506 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 660.506 Section 660.506 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... § 660.506 Gear restrictions. The only fishing gear authorized for use in the reduction fishery...

  3. 50 CFR 665.104 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.104 Section 665... § 665.104 Gear restrictions. (a) Bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets. Fishing for American Samoa bottomfish MUS with bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets is prohibited. (b) Possession of gear....

  4. 50 CFR 300.109 - Gear disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear disposal. 300.109 Section 300.109... Antarctic Marine Living Resources § 300.109 Gear disposal. (a) The operator of a harvesting vessel may not... fishing vessels or gear, or that may catch fish or cause damage to any marine resource, including...

  5. 50 CFR 665.406 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.406 Section 665.406... Gear restrictions. (a) Bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets. Fishing for bottomfish with bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets is prohibited. (b) Possession of gear. Possession of a bottom trawl and...

  6. 50 CFR 665.605 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.605 Section 665... Fisheries § 665.605 Gear restrictions. (a) Bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets. Fishing for PRIA bottomfish MUS with bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets is prohibited. (b) Possession of gear....

  7. 50 CFR 665.464 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.464 Section 665.464 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... § 665.464 Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any precious...

  8. 50 CFR 665.664 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.664 Section 665.664 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Fisheries § 665.664 Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any...

  9. 50 CFR 665.664 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.664 Section 665.664 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Fisheries § 665.664 Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any...

  10. 50 CFR 665.264 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.264 Section 665.264 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any precious coral permit area....

  11. 50 CFR 665.264 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.264 Section 665.264 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any precious coral permit area....

  12. 50 CFR 665.164 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.164 Section 665.164 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... § 665.164 Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any precious...

  13. 50 CFR 648.163 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 648.163 Section 648.163... Bluefish Fishery § 648.163 Gear restrictions. If the Council determines through its annual review or framework adjustment process that gear restrictions are necessary to assure that the fishing mortality...

  14. 50 CFR 665.164 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.164 Section 665.164 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... § 665.164 Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any precious...

  15. 50 CFR 665.104 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.104 Section 665... § 665.104 Gear restrictions. (a) Bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets. Fishing for American Samoa bottomfish MUS with bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets is prohibited. (b) Possession of gear....

  16. 50 CFR 665.664 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.664 Section 665.664 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Fisheries § 665.664 Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any...

  17. 50 CFR 665.605 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.605 Section 665... Fisheries § 665.605 Gear restrictions. (a) Bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets. Fishing for PRIA bottomfish MUS with bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets is prohibited. (b) Possession of gear....

  18. 50 CFR 665.664 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.664 Section 665.664 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Fisheries § 665.664 Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any...

  19. 50 CFR 660.506 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 660.506 Section 660.506 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... § 660.506 Gear restrictions. The only fishing gear authorized for use in the reduction fishery...

  20. 50 CFR 665.104 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.104 Section 665.104..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC American Samoa Fisheries § 665.104 Gear... trawls and bottom set gillnets is prohibited. (b) Possession of gear. The possession of a bottom trawl...

  1. 50 CFR 665.605 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.605 Section 665... Fisheries § 665.605 Gear restrictions. (a) Bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets. Fishing for PRIA bottomfish MUS with bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets is prohibited. (b) Possession of gear....

  2. 50 CFR 665.804 - Gear identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear identification. 665.804 Section 665... Fisheries § 665.804 Gear identification. (a) Identification. The operator of each permitted vessel in the... action. Longline gear not marked in compliance with paragraph (a) of this section and found deployed...

  3. 50 CFR 665.406 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.406 Section 665... § 665.406 Gear restrictions. (a) Bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets. Fishing for bottomfish with bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets is prohibited. (b) Possession of gear. Possession of a bottom...

  4. 50 CFR 665.406 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.406 Section 665... § 665.406 Gear restrictions. (a) Bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets. Fishing for bottomfish with bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets is prohibited. (b) Possession of gear. Possession of a bottom...

  5. 50 CFR 665.664 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.664 Section 665.664 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... § 665.664 Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any precious...

  6. 50 CFR 665.264 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.264 Section 665.264 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any precious coral permit area....

  7. 50 CFR 648.203 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 648.203 Section 648... Atlantic Herring Fishery § 648.203 Gear restrictions. (a) Midwater trawl gear may only be used by a vessel... Nantucket Lightship Area as described in § 648.81(c)(1), provided it complies with the midwater trawl...

  8. 50 CFR 665.804 - Gear identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gear identification. 665.804 Section 665... Fisheries § 665.804 Gear identification. (a) Identification. The operator of each permitted vessel in the... action. Longline gear not marked in compliance with paragraph (a) of this section and found deployed...

  9. 50 CFR 300.109 - Gear disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gear disposal. 300.109 Section 300.109... Antarctic Marine Living Resources § 300.109 Gear disposal. (a) The operator of a harvesting vessel may not... fishing vessels or gear, or that may catch fish or cause damage to any marine resource, including...

  10. 50 CFR 665.464 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.464 Section 665.464 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... § 665.464 Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any precious...

  11. 50 CFR 665.164 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.164 Section 665.164 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... § 665.164 Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any precious...

  12. 50 CFR 665.264 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.264 Section 665.264..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC Hawaii Fisheries § 665.264 Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any precious coral permit area....

  13. 50 CFR 665.804 - Gear identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gear identification. 665.804 Section 665... Fisheries § 665.804 Gear identification. (a) Identification. The operator of each permitted vessel in the... action. Longline gear not marked in compliance with paragraph (a) of this section and found deployed...

  14. 50 CFR 665.104 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.104 Section 665... § 665.104 Gear restrictions. (a) Bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets. Fishing for American Samoa bottomfish MUS with bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets is prohibited. (b) Possession of gear....

  15. 50 CFR 665.164 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.164 Section 665.164 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... § 665.164 Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any precious...

  16. 50 CFR 665.104 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.104 Section 665... § 665.104 Gear restrictions. (a) Bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets. Fishing for American Samoa bottomfish MUS with bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets is prohibited. (b) Possession of gear....

  17. 50 CFR 665.464 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.464 Section 665.464 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any precious coral permit area....

  18. 50 CFR 665.605 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.605 Section 665... Fisheries § 665.605 Gear restrictions. (a) Bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets. Fishing for PRIA bottomfish MUS with bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets is prohibited. (b) Possession of gear....

  19. 50 CFR 665.605 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.605 Section 665.605... § 665.605 Gear restrictions. (a) Bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets. Fishing for PRIA bottomfish MUS with bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets is prohibited. (b) Possession of gear. Possession of...

  20. 50 CFR 665.464 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.464 Section 665.464 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... § 665.464 Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any precious...

  1. 50 CFR 665.406 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.406 Section 665... § 665.406 Gear restrictions. (a) Bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets. Fishing for bottomfish with bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets is prohibited. (b) Possession of gear. Possession of a bottom...

  2. 50 CFR 665.164 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.164 Section 665.164..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC American Samoa Fisheries § 665.164 Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any precious coral permit area....

  3. 50 CFR 300.109 - Gear disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gear disposal. 300.109 Section 300.109... Antarctic Marine Living Resources § 300.109 Gear disposal. (a) The operator of a harvesting vessel may not... fishing vessels or gear, or that may catch fish or cause damage to any marine resource, including...

  4. 50 CFR 665.264 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.264 Section 665.264 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any precious coral permit area....

  5. 50 CFR 648.203 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 648.203 Section 648... Atlantic Herring Fishery § 648.203 Gear restrictions. (a) Midwater trawl gear may only be used by a vessel... Nantucket Lightship Area as described in § 648.81(c)(1), provided it complies with the midwater trawl...

  6. 50 CFR 648.203 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 648.203 Section 648... Atlantic Herring Fishery § 648.203 Gear restrictions. (a) Midwater trawl gear may only be used by a vessel... Nantucket Lightship Area as described in § 648.81(c)(1), provided it complies with the midwater trawl...

  7. 50 CFR 665.464 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.464 Section 665.464 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... § 665.464 Gear restrictions. Only selective gear may be used to harvest coral from any precious...

  8. 50 CFR 300.109 - Gear disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear disposal. 300.109 Section 300.109... Antarctic Marine Living Resources § 300.109 Gear disposal. (a) The operator of a harvesting vessel may not... fishing vessels or gear, or that may catch fish or cause damage to any marine resource, including...

  9. 50 CFR 648.203 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 648.203 Section 648... Atlantic Herring Fishery § 648.203 Gear restrictions. (a) Midwater trawl gear may only be used by a vessel... Nantucket Lightship Area as described in § 648.81(c)(1), provided it complies with the midwater trawl...

  10. 50 CFR 665.406 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear restrictions. 665.406 Section 665... § 665.406 Gear restrictions. (a) Bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets. Fishing for bottomfish with bottom trawls and bottom set gillnets is prohibited. (b) Possession of gear. Possession of a bottom...

  11. 50 CFR 665.804 - Gear identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear identification. 665.804 Section 665... Fisheries § 665.804 Gear identification. (a) Identification. The operator of each permitted vessel in the... action. Longline gear not marked in compliance with paragraph (a) of this section and found deployed...

  12. Casimir torque on a cylindrical gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidya, Varun

    2014-08-01

    I utilize effective field theory(EFT) techniques to calculate the Casimir torque on a cylindrical gear in the presence of a polarizable but neutral object and present results for the energy and torque as a function of angle for a gear with multiple cogs, as well as for the case of a concentric cylindrical gear.

  13. Gear teeth impacts in hydrodynamic conjunctions promoting idle gear rattle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodossiades, S.; Tangasawi, O.; Rahnejat, H.

    2007-06-01

    The rattle phenomenon in vehicular transmissions and its impact on the automotive industry have been widely reported in the literature. A variety of palliative measures have been suggested for attenuation of rattle such as use of backlash eliminators, clutch dampers or dual-mass flywheels. These palliative measures incur further costs and can have untoward implications in powertrain noise and vibration problems. A fundamental investigation of the dynamics of impacting gears is undoubtedly the way forward for a root cause solution. This paper introduces a new approach for understanding the interactions between the transmission gears during engine idle conditions by taking into account the effect of lubrication. Gear impacting surfaces are treated as lubricated conjunctions rather than the usually reported dry impacting solids. Depending on load and speed of entraining motion of the lubricant into the contact domains, the regime of lubrication alters. In this paper, the influence of lubricant in torsional vibration of lightly loaded idling gears is examined which promotes iso-viscous hydrodynamic conditions. It is shown that the lubricant film under these conditions behaves as a time-varying nonlinear spring-damper element. Spectral analysis of the system response is compared to the findings of the linearised system.

  14. 46 CFR Appendix IV to Part 390 - Sample Addendum to Maritime Administration Capital Construction Fund Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sample Addendum to Maritime Administration Capital Construction Fund Agreement IV Appendix IV to Part 390 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS UNDER PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App. IV Appendix IV to...

  15. 78 FR 53155 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Recovery Plan for Phyllostegia hispida; Addendum...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Recovery Plan for Phyllostegia hispida; Addendum to the Molokai Plant Cluster Recovery Plan AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior... availability of our final recovery plan for Phyllostegia hispida (no common name) under the Endangered...

  16. 2011 Addendum to the SNL/NM SWEIS Supplemental Information Source Documents

    SciTech Connect

    Dimmick, Ross

    2014-12-01

    This document contains updates to the Supplemental Information Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement Source Documents that were developed in 2010. In general, this addendum provides calendar year 2010 data, along with changes or additions to text in the original documents.

  17. Addendum to the Safety Analysis Report for the Steel Waste Packaging. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, S R

    1996-02-15

    The Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the Steel Waste Package requires additional analyses to support the shipment of remote-handled radioactive waste and special-case waste from the 324 building hot cells to PUREX for interim storage. This addendum provides the analyses required to show that this waste can be safely shipped onsite in the configuration shown.

  18. Addendum by Race/Ethnicity: National Freshman Attitudes Report, 2012. National Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noel-Levitz, Inc, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Included in this addendum are the findings for the Noel-Levitz 2012 National Freshman Attitudes Report by race/ethnicity for incoming students. These data show the percentage of students within each group that agreed with each item. Also included in this paper are the demographic breakdown of the respondents and a brief explanation of the…

  19. ADDENDUM TO ASSESSMENT OF STYRENE EMISSION CONTROLS FOR FRP/C AND BOAT BUILDING INDUSTRIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report is an addendum to a 1996 report, Assessment of Styrene Emission Controls for FRP/C and Boat Building Industries. It presents additional evaluation of the biological treatment of styrene emissions, Dow Chemical Company's Sorbathene solvent vapor recovery system, Occupa...

  20. Addendum to the Intervenor's Education Plan for the Denver Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardenas, Jose A.

    The addendum to the Denver Public Schools education plan, which was submitted to the Court on January 23, 1974, makes specific recommendations for elements of school activities outlined in the plan. The recommendations pertain to the philosophy; policy; the scope and sequence of poverty, cultural, language, mobility, and perceptual aspects;…

  1. 77 FR 52749 - 30-Day Proposed Information Collection: Addendum to Declaration for Federal Employment, Child...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ... Federal Employment, Child Care and Indian Child Care Worker Positions; Request for Public Comment AGENCY... Collection: Title: Addendum to Declaration for Federal Employment, Child Care and Indian Child Care Worker..., Child Care and Indian Child Care Worker Positions.'' Although there was a change on the form...

  2. Action Research: Addendum to the Encyclopedia of Distance Education Research in Iowa. Revised 2nd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maushak, Nancy J. Ed.; Manternach-Wigans, Lynn, Ed.

    "Action Research" and the "Encyclopedia of Distance Education Research" (1994) are designed as resources for distance education research in Iowa, including information on developing, implementing, and administering distance education systems. This addendum containing an additional seven research studies includes the following…

  3. 46 CFR Appendix IV to Part 390 - Sample Addendum to Maritime Administration Capital Construction Fund Agreement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sample Addendum to Maritime Administration Capital Construction Fund Agreement IV Appendix IV to Part 390 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REGULATIONS UNDER PUBLIC LAW 91-469 CAPITAL CONSTRUCTION FUND Pt. 390, App. IV Appendix IV to...

  4. Addendum to the Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    M. D. Staiger; Michael Swenson; T. R. Thomas

    2004-05-01

    This report is an addendum to the report Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, INEEL/EXT-98-00455 Rev. 1, June 2003. The original report provided a summary description of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities (CSSFs). It also contained dozens of pages of detailed data tables documenting the volume and composition (chemical content and radionuclide activity) of the calcine stored in the CSSFs and the liquid waste from which the calcine was derived. This addendum report compiles the calcine composition data from the original report. It presents the compiled data in a graphical format with units (weight percent, curies per cubic meter, and nanocuries per gram) that are commonly used in regulatory and waste acceptance criteria documents. The compiled data are easier to use and understand when comparing the composition of the calcine with potential regulatory or waste acceptance criteria. This addendum report also provides detailed explanations for the large variability in the calcine composition among the CSSFs. The calcine composition varies as a result of reprocessing different types of fuel that had different cladding materials. Different chemicals were used to dissolve the various types of fuel, extract the uranium, and calcine the resulting waste. This resulted in calcine with variable compositions. This addendum report also identifies a few trace chemicals and radionuclides for which the accuracy of the amounts estimated to be in the calcine could be improved by making adjustments to the assumptions and methods used in making the estimates.

  5. Reference Mission Version 3.0 Addendum to the Human Exploration of Mars: The Reference Mission of the NASA Mars Exploration Study Team. Addendum; 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Bret G. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This Addendum to the Mars Reference Mission was developed as a companion document to the NASA Special Publication 6107, "Human Exploration of Mars: The Reference Mission of the NASA Mars Exploration Study Team." It summarizes changes and updates to the Mars Reference Missions that were developed by the Exploration Office since the final draft of SP 6107 was printed in early 1999. The Reference Mission is a tool used by the exploration community to compare and evaluate approaches to mission and system concepts that could be used for human missions to Mars. It is intended to identify and clarify system drivers, significant sources of cost, performance, risk, and schedule variation. Several alternative scenarios, employing different technical approaches to solving mission and technology challenges, are discussed in this Addendum. Comparing alternative approaches provides the basis for continual improvement to technology investment plan and a general understanding of future human missions to Mars. The Addendum represents a snapshot of work in progress in support of planning for future human exploration missions through May 1998.

  6. Elasto-dynamic analysis of a gear pump-Part III: Experimental validation procedure and model extension to helical gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucchi, E.; Dalpiaz, G.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns external gear pumps for automotive applications, which operate at high speed and low pressure. In previous works of the authors (Part I and II, [1,2]), a non-linear lumped-parameter kineto-elastodynamic model for the prediction of the dynamic behaviour of external gear pumps was presented. It takes into account the most important phenomena involved in the operation of this kind of machine. The two main sources of noise and vibration are considered: pressure pulsation and gear meshing. The model has been used in order to foresee the influence of working conditions and design modifications on vibration generation. The model's experimental validation is a difficult task. Thus, Part III proposes a novel methodology for the validation carried out by the comparison of simulations and experimental results concerning forces and moments: it deals with the external and inertial components acting on the gears, estimated by the model, and the reactions and inertial components on the pump casing and the test plate, obtained by measurements. The validation is carried out comparing the level of the time synchronous average in the time domain and the waterfall maps in the frequency domain, with particular attention to identify system resonances. The validation results are satisfactory globally, but discrepancies are still present. Moreover, the assessed model has been properly modified for the application to a new virtual pump prototype with helical gears in order to foresee gear accelerations and dynamic forces. Part IV is focused on improvements in the modelling and analysis of the phenomena bound to the pressure evolution around the gears in order to achieve results closer to the measured values. As a matter of fact, the simulation results have shown that a variable meshing stiffness has a notable contribution on the dynamic behaviour of the pump but this is not as important as the pressure phenomena. As a consequence, the original model was modified with the

  7. Analysis of the vibratory excitation of gear systems for fault detection in rotating machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Paya, B.A.; Esat, I.I.; Badi, M.N.M.

    1997-07-01

    The concepts of model-based fault detection for vibration condition monitoring of rotating machinery are discussed and presented in this paper. The mathematical model presented and fully developed in the earlier works is further modified so it incorporates a typical gear tooth irregularity fault. This fault was simulated on the contact line of the gear model. The results obtained from this analytical model are compared with the ones obtained from a model drive-line. The drive-line consists of a number of rotating parts including an electric motor, a gear system, and a disk brake. The gear system has two meshing spur gears which is equivalent to the analytical model. The comparison of the results are very good as some vibration frequencies of the analytical results correlates with the experimental ones. it is shown that certain vibration frequencies of a real experimental model gear system can be obtained from its analytical counterpart. It is also shown that it is possible to model a typical gear tooth fault by simulating a forcing function as a shock to the modelled system.

  8. Questions and Answers for Reporting for the 2006 Partial Updating of the TSCA Chemical Inventory Database: Inorganic Chemicals Addendum

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document addresses specific questions related to reporting inorganic chemicals under the IUR and is an addendum to the Questions and Answers for Reporting for the 2006 Partial Updating of the TSCA Chemical Inventory Database (Questions and Answers Document).

  9. Engine starter with a planetary reduction gear

    SciTech Connect

    Yabunaka, K.

    1987-06-09

    This patent describes an engine starter having a motor and a planetary reduction gear comprising: a rotor having a rotor shaft; an output shaft drivingly connected to the rotor shaft through the planetary reducing gear; a yoke having a cylindrical portion surrounding the stator and a support portion rotatably supporting the output shaft; a sun gear located on an outer surface of the rotor shaft; a ring gear formed on an inner surface of the yoke; and the yoke, support portion, and the ring gear comprise one-piece.

  10. Recent manufacturing advances for spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Bill, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command (AVSCOM), through the Propulsion Directorate at NASA Lewis Research Center, has recently sponsored projects to advance the manufacturing process for spiral bevel gears. This type of gear is a critical component in rotary-wing propulsion systems. Two successfully completed contracted projects are described. The first project addresses the automated inspection of spiral bevel gears through the use of coordinate measuring machines. The second project entails the computer-numerical-control (CNC) conversion of a spiral bevel gear grinding machine that is used for all aerospace spiral bevel gears. The results of these projects are described with regard to the savings effected in manufacturing time.

  11. Asymmetric gear rectifies random robot motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He; Zhang, H. P.

    2013-06-01

    We experimentally study the dynamics of centimetric robots and their interactions with rotary gears through inelastic collisions. Under the impacts of self-propelled robots, a gear with symmetric teeth diffuses with no preferred direction of motion. An asymmetric gear, however, rectifies random motion of nearby robots which, in return, exert a torque on the gear and drive it into unidirectional motion. Rectification efficiency increases with the degree of gear asymmetry. Our work demonstrates that asymmetric environments can be used to rectify and extract energy from random motion of macroscopic self-propelled particles.

  12. Recent manufacturing advances for spiral bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Bill, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command (AVSCOM), through the Propulsion Directorate at NASA LRC, has recently sponsored projects to advance the manufacturing process for spiral bevel gears. This type of gear is a critical component in rotary-wing propulsion systems. Two successfully completed contracted projects are described. The first project addresses the automated inspection of spiral bevel gears through the use of coordinate measuring machines. The second project entails the computer-numerical-control (CNC) conversion of a spiral bevel gear grinding machine that is used for all aerospace spiral bevel gears. The results of these projects are described with regard to the savings effected in manufacturing time.

  13. Driving gear for front and rear wheels of automobile

    SciTech Connect

    Ashikawa, N.; Sakuma, S.

    1986-10-21

    A driving gear is described for front and rear wheels of an automobile, comprising an engine with a crank shaft disposed in a direction of width of a body of the automobile, a transmission supported on an engine case at one side axially of the crank shaft, and a clutch provided between the engine and the transmission. The driving gear includes a first differential gear of a planetary gear type coupled to the transmission via a reduction gear, a second differential gear of a bevel gear type transmission an output of the first differential gear to left and right front wheels of the automobile, and a third differential gear transmitting an output of the first differential gear to left and right rear wheels of the automobile. The first differential gear is disposed adjacent to the reduction gear and comprises a sun gear, a ring gear and planet gears engaging with the sun and ring gears. The planet gears are pivoted directly on and driven by the reduction gear; the first and second differential gears are provided on opposite sides of a plane perpendicular to the crankshaft and including the clutch. The first and second differential gears also lie along a common axis parallel to the crank shaft. The sun gear and the ring gear are coupled individually to the front and rear wheels respectively.

  14. GEAR UP Aspirations Project Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a formative evaluation of the first two years of the Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) Aspirations Project (Aspirations) using a Context, Input, Process, and Product (CIPP) model so as to gain an in-depth understanding of the project during the middle school…

  15. Illinois Shifting Gears Policy Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitzel, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Illinois Shifting Gears is a multilevel initiative that has simultaneously created bridge programs in the field and altered state policy to facilitate the creation of more programs in the future. These efforts have informed each other, giving policymakers the opportunity to interact with practitioners, troubleshoot bridge programs, and make…

  16. A mathematical model of an active control landing gear for load control during impact and roll-out

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.; Carden, H. D.

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical model of an active control landing gear (ACOLAG) was developed and programmed for operation on a digital computer. The mathematical model includes theoretical subsonic aerodynamics; first-mode wing bending and torsional characteristics; oleo-pneumatic shock strut with fit and binding friction; closed-loop, series-hydraulic control; empirical tire force-deflection characteristics; antiskid braking; and sinusoidal or random runway roughness. The mathematical model was used to compute the loads and motions for a simulated vertical drop test and a simulated landing impact of a conventional (passive) main landing gear designed for a 2268-kg (5000-lbm) class airplane. Computations were also made for a simply modified version of the passive gear including a series-hydraulic active control system. Comparison of computed results for the passive gear with experimental data shows that the active control landing gear analysis is valid for predicting the loads and motions of an airplane during a symmetrical landing. Computed results for the series-hydraulic active control in conjunction with the simply modified passive gear show that 20- to 30-percent reductions in wing force, relative to those occurring with the modified passive gear, can be obtained during the impact phase of the landing. These reductions in wing force could result in substantial increases in fatigue life of the structure.

  17. A study of polymer quenching on gears

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H.; Yi, T.

    1996-12-31

    The quenching oil was widely used as a quenchant for the carburized gear direct hardening. With the progress of the quenching technology, however, the oil quenching of gears has been successfully replaced by the polymer quenching in the production. This paper will investigate the principle and application of gear quenching to replace oil, with aqueous polymer quenchants. During the direct quenching of carburized gear and precision forging gear, cracking and distortion reduction, and maximum and uniformity hardness can be achieved. From the quenching process and economic, advantages and limitations of polymer quenching of gears will be discussed. The data of production indicate that it is suitable for gear hardening to use polymer quenchant. The characteristics of polymer quenching are the improved performance, reduced fire hazards and environmental safety, processing flexibility and lower process costs.

  18. Computerized Design of Low-noise Face-milled Spiral Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Zhang, YI; Handschuh, Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    An advanced design methodology is proposed for the face-milled spiral bevel gears with modified tooth surface geometry that provides a reduced level of noise and has a stabilized bearing contact. The approach is based on the local synthesis of the gear drive that provides the 'best' machine-tool settings. The theoretical aspects of the local synthesis approach are based on the application of a predesigned parabolic function for absorption of undesirable transmission errors caused by misalignment and the direct relations between principal curvatures and directions for mating surfaces. The meshing and contact of the gear drive is synthesized and analyzed by a computer program. The generation of gears with the proposed geometry design can be accomplished by application of existing equipment. A numerical example that illustrates the proposed theory is presented.

  19. Modeling and analysis of gear tooth crack growth under variable-amplitude loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Juliang; Wang, Wenyi; Man, Zhihong; Khoo, Suiyang

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to reveal the pattern of gear tooth crack growth under variable-amplitude loading. To this end, a nonlinear dynamic model is proposed to describe the gear tooth crack growth. The state variables of the model are crack length and crack opening stress. The dynamics of crack growth is modeled as a modified Paris equation based on the concept of crack closure. A nonlinear second-order autoregressive equation is developed to model the dynamic behavior of the crack opening stresses. The model parameters are estimated by means of a two-step estimation method because of relatively small sample size of crack length data for G6 gear tests. The model is also validated with the crack growth data of the G6 gear.

  20. Three dimensional finite element stress predictions of spur gears compared to gear fatigue rig measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ozkul, M.

    1989-01-01

    A three dimensional finite element analysis technique has been developed for evaluating the gear tooth contact and fillet bending stresses. The method is based on an isoparametric formulation using 20-noded solid elements and the sub-structure approach to minimize computer core usage. The analysis has been applied to a test case of LCR spur gears specifically designed for pitting endurance testing on a gear fatigue rig. The analysis results are compared with strain gauge results obtained from gear fatigue rig to determine allowables for gear tooth stressing. They are finally compared to the tooth stresses obtained using a gear teeth dynamic model for further substantiation.

  1. Addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 452: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 452: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for CASs: • 25-25-09, Spill H940825C (from UST 25-3101-1) • 25-25-14, Spill H940314E (from UST 25-3102-3) • 25-25-15, Spill H941020E (from UST 25-3152-1) These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs

  2. Addendum 2 to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 454: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 454: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for CASs: • 12-25-08, Spill H950524F (from UST 12-B-1) • 12-25-10, Spill H950919A (from UST 12-COMM-1) These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be

  3. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 394: Areas 12, 18, and 29 Spill/Release Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the September 2003, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 394: Areas 12, 18, and 29 Spill/Release Sites as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 12-25-04, UST 12-16-2 Waste Oil Release • CAS 18-25-01, Oil Spills • CAS 18-25-02, Oil Spills • CAS 18-25-03, Oil Spill • CAS 29-44-01, Fuel Spill These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the

  4. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2, 6, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the April 1999, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2, 6, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 03-05-002-SW02, Septic Waste System • CAS 03-05-002-SW06, Septic Waste System These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re

  5. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 423: Area 3 Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the July 1999, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 423: Area 3 Building 0360 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 03-02-002-0308, Underground Discharge Point. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the

  6. Addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the August 2001, Corrective Action Decision Document / Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 22-99-05, Fuel Storage Area. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because

  7. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 358: Areas 18, 19, 20 Cellars/Mud Pits Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the January 2004, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 358: Areas 18, 19, 20 Cellars/Mud Pits as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 20-23-02, Postshot Cellar • CAS 20-23-03, Cellar • CAS 20-23-04, Postshot Cellar • CAS 20-23-05, Postshot Cellar • CAS 20-23-06, Cellar • CAS 20-37-01, Cellar & Mud Pit • CAS 20-37-05, Cellar These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action

  8. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the April 2000, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 23-56-01, Former Mercury Fire Training Pit. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at

  9. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the November 2002, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 03-04-01, Area 3 Change House Septic System • CAS 03-09-04, Mud Pit These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these

  10. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 & 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the June 2006, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 & 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 01-25-01, AST Release • CAS 03-25-03, Mud Plant AST Diesel Release These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to

  11. Addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 454: Historical Undrground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the April 1998, Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 454: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 12-25-09, Spill 960722-02 (from UST 12-B-3). This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a

  12. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revison 0

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn Kidman

    2008-10-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the June 2003, Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications for Modifications for Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (UR Modification document) dated February 2008. The UR Modification document was approved by NDEP on February 26, 2008. The approval of the UR Modification document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR modifications. In conformance with the UR Modification document, this addendum consists of: • This cover page that refers the reader to the UR Modification document for additional information • The cover and signature pages of the UR Modification document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the UR Modification document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for: • CAS 06-20-02, 20-inch Cased Hole • CAS 06-23-03, Drain Pit These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996; as amended August 2006). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006c). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because

  13. Addendum 2 to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 358: Areas 18, 19, 20 Cellars/Mud Pits, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revison 0

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 358: Areas 18, 19, 20 Cellars/Mud Pits, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, January 2004 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 19-09-05, Mud Pit. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for

  14. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, December 1997 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 12-19-01, A12 Fleet Ops Steam Cleaning Efflu. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the

  15. Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 326: Areas 6 and 27 Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Grant Evenson

    2009-05-01

    This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 326: Areas 6 and 27 Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision 1), December 2002 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 06-25-01, CP-1 Heating Oil Release. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to

  16. Expansion of epicyclic gear dynamic analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Linda Smith; Pike, James A.

    1987-01-01

    The multiple mesh/single stage dynamics program is a gear tooth analysis program which determines detailed geometry, dynamic loads, stresses, and surface damage factors. The program can analyze a variety of both epicyclic and single mesh systems with spur or helical gear teeth including internal, external, and buttress tooth forms. The modifications refine the options for the flexible carrier and flexible ring gear rim and adds three options: a floating Sun gear option; a natural frequency option; and a finite element compliance formulation for helical gear teeth. The option for a floating Sun incorporates two additional degrees of freedom at the Sun center. The natural frequency option evaluates the frequencies of planetary, star, or differential systems as well as the effect of additional springs at the Sun center and those due to a flexible carrier and/or ring gear rim. The helical tooth pair finite element calculated compliance is obtained from an automated element breakup of the helical teeth and then is used with the basic gear dynamic solution and stress postprocessing routines. The flexible carrier or ring gear rim option for planetary and star spur gear systems allows the output torque per carrier and ring gear rim segment to vary based on the dynamic response of the entire system, while the total output torque remains constant.

  17. Geared-neutral continuously variable transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Macey, J.P.; Vahabzadeh, H.

    1987-02-24

    A continuously variable transmission is described comprising: input drive means; output drive means, a variable ratio friction belt drive means drivingly connected to the input drive means and including a driven shaft; fixed ratio drive means having an input shaft and an output shaft; selectively engageable first clutch means for connecting the input drive means to the input shaft; planetary gear means having a sun gear connected to the driven shaft, a ring gear drivingly connected with the output drive means and carrier and pinion gear means drivingly connected between the sun gear and the ring gear; second clutch means being selectively engageable for connecting the sun gear to the output drive means; third clutch means being selectively engageable for connecting the output shaft to the carrier and pinion gear means; and oneway clutch means disposed in parallel drive relation with the third clutch means for transmitting torque to the carrier and pinion gear means when the third clutch means is disengaged and the output shaft is attempting to rotate faster than the carrier and pinion gear means.

  18. Precision of spiral-bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Goldrich, R. N.; Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1983-01-01

    The kinematic errors in spiral bevel gear trains caused by the generation of nonconjugate surfaces, by axial displacements of the gears during assembly, and by eccentricity of the assembled gears were determined. One mathematical model corresponds to the motion of the contact ellipse across the tooth surface, (geometry I) and the other along the tooth surface (geometry II). The following results were obtained: (1) kinematic errors induced by errors of manufacture may be minimized by applying special machine settings, the original error may be reduced by order of magnitude, the procedure is most effective for geometry 2 gears, (2) when trying to adjust the bearing contact pattern between the gear teeth for geometry I gears, it is more desirable to shim the gear axially; for geometry II gears, shim the pinion axially; (3) the kinematic accuracy of spiral bevel drives are most sensitive to eccentricities of the gear and less sensitive to eccentricities of the pinion. The precision of mounting accuracy and manufacture are most crucial for the gear, and less so for the pinion. Previously announced in STAR as N82-30552

  19. Precision of spiral-bevel gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Goldrich, R. N.; Coy, J. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1982-01-01

    The kinematic errors in spiral bevel gear trains caused by the generation of nonconjugate surfaces, by axial displacements of the gears during assembly, and by eccentricity of the assembled gears were determined. One mathematical model corresponds to the motion of the contact ellipse across the tooth surface, (geometry I) and the other along the tooth surface (geometry II). The following results were obtained: (1) kinematic errors induced by errors of manufacture may be minimized by applying special machine settings, the original error may be reduced by order of magnitude, the procedure is most effective for geometry 2 gears, (2) when trying to adjust the bearing contact pattern between the gear teeth for geometry 1 gears, it is more desirable to shim the gear axially; for geometry II gears, shim the pinion axially; (3) the kinematic accuracy of spiral bevel drives are most sensitive to eccentricities of the gear and less sensitive to eccentricities of the pinion. The precision of mounting accuracy and manufacture are most crucial for the gear, and less so for the pinion.

  20. 50 CFR 648.51 - Gear and crew restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear and crew restrictions. 648.51... Measures for the Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery § 648.51 Gear and crew restrictions. (a) Trawl vessel gear... long axis of the net. (3) Chafing gear and other gear obstructions—(i) Net obstruction or...

  1. 50 CFR 648.51 - Gear and crew restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear and crew restrictions. 648.51... Measures for the Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery § 648.51 Gear and crew restrictions. (a) Trawl vessel gear... long axis of the net. (3) Chafing gear and other gear obstructions—(i) Net obstruction or...

  2. 50 CFR 697.23 - Restricted gear areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Measures § 697.23 Restricted gear areas. (a) Resolution of lobster gear conflicts with fisheries managed... all mobile gear is on board the vessel while inside the area. (ii) Lobster trap gear. From June 16 through September 30 of each fishing year, no fishing vessel with lobster trap gear or person on a...

  3. 50 CFR 697.23 - Restricted gear areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Measures § 697.23 Restricted gear areas. (a) Resolution of lobster gear conflicts with fisheries managed... all mobile gear is on board the vessel while inside the area. (ii) Lobster trap gear. From June 16 through September 30 of each fishing year, no fishing vessel with lobster trap gear or person on a...

  4. 50 CFR 697.23 - Restricted gear areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Measures § 697.23 Restricted gear areas. (a) Resolution of lobster gear conflicts with fisheries managed... all mobile gear is on board the vessel while inside the area. (ii) Lobster trap gear. From June 16 through September 30 of each fishing year, no fishing vessel with lobster trap gear or person on a...

  5. 50 CFR 697.23 - Restricted gear areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Measures § 697.23 Restricted gear areas. (a) Resolution of lobster gear conflicts with fisheries managed... all mobile gear is on board the vessel while inside the area. (ii) Lobster trap gear. From June 16 through September 30 of each fishing year, no fishing vessel with lobster trap gear or person on a...

  6. 50 CFR 697.23 - Restricted gear areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Measures § 697.23 Restricted gear areas. (a) Resolution of lobster gear conflicts with fisheries managed... all mobile gear is on board the vessel while inside the area. (ii) Lobster trap gear. From June 16 through September 30 of each fishing year, no fishing vessel with lobster trap gear or person on a...

  7. 29 CFR 1919.19 - Gear requiring welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gear requiring welding. 1919.19 Section 1919.19 Labor... (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels' Cargo Gear § 1919.19 Gear requiring welding. Chains or other gear which have been lengthened, altered or repaired by welding shall be properly...

  8. 49 CFR 230.92 - Draw gear and draft systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Draw gear and draft systems. 230.92 Section 230.92... Tenders Draw Gear and Draft Systems § 230.92 Draw gear and draft systems. Couplers, draft gear and... condition for service. Driving Gear...

  9. 29 CFR 1919.19 - Gear requiring welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gear requiring welding. 1919.19 Section 1919.19 Labor... (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels' Cargo Gear § 1919.19 Gear requiring welding. Chains or other gear which have been lengthened, altered or repaired by welding shall be properly...

  10. 29 CFR 1919.19 - Gear requiring welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gear requiring welding. 1919.19 Section 1919.19 Labor... (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels' Cargo Gear § 1919.19 Gear requiring welding. Chains or other gear which have been lengthened, altered or repaired by welding shall be properly...

  11. 50 CFR 660.219 - Fixed gear identification and marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed gear identification and marking... West Coast Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.219 Fixed gear identification and marking. (a) Gear identification. (1) Limited entry fixed gear (longline, trap or pot) must be marked...

  12. 50 CFR 660.219 - Fixed gear identification and marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed gear identification and marking... West Coast Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.219 Fixed gear identification and marking. (a) Gear identification. (1) Limited entry fixed gear (longline, trap or pot) must be marked...

  13. 50 CFR 660.219 - Fixed gear identification and marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fixed gear identification and marking. 660... Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.219 Fixed gear identification and marking. (a) Gear identification. (1) Limited entry fixed gear (longline, trap or pot) must be marked at the surface and at...

  14. 50 CFR 622.375 - Authorized and unauthorized gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Authorized and unauthorized gear. 622.375... unauthorized gear. (a) Authorized gear. Subject to the prohibitions on gear/methods specified in § 622.9, the following are the only fishing gears that may be used in the Gulf, Mid-Atlantic, and South Atlantic EEZ...

  15. 49 CFR 230.92 - Draw gear and draft systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Draw gear and draft systems. 230.92 Section 230.92... Tenders Draw Gear and Draft Systems § 230.92 Draw gear and draft systems. Couplers, draft gear and... condition for service. Driving Gear...

  16. 49 CFR 230.92 - Draw gear and draft systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Draw gear and draft systems. 230.92 Section 230.92... Tenders Draw Gear and Draft Systems § 230.92 Draw gear and draft systems. Couplers, draft gear and... condition for service. Driving Gear...

  17. 50 CFR 622.375 - Authorized and unauthorized gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Authorized and unauthorized gear. 622.375... unauthorized gear. (a) Authorized gear. Subject to the prohibitions on gear/methods specified in § 622.9, the following are the only fishing gears that may be used in the Gulf, Mid-Atlantic, and South Atlantic EEZ...

  18. 49 CFR 230.92 - Draw gear and draft systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Draw gear and draft systems. 230.92 Section 230.92... Tenders Draw Gear and Draft Systems § 230.92 Draw gear and draft systems. Couplers, draft gear and... condition for service. Driving Gear...

  19. 29 CFR 1919.19 - Gear requiring welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gear requiring welding. 1919.19 Section 1919.19 Labor... (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels' Cargo Gear § 1919.19 Gear requiring welding. Chains or other gear which have been lengthened, altered or repaired by welding shall be properly...

  20. 49 CFR 230.92 - Draw gear and draft systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Draw gear and draft systems. 230.92 Section 230.92... Tenders Draw Gear and Draft Systems § 230.92 Draw gear and draft systems. Couplers, draft gear and... condition for service. Driving Gear...

  1. 29 CFR 1919.19 - Gear requiring welding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gear requiring welding. 1919.19 Section 1919.19 Labor... (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels' Cargo Gear § 1919.19 Gear requiring welding. Chains or other gear which have been lengthened, altered or repaired by welding shall be properly...

  2. Swimming bacteria power microscopic gears

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Andrey; Apodaca, Mario M.; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2010-01-19

    Whereas the laws of thermodynamics prohibit extraction of useful work from the Brownian motion of particles in equilibrium, these motions can be “rectified” under nonequilibrium conditions, for example, in the presence of asymmetric geometrical obstacles. Here, we describe a class of systems in which aerobic bacteria Bacillus subtilis moving randomly in a fluid film power submillimeter gears and primitive systems of gears decorated with asymmetric teeth. The directional rotation is observed only in the regime of collective bacterial swimming and the gears’ angular velocities depend on and can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to the bacteria. The ability to harness and control the power of collective motions appears an important requirement for further development of mechanical systems driven by microorganisms.

  3. Swimming bacteria power microscopic gears

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Andrey; Apodaca, Mario M.; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2010-01-01

    Whereas the laws of thermodynamics prohibit extraction of useful work from the Brownian motion of particles in equilibrium, these motions can be “rectified” under nonequilibrium conditions, for example, in the presence of asymmetric geometrical obstacles. Here, we describe a class of systems in which aerobic bacteria Bacillus subtilis moving randomly in a fluid film power submillimeter gears and primitive systems of gears decorated with asymmetric teeth. The directional rotation is observed only in the regime of collective bacterial swimming and the gears’ angular velocities depend on and can be controlled by the amount of oxygen available to the bacteria. The ability to harness and control the power of collective motions appears an important requirement for further development of mechanical systems driven by microorganisms. PMID:20080560

  4. Zero torque gear head wrench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, A. R.; Norman, R. M. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A gear head wrench particularly suited for use in applying torque to bolts without transferring torsional stress to bolt-receiving structures is introduced. The wrench is characterized by a coupling including a socket, for connecting a bolt head with a torque multiplying gear train, provided within a housing having an annulus concentrically related to the socket and adapted to be coupled with a spacer interposed between the bolt head and the juxtaposed surface of the bolt-receiving structure for applying a balancing counter-torque to the spacer as torque is applied to the bolt head whereby the bolt-receiving structure is substantially isolated from torsional stress. As a result of the foregoing, the operator of the wrench is substantially isolated from any forces which may be imposed.

  5. Bacteria turn a tiny gear

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Thousands of tiny Bacillus subtillis bacteria turn a single gear, just 380 microns across. (A human hair is about 100 microns across.) The method could be used to create micro-machines. Argonne National Laboratory scientist Igor Aronson pioneered this technique. Read more at the New York Times: http://ow.ly/ODfI or at Argonne: http://ow.ly/ODfa Video courtesy Igor Aronson.

  6. A review of 41 upper extremity war injuries and the protective gear worn during Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    PubMed

    Greer, Michelle A; Miklos-Essenberg, M Elizabeth; Harrison-Weaver, Sandra

    2006-07-01

    Forty-one patients with upper extremity war injuries sustained during combat operations Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom were reviewed to report on protective gear availability and usage at the time of injury. Participants treated at the Madigan Army Medical Center occupational therapy clinic from August 2004 until February 2005 completed a questionnaire regarding injuries sustained during deployment. Overall, 6 injuries were to upper extremity regions that were covered with issued protective gear; 21 injuries were to areas not covered with issued protective gear (i.e., participant was not wearing issued gear), and 22 injuries were to regions that were not covered because no protective gear was issued for that body area. Although this study is limited, future research would provide valuable insights about the efficacy of current body armor and the need for additional or modified gear.

  7. High-torque quiet gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Paul E.

    1995-07-01

    A high-torque quiet gear construction consists of an inner hub having a plurality of circumferentially spaced arms extending radially outwardly therefrom, and an outer ring member having a plurality of circumferentially spaced-teeth extending radially inwardly therefrom. The ring member further includes a plurality of gear formations on an outer surface thereof for intermeshing with other gears. The teeth of the ring member are received in spaced relation in corresponding spaces formed between adjacent arms of the hub. An elastomeric member is received in the space formed between the hub and the ring member to form a resilient correction between the arms of the hub and the teeth of the ring member. The side surfaces of the arms and the teeth extend generally parallel to each other and at least partially overlap in a longitudinal direction. The purpose of this configuration is to place the elastomeric member in compression when torque is applied to the hub. Since elastomeric material is relatively incompressible, the result is low shear loads on the adhesive bonds which hold the elastomeric member to both the hub and outer ring member.

  8. Automatic transmission's Ravigneaux type planetary gear train having two ring gears

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraiwa, K.

    1989-02-07

    A planetary gear system is described comprising: a stationary member; input means for receiving a driving torque; an output shaft; a compound planetary gear train; a clutch group including a first clutch disposed between the input means and the first sun gear for connection and disconnection therebetween, a second clutch disposed between the input means and the second sun gear for connection and disconnection therebetween, and a third clutch disposed between the input means and the pinion carrier for connection and disconnection therebetween; and a holding device group including a first holding device disposed between the first sun gear and the stationary member for holding the first sun gear, a second holding device disposed between the pinion carrier and the stationary member for holding the pinion carrier, and a third holding device disposed between the second ring gear and the stationary member for holding the second ring gear.

  9. Effects of gear box vibration and mass imbalance on the dynamics of multistage gear transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Tu, Y. K.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Townsend, D. P.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of multistage gear transmission system, with the effects of gear-box-induced vibrations and rotor mass-imbalances is analyzed. The model method, using undamped frequencies and planar mode shapes, is used to reduce the degree-of-freedom of the system. The various rotor-bearing stages as well as lateral and torsional vibrations of each individual stage are coupled through localized gear-mesh-tooth interactions. Gear-box vibrations are coupled to the gear stage dynamics through bearing support forces. Transient and steady state dynamics of lateral and torsional vibrations of the geared system are examined in both time and frequency domain. A typical three-staged geared system is used as an example. Effects of mass-imbalance and gear box vibrations on the system dynamic behavior are presented in terms of modal excitation functions for both lateral and torsional vibrations. Operational characteristics and conclusions are drawn from the results presented.

  10. Lubrication and cooling for high speed gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    The problems and failures occurring with the operation of high speed gears are discussed. The gearing losses associated with high speed gearing such as tooth mesh friction, bearing friction, churning, and windage are discussed with various ways shown to help reduce these losses and thereby improve efficiency. Several different methods of oil jet lubrication for high speed gearing are given such as into mesh, out of mesh, and radial jet lubrication. The experiments and analytical results for the various methods of oil jet lubrication are shown with the strengths and weaknesses of each method discussed. The analytical and experimental results of gear lubrication and cooling at various test conditions are presented. These results show the very definite need of improved methods of gear cooling at high speed and high load conditions.

  11. Topological and parametric optimization of gear trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swantner, Albert; Campbell, Matthew I.

    2012-11-01

    A method for automating the design of gear trains comprised of simple, compound, bevel and worm is described. The search process combines topological changes, discrete variable choices and continuous variable optimization. By combing best-first search, implicit enumeration, automated optimization invocation and gradient-based optimization, a near guarantee of the optimal solution can be made. While the combination of methods is specific to gear trains, there are aspects of the work that make it amenable to other engineering design problems. In addition, the topological and discrete modifications to the candidate solutions are specific to gear trains, but the graph grammar methodology that is adopted has been tailored to other problems. This article presents details on the rules that generate feasible gear trains, the evaluation routines used in determining the objective functions and constraints, and the interaction among the three search methods. Resulting gear trains are presented for a variety of gear problems.

  12. Noncircular Gears: Geometry and Visualization MODEL Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES david.stringer@us.army.mil 14. ABSTRACT Circular gears are optimized to provide constant torque and speed ratio with low...noise. In conventional automotive applications, a transmission provides the required power, torque , and speed settings using a finite arrangement of...a noncircular gear pair of desired velocity and torque ratio distribution. Finally, to graphically depict the noncircular effects on gear motion

  13. 50 CFR 679.24 - Gear limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gear limitations. 679.24 Section 679.24... § 679.24 Gear limitations. Regulations pertaining to vessel and gear markings are set forth in this... § 300.62 of chapter III of this title. (a) Marking of hook-and-line, longline pot, and pot-and-line...

  14. 50 CFR 679.24 - Gear limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear limitations. 679.24 Section 679.24... § 679.24 Gear limitations. Regulations pertaining to vessel and gear markings are set forth in this... § 300.62 of chapter III of this title. (a) Marking of hook-and-line, longline pot, and pot-and-line...

  15. Tool Gear: Infrastructure for Parallel Tools

    SciTech Connect

    May, J; Gyllenhaal, J

    2003-04-17

    Tool Gear is a software infrastructure for developing performance analysis and other tools. Unlike existing integrated toolkits, which focus on providing a suite of capabilities, Tool Gear is designed to help tool developers create new tools quickly. It combines dynamic instrumentation capabilities with an efficient database and a sophisticated and extensible graphical user interface. This paper describes the design of Tool Gear and presents examples of tools that have been built with it.

  16. 50 CFR 679.24 - Gear limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear limitations. 679.24 Section 679.24... § 679.24 Gear limitations. Regulations pertaining to vessel and gear markings are set forth in this... § 300.62 of chapter III of this title. (a) Marking of hook-and-line, longline pot, and pot-and-line...

  17. 50 CFR 679.24 - Gear limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gear limitations. 679.24 Section 679.24... § 679.24 Gear limitations. Regulations pertaining to vessel and gear markings are set forth in this... § 300.62 of chapter III of this title. (a) Marking of hook-and-line, longline pot, and pot-and-line...

  18. 50 CFR 679.24 - Gear limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear limitations. 679.24 Section 679.24... § 679.24 Gear limitations. Regulations pertaining to vessel and gear markings are set forth in this... § 300.62 of chapter III of this title. (a) Marking of hook-and-line, longline pot, and pot-and-line...

  19. Dynamic loading on parallel shaft gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, H. H. (edward); Huston, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    A computer-based analysis of the dynamic effects of spur gear systems is presented. The method of analysis with its associated computer code is capable of determining the dynamic response of spur gear systems having involute tooth profiles and standard contact ratios. Various parameters affecting the system dynamic behavior are examined. Numerical results of the analysis are compared with semi-empirical formulae, AGMA (American Gear Manufacturers Association) formulae, and experimental data. A close correlation with the experimental data is obtained.

  20. Optimum weight design of functionally graded material gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Shikai; Zhang, He; Zhou, Jingtao; Song, Guohua

    2015-11-01

    Traditional gear weight optimization methods consider gear tooth number, module, face width or other dimension parameters of gear as design variables. However, due to the complicated form and geometric features peculiar to the gear, there will be large amounts of design parameters in gear design, and the influences of gear parameters changing on gear trains, transmission system and the whole equipment have to be taken into account, which increases the complexity of optimization problem. This paper puts forward to apply functionally graded materials (FGMs) to gears and then conduct the optimization. According to the force situation of gears, the material distribution form of FGM gears is determined. Then based on the performance parameters analysis of FGMs and the practical working demands for gears, a multi-objective optimization model is formed. Finally by using the goal driven optimization (GDO) method, the optimal material distribution is achieved, which makes gear weight and the maximum deformation be minimum and the maximum bending stress do not exceed the allowable stress. As an example, the applying of FGM to automotive transmission gear is conducted to illustrate the optimization design process and the result shows that under the condition of keeping the normal working performance of gear, the method achieves in greatly reducing the gear weight. This research proposes a FGM gears design method that is able to largely reduce the weight of gears by optimizing the microscopic material parameters instead of changing the macroscopic dimension parameters of gears, which reduces the complexity of gear weight optimization problem.

  1. Low-noise, high-strength, spiral-bevel gears for helicopter transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Henry, Zachary S.; Litvin, Faydor L.

    1993-01-01

    Improvements in spiral-bevel gear design were investigated to support the Army/NASA Advanced Rotorcraft Transmission program. Program objectives were to reduce weight by 25 percent, reduce noise by 10 dB, and increase life to 5000 hr mean-time-between-removal. To help meet these goals, advanced-design spiral-bevel gears were tested in an OH-58D helicopter transmission using the NASA 500-hp Helicopter Transmission Test Stand. Three different gear designs tested included: (1) the current design of the OH-58D transmission except gear material X-53 instead of AISI 9310; (2) a higher-strength design the same as the current but with a full fillet radius to reduce gear tooth bending stress (and thus, weight); and (3) a lower-noise design the same as the high-strength but with modified tooth geometry to reduce transmission error and noise. Noise, vibration, and tooth strain tests were performed and significant gear stress and noise reductions were achieved.

  2. Local meshing plane analysis as a source of information about the gear quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mączak, Jędrzej

    2013-07-01

    In the paper the application of the local meshing plane concept is discussed and applied for detecting of tooth degradation due to fatigue, and for overall gear quality assessment. Knowing the kinematic properties of the machine (i.e. gear tooth numbers) it is possible to modify the diagnostic signal in such a manner that its fragments will be linked to different rotating parts. This allows for presentation of either raw or processed gearbox signal in a form of three dimensional map on the plane "pinion teeth×gear teeth", called local meshing plane. The meshing plane in Cartesian coordinates z1×z2 allows for precise location and assessment of gear faults in terms of meshing quality of consecutive tooth pairs. Although the method was applied to simulated signals generated by the gearbox model, similar results were obtained for the measurement signals recorded during the back-to-back test stand experiment. The described method could be used for assessing the manufacturing quality of gears, the assembly quality as well as for the gear failure evaluation during normal exploitation.

  3. Load Sharing Behavior of Star Gearing Reducer for Geared Turbofan Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Shuai; Zhang, Yidu; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Feiming; Matsumura, Shigeki; Houjoh, Haruo

    2017-03-01

    Load sharing behavior is very important for power-split gearing system, star gearing reducer as a new type and special transmission system can be used in many industry fields. However, there is few literature regarding the key multiple-split load sharing issue in main gearbox used in new type geared turbofan engine. Further mechanism analysis are made on load sharing behavior among star gears of star gearing reducer for geared turbofan engine. Comprehensive meshing error analysis are conducted on eccentricity error, gear thickness error, base pitch error, assembly error, and bearing error of star gearing reducer respectively. Floating meshing error resulting from meshing clearance variation caused by the simultaneous floating of sun gear and annular gear are taken into account. A refined mathematical model for load sharing coefficient calculation is established in consideration of different meshing stiffness and supporting stiffness for components. The regular curves of load sharing coefficient under the influence of interactions, single action and single variation of various component errors are obtained. The accurate sensitivity of load sharing coefficient toward different errors is mastered. The load sharing coefficient of star gearing reducer is 1.033 and the maximum meshing force in gear tooth is about 3010 N. This paper provides scientific theory evidences for optimal parameter design and proper tolerance distribution in advanced development and manufacturing process, so as to achieve optimal effects in economy and technology.

  4. Effects of gear crack propagation paths on vibration responses of the perforated gear system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Pang, Xu; Zeng, Jin; Wang, Qibin; Wen, Bangchun

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigates the dynamic behaviors of a perforated gear system considering effects of the gear crack propagation paths and this study focuses on the effects of a crack propagating through the rim on the time-varying mesh stiffness (TVMS) and vibration responses. Considering the effects of the extended tooth contact, a finite element (FE) model of a gear pair is established based on ANSYS software. TVMS of the perforated gear with crack propagating through tooth and rim are calculated by using the FE model. Furthermore, a lumped mass model is adopted to investigate the vibration responses of the perforated gear system. The results show that there exist three periods related to slots of the gear body in a rotating period of the perforated gear. Gear cracks propagating through tooth and rim both reduce the gear body stiffness and lead to reduction of TVMS besides the crack tooth contact moment, and the TVMS weakening for the former is less than that for the latter. Moreover, the results also show that the gear crack propagating through the rim (CPR) has a greater effect on vibration responses than the gear crack propagating through the tooth (CPT) under the same crack level. Vibration level increases with the increasing crack depth, especially for the gear with CPR.

  5. Design of spur gears for improved efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, N. E.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1981-01-01

    A method to calculate spur gear system power loss for a wide range of gear geometries and operating conditions is used to determine design requirements for an efficient gearset. The effects of spur gear size, pitch, ratio, pitch-line-velocity and load on efficiency are shown. A design example is given to illustrate how the method is to be applied. In general, peak efficiencies were found to be greater for larger diameter and fine pitched gears and tare (no-load) losses were found to be significant.

  6. Evaluation of Carburized and Ground Face Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Heath, Gregory F.; Sheth, Vijay

    1999-01-01

    Experimental durability tests were performed on carburized and ground AIS19310 steel face gears. The tests were in support of a Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Technology Reinvestment Program (TRP) to enhance face-gear technology. The tests were conducted in the NASA Glenn spiral-bevel-gear/face-gear test facility. Tests were run at 2300 rpm face gear speed and at loads of 64, 76, 88, 100, and 112-percent of the design torque of 377 N-m (3340 in-lb). The carburized and ground face gears demonstrated the required durability when run for ten-million cycles at each of the applied loads. Proper installation was critical for the successful operation of the spur pinions and face gears. A large amount of backlash produced tooth contact patterns that approached the inner-diameter edge of the face-gear tooth. Low backlash produced tooth contact patterns that approached the outer-diameter edge of the face-gear tooth. Measured backlashes in the range of 0.178 to 0.254 mm (0.007 to 0.010 in) produced acceptable tooth contact patterns.

  7. Addendum 2: Logs of monitor wells drilled May 1988 through December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, J.; Qualheim, B.; McPherrin, R.; Barber, K.; Hedegaard, R.; McConihe, W.; Miller, T.

    1993-11-01

    The logs in this addendum were plotted in a new format by the same software package (LOGGER by Rockware, Denver, CO) that was used in the original publication. The scale remains the same, 1 inch = 15 foot. The header is totally automated with a subheading indexing the well-construction symbols. Geophysical curves are labeled in their respective channels, and percentage core recovery is plotted in a histogram. Lithologic symbols are plotted to scale in a channel similar to previous logs. The lithologic description also has been automated to assure consistency in terminology. Descriptions are more extensive and are referenced by leader lines to the lithologic symbol. Additional figures included for this Addendum are: a plot of all the monitoring well locations at the LLNL Main site and a plot detailing the gasoline spill area well locations in the vicinity of Building 403.

  8. Addendum to Revision 1 of the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Addendum Revision No. 1)

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office

    2001-06-06

    This document is submitted as an addendum to the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. The addendum was prepared to propose work activities in response to comments resulting from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) review of the draft Frenchman Flat CAU model of groundwater flow and contaminant transport completed in April 1999. The reviewers included an external panel of experts and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. As a result of the review, additional work scope, including new data-collection and modeling activities, has been identified for the Frenchman Flat CAU. The proposed work scope described in this addendum will be conducted in accordance with the revised Underground Test Area strategy contained in the December 2000 amendment to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The Frenchman Flat CAU model is a group of interdependent models designed to predict the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear tests conducted within this CAU. At the time of the DOE review, the CAU model consisted of a CAU groundwater flow and transport model comprised of two major components: a groundwater flow model and a recharge model. The CAU groundwater flow model is supported by a hydrostratigraphic model and a recharge model, whereas the CAU transport model is supported by a source-term model. As part of the modeling activities proposed in this addendum, two new major components may be added to the Frenchman Flat CAU model: a total-system model and two local groundwater flow and transport models. The reviewers identified several issues relating to insufficiency of data and inadequacy of the modeling process that should be addressed to provide additional confidence in the modeling results with respect to the potential for contaminant migration to the Lower Carbonate Aquifer. The proposed additional work scope includes new data

  9. ADDENDUM: The classification of Novikov algebras in low dimensions: invariant bilinear forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Chengming; Meng, Daoji

    2001-10-01

    In this note, we give a complete classification of the (non-degenerate) symmetric invariant bilinear forms on Novikov algebras in dimension 2 and 3, which can be regarded as an addendum of the classification of Novikov algebras in low dimensions given in our previous work (Bai C M and Meng D J 2001 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 34 1581-94).

  10. Addendum to the MiniBooNE Run Plab. MinneBooNE Physics in 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.

    2004-11-02

    The primary physics goal of Mini BooNE is to confirm or rule out the LSND vμ→ve oscilliation observation with high significance. In the 2003 Run Plan document presented to the PAC, we outlined the need for 1 X 1021 protons on target (POT) to achieve this goal. In this document, we present an addendum to our run plan for fiscal year 2006 (FY2006).

  11. Software Technology for Adaptable, Reliable Systems (STARS) Program: SPMS Training Class: Student Handout. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-02

    Sequence 03705-001B 30 September 1991 (3 SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY FOR ADAPTABLE, RELIABLE SYSTEMS ( STARS ) PROGRAM ELEGTE m AUG15 1991 Ö I 0 SPMS Training...September 1991 SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY FOR ADAPTABLE, RELIABLE SYSTEMS ( STARS ) PROGRAM SPMS Training Class: Student Handout Addendum to: Software...document is the student handout prepared for the "SEI/ STARS P.3 Asset Acquisition Sub-task" training class. The student handout covers basic aspects

  12. Work Plan, Galena Airport and Kalakaket Radio Relay Station, Alaska. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-08

    Federal Regulations (CFR), Chapter I and V, Protection of Environment. ad Air Force Regulations (AFR) 19-1, " Pollution Abatement and Environmental...Quality," 9 Jan 78. ae) AFR 19-2, "Environmental Impact Analysis Process (EIAP)," 23 Sep 81. af) AFR 19-6, " Air Pollution Control Systems for Boilers and...United States Air Force "-- 611th Civil Engineer O • Squadron Elmendorf AFB, Alaska Final Addendum to the Work Plan Galena Airport and Kalakaket

  13. Mariner Mars 1971 television picture catalog: Sequence design and picture coverage, volume 2, addendum 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koskela, P. E.

    1973-01-01

    This addendum to the Mariner Mars 1971 Television Picture Catalog, Volume 2 (for abstract, see N73-20850) contains data for the Mariner 9 TV pictures taken after Rev 262. Some of the data presented in Volume 2 is brought up to date. The new provisional mapping pole is discussed, and tables provide the latitude and longitude with respect to the new pole, prime meridian, and rotation rate for the centerpoints of all the Mariner 9 TV pictures.

  14. Sierra/SolidMechanics 4.22 user's guide : addendum for shock capabilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-10-01

    This is an addendum to the Sierra/SolidMechanics 4.22 User's Guide to document additional capabilities that are available for use in the Presto{_}ITAR code that are not available for use in the standard version of Sierra/SolidMechanics (Sierra/SM). Presto{_}ITAR is an enhanced version of Sierra/SM that provides capabilities that make it regulated under the U.S. Department of State's International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) export-control rules. This code is part of the Vivace product, and is only distributed to entities that comply with ITAR regulations. The enhancements primarily focus on material models that include an energy-dependent pressure response, appropriate for very large deformations and strain rates. Since this is an addendum to the standard Sierra/SolidMechanics User's Guide, please refer to that document first for general descriptions of code capability and use. This addendum documents material models and element features that support energy-dependent material models.

  15. Improvements to the FATOLA computer program including added actively controlled landing gear subroutines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mall, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    Modifications to a multi-degree-of-freedom flexible aircraft take-off and landing analysis (FATOLA) computer program, including a provision for actively controlled landing gears to expand the programs simulation capabilities, are presented. Supplemental instructions for preparation of data and for use of the modified program are included.

  16. Detecting gear tooth fracture in a high contact ratio face gear mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrajsek, James J.; Handschuh, Robert F.; Lewicki, David G.; Decker, Harry J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarized the results of a study in which three different vibration diagnostic methods were used to detect gear tooth fracture in a high contact ratio face gear mesh. The NASA spiral bevel gear fatigue test rig was used to produce unseeded fault, natural failures of four face gear specimens. During the fatigue tests, which were run to determine load capacity and primary failure mechanisms for face gears, vibration signals were monitored and recorded for gear diagnostic purposes. Gear tooth bending fatigue and surface pitting were the primary failure modes found in the tests. The damage ranged from partial tooth fracture on a single tooth in one test to heavy wear, severe pitting, and complete tooth fracture of several teeth on another test. Three gear fault detection techniques, FM4, NA4*, and NB4, were applied to the experimental data. These methods use the signal average in both the time and frequency domain. Method NA4* was able to conclusively detect the gear tooth fractures in three out of the four fatigue tests, along with gear tooth surface pitting and heavy wear. For multiple tooth fractures, all of the methods gave a clear indication of the damage. It was also found that due to the high contact ratio of the face gear mesh, single tooth fractures did not significantly affect the vibration signal, making this type of failure difficult to detect.

  17. Planetary gear profile modification design based on load sharing modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Miguel; Fernández Del Rincón, Alfonso; De-Juan, Ana Magdalena; Garcia, Pablo; Diez, Alberto; Viadero, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    In order to satisfy the increasing demand on high performance planetary transmissions, an important line of research is focused on the understanding of some of the underlying phenomena involved in this mechanical system. Through the development of models capable of reproduce the system behavior, research in this area contributes to improve gear transmission insight, helping developing better maintenance practices and more efficient design processes. A planetary gear model used for the design of profile modifications ratio based on the levelling of the load sharing ratio is presented. The gear profile geometry definition, following a vectorial approach that mimics the real cutting process of gears, is thoroughly described. Teeth undercutting and hypotrochoid definition are implicitly considered, and a procedure for the incorporation of a rounding arc at the tooth tip in order to deal with corner contacts is described. A procedure for the modeling of profile deviations is presented, which can be used for the introduction of both manufacturing errors and designed profile modifications. An easy and flexible implementation of the profile deviation within the planetary model is accomplished based on the geometric overlapping. The contact force calculation and dynamic implementation used in the model are also introduced, and parameters from a real transmission for agricultural applications are presented for the application example. A set of reliefs is designed based on the levelling of the load sharing ratio for the example transmission, and finally some other important dynamic factors of the transmission are analyzed to assess the changes in the dynamic behavior with respect to the non-modified case. Thus, the main innovative aspect of the proposed planetary transmission model is the capacity of providing a simulated load sharing ratio which serves as design variable for the calculation of the tooth profile modifications.

  18. The transfer function method for gear system dynamics applied to conventional and minimum excitation gearing designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    A transfer function method for predicting the dynamic responses of gear systems with more than one gear mesh is developed and applied to the NASA Lewis four-square gear fatigue test apparatus. Methods for computing bearing-support force spectra and temporal histories of the total force transmitted by a gear mesh, the force transmitted by a single pair of teeth, and the maximum root stress in a single tooth are developed. Dynamic effects arising from other gear meshes in the system are included. A profile modification design method to minimize the vibration excitation arising from a pair of meshing gears is reviewed and extended. Families of tooth loading functions required for such designs are developed and examined for potential excitation of individual tooth vibrations. The profile modification design method is applied to a pair of test gears.

  19. Optimal sinusoidal modelling of gear mesh vibration signals for gear diagnosis and prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Zhihong; Wang, Wenyi; Khoo, Suiyang; Yin, Juliang

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the synchronous signal average of gear mesh vibration signals is modelled with the multiple modulated sinusoidal representations. The signal model parameters are optimised against the measured signal averages by using the batch learning of the least squares technique. With the optimal signal model, all components of a gear mesh vibration signal, including the amplitude modulations, the phase modulations and the impulse vibration component induced by gear tooth cracking, are identified and analysed with insight of the gear tooth crack development and propagation. In particular, the energy distribution of the impulse vibration signal, extracted from the optimal signal model, provides sufficient information for monitoring and diagnosing the evolution of the tooth cracking process, leading to the prognosis of gear tooth cracking. The new methodologies for gear mesh signal modelling and the diagnosis of the gear tooth fault development and propagation are validated with a set of rig test data, which has shown excellent performance.

  20. 50 CFR 648.144 - Gear restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... restrictions—(1) General. (i) Otter trawlers whose owners are issued a black sea bass moratorium permit and... Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.144 Gear restrictions. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 60637, Sept. 29, 2011. (a) Trawl gear restrictions—(1) General. (i) Otter trawlers whose owners are issued a...

  1. Gear Lubrication and Cooling Experiment and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Akin, L. S.

    1983-01-01

    A gear tooth temperature analysis was performed using a finite element method combined with a calculated heat input, a calculated oil jet impingement depth, and estimated heat transfer coefficients for the different parts of the gear tooth that are oil cooled and air cooled. Experimental measurements of gear tooth average surface temperature and gear tooth instantaneous surface temperature were made with a fast response, infrared, radiometric microscope. Increasing oil pressure has a significant effect on both average surface temperature and peak surface temperature at loads above 1895 N/cm(1083 lb/in) and speeds of 10,000 and 7500 rpm. Both increasing speed (from 5000 to 10,000 rpm) at constant speed cause a significant rise in the average surface temperature and in the instantaneous peak surface temperatures on the gear teeth. The oil jet pressure required to provide the best cooling for gears is the pressure required to obtain full gear tooth impingement. Calculated results for gear tooth temperatures were close to experimental results for various oil jet impingement depths for identical operating conditions.

  2. Computer aided design of spur gear teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. L.; Mavriplis, D.; Oswald, F. B.

    1989-01-01

    Procedures for computer-modeling of spur gear tooth fabrication are given. It is shown that the standard involute tooth form results from a cutter with an involute shape rolling onto a gear blank. Specifically, the envelope of an involute is an involute. Examples are given and applications are discussed.

  3. 50 CFR 665.246 - Gear identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear identification. 665.246 Section 665.246 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Gear identification. In Permit Area 1, the vessel's official number must be marked legibly on all...

  4. 50 CFR 665.246 - Gear identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gear identification. 665.246 Section 665.246 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Gear identification. In Permit Area 1, the vessel's official number must be marked legibly on all...

  5. 50 CFR 622.243 - Gear identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear identification. 622.243 Section 622.243 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.243 Gear identification. (a) Golden crab traps and...

  6. 50 CFR 665.246 - Gear identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear identification. 665.246 Section 665.246 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Gear identification. In Permit Area 1, the vessel's official number must be marked legibly on all...

  7. 50 CFR 665.246 - Gear identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gear identification. 665.246 Section 665.246 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Gear identification. In Permit Area 1, the vessel's official number must be marked legibly on all...

  8. 50 CFR 622.376 - Gear identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear identification. 622.376 Section 622.376 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Migratory Pelagic Resources (Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic) § 622.376 Gear identification. (a)...

  9. 50 CFR 622.430 - Gear identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear identification. 622.430 Section 622.430 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.430 Gear identification. (a) Fish traps...

  10. 50 CFR 622.430 - Gear identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear identification. 622.430 Section 622.430 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Fishery of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands § 622.430 Gear identification. (a) Fish traps...

  11. 50 CFR 622.376 - Gear identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear identification. 622.376 Section 622.376 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Migratory Pelagic Resources (Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic) § 622.376 Gear identification. (a)...

  12. 50 CFR 665.246 - Gear identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gear identification. 665.246 Section 665.246 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Gear identification. In Permit Area 1, the vessel's official number must be marked legibly on all...

  13. 50 CFR 622.243 - Gear identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear identification. 622.243 Section 622.243 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Fishery of the South Atlantic Region § 622.243 Gear identification. (a) Golden crab traps and...

  14. Modeling Noise in Geared Transmission Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyam, C. V. S. R.

    2010-11-01

    Noise is an unwanted sound that affects human and environment if not controlled properly. In the present article an effort is made to reduce noise in geared transmission systems by modeling noise. Numerical solution methods are suggested at the end. Energy considerations in geared transmissions are discussed.

  15. Analysis of Landing-Gear Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milwitzky, Benjamin; Cook, Francis E

    1953-01-01

    This report presents a theoretical study of the behavior of the conventional type of oleo-pneumatic landing gear during the process of landing impact. The basic analysis is presented in a general form and treats the motions of the landing gear prior to and subsequent to the beginning of shock-strut deflection. The applicability of the analysis to actual landing gears has been investigated for the particular case of a vertical landing gear in the absence of drag loads by comparing calculated results with experimental drop-test data for impacts with and without tire bottoming. The calculated behavior of the landing gear was found to be in good agreement with the drop-test data.

  16. HIP diffusion bonding for gear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ashworth, M.A.; Jacobs, M.H.; Armstrong, G.R.; Freeman, R.; Rickinson, B.A.; King, S.

    1996-12-31

    Mechanical actuators used on aircraft flight control systems contain highly stressed gears which are made from low alloy steels; either through or surface hardened. Corrosion protection has traditionally been provided by cadmium plating. Conventional stainless steels, even when given surface treatments do not provide the necessary strength, wear and corrosion properties for such gears. HIP processing has been used on cobalt based alloy powders as a new approach to produce gears for mechanical and corrosion testing. The technology has been used both to consolidate the powder and HIP diffusion bond the alloy to conventional stainless steels. The microstructure and properties of the consolidated alloy are presented together with preliminary results from component testing. The diffusion bonding route has produced gears which have much better wear and corrosion resistance than conventional steel gears whilst retaining equivalent fatigue properties. The economics of the process are discussed together with the concept of using the HIP process to shape as well as consolidate the material.

  17. Vibration signature analysis of multistage gear transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Tu, Y. K.; Savage, M.; Townsend, D. P.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis is presented for multistage multimesh gear transmission systems. The analysis predicts the overall system dynamics and the transmissibility to the gear box or the enclosed structure. The modal synthesis approach of the analysis treats the uncoupled lateral/torsional model characteristics of each stage or component independently. The vibration signature analysis evaluates the global dynamics coupling in the system. The method synthesizes the interaction of each modal component or stage with the nonlinear gear mesh dynamics and the modal support geometry characteristics. The analysis simulates transient and steady state vibration events to determine the resulting torque variations, speeds, changes, rotor imbalances, and support gear box motion excitations. A vibration signature analysis examines the overall dynamic characteristics of the system, and the individual model component responses. The gear box vibration analysis also examines the spectral characteristics of the support system.

  18. Dynamics of early planetary gear trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    August, R.; Kasuba, R.; Frater, J. L.; Pintz, A.

    1984-01-01

    A method to analyze the static and dynamic loads in a planetary gear train was developed. A variable-variable mesh stiffness (VVMS) model was used to simulate the external and internal spur gear mesh behavior, and an equivalent conventional gear train concept was adapted for the dynamic studies. The analysis can be applied either involute or noninvolute spur gearing. By utilizing the equivalent gear train concept, the developed method may be extended for use for all types of epicyclic gearing. The method is incorporated into a computer program so that the static and dynamic behavior of individual components can be examined. Items considered in the analysis are: (1) static and dynamic load sharing among the planets; (2) floating or fixed Sun gear; (3) actual tooth geometry, including errors and modifications; (4) positioning errors of the planet gears; (5) torque variations due to noninvolute gear action. A mathematical model comprised of power source, load, and planetary transmission is used to determine the instantaneous loads to which the components are subjected. It considers fluctuating output torque, elastic behavior in the system, and loss of contact between gear teeth. The dynamic model has nine degrees of freedom resulting in a set of simultaneous second order differential equations with time varying coefficients, which are solved numerically. The computer program was used to determine the effect of manufacturing errors, damping and component stiffness, and transmitted load on dynamic behavior. It is indicated that this methodology offers the designer/analyst a comprehensive tool with which planetary drives may be quickly and effectively evaluated.

  19. The Dilemma of Derelict Gear

    PubMed Central

    Scheld, A. M.; Bilkovic, D. M.; Havens, K. J.

    2016-01-01

    Every year, millions of pots and traps are lost in crustacean fisheries around the world. Derelict fishing gear has been found to produce several harmful environmental and ecological effects, however socioeconomic consequences have been investigated less frequently. We analyze the economic effects of a substantial derelict pot removal program in the largest estuary of the United States, the Chesapeake Bay. By combining spatially resolved data on derelict pot removals with commercial blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) harvests and effort, we show that removing 34,408 derelict pots led to significant gains in gear efficiency and an additional 13,504 MT in harvest valued at US $21.3 million—a 27% increase above that which would have occurred without removals. Model results are extended to a global analysis where it is seen that US $831 million in landings could be recovered annually by removing less than 10% of the derelict pots and traps from major crustacean fisheries. An unfortunate common pool externality, the degradation of marine environments is detrimental not only to marine organisms and biota, but also to those individuals and communities whose livelihoods and culture depend on profitable and sustainable marine resource use. PMID:26790394

  20. The Dilemma of Derelict Gear.

    PubMed

    Scheld, A M; Bilkovic, D M; Havens, K J

    2016-01-21

    Every year, millions of pots and traps are lost in crustacean fisheries around the world. Derelict fishing gear has been found to produce several harmful environmental and ecological effects, however socioeconomic consequences have been investigated less frequently. We analyze the economic effects of a substantial derelict pot removal program in the largest estuary of the United States, the Chesapeake Bay. By combining spatially resolved data on derelict pot removals with commercial blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) harvests and effort, we show that removing 34,408 derelict pots led to significant gains in gear efficiency and an additional 13,504 MT in harvest valued at US $21.3 million--a 27% increase above that which would have occurred without removals. Model results are extended to a global analysis where it is seen that US $831 million in landings could be recovered annually by removing less than 10% of the derelict pots and traps from major crustacean fisheries. An unfortunate common pool externality, the degradation of marine environments is detrimental not only to marine organisms and biota, but also to those individuals and communities whose livelihoods and culture depend on profitable and sustainable marine resource use.

  1. The Dilemma of Derelict Gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheld, A. M.; Bilkovic, D. M.; Havens, K. J.

    2016-01-01

    Every year, millions of pots and traps are lost in crustacean fisheries around the world. Derelict fishing gear has been found to produce several harmful environmental and ecological effects, however socioeconomic consequences have been investigated less frequently. We analyze the economic effects of a substantial derelict pot removal program in the largest estuary of the United States, the Chesapeake Bay. By combining spatially resolved data on derelict pot removals with commercial blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) harvests and effort, we show that removing 34,408 derelict pots led to significant gains in gear efficiency and an additional 13,504 MT in harvest valued at US $21.3 million—a 27% increase above that which would have occurred without removals. Model results are extended to a global analysis where it is seen that US $831 million in landings could be recovered annually by removing less than 10% of the derelict pots and traps from major crustacean fisheries. An unfortunate common pool externality, the degradation of marine environments is detrimental not only to marine organisms and biota, but also to those individuals and communities whose livelihoods and culture depend on profitable and sustainable marine resource use.

  2. Dynamic simulation of planetary gear set with flexible spur ring gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zaigang; Shao, Yimin; Su, Daizhong

    2013-12-01

    Ring gear is a key element for vibration transmission and noise radiation in the planetary gear system which has been widely employed in different areas, such as wind turbine transmissions. Its flexibility has a great influence on the mesh stiffness of internal gear pair and the dynamic response of the planetary gear system, especially for the thin ring cases. In this paper, the flexibility of the internal ring gear is considered based on the uniformly curved Timoshenko beam theory. The ring deformation is coupled into the mesh stiffness model, which enables the investigation on the effects of the ring flexibility on the mesh stiffness and the dynamic responses of the planetary gear. A method about how to synthesize the total mesh stiffness of the internal gear pairs in multi-tooth region together with the ring deformation and the tooth errors is proposed. Numerical results demonstrate that the ring thickness has a great impact on the shape and magnitude of the mesh stiffness of the internal gear pair. It is noted that the dynamic responses of the planetary gear set with equally spaced supports for the ring gear are modulated due to the cyclic variation of the mesh stiffness resulted from the presence of the supports, which adds more complexity in the frequency structure.

  3. The application of elastohydrodynamic lubrication in gear tooth contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical method is presented for determining elastohydrodynamic film thickness in gears from theory and how the film affects gear failure and life. The practical aspects of gear lubrication are presented, including mechanical and service variables which must be considered to obtain optimum gear performance under severe operating conditions.

  4. Calculation of the efficiency of aircraft gear drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatalov, B. I.

    Expressions are presented for determining the efficiency of helical, spur, and beveled gear drives. It is shown that losses in the gearing increase significantly with the decreasing number of teeth; the efficiency of external gears is less than that of internal gears. A formula for determining friction losses is included.

  5. 50 CFR 660.211 - Fixed gear fishery-definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fixed gear fishery-definitions. 660.211... Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.211 Fixed gear fishery—definitions. These definitions are specific to the limited entry fixed gear fisheries covered in this subpart. General groundfish...

  6. 50 CFR 600.510 - Gear avoidance and disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gear avoidance and disposal. 600.510... Gear avoidance and disposal. (a) Vessel and gear avoidance. (1) FFV's arriving on fishing grounds where fishing vessels are already fishing or have set their gear for that purpose must ascertain the...

  7. 14 CFR 25.1515 - Landing gear speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Landing gear speeds. 25.1515 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1515 Landing gear speeds. (a) The established landing gear operating speed or speeds, V LO, may not exceed the speed at which it is safe both to extend and to retract the landing gear,...

  8. 14 CFR 23.477 - Landing gear arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Landing gear arrangement. 23.477 Section 23....477 Landing gear arrangement. Sections 23.479 through 23.483, or the conditions in appendix C, apply to airplanes with conventional arrangements of main and nose gear, or main and tail gear....

  9. 14 CFR 23.477 - Landing gear arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Landing gear arrangement. 23.477 Section 23....477 Landing gear arrangement. Sections 23.479 through 23.483, or the conditions in appendix C, apply to airplanes with conventional arrangements of main and nose gear, or main and tail gear....

  10. 14 CFR 23.477 - Landing gear arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Landing gear arrangement. 23.477 Section 23....477 Landing gear arrangement. Sections 23.479 through 23.483, or the conditions in appendix C, apply to airplanes with conventional arrangements of main and nose gear, or main and tail gear....

  11. 46 CFR 58.25-20 - Piping for steering gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Piping for steering gear. 58.25-20 Section 58.25-20... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-20 Piping for steering gear. (a) Pressure piping must... the hydraulic system can be readily recharged from within the steering-gear compartment and must...

  12. 50 CFR 660.211 - Fixed gear fishery-definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed gear fishery-definitions. 660.211... Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.211 Fixed gear fishery—definitions. These definitions are specific to the limited entry fixed gear fisheries covered in this subpart. General groundfish...

  13. 50 CFR 660.211 - Fixed gear fishery-definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed gear fishery-definitions. 660.211... Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.211 Fixed gear fishery—definitions. These definitions are specific to the limited entry fixed gear fisheries covered in this subpart. General groundfish...

  14. 50 CFR 660.211 - Fixed gear fishery-definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fixed gear fishery-definitions. 660.211... Groundfish-Limited Entry Fixed Gear Fisheries § 660.211 Fixed gear fishery—definitions. These definitions are specific to the limited entry fixed gear fisheries covered in this subpart. General groundfish...

  15. 14 CFR 25.1515 - Landing gear speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Landing gear speeds. 25.1515 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1515 Landing gear speeds. (a) The established landing gear operating speed or speeds, V LO, may not exceed the speed at which it is safe both to extend and to retract the landing gear,...

  16. 46 CFR 58.25-20 - Piping for steering gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Piping for steering gear. 58.25-20 Section 58.25-20... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-20 Piping for steering gear. (a) Pressure piping must... the hydraulic system can be readily recharged from within the steering-gear compartment and must...

  17. 14 CFR 23.477 - Landing gear arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Landing gear arrangement. 23.477 Section 23....477 Landing gear arrangement. Sections 23.479 through 23.483, or the conditions in appendix C, apply to airplanes with conventional arrangements of main and nose gear, or main and tail gear....

  18. 46 CFR 108.641 - Instructions for changing steering gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Instructions for changing steering gear. 108.641 Section... steering gear. Instructions stating, in order, the different steps to be taken for changing to emergency and secondary steering gear must be posted in the steering gear room and at each secondary...

  19. 50 CFR 600.510 - Gear avoidance and disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear avoidance and disposal. 600.510... Gear avoidance and disposal. (a) Vessel and gear avoidance. (1) FFV's arriving on fishing grounds where fishing vessels are already fishing or have set their gear for that purpose must ascertain the...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1515 - Landing gear speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Landing gear speeds. 25.1515 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1515 Landing gear speeds. (a) The established landing gear operating speed or speeds, V LO, may not exceed the speed at which it is safe both to extend and to retract the landing gear,...

  1. 46 CFR 58.25-20 - Piping for steering gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Piping for steering gear. 58.25-20 Section 58.25-20... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-20 Piping for steering gear. (a) Pressure piping must... the hydraulic system can be readily recharged from within the steering-gear compartment and must...

  2. 50 CFR 600.510 - Gear avoidance and disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gear avoidance and disposal. 600.510... Gear avoidance and disposal. (a) Vessel and gear avoidance. (1) FFV's arriving on fishing grounds where fishing vessels are already fishing or have set their gear for that purpose must ascertain the...

  3. 29 CFR 1919.31 - Proof tests-loose gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof tests-loose gear. 1919.31 Section 1919.31 Labor... (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels: Tests and Proof Loads; Heat Treatment; Competent Persons § 1919.31 Proof tests—loose gear. (a) Chains, rings, shackles and other loose gear...

  4. 46 CFR 58.25-20 - Piping for steering gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Piping for steering gear. 58.25-20 Section 58.25-20... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-20 Piping for steering gear. (a) Pressure piping must... the hydraulic system can be readily recharged from within the steering-gear compartment and must...

  5. 49 CFR 230.77 - Foundation brake gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Foundation brake gear. 230.77 Section 230.77... Tenders Brake and Signal Equipment § 230.77 Foundation brake gear. (a) Maintenance. Foundation brake gear...) Distance above the rails. No part of the foundation brake gear of the steam locomotive or tender shall...

  6. 49 CFR 230.77 - Foundation brake gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Foundation brake gear. 230.77 Section 230.77... Tenders Brake and Signal Equipment § 230.77 Foundation brake gear. (a) Maintenance. Foundation brake gear...) Distance above the rails. No part of the foundation brake gear of the steam locomotive or tender shall...

  7. 29 CFR 1919.31 - Proof tests-loose gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof tests-loose gear. 1919.31 Section 1919.31 Labor... (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels: Tests and Proof Loads; Heat Treatment; Competent Persons § 1919.31 Proof tests—loose gear. (a) Chains, rings, shackles and other loose gear...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1515 - Landing gear speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Landing gear speeds. 25.1515 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1515 Landing gear speeds. (a) The established landing gear operating speed or speeds, V LO, may not exceed the speed at which it is safe both to extend and to retract the landing gear,...

  9. 46 CFR 108.641 - Instructions for changing steering gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Instructions for changing steering gear. 108.641 Section... steering gear. Instructions stating, in order, the different steps to be taken for changing to emergency and secondary steering gear must be posted in the steering gear room and at each secondary...

  10. 49 CFR 230.77 - Foundation brake gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Foundation brake gear. 230.77 Section 230.77... Tenders Brake and Signal Equipment § 230.77 Foundation brake gear. (a) Maintenance. Foundation brake gear...) Distance above the rails. No part of the foundation brake gear of the steam locomotive or tender shall...

  11. 29 CFR 1919.31 - Proof tests-loose gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof tests-loose gear. 1919.31 Section 1919.31 Labor... (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels: Tests and Proof Loads; Heat Treatment; Competent Persons § 1919.31 Proof tests—loose gear. (a) Chains, rings, shackles and other loose gear...

  12. 50 CFR 622.31 - Buoy gear identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Buoy gear identification. 622.31 Section... Resources of the Gulf of Mexico § 622.31 Buoy gear identification. (a) Buoy gear. In the Gulf EEZ, if buoy gear is used or possessed, each buoy must display the official number of the vessel. See § 622.2...

  13. 50 CFR 622.31 - Buoy gear identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Buoy gear identification. 622.31 Section... Resources of the Gulf of Mexico § 622.31 Buoy gear identification. (a) Buoy gear. In the Gulf EEZ, if buoy gear is used or possessed, each buoy must display the official number of the vessel. See § 622.2...

  14. 46 CFR 108.641 - Instructions for changing steering gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Instructions for changing steering gear. 108.641 Section... steering gear. Instructions stating, in order, the different steps to be taken for changing to emergency and secondary steering gear must be posted in the steering gear room and at each secondary...

  15. 14 CFR 25.1515 - Landing gear speeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Landing gear speeds. 25.1515 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1515 Landing gear speeds. (a) The established landing gear operating speed or speeds, V LO, may not exceed the speed at which it is safe both to extend and to retract the landing gear,...

  16. 29 CFR 1919.31 - Proof tests-loose gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof tests-loose gear. 1919.31 Section 1919.31 Labor... (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels: Tests and Proof Loads; Heat Treatment; Competent Persons § 1919.31 Proof tests—loose gear. (a) Chains, rings, shackles and other loose gear...

  17. 49 CFR 230.77 - Foundation brake gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foundation brake gear. 230.77 Section 230.77... Tenders Brake and Signal Equipment § 230.77 Foundation brake gear. (a) Maintenance. Foundation brake gear...) Distance above the rails. No part of the foundation brake gear of the steam locomotive or tender shall...

  18. 14 CFR 23.477 - Landing gear arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Landing gear arrangement. 23.477 Section 23....477 Landing gear arrangement. Sections 23.479 through 23.483, or the conditions in appendix C, apply to airplanes with conventional arrangements of main and nose gear, or main and tail gear....

  19. 46 CFR 58.25-20 - Piping for steering gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piping for steering gear. 58.25-20 Section 58.25-20... MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Steering Gear § 58.25-20 Piping for steering gear. (a) Pressure piping must... the hydraulic system can be readily recharged from within the steering-gear compartment and must...

  20. 29 CFR 1919.31 - Proof tests-loose gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof tests-loose gear. 1919.31 Section 1919.31 Labor... (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Vessels: Tests and Proof Loads; Heat Treatment; Competent Persons § 1919.31 Proof tests—loose gear. (a) Chains, rings, shackles and other loose gear...

  1. 49 CFR 230.77 - Foundation brake gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Foundation brake gear. 230.77 Section 230.77... Tenders Brake and Signal Equipment § 230.77 Foundation brake gear. (a) Maintenance. Foundation brake gear...) Distance above the rails. No part of the foundation brake gear of the steam locomotive or tender shall...

  2. 50 CFR 622.46 - Prevention of gear conflicts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Prevention of gear conflicts. 622.46... Management Measures § 622.46 Prevention of gear conflicts. (a) No person may knowingly place in the Gulf EEZ... zones for shrimp trawling and the use of fixed gear to prevent gear conflicts. Necessary prohibitions...

  3. 50 CFR 622.46 - Prevention of gear conflicts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prevention of gear conflicts. 622.46... Management Measures § 622.46 Prevention of gear conflicts. (a) No person may knowingly place in the Gulf EEZ... zones for shrimp trawling and the use of fixed gear to prevent gear conflicts. Necessary prohibitions...

  4. 50 CFR 622.59 - Prevention of gear conflicts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prevention of gear conflicts. 622.59... ATLANTIC Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico § 622.59 Prevention of gear conflicts. (a) No person may... zones for shrimp trawling and the use of fixed gear to prevent gear conflicts. Necessary prohibitions...

  5. Flexible universal gear box system with yokes

    SciTech Connect

    Giocastro, J.; Giocastro, S.

    1987-01-20

    This patent describes a flexible joint system associated with the front and rear portions of a motor vehicle, comprising, in combination: a generally horizontal pivot member, a pair of opposed first and second yoke means rotatably connected to the pivot member the first yoke means being secured to the front portion of the vehicle and the second yoke means being secured to the rear portion of the vehicle. The final and second yoke means are movable relative to one another, a generally horizontal shaft member rotatably connected to and transversely passing through the first yoke means and disposed approximately perpendicular to the pivot member, first bevel gear means secured to the pivot member between the first and second yoke means, second bevel gear means perpendicular and meshing with the first bevel gear means and secured to the shaft member, and the second yoke means being for rotating about the pivot member relative to the first yoke means and for rotating the second bevel gear means relative to the first bevel gear means in response to movement of the rear portion of the motor vehicle. The first yoke means is for rotating about the pivot member relative to and for rotating the first bevel gear means relative to the second bevel gear means in response to movement of the front portion of the motor vehicle.

  6. How automatic is manual gear shifting?

    PubMed

    Shinar, D; Meir, M; Ben-Shoham, I

    1998-12-01

    Manual gear shifting is often used as an example of an automated (vs. controlled) process in driving. The present study provided an empirical evaluation of this assumption by evaluating sign detection and recall performance of novice and experienced drivers driving manual shift and automatic transmission cars in a downtown area requiring frequent gear shifting. The results showed that manual gear shifting significantly impaired sign detection performance of novice drivers using manual gears compared with novice drivers using an automatic transmission, whereas no such differences existed between the two transmission types for experienced drivers. The results clearly demonstrate that manual gear shifting is a complex psychomotor skill that is not easily (or quickly) automated and that until it becomes automated, it is an attention-demanding task that may impair other monitoring aspects of driving performance. Actual or potential applications of this research include a reevaluation of the learning process in driving and the need for phased instruction in driving from automatic gears to manual gears.

  7. Apparatus for controlling transmission gear shift selection

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T.M.

    1986-07-29

    In an automotive engine having an electrical power source and an automatic or semi-automatic transmission including a manually operated transmission gear shift lever having at least two forward drive positions, an apparatus is described which consists of: (a) a speed sensing means for sensing the rotation speed of the engine and generating an output signal when the engine reaches a preselected rotational speed; and (b) a gear shifting means for changing the shift positions of the gear shift lever from a first drive position to a second drive position automatically in response to the output signal from the speed sensing means, the gear shifting means including (i) a latch actuable between open and closed positions, (ii) a normally de-energized solenoid having a plunger connected to the latch and operable to move the latch to the open position when the solenoid is energized by the electrical power source, (iii) a relay means for allowing the energizing of the solenoid by the power source in response to the output signal from the speed sensing means, and (iv) an actuating means, including a spring biased linkage mechanism operably connected to the gear shift lever and the latch, for actuating the movement of the gear shift lever from the first drive position to the second drive position in response to movement of the latch from the closed to the open position, thereby causing gear shifting to occur when the engine reaches the preselected rotational speed.

  8. Multi-angle pinion and gear power transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, F.M.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes a worm and gear power transmission which consists of a housing, an input shaft, two axially aligned, different ratio worms formed on the input shaft in the housing. It also includes a pair of gears spaced apart in the housing such that a first gear of the pair meshes with one of the worms, and a second gear of the pair meshes with the other worm, the first and second gears positioned such that planes through the gears and the axis of the input shaft are at a right angle to one another, and output shafts extending out of the housing from the respective gears.

  9. High Speed Gear Sized and Configured to Reduce Windage Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, Robert F. (Inventor); Medvitz, Richard B. (Inventor); Hill, Matthew John (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A gear and drive system utilizing the gear include teeth. Each of the teeth has a first side and a second side opposite the first side that extends from a body of the gear. For each tooth of the gear, a first extended portion is attached to the first side of the tooth to divert flow of fluid adjacent to the body of the gear to reduce windage losses that occur when the gear rotates. The gear may be utilized in drive systems that may have high rotational speeds, such as speeds where the tip velocities are greater than or equal to about 68 m/s. Some embodiments of the gear may also utilize teeth that also have second extended portions attached to the second sides of the teeth to divert flow of fluid adjacent to the body of the gear to reduce windage losses that occur when the gear rotates.

  10. Addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    DOE /NV

    2000-05-18

    This document is an addendum to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, DOE/NV-582-Rev. 0. This addendum provides the requested documentation that supports the assertion that contamination above levels of concern does not exist in the abandoned sewer lines. This addendum summarizes the results of the manhole investigation conducted during March 2000. Results of the manhole investigation indicate that no changes to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report are necessary and all other sections of the document shall remain unchanged.

  11. Performance improvement of magnetic gear and efficiency comparison with conventional mechanical gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kenji; Fukuoka, Michinari; Ichinokura, Osamu

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic gears can transmit torque without any mechanical contact. Hence, they have low vibration, no wear, and fatigue, which ensure maintenance-free operation. There are various types of magnetic gears. Among them, a planetary type magnetic gear, which consists of coaxial inner and outer rotors with surface-mounted permanent magnet and ferromagnetic stationary parts called pole-pieces, has recently attracted interest since it offers higher torque than other type magnetic gears. This paper presents a comprehensive investigation of the influence of geometry and position of the pole-pieces on torque characteristic based on finite element analysis and experiment. Surveyed parameters of the pole-pieces include lengths in the radial and axial directions and position in the radial direction. Finally, it is demonstrated that the maximum torque of the improved prototype magnetic gear is increased by 45% and the maximum efficiency achieves up to about 99%, which is equal to or more than a conventional planetary type mechanical gear.

  12. Estimation of gear tooth transverse crack size from vibration by fusing selected gear condition indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sukhwan; Li, C. James

    2006-09-01

    Gears are common power transmission elements and are frequently responsible for transmission failures. Since a tooth crack is not directly measurable while a gear is in operation, one has to develop an indirect method to estimate its size from some measurables. This study developed such a method to estimate the size of a tooth transverse crack for a spur gear in operation. Using gear vibrations measured from an actual gear accelerated test, this study examined existing gear condition indices to identify those correlated well to crack size and established their utility for crack size estimation through index fusion using a neural network. When tested with vibrations measured from another accelerated test, the method had an averaged estimation error of about 5%.

  13. Gear fatigue crack prognosis using embedded model, gear dynamic model and fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. James; Lee, Hyungdae

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents a model-based method that predicts remaining useful life of a gear with a fatigue crack. The method consists of an embedded model to identify gear meshing stiffness from measured gear torsional vibration, an inverse method to estimate crack size from the estimated meshing stiffness; a gear dynamic model to simulate gear meshing dynamics and determine the dynamic load on the cracked tooth; and a fast crack propagation model to forecast the remaining useful life based on the estimated crack size and dynamic load. The fast crack propagation model was established to avoid repeated calculations of FEM and facilitate field deployment of the proposed method. Experimental studies were conducted to validate and demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method for prognosis of a cracked gear.

  14. NASA Orbiter Extended Nose Landing Gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Steven R.; Jensen, Scott A.; Hansen, Christopher P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the design, development, test, and evaluation of a prototype Extended Nose Landing Gear (ENLG) for NASA's Space Shuttle orbiters. The ENLG is a proposed orbiter modification developed in-house at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) by a joint government/industry team. It increases the orbiter's nose landing gear (NLG) length, thereby changing the vehicle's angle of attack during rollout, which lowers the aerodynamic forces on the vehicle. This, in combination with a dynamic elevon change, will lower the loads on the orbiter's main landing gear (MLG). The extension is accomplished by adding a telescoping section to the current NLG strut that will be pneumatically extended during NLG deployment.

  15. Engagement of Metal Debris into Gear Mesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    handschuh, Robert F.; Krantz, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    A series of bench-top experiments was conducted to determine the effects of metallic debris being dragged through meshing gear teeth. A test rig that is typically used to conduct contact fatigue experiments was used for these tests. Several sizes of drill material, shim stock and pieces of gear teeth were introduced and then driven through the meshing region. The level of torque required to drive the "chip" through the gear mesh was measured. From the data gathered, chip size sufficient to jam the mechanism can be determined.

  16. Roller/Gear Drives For Robotic Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, William J.; Shipitalo, William

    1995-01-01

    Pitch/yaw roller/gear drive and wrist-roll roller/gear drive designed to incorporate several features desirable in robotic-joint actuators. Includes zero backlash, high efficiency, smooth motion (little ripple in torque and in speed ratio), and high degree of back-drivability. Pitch/yaw drive is novel two-axis drive containing combination of gears, rollers, and springs acting together eliminating backlash and cogging. Wrist-roll drive more-conventional single-axis drive offering advantages like those of pitch/yaw drive.

  17. An Integrated Approach for Gear Health Prognostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, David; Bechhoefer, Eric; Dempsey, Paula; Ma, Jinghua

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an integrated approach for gear health prognostics using particle filters is presented. The presented method effectively addresses the issues in applying particle filters to gear health prognostics by integrating several new components into a particle filter: (1) data mining based techniques to effectively define the degradation state transition and measurement functions using a one-dimensional health index obtained by whitening transform; (2) an unbiased l-step ahead RUL estimator updated with measurement errors. The feasibility of the presented prognostics method is validated using data from a spiral bevel gear case study.

  18. Motor vehicle differential gear housing

    SciTech Connect

    Bitcon, L.L.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a motor vehicle differential gear housing. It comprises: a substantially box shaped casing having an interior and exterior defined by front, rear, top, bottom and two side panels, the front and rear panels each having an aperture, the apertures being at least partially in axial alignment; first bearing means cooperating with the apertures and demountably secured to each of the front and rear panels. The first bearing means is aligned coaxially with the aligned portions of the apertures; the side panels each having an opening, the openings being at least partially in axial alignment; axle support bearing housings aligned coaxially with the aligned portions of the openings on the side panels and threadedly mounted therein and adapted to have driving axles journaled in second bearing means in the bearing housings; and at least the front and rear panels being removably attached to the side panels.

  19. Production Laser Welding Of Gears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guastaferri, David

    1986-11-01

    With the greater acceptance of laser technology as a viable alternative to traditional metals joining methods, the need has arisen to integrate lasers into efficient high production systems. This paper will describe one such system which is dedicated to the automated processing and laser welding of automotive transmission gear components. The system features two (2) 6 KW CO2 lasers, automated part manipulation, vapor degreasers, air cylinder press stations, fully enclosed weld stations incorporating bottom delivery methods, and programmable computer control which allows complete monitoring throughout the entire production cycle. It is the intent of this paper to describe all segments of the system in detail as to design, manufacture, and integration. Concerning this specific application, an overview from initial inquiry through final installation of the manufactured system will be presented and will focus on the laser welding process and parameter development as it relates to the total systems concept and production goals.

  20. Influence of Tooth Spacing Error on Gears With and Without Profile Modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padmasolala, Giri; Lin, Hsiang H.; Oswald, Fred B.

    2000-01-01

    A computer simulation was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of profile modification for reducing dynamic loads in gears with different tooth spacing errors. The simulation examined varying amplitudes of spacing error and differences in the span of teeth over which the error occurs. The modification considered included both linear and parabolic tip relief. The analysis considered spacing error that varies around most of the gear circumference (similar to a typical sinusoidal error pattern) as well as a shorter span of spacing errors that occurs on only a few teeth. The dynamic analysis was performed using a revised version of a NASA gear dynamics code, modified to add tooth spacing errors to the analysis. Results obtained from the investigation show that linear tip relief is more effective in reducing dynamic loads on gears with small spacing errors but parabolic tip relief becomes more effective as the amplitude of spacing error increases. In addition, the parabolic modification is more effective for the more severe error case where the error is spread over a longer span of teeth. The findings of this study can be used to design robust tooth profile modification for improving dynamic performance of gear sets with different tooth spacing errors.