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Sample records for addiction medicine training

  1. Training in addiction medicine in Australia.

    PubMed

    Haber, Paul S; Murnion, Bridin P

    2011-04-01

    Barriers to entering addiction medicine (AM) have led to a persisting workforce shortage. To address this problem, the Chapter of Addiction Medicine (AChAM) was formed in 2001 as a subdivision of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP). Through consultation, AChAM has identified the scope of practice and offered fellowship to suitable established practitioners. The Chapter successfully applied to the Australian Government for recognition of AM as a medical specialty, which was finalized in November 2009. Specialist reimbursement item numbers were incorporated into that decision process and commence operating in November 2010. AChAM has designed and implemented a training scheme using a model similar to that of the RACP internal medicine training program. This comprises 3 years of basic general medical training post internship followed by 3 years of discipline-specific supervised training. The training is broadly based, with experience in both ambulatory care and inpatient care, and including physical health as well as mental health. Assessment is continuous and competency based. There is no exit examination. The overriding clinical approach rests upon the harm minimization framework consistent with long-established national drug policy in Australia and favors evidence-based treatment.

  2. Training in Addiction Medicine in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, Paul S.; Murnion, Bridin P.

    2011-01-01

    Barriers to entering addiction medicine (AM) have led to a persisting workforce shortage. To address this problem, the Chapter of Addiction Medicine (AChAM) was formed in 2001 as a subdivision of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP). Through consultation, AChAM has identified the scope of practice and offered fellowship to suitable…

  3. Training the next generation of providers in addiction medicine.

    PubMed

    Rasyidi, Ernest; Wilkins, Jeffery N; Danovitch, Itai

    2012-06-01

    Within the United States there exists a profound discrepancy between the significant public health problem of substance abuse and the access to treatment for addicted individuals. Part of the insufficient access to treatment is a function of relatively low levels or professional experts in addiction medicine. Part of the low levels of professional addiction experts is the result of inadequate addiction medicine training of medical students and residents. This article outlines deficits in addiction medicine training among medical students and residents, yet real change in the addiction medicine training process will always be subject to the complexity of producing alterations across multiple credentialing institutions as well as the keen competition between educators for “more time” for their particular subject. Other hurdles include the broad-based issue of stigma regarding alcoholism and other substance abuse that likely impact all systems that regulate physician addiction medicine training. As noted in the discussion of psychiatry residency, even psychiatry residents manifest stigma regarding substance abusing patients. Five currently active processes may allow for fundamental change to the inertia in physician addiction medicine training while also potentially impacting stigma: 1. We appear to be at the beginning of the integration of addiction into traditional medicine through the formation of a legitimized addiction medicine subspecialty. 2. The training of primary care trainees and practitioners in the use of SBIRT is accelerating, thus creating another process of addiction integration into traditional medicine. 3. The PCMH is being established as a model for primary care 4. The Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 (MHPAEA) became effective for group health care plan years beginning on or after July 1, 2010; thereby, substance abuse benefits and cost are to be the same as general medical or surgical

  4. Developing a competence-based addiction medicine curriculum in Indonesia: the training needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Pinxten, W J L; De Jong, C; Hidayat, T; Istiqomah, A N; Achmad, Y M; Raya, R P; Norviatin, D; Siregar, I M P

    2011-04-01

    Indonesia has one of the fastest growing, injecting drugs user-driven, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemics in Asia. Coverage of needle and syringe programs (NSPs), opioid substitution therapy (OST), and antiretroviral treatment (ART) is increasing, but is still low, whereas professional training in addiction medicine is not yet established. Urgent development and scaling-up of professional capacity in comprehensive, evidence-based addiction medicine is needed. In this article the results of the first step is presented, being the training needs assessment (TNA) and the process of further developing a national evidence- and competence-based addiction medicine curriculum in Indonesia.

  5. Addiction Medicine: Current Status of Certification, Maintenance of Certification, Training, and Practice.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Kevin; Wiegand, Timothy

    2016-03-01

    Addiction medicine (ADM) is an emerging medical field. It will soon be recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties as a multispecialty subspecialty, sponsored by the American Board of Preventive Medicine. Certification and maintenance of certification in ADM are available currently through the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). There is an urgent need for trained and certified ADM physicians to serve the needs of patients and society. Thirty-seven addiction medicine fellowships of 12 months duration are now available, and their number is increasing. Physicians specializing in medical toxicology have educational, training, and practice overlap with addiction medicine. Medical toxicology physicians usually meet ADM examination eligibility requirements, based on clinical practice experience and continuing medical education activities. Those with fellowship training or in a fellowship bring training experience which has commonalities to ADM fellowship training, and therefore are particularly prepared for examination and practice in ADM. There are opportunities for partnerships in training, practice, and leadership between addiction medicine and medical toxicology.

  6. Developing a Competence-Based Addiction Medicine Curriculum in Indonesia: The Training Needs Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinxten, W. J. L.; De Jong, C.; Hidayat, T.; Istiqomah, A. N.; Achmad, Y. M.; Raya, R. P.; Norviatin, D.; Siregar, I. M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Indonesia has one of the fastest growing, injecting drugs user-driven, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemics in Asia. Coverage of needle and syringe programs (NSPs), opioid substitution therapy (OST), and antiretroviral treatment (ART) is increasing, but is still low, whereas professional training in addiction medicine is not yet…

  7. Specialized Training on Addictions for Physicians in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tontchev, Gramen V.; Housel, Timothy R.; Callahan, James F.; Kunz, Kevin B.; Miller, Michael M.; Blondell, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    In the United States accredited residency programs in addiction exist only for psychiatrists specializing in addiction psychiatry (ADP); nonpsychiatrists seeking training in addiction medicine (ADM) can train in nonaccredited "fellowships," or can receive training in some ADP programs, only to not be granted a certificate of completion of…

  8. The Master in Addiction Medicine Program in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Jong, Cornelis; Luycks, Lonneke; Delicat, Jan-Wilm

    2011-01-01

    Since 2007 there is a full-time, 2-year professional training in addiction medicine in the Netherlands. The aim of this article is to describe in detail the development and present status of the Dutch Master in Addiction Medicine (MiAM) program. In this competency-based professional training, theoretical courses are integrated with learning in…

  9. The master in addiction medicine program in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    De Jong, Cornelis; Luycks, Lonneke; Delicat, Jan-Wilm

    2011-04-01

    Since 2007 there is a full-time, 2-year professional training in addiction medicine in the Netherlands. The aim of this article is to describe in detail the development and present status of the Dutch Master in Addiction Medicine (MiAM) program. In this competency-based professional training, theoretical courses are integrated with learning in clinical practice under guidance of an experienced clinical teacher. The theoretical courses consist of evidence-based medicine, communication and basic psychotherapeutic skills, neurobiology of addiction, addiction medicine, addiction and psychiatry, and public health. The 7 main competencies are made ready for operation in the personal education plan and are evaluated by different styles of examination.

  10. Specialized training on addictions for physicians in the United States.

    PubMed

    Tontchev, Gramen V; Housel, Timothy R; Callahan, James F; Kunz, Kevin B; Miller, Michael M; Blondell, Richard D

    2011-04-01

    In the United States accredited residency programs in addiction exist only for psychiatrists specializing in addiction psychiatry (ADP); nonpsychiatrists seeking training in addiction medicine (ADM) can train in nonaccredited "fellowships," or can receive training in some ADP programs, only to not be granted a certificate of completion of accredited training. Information about ADP residency programs has been tabulated, but it is not available for ADM fellowships. The authors conducted a national survey to compile information about the location, structure, curriculum, and other characteristics of active ADM fellowships. Of the 40 accredited ADP residency programs, 7 offered training in addiction to nonpsychiatrists. The authors identified 14 nonaccredited ADM fellowships. In 2009 and 2010, there were approximately 15 nonpsychiatrists in ADP programs and 25 in ADM fellowships. Clinical experiences included inpatient services, outpatient treatment services such as methadone maintenance or buprenorphine maintenance, and providing addiction consult services. The most common academic activities included weekly lectures and the teaching of medical students.

  11. Training Psychiatry Addiction Fellows in Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Serafini, Kelly; Bryant, Katurah; Ikomi, Jolomi; LaPaglia, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acupuncture has been studied as an adjunct for addictions treatment. Because many hospitals, outpatient clinics, and facilities are integrating acupuncture treatment, it is important that psychiatrists remain informed about this treatment. This manuscript describes the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol and its inclusion as part of the curriculum for psychiatry addictions fellows. Methods Psychiatry and psychology fellows completed the NADA training (N = 20) and reported on their satisfaction with the training. Results Overall, participants stated that they found the training beneficial and many were integrating acupuncture within their current practice. Conclusions Results support the acceptability of acupuncture training among psychiatry fellows in this program. PMID:26048457

  12. Extended family medicine training

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley; Lawrence, Kathrine; Archibald, Douglas; Mackay, Maria Palacios; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine trends in family medicine training at a time when substantial pedagogic change is under way, focusing on factors that relate to extended family medicine training. Design Aggregate-level secondary data analysis based on the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry. Setting Canada. Participants All Canadian citizens and permanent residents who were registered in postgraduate family medicine training programs within Canadian faculties of medicine from 1995 to 2013. Main outcome measures Number and proportion of family medicine residents exiting 2-year and extended (third-year and above) family medicine training programs, as well as the types and numbers of extended training programs offered in 2015. Results The proportion of family medicine trainees pursuing extended training almost doubled during the study period, going from 10.9% in 1995 to 21.1% in 2013. Men and Canadian medical graduates were more likely to take extended family medicine training. Among the 5 most recent family medicine exit cohorts (from 2009 to 2013), 25.9% of men completed extended training programs compared with 18.3% of women, and 23.1% of Canadian medical graduates completed extended training compared with 13.6% of international medical graduates. Family medicine programs vary substantially with respect to the proportion of their trainees who undertake extended training, ranging from a low of 12.3% to a high of 35.1% among trainees exiting from 2011 to 2013. Conclusion New initiatives, such as the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum, CanMEDS–Family Medicine, and Certificates of Added Competence, have emerged as part of family medicine education and credentialing. In acknowledgment of the potential effect of these initiatives, it is important that future research examine how pedagogic change and, in particular, extended training shapes the care family physicians offer their patients. As part of that research it will be important to measure the breadth and uptake of

  13. [Addiction].

    PubMed

    Besson, J; Grivel, J; Tomei, A; Falcheri, J-P; Waelchli, M; Simon, O; Rossier, V

    2012-01-11

    The news in addiction medicine for 2011 include new knowledges coming from the neurosciences, but also new clinical concepts, as the role of hospital addiction units in an integrated network of care. The issue of cocaine vaccination is discussed from an ethical point of view. Finally, the integration of mindfulness techniques is introduced as a useful approach in the treatment of the addictions.

  14. Internal Medicine Residents' Training in Substance Use Disorders: A Survey of the Quality of Instruction and Residents' Self-Perceived Preparedness to Diagnose and Treat Addiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakeman, Sarah E.; Baggett, Meridale V.; Pham-Kanter, Genevieve; Campbell, Eric G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Resident physicians are the direct care providers for many patients with addiction. This study assesses residents' self-perceived preparedness to diagnose and treat addiction, measures residents' perceptions of the quality of addictions instruction, and evaluates basic knowledge of addictions. Methods: A survey was e-mailed to 184…

  15. Addiction Medicine in Canada: Challenges and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    el-Guebaly, Nady; Crockford, David; Cirone, Sharon; Kahan, Meldon

    2011-01-01

    In Canada, the qualification of physicians is the jurisdiction of the College of Family Physicians and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons. The Colleges have promoted the training of "generalists" in family medicine and "sophisticated generalists" among the traditional specialties, and the development of subspecialties…

  16. Behavioral addictions in addiction medicine: from mechanisms to practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Banz, Barbara C; Yip, Sarah W; Yau, Yvonne H C; Potenza, Marc N

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress has been made in our understanding of nonsubstance or "behavioral" addictions, although these conditions and their most appropriate classification remain debated and the knowledge basis for understanding the pathophysiology of and treatments for these conditions includes important gaps. Recent developments include the classification of gambling disorder as a "Substance-Related and Addictive Disorder" in the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) and proposed diagnostic criteria for Internet Gaming Disorder in Section 3 of DSM-5. This chapter reviews current neuroscientific understandings of behavioral addictions and the potential of neurobiological data to assist in the development of improved policy, prevention, and treatment efforts.

  17. Functional neuroimaging for addiction medicine: From mechanisms to practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Ekhtiari, Hamed; Faghiri, Ashkan; Oghabian, Mohammad-Ali; Paulus, Martin P

    2016-01-01

    During last 20 years, neuroimaging with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in people with drug addictions has introduced a wide range of quantitative biomarkers from brain's regional or network level activities during different cognitive functions. These quantitative biomarkers could be potentially used for assessment, planning, prediction, and monitoring for "addiction medicine" during screening, acute intoxication, admission to a program, completion of an acute program, admission to a long-term program, and postgraduation follow-up. In this chapter, we have briefly reviewed main neurocognitive targets for fMRI studies associated with addictive behaviors, main study types using fMRI among drug dependents, and potential applications for fMRI in addiction medicine. Main challenges and limitations for extending fMRI studies and evidences aiming at clinical applications in addiction medicine are also discussed. There is still a significant gap between available evidences from group-based fMRI studies and personalized decisions during daily practices in addiction medicine. It will be important to fill this gap with large-scale clinical trials and longitudinal studies using fMRI measures with a well-defined strategic plan for the future.

  18. Cognitive interventions for addiction medicine: Understanding the underlying neurobiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zilverstand, Anna; Parvaz, Muhammad A; Moeller, Scott J; Goldstein, Rita Z

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging provides a tool for investigating the neurobiological mechanisms of cognitive interventions in addiction. The aim of this review was to describe the brain circuits that are recruited during cognitive interventions, examining differences between various treatment modalities while highlighting core mechanisms, in drug addicted individuals. Based on a systematic Medline search we reviewed neuroimaging studies on cognitive behavioral therapy, cognitive inhibition of craving, motivational interventions, emotion regulation, mindfulness, and neurofeedback training in addiction. Across intervention modalities, common results included the normalization of aberrant activity in the brain's reward circuitry, and the recruitment and strengthening of the brain's inhibitory control network. Results suggest that different cognitive interventions act, at least partly, through recruitment of a common inhibitory control network as a core mechanism. This implies potential transfer effects between training modalities. Overall, results confirm that chronically hypoactive prefrontal regions implicated in cognitive control in addiction can be normalized through cognitive means.

  19. Cognitive interventions for addiction medicine: Understanding the underlying neurobiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zilverstand, Anna; Parvaz, Muhammad A.; Moeller, Scott J.; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging provides a tool for investigating the neurobiological mechanisms of cognitive interventions in addiction. The aim of this review was to describe the brain circuits that are recruited during cognitive interventions, examining differences between various treatment modalities while highlighting core mechanisms, in drug addicted individuals. Based on a systematic Medline search we reviewed neuroimaging studies on cognitive behavioral therapy, cognitive inhibition of craving, motivational interventions, emotion regulation, mindfulness, and neurofeedback training in addiction. Across intervention modalities, common results included the normalization of aberrant activity in the brain’s reward circuitry, and the recruitment and strengthening of the brain’s inhibitory control network. Results suggest that different cognitive interventions act, at least partly, through recruitment of a common inhibitory control network as a core mechanism. This implies potential transfer effects between training modalities. Overall, results confirm that chronically hypoactive prefrontal regions implicated in cognitive control in addiction can be normalized through cognitive means. PMID:26822363

  20. Movies as a vehicle to teach addiction medicine.

    PubMed

    Cape, Gavin

    2009-06-01

    Dependence on a substance and the role of medical practitioners in this health problem can be perceived as an enigma. Movies, as a tool for teaching, can be a powerful means of engaging, clarifying and educating students within the addiction medicine arena. Popular mythologies and stereotypes of drug use (including alcohol) and users in cinema can be explored within a learning environment aiding the understanding of this complex topic, thereby improving the therapeutic commitment to addiction medicine. There is a responsibility of the teacher to use this tool with care so as not to perpetuate the mythologies of addiction as often portrayed within commercial cinema. Tried and tested use of this potent educational aid, with suggestions for further development, are outlined in this article.

  1. Application of person-centered medicine in addiction

    PubMed Central

    Tarter, Ralph E.; Kirisci, Levent; Ridenour, Ty; Bogen, Debra

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses human individuality within a lifespan developmental perspective. The practical application of an individual differences framework for diagnosis, prevention and treatment of addiction is described. A brief overview of the methods conducive to knowledge development within the rubric of person-centered medicine that are available to practitioners working in office and clinic settings concludes the discussion. PMID:23243492

  2. 2013 Update in addiction medicine for the generalist.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Adam J; Bertholet, Nicolas; McNeely, Jennifer; Starrels, Joanna L; Tetrault, Jeanette M; Walley, Alexander Y

    2013-11-04

    Increasingly, patients with unhealthy alcohol and other drug use are being seen in primary care and other non-specialty addiction settings. Primary care providers are well positioned to screen, assess, and treat patients with alcohol and other drug use because this use, and substance use disorders, may contribute to a host of medical and mental health harms. We sought to identify and examine important recent advances in addiction medicine in the medical literature that have implications for the care of patients in primary care or other generalist settings. To accomplish this aim, we selected articles in the field of addiction medicine, critically appraised and summarized the manuscripts, and highlighted their implications for generalist practice. During an initial review, we identified articles through an electronic Medline search (limited to human studies and in English) using search terms for alcohol and other drugs of abuse published from January 2010 to January 2012. After this initial review, we searched for other literature in web-based or journal resources for potential articles of interest. From the list of articles identified in these initial reviews, each of the six authors independently selected articles for more intensive review and identified the ones they found to have a potential impact on generalist practice. The identified articles were then ranked by the number of authors who selected each article. Through a consensus process over 4 meetings, the authors reached agreement on the articles with implications for practice for generalist clinicians that warranted inclusion for discussion. The authors then grouped the articles into five categories: 1) screening and brief interventions in outpatient settings, 2) identification and management of substance use among inpatients, 3) medical complications of substance use, 4) use of pharmacotherapy for addiction treatment in primary care and its complications, and 5) integration of addiction treatment and

  3. 2013 Update in addiction medicine for the generalist

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, patients with unhealthy alcohol and other drug use are being seen in primary care and other non-specialty addiction settings. Primary care providers are well positioned to screen, assess, and treat patients with alcohol and other drug use because this use, and substance use disorders, may contribute to a host of medical and mental health harms. We sought to identify and examine important recent advances in addiction medicine in the medical literature that have implications for the care of patients in primary care or other generalist settings. To accomplish this aim, we selected articles in the field of addiction medicine, critically appraised and summarized the manuscripts, and highlighted their implications for generalist practice. During an initial review, we identified articles through an electronic Medline search (limited to human studies and in English) using search terms for alcohol and other drugs of abuse published from January 2010 to January 2012. After this initial review, we searched for other literature in web-based or journal resources for potential articles of interest. From the list of articles identified in these initial reviews, each of the six authors independently selected articles for more intensive review and identified the ones they found to have a potential impact on generalist practice. The identified articles were then ranked by the number of authors who selected each article. Through a consensus process over 4 meetings, the authors reached agreement on the articles with implications for practice for generalist clinicians that warranted inclusion for discussion. The authors then grouped the articles into five categories: 1) screening and brief interventions in outpatient settings, 2) identification and management of substance use among inpatients, 3) medical complications of substance use, 4) use of pharmacotherapy for addiction treatment in primary care and its complications, and 5) integration of addiction treatment and

  4. Noninvasive brain stimulation for addiction medicine: From monitoring to modulation.

    PubMed

    Yavari, Fatemeh; Shahbabaie, Alireza; Leite, Jorge; Carvalho, Sandra; Ekhtiari, Hamed; Fregni, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Addiction is a chronic relapsing brain disease with significant economical and medical burden on the societies but with limited effectiveness in the available treatment options. Better understanding of the chemical, neuronal, regional, and network alterations of the brain due to drug abuse can ultimately lead to tailoring individualized and more effective interventions. To this end, employing new assessment and intervention procedures seems crucial. Noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques including transcranial electrical and magnetic stimulations (tES and TMS) have provided promising opportunities for the addiction medicine in two main domains: (1) providing new insights into neurochemical and neural circuit changes in the human brain cortex and (2) understanding the role of different brain regions by using NIBS and modulating cognitive functions, such as drug craving, risky decision making, inhibitory control and executive functions to obtain specific treatment outcomes. In spite of preliminary positive results, there are several open questions, which need to be addressed before routine clinical utilization of NIBS techniques in addiction to medicine, such as how to account for interindividual differences, define optimal cognitive and neural targets, optimize stimulation protocols, and integrate NIBS with other therapeutic methods. Therefore, in this chapter we revise the available literature on the use of NIBS (TMS and tES) in the diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic aspects of the addiction medicine.

  5. Training of aerospace medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Mohler, S R

    1985-03-01

    In the U. S. there are 23 recognized medical specialty boards. One of these is preventive medicine. Within preventive medicine there are three areas: Aerospace Medicine, Occupational Medicine, and Public Health/General Preventive Medicine. The preventive medicine specialties have a common core of required training including biostatistics, epidemiology, health services administration and environmental health. These, plus associated topics are covered during year one of training. Year two of training involves clinical rotations specifically tailored to the eye, ear, heart, lungs and brain, plus flight training to the private pilot level, and a Masters Degree research project for the required thesis. During year three the physicians in aerospace medicine practice full-time aerospace medicine in a NASA or other government laboratory or a private facility. To date, more than 40 physicians have received aerospace medicine training through the Wright State University School of Medicine program. Among these are physicians from Japan, Australia, Taiwan, Canada and Mexico. In addition to the civilian program at Wright State University, there are programs conducted by the U. S. Air Force and Navy. The Wright State program has been privileged to have officers from the U. S. Army, Navy and Air Force. A substantial supporter of the Wright State program is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and a strong space component is contained in the program.

  6. [Guideline 'Medicinal care for drug addicts in penal institutions'].

    PubMed

    Westra, Michel; de Haan, Hein A; Arends, Marleen T; van Everdingen, Jannes J E; Klazinga, Niek S

    2009-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the policy on care for prisoners who are addicted to opiates is still heterogeneous. The recent guidelines entitled 'Medicinal care for drug addicts in penal institutions' should contribute towards unambiguous and more evidence-based treatment for this group. In addition, it should improve and bring the care pathways within judicial institutions and mainstream healthcare more into line with one another. Each rational course of medicinal treatment will initially be continued in the penal institution. In penal institutions the help on offer is mainly focused on abstinence from illegal drugs while at the same time limiting the damage caused to the health of the individual user. Methadone is regarded at the first choice for maintenance therapy. For patient safety, this is best given in liquid form in sealed cups of 5 mg/ml once daily in the morning. Recently a combination preparation containing buprenorphine and naloxone - a complete opiate antagonist - has become available. On discontinuation of opiate maintenance treatment intensive follow-up care is necessary. During this period there is considerable risk of a potentially lethal overdose. Detoxification should be coupled with psychosocial or medicinal intervention aimed at preventing relapse. Naltrexone is currently the only available opiate antagonist for preventing relapse. In those addicted to opiates, who also take benzodiazepines without any indication, it is strongly recommended that these be reduced and discontinued. This can be achieved by converting the regular dosage into the equivalent in diazepam and then reducing this dosage by a maximum of 25% a week.

  7. A Survey of Training Needs of Experienced Certified Addictions Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taleff, Michael J.

    1996-01-01

    Survey of 208 Certified Addiction Counselors (CAC) and Certified Prevention Specialists (CPS) about education and training topics in the field of alcohol and other drug abuse. Results indicate that CAC/CPS professionals prefer training topics that encompass cultural issues, alternative forms of treatment and relapse prevention delivered in…

  8. Training Addiction Counselors: Collaborating through Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Geri; Elliott, Ellen; Finch, Jennifer; Kirkley, Dale; Litten, DeLillian; Nunn, David; Brown, Jacky; Lassiter, Pam

    At the 2002 American Counseling Association Conference, eight individuals presented their experiences in classroom collaboration among four different settings (university classroom, university counseling wellness center, community college classroom, addiction counseling treatment center). Student activities, that were a part of the graduate…

  9. Marijuana: A Fifty-Year Personal Addiction Medicine Perspective.

    PubMed

    Smith, David E

    2016-01-01

    As of September 2015, the cultivation, possession, and/or use of marijuana is illegal under U.S. federal law as a Schedule I narcotic; however, it is legal in four states and Washington, D.C. Forty-six states allow some form of medicinal marijuana or decriminalization. Marijuana has been used medicinally for thousands of years; Marijuana's regulation by law enforcement in the U.S., rather than the medical community, led to an almost complete halt to academic and scientific research after the 1930s. The late 1960s saw an upsurge in recreational marijuana use by middle-class youth, the majority of whom experienced minimal adverse effects aside from arrest and attendant legal complications. Since the mid-1990s, the use of medicinal marijuana for certain conditions has gained increasing acceptance. Stronger strains and formulations of marijuana pose a risk to the developing brains of adolescents. Within the addiction medicine community, there is currently no consensus on marijuana. In the East, the feeling is primarily that marijuana continue to be proscribed. In the West, where clinicians must face the realities of medicalization, decriminalization, and/or legalization, as well as widespread recreational use, there is more of a movement to minimize adverse effects, particularly on youth.

  10. Ethics and Accreditation in Addictions Counselor Training: Possible Field Placement Issues for CACREP-Accredited Addictions Counseling Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linton, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    Professional counselors have long been practicing in alcohol and drug treatment settings. However, only recently has the counseling field offered formal recognition of addictions counseling as a specialization through the implementation of accreditation standards for addiction counseling training programs. With the passage of the 2009 standards,…

  11. A systems medicine research approach for studying alcohol addiction.

    PubMed

    Spanagel, Rainer; Durstewitz, Daniel; Hansson, Anita; Heinz, Andreas; Kiefer, Falk; Köhr, Georg; Matthäus, Franziska; Nöthen, Markus M; Noori, Hamid R; Obermayer, Klaus; Rietschel, Marcella; Schloss, Patrick; Scholz, Henrike; Schumann, Gunter; Smolka, Michael; Sommer, Wolfgang; Vengeliene, Valentina; Walter, Henrik; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmermann, Uli S; Stringer, Sven; Smits, Yannick; Derks, Eske M

    2013-11-01

    According to the World Health Organization, about 2 billion people drink alcohol. Excessive alcohol consumption can result in alcohol addiction, which is one of the most prevalent neuropsychiatric diseases afflicting our society today. Prevention and intervention of alcohol binging in adolescents and treatment of alcoholism are major unmet challenges affecting our health-care system and society alike. Our newly formed German SysMedAlcoholism consortium is using a new systems medicine approach and intends (1) to define individual neurobehavioral risk profiles in adolescents that are predictive of alcohol use disorders later in life and (2) to identify new pharmacological targets and molecules for the treatment of alcoholism. To achieve these goals, we will use omics-information from epigenomics, genetics transcriptomics, neurodynamics, global neurochemical connectomes and neuroimaging (IMAGEN; Schumann et al. ) to feed mathematical prediction modules provided by two Bernstein Centers for Computational Neurosciences (Berlin and Heidelberg/Mannheim), the results of which will subsequently be functionally validated in independent clinical samples and appropriate animal models. This approach will lead to new early intervention strategies and identify innovative molecules for relapse prevention that will be tested in experimental human studies. This research program will ultimately help in consolidating addiction research clusters in Germany that can effectively conduct large clinical trials, implement early intervention strategies and impact political and healthcare decision makers.

  12. Interdisciplinary research training in substance abuse and addictions.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Elaine Adams

    2013-01-01

    Considerable evidence shows that the management of complex problems of and related to substance abuse and addictions require comprehensive approaches based on solid research. Nonetheless, timely and widespread dissemination of research findings remains uncommon, hindering nursing practice, impeding the health of individuals and families, and imposing untoward costs for society. Shifts in science paradigms underscore the need for efficient and effective interdisciplinary research teams to carry out innovative research within a translational science framework. This means that early career investigators will need the knowledge and skills to conduct research as part of an interdisciplinary team and to contribute systematically to translational research in the area of substance abuse and addictions. This brief report describes a nursing research training program sponsored by the National Institute on Drug Abuse that evolved into an interdisciplinary program administrated within a school of nursing. Factors conducive to program development are described, along with the structure and elements of the program and examples of the scholars' projects and accomplishments. The common benefits of interdisciplinary research training for both predoctoral and postdoctoral research scholars include consistent exposure to new and alternative scientific models and methodological approaches as well as endurance of cross-discipline network connections. Benefits and challenges of this program carry implications for the design of future nursing research training programs in the field of substance abuse and addictions.

  13. Training the Staff of a Drug Addiction Treatment Facility: A Case Study of Hogar De Encuentro

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Andrew A.; Leske, M. Cristina

    1977-01-01

    This paper, presented at the American Public Health Association meeting; Chicago, November 1975, discusses a staff training program at a drug addiction treatment facility established for Spanish-speaking (and other) drug addicts. Staff improved counseling skills and knowledge of drug addiction, but changed little in attitudes toward drug use and…

  14. Addiction.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Terry E; Berridge, Kent C

    2003-01-01

    The development of addiction involves a transition from casual to compulsive patterns of drug use. This transition to addiction is accompanied by many drug-induced changes in the brain and associated changes in psychological functions. In this article we present a critical analysis of the major theoretical explanations of how drug-induced alterations in psychological function might cause a transition to addiction. These include: (a) the traditional hedonic view that drug pleasure and subsequent unpleasant withdrawal symptoms are the chief causes of addiction; (b) the view that addiction is due to aberrant learning, especially the development of strong stimulus-response habits; (c) our incentive-sensitization view, which suggests that sensitization of a neural system that attributes incentive salience causes compulsive motivation or "wanting" to take addictive drugs; and (d) the idea that dysfunction of frontal cortical systems, which normally regulate decision making and inhibitory control over behavior, leads to impaired judgment and impulsivity in addicts.

  15. Evaluation of a Cross-Training Curriculum for Mental Health and Addiction Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendler, Alicia M.; Murdock, Tamera B.

    2005-01-01

    Cross-training professionals from mental health and addiction treatment systems can help further the goal of comprehensive treatment for clients with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders (co-occurring disorders). Two such trainings brought together 122 professionals from mental health and addiction treatment fields. This…

  16. Genetic imaging consortium for addiction medicine: From neuroimaging to genes.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Scott; Kan, Kees-Jan; Chaarani, Bader; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Batalla, Albert; Brooks, Samantha; Cousijn, Janna; Dagher, Alain; de Ruiter, Michiel; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W; Goldstein, Rita Z; Goudriaan, Anna E; Heitzeg, Mary M; Hutchison, Kent; Li, Chiang-Shan R; London, Edythe D; Lorenzetti, Valentina; Luijten, Maartje; Martin-Santos, Rocio; Morales, Angelica M; Paulus, Martin P; Paus, Tomas; Pearlson, Godfrey; Schluter, Renée; Momenan, Reza; Schmaal, Lianne; Schumann, Gunter; Sinha, Rajita; Sjoerds, Zsuzsika; Stein, Dan J; Stein, Elliot A; Solowij, Nadia; Tapert, Susan; Uhlmann, Anne; Veltman, Dick; van Holst, Ruth; Walter, Henrik; Wright, Margaret J; Yucel, Murat; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah; Hibar, Derrek P; Jahanshad, Neda; Thompson, Paul M; Glahn, David C; Garavan, Hugh; Conrod, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Since the sample size of a typical neuroimaging study lacks sufficient statistical power to explore unknown genomic associations with brain phenotypes, several international genetic imaging consortia have been organized in recent years to pool data across sites. The challenges and achievements of these consortia are considered here with the goal of leveraging these resources to study addiction. The authors of this review have joined together to form an Addiction working group within the framework of the ENIGMA project, a meta-analytic approach to multisite genetic imaging data. Collectively, the Addiction working group possesses neuroimaging and genomic data obtained from over 10,000 subjects. The deadline for contributing data to the first round of analyses occurred at the beginning of May 2015. The studies performed on this data should significantly impact our understanding of the genetic and neurobiological basis of addiction.

  17. What does addiction medicine expect from neuroscience? From genes and neurons to treatment responses.

    PubMed

    Le Foll, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    The field of neuroscience is rapidly growing as evidenced by the mapping of the human genome, the progress in brain imaging technologies, and the refinement of sophisticated molecular tools that can be combined with innovative preclinical models. With these advances, it seems that our understanding of processes underlying addiction has never been so great. In comparison, the clinical domain has evolved at a much slower pace. Nonetheless, the addiction medical field has seen some gradual improvements in clinical care with the availability of a larger range of pharmacological options. Notably, several therapeutic alternatives are now offered for the treatment of nicotine, alcohol, and opioid use disorders. Some of these developments in treatment regimens have directly emerged from basic neuroscience research and represent a success story for the bench to beside translational approach. However, the clinical and research needs in addiction medicine are huge. There are still no pharmacological interventions available for psychostimulant and cannabis use disorders. Further, major questions remain unanswered: Would a better understanding of the neurocircuitry of addiction lead to therapeutic intervention? Would a better understanding of the neurochemical signature of addiction lead to the validation of a therapeutic target? Will pharmacogenetics hold its promise as a personalized medicine treatment approach? Using recent research developments, we will illustrate the potential of neuroscience to address some of the pressing questions in Addiction Medicine.

  18. Opioid neuroscience for addiction medicine: From animal models to FDA approval for alcohol addiction.

    PubMed

    Berrettini, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol addiction is one of the most common and devastating diseases in the world. Given the tremendous heterogeneity of alcohol-addicted individuals, it is unlikely that one medication will help nearly all patients. Thus, there is a clear need to develop predictors of response to existing medications. Naltrexone is a mu opioid receptor antagonist which has been approved in the United States for treatment of alcohol addiction since 1994. It has limited efficacy, in part due to noncompliance, but many patients do not respond despite high levels of compliance. There are reports that a mis-sense single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs179919 or A118G) in the mu opioid receptor gene predicts a favorable response to naltrexone if an individual carries a "G" allele. This chapter will review the evidence for this hypothesis. The data suggest that the "G" allele has a complex role in alcohol addiction, increasing the rewarding valence of alcohol. Whether the G allele increases risk for alcoholism and whether it predisposes to a beneficial naltrexone response among alcohol-addicted persons must await additional research with large sample sizes of multiple ethnicities in prospective clinical trials.

  19. Experimental medicine in drug addiction: towards behavioral, cognitive and neurobiological biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Duka, Theodora; Crombag, Hans S; Stephens, David N

    2011-09-01

    Several theoretical frameworks have been developed to understand putative processes and mechanisms involved in addiction. Whilst these 'theories of addiction' disagree about importance and/or nature of a number of key psychological processes (e.g. the necessity of craving and/or the involvement of drug-value representations), a number of commonalities exist. For instance, it is widely accepted that Pavlovian associations between cues and environmental contexts and the drug effects acquired over the course of addiction play a critical role, especially in relapse vulnerability in detoxified addicts. Additionally, all theories of addiction (explicitly or implicitly) propose that chronic drug exposure produces persistent neuroplastic changes in neurobiological circuitries underlying critical emotional, cognitive and motivational processes, although disagreement exists as to the precise nature of these neurobiological changes and/or their psychological consequences. The present review, rather than limiting itself to any particular theoretical stance, considers various candidate psychological, neurobiological and/or behavioral processes in addiction and outlines conceptual and procedural approaches for the experimental medicine laboratory. The review discusses (1) extinction, renewal and (re)consolidation of learned associations between cues and drugs, (2) the drug reward value, (3) motivational states contributing to drug seeking and (4) reflective (top-down) and sensory (bottom-up) driven decision-making. In evaluating these psychological and/or behavioral processes and their relationship to addiction we make reference to putative underlying brain structures identified by basic animal studies and/or imaging studies with humans.

  20. Meditation Awareness Training for the Treatment of Sex Addiction: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Van Gordon, William; Shonin, Edo; Griffiths, Mark D

    2016-06-01

    Background Sex addiction is a disorder that can have serious adverse functional consequences. Treatment effectiveness research for sex addiction is currently underdeveloped, and interventions are generally based on the guidelines for treating other behavioral (as well as chemical) addictions. Consequently, there is a need to clinically evaluate tailored treatments that target the specific symptoms of sex addiction. It has been proposed that second-generation mindfulness-based interventions (SG-MBIs) may be an appropriate treatment for sex addiction because in addition to helping individuals increase perceptual distance from craving for desired objects and experiences, some SG-MBIs specifically contain meditations intended to undermine attachment to sex and/or the human body. The current study conducts the first clinical investigation into the utility of mindfulness for treating sex addiction. Case presentation An in-depth clinical case study was conducted involving an adult male suffering from sex addiction that underwent treatment utilizing an SG-MBI known as Meditation Awareness Training (MAT). Following completion of MAT, the participant demonstrated clinically significant improvements in addictive sexual behavior, as well as reductions in depression and psychological distress. The MAT intervention also led to improvements in sleep quality, job satisfaction, and non-attachment to self and experiences. Salutary outcomes were maintained at 6-month follow-up. Discussion and conclusion The current study extends the literature exploring the applications of mindfulness for treating behavioral addiction, and findings indicate that further clinical investigation into the role of mindfulness for treating sex addiction is warranted.

  1. Meditation Awareness Training for the Treatment of Sex Addiction: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Van Gordon, William; Shonin, Edo; Griffiths, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sex addiction is a disorder that can have serious adverse functional consequences. Treatment effectiveness research for sex addiction is currently underdeveloped, and interventions are generally based on the guidelines for treating other behavioral (as well as chemical) addictions. Consequently, there is a need to clinically evaluate tailored treatments that target the specific symptoms of sex addiction. It has been proposed that second-generation mindfulness-based interventions (SG-MBIs) may be an appropriate treatment for sex addiction because in addition to helping individuals increase perceptual distance from craving for desired objects and experiences, some SG-MBIs specifically contain meditations intended to undermine attachment to sex and/or the human body. The current study conducts the first clinical investigation into the utility of mindfulness for treating sex addiction. Case presentation An in-depth clinical case study was conducted involving an adult male suffering from sex addiction that underwent treatment utilizing an SG-MBI known as Meditation Awareness Training (MAT). Following completion of MAT, the participant demonstrated clinically significant improvements in addictive sexual behavior, as well as reductions in depression and psychological distress. The MAT intervention also led to improvements in sleep quality, job satisfaction, and non-attachment to self and experiences. Salutary outcomes were maintained at 6-month follow-up. Discussion and conclusion The current study extends the literature exploring the applications of mindfulness for treating behavioral addiction, and findings indicate that further clinical investigation into the role of mindfulness for treating sex addiction is warranted. PMID:27348560

  2. The International Certification of Addiction Medicine: Validating Clinical Knowledge across Borders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    el-Guebaly, Nady; Violato, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The experience of the International Society of Addiction Medicine in setting up the first international certification of clinical knowledge is reported. The steps followed and the results of a psychometric analysis of the tests from the first 65 candidates are reported. Lessons learned in the first 5 years and challenges for the future are…

  3. Craving to Quit: psychological models and neurobiological mechanisms of mindfulness training as treatment for addictions

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Judson A.; Elwafi, Hani M.; Davis, Jake H.

    2012-01-01

    Humans suffer heavily from substance use disorders and other addictions. Despite much effort that has been put into understanding the mechanisms of the addictive process, treatment strategies have remained sub-optimal over the past several decades. Mindfulness training, which is based on ancient Buddhist models of human suffering, has recently shown preliminary efficacy in treating addictions. Interestingly, these early models show remarkable similarity to current models of the addictive process, especially in their overlap with operant conditioning (positive and negative reinforcement). Further, they may provide explanatory power for the mechanisms of mindfulness training, including its effects on core addictive elements, such as craving, and the underlying neurobiological processes that may be active therein. In this review, using smoking as an example, we will highlight similarities between ancient and modern views of the addictive process, review studies of mindfulness training for addictions and their effects on craving and other components of this process, and discuss recent neuroimaging findings that may inform our understanding of the neural mechanisms of mindfulness training. PMID:22642859

  4. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Rosário; Costa, Gracinda

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear medicine in Portugal has been an autonomous speciality since 1984. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, 5 years of training are necessary. The curriculum is very similar to the one approved under the auspices of the European Union of Medical Specialists, namely concerning the minimum recommended number of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. There is a final assessment, and during the training the resident is in an approved continuing education programme. Departments are accredited by the Medical College in order to verify their capacity to host nuclear medicine residencies.

  5. A Training Manual for Nuclear Medicine Technologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Guy H.; Alexander, George W.

    This manual was prepared for a training program in Nuclear Medicine Technology at the University of Cincinnati. Instructional materials for students enrolled in these courses in the training program include: Nuclear Physics and Instrumentation, Radionuclide Measurements, Radiation Protection, and Tracer Methodology and Radiopharmaceuticals. (CS)

  6. Using Experiential Activities to Prepare Counselors-in-Training to Understand the Power of Cravings when Addressing Clients with Addiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrawood, Laura K.; McClure, Cristen C.; Nelson, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Providing skilled treatment options for clients experiencing addiction is imperative to positive client treatment outcomes. As a prerequisite to providing efficacious addiction treatment, counselors-in-training are charged with the responsibility of understanding the affect of cravings on addiction relapse. This article presents 3 experiential,…

  7. Residential placement for veterans with addiction: American Society of Addiction Medicine criteria vs. a veterans homeless program.

    PubMed

    Westermeyer, Joseph; Lee, Kathryn

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to compare placements of patients with addiction undertaken by a) a unidimensional, protocol-driven, independent "permanent" housing "wet" program versus b) a multidimensional, patient-individualized, contingency-based housing approach. The sample consisted of eight veterans in a single team's panel admitted to a housing program and eight matched veterans on the verge of homelessness placed by the team according to the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) criteria. The two groups (matched for sex, race-ethnicity, and age [SD, 5 years]) were similar on demography, substance disorder, and psychiatric comorbidity. Measures consisted of a) description of the placements, b) 12-month postplacement outcomes using a 12-item scale, and c) a Drug Abuse Research Project-based 10-item scale to assess recovery processes at two 6-month preplacement and two 6-month postplacement intervals. The veterans in the housing program escalated drinking and/or drug use; all were readdicted by the end of 12 months after placement. In the ASAM-criteria group, five of the eight patients had brief slips lasting 2 days or less, but none were readdicted at 12 months. The housing program group experienced five nontrivial outcomes: three imprisonments for felonies, one life-threatening medical complication, and one death. In conclusion, the findings support close monitoring and relevant contingencies using the ASAM criteria in the treatment of substance use disorder.

  8. Neurocognitive rehabilitation for addiction medicine: From neurophysiological markers to cognitive rehabilitation and relapse prevention.

    PubMed

    Campanella, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Currently, relapse prevention remains the main challenge in addiction medicine, indicating that the established treatment methods combining psychotherapy with neuropharmacological interventions are not entirely effective. Therefore, there is a push to develop alternatives to psychotherapy- and medication-based approaches to addiction treatment. Two major cognitive factors have been identified that trigger relapse in addicted patients: attentional biases directed toward drug-related cues, which increase the urge to consume, and impaired response inhibition toward these cues, which makes it more difficult for addicted people to resist temptation. Recent studies on newly detoxified alcoholic patients have shown that by using the appropriate tasks to index these cognitive functions with event-related potentials (ERPs), it is possible to discriminate between future relapsers and nonrelapsers. These preliminary data suggest that the ERP technique has great clinical potential for preventing relapse in alcohol-dependent patients, as well as for addictive states in general. Indeed, ERPs may help to identify patients highly vulnerable to relapse and allow the development of individually adapted cognitive rehabilitation programs. The implementation of this combined approach requires an intense collaboration between psychiatry departments, clinical neurophysiology laboratories, and neuropsychological rehabilitation centers. The potential pitfalls and limitations of this approach are also discussed.

  9. Satisfaction with civilian family medicine residency training

    PubMed Central

    Wolfrom, Brent; Hodgetts, Geoff; Kotecha, Jyoti; Pollock, Emily; Martin, Mary; Han, Han; Morissette, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate satisfaction with civilian residency training programs among serving general duty medical officers within the Canadian Armed Forces. Design A 23-item, cross-sectional survey face-validated by the office of the Surgeon General of the Canadian Armed Forces. Setting Canada. Participants General duty medical officers serving in the Canadian Armed Forces as of February 2014 identified through the Directorate of Health Services Personnel of the Canadian Forces Health Services Group Headquarters. Main outcome measures Satisfaction with and time spent in 7 domains of training: trauma, critical care, emergency medicine, psychiatry, occupational health, sports medicine, and base clinic training. Overall preparedness for leading a health care team, caring for a military population, working in isolated and challenging environments, and being deployed were evaluated on a 5-point Likert scale. Results Among the survey respondents (n = 135, response rate 54%), 77% agreed or strongly agreed that their family medicine residency training was relevant to their role as a general duty medical officer. Most respondents were either satisfied or very satisfied with their emergency medicine training (77%) and psychiatry training (63%), while fewer were satisfied or very satisfied with their sports medicine (47%), base clinic (41%), and critical care (43%) training. Even fewer respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with their trauma (26%) and occupational health (12%) training. Regarding overall preparedness, 57% believed that they were adequately prepared to care for a military patient population, and 52% of respondents believed they were prepared for their first posting. Fewer respondents (38%) believed they were prepared to work in isolated, austere, or challenging environments, and even fewer (32%) believed that residency training prepared them to lead a health care team. Conclusion General duty medical officers were satisfied with many aspects of

  10. Training the Future Leaders in Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mason-Suares, Heather; Sweetser, David A.; Lindeman, Neal I.; Morton, Cynthia C.

    2016-01-01

    The era of personalized medicine has arrived, and with it a need for leaders in this discipline. This generation of trainees requires a cadre of new skill sets to lead the implementation of personalized medicine into mainstream healthcare. Traditional training programs no longer provide trainees with all the skills they will need to optimize implementation of this revolution now underway in medicine. Today’s trainees must manage clinical teams, act as clinical and molecular diagnostic consultants, train other healthcare professionals, teach future generations, and be knowledgeable about clinical trials to facilitate genomic-based therapies. To prepare trainees for the transition to junior faculty positions, contemporary genomic training programs must emphasize the development of these management, teaching, and clinical skills. PMID:26751479

  11. Training the Future Leaders in Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mason-Suares, Heather; Sweetser, David A; Lindeman, Neal I; Morton, Cynthia C

    2016-01-07

    The era of personalized medicine has arrived, and with it a need for leaders in this discipline. This generation of trainees requires a cadre of new skill sets to lead the implementation of personalized medicine into mainstream healthcare. Traditional training programs no longer provide trainees with all the skills they will need to optimize implementation of this revolution now underway in medicine. Today's trainees must manage clinical teams, act as clinical and molecular diagnostic consultants, train other healthcare professionals, teach future generations, and be knowledgeable about clinical trials to facilitate genomic-based therapies. To prepare trainees for the transition to junior faculty positions, contemporary genomic training programs must emphasize the development of these management, teaching, and clinical skills.

  12. Future directions in training zoological medicine veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, James W; Miller, R Eric

    2006-01-01

    The American College of Zoological Medicine (ACZM) is dedicated to excellence in furthering the health and well-being of both captive and free-ranging wild animals. Currently there are 14 ACZM-approved residency programs in zoological medicine. In addition, eight non-approved residencies and 15 internships in North America provide training opportunities in this field. This article outlines some of the training opportunities for both veterinary students and graduate veterinarians that would best position them for entry into a zoological medicine training program. Although there is a growing number of opportunities for individuals to serve in captive and free-ranging wildlife health positions, existing training programs are inadequate to meet these needs. It is also acknowledged that there is an increasing number of veterinary students entering veterinary schools with an interest in zoological medicine and that the job market is still limited. However, positions and opportunities in zoological medicine are available for those individuals with the drive, dedication, and passion to succeed.

  13. Response inhibition and addiction medicine: from use to abstinence.

    PubMed

    Spechler, Philip A; Chaarani, Bader; Hudson, Kelsey E; Potter, Alexandra; Foxe, John J; Garavan, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    Historically, neuroscientific research into addiction has emphasized affective and reinforcement mechanisms as the essential elements underlying the pursuit of drugs, their abuse, and difficulties associated with abstinence. However, research over the last decade or so has shown that cognitive control systems, associated largely but not exclusively with the frontal lobes, are also important contributors to drug use behaviors. Here, we focus on inhibitory control and its contribution to both current use and abstinence. A body of evidence points to impaired inhibitory abilities across a range of drugs of abuse. Typically, studies suggest that substance-abusing individuals are characterized by relative hypoactivity in brain systems underlying inhibitory control. In contrast, abstinent users tend to show either normal or supernormal levels of activity in the same systems attesting to the importance of inhibitory control in suppressing the drug use urges that plague attempts at abstinence. In this chapter, the brain and behavioral basis of response inhibition will be reviewed, with a focus on neuroimaging studies of response inhibition in current and abstinent drug abusers.

  14. Pediatric training in emergency medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, S; Fleisher, G; Henretig, F; Ruddy, R

    1982-04-01

    Endorsed emergency medicine (EM) residency programs were surveyed as to the nature and extent of training they provided in pediatric emergency care (PEC). In the surveys returned (82%) there were several important findings. The amount of time in PEC training was generally two months per year of training. This accounted for 16% of training time. However, the volume of pediatric patients was 25% of the overall patient population. There was wide variation in the sites of PEC training. Didactic sessions often did not cover even core topics. The training program directors were equally divided in their satisfaction with this aspect of their programs. Changes were recommended by 80% of the directors. Changes most often suggested were increasing pediatric patient exposure and obtaining PEC specialists as trainers.

  15. [Training in tropical medicine in France].

    PubMed

    Touze, Jean-Étienne; Laroche, Roland

    2013-10-01

    Tropical medicine was a key element of the medical structures provided by France to our former colonies and, later; to countries within the scope of our international cooperation. hI recent decades, France has drastically reduced its bilateral commitments to countries in the tropics, and especially in sub-Saharan Africa. At the same time, the teaching of tropical medicine, which was highly regarded even beyond our borders, has lost a good deal of its expertise. Initially available in a few large French centers, and ensured by teachers with extensive field experience, training in tropical medicine is now offered in many universities. However; their programs and educational objectives, focusing mainly on infectious and parasitic diseases, no longer meet the healthcare priorities of southern countries, which are facing an epidemiological transition and the rise of non communicable diseases. Few teachers now have recognized expertise in tropical medicine. These changes have had negative consequences for research programs in tropical medicine and for the image of French assistance to developing countries. In this context, the followving perspectives should be considered: 1) training in tropical medicine should be enhanced by the creation of a national diploma recognized by international bodies. 2) The creation of a doctoral course in tropical medicine is a prerequisite for achieving this goal, and the future diploma must include a significant research component. 3) Teaching in tropical medicine must become more practical and be ensured by teachers with extensive field experience. 4) Training in tropical medicine should be part of a bilateral relationship with countries in the tropics, each party contributing its expertise while respecting that of its partners. 5) Training in tropical medicine should be backed uip by high-level scientific research based on enhanced synergy of our current networks (Institute for Research and Development, Network of overseas Pasteur

  16. Behavioral Medicine Training in Postdoctoral Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockhart, Peter B.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Carolinas Medical Center (North Carolina) initiated a behavioral training program for general practice dental residents to develop skills in handling patient anxiety/stress, obesity, and depression. The program includes monthly seminars, a clinical rotation in behavioral medicine with additional related seminars, and a month-long clinical rotation…

  17. Aspects of higher training in emergency medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kilroy, D

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To devise and develop a structured questionnaire addressing important issues relating to specialist registrar training in emergency medicine in the UK, and to then administer this questionnaire nationally to higher trainees in order to establish current practice and opinion regarding those issues. Methods: Informal interviews with current trainees were undertaken to identify themes which might be of wider importance in relation to training. The transcriptions were incorporated into a discussion questionnaire which was circulated to other trainees and to members of the Joint Committee on Higher Training in Accident and Emergency. A postal survey was developed from this draft and distributed to all trainees currently registered with the Faculty of Accident and Emergency Medicine. Results: The response rate was 75%. Collective responses to certain aspects of training are demonstrated in order to reflect current practice and opinion among UK specialist registrars and to allow further debate. Conclusion: Development of a structured questionnaire allows issues in relation to training in emergency medicine to be assessed. The findings of the survey allow national data to be presented which will be of interest to trainees and trainers in the UK as well as overseas. PMID:12954958

  18. Evaluation and treatment of sex addiction.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Kenneth Paul; Carnes, Patrick; O'Connor, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    There have been several diagnostic labels for persistent, excessive sexual behaviors, often referred in the popular media as sex addiction. Two related diagnoses, Internet addictive disorder and hypersexual disorder, were considered for, but not included in the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. However, most clinicians, even those trained in sexual disorders or addiction medicine, have little to no training in treating sexual compulsivity and cybersex addiction. The authors present the historical context, proposed diagnostic criteria, evaluation protocols, comorbid disorders, speculations about the neuroscience, and treatment recommendations.

  19. Nuclear medicine technologist training in European countries.

    PubMed

    Lass, Piotr

    2002-08-01

    This article overviews the training of nuclear medicine technologists in chosen European countries, the United States and Canada. There are basically two types of training: at medical schools following secondary school, without any university degree, usually on a 2- or 3-year basis, or else as a university course, leading to a BSc degree after 3 years, and in some countries to an MSc degree after an additional 2 years. In the United States both systems coexist, while in Europe the picture varies from country to country. The number of hours devoted to nuclear medicine also varies between curricula. Some efforts are being made to unify this system by transition to the university model of education in many European countries.

  20. Neuroscience of attentional processes for addiction medicine: from brain mechanisms to practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Fadardi, Javad Salehi; Cox, W Miles; Rahmani, Arash

    2016-01-01

    The present chapter first argues how having a goal for procuring alcohol or other substances leads to the development of a time-binding, dynamic, and goal oriented motivational state termed current concern, as the origin of substance-related attentional bias. Next, it discusses the importance of attentional bias in the development, continuation of, and relapsing to substance abuse. It further proceeds with a review of selective evidence from cognitive psychology that helps account for making decisions about using an addictive substance or refraining from using it. A discussion on the various brain loci that are involved in attentional bias and other kinds of cue reactivity is followed by presenting findings from neurocognitive research. Finally, from an interdisciplinary perspective, the chapter presents new trends and ideas that can be applied to addiction-related cognitive measurement and training.

  1. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland.

    PubMed

    Teresińska, Anna; Birkenfeld, Bożena; Królicki, Leszek; Dziuk, Mirosław

    2014-10-01

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which accepts the specialization programs, supervises the training, organizes the examinations, and awards the specialist title. Specialization in NM for physicians lasts for five years. It consists of 36 months of training in a native nuclear medicine department, 12 months of internship in radiology, 3 months in cardiology, 3 months in endocrinology, 3 months in oncology, and 3 months in two other departments of NM. If a NM trainee is a specialist of a clinical discipline and/or is after a long residency in NM departments, the specialization in NM can be shortened to three years. During the training, there are obligatory courses to be attended which include the elements of anatomy imaging in USG, CT, and MR. Currently, there are about 170 active NM specialists working for 38.5 million inhabitants in Poland. For other professionals working in NM departments, it is possible to get the title of a medical physics specialist after completing 3.5 years of training (for those with a master's in physics, technical physics or biomedical engineering) or the title of a radiopharmacy specialist after completing 3 years of training (for those with a master's in chemistry or biology). At present, the specialization program in NM for nurses is being developed by the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education. Continuing education and professional development are obligatory for all physicians and governed by the Polish Medical Chamber. The Polish Society of Nuclear Medicine (PTMN) organizes regular

  2. A scoping review of interdisciplinary collaboration in addictions education and training.

    PubMed

    Broyles, Lauren M; Conley, James W; Harding, John D; Gordon, Adam J

    2013-01-01

    Developing a workforce of multidisciplinary healthcare professionals equipped with the knowledge and skills to collaboratively address the public health crisis of alcohol and other drug (AOD) use is critical for effectively identifying, preventing, and managing AOD conditions and their sequelae. Despite general enthusiasm for interdisciplinary education and training, little is known overall about the nature and outcomes of interdisciplinary collaboration in addictions education and training. We conducted a five-stage scoping review of the literature to provide an eight domain overview of the state of interdisciplinary collaboration in addictions education (ICAE). In our final review of 30 articles, we identified a lack of conceptual and terminological clarity around ICAE but a wide range of learners and professional collaborators in ICAE initiatives, which focused on a variety of AOD topics and used a constellation of didactic, interactive, and service-learning teaching strategies and formats. Although we found limited substantive educational or practice-oriented outcomes available for ICAE initiatives, learner and faculty feedback reflected high enthusiasm for ICAE and widespread perceptions of benefit for improved clinical care. Facilitators and barriers to the implementation of ICAE initiatives occurred at the level of the individual and the institution and ranged from pragmatic to conceptual. Emerging trends in ICAE initiatives included increased application of learning and implementation theory and extension of ICAE into research training. We conclude with recommendations to support ICAE as a new paradigm for addictions education for all health professionals.

  3. Neuroscience of drug craving for addiction medicine: From circuits to therapies.

    PubMed

    Ekhtiari, Hamed; Nasseri, Padideh; Yavari, Fatemeh; Mokri, Azarkhsh; Monterosso, John

    2016-01-01

    Drug craving is a dynamic neurocognitive emotional-motivational response to a wide range of cues, from internal to external environments and from drug-related to stressful or affective events. The subjective feeling of craving, as an appetitive or compulsive state, could be considered a part of this multidimensional process, with modules in different levels of consciousness and embodiment. The neural correspondence of this dynamic and complex phenomenon may be productively investigated in relation to regional, small-scale networks, large-scale networks, and brain states. Within cognitive neuroscience, this approach has provided a long list of neural and cognitive targets for craving modulations with different cognitive, electrical, or pharmacological interventions. There are new opportunities to integrate different approaches for carving management from environmental, behavioral, psychosocial, cognitive, and neural perspectives. By using cognitive neuroscience models that treat drug craving as a dynamic and multidimensional process, these approaches may yield more effective interventions for addiction medicine.

  4. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity
department of addictive behaviour and addiction medicine, central institute of Mental Health, Mannheim, University of Heidelberg.

    PubMed

    Mann, Karl

    2010-12-01

    Addictive behaviour is as prevalent in Germany as in other western countries, but in contrast to some European countries and the United States, very little money was given to this research field. Change came in the early 1990s, when the German government started to launch specific grants for addiction research. The first chair in addiction research was created in 1999 (Karl Mann) at the Central Institute of Mental Health Mannheim (CIMH; University of Heidelberg). The recruitment of a pre-clinical alcohol researcher as head of the department of psychopharmacology followed (Rainer Spanagel). This 'addiction research cluster' collaborates with several research groups at the CIMH (such as genetics). We inaugurated a clinical trial network which now comprises up to 20 treatment centres throughout Germany. Like most authors, we found effect sizes of different treatment modalities more in the low to moderate range, perhaps because of the heterogeneity of large patient samples. Therefore, we concentrated upon the biological basis of addiction in order to define more homogeneous 'subtypes' of patients for a better match with existing treatments. Results concerning genetics and neuroimaging (both animal and human) are promising, and could move our field towards a more personalized treatment approach. Our funding has been extended over the years, including involvement in several large European grants. We are studying substance-related problems as well as so-called 'behavioural addictions'. As a natural consequence of this development, we are deeply involved both in informing the general public on addiction issues as well as in counselling policy makers in Germany.

  5. Meconium drug testing reveals maternal misuse of medicinal opioids among addicted mothers.

    PubMed

    Launiainen, Terhi; Nupponen, Irmeli; Halmesmäki, Erja; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2013-07-01

    Meconium drug testing is a non-invasive method to detect prenatal drug exposure, which can cause severe problems for the infant, indicating the need for follow-up measures to ensure the welfare of the child. Meconium samples for drug testing were collected from 143 infants as part of routine clinical work among addicted mothers. The drug testing findings were combined with medical records including clinical background and follow-up data. The substances screened for included medicinal opioids, 6-monoacetylmorphine (a metabolite of heroin), amphetamines and tetrahydrocannabinolic acid. At least one of the 13 target drugs was detected in 57 (40%) meconium samples. In 21 cases, the findings were unexpected on the basis of clinical data or denied by the mother. Medicinal opioids, especially the opioid substitution treatment drugs buprenorphine and methadone, comprised the majority of the findings of both admitted and unexpected drug misuse. Meconium drug testing methods should target not just traditional illicit drugs but also prescription drugs with misuse potential.

  6. Culture change in addictions treatment: a targeted training and technical assistance initiative affects tobacco-related attitudes and beliefs in addiction treatment settings.

    PubMed

    Perka, Edward J

    2011-11-01

    Targeted training and technical assistance can have a major impact on the attitudes and beliefs of addiction service providers with respect to the treatment of tobacco dependency. Major gains have been made with the general public since the mid-1960s with respect to the reduction of tobacco use behavior and tobacco-related diseases. Tobacco use continues to be a major public health problem, and tobacco control initiatives are significantly affecting public attitudes and norms regarding tobacco use. There is, however, a specific population that has not benefited from these gains and, in fact, has been encouraged to continue smoking rather than make an attempt to quit. Individuals with a substance use disorder and/or mental health disorder have a much higher percentage of tobacco use than the general population, resulting in major health disparities. The addiction treatment and recovery community has lagged behind the general public in addressing tobacco use. New York State's project, "Integrating Tobacco Use Interventions Into Chemical Dependence Services," is a model that demonstrates how innovative regulations, and training and technical assistance developed specifically for addiction service providers, can initiate culture change with respect to tobacco use within addiction treatment settings, resulting in improved treatment outcomes and longer term stable recovery.

  7. Training Addiction Counselors to Implement an Evidence-Based Intervention: Strategies for Increasing Organizational and Provider Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woo, Stephanie M.; Hepner, Kimberly A.; Gilbert, Elizabeth A.; Osilla, Karen Chan; Hunter, Sarah B.; Munoz, Ricardo F.; Watkins, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    One barrier to widespread public access to empirically supported treatments (ESTs) is the limited availability and high cost of professionals trained to deliver them. Our earlier work from 2 clinical trials demonstrated that front-line addiction counselors could be trained to deliver a manualized, group-based cognitive behavioral therapy (GCBT)…

  8. Association between Internet addiction and depression in Thai medical students at Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Boonvisudhi, Thummaporn

    2017-01-01

    Objective To study the extent of Internet addiction (IA) and its association with depression in Thai medical students. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital. Participants were first- to fifth-year medical students who agreed to participate in this study. Demographic characteristics and stress-related factors were derived from self-rated questionnaires. Depression was assessed using the Thai version of Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). A total score of five or greater derived from the Thai version of Young Diagnostic Questionnaire for Internet Addiction was classified as “possible IA”. Then chi-square test and logistic regression were used to evaluate the associations between possible IA, depression and associated factors. Results From 705 participants, 24.4% had possible IA and 28.8% had depression. There was statistically significant association between possible IA and depression (odds ratio (OR) 1.92, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.34–2.77, P-value <0.001). Logistic regression analysis illustrated that the odds of depression in possible IA group was 1.58 times of the group of normal Internet use (95% CI: 1.04–2.38, P-value = 0.031). Academic problems were found to be a significant predictor of both possible IA and depression. Conclusion IA was likely to be a common psychiatric problem among Thai medical students. The research has also shown that possible IA was associated with depression and academic problems. We suggest that surveillance of IA should be considered in medical schools. PMID:28319167

  9. 75 FR 69686 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... Administration Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry AGENCY: Health Resources and... the cancellation of the Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and...

  10. Project ASPIRE: Incorporating Integrative Medicine Into Residency Training

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Haq; Via, Christina M.; Ali, Ather; Rosenberger, Lisa D.

    2016-01-01

    Griffin Hospital, a community hospital affiliated with Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Medicine, received Health Resources and Services Administration funding to strengthen and improve its combined internal medicine and general preventive medicine residency program by incorporating an integrative medicine curriculum. The purpose of project ASPIRE (Advancing Skills of Preventive medicine residents through Integrative medicine Education, Research and Evaluation) was to create, implement, and evaluate a needs-based, innovative training curriculum in integrative medicine. Through this robust new training, the authors aimed to produce preventive medicine-trained physicians with competencies in integrative medicine to collaboratively work with other integrative medicine practitioners in interdisciplinary teams to provide holistic, patient-centered care. The multifaceted collaborative curriculum was composed of didactics, grand rounds, journal club, objective structured clinical examinations, and two new practicum rotations in integrative medicine. The new practicum rotations included block rotations at the Integrative Medicine Center at Griffin Hospital and the Yale Stress Center. Between 2012 and 2014, three cohorts participated in the curriculum; two of these cohorts included three advanced preventive medicine residents each and the fourth included four residents. Project faculty conducted 14 lectures and journal clubs, and two grand rounds. Six of the ten participating residents (60%) completed integrative medicine clinical rotations. Residents’ attitudes toward integrative medicine were evaluated through self-assessment using the Complementary, Alternative, and Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire; data were analyzed in 2015. This article describes the results of this prospective observational study based on single-institution experience over the course of the 2-year project period. PMID:26477907

  11. Resting state functional connectivity analysis for addiction medicine: From individual loci to complex networks.

    PubMed

    Pariyadath, Vani; Gowin, Joshua L; Stein, Elliot A

    2016-01-01

    Resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) has provided a new and valuable tool for investigating network-level dysfunction in addiction. Following the recent development of a framework of large scale network disruptions, we have been able to arrive at unique insights into craving-related aspects of addiction using rsFC. However, such network-level advancement has thus far eluded our understanding of mesocorticolimbic involvement in addiction. Given the importance of this system in vulnerability and resilience to addiction, understanding mesocorticolimbic dynamics to the same extent could provide critical insights into the disease. To this end, we review here recent studies on addiction that employ rsfC and suggest a new approach, one that combines a novel model for addiction with new experimental techniques as well as participant groups, to accelerate progress in this arena.

  12. Nuclear medicine training and practice in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Kamínek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear medicine in the Czech Republic is a full specialty with an exclusive practice. Since the training program was organized and structured in recent years, residents have had access to the specialty of nuclear medicine, starting with a two-year general internship (in internal medicine or radiology). At present, nuclear medicine services are provided in 45 departments. In total, 119 nuclear medicine specialists are currently registered. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, five years of training are necessary; the first two years consist of a general internship in internal medicine or radiology. The remaining three years consist of training in the nuclear medicine specialty itself, but includes three months of practice in radiology. Twenty-one physicians are currently in nuclear medicine training and a mean of three specialists pass the final exam per year. The syllabus is very similar to that of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), namely concerning the minimum recommended numbers for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In principle, the Czech law requires continuous medical education for all practicing doctors. The Czech Medical Chamber has provided a continuing medical education (CME) system. Other national CMEs are not accepted in Czech Republic.

  13. Graduate Training in Toxicology in Colleges of Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robens, J. F.; Buck, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    Presented are an American Board of Veterinary Toxicology survey and evaluation of the training resources available in graduate programs in toxicology located in colleges of veterinary medicine. Regulatory toxicology, number of toxicologists needed, and curriculum are also discussed. (JMD)

  14. Hands-On Sports Medicine Training for Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanji, Jeffrey L.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the development of a hands-on sports medicine training program for residents at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center. Education strategies include clinical teaching, on-the-field education, experiential learning, and didactic instruction. Programs focusing exclusively on sports medicine are needed because the number of…

  15. The Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program: impact and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Whyte, John; Boninger, Michael; Helkowski, Wendy; Braddom-Ritzler, Carolyn

    2009-03-01

    Physician scientists are seen as important in healthcare research. However, the number of physician scientists and their success in obtaining National Institutes of Health funding have been declining for many years. The shortage of physician scientists in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation is particularly severe and can be attributed to many of the same factors that affect physician scientists in general, as well as to the lack of well-developed models for research training. In 1995, the Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program was funded by a K12 grant from the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research, as one strategy for increasing the number of research-productive physiatrists. The Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program's structure was revised in 2001 to improve the level of preparation of incoming trainees and to provide a stronger central mentorship support network. We describe the original and revised structure of the Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program and review subjective and objective data on the productivity of the trainees who have completed the program. These data suggest that Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program trainees are, in general, successful in obtaining and maintaining academic faculty positions and that the productivity of the cohort trained after the revision, in particular, shows impressive growth after about 3 yrs of training.

  16. Training the Navy Preventive Medicine Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janoski, Tom

    1977-01-01

    This article gives the history and purpose of the Navy Preventive Medicine Technician (PMT) School, overviews the program's goals, and summarizes the program of study. PMT students receive 26 weeks of intensive didactic and practical instruction in preventive medicine and environmental health. Graduates receive 421/2 semester hours of college…

  17. American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) National Practice Guideline for the Use of Medications in the Treatment of Addiction Involving Opioid Use.

    PubMed

    Kampman, Kyle; Jarvis, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control have recently described opioid use and resultant deaths as an epidemic. At this point in time, treating this disease well with medication requires skill and time that are not generally available to primary care doctors in most practice models. Suboptimal treatment has likely contributed to expansion of the epidemic and concerns for unethical practices. At the same time, access to competent treatment is profoundly restricted because few physicians are willing and able to provide it. This "Practice Guideline" was developed to assist in the evaluation and treatment of opioid use disorder, and in the hope that, using this tool, more physicians will be able to provide effective treatment. Although there are existing guidelines for the treatment of opioid use disorder, none have included all of the medications used at present for its treatment. Moreover, few of the existing guidelines address the needs of special populations such as pregnant women, individuals with co-occurring psychiatric disorders, individuals with pain, adolescents, or individuals involved in the criminal justice system. This Practice Guideline was developed using the RAND Corporation (RAND)/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Method (RAM) - a process that combines scientific evidence and clinical knowledge to determine the appropriateness of a set of clinical procedures. The RAM is a deliberate approach encompassing review of existing guidelines, literature reviews, appropriateness ratings, necessity reviews, and document development. For this project, American Society of Addiction Medicine selected an independent committee to oversee guideline development and to assist in writing. American Society of Addiction Medicine's Quality Improvement Council oversaw the selection process for the independent development committee. Recommendations included in the guideline encompass a broad range of topics, starting with the initial evaluation of the

  18. [The Sino-French emergency and disaster medicine training center].

    PubMed

    Pourriat, Jean-Louis; Dahan, Benjamin; Lapandry, Claude

    2012-01-01

    French (AP-HP) and Chinese (Beijing Health Office) hospitals, with support from the French company Total, collaborated in order to improve Chinese doctors' knowledge of emergency and disaster medicine prior to the Beijing Olympic Games. A Sino-French emergency and disaster medicine training center was subsequently opened in Beijing in 2008, with the aim of providing high-level continuous medical training for Chinese specialists in emergency medicine. Teaching in the management of critical situations was based on the use of a latest-generation simulator (Sim 3G; Laerdal). This collaboration has had both pedagogical and diplomatic benefits.

  19. Evaluation of a Medicine Information Training Program for Older People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quine, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Australian older adults were trained to act as advocates and role models to inform peers on effective use of medicines. Trainees reported difficulties experienced by older learners when training is too concentrated. Many noted increased self-esteem and personal growth as a result of their involvement. (SK)

  20. New developments in education and training in sexual medicine.

    PubMed

    Reisman, Yacov; Eardley, Ian; Porst, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    INTRODUCTION.: The past 12 months have been historic ones for the field of Sexual Medicine in that we have seen the creation of the European Board examination in Sexual Medicine with the title of "Fellow of the European Committee on Sexual Medicine" (FECSM) offered to successful candidates. AIM.: The study aims to promote a high standard of care in Sexual Medicine. METHODS.: An important way of promoting high standards of care is by the development of training, regulation, and assessment framework. The background to these developments and the recent educational activities of the European Society for Sexual Medicine (ESSM) are described in this article. RESULTS.: The creation of the Multidisciplinary Joint Committee on Sexual Medicine (MJCSM) under the auspices of the European Union of Medical Specialists, with the primary purpose to develop the highest possible standards of training in Sexual Medicine in Europe, made it possible to create a process for qualification in Sexual Medicine. The ESSM educational activities created opportunities to support trainees in Sexual Medicine and the first MJCSM exam was held in Amsterdam with a high overall success rate. CONCLUSION.: These activities are intended to improve quality. The FECSM examination is the first of its type and provides a real opportunity for Sexual Medicine physicians to demonstrate and document their knowledge.

  1. Report on residency training information (2011-2012), American Board of Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Carius, Michael L; Collier, Robert E; Counselman, Francis L; Kowalenko, Terry; Marco, Catherine A; Muelleman, Robert L; Korte, Robert C

    2012-05-01

    The American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) gathers extensive background information on emergency medicine residency training programs and the residents in those programs. We present the 2012 annual report on the status of US emergency medicine training programs.

  2. American Board of Emergency Medicine Report on Residency Training Information (2015-2016).

    PubMed

    Marco, Catherine A; Baren, Jill M; Beeson, Michael S; Carius, Michael L; Counselman, Francis L; Gausche-Hill, Marianne; Goyal, Deepi G; Kowalenko, Terry; Muelleman, Robert L; Wahl, Robert P; Joldersma, Kevin B

    2016-05-01

    The American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) gathers extensive background information on emergency medicine residency programs and the residents training in those programs. We present the 2016 annual report on the status of US emergency medicine training programs.

  3. American Board of Emergency Medicine report on residency training information (2013-2014), American Board of Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Baren, Jill M; Beeson, Michael S; Counselman, Francis L; Kowalenko, Terry; Marco, Catherine A; Muelleman, Robert L; Nelson, Lewis S; Wahl, Robert P; Korte, Robert C

    2014-05-01

    The American Board of Emergency Medicine gathers extensive background information on emergency medicine residency programs and the residents in them. We present the 2014 annual report on the status of US emergency medicine training programs.

  4. American Board of Emergency Medicine report on residency training information (2012-2013), American Board of Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Baren, Jill M; Counselman, Francis L; Kowalenko, Terry; Marco, Catherine A; Muelleman, Robert L; Wahl, Robert P; Korte, Robert C

    2013-05-01

    The American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) gathers extensive background information on emergency medicine residency programs and the residents in those programs. We present the 2013 annual report on the status of US emergency medicine training programs.

  5. Integrated internist - addiction medicine - hepatology model for hepatitis C management for individuals on methadone maintenance.

    PubMed

    Martinez, A D; Dimova, R; Marks, K M; Beeder, A B; Zeremski, M; Kreek, M J; Talal, A H

    2012-01-01

    Despite a high prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) among drug users, HCV evaluation and treatment acceptance are extremely low among these patients when referred from drug treatment facilities for HCV management. We sought to increase HCV treatment effectiveness among patients from a methadone maintenance treatment program (MMTP) by maintaining continuity of care. We developed, instituted and retrospectively assessed the effectiveness of an integrated, co-localized care model in which an internist-addiction medicine specialist from MMTP was embedded in the hepatitis clinic. Methadone maintenance treatment program patients were referred, evaluated by the internist and hepatologist in hepatitis clinic and provided HCV treatment with integration between both sites. Of 401 evaluated patients, anti-HCV antibody was detected in 257, 86% of whom were older than 40 years. Hepatitis C virus RNA levels were measured in 222 patients, 65 of whom were aviremic. Of 157 patients with detectable HCV RNA, 125 were eligible for referral to the hepatitis clinic, 76 (61%) of whom accepted and adhered with the referral. Men engaged in MMTP <36 months were significantly less likely to be seen in hepatitis clinic than men in MMTP more than 36 months (odds ratio = 7.7; 95% confidence interval 2.6-22.9) or women. We evaluated liver histology in 63 patients, and 83% had moderate to advanced liver disease. Twenty-four patients initiated treatment with 19 completing and 13 (54%) achieving sustained response. In conclusion, integrated care between the MMTP and the hepatitis clinic improves adherence with HCV evaluation and treatment compared to standard referral practices.

  6. Neuroscience of resilience and vulnerability for addiction medicine: From genes to behavior.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Jonathan D; Flagel, Shelly B

    2016-01-01

    Addiction is a complex behavioral disorder arising from roughly equal contributions of genetic and environmental factors. Behavioral traits such as novelty-seeking, impulsivity, and cue-reactivity have been associated with vulnerability to addiction. These traits, at least in part, arise from individual variation in functional neural systems, such as increased striatal dopaminergic activity and decreased prefrontal cortical control over subcortical emotional and motivational responses. With a few exceptions, genetic studies have largely failed to consistently identify specific alleles that affect addiction liability. This may be due to the multifactorial nature of addiction, with different genes becoming more significant in certain environments or in certain subsets of the population. Epigenetic mechanisms may also be an important source of risk. Adolescence is a particularly critical time period in the development of addiction, and environmental factors at this stage of life can have a large influence on whether inherited risk factors are actually translated into addictive behaviors. Knowledge of how individual differences affect addiction liability at the level of genes, neural systems, behavioral traits, and sociodevelopmental trajectories can help to inform and improve clinical practice.

  7. Neurosciences intensive care medicine in initial neurosurgical training.

    PubMed

    Pereira, E A C; Madder, H; Millo, J; Kearns, C F

    2009-04-01

    The authors describe a novel 4-month clinical placement in neurosciences intensive care medicine (NICM) undertaken in the first specialty registrar (ST1) year of neurosurgical training as part of a clinical neurosciences themed training year. Neurosurgery is unique among British surgical specialties in having pioneered themed early years in run-through training to replace basic surgical training in general surgical specialties as part of Modernising Medical Careers. After describing events leading to the new neurosurgical training, the knowledge, skills and attitudes acquired in NICM are highlighted alongside discussion of logistic aspects and future directions from an inaugural experience.

  8. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Zehra; Bozkurt, M Fani; Erbas, Belkıs; Durak, Hatice

    2017-01-31

    Nuclear medicine applications in Turkey started in the early 1950s, grew as an independent medical discipline and finally were recognized by the Ministry of Health in 1973. Later on, the professional organization of nuclear medicine physicians and other related professionals including radiopharmacists and technologists under the Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine were established in 1975. Recently after completing more than a half century in Turkey, nuclear medicine has proved to be a strong and evolving medical field with more than 600 physicians serving for the changing needs of clinical practice throughout these years. This article describes past and present facts in this field and attempts to provide insights into the future which hopefully will be brighter than before.

  9. [Dynamic VRML for training in medicine].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziqun; Zhao, Jiaao

    2006-02-01

    Experimenting in medicine can be accomplished by virtual reality system. VRML is a tool to build virtual object and scenes which can realize static and animated applications in medicine. However, to creat a real environment, the demanded level of interactivity and dynamics is difficult to achieve. In this paper we describe some approaches and techniques which can realize dynamic 3D. Our demonstration is based on the implementation of a virtual baby model, whose character can be accomplished by external JAVA applications.

  10. Neuroscience of opiates for addiction medicine: From stress-responsive systems to behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Leri, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Opiate addiction, similarly to addiction to other psychoactive drugs, is chronic relapsing brain disease caused by drug-induced short-term and long-term neuroadaptations at the molecular, cellular, and behavioral levels. Preclinical research in laboratory animals has found important interactions between opiate exposure and stress-responsive systems. In this review, we will discuss the dysregulation of several stress-responsive systems in opiate addiction: vasopressin and its receptor system, endogenous opioid systems (including proopiomelanocortin/mu opioid receptor and dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor), orexin and its receptor system, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. A more complete understanding of how opiates alter these stress systems, through further laboratory-based studies, is required to identify novel and effective pharmacological targets for the long-term treatment of heroin addiction.

  11. Neuroscience of inhibition for addiction medicine: From prediction of initiation to prediction of relapse

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Scott J.; Bederson, Lucia; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2017-01-01

    A core deficit in drug addiction is the inability to inhibit maladaptive drug-seeking behavior. Consistent with this deficit, drug-addicted individuals show reliable cross-sectional differences from healthy non-addicted controls during tasks of response inhibition accompanied by brain activation abnormalities as revealed by functional neuroimaging. However, it is less clear whether inhibition-related deficits predate the transition to problematic use, and, in turn, whether these deficits predict the transition out of problematic substance use. Here, we review longitudinal studies of response inhibition in children/adolescents with little substance experience and longitudinal studies of already-addicted individuals attempting to sustain abstinence. Results show that response inhibition, and its underlying neural correlates, predict both substance use outcomes (onset and abstinence). Neurally, key roles were observed for multiple regions of the frontal cortex (e.g., inferior frontal gyrus, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex). In general, less activation of these regions during response inhibition predicted not only the onset of substance use, but interestingly, also better abstinence-related outcomes among individuals already addicted. The role of subcortical areas, although potentially important, is less clear because of inconsistent results and because these regions are less classically reported in studies of healthy response inhibition. Overall, this review indicates that response inhibition is not simply a manifestation of current drug addiction, but rather a core neurocognitive dimension that predicts key substance use outcomes. Early intervention in inhibitory deficits could have high clinical and public health relevance. PMID:26806776

  12. Firearm injury prevention training in Preventive Medicine Residency programs.

    PubMed

    Khubchandani, Jagdish; Price, James H; Dake, Joseph A

    2009-08-01

    Preventive medicine plays a central role in the reducing the number of deaths due to preventable causes of premature deaths. General Preventive Medicine Residency programs have not been studied in relation to training in this area. A three-wave mail survey was conducted with email and telephone follow-ups. The outcome measures were the portion of program directors involved in training residents on firearm injury prevention issues and their perceived benefits and barriers of training residents on firearm injury prevention issues. Only 25% of the programs provided formal training on firearm injury prevention. Program directors who provided formal training perceived significantly higher number of benefits to offering such training than did directors who did not provide such training but no significant difference was found between the two for number of perceived barriers. If preventive medicine residency graduates are to play a role in reducing premature morbidity and mortality from firearms it will require more residencies to offer formal training in this area. The Association for Prevention Teaching and Research needs to develop guidelines on specific curriculum topics regarding firearm injury prevention.

  13. Training requirements for chemists in radiotracer development for nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, R.; Fowler, J.

    1988-01-01

    This panel was organized to address the current and anticipated future shortage of chemists with advanced training to fill positions in the nuclear medicine field. Although hard data and statistics are difficult to acquire, we will attempt to highlight the impact of chemistry on nuclear medicine and to describe the growth of the field which has led to an increasing need for chemists resulting in the current manpower shortage. We also will make recommendations for attracting Ph.D. chemists to careers in nuclear medicine research and possible mechanisms for postgraduate training. Solving this problem and establishing a long term committment and mechanism for advanced training is critically important to meet the current needs of the profession and to assure future growth and innovation. 3 tabs.

  14. No Denying It: Medicinal Chemistry Training Is in Big Trouble.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Michael F

    2016-12-22

    There has been little consensus between the pharmaceutical industry and academic communities concerning the best approach to train medicinal chemists for drug discovery. For decades the pharmaceutical industry has shown preference for synthetic organic graduates over candidates with degrees from medicinal chemistry programs on the assumption that medicinal chemistry expertise will be acquired on the job. However, ongoing changes to pharmaceutical drug discovery organizations and practices threaten to undermine this training model. There is a compelling argument to be made for establishment of a strong industry-academic partnership to train new candidates with sophisticated knowledge of contemporary drug design concepts and techniques to ensure that the future needs of both industry and academic drug discovery research can be served.

  15. Differences between family and emergency medicine training before sports medicine fellowship.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Mark; Christensen, Heidi K

    2015-01-01

    Residency training clearly impacts physicians' approach toward fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine. Although the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education sets strict standards for all programs, family medicine and emergency medicine training differ a great deal in general and provide physicians from both backgrounds varied perspectives and skill sets. The family physician acquires a substantial amount of experience in continuity of care and integration of health care into a patient's everyday life. On the other hand, the emergency physician receives exceptional training in the management of acutely ill and injured patients and leadership of a large health care team. Furthermore, while the emergency physician may be skilled in procedures such as fracture reduction and diagnostic ultrasound, the family physician is proficient in developing patient rapport and compliance with a treatment plan. Although physicians from different backgrounds may start with many differences, fellowship training is essential in bridging those gaps.

  16. American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) National Practice Guideline for the Use of Medications in the Treatment of Addiction Involving Opioid Use

    PubMed Central

    Kampman, Kyle; Jarvis, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control have recently described opioid use and resultant deaths as an epidemic. At this point in time, treating this disease well with medication requires skill and time that are not generally available to primary care doctors in most practice models. Suboptimal treatment has likely contributed to expansion of the epidemic and concerns for unethical practices. At the same time, access to competent treatment is profoundly restricted because few physicians are willing and able to provide it. This “Practice Guideline” was developed to assist in the evaluation and treatment of opioid use disorder, and in the hope that, using this tool, more physicians will be able to provide effective treatment. Although there are existing guidelines for the treatment of opioid use disorder, none have included all of the medications used at present for its treatment. Moreover, few of the existing guidelines address the needs of special populations such as pregnant women, individuals with co-occurring psychiatric disorders, individuals with pain, adolescents, or individuals involved in the criminal justice system. This Practice Guideline was developed using the RAND Corporation (RAND)/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Method (RAM) – a process that combines scientific evidence and clinical knowledge to determine the appropriateness of a set of clinical procedures. The RAM is a deliberate approach encompassing review of existing guidelines, literature reviews, appropriateness ratings, necessity reviews, and document development. For this project, American Society of Addiction Medicine selected an independent committee to oversee guideline development and to assist in writing. American Society of Addiction Medicine's Quality Improvement Council oversaw the selection process for the independent development committee. Recommendations included in the guideline encompass a broad range of topics, starting with the initial evaluation of

  17. Family Orientation in Family Medicine Training

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Yves R.; Tannenbaum, David

    1990-01-01

    Teaching about the family has become an important part of the family medicine curriculum. The family orientation index, a 39-item questionnaire, was designed to evaluate the family orientation of services and care provided as well as the teaching and research. The questionnaire was distributed to 55 program directors at 16 Canadian universities. The response rate was 84%. The results indicate that the family orientation of services is less than optimal. PMID:21233938

  18. Development of an academic training program in insurance medicine.

    PubMed

    Donceel, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We outline the aims and content of an inter-university academic training program in insurance medicine in Flanders, Belgium. The program leads to the diploma of "Master of Insurance Medicine and Medico-legal Expertise." The program was re-organized in 2005-2006 and is accessible for physicians who want to practice social and/or private insurance medicine as their main medical profession or as an accessory activity. The aim of education is to prepare insurance physicians to provide high quality assessments, advice and decisions. The combined education in both social and private insurance medicine offers a broad perspective on the discipline and promotes collaboration within the specialty. The recent recognition of Insurance Medicine as a medical specialty in Belgium strengthens the position of insurance physicians as they collaborate with other medical specialists and with the management of insurance companies or the social security institute.

  19. Resistance training is medicine: effects of strength training on health.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Wayne L

    2012-01-01

    Inactive adults experience a 3% to 8% loss of muscle mass per decade, accompanied by resting metabolic rate reduction and fat accumulation. Ten weeks of resistance training may increase lean weight by 1.4 kg, increase resting metabolic rate by 7%, and reduce fat weight by 1.8 kg. Benefits of resistance training include improved physical performance, movement control, walking speed, functional independence, cognitive abilities, and self-esteem. Resistance training may assist prevention and management of type 2 diabetes by decreasing visceral fat, reducing HbA1c, increasing the density of glucose transporter type 4, and improving insulin sensitivity. Resistance training may enhance cardiovascular health, by reducing resting blood pressure, decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, and increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Resistance training may promote bone development, with studies showing 1% to 3% increase in bone mineral density. Resistance training may be effective for reducing low back pain and easing discomfort associated with arthritis and fibromyalgia and has been shown to reverse specific aging factors in skeletal muscle.

  20. Training experts in family medicine teaching.

    PubMed

    Švab, Igor; Allen, Justin; Žebiene, Egle; Petek Šter, Marija; Windak, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Family medicine teachers require specific educational skills. A framework for their professional development is essential for future development of the discipline in Europe. EURACT developed a framework on educational expertise, and subsequently applied it in a curriculum of teaching-skills courses of various levels. The aim of this article is to describe the development of the teaching framework, and of an international three-level course programme for 'teaching-the-teachers'. Furthermore, we describe our experiences and lessons learned, in particular with regard to the level-three programme for proficient teachers, which was new. We conclude that it is possible to develop a theoretical framework of family medicine teaching expertise and to apply it in an international high-level educational programme for future experts in family medicine education. Research evidence of the usefulness of this approach is needed, and the threats for its further development into a sustainable activity are its high teacher/student ratio associated with relatively high costs and difficulties in recruiting suitable participants.

  1. Herbal medicines for the management of opioid addiction: safe and effective alternatives to conventional pharmacotherapy?

    PubMed

    Ward, Jeanine; Rosenbaum, Christopher; Hernon, Christina; McCurdy, Christopher R; Boyer, Edward W

    2011-12-01

    Striking increases in the abuse of opioids have expanded the need for pharmacotherapeutic interventions. The obstacles that confront effective treatment of opioid addiction - shortage of treatment professionals, stigma associated with treatment and the ability to maintain abstinence - have led to increased interest in alternative treatment strategies among both treatment providers and patients alike. Herbal products for opioid addiction and withdrawal, such as kratom and specific Chinese herbal medications such as WeiniCom, can complement existing treatments. Unfortunately, herbal treatments, while offering some advantages over existing evidence-based pharmacotherapies, have poorly described pharmacokinetics, a lack of supportive data derived from well controlled clinical trials, and severe toxicity, the cause for which remains poorly defined. Herbal products, therefore, require greater additional testing in rigorous clinical trials before they can expect widespread acceptance in the management of opioid addiction.

  2. Foreign Trained Physicians and American Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Rosemary; Vermeulen, Joan

    The purpose of the study was to bring together available materials on the location, activity, and function of more than 63,000 foreign trained physicians in the United States; to review the political, economic, and organizational factors which have led to the current manpower situation; and to analyze these data in terms of physician manpower,…

  3. The Residency Training Experience in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery.

    PubMed

    Shofler, David; Chuang, Taijung; Argade, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The podiatric medicine and surgery residency is currently characterized by 3 years of comprehensive training. Contemporary issues have recently influenced the direction of training in the profession of podiatric medicine. Formal investigation into the residency training experience has, nonetheless, been limited. The purpose of the present study was to conduct a learning needs assessment of podiatric residency training. An electronic survey was developed, with comparable versions for program directors and residents. The specific topics investigated included the use of minimum activity volume numbers, learning resources, duty hours, strengths and weaknesses of residents, motivation of hosting student externship positions, noncognitive residency traits, meetings between residents and directors, resident satisfaction, and director satisfaction. A total of 197 program directors nationwide were sent the survey electronically, and 109 (53%) responded. Of 230 residents receiving the survey, 159 (78%) responded. Several statistically significant differences, and notable similarities, were observed between the 2 groups encompassing many aspects of the survey. A majority opinion, among both directors and residents, was found that the use of procedural assessment tools might improve resident evaluation. The responding directors and residents agreed that the following 3 topics were weaknesses in podiatric training: practice management, biomechanics, and performing podiatric research. Direct feedback immediately after surgery was the most valuable learning resource reported by the residents. The results of our study reflect the current status of the podiatric medicine and surgery residency and could facilitate improvement in the residency training experience.

  4. [Training in internal medicine and its specialties: universities' proposals].

    PubMed

    Norero, C

    1996-04-01

    Medical School graduates can enter a medicine subspecialty training program upon completion of a 3 year Internal Medicine residency. The Ministry of Health has contributed to postgraduate training by defining the type of physician the country needs, and by financial support of specially (Internal Medicine) training. Before 1995, when applicants began being charged a fee, finding for subspecialty training was provided exclusively by the universities. Currently, 450 training post are available for 550 graduates from all medical schools. Of these, 59 are in Internal Medicine and 58 in its subspecialties. A quantitative analysis of 40 years of training programs in Internal Medicine by the traditional medical schools shows that only the Catholic University of Chile Medical School privileges subspecially training whereas all other schools favor general Internal Medicine training. A high number of Internal Medicine trainees never take final examination. Nevertheless, training through practice, not necessarily in a university setting, accounts for 67% of Autonomous National Corporation for Certification of Medical Specialties. CONACEM accredited subspecialists. About 63% of those who finish an Internal Medicine training program decide to go into subspecialization. It is felt that subspecialization involves technical as well as non-professional aspects, such as a philosophical stance towards the search for truth through research and creativity. An integral education in a subspecialty can only be given by the university. Non-university centers, however, can contribute to subspecialization by allowing trainees to gain access to newer technology or to larger numbers of patients. A critical question is how many subspecialists should exist in relation to the number of generalists and according to the country's health requirements. In my personal view, the proportion of subspecialists is excessive. The decision to subspecialize should not be exclusively a personal choice, but

  5. Family medicine residency training and burnout: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Kimberly; Oda, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Background Almost three-quarters of family practice residents in British Columbia (BC) meet criteria for burnout. We sought to understand how burnout is perceived and experienced by family medicine residents, and to identify both contributory and protective factors for resident burnout. Method Two semi-structured focus groups were conducted with ten family practice residents from five distinct University of British Columbia training sites. Participants completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The data were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Seventy percent of the focus group participants met criteria for burnout using the MBI. The experience of burnout was described as physical and emotional exhaustion, loss of motivation, isolation from loved ones, and disillusionment with the medical profession. Contributory factors included high workload, burned-out colleagues, perceived undervaluing of family medicine, lack of autonomy, and inability to achieve work-life balance. Protective factors included strong role models in medicine, feeling that one’s work is valued and rotations in family medicine. Conclusions The high level of burnout in family medicine residents in BC is a multifactorial and complex phenomenon. Training programs and faculty should be aware of burnout risk factors and strive to implement changes to reduce burnout, including allowing residents increased control over scheduling, access to counseling services and training for resident mentors. PMID:26451218

  6. Leadership training in a family medicine residency program

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Erin; Moore, Ainsley; Schabort, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the current status of leadership training as perceived by family medicine residents to inform the development of a formal leadership curriculum. Design Cross-sectional quantitative survey. Setting Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, in December 2013. Participants A total of 152 first- and second-year family medicine residents. Main outcome measures Family medicine residents’ attitudes toward leadership, perceived level of training in various leadership domains, and identified opportunities for leadership training. Results Overall, 80% (152 of 190) of residents completed the survey. On a Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 4 = neutral, 7 = strongly agree), residents rated the importance of physician leadership in the clinical setting as high (6.23 of 7), whereas agreement with the statement “I am a leader” received the lowest rating (5.28 of 7). At least 50% of residents desired more training in the leadership domains of personal mastery, mentorship and coaching, conflict resolution, teaching, effective teamwork, administration, ideals of a healthy workplace, coalitions, and system transformation. At least 50% of residents identified behavioural sciences seminars, a lecture and workshop series, and a retreat as opportunities to expand leadership training. Conclusion The concept of family physicians as leaders resonated highly with residents. Residents desired more personal and system-level leadership training. They also identified ways that leadership training could be expanded in the current curriculum and developed in other areas. The information gained from this survey might facilitate leadership development among residents through application of its results in a formal leadership curriculum. PMID:28292816

  7. Effect of location on family medicine residents' training.

    PubMed Central

    Lebel, D.; Hogg, W.

    1993-01-01

    A survey of family medicine residents trained at community-based or hospital-based centres suggested differences in experience and in career plans. Community-based residents saw more patients in the same family, believed they knew the community better, made more housecalls, expected to use allied health professionals more frequently, and were more likely to choose a small community practice. PMID:8499787

  8. A Novel Approach to Medicine Training for Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onate, John; Hales, Robert; McCarron, Robert; Han, Jaesu; Pitman, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A unique rotation was developed to address limited outpatient internal medicine training in psychiatric residency by the University of California, Davis, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, which provides medical care to patients with mental illness. Methods: The number of patients seen by the service and the number of…

  9. Reinforcement principles for addiction medicine; from recreational drug use to psychiatric disorder.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The transition from recreational drug use to addiction can be conceptualized as a pathological timeline whereby the psychological mechanisms responsible for disordered drug use evolve from positive reinforcement to favor elements of negative reinforcement. Abused substances (ranging from alcohol to psychostimulants) are initially ingested at regular occasions according to their positive reinforcing properties. Importantly, repeated exposure to rewarding substances sets off a chain of secondary reinforcing events, whereby cues and contexts associated with drug use may themselves become reinforcing and thereby contribute to the continued use and possible abuse of the substance(s) of choice. Indeed, the powerful reinforcing efficacy of certain drugs may eclipse that of competing social rewards (such as career and family) and lead to an aberrant narrowing of behavioral repertoire. In certain vulnerable individuals, escalation of drug use over time is thought to drive specific molecular neuroadaptations that foster the development of addiction. Research has identified neurobiological elements of altered reinforcement following excessive drug use that comprise within-circuit and between-circuit neuroadaptations, both of which contribute to addiction. Central to this process is the eventual potentiation of negative reinforcement mechanisms that may represent the final definitive criterion locking vulnerable individuals into a persistent state of addiction. Targeting the neural substrates of reinforcement likely represents our best chances for therapeutic intervention for this devastating disease.

  10. Adolescent psychotherapy for addiction medicine: From brain development to neurocognitive treatment mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Rachel E; Feldstein Ewing, Sarah W

    2016-01-01

    Effectively treating addiction is a challenge among any population, and treatment for adolescents may be particularly challenging in the context of ongoing neurodevelopment, which may alter the brain's initial response to substances as well as its response to treatment. One way to improve treatment outcomes for youth is to use a translational perspective that explicitly connects cognitive and neurodevelopmental fields with the field of behavioral therapies. This integrative approach is a potential first step to inform the correspondence between the neurocognitive and behavioral fields in youth addiction. This chapter seeks to provide context for neurocognitive treatment studies by first discussing recent structural and functional neuroimaging studies showing associations with substance use or behavioral addictions. Several regions of interest are then proposed that appear to also be associated with addiction treatment across multiple studies, namely, the accumbens/striatum, precuneus, insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. This research suggests that reward, self-reflective, and executive control areas might be especially relevant in youth behavioral treatment response, and preliminary evidence suggests that existing treatments may encourage neurocognitive changes in these areas.

  11. Human Factors in Training - Space Medicine Proficiency Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Erin; Arsintescu, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The early Constellation space missions are expected to have medical capabilities very similar to those currently on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS). For Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) missions to ISS, medical equipment will be located on ISS, and carried into CEV in the event of an emergency. Flight Surgeons (FS) on the ground in Mission Control will be expected to direct the Crew Medical Officer (CMO) during medical situations. If there is a loss of signal and the crew is unable to communicate with the ground, a CMO would be expected to carry out medical procedures without the aid of a FS. In these situations, performance support tools can be used to reduce errors and time to perform emergency medical tasks. Work on medical training has been conducted in collaboration with the Medical Training Group at the Space Life Sciences Directorate and with Wyle Lab which provides medical training to crew members, Biomedical Engineers (BMEs), and to flight surgeons under the JSC Space Life Sciences Directorate s Bioastronautics contract. The space medical training work is part of the Human Factors in Training Directed Research Project (DRP) of the Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE) Project under the Space Human Factors and Habitability (SHFH) Element of the Human Research Program (HRP). Human factors researchers at Johnson Space Center have recently investigated medical performance support tools for CMOs on-orbit, and FSs on the ground, and researchers at the Ames Research Center performed a literature review on medical errors. The work proposed for FY10 continues to build on this strong collaboration with the Space Medical Training Group and previous research. This abstract focuses on two areas of work involving Performance Support Tools for Space Medical Operations. One area of research building on activities from FY08, involved the feasibility of just-in-time (JIT) training techniques and concepts for real-time medical procedures. In Phase 1

  12. [Coaching development: specialist training in Intellectual Disability Medicine].

    PubMed

    Ewals, Frans

    2014-01-01

    In the Netherlands the specialization Intellectual Disability Medicine started in 2000. The main reasons for its existence are the unmet health needs of people with intellectual disability. The discipline has developed rapidly, from general practitioner-plus to a specialist in comorbidity next to the general practitioner. The specialization takes 3 years. Training hospitals can be found all over the Netherlands. The trainees follow the weekly educational activities at the national training institute that is linked to the Erasmus Medical Centre in Rotterdam. Given the great diversity of health questions that specialists in intellectual disability medicine (Dutch acronym: AVGs) have to deal with in their training, aside from clinical issues, a lot of attention is devoted to such topics as how to work methodically, medical-ethical questions and network development. About 220 AVGs are currently registered.

  13. Interdisciplinary training to build an informatics workforce for precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Marc S.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Payne, Philip R.O.

    2015-01-01

    The proposed Precision Medicine Initiative has the potential to transform medical care in the future through a shift from interventions based on evidence from population studies and empiric response to ones that account for a range of individual factors that more reliably predict response and outcomes for the patient. Many things are needed to realize this vision, but one of the most critical is an informatics workforce that has broad interdisciplinary training in basic science, applied research and clinical implementation. Current approaches to informatics training do not support this requirement. We present a collaborative model of training that has the potential to produce a workforce prepared for the challenges of implementing precision medicine. PMID:27054076

  14. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment: overview of and student satisfaction with an undergraduate addiction training program for nurses.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Ann M; Puskar, Kathryn; Hagle, Holly; Gotham, Heather J; Talcott, Kimberly S; Terhorst, Lauren; Fioravanti, Marie; Kane, Irene; Hulsey, Eric; Luongo, Peter; Burns, Helen K

    2013-10-01

    Preparing nursing students to apply an evidence-based screening and brief intervention approach with patients has the potential to reduce patients' risky alcohol and drug use. Responding to Mollica, Hyman, and Mann's article published in 2011, the current article describes implementation results of an Addiction Training for Nurses program of Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) embedded within an undergraduate nursing curriculum. Results reveal that students in other schools of nursing would benefit from similar, significant training on substance use disorders and SBIRT. Training satisfaction surveys (N = 488) indicate students were satisfied with the quality of the training experience. More than 90% of students strongly agreed or agreed that the training was relevant to their nursing careers and would help their patients. Additional clinical practice and skill development may increase students' reported effectiveness in working with the topic area of substance use and SBIRT.

  15. A dual-systems perspective on addiction: contributions from neuroimaging and cognitive training

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Samuel M.; Bickel, Warren K.

    2014-01-01

    Dual-systems theories explain lapses in self-control in terms of a conflict between automatic and deliberative modes of behavioral control. Numerous studies have now tested whether the brain areas that control behavior are organized in a manner consistent with dual-systems models. Brain regions directly associated with the mesolimbic dopamine system, the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in particular, capture some of the features assumed by automatic processing. Regions in the lateral prefrontal cortex (lPFC) are more closely linked to deliberative processing and the exertion of self-control in the suppression of impulses. While identifying these regions crudely supports dual-system theories, important modifications to what constitutes automatic and deliberative behavioral control are also suggested. Experiments have identified various means by which automatic processes may be sculpted. Additional work decomposes deliberative processes into component functions such as generalized working memory, reappraisal of emotional stimuli, and prospection. The importance of deconstructing dual-systems models into specific cognitive processes is clear for understanding and treating addiction. We discuss intervention possibilities suggested by recent research, and focus in particular on cognitive training approaches to bolster deliberative control processes that may aid quit attempts. PMID:25336389

  16. A dual-systems perspective on addiction: contributions from neuroimaging and cognitive training.

    PubMed

    McClure, Samuel M; Bickel, Warren K

    2014-10-01

    Dual-systems theories explain lapses in self-control in terms of a conflict between automatic and deliberative modes of behavioral control. Numerous studies have now tested whether the brain areas that control behavior are organized in a manner consistent with dual-systems models. Brain regions directly associated with the mesolimbic dopamine system, the nucleus accumbens and ventromedial prefrontal cortex in particular, capture some of the features assumed by automatic processing. Regions in the lateral prefrontal cortex are more closely linked to deliberative processing and the exertion of self-control in the suppression of impulses. While identifying these regions crudely supports dual-systems theories, important modifications to what constitutes automatic and deliberative behavioral control are also suggested. Experiments have identified various means by which automatic processes may be sculpted. Additional work decomposes deliberative processes into component functions such as generalized working memory, reappraisal of emotional stimuli, and prospection. The importance of deconstructing dual-systems models into specific cognitive processes is clear for understanding and treating addiction. We discuss intervention possibilities suggested by recent research, and focus in particular on cognitive training approaches to bolster deliberative control processes that may aid quit attempts.

  17. The process addictions and the new ASAM definition of addiction.

    PubMed

    Smith, David E

    2012-01-01

    Addiction is a primary, chronic disease involving brain reward, motivation, memory and related circuitry; it can lead to relapse, progressive development, and the potential for fatality if not treated. While pathological use of alcohol and, more recently, psychoactive substances have been accepted as addictive diseases, developing brain science has set the stage for inclusion of the process addictions, including food, sex, shopping and gambling problems, in a broader definition of addiction as set forth by the American Society of Addiction Medicine in 2011.

  18. American Board of Emergency Medicine report on residency training information (2014-2015).

    PubMed

    Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Marco, Catherine A; Baren, Jill M; Beeson, Michael S; Carius, Michael L; Counselman, Francis L; Heller, Barry N; Kowalenko, Terry; Muelleman, Robert L; Nelson, Lewis S; Wahl, Robert P; Korte, Robert C; Joldersma, Kevin B

    2015-05-01

    The American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) gathers extensive background information on emergency medicine residency programs and the residents in those programs. We present the 2015 annual report on the status of US emergency medicine training programs.

  19. A Learning-Curve Approach to the Self-Assessment of Internal Medicine Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Susan C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    In response to the perceived need for primary care physicians, two major changes in internal medicine training have occurred: (1) a third year of general training was required for internal medicine board certification and (2) many hospitals developed primary care internal medicine residencies with an increased emphasis on ambulatory training.…

  20. Personalized Cancer Genetics Training for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Blazer, Kathleen R.; MacDonald, Deborah J.; Culver, Julie O.; Huizenga, Carin R.; Morgan, Robert J.; Uman, Gwen C.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess the impact of a multi-modal interdisciplinary course in genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) and research collaboration for community-based clinicians. Clinicians are increasingly requested to conduct GCRA, but many are inadequately prepared to provide these services. Methods A prospective analysis of 131 participants (48 physicians, 41 advanced-practice nurses and 42 genetic counselors) from community settings across the U.S. The course was delivered in three phases: distance didactic learning, face-to-face training and 12 months of Web-based professional development activities to support integration of skills into practice. Cancer genetics knowledge, skills, professional self-efficacy and practice changes were measured at baseline, immediate- and 14-months-post course. Results Knowledge, skills and self-efficacy scores were significantly different between practice disciplines; however, post scores increased significantly overall and for each discipline (p<.001). Fourteen-month practice outcomes reflect significant increases in provision of GCRA services (p=.018), dissemination of cancer prevention information (p=.005) and high-risk screening recommendations (p=.004) to patients, patient enrollment in research (p=.013), and educational outreach about GCRA (p=.003). Conclusions Results support the efficacy of the multi-modal course as a tool to develop a genetically literate workforce. Sustained alumni participation in Web-based professional development activities has evolved into a distance-mediated Community of Practice in clinical cancer genetics, modeling the lifelong learning goals envisioned by leading CME stakeholders. PMID:21629123

  1. Training in intensive care medicine. A challenge within reach.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Ortega, A; Rothen, H U; Franco, N; Rayo, L A; Martín-Loeches, I; Ramírez, P; Cuñat de la Hoz, J

    2014-01-01

    The medical training model is currently immersed in a process of change. The new paradigm is intended to be more effective, more integrated within the healthcare system, and strongly oriented towards the direct application of knowledge to clinical practice. Compared with the established training system based on certification of the completion of a series or rotations and stays in certain healthcare units, the new model proposes a more structured training process based on the gradual acquisition of specific competences, in which residents must play an active role in designing their own training program. Training based on competences guarantees more transparent, updated and homogeneous learning of objective quality, and which can be homologated internationally. The tutors play a key role as the main directors of the process, and institutional commitment to their work is crucial. In this context, tutors should receive time and specific formation to allow the evaluation of training as the cornerstone of the new model. New forms of objective summative and training evaluation should be introduced to guarantee that the predefined competences and skills are effectively acquired. The free movement of specialists within Europe is very desirable and implies that training quality must be high and amenable to homologation among the different countries. The Competency Based training in Intensive Care Medicine in Europe program is our main reference for achieving this goal. Scientific societies in turn must impulse and facilitate all those initiatives destined to improve healthcare quality and therefore specialist training. They have the mission of designing strategies and processes that favor training, accreditation and advisory activities with the government authorities.

  2. Psychiatry Training in Canadian Family Medicine Residency Programs

    PubMed Central

    Kates, Nick; Toews, John; Leichner, Pierre

    1985-01-01

    Family physicians may spend up to 50% of their time diagnosing and managing mental disorders and emotional problems, but this is not always reflected in the training they receive. This study of the teaching of psychiatry in the 16 family medicine residency programs in Canada showed that although the majority of program directors are reasonably satisfied with the current training, they see room for improvement—particularly in finding psychiatrists with a better understanding of family practice, in integrating the teaching to a greater degree with clinical work, thereby increasing its relevance, and in utilizing more suitable clinical settings. PMID:21279156

  3. Core content for training in venous and lymphatic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Min, Robert J; Comerota, Anthony J; Meissner, Mark H; Carman, Teresa L; Rathbun, Suman W; Jaff, Michael R; Wakefield, Thomas W; Feied, Craig F

    2014-01-01

    The major venous societies in the United States share a common mission to improve the standards of medical practitioners, the educational goals for teaching and training programs in venous disease, and the quality of patient care related to the treatment of venous disorders. With these important goals in mind, a task force made up of experts from the specialties of dermatology, interventional radiology, phlebology, vascular medicine, and vascular surgery was formed to develop a consensus document describing the Core Content for venous and lymphatic medicine and to develop a core educational content outline for training. This outline describes the areas of knowledge considered essential for practice in the field, which encompasses the study, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with acute and chronic venous and lymphatic disorders. The American Venous Forum and the American College of Phlebology have endorsed the Core Content. PMID:25059735

  4. Geritalk: communication skills training for geriatric and palliative medicine fellows.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Amy S; Back, Anthony L; Arnold, Robert M; Goldberg, Gabrielle R; Lim, Betty B; Litrivis, Evgenia; Smith, Cardinale B; O'Neill, Lynn B

    2012-02-01

    Expert communication is essential to high-quality care for older patients with serious illness. Although the importance of communication skills is widely recognized, formal curricula for teaching communication skills to geriatric and palliative medicine fellows is often inadequate or unavailable. The current study drew upon the educational principles and format of an evidence-based, interactive teaching method to develop an intensive communication skills training course designed specifically to address the common communication challenges that geriatric and palliative medicine fellows face. The 2-day retreat, held away from the hospital environment, included large-group overview presentations, small-group communication skills practice, and development of future skills practice commitment. Faculty received in-depth training in small-group facilitation techniques before the course. Geriatric and palliative medicine fellows were recruited to participate in the course and 100% (n = 18) enrolled. Overall satisfaction with the course was very high (mean 4.8 on a 5-point scale). After the course, fellows reported an increase in self-assessed preparedness for specific communication challenges (mean increase 1.4 on 5-point scale, P < .001). Two months after the course, fellows reported a high level of sustained skills practice (mean 4.3 on 5-point scale). In sum, the intensive communication skills program, customized for the specific needs of geriatric and palliative medicine fellows, improved fellows' self-assessed preparedness for challenging communication tasks and provided a model for ongoing deliberate practice of communication skills.

  5. Mindfulness training targets neurocognitive mechanisms of addiction at the attention-appraisal-emotion interface.

    PubMed

    Garland, Eric L; Froeliger, Brett; Howard, Matthew O

    2014-01-10

    Prominent neuroscience models suggest that addictive behavior occurs when environmental stressors and drug-relevant cues activate a cycle of cognitive, affective, and psychophysiological mechanisms, including dysregulated interactions between bottom-up and top-down neural processes, that compel the user to seek out and use drugs. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) target pathogenic mechanisms of the risk chain linking stress and addiction. This review describes how MBIs may target neurocognitive mechanisms of addiction at the attention-appraisal-emotion interface. Empirical evidence is presented suggesting that MBIs ameliorate addiction by enhancing cognitive regulation of a number of key processes, including: clarifying cognitive appraisal and modulating negative emotions to reduce perseverative cognition and emotional arousal; enhancing metacognitive awareness to regulate drug-use action schema and decrease addiction attentional bias; promoting extinction learning to uncouple drug-use triggers from conditioned appetitive responses; reducing cue-reactivity and increasing cognitive control over craving; attenuating physiological stress reactivity through parasympathetic activation; and increasing savoring to restore natural reward processing. Treatment and research implications of our neurocognitive framework are presented. We conclude by offering a temporally sequenced description of neurocognitive processes targeted by MBIs through a hypothetical case study. Our neurocognitive framework has implications for the optimization of addiction treatment with MBIs.

  6. Mindfulness Training Targets Neurocognitive Mechanisms of Addiction at the Attention-Appraisal-Emotion Interface

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Eric L.; Froeliger, Brett; Howard, Matthew O.

    2014-01-01

    Prominent neuroscience models suggest that addictive behavior occurs when environmental stressors and drug-relevant cues activate a cycle of cognitive, affective, and psychophysiological mechanisms, including dysregulated interactions between bottom-up and top-down neural processes, that compel the user to seek out and use drugs. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) target pathogenic mechanisms of the risk chain linking stress and addiction. This review describes how MBIs may target neurocognitive mechanisms of addiction at the attention-appraisal-emotion interface. Empirical evidence is presented suggesting that MBIs ameliorate addiction by enhancing cognitive regulation of a number of key processes, including: clarifying cognitive appraisal and modulating negative emotions to reduce perseverative cognition and emotional arousal; enhancing metacognitive awareness to regulate drug-use action schema and decrease addiction attentional bias; promoting extinction learning to uncouple drug-use triggers from conditioned appetitive responses; reducing cue-reactivity and increasing cognitive control over craving; attenuating physiological stress reactivity through parasympathetic activation; and increasing savoring to restore natural reward processing. Treatment and research implications of our neurocognitive framework are presented. We conclude by offering a temporally sequenced description of neurocognitive processes targeted by MBIs through a hypothetical case study. Our neurocognitive framework has implications for the optimization of addiction treatment with MBIs. PMID:24454293

  7. Training family medicine residents to care for children

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Pauline; Curran, Vernon; Hollett, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed There is a lack of consensus around the optimal way to train family medicine residents to care for children. Objective of program Evaluation of an ambulatory versus an inpatient pediatrics rotation for family medicine residents. Program description A 4-week pediatrics rotation for second-year family medicine residents was introduced involving half-day ambulatory pediatric clinics. A nonequivalent control group evaluation study design was followed. Patient logbook entries, as well as residents’ satisfaction, knowledge, and self-reported confidence outcomes were compared between family medicine residents completing the new ambulatory rotation and those completing a traditional inpatient-ambulatory pediatrics rotation. Conclusion An ambulatory rotation in pediatrics is a feasible option for facilitating family medicine resident learning in child health care. Residents report exposure to more patient cases that reflect a family practice office setting and the same level of knowledge and confidence as residents completing an inpatient-ambulatory rotation. Intraprofessional collaboration, flexibility in scheduling, and the support of pediatric preceptors are key factors in the organization and implementation of an ambulatory rotation. PMID:21321160

  8. ‘I can't be an addict. I am.’ Over-the-counter medicine abuse: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Over-the-counter (OTC) pharmacy medicines are considered relatively safe in contrast to prescribed and illicit substances, but their abuse and addiction potential is increasingly recognised. Those affected represent a hard to reach group, with little known about their experiences. Study objectives were to describe the experiences and views of those self-reporting OTC medicine abuse, and why medicines were taken, how they were obtained and associated treatment and support sought. Design Qualitative study using in-depth mainly telephone interviews. Participants A purposive sample of 25 adults, aged 20–60s, 13 women. Setting UK, via two internet support groups. Results Individuals considered themselves ‘addicted’, but socially and economically active and different from illicit substance misusers. They blamed themselves for losing control over their medicine use, which usually began for genuine medical reasons and not experimentation and was often linked to the cessation of, or ongoing, medical prescribing. Codeine, in compound analgesics, was the main medicine implicated with three distinct dose ranges emerging with decongestant and sedative antihistamine abuse also being reported. Subsequent use was for the ‘buzz’ or similar effects of the opiate, which was obtained unproblematically by having lists of pharmacies to visit and occasionally using internet suppliers. Perceived withdrawal symptoms were described for all three dose ranges, and work and health problems were reported with higher doses. Mixed views about different treatment and support options emerged with standard drug treatment services being considered inappropriate for OTC medicines and concerns that this ‘hidden addiction’ was recorded in medical notes. Most supported the continued availability of OTC medicines with appropriate addiction warnings. Conclusions Greater awareness of the addiction potential of OTC medicines is needed for the public, pharmacists and medical

  9. Training Standards Statements of Family Medicine Postgraduate Training – A Review of Existing Documents Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Sarah; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Marquard, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction For the effective and safe management of complex care needs for patients in community settings, high quality family medicine (FM) training programmes are needed. In less primary care oriented countries, training standards statements for FM postgraduate training are less commonly found. The aim of this study was to review international training standards statements in FM postgraduate training and to catalogue these statements to be used as a best practice standard guide for FM training programs in Germany. Materials and Methods A structured three-tiered search was performed: a systematic literature search in MEDLINE®; a search of international indicator databases; and a search in grey literature, consisting of a survey of international experts and a search in “Google (Scholar)”. From all identified documents, training standards statements were extracted, translated and summarized into categories referring to the same quality aspect. Results The search strategy revealed 25 relevant documents (MEDLINE® n = 15, databases n = 2, experts n = 7, “Google” n = 1), containing 337 training standards statements. These were summarized into 80 statements. They covered structure quality (n = 35); process quality (n = 43); and two training standards statements referred to outcome quality (n = 2). Conclusion A broad range of internationally sourced training standards statements for FM postgraduate training could be identified from countries with well-established primary care systems. Only few statements internationally referred to outcome quality, expressing the difficulty in assessing outcome. The resulting inventory of training standards statements for FM postgraduate training can serve as a resource for institutions seeking to formalise and systematise FM training at regional or national levels. PMID:27459714

  10. General medicine advanced training: lessons from the John Hunter training programme.

    PubMed

    Jackel, D; Attia, J; Pickles, R

    2014-03-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid growth in the number of advanced trainees pursuing general medicine as a specialty. This reflects an awareness of the need for broader training experiences to equip future consultant physicians with the skills to manage the healthcare challenges arising from the demographic trends of ageing and increasing comorbidity. The John Hunter Hospital training programme in general medicine has several characteristics that have led to the success in producing general physicians prepared for these challenges. These include support from a core group of committed general physicians, an appropriate and sustainable funding model, flexibility with a focus on genuine training and developing awareness of a systems approach, and strong links with rural practice.

  11. Correlation of United States Medical Licensing Examination and Internal Medicine In-Training Examination Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Jose A., Jr.; Greer, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    The Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (ITE) is administered during residency training in the United States as a self-assessment and program assessment tool. Performance on this exam correlates with outcome on the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying examination. Internal Medicine Program Directors use the United States Medical…

  12. 76 FR 64952 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care, Medicine and Dentistry . Dates and Times: November 7, 2011, 8:30 a.m.... Purpose: The Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (``Advisory...

  13. ["Cold turkey" detoxification of drug, narcotic and chemical addicts conducted at the Occupational Diseases and Toxicology Ward of the Polish Center of Occupational Medicine in Poznan in 1986-1996].

    PubMed

    Mańkowski, W; Sikorski, M

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we have discussed the method of the "pure" detoxification (without the use of any psychotropics) of patients addicted to drugs, narcotics and chemicals treated at the Occupational Diseases & Toxicology Ward of the WCMP in Poznań. The material includes 152 cases of addicted patients who were treated in the Ward in the period from 1986 till 1996. Our research proved that the applied method is safe for the patients. We also found that addicts sharing hospital room with general medicine, not addicted patients, experience a positive effects in the process of treatment and resocialization.

  14. Neuroscience of nicotine for addiction medicine: novel targets for smoking cessation medications.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Manoranjan S

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality associated with tobacco smoking constitutes a significant burden on healthcare budgets all over the world. Therefore, promoting smoking cessation is an important goal of health professionals and policy makers throughout the world. Nicotine is a major psychoactive component in tobacco that is largely responsible for the widespread addiction to tobacco. A majority of the currently available FDA-approved smoking cessation medications act via neuronal nicotinic receptors. These medications are effective in approximately half of all the smokers, who want to quit and relapse among abstinent smokers continues to be high. In addition to relapse among abstinent smokers, unpleasant effects associated with nicotine withdrawal are a major motivational factor in continued tobacco smoking. Over the last two decades, animal studies have helped in identifying several neural substrates that are involved in nicotine-dependent behaviors including those associated with nicotine withdrawal and relapse to tobacco smoking. In this review, first the role of specific brain regions/circuits that are involved in nicotine dependence will be discussed. Next, the review will describe the role of specific nicotinic receptor subunits in nicotine dependence. Finally, the review will discuss the role of classical neurotransmitters (dopamine, serotonin, noradrenaline, glutamate, and γ-aminobutyric acid) as well as endogenous opioid and endocannabinoid signaling in nicotine dependence. The nicotinic and nonnicotinic neural substrates involved in nicotine-dependent behaviors can serve as possible targets for future smoking cessation medications.

  15. 78 FR 26053 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a) (2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Dates and Times: May 20, 2013...

  16. Trends and different educational pathways for training physicians in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A; Smith, Gary T; Baker, Stephen R

    2008-12-01

    The introduction of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (CT), single photon-emission CT/CT, and software packages for multimodality imaging has accelerated the need for nuclear medicine physicians to obtain more training in cross-sectional imaging, especially in CT. In recent years, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, the American Board of Radiology, and the American Board of Nuclear Medicine have promulgated new rules and regulations. In addition, the Society of Nuclear Medicine, the American College of Radiology, and the American College of Cardiology Foundation have crafted new guidelines and training requirements. All these changes have consequences for the education of physicians in nuclear medicine. Self-referral and concerns about radiation exposure from nuclear medicine examinations and CT are also affecting the education of physicians practicing nuclear medicine. The authors examine the impact of these developments on training and certification in nuclear medicine and suggest another pathway to train some nuclear medicine physicians.

  17. Ambulatory care training during core internal medicine residency training: the Canadian experience.

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, P J; Meagher, T W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the status of ambulatory care training of core internal medicine residents in Canada. DESIGN: Mail survey. PARTICIPANTS: All 16 program directors of internal medicine residency training programs in Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: The nature and amount of ambulatory care training experienced by residents, information about the faculty tutors, and the sources and types of patients seen by the residents. As well, the program directors were asked for their opinions on the ideal ambulatory care program and the kinds of teaching skills required of tutors. RESULTS: All of the directors responded. Fifteen stated that the ambulatory care program is mandatory, and the other stated that it is an elective. Block rotations are more common than continuity-of-care assignments. In 12 of the programs 10% or less of the overall training time is spent in ambulatory care. In 11 the faculty tutors comprise a mixture of generalists and subspecialists. The tutors simultaneously care for patients and teach residents in the ambulatory care setting in 14 of the schools. Most are paid through fee-for-service billing. The respondents felt that the ideal program should contain a mix of general and subspecialty ambulatory care training. There was no consensus on whether it should be a block or continuity-of-care experience, but the directors felt that consultation and communication skills should be emphasized regardless of which type of experience prevails. CONCLUSIONS: Although there is a widespread commitment to provide core internal medicine residents with experience in ambulatory care, there is little uniformity in how this is achieved in Canadian training programs. PMID:8324688

  18. [Tropical medicine/tropical dermatology training in Tanzania and Ghana: Personal experience and selected case reports].

    PubMed

    Völker, K

    2015-05-01

    As a consultant for dermatology with special interested in tropical diseases, I accepted my employers offer (German Armed Forces) to start my training in tropical medicine and tropical dermatology in Africa. The dermatological part of the training was completed at the Regional Dermatology Training Centre (RDTC) in Moshi, Tanzania. This was followed by tropical medicine training at the Presbyterian Hospital in Agogo, Ghana. In this article, I report on my experiences in Africa and present selected case reports.

  19. Training Opioid Addiction Treatment Providers to Adopt Contingency Management: A Prospective Pilot Trial of a Comprehensive Implementation Science Approach

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Sara J.; Squires, Daniel D.; Strong, David R.; Barnett, Nancy P.; Monti, Peter M.; Petry, Nancy M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Few prospective studies have evaluated theory-driven approaches to the implementation of evidence-based opioid treatment. This study compared the effectiveness of an implementation model (Science to Service Laboratory; SSL) to training as usual (TAU) in promoting the adoption of contingency management across a multi-site opiate addiction treatment program. We also examined whether the SSL affected putative mediators of contingency management adoption (perceived innovation characteristics and organizational readiness to change). Methods Sixty treatment providers (39 SSL, 21 TAU) from 15 geographically diverse satellite clinics (7 SSL, 8 TAU) participated in the 12-month study. Both conditions received didactic contingency management training and those in the pre-determined experimental region received 9 months of SSL-enhanced training. Contingency management adoption was monitored biweekly, while putative mediators were measured at baseline, 3-, and 12-months. Results Relative to providers in the TAU region, treatment providers in the SSL region had comparable likelihood of contingency management adoption in the first 20 weeks of the study, and then significantly higher likelihood of adoption (odds ratios = 2.4-13.5) for the remainder of the study. SSL providers also reported higher levels of one perceived innovation characteristic (Observability) and one aspect of organizational readiness to change (Adequacy of Training Resources), although there was no evidence that the SSL affected these putative mediators over time. Conclusions Results of this study indicate that a fully powered randomized trial of the SSL is warranted. Considerations for a future evaluation are discussed. PMID:26682582

  20. Training and education to increase the effectiveness of technology introduction in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, Albert H.

    1994-12-01

    Training and education can increase the effectiveness with which new technology can be introduced in medicine. However, the use of technology in the education and training itself can be the vehicle for that increased effectiveness. The most effective way that education and training can be improved by technology is through the use of simulation. Examples are given from, first, the historical perspective in aircrew and spacecrew flight training; an anesthesiology training simulator; and a laparoscopic surgery training simulator.

  1. Methadone-related opioid agonist pharmacotherapy for heroin addiction. History, recent molecular and neurochemical research and future in mainstream medicine.

    PubMed

    Kreek, M J

    2000-01-01

    In 1963, Professor Vincent P. Dole at the Rockefeller University formed a small team to develop a pharmacotherapy for the management of heroin addiction. They hypothesized that heroin addiction is a disease of the brain with behavioral manifestations, and not merely a personality disorder or criminal behavior and began to address the specific question of whether a long-acting opioid agonist could be used in the long-term maintenance treatment of heroin addiction. Over the next 35 years, many studies documented the safety, efficacy and effectiveness of methadone pharmacotherapy for heroin addiction, but Federal regulations and stigmatization of heroin addiction prevented implementation of treatment. Finally, in 1999, NIH published a report unequivocally supporting methadone maintenance pharmacotherapy for heroin addiction. Two other effective opioid agonist treatments have been developed: the even longer acting opioid agonist l-alpha-acetylmethadol (LAAM) has been approved for pharmacotherapy for heroin addiction, and still under study is the opioid partial agonist-antagonist buprenorphine-naloxone combination. A variety of studies, both laboratory based and clinical, have revealed the mechanisms of action of long-acting opioid agonists in treatment, including prevention of disruption of molecular, cellular and physiologic events and, in fact, allowing normalization of those functions disrupted by chronic heroin use. Recent molecular biological studies have revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms of the human mu opioid receptor gene; the mu opioid receptor is the site of action of heroin, the major opiate drug of abuse, analgesic agents such as morphine, and the major treatment agents for heroin addiction. These findings support the early hypotheses of our laboratory that addiction may be due to a combination of genetic, drug-induced and environmental (including behavioral) factors and also, that atypical stress responsivity may contribute to the acquisition and

  2. Sports medicine training room clinic model for the military.

    PubMed

    Brawley, Stephen; Fairbanks, Keith; Nguyen, William; Blivin, Steve; Frantz, Earl

    2012-02-01

    A transition from traditional problem-based clinics to the Sports Medicine and Reconditioning Team (SMART) clinic model was completed by January 2009 at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune. The SMART clinic model allows for more patients to be seen and enhances coordinated care between providers. The objective of this research is to show the advantages of implementing a training room team approach for the care of musculoskeletal injuries in active duty members by comparing the number of patients seen, the number of limited duty (LIMDU) periods, the number of physical evaluation boards (PEBs), and the percentage of orthopedic referrals. Electronic medical records for patients seen at sports medicine clinics between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010 were reviewed. Naval Hospital Camp Lejeune provided a database of patients placed on LIMDU and PEB from 2007 through 2010. Fifty-eight and twenty-four percent more encounters occurred in 2009 and 2010, respectively, than that in 2007. The percentage of LIMDU referred for PEB in 2010 was reduced to 9% compared to that in 2007. In conclusion, the SMART clinic model allows for more patients to be seen and a reduction in the percentage of patients recommended for PEB from LIMDU.

  3. Effects of Medicine Ball Training on Fitness Performance of High-School Physical Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Mediate, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of medicine ball training on the fitness performance of high-school physical education students. Sixty-nine high-school students participated in a 6-week medicine training program during the first 10 to 15 minutes of each physical education class. A group of 49 students who participated in…

  4. Building family medicine postgraduate training in Jamaica: overcoming challenges in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Standard-Goldson, A; Williams-Green, P; Smith, K; Segree, W; James, K; Eldemire-Shearer, D

    2015-01-01

    This paper recounts the development of family medicine postgraduate training in Jamaica, the challenges faced and lessons learned. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by past trainees exploring the perceived usefulness, strengths and weaknesses of the programme. The results of this study helped guide the strengthening of family medicine training in a resource-limited setting.

  5. Narcotic Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Fern, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    This article presents the major features of narcotic addictions, focusing on the role of methadone as a means of controlling or removing the addiction. It concludes with some observations on society's attitude towards addicts, addictions and programs for control of addiction. PMID:21308103

  6. Pediatric emergency medicine fellow training in ultrasound: consensus educational guidelines.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Rebecca L; Hsu, Deborah; Nagler, Joshua; Chen, Lei; Gallagher, Rachel; Levy, Jason A

    2013-03-01

    The importance of point-of-care emergency ultrasound (EUS) to the practice of emergency medicine (EM) is well established, and mounting research continues to demonstrate how EUS can benefit pediatric emergency department (ED) patients. As members of the EM community, pediatric EM (PEM) physicians should understand the potential value of EUS and seek opportunities to incorporate EUS into their daily practice. Currently, EUS education and training is at an early developmental stage for PEM fellows and varies greatly between programs. The goal of this article is to provide consensus education guidelines and to describe a sample curriculum that can be used by PEM fellowship programs when developing or revising their US training curricula. The authors recognize that programs may be at different stages of EUS development and will consequently need to tailor curricula to individual institutional needs and capabilities. This guideline was developed through a collaborative process between EUS educators and members of the American Academy of Pediatrics Section of EM Fellowship Directors Subcommittee. The guideline includes the following topics: important considerations regarding EUS in PEM, PEM US program framework, PEM US curriculum, PEM US education program, and competency assessment.

  7. Adequacy of Training in Preventive Medicine and Public Health: A National Survey of Residency Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, David H.; Salive, Marcel E.

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 797 preventive medicine residency graduates found that improvements are needed in the curricula for health administration, environmental health, health education, and occupational medicine. Women found their training less adequate than men did in all areas except clinical preventive medicine. Graduates tended to practice ultimately in…

  8. 76 FR 30951 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: June 13, 2011, 1 p.m... Secretary, Division of Medicine and Dentistry, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and...

  9. 75 FR 14446 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary CareMedicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: April 22, 2010, 8 a.m... of Health Professions, Division of Medicine and Dentistry. In the plenary session, the...

  10. 75 FR 64318 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care, Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: November 15, 2010, 8... Secretary, Division of Medicine and Dentistry, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and...

  11. 77 FR 36550 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care, Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Dates and Times: July 19, 2012, 8..., 2012, will begin with an update on the Division of Medicine and Dentistry's development of...

  12. The foundations of interdisciplinary fellowship training in adolescent medicine in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bravender, Terrill

    2016-08-01

    The field of adolescent medicine, having developed from the specialty of Pediatrics, encompasses a holistic and developmental approach from its very origin. While its foundations were in medicine, early leaders in the field emphasized the importance of mental health care as well as nutrition, public health, and social justice. As the specialty became further established in the US with the creation of an academic society, board certification and training program accreditation, the interdisciplinary nature of adolescent medicine practice and training became formalized. This formal recognition brought with it strict guidelines with regards training and board certification. Despite the often Byzantinian training requirements, an interdisciplinary approach forms the core of adolescent medicine practice, and the incorporation of interdisciplinary training is a necessity for graduate medical education programs in the field of adolescent medicine.

  13. Education and training in family medicine: progress and a proposed national vision for 2030.

    PubMed

    Goh, Lee Gan; Ong, Chooi Peng

    2014-03-01

    This review provides an update of education and training in family medicine in Singapore and worldwide. Family medicine has progressed much since 1969 when it was recognised as the 20th medical discipline in the United States. Three salient changes in the local healthcare landscape have been noted over time, which are of defining relevance to family medicine in Singapore, namely the rise of noncommunicable chronic diseases, the care needs of an expanding elderly population, and the care of a larger projected population in 2030. The change in the vision of family medicine into the future refers to a new paradigm of one discipline in many settings, and not limited to the community. Family medicine needs to provide a patient-centred medical home, and the discipline's education and training need to be realigned. The near-term training objectives are to address the service, training and research needs of a changing and challenging healthcare landscape.

  14. Education and training in family medicine: progress and a proposed national vision for 2030

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Lee Gan; Ong, Chooi Peng

    2014-01-01

    This review provides an update of education and training in family medicine in Singapore and worldwide. Family medicine has progressed much since 1969 when it was recognised as the 20th medical discipline in the United States. Three salient changes in the local healthcare landscape have been noted over time, which are of defining relevance to family medicine in Singapore, namely the rise of noncommunicable chronic diseases, the care needs of an expanding elderly population, and the care of a larger projected population in 2030. The change in the vision of family medicine into the future refers to a new paradigm of one discipline in many settings, and not limited to the community. Family medicine needs to provide a patient-centred medical home, and the discipline’s education and training need to be realigned. The near-term training objectives are to address the service, training and research needs of a changing and challenging healthcare landscape. PMID:24664375

  15. Psychosocial Training in U.S. Internal Medicine and Family Practice Residency Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaufberg, Elizabeth H.; Joseph, Robert C.; Pels, Richard J.; Wyshak, Grace; Wieman, Dow; Nadelson, Carol C.

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed directors of internal medicine (IM) and family practice (FP) residency programs regarding the format, content, and quantity of psychosocial training in their programs, their opinions on topics related to such training, and program demographics. Found considerable variation in content and time devoted to psychosocial training within and…

  16. Training Future Leaders of Academic Medicine: Internal Programs at Three Academic Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morahan, Page S.; Kasperbauer, Dwight; McDade, Sharon A.; Aschenbrener, Carol A.; Triolo, Pamela K.; Monteleone, Patricia L.; Counte, Michael; Meyer, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews need for internal leadership training programs at academic health centers and describes three programs. Elements common to the programs include small classes, participants from many areas of academic medicine and health care, building on prior experience and training, training conducted away from the institution, short sessions, faculty…

  17. AAPM/SNMMI Joint Task Force: report on the current state of nuclear medicine physics training.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Beth A; Allison, Jerry D; Clements, Jessica B; Coffey, Charles W; Fahey, Frederic H; Gress, Dustin A; Kinahan, Paul E; Nickoloff, Edward L; Mawlawi, Osama R; MacDougall, Robert D; Pizzutiello, Robert J

    2015-09-08

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) recognized the need for a review of the current state of nuclear  medicine physics training and the need to explore pathways for improving nuclear medicine physics training opportunities. For these reasons, the two organizations formed a joint AAPM/SNMMI Ad Hoc Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Physics  Training. The mission of this task force was to assemble a representative group of stakeholders to:• Estimate the demand for board-certified nuclear medicine physicists in the next 5-10 years,• Identify the critical issues related to supplying an adequate number of physicists who have received the appropriate level of training in nuclear medicine physics, and• Identify approaches that may be considered to facilitate the training of nuclear medicine physicists.As a result, a task force was appointed and chaired by an active member of both organizations that included representation from the AAPM, SNMMI, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), the American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine (ABSNM), and the Commission for the Accreditation of Medical Physics Educational Programs (CAMPEP). The Task Force first met at the AAPM Annual Meeting in Charlotte in July 2012 and has met regularly face-to-face, online, and by conference calls. This manuscript reports the findings of the Task Force, as well as recommendations to achieve the stated mission.

  18. AAPM/SNMMI Joint Task Force: report on the current state of nuclear medicine physics training.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Beth A; Allison, Jerry D; Clements, Jessica B; Coffey, Charles W; Fahey, Frederic H; Gress, Dustin A; Kinahan, Paul E; Nickoloff, Edward L; Mawlawi, Osama R; MacDougall, Robert D; Pizzuitello, Robert J

    2015-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) recognized the need for a review of the current state of nuclear medicine physics training and the need to explore pathways for improving nuclear medicine physics training opportunities. For these reasons, the two organizations formed a joint AAPM/SNMMI Ad Hoc Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Physics Training. The mission of this task force was to assemble a representative group of stakeholders to: Estimate the demand for board-certified nuclear medicine physicists in the next 5-10 years, Identify the critical issues related to supplying an adequate number of physicists who have received the appropriate level of training in nuclear medicine physics, and Identify approaches that may be considered to facilitate the training of nuclear medicine physicists. As a result, a task force was appointed and chaired by an active member of both organizations that included representation from the AAPM, SNMMI, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), the American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine (ABSNM), and the Commission for the Accreditation of Medical Physics Educational Programs (CAMPEP). The Task Force first met at the AAPM Annual Meeting in Charlotte in July 2012 and has met regularly face-to-face, online, and by conference calls. This manuscript reports the findings of the Task Force, as well as recommendations to achieve the stated mission. PACS number: 01.40.G.

  19. Training of aerospace medicine physicians in the Soviet Union and the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Tokarev, V F; Razsolov, N A; Mohler, S R; Nicogossian, A E

    1986-04-01

    The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the United States of America operate major aerospace medicine programs; each country has taken specific measures to assure the development of an adequate number of trained aerospace medicine physicians. This jointly prepared paper emphasizes the training of aerospace medicine physicians related to civil aerospace activities. Those working in the field of aerospace medicine will find of interest the aerospace medical approaches taken by the U.S.S.R. and the U.S.A. in achieving their respective aerospace objectives.

  20. The East African Training Initiative. A Model Training Program in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine for Low-Income Countries.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Charles B; Carter, E Jane; Braendli, Otto; Getaneh, Asqual; Schluger, Neil W

    2016-04-01

    Despite an extensive burden of lung disease in East Africa, there are remarkably few pulmonary physicians in the region and no pulmonary subspecialty training programs. We developed a unique training program for pulmonary medicine in Ethiopia. The East African Training Initiative (EATI) is a 2-year fellowship program at Tikur Anbessa (Black Lion) Specialized Teaching Hospital, the largest public hospital in Ethiopia and the teaching hospital for the Addis Ababa University School of Medicine. The first year is devoted to clinical care and procedural skills. Lectures, conferences, daily inpatient and outpatient rounds, and procedure supervision by visiting faculty provide the clinical knowledge foundation. In the second year, training in clinical research is added to ongoing clinical training. Before graduation, fellows must pass rigorous written and oral examinations and achieve high marks on faculty evaluations. Funding derives from several sources. Ethiopian trainees are paid by the Ethiopian Ministry of Health and the Addis Ababa University School of Medicine. The World Lung Foundation and the Swiss Lung Foundation supply travel and housing costs for visiting faculty, who receive no other stipend. The first two trainees graduated in January 2015, and a second class of three fellows completed training in January 2016. All five presented research abstracts at the annual meetings of the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease in 2014 and 2015. The EATI has successfully provided pulmonary medicine training in Ethiopia and has capacity for local leadership. We believe that EATI could be a model for other resource-limited countries.

  1. Core content for wilderness medicine fellowship training of emergency medicine graduates.

    PubMed

    Lipman, Grant S; Weichenthal, Lori; Stuart Harris, N; McIntosh, Scott E; Cushing, Tracy; Caudell, Michael J; Macias, Darryl J; Weiss, Eric A; Lemery, Jay; Ellis, Mark A; Spano, Susanne; McDevitt, Marion; Tedeschi, Christopher; Dow, Jennifer; Mazzorana, Vicki; McGinnis, Henderson; Gardner, Angela F; Auerbach, Paul S

    2014-02-01

    Wilderness medicine is the practice of resource-limited medicine under austere conditions. In 2003, the first wilderness medicine fellowship was established, and as of March 2013, a total of 12 wilderness medicine fellowships exist. In 2009 the American College of Emergency Physicians Wilderness Medicine Section created a Fellowship Subcommittee and Taskforce to bring together fellowship directors, associate directors, and other interested stakeholders to research and develop a standardized curriculum and core content for emergency medicine (EM)-based wilderness medicine fellowships. This paper describes the process and results of what became a 4-year project to articulate a standardized curriculum for wilderness medicine fellowships. The final product specifies the minimum core content that should be covered during a 1-year wilderness medicine fellowship. It also describes the structure, length, site, and program requirements for a wilderness medicine fellowship.

  2. Conceptualizing Nonsuicidal Self-Injury as a Process Addiction: Review of Research and Implications for Counselor Training and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buser, Trevor J.; Buser, Juleen K.

    2013-01-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) may be characterized as a process addiction for some individuals who self-injure. The authors review findings on the addictive features of NSSI, including compulsivity, loss of control, continued use despite negative consequences, and tolerance.

  3. Aviation medicine graduate training at Ohio State University, 1955-1977.

    PubMed

    Billings, Charles E

    2010-05-01

    Between 1955 and 1977, The Ohio State University sponsored what is believed to be the first residency training program in aviation medicine. The training program was instigated by Richard Meiling, M.D., the associate dean of the College of Medicine, who had been a U.S. Army flight surgeon during World War II. Dr. Meiling was active after the war in a committee of physicians that advocated establishment of a residency training program and certification of aviation medicine as an approved specialty. From 1955 to 1977, 51 physicians were trained at Ohio State in aviation (later aerospace) and occupational medicine. The programs were located in the Department of Preventive Medicine and directed by William F. Ashe, M.D., chairman. It was a 3-yr residency: the first was an academic year that included full-time coursework and research, and a second year was also devoted to advanced coursework and field experience, during which the resident finished conducting research and submitted a thesis. The third year was a practicum in which the residents were located at any of a number of academic, aeronautical, or industrial sites under supervision of faculty members. They were then qualified to take the examinations of the American Board of Preventive Medicine in either aviation or occupational medicine. A number of graduates took both examinations during the first years of practice following their training; several continued to practice in both specialties throughout their careers.

  4. Epidemiology and Herd Health Training in the School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archbald, L. F.; Hagstad, H. V.

    1978-01-01

    At Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, training in preventive medicine is incorporated into all four years of the curriculum. The curriculum is described with focus on the fourth year practical course that involves problem solving, using various herds in the area. (JMD)

  5. Undergraduate Training in Companion Animal Preventive Medicine at Louisiana State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bech-Nielsen, Steen

    1979-01-01

    The veterinary curriculum at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine has developed an undergraduate professional training program in companion animal preventive medicine--a new area of specialization--as a field of clinical practice. Curricula for years three and four are described. (Author/MLW)

  6. Case Presentations from the Addiction Academy.

    PubMed

    Laes, JoAn R; Wiegand, Timothy

    2016-03-01

    In this article, a case-based format is used to address complex clinical issues in addiction medicine. The cases were developed from the authors' practice experience, and were presented at the American College of Medical Toxicology Addiction Academy in 2015. Section I: Drug and Alcohol Dependence and Pain explores cases of patients with co-occurring pain and substance use disorders. Section II: Legal and Policy Issues in Substance Use Disorders highlights difficult legal and policy questions in addiction medicine. Section III: Special Populations and Addictive Disorders delves into the complexity of addiction in special populations (pregnant, pediatric, and geriatric patients).

  7. The Teaching of Liberal Arts in Internal Medicine Residency Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Povar, Gail J.; Keith, Karla J.

    1984-01-01

    A survey on the teaching of liberal arts in internal medicine residency programs and the importance of liberal arts to the practice of medicine is discussed. Law and organization of the health care system as well as economics and bioethics were rated as essential to medical practice. (Author/MLW)

  8. Neurofeedback training for opiate addiction: improvement of mental health and craving.

    PubMed

    Dehghani-Arani, Fateme; Rostami, Reza; Nadali, Hosein

    2013-06-01

    Psychological improvements in patients with substance use disorders have been reported after neurofeedback treatment. However, neurofeedback has not been commonly accepted as a treatment for substance dependence. This study was carried out to examine the effectiveness of this therapeutic method for opiate dependence disorder. The specific aim was to investigate whether treatment leads to any changes in mental health and substance craving. In this experimental study with a pre-post test design, 20 opiate dependent patients undergoing Methadone or Buprenorphine maintenance treatment were examined and matched and randomized into two groups. While both experimental and control groups received their usual maintenance treatment, the experimental group received 30 sessions of neurofeedback treatment in addition. The neurofeedback treatment consisted of sensory motor rhythm training on Cz, followed by an alpha-theta protocol on Pz. Data from the general health questionnaire and a heroin craving questionnaire were collected before and after treatment. Multivariate analysis of covariance showed that the experimental group achieved improvement in somatic symptoms, depression, and total score in general mental health; and in anticipation of positive outcome, desire to use opioid, and relief from withdrawal of craving in comparison with the control group. The study supports the effectiveness of neurofeedback training as a therapeutic method in opiate dependence disorder, in supplement to pharmacotherapy.

  9. Implementing the ASAM Criteria in community treatment centers in Illinois: opportunities and challenges. American Society of Addiction Medicine.

    PubMed

    Heatherton, B

    2000-01-01

    The incorporation of the ASAM Criteria into addiction treatment centers procedure has afforded us an enormous opportunity to add credibility to our treatment. Herein lies perhaps the strongest argument for these criteria. The ASAM Criteria encourage addiction treatment centers to establish themselves as healthcare providers in their own right. The task is now for Illinois addiction treatment providers; particularly community based providers, to prove our credibility through the legitimate use of the criteria. Since most, if not all, of our patients are without means and without knowledge on quality treatment, they become easy targets for substandard or at least unimaginative and uninspired treatment. It is not that community based treatment centers are, by nature, unprincipled treatment warehouses. But it certainly can be said that our centers are frequently the last to change our treatment practices. Certainly we have become "the last resort" for the courts, overburdened mental health centers and overpopulated homeless shelters with little emphasis on clinical quality of care. Overcoming such programmed ways of viewing treatment was difficult specifically for Triangle Center and generally for community treatment providers throughout Illinois. In fact, I dare say that this transition has not occurred in total as many still passively resist this opportunity. Yet others have viewed this change as the breath of fresh air that our profession has long sought. Such variance in opinion ultimately proves that implementation of the ASAM Criteria, in a community based system, is dependent on the clinician and administrators willingness to understand, recognize and apply the Criteria.

  10. Gambling Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Gambling Addiction KidsHealth > For Teens > Gambling Addiction Print A ... So what's the story with gambling? What Is Gambling? Gambling means taking part in any activity or ...

  11. Gambling Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Gambling Addiction KidsHealth > For Teens > Gambling Addiction A A ... So what's the story with gambling? What Is Gambling? Gambling means taking part in any activity or ...

  12. Pain medicine: The case for an independent medical specialty and training programs.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Michel Y; Follett, Kenneth A

    2014-06-01

    Over the last 30 years, pain has become one of the most dynamic areas of medicine and a public health issue. According to a recent Institute of Medicine report, pain affects approximately 100 million Americans at an estimated annual economic cost of $560 to $635 billion and is poorly treated overall. The American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) recognizes a pain subspecialty, but pain care delivery has struggled with increasing demand and developed in an inconsistent and uncoordinated fashion. Pain education is insufficient and highly variable. Multiple pain professional organizations have led to fragmentation of the field and lack of interdisciplinary agreement, resulting in confusion regarding who speaks for pain medicine. In this Perspective, the authors argue that ABMS recognition of pain medicine as an independent medical specialty would provide much needed structure and oversight for the field and would generate credibility for the specialty and its providers among medical peers, payers, regulatory and legislative agencies, and the public at large. The existing system, managed by three ABMS boards, largely excludes other specialties that contribute to pain care, fails to provide leadership from a single professional organization, provides suboptimal training exposure to pain medicine, and lengthens training, which results in inefficient use of time and educational resources. The creation of a primary ABMS conjoint board in pain medicine with its own residency programs and departments would provide better coordinated training, ensure the highest degree of competence of pain medicine specialists, and improve the quality of pain care and patient safety.

  13. Physician training in aerospace medicine--an historical review in the United States.

    PubMed

    Doarn, Charles R; Mohler, Stanley R

    2013-02-01

    The training of U.S. physicians in aviation medicine closely followed the development of reliable airplanes. This training has matured as aviation and space travel have become more routine over the past several decades. In the U.S., this training began in support of military pilots who were flying increasingly complex aircraft in the early part of the 20th century. As individuals reached into the stratosphere, low Earth orbit, and eventually to the Moon, physicians were trained not only through military efforts but in academic settings as well. This paper provides an historical summary of how physician training in aerospace medicine developed in the U.S., citing both the development of the military activities and, more importantly, the perspectives of the academic programs. This history is important as we move forward in the development of commercial space travel and the needs that such a business model will be required to meet.

  14. Behind Scenes in Medicine: Training the Pharmaceutical Detail Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltz, Judith S.

    1974-01-01

    The pharmaceutical detail man, in bringing information about new drugs to physicians, hospitals and pharmacists, performs a complex and sensitive task. Does his training fit him to meet the challenge? (Author)

  15. New family medicine residency training programme: Residents’ perspectives from the University of Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Tshitenge, Stephane; Setlhare, Vincent; Tsima, Billy; Adewale, Ganiyu; Parsons, Luise

    2016-01-01

    Background Family Medicine (FM) training is new in Botswana. No previous evaluation of the experiences and opinions of residents of the University of Botswana (UB) Family Medicine training programme has been reported. Aims This study explored and assessed residents’ experiences and satisfaction with the FM training programme at the UB and solicited potential strategies for improvement from the residents. Methods A descriptive survey using a self-administered questionnaire based on a Likert-type scale and open-ended questions was used to collect data from FM residents at the UB. Results Eight out the 14 eligible residents participated to this study. Generally, residents were not satisfied with the FM training programme. Staff shortage, inadequate supervision and poor programme organisation by the faculty were the main reasons for this. However, the residents were satisfied with weekly training schedules and the diversity of patients in the current training sites. Residents’ potential solutions included an increase in staff, the acquisition of equipment at teaching sites and emphasis on FM core topics teachings. They had different views regarding how certain future career paths will be. Conclusions Despite the general dissatisfaction among residents because of challenges faced by the training programme, we have learnt that residents are capable of valuable inputs for improvement of their programme when engaged. There is need for the Department of Family Medicine to work with the Ministry of Health to set a clear career pathway for future graduates and to reflect on residents’ input for possible implementation. PMID:27796117

  16. Key informants’ perspectives on development of family medicine training programs in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gossa, Weyinshet; Wondimagegn, Dawit; Mekonnen, Demeke; Eshetu, Wondwossen; Abebe, Zerihun; Fetters, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    As a very low-income country, Ethiopia faces significant development challenges, though there is great aspiration to dramatically improve health care in the country. Family medicine has recently been recognized through national policy as one potential contributor in addressing Ethiopia’s health care challenges. Family medicine is a new specialty in Ethiopia emerging in the context of family medicine development in Sub-Saharan Africa. The Addis Ababa University family medicine residency program started in 2013 and is the first and the only family medicine program in the country as of March 2016. Stakeholders on the ground feel that family medicine is off to a good start and have great enthusiasm and optimism for its success. While the Ministry of Health has a vision for the development of family medicine and a plan for rapid upscaling of family medicine across the country, significant challenges remain. Continuing discussion about the potential roles of family medicine specialists in Ethiopia and policy-level strategic planning to place family medicine at the core of primary health care delivery in the country is needed. In addition, the health care-tier system needs to be restructured to include the family medicine specialists along with appropriately equipped health care facilities for training and practice. Key stakeholders are optimistic that family medicine expansion can be successful in Ethiopia through a coordinated effort by the Ministry of Health and collaboration between institutions within the country, other Sub-Saharan African countries, and international partners supportive of establishing family medicine in Ethiopia. PMID:27175100

  17. Medicinal chemistry teaching and training: a continuous adaptation.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Henk; de Souza, Noel J

    2009-07-01

    Bridging the gap: The differences between medicinal chemistry at the industrial and academic levels raises the question: Is there a significant gap between the two spheres that requires attention, or should such differences be deemed natural, without the need to close the gap? Herein we provide perspectives on this issue, based in part on opinions expressed at a forum discussion held at ISMC 2008 in Vienna.

  18. Addicted to Expectations? Conference!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliland, Mary

    Whether teaching incoming students or training faculty in other disciplines, writing instructors often form unrealistic expectations about goals and skills of students and colleagues, which (like chemical addictions) predictably recur each semester as though they had never occurred before. For effective instruction, it is important that…

  19. A comparison of surgery and family medicine residents' perceptions of cross-cultural care training.

    PubMed

    Chun, Maria B J; Jackson, David S; Lin, Susan Y; Park, Elyse R

    2010-12-01

    The need for physicians formally trained to deliver care to diverse patient populations has been widely advocated. Utilizing a validated tool, Weissman and Betancourt's Cross-Cultural Care Survey, the aim of this current study was to compare surgery and family medicine residents' perceptions of their preparedness and skillfulness to provide high quality cross-cultural care. Past research has documented differences between the two groups' reported impressions of importance and level of instruction received in cross-cultural care. Twenty surgery and 15 family medicine residents participated in the study. Significant differences were found between surgery and family medicine residents on most ratings of the amount of training they received in cross-cultural skills. Specifically, family medicine residents reported having received more training on: 1) determining how patients want to be addressed, 2) taking a social history, 3) assessing their understanding of the cause of illness, 4) negotiating their treatment plan, 5) assessing whether they are mistrustful of the health care system and÷or doctor, 6) identifying cultural customs, 7) identifying how patients make decisions within the family, and 8) delivering services through a medical interpreter. One unexpected finding was that surgery residents, who reported not receiving much formal cultural training, reported higher mean scores on perceived skillfulness (i.e. ability) than family medicine residents. The disconnect may be linked to the family medicine residents' training in cultural humility - more knowledge and understanding of cross-cultural care can paradoxically lead to perceptions of being less prepared or skillful in this area.

  20. Drug Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... mental health disorders, several factors may contribute to development of drug addiction and dependence. The main factors are: Environment. Environmental factors, including your family's beliefs and attitudes ...

  1. Breaking bad news: structured training for family medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Ungar, Lea; Alperin, Mordechai; Amiel, Gilad E; Beharier, Zvi; Reis, Shmuel

    2002-09-01

    Previous research has shown that physicians experience incompetence and difficulty in dealing with patients' feelings after they have broken bad news to them. During the past 10 years, we have implemented a longitudinal training program targeting these issues. The present article describes this training and discusses its contribution to doctors' skills at approaching distressed patients. In order to cope with breaking bad news to patients and their families, physicians should be skilled at crisis intervention and communication techniques. They should also be aware of their personal attitudes and emotional reactions when breaking bad news. Each session encompassed these areas, as well as the most prominent issues arising when breaking bad news. In a 1-5 Likert scale, the course received an overall score of 4.47 (S.D. 0.51). Participants noted that they had gained relevant communication skills for future patient encounters.

  2. Computer-based Training in Medicine and Learning Theories.

    PubMed

    Haag, Martin; Bauch, Matthias; Garde, Sebastian; Heid, Jörn; Weires, Thorsten; Leven, Franz-Josef

    2005-01-01

    Computer-based training (CBT) systems can efficiently support modern teaching and learning environments. In this paper, we demonstrate on the basis of the case-based CBT system CAMPUS that current learning theories and design principles (Bloom's Taxonomy and practice fields) are (i) relevant to CBT and (ii) are feasible to implement using computer-based training and adequate learning environments. Not all design principles can be fulfilled by the system alone, the integration of the system in adequate teaching and learning environments therefore is essential. Adequately integrated, CBT programs become valuable means to build or support practice fields for learners that build domain knowledge and problem-solving skills. Learning theories and their design principles can support in designing these systems as well as in assessing their value.

  3. Addiction Competencies in the 2009 CACREP Clinical Mental Health Counseling Program Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Tiffany K.; Craig, Stephen E.; Fetherson, Bianca T. L.; Simpson, C. Dennis

    2013-01-01

    The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs developed addiction competencies for clinical mental health counseling students. This article highlights these competencies, provides an overview of current addiction training, and describes methods to integrate addiction education into curricula.

  4. Assessing the integration of genomic medicine in genetic counseling training programs.

    PubMed

    Profato, Jessica; Gordon, Erynn S; Dixon, Shannan; Kwan, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    Medical genetics has entered a period of transition from genetics to genomics. Genetic counselors (GCs) may take on roles in the clinical implementation of genomics. This study explores the perspectives of program directors (PDs) on including genomic medicine in GC training programs, as well as the status of this integration. Study methods included an online survey, an optional one-on-one telephone interview, and an optional curricula content analysis. The majority of respondents (15/16) reported that it is important to include genomic medicine in program curricula. Most topics of genomic medicine are either "currently taught" or "under development" in all participating programs. Interview data from five PDs and one faculty member supported the survey data. Integrating genomics in training programs is challenging, and it is essential to develop genomics resources for curricula.

  5. Designing graduate training programs in conservation medicine-producing the right professionals with the right tools.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Gretchen E; Epstein, Jonathan H; Paul-Murphy, Joanne; Modrall, Jennifer D

    2008-12-01

    New challenges to human, animal, and ecosystem health demand novel solutions: New diseases are emerging from new configurations of humans, their domestic animals and wildlife; new pressures on once robust and resilient ecosystems are compromising their integrity; synthetic compounds and engineered organisms, new to the natural world, are spreading unpredictably around the globe. Globalization provides opportunities for infectious organisms to gain access to new hosts, changing in distribution and virulence. What type of training should be developed to provide professionals with the right tools to meet these challenges? In this article, we offer recommendations for developing academic programs in conservation medicine. We discuss the need for, and the advantages to, using a conservation medicine approach to address real world situations and present illustrations of how this is applied today. We suggest a core set of skills that are needed in a conservation medicine practitioner, and recommend key considerations for designing new conservation medicine training programs. We review existing programs that offer conservation medicine content, and provide examples of where opportunities exist for those interested in pursuing a conservation medicine career.

  6. [Further training for medical specialists in respiratory medicine: how can we improve it?].

    PubMed

    Karg, O

    2015-09-01

    Young physicians in Germany often criticize the advanced training programme, especially the lack of structure and the insufficient rotations. The Medical Association in each Bundesland/federal state require to include a proposal for advanced training and rotation in a trainer's aplication for an educational license. However, there is no systematic scrutiny of these concepts and therefore the criteria stated outcomes are often only incompletely met. Trainers engage too little in training methods and medical didactics. They rarely evaluate learning outcomes, and structured assessments based on workplace are exceptions. The reasons are deeply rooted in Germany's education system: Resources for specialist training are not provided, and there is no funding for a commitment in continued medical education. In addition, teaching is not assigned a quantifiable value. However, during the last decade awareness has arisen that good training programmes are an important part of quality assurance and the validation of a hospital. Better planning, structuring and evaluation of training programmes is necessary. New learning methods should be incorporated in training programmes. The German Respiratory Society (DGP) wishes to contribute to the improvement of advanced training: for example with "train the trainer" seminars for teachers, with a structured educational course programme for the trainees, with assessments such as the HERMES (Harmonized Education in Respiratory Medicine for European Specialists) exam and with support for the accreditation as a Respiratory Training Centre of the ERS (European Respiratory Society) and EBAP (European Board for Accreditation in Pneumology).

  7. [Food addiction - substance use disorder or behavioral addiction?].

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Özgür; Kliewer, Josephine; Föcker, Manuel; Antel, Jochen; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2015-05-01

    This article looks at food addiction as a subject situated between psychiatry, neurobiology, nutritional science, internal medicine, food industry, and public health. Essentially, the question is whether or not individual nutritional components can induce physical dependence, similar to the well-known effects of drugs such as alcohol and cocaine, or whether food addiction is rather a behavioral addiction. The literature describes many overlaps as well as differences of substance-based and non-substance-based addiction in both clinical and neurobiological terms. Until recently it was argued that food addiction appears only in the realms of obesity and eating disorders (e.g., binge-eating disorder, BED). Some studies, however, described the prevalence of food addiction symptoms and diagnoses independent of overweight or that they were in subjects who do not fulfill the criteria for BED. This article sums up the controversial discussion about the phenomenological and neurobiological classification of food addiction. Implications of food addiction for children and adolescents as well as public-health-related issues are also discussed.

  8. [The importance of teamwork in emergency medicine training].

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, B; Carron, P-N

    2007-08-15

    The study of dynamics in relation to performing in small groups has increased pedagogic knowledge about teamwork. The successful management of patients with life-threatening pathologies depends highly from a succession of teams with a specific mission as: the call centre 144, Paramedics, the ED, the Operating Theatre and the Intensive care. To enable each team to operate successfully, it is essential to coordinate their qualifications and synergism. This can be efficiently attained by simulating real situations and by following protocols dedicated to teamwork. Emergency Medicine, which is on the brink of acquiring its proper curriculum, must adopt this concept to integrate knowledge and know-how, and the art of being and doing. At this stage, the Emergency Physician will have the competence which will enable him to be a real "team leader".

  9. Tablet computer enhanced training improves internal medicine exam performance

    PubMed Central

    Wende, Ilja; Grittner, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Background Traditional teaching concepts in medical education do not take full advantage of current information technology. We aimed to objectively determine the impact of Tablet PC enhanced training on learning experience and MKSAP® (medical knowledge self-assessment program) exam performance. Methods In this single center, prospective, controlled study final year medical students and medical residents doing an inpatient service rotation were alternatingly assigned to either the active test (Tablet PC with custom multimedia education software package) or traditional education (control) group, respectively. All completed an extensive questionnaire to collect their socio-demographic data, evaluate educational status, computer affinity and skills, problem solving, eLearning knowledge and self-rated medical knowledge. Both groups were MKSAP® tested at the beginning and the end of their rotation. The MKSAP® score at the final exam was the primary endpoint. Results Data of 55 (tablet n = 24, controls n = 31) male 36.4%, median age 28 years, 65.5% students, were evaluable. The mean MKSAP® score improved in the tablet PC (score Δ + 8 SD: 11), but not the control group (score Δ- 7, SD: 11), respectively. After adjustment for baseline score and confounders the Tablet PC group showed on average 11% better MKSAP® test results compared to the control group (p<0.001). The most commonly used resources for medical problem solving were journal articles looked up on PubMed or Google®, and books. Conclusions Our study provides evidence, that tablet computer based integrated training and clinical practice enhances medical education and exam performance. Larger, multicenter trials are required to independently validate our data. Residency and fellowship directors are encouraged to consider adding portable computer devices, multimedia content and introduce blended learning to their respective training programs. PMID:28369063

  10. Potential role for psychological skills training in emergency medicine: Part 1 - Introduction and background.

    PubMed

    Lauria, Michael J; Rush, Stephen; Weingart, Scott D; Brooks, Jason; Gallo, Isabelle A

    2016-10-01

    Psychological skills training (PST) is the systematic acquisition and practice of different psychological techniques to improve cognitive and technical performance. This training consists of three phases: education, skills acquisition and practice. Some of the psychological skills developed in this training include relaxation techniques, focusing and concentration skills, positive 'self-suggestion' and visualisation exercises. Since the middle of the 20th century, PST has been successfully applied by athletes, performing artists, business executives, military personnel and other professionals in high-risk occupations. Research in these areas has demonstrated the breadth and depth of the training's effectiveness. Despite the benefits realised in other professions, medicine has only recently begun to explore certain elements of PST. The present paper reviews the history and evidence behind the concept of PST. In addition, it presents some aspects of PST that have already been incorporated into medical training as well as implications for developing more comprehensive programmes to improve delivery of emergency medical care.

  11. Identifying and training non-technical skills for teams in acute medicine.

    PubMed

    Flin, R; Maran, N

    2004-10-01

    The aviation domain provides a better analogy for the "temporary" teams that are found in acute medical specialities than industrial or military teamwork research based on established teams. Crew resource management (CRM) training, which emphasises portable skills (for whatever crew a pilot is rostered to on a given flight), has been recognised to have potential application in medicine, especially for teams in the operating theatre, intensive care unit, and emergency room. Drawing on research from aviation psychology that produced the behavioural marker system NOTECHS for rating European pilots' non-technical skills for teamwork on the flightdeck, this paper outlines the Anaesthetists Non-Technical Skills behavioural rating system for anaesthetists working in operating theatre teams. This taxonomy was used as the design basis for a training course, Crisis Avoidance Resource Management for Anaesthetists used to develop these skills, based in an operating theatre simulator. Further developments of this training programme for teams in emergency medicine are outlined.

  12. A laboratory medicine residency training program that includes clinical consultation and research.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, E D; Pierce, G F; McDonald, J M

    1990-04-01

    We describe a laboratory medicine residency training program that includes ongoing interaction with both clinical laboratories and clinical services as well as significant research experience. Laboratory medicine residents serve as on-call consultants in the interpretation of test results, design of testing strategies, and assurance of test quality. The consultative on-call beeper system was evaluated and is presented as an effective method of clinical pathology training that is well accepted by the clinical staff. The research component of the residency program is also described. Together, these components provide training in real-time clinical problem solving and prepare residents for the changing technological environment of the clinical laboratory. At the completion of the residency, the majority of the residents are qualified laboratory subspecialists and are also capable of running an independent research program.

  13. Identifying and training non-technical skills for teams in acute medicine

    PubMed Central

    Flin, R; Maran, N

    2004-01-01

    The aviation domain provides a better analogy for the "temporary" teams that are found in acute medical specialities than industrial or military teamwork research based on established teams. Crew resource management (CRM) training, which emphasises portable skills (for whatever crew a pilot is rostered to on a given flight), has been recognised to have potential application in medicine, especially for teams in the operating theatre, intensive care unit, and emergency room. Drawing on research from aviation psychology that produced the behavioural marker system NOTECHS for rating European pilots' non-technical skills for teamwork on the flightdeck, this paper outlines the Anaesthetists Non-Technical Skills behavioural rating system for anaesthetists working in operating theatre teams. This taxonomy was used as the design basis for a training course, Crisis Avoidance Resource Management for Anaesthetists used to develop these skills, based in an operating theatre simulator. Further developments of this training programme for teams in emergency medicine are outlined. PMID:15465960

  14. Training in clinical forensic medicine in the UK--perceptions of current regulatory standards.

    PubMed

    Stark, Margaret M; Norfolk, Guy A

    2011-08-01

    As clinical forensic medicine (CFM) is not currently recognised as a speciality in the UK there are no nationally agreed mandatory standards for training forensic physicians in either general forensic (GFM) or sexual offence medicine (SOM). The General Medical Council (GMC), the medical regulator in the UK, has issued clear standards for training in all specialities recommending that "trainees must be supported to acquire the necessary skills and experience through induction, effective educational supervision, an appropriate workload and time to learn". In order to evaluate the current situation in the field of clinical forensic medicine, doctors who have recently (within the last two years) started working in the field "trainees" (n = 38), and trainers (n = 61) with responsibility for clinical and educational supervision of new trainees, were surveyed by questionnaire to gather their perceptions of how the relevant GMC standards are being met in initial on-the-job training. Telephone interviews were performed with eleven doctors working as clinical or medical directors to determine their views. It is clear that currently the quality of training in CFM is sub-standard and inconsistent and that the published standards, as to the minimum requirement for training that must be met by post-graduate medical and training providers at all levels, are not being met. The Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine (FFLM) needs to set explicit minimum standards which will comply with the regulator and work to pilot credentialing for forensic physicians. A number of recommendations are made for urgent FFLM development.

  15. The Imperial College Cambridge Manchester (ICCAM) platform study: An experimental medicine platform for evaluating new drugs for relapse prevention in addiction. Part A: Study description.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Louise M; Flechais, Remy S A; Murphy, Anna; Reed, Laurence J; Abbott, Sanja; Boyapati, Venkataramana; Elliott, Rebecca; Erritzoe, David; Ersche, Karen D; Faluyi, Yetunde; Faravelli, Luca; Fernandez-Egea, Emilio; Kalk, Nicola J; Kuchibatla, Shankar S; McGonigle, John; Metastasio, Antonio; Mick, Inge; Nestor, Liam; Orban, Csaba; Passetti, Filippo; Rabiner, Eugenii A; Smith, Dana G; Suckling, John; Tait, Roger; Taylor, Eleanor M; Waldman, Adam D; Robbins, Trevor W; Deakin, J F William; Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2015-09-01

    Drug and alcohol dependence are global problems with substantial societal costs. There are few treatments for relapse prevention and therefore a pressing need for further study of brain mechanisms underpinning relapse circuitry. The Imperial College Cambridge Manchester (ICCAM) platform study is an experimental medicine approach to this problem: using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques and selective pharmacological tools, it aims to explore the neuropharmacology of putative relapse pathways in cocaine, alcohol, opiate dependent, and healthy individuals to inform future drug development. Addiction studies typically involve small samples because of recruitment difficulties and attrition. We established the platform in three centres to assess the feasibility of a multisite approach to address these issues. Pharmacological modulation of reward, impulsivity and emotional reactivity were investigated in a monetary incentive delay task, an inhibitory control task, and an evocative images task, using selective antagonists for µ-opioid, dopamine D3 receptor (DRD3) and neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptors (naltrexone, GSK598809, vofopitant/aprepitant), in a placebo-controlled, randomised, crossover design. In two years, 609 scans were performed, with 155 individuals scanned at baseline. Attrition was low and the majority of individuals were sufficiently motivated to complete all five sessions (n=87). We describe herein the study design, main aims, recruitment numbers, sample characteristics, and explain the test hypotheses and anticipated study outputs.

  16. A Perspective of the future of nuclear medicine training and certification

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo-Perez, Julio; Paris, Manuel; Graham, Michael M.; Osborne, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine has evolved from a medical subspecialty using quite basic tests to one using elaborate methods to image organ physiology and has truly become “Molecular Imaging”. Concurrently, there has also been a timely debate about who has to be responsible for keeping pace with all of the components of the developmental cycle; imaging, radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation. Since the foundation of the ABNM, the practice of Nuclear Medicine and the process toward certification have undergone major revisions. At present, the debate is focused on the inevitable future convergence of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine. The potential for further cooperation or fusion of the American Board of Radiology (ABR) and the American Board of Nuclear Medicine (ABNM) is likely to bring about a new path for Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging training. If the merger is done carefully, respecting the strengths of both partners equally, there is an excellent potential to create a hybrid Nuclear Medicine – Radiology specialty that combines Physiology and Molecular Biology with detailed anatomic imaging that will sustain the innovation that has been central to nuclear medicine residency and practice. Herein, we also introduce a few basic trends in imaging utilization in the United States. These trends do not predict future utilization, but highlight the need for an appropriately credentialed practitioner to interpret these examinations and provide value to the healthcare system. PMID:26687859

  17. Can evidence-based medicine change toilet-training practice?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsi-Yang

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To assess the evidence showing that a specific method of toilet training (TT) is more effective than others, as any method of TT recommended by a physician faces obstacles because parents rarely request advice on TT from physicians, and TT practices vary tremendously across cultures and socioeconomic levels. Methods Reports on the natural course of urinary incontinence in children and different methods of TT, published in English between 1946 and 2012, were reviewed. Specifically investigated were historical recommendations on TT, the prevalence of urinary incontinence during childhood, the outcome of TT methods, and the effect of culture and socioeconomic status on the choice of TT method and timing. Results TT now occurs at later ages than it did previously. This progression reflects changing ideas about normal childhood physiology and psychology. The prevalence of urinary incontinence in European countries progressively decreased in children aged between 6–7 years and 16–17 years old. TT methods change with increasing socioeconomic levels to ‘child-centred’ techniques applied at older ages, but the prevalence of urinary incontinence after ‘parent-centred’ techniques of TT at younger ages has not been studied. There is currently no evidence that a specific timing or method of TT is more effective or prevents voiding dysfunction. Conclusions Follow-up studies of urinary continence in children toilet trained at 6–12 months of age might provide evidence for whether a given method or timing of TT is beneficial to prevent voiding dysfunction. The recommendations of physicians might be more readily adopted if they fit culturally accepted ideas of good parenting techniques. PMID:26579239

  18. Establishment of a General Medicine Residency Training Program in Rural West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Drislane, Frank W.; Akpalu, Albert; Wegdam, Harry H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Ghana, a developing country in West Africa, has major medical burdens in taking care of a large population with limited resources. Its three medical schools produce more than 200 graduates per year, but most emigrate to developed lands after training. Ghana is working to educate and retain locally trained physicians, but it is difficult to get them to work in rural settings where the need is greatest. This article details the establishment of a General Medicine residency at a 150-bed hospital in rural Ghana. Early training comprises 6 months each in Medicine, Surgery, OB/GYN, and Pediatrics; the hospital in Techiman also has a Surgery residency. House officers choose the program for more hands-on experience than they can get in larger centers. They perform many tasks, including surgery, sooner and more independently than do residents in developed countries. The training program includes a morning report, clinical teaching rounds, and rotations on in-patient wards and in the Emergency Department and clinics. Teaching focuses on history, physical examination, good communication, and proper follow-up, with rigorous training in the OR and some clinical research projects pertinent to Ghana. Trainees work hard and learn from one another, from a dedicated faculty, and by evaluating and treating very sick patients. Ghana’s rural residencies offer rigorous and attractive training, but it is too soon to tell whether this will help stem the “brain drain” of young physicians out of West Africa. PMID:25191148

  19. Postgraduate family medicine training in Singapore--a new way forward.

    PubMed

    Wong, Teck Yee; Chong, Phui Nah; Chng, Shih Kiat; Tay, Ee Guan

    2012-05-01

    Postgraduate Family Medicine (FM) training is important to train future primary care doctors to provide accessible and cost effective healthcare. In Singapore, a structured postgraduate FM training programme has been available for 20 years. This programme is characterised by involvement of both FM and non-FM doctors, well written modules and a rigorous assessment process. However, challenges faced by both the current healthcare system and training structure underlie the need to review the training structure to ensure its relevancy for future Family Physicians (FPs) to manage the needs of their patients. A workgroup was formed to review the current FM postgraduate programme and to explore the possibility of using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) framework to enhance our current system. The workgroup felt that broad-based training and comprehensive coverage of topics are areas that are important to retain in any new FM residency programme. Weaknesses identified included a lack of early FM exposure and the need to strengthen formative assessments. New organisational structures such as Family Medicine Centres (FMC) need to be established and the involvement of the private sector in any FM residency progammes could be enhanced. The implementation of the FM Residency Programme in 2011 presented a unique opportunity to realign FM postgraduate education in line with the national objectives and to equip FPs with the necessary knowledge and skills for managing the future healthcare needs of Singaporeans.

  20. Teaching transfusion medicine: current situation and proposals for proper medical training

    PubMed Central

    Flausino, Gustavo de Freitas; Nunes, Flávio Ferreira; Cioffi, Júnia Guimarães Mourão; Proietti, Anna Bárbara de Freitas Carneiro

    2014-01-01

    The current curricula in medical schools and hospital residence worldwide lack exposure to blood transfusion medicine, and require the reformulation of academic programs. In many countries, training in blood transfusion is not currently offered to medical students or during residency. Clinical evidence indicates that blood transfusions occur more frequently than recommended, contributing to increased risk due to this procedure. Therefore, the rational use of blood and its components is essential, due to the frequent undesirable reactions, to the increasing demand of blood products and the cost of the process. Significant improvements in knowledge of and skills in transfusion medicine are needed by both students and residents. Improvements are needed in both background knowledge and the practical application of this knowledge to improve safety. Studies prove that hemovigilance has an impact on transfusion safety and helps to prevent the occurrence of transfusion-related adverse effects. To ensure that all these aspects of blood transfusion are being properly addressed, many countries have instituted hospital transfusion committees. From this perspective, the interventions performed during the formation of medical students and residents, even the simplest, have proven effective in the acquisition of knowledge and medical training, thereby leading to a reduction in inappropriate use of blood. Therefore, we would like to emphasize the importance of the exposure of medical students and residents to blood services and transfusion medicine in order for them to acquire adequate medical training, as well as to discuss some changes in the current medical curricula regarding transfusion medicine that we judge critical. PMID:25638770

  1. The potential interest of topiramate in addiction.

    PubMed

    Thorens, Gabriel; Billieux, Joel; Manghi, Rita; Khan, Riaz; Khazaal, Yasser; Zullino, Daniele Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Topiramate is one of the currently most promising compounds in the field of addiction medicine. This paper discusses its potential utility related to a phase model of addiction development, focusing on the assumption that addiction is a continuous process involving different neurobiological pathways, depending on the stage of addiction. A specific emphasis will be made on the development of dysfunctional automatic behaviors in late stage of addiction and the central role of glutamate and AMPA receptors. The aim is to propose that if a too broad effect of anti-addiction medication is expected (such as anti-craving, anti-relapse and preventive effects), the results might be disappointing. The speculative specific efficacy of topiramate in addiction is described.

  2. Narrative medicine as a means of training medical students toward residency competencies

    PubMed Central

    Arntfield, Shannon L.; Slesar, Kristen; Dickson, Jennifer; Charon, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study sought to explore the perceived influence of narrative medicine training on clinical skill development of fourth-year medical students, focusing on competencies mandated by ACGME and the RCPSC in areas of communication, collaboration, and professionalism. Methods Using grounded-theory, three methods of data collection were used to query twelve medical students participating in a one-month narrative medicine elective regarding the process of training and the influence on clinical skills. Iterative thematic analysis and data triangulation occurred. Results Response rate was 91% (survey), 50% (focus group) and 25% (follow-up). Five major findings emerged. Students perceive that they: develop and improve specific communication skills; enhance their capacity to collaborate, empathize, and be patient-centered; develop personally and professionally through reflection. They report that the pedagogical approach used in narrative training is critical to its dividends but misunderstood and perceived as counter-culture. Conclusion/Practice implications Participating medical students reported that they perceived narrative medicine to be an important, effective, but counter-culture means of enhancing communication, collaboration, and professional development. The authors contend that these skills are integral to medical practice, consistent with core competencies mandated by the ACGME/RCPSC, and difficult to teach. Future research must explore sequelae of training on actual clinical performance. PMID:23462070

  3. A Questionnaire-Based Survey of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residency Training in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Butt, Aamir W; Soomro, Nabila; Akhtar, Noreen

    2017-01-01

    Pakistan is one of the three countries in South East Asia that has an active postgraduate physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) training program. College of Physicians and Surgeons Pakistan (CPSP) offers a four-year structured training program in PM&R. It consists of clinical teaching, lectures, rotations in other specialties, and writing a research dissertation. The aim of this survey was to provide an objective analysis of the current PM&R training program, including the facilities available for training, the participation of residents in academic activities, and their participation in different PM&R procedures. Hospital ethics committee approval was obtained. The questionnaire had sections on informed consent; basic demographics; the different components of residency training; and self-assessement of competence in different procedural skills. It was approved by the dean of PM&R at CPSP. There are six accredited training centers in Pakistan. Twelve residents are undergoing residency training at four different centers (Dec 2015). Key persons were nominated at each center to facilitate data collection. All residents (100% response rate) completed the survey. Almost all had read the CPSP training manual. Most had submitted the research dissertation. Training facilities varied across different centers, with the military center being the best equipped. The self-assessed competence of residents in different PM&R procedures varied among different centers, but overall it conformed to the competency levels specified in the training manual. Overall PM&R residency training in Pakistan is satisfactory, but there is a need to strengthen the weak areas and standardize the training across all centers in the country. PMID:28286724

  4. A Questionnaire-Based Survey of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residency Training in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Farooq A; Butt, Aamir W; Soomro, Nabila; Akhtar, Noreen

    2017-01-31

    Pakistan is one of the three countries in South East Asia that has an active postgraduate physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) training program. College of Physicians and Surgeons Pakistan (CPSP) offers a four-year structured training program in PM&R. It consists of clinical teaching, lectures, rotations in other specialties, and writing a research dissertation. The aim of this survey was to provide an objective analysis of the current PM&R training program, including the facilities available for training, the participation of residents in academic activities, and their participation in different PM&R procedures. Hospital ethics committee approval was obtained. The questionnaire had sections on informed consent; basic demographics; the different components of residency training; and self-assessement of competence in different procedural skills. It was approved by the dean of PM&R at CPSP. There are six accredited training centers in Pakistan. Twelve residents are undergoing residency training at four different centers (Dec 2015). Key persons were nominated at each center to facilitate data collection. All residents (100% response rate) completed the survey. Almost all had read the CPSP training manual. Most had submitted the research dissertation. Training facilities varied across different centers, with the military center being the best equipped. The self-assessed competence of residents in different PM&R procedures varied among different centers, but overall it conformed to the competency levels specified in the training manual. Overall PM&R residency training in Pakistan is satisfactory, but there is a need to strengthen the weak areas and standardize the training across all centers in the country.

  5. NIR tracking assists sports medicine in junior basketball training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paeglis, Roberts; Bluss, Kristaps; Rudzitis, Andris; Spunde, Andris; Brice, Tamara; Nitiss, Edgars

    2011-07-01

    We recorded eye movements of eight elite junior basketball players. We hypothesized that a more stable gaze is correlated to a better shot rate. Upon preliminary testing we invited male juniors whose eyes could be reliably tracked in a game situation. To these ends, we used a head-mounted video-based eye tracker. The participants had no record of ocular or other health issues. No significant differences were found between shots made with and without the tracker cap, Paired samples t-test yielded p= .130 for the far and p=..900 > .050 for the middle range shots. The players made 40 shots from common far and middle range locations, 5 and 4 meters respectively for aged 14 years As expected, a statistical correlation was found between gaze fixation (in milliseconds) for the far and middle range shot rates, r=.782, p=.03. Notably, juniors who fixated longer before a shot had a more stable fixation or a lower gaze dispersion (in tracker's screen pixels), r=-.786, p=.02. This finding was augmented by the observation that the gaze dispersion while aiming at the basket was less (i.e., gaze more stable) in those who were more likely to score. We derived a regression equation linking fixation duration to shot success. We advocate infra-red eye tracking as a means to monitor player selection and training success.

  6. Staffing and training issues in critical care hyperbaric medicine.

    PubMed

    Kot, Jacek

    2015-03-01

    The integrated chain of treatment of the most severe clinical cases that require hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) assumes that intensive care is continued while inside the hyperbaric chamber. Such an approach needs to take into account all the risks associated with transportation of the critically ill patient from the ICU to the chamber and back, changing of ventilator circuits and intravascular lines, using different medical devices in a hyperbaric environment, advanced invasive physiological monitoring as well as medical procedures (infusions, drainage, etc) during long or frequently repeated HBOT sessions. Any medical staff who take care of critically ill patients during HBOT should be certified and trained according to both emergency/intensive care and hyperbaric requirements. For any HBOT session, the number of staff needed for any HBOT session depends on both the type of chamber and the patient's status--stable, demanding or critically ill. For a critically ill patient, the standard procedure is a one-to-one patient-staff ratio inside the chamber; however, the final decision whether this is enough is taken after careful risk assessment based on the patient's condition, clinical indication for HBOT, experience of the personnel involved in that treatment and the available equipment.

  7. Exploring the experience of residents during the first six months of family medicine residency training

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Dawn; Nasmith, Louise; Takahashi, Susan Glover; Harvey, Bart J.

    2017-01-01

    Background The shift from undergraduate to postgraduate education signals a new phase in a doctor’s training. This study explored the resident’s perspective of how the transition from undergraduate to postgraduate (PGME) training is experienced in a Family Medicine program as they first meet the reality of feeling and having the responsibility as a doctor. Methods Qualitative methods explored resident experiences using interpretative inquiry through monthly, individual in-depth interviews with five incoming residents during the first six months of training. Focus groups were also held with residents at various stages of training to gather their reflection about their experience of the first six months. Residents were asked to describe their initial concerns, changes that occurred and the influences they attributed to those changes. Results Residents do not begin a Family Medicine PGME program knowing what it means to be a Family Physician, but learn what it means to fulfill this role. This process involves adjusting to significant shifts in responsibility in the areas of Knowledge, Practice Management, and Relationships as they become more responsible for care outcomes. Conclusion This study illuminated the resident perspective of how the transition is experienced. This will assist medical educators to better understand the early training experiences of residents, how these experiences contribute to consolidating their new professional identity, and how to better align teaching strategies with resident learning needs. PMID:28344713

  8. [Vaccines for the treatment of drug addiction].

    PubMed

    Zorzoli, Ermanno; Marino, Maria Giulia; Bagnato, Barbara; Franco, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of drug addiction is a very wide-ranging sector within modern medicine. The use of immunotherapy in this context represents an innovative approach. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate, through a literature review, the main avenues of research and the results obtained with immunotherapy in the treatment of drug addiction.

  9. Exploring situational awareness in emergency medicine: developing a shared mental model to enhance training and assessment.

    PubMed

    Lowe, David J; Ireland, Alastair J; Ross, Al; Ker, Jean

    2016-04-29

    Non-technical skills (NTS) are gaining increasing prominence within the field of emergency medicine. Situational awareness (SA), one key component of NTS, is a key skill for emergency physicians (EPs) during initial training and throughout their career. Furthermore, the majority of frameworks used to evaluate clinical performance incorporate SA as one key component. This review seeks to define and explore the concept of SA within the context of emergency medicine. We describe SA at an individual, team and departmental level. Development of this ability enables EPs to function effectively within the challenging environment of the emergency department (ED). Enhancing our understanding of SA may develop the cognitive process that underpins our clinical performance. We propose a model for consideration to support evaluation and training of SA within the ED, linking the model to the novice expert continuum.

  10. Family medicine training in Saudi Arabia: Are there any variations among different regions?

    PubMed Central

    Abu Zuhairah, Ammar R.; Al-Dawood, Kasim M.; Khamis, Amar H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim was to compare Eastern, Makkah, and Asir regions in term of residents’ perception of the achievement of training objectives, and to assess various rotations based on residents’ perception. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study was done among family medicine residents in the Eastern, Makkah, and Asir regions. Methodology: A questionnaire was developed by the investigator and validated by two experts. All residents, except R1 residents, were included. All data were collected by the investigator by direct contact with the residents. Statistical Analysis Used: Cronbach's alpha, analysis of variance, t-test, and univariate regression model as appropriate, were used. Results: Reliability of the questionnaire was found to be 75.4%. One hundred and seven (response rate: 83.6%) residents completed the questionnaire. There were 51 (47.7%), 27 (25.2%), and 29 (27.1%) residents in the program in the Eastern region, Makkah, and Asir, respectively. The mean age was 29.1 ± 2.5 years; half of the residents were male, most of (83.2%) were married, and more than half (54.2%) of had worked in primary health care before joining the program. Overall, 45% of the residents perceived that they had achieved the training objectives. The highest rotations as perceived by the residents were psychiatry and otolaryngology while the lowest were orthopedics and ophthalmology. There were significant differences among the study regions with regard to the rotations in family medicine, internal medicine, orthopedics, general surgery, and emergency medicine. Conclusions: Overall, a good percentage of the residents perceived that they had achieved the training objectives. The rotations differed in the studied regions. Psychiatry and otolaryngology had the highest percentage of family medicine residents who perceived that they had achieved the training objectives while lowest was in internal medicine and obstetrics and gynecology. The highest rotations as perceived by the

  11. Family medicine training in sub-Saharan Africa: South–South cooperation in the Primafamed project as strategy for development

    PubMed Central

    Flinkenflögel, Maaike; Essuman, Akye; Chege, Patrick; Ayankogbe, Olayinka; De Maeseneer, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Health-care systems based on primary health care (PHC) are more equitable and cost effective. Family medicine trains medical doctors in comprehensive PHC with knowledge and skills that are needed to increase quality of care. Family medicine is a relatively new specialty in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective. To explore the extent to which the Primafamed South–South cooperative project contributed to the development of family medicine in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods. The Primafamed (Primary Health Care and Family Medicine Education) project worked together with 10 partner universities in sub-Saharan Africa to develop family medicine training programmes over a period of 2.5 years. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analysis was done and the training development from 2008 to 2010 in the different partner universities was analysed. Results. During the 2.5 years of the Primafamed project, all partner universities made progress in the development of their family medicine training programmes. The SWOT analysis showed that at both national and international levels, the time is ripe to train medical doctors in family medicine and to integrate the specialty into health-care systems, although many barriers, including little awareness, lack of funding, low support from other specialists and reserved support from policymakers, are still present. Conclusions. Family medicine can play an important role in health-care systems in sub-Saharan Africa; however, developing a new discipline is challenging. Advocacy, local ownership, action research and support from governments are necessary to develop family medicine and increase its impact. The Primafamed project showed that development of sustainable family medicine training programmes is a feasible but slow process. The South–South cooperation between the ten partners and the South African departments of family medicine strengthened confidence at both national and international levels. PMID:24857843

  12. Assessment of leadership training needs of internal medicine residents at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Traci N; Blumenthal, Daniel M; Bernard, Kenneth; Iyasere, Christiana

    2015-07-01

    Internal medicine (IM) physicians, including residents, assume both formal and informal leadership roles that significantly impact clinical and organizational outcomes. However, most internists lack formal leadership training. In 2013 and 2014, we surveyed all rising second-year IM residents at a large northeastern academic medical center about their need for, and preferences regarding, leadership training. Fifty-five of 113 residents (49%) completed the survey. Forty-four residents (80% of respondents) reported a need for additional formal leadership training. A self-reported need for leadership training was not associated with respondents' gender or previous leadership training and experience. Commonly cited leadership skill needs included "leading a team" (98% of residents), "confronting problem employees" (93%), "coaching and developing others" (93%), and "resolving interpersonal conflict" (84%). Respondents preferred to learn about leadership using multiple teaching modalities. Fifty residents (91%) preferred to have a physician teach them about leadership, while 19 (35%) wanted instruction from a hospital manager. IM residents may not receive adequate leadership development education during pregraduate and postgraduate training. IM residents may be more likely to benefit from leadership training interventions that are physician-led, multimodal, and occur during the second year of residency. These findings can help inform the design of effective leadership development programs for physician trainees.

  13. Recruiting Quarterbacks: Strategies for Revitalizing Training in Primary Care Internal Medicine.

    PubMed

    Goroll, Allan H

    2016-02-01

    Current U.S. primary care workforce shortages and trainees' declining interest in primary care residency training, especially regarding primary care internal medicine, have many parallels with circumstances in the early 1970s, when modern adult primary care first emerged. Rediscovery of the lessons learned and the solutions developed at that time and applying them to the current situation have the potential to help engage a new generation of young physicians in the primary care mission.The author compares the internal medicine residency primary care track at the University of New Mexico, described by Brislen and colleagues in this issue, with the nation's first three-year primary care internal medicine residency track introduced at Massachusetts General Hospital in 1973. Strategies for addressing the challenges of primary care practice and improving learner attitudes toward the field are discussed. The author suggests that primary care physicians should be likened to "quarterbacks" rather than "gatekeepers" or "providers" to underscore the intensity of training, level of responsibility, degree of professionalism, and amount of compensation required for this profession. The advent of multidisciplinary team practice, modern health information technology, and fundamental payment reform promises to dramatically alter the picture of primary care, restoring its standing as one of the best job descriptions in medicine.

  14. Signs of Drug Use and Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts ... Antonio_Diaz Matt's brother Stephen is addicted to meth. Matt wants to help Stephen, but he isn' ...

  15. DoD-Supported Overseas Training Rotations in Tropical Medicine and Global Health, 2000-2015.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, James D; Hickey, Patrick W; Coldren, Rodney L; Korman, Amy K; Keep, Lisa W; DeFraites, Robert F; Smith, Maria; Mancuso, Luke J; Sanchez, Jose L

    2017-03-01

    In 1999, the Department of Defense developed a tropical medicine training program (TMTP) to train military physicians, medical students, and scientists in performing surveillance activities in an overseas environment. This review describes the competencies, educational approach, program participants, institutional collaborations, and process outcomes of the TMTP from 2000 to 2015. TMTP-sponsored rotations addressed a wide variety of interdisciplinary competencies, many of which have military-unique applications. Rotations consisted of both didactic and experiential (overseas) components. The program provided 282 rotations for 260 trainees between 2006 and 2015, the years for which data were available. The Department of Defense accrues benefits from this training program in three main ways: (1) building a cadre of health care professionals who will go on to work at the overseas research laboratories, (2) supporting force health protection and readiness through experiential tropical medicine training, and (3) engaging in global health collaborations and partnerships. The primary challenges include funding, health and security, trainee and site heterogeneity, supervision, trainee engagement, and burden on the host institution. The program will continue to focus on improvement in these areas, with special attention to trainee preparation, communication with both trainees and host sites, and increasing reciprocity with host sites and their faculty.

  16. Innovative strategies for transforming internal medicine residency training in resource-limited settings: the Mozambique experience.

    PubMed

    Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Carrilho, Carla; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Funzamo, Carlos; Patel, Sam; Preziosi, Michael; Lederer, Philip; Tilghman, Winston; Benson, Constance A; Badaró, Roberto; Nguenha, A; Schooley, Robert T; Noormahomed, Emília V

    2014-08-01

    With approximately 4 physicians per 100,000 inhabitants, Mozambique faces one of the most severe health care provider shortages in Sub-Saharan Africa. The lack of sufficient well-trained medical school faculty is one of Mozambique's major barrier to producing new physicians annually. A partnership between the Universidade Eduardo Mondlane and the University of California, San Diego, has addressed this challenge with support from the Medical Education Partnership Initiative. After an initial needs assessment involving questionnaires and focus groups of residents, and working with key members from the Ministry of Health, the Medical Council, and Maputo Central Hospital, a set of interventions was designed. The hospital's internal medicine residency program was chosen as the focus for the plan. Interventions included curriculum design, new teaching methodologies, investment in an informatics infrastructure for access to digital references, building capacity to support clinical research, and providing financial incentives to retain junior faculty. The number of candidates entering the internal medicine residency program has increased, and detailed monitoring and evaluation is measuring the impact of these changes on the quality of training. These changes are expected to improve the long-term quality of postgraduate training in general through dissemination to other departments. They also have the potential to facilitate equitable distribution of specialists nationwide by expanding postgraduate training to other hospitals and universities.

  17. Global health and transfusion medicine: education and training in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Eichbaum, Quentin; Shan, Hua; Goncalez, Thelma T; Duits, A J; Knox, Patricia; Reilly, Jim; Andrews, David

    2014-07-01

    Education and training in transfusion medicine have improved over the past decade in developing countries but are still generally deficient for the purpose of maintaining the safety of the global blood supply. In 2009, the World Health Organization global database on blood safety indicated that only 72% of countries in the world were able to meet their training needs necessary for maintaining the safety of their local blood supply. Educational approaches in transfusion medicine vary widely between continents and world regions. In this article, we summarize a session on global health education and training in developing countries that took place at the 2012 AABB conference. The panel consisted of transfusion representatives from South America (Brazil), Asia (China), Africa (South Africa), and the Caribbean (Curaçao), as well as a description of capacitation issues in postearthquake Haiti and the pivotal role of the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) in transfusion training and education in Africa. We present here summaries of each of these panel presentations.

  18. A multimethod approach for cross-cultural training in an internal medicine residency program.

    PubMed

    Staton, Lisa J; Estrada, Carlos; Panda, Mukta; Ortiz, David; Roddy, Donna

    2013-01-01

    Background Cultural competence training in residency is important to improve learners' confidence in cross-cultural encounters. Recognition of cultural diversity and avoidance of cultural stereotypes are essential for health care providers. Methods We developed a multimethod approach for cross-cultural training of Internal Medicine residents and evaluated participants' preparedness for cultural encounters. The multimethod approach included (1) a conference series, (2) a webinar with a national expert, (3) small group sessions, (4) a multicultural social gathering, (5) a Grand Rounds presentation on cross-cultural training, and (6) an interactive, online case-based program. Results The program had 35 participants, 28 of whom responded to the survey. Of those, 16 were white (62%), and residents comprised 71% of respondents (n=25). Following training, 89% of participants were more comfortable obtaining a social history. However, prior to the course only 27% were comfortable caring for patients who distrust the US system and 35% could identify religious beliefs and customs which impact care. Most (71%) believed that the training would help them give better care for patients from different cultures, and 63% felt more comfortable negotiating a treatment plan following the course. Conclusions Multimethod training may improve learners' confidence and comfort with cross-cultural encounters, as well as lay the foundation for ongoing learning. Follow-up is needed to assess whether residents' perceived comfort will translate into improved patient outcomes.

  19. Evaluation of the educational environment of the Saudi family medicine residency training program

    PubMed Central

    Khoja, Abdullah T.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The study was conducted to evaluate the educational environment (EE) in Family Medicine Training Programs. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey, The Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM), was distributed to all residents at the four training centers in the central region. Cronbach's alpha was used to test the reliability. The mean and standard deviation (SD) for each item, the overall score and the three domains were calculated. A multiple linear regression model was developed with PHEEM scores as an outcome. The Mann–Whitney–Wilcoxon test was used to compare each item based on the selected factors. Results: The overall score was 67.1/160 (SD: 20.1). The PHEEM's domains scores: 24.2/56 (SD: 7.13) for perception of role autonomy; 25.3/60 (SD: 8.88), for perception of teaching; and 17/44 (SD: 5.6), for perception of social support. Training center and Level of training were the significant outcome predictors. Centre 1 (Joint Program) significantly had better scores than Centre 2. The instrument showed great reliability with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.92. Conclusions: There are many problems in the training program. Urgent actions are needed to improve the residents' learning experience particularly during rotations. Also, the curriculum should be restructured, and effective training methods introduced using the Best Evidence in Medical Education to meet the expectations and learning needs of family physicians. PMID:25657612

  20. Conference report: Undergraduate family medicine and primary care training in Sub-Saharan Africa: Reflections of the PRIMAFAMED network

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Robert; Essuman, Akye; Flinkenflögel, Maaike

    2017-01-01

    Internationally, there is a move towards strengthening primary healthcare systems and encouraging community-based and socially responsible education. The development of doctors with an interest in primary healthcare and family medicine in the African region should begin during undergraduate training. Over the last few years, attention has been given to the development of postgraduate training in family medicine in the African region, but little attention has been given to undergraduate training. This article reports on the 8th PRIMAFAMED (Primary Care and Family Medicine Education) network meeting held in Nairobi from 21 to 24 May 2016. At this meeting the delegates spent time presenting and discussing the current state of undergraduate training at 18 universities in the region and shared lessons on how to successfully implement undergraduate training. This article reports on the rationale for, information presented, process followed and conclusions reached at the conference. PMID:28155289

  1. Interoception and drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Martin P; Stewart, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    The role of interoception and its neural basis with relevance to drug addiction is reviewed. Interoception consists of the receiving, processing, and integrating body-relevant signals with external stimuli to affect ongoing motivated behavior. The insular cortex is the central nervous system hub to process and integrate these signals. Interoception is an important component of several addiction relevant constructs including arousal, attention, stress, reward, and conditioning. Imaging studies with drug-addicted individuals show that the insular cortex is hypo-active during cognitive control processes but hyperactive during cue reactivity and drug-specific, reward-related processes. It is proposed that interoception contributes to drug addiction by incorporating an "embodied" experience of drug uses together with the individual's predicted versus actual internal state to modulate approach or avoidance behavior, i.e. whether to take or not to take drugs. This opens the possibility of two types of interventions. First, one may be able to modulate the embodied experience by enhancing insula reactivity where necessary, e.g. when engaging in drug seeking behavior, or attenuating insula when exposed to drug-relevant cues. Second, one may be able to reduce the urge to act by increasing the frontal control network, i.e. inhibiting the urge to use by employing cognitive training. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'NIDA 40th Anniversary Issue'.

  2. Senior house officers in medicine: postal survey of training and work experience.

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, P. J.; Newton, R. W.; Buckley, G.; Roberts, M. A.; Dodd, M.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe working conditions for senior house officers in medicine in Scotland and to relate these to the quality of clinical training they receive. DESIGN: Postal questionnaire survey. SUBJECTS: All senior house officers in medicine and related specialties in post in Scotland in October 1995 (n = 437); 252 (58%) respondents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Questionnaires covered hours, working patterns, measures of workload, an attitudes to work scale, and experience of education and training. RESULTS: In the week before the questionnaire, doctors on rotas had worked a mean of 7.4 (95% confidence interval 5.8 to 9.0) hours in excess of their contracts, compared with 3.7 (2.0 to 5.5) hours for those on partial shifts. The most common reason for this was "the needs of the patients or the service." Those on partial shifts reported significantly less continuity of care with patients than those on rotas (Mann-Whitney U test, z = -4.2, P < 0.0001) or full shifts (z = -2.08, P = 0.03). Doctors in general medicine reported significantly higher measures of workload (number of acute admissions, number of times called out, and fewest hours' uninterrupted sleep) than those in subspecialties. Consultants' clinical teaching and style of conducting a ward round were significantly related to factors extracted from the attitudes to work scale. CONCLUSIONS: The quality of senior house officers' training is detrimentally affected by a variety of conditions, especially the need for closer support and supervision, the need for greater feedback, and the lack of time that consultants have to dedicate to clinical training. Efforts should be made to improve these conditions and to reinforce a close working relationship between trainee and supervising consultant. PMID:9116556

  3. Education and training for medicines development, regulation, and clinical research in emerging countries.

    PubMed

    Kerpel-Fronius, Sandor; Rosenkranz, Bernd; Allen, Elizabeth; Bass, Rolf; Mainard, Jacques D; Dodoo, Alex; Dubois, Dominique J; Hela, Mandisa; Kern, Steven; Massud, Joao; Silva, Honorio; Whitty, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this satellite workshop held at the 17th World Congress of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (WCP2014) was to discuss the needs, optimal methods and practical approaches for extending education and teaching of medicines development, regulation, and clinical research to Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs). It was generally agreed that, for efficiently treating the rapidly growing number of patients suffering from non-communicable diseases, modern drug therapy has to become available more widely and with a shorter time lag in these countries. To achieve this goal many additional experts working in medicines development, regulation, and clinical research have to be trained in parallel. The competence-oriented educational programs designed within the framework of the European Innovative Medicine Initiative-PharmaTrain (IMI-PhT) project were developed with the purpose to cover these interconnected fields. In addition, the programs can be easily adapted to the various local needs, primarily due to their modular architecture and well defined learning outcomes. Furthermore, the program is accompanied by stringent quality assurance standards which are essential for providing internationally accepted certificates. Effective cooperation between international and local experts and organizations, the involvement of the industry, health care centers and governments is essential for successful education. The initiative should also support the development of professional networks able to manage complex health care strategies. In addition it should help establish cooperation between neighboring countries for jointly managing clinical trials, as well as complex regulatory and ethical issues.

  4. Education and training for medicines development, regulation, and clinical research in emerging countries

    PubMed Central

    Kerpel-Fronius, Sandor; Rosenkranz, Bernd; Allen, Elizabeth; Bass, Rolf; Mainard, Jacques D.; Dodoo, Alex; Dubois, Dominique J.; Hela, Mandisa; Kern, Steven; Massud, Joao; Silva, Honorio; Whitty, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this satellite workshop held at the 17th World Congress of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (WCP2014) was to discuss the needs, optimal methods and practical approaches for extending education and teaching of medicines development, regulation, and clinical research to Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs). It was generally agreed that, for efficiently treating the rapidly growing number of patients suffering from non-communicable diseases, modern drug therapy has to become available more widely and with a shorter time lag in these countries. To achieve this goal many additional experts working in medicines development, regulation, and clinical research have to be trained in parallel. The competence-oriented educational programs designed within the framework of the European Innovative Medicine Initiative-PharmaTrain (IMI-PhT) project were developed with the purpose to cover these interconnected fields. In addition, the programs can be easily adapted to the various local needs, primarily due to their modular architecture and well defined learning outcomes. Furthermore, the program is accompanied by stringent quality assurance standards which are essential for providing internationally accepted certificates. Effective cooperation between international and local experts and organizations, the involvement of the industry, health care centers and governments is essential for successful education. The initiative should also support the development of professional networks able to manage complex health care strategies. In addition it should help establish cooperation between neighboring countries for jointly managing clinical trials, as well as complex regulatory and ethical issues. PMID:25926798

  5. Uniform Evaluation of Programs to Combat Narcotic Addiction. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friends of Psychiatric Research, Inc., Baltimore, MD.

    Early in 1967, the Office of Economic Opportunity was authorized to formulate and carry out programs for the prevention of narcotic addiction and the rehabilitation of narcotic addicts. Such programs were required to include provisions for the detoxification, guidance, training and job placement of narcotic addicts. The programs were aimed at…

  6. Emergency medicine residents’ attitudes and opinions of in-training exam preparation

    PubMed Central

    Eastin, Travis R; Bernard, Aaron W

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Emergency Medicine (EM) residents take the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) in-training exam, and performance on this exam has been shown to correlate to performance on the ABEM qualifying exam. Though many residencies have in-training exam preparation activities, there is little data on the effectiveness of these efforts. This study aimed to elicit resident perspectives about the exam and exam preparation in order to generate hypotheses and better inform future preparation efforts. Methods Second- and third-year EM residents at a single institution were interviewed using a semi-structured format. Qualitative methodology was used to analyze the data. Results Thirteen EM residents participated in the study. Eight major themes and 18 sub-themes were identified. These were further characterized as relating to the exam itself or to exam preparation. Residents generally value the in-training exam. Sixty-nine percent noted that it provided an assessment of their current knowledge and deficiencies. Thirty-eight percent noted that it improved familiarity with the qualifying exam. Regarding exam preparation, residents stated that a question format was preferred, especially when accompanying explanations were of high quality. Additionally, practical considerations, such as portability, impacted resident selection of study tools. Conclusion Residents value the in-training exam as a marker of their academic progress and for their ability to gain familiarity with the qualifying exam. They prefer question-based preparation over text-based learning, as long as there is a detailed explanation of each answer. Educators creating structured in-training review may want to focus on question-based material with detailed explanations. PMID:24062620

  7. EM Talk: communication skills training for emergency medicine patients with serious illness.

    PubMed

    Grudzen, Corita R; Emlet, Lillian L; Kuntz, Joanne; Shreves, Ashley; Zimny, Erin; Gang, Maureen; Schaulis, Monique; Schmidt, Scott; Isaacs, Eric; Arnold, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The emergency department visit for a patient with serious illness represents a sentinel event, signalling a change in the illness trajectory. By better understanding patient and family wishes, emergency physicians can reinforce advance care plans and ensure the hospital care provided matches the patient's values. Despite their importance in care at the end of life, emergency physicians have received little training on how to talk to seriously ill patients and their families about goals of care. To expand communication skills training to emergency medicine, we developed a programme to give emergency medicine physicians the ability to empathically deliver serious news and to talk about goals of care. We have built on lessons from prior studies to design an intervention employing the most effective pedagogical techniques, including the use of simulated patients/families, role-playing and small group learning with constructive feedback from master clinicians. Here, we describe our evidence-based communication skills training course EM Talk using simulation, reflective feedback and deliberate practice.

  8. Training veterinary students in shelter medicine: a service-learning community-classroom technique.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Brenda J; Gruen, Margaret E

    2014-01-01

    Shelter medicine is a rapidly developing field of great importance, and shelters themselves provide abundant training opportunities for veterinary medical students. Students trained in shelter medicine have opportunities to practice zoonotic and species-specific infectious disease control, behavioral evaluation and management, primary care, animal welfare, ethics, and public policy issues. A range of sheltering systems now exists, from brick-and-mortar facilities to networks of foster homes with no centralized facility. Exposure to a single shelter setting may not allow students to understand the full range of sheltering systems that exist; a community-classroom approach introduces students to a diverse array of sheltering systems while providing practical experience. This article presents the details and results of a series of 2-week elective clinical rotations with a focus on field and service learning in animal shelters. The overall aim was to provide opportunities that familiarized students with sheltering systems and delivered primary-care training. Other priorities included increasing awareness of public health concerns and equipping students to evaluate shelters on design, operating protocols, infectious disease control, animal enrichment, and community outreach. Students were required to participate in rounds and complete a project that addressed a need recognized by them during the rotation. This article includes costs associated with the rotation, a blueprint for how the rotation was carried out at our institution, and details of shelters visited and animals treated, including a breakdown of treatments provided. Also discussed are the student projects and student feedback on this valuable clinical experience.

  9. The Experience of Addiction as Told by the Addicted: Incorporating Biological Understandings into Self-Story

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Rachel R; Dingel, Molly J; Ostergren, Jenny E; Nowakowski, Katherine E; Koenig, Barbara A

    2012-01-01

    How do the addicted view addiction against the framework of formal theories that attempt to explain the condition? In this empirical paper, we report on the lived experience of addiction based on 63 semi-structured, open-ended interviews with individuals in treatment for alcohol and nicotine abuse at five sites in Minnesota. Using qualitative analysis, we identified four themes that provide insights into understanding how people who are addicted view their addiction, with particular emphasis on the biological model. More than half of our sample articulated a biological understanding of addiction as a disease. Themes did not cluster by addictive substance used; however, biological understandings of addiction did cluster by treatment center. Biological understandings have the potential to become dominant narratives of addiction in the current era. Though the desire for a “unified theory” of addiction seems curiously seductive to scholars, it lacks utility. Conceptual “disarray” may actually reflect a more accurate representation of the illness as told by those who live with it. For practitioners in the field of addiction, we suggest the practice of narrative medicine with its ethic of negative capability as a useful approach for interpreting and relating to diverse experiences of disease and illness. PMID:23081782

  10. [Heroin addiction].

    PubMed

    Hosztafi, Sándor

    2011-01-01

    Heroin is an illicit, highly addictive drug. It is either the most abused or the most rapidly acting member of opioids. Abusers describe a feeling of a surge of pleasurable sensation, named as "rush" or "high". Repeated administration of high doses of heroin results in the induction of physical dependence. Physical dependence refers to an altered physiological state produced by chronic administration of heroin which necessitates the continued administration of the drug to prevent the appearance of a characteristic syndrome, the opioid withdrawal or abstinence syndrome. Withdrawal symptoms may occur within a few hours after the last administration of heroin. Symptoms of the withdrawal include restlessness, insomnia, drug craving, diarrhea, muscle and bone pain, cold flashes with goose bumps, and leg movements. Major withdrawal symptoms peak between 48 and 72 hours after the last dose of heroin and subside after about a week. At this time, weakness and depression are pronounced and nausea and vomiting are common. Nevertheless, some chronic addicts have shown persistent withdrawal signs for many months or even years. Heroin addiction is considered as a behavioural state of compulsive drug use and a high tendency to relapse after periods of abstinence. It is generally accepted that compulsive use and relapse are typically associated with the status of heroin craving or heroin hunger that are difficult to define but appear to be powerful motivational significance in the addiction process. The route of administering heroin varies largely and may indicate the degree of seriousness of the individual's addiction. Intravenous administration seems to be the predominant method of heroin use, but recently a shift in heroin use pattern has been found, i.e. from injection to sniffing and smoking. Frequent injections coupled with widespread sharing of syringes increase the risk of contracting HIV, hepatitis B, C and other blood-borne infectious diseases. Long-term use of heroin

  11. Training evidence-based veterinary medicine by collaborative development of critically appraised topics.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Sebastian P; Haimerl, Peggy; Heuwieser, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    In current veterinary education, skills such as retrieving, critically appraising, interpreting, and applying the results of published scientific studies are rarely taught. In this study, the authors tested the concept of team-based development of critically appraised topics (CATs) in training students in evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM). The 116 participants were in their fifth year and attending the clinical rotation at the Clinic for Animal Reproduction. Students developed 18 CATs of varying quality on topics of their choice. Preparing the CATs in teams stimulated discussion on the topic and the quality of the retrieved papers. Evaluation of the project revealed that more than 90% of the students endorsed training in critical appraisal of information in veterinary education. In addition, more than 90% considered the development of CATs an effective exercise for assessing the quality of scientific literature. A provided literature evaluation form was perceived as a useful tool for systematically summarizing a publication's quality. In conclusion, team-based development of CATs during clinical rotations is highly valuable for training in EBVM. Learning and intrinsic motivation seem to be enhanced by creating a situation similar to veterinary practice because the task is embedded into an authentic clinical problem. This approach to clinical training helps to prepare students to integrate evidence from literature into practice.

  12. Basic estimate of needs for training in evidence-based medicine in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Bacharova, L; Hlavacka, S; Rusnakova, V

    2000-01-01

    This study reports the findings of the first survey of the knowledge and needs for training in evidence based medicine (EBM) of health-care workers in Slovakia. This study was primarily qualitative and based on a triangular approach, which included: analysis of the situation in pre- and postgraduate education in Slovakia aimed at estimating needs in EBM and critical appraisal skills (CAS) training; analysis of questionnaires distributed in a sample of medical doctors and university educated public health workers undergoing postgraduate training; and focus group discussions. The findings revealed a real gap in knowledge in EBM and CAS in Slovakia and identified several areas as the focus for intervention. The results showed also some important behavioural and cultural aspects, including low individual responsibility for education; tendency to delegate responsibility to authorities (experts, top management, Ministry of Health); and persistence of the state paternalistic type of education. Concludes that managers planning to implement EBM in Slovakia should therefore consider a broader behavioural and cultural context for change, not just introduction of a training EBM module.

  13. Knowledge Levels and Training Needs of Disaster Medicine among Health Professionals, Medical Students, and Local Residents in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongwei; Yin, Jianhua; Tan, Xiaojie; Chang, Wenjun; Ding, Yibo; Han, Yifang; Cao, Guangwen

    2013-01-01

    Background Disaster is a serious public health issue. Health professionals and community residents are main players in disaster responses but their knowledge levels of disaster medicine are not readily available. This study aimed to evaluate knowledge levels and training needs of disaster medicine among potential disaster responders and presented a necessity to popularize disaster medicine education. Methods A self-reporting questionnaire survey on knowledge level and training needs of disaster medicine was conducted in Shanghai, China, in 2012. A total of randomly selected 547 health professionals, 456 medical students, and 1,526 local residents provided intact information. The total response rate was 93.7%. Results Overall, 1.3% of these participants have received systematic disaster medicine training. News media (87.1%) was the most common channel to acquire disaster medicine knowledge. Although health professionals were more knowledgeable than community residents, their knowledge structure of disaster medicine was not intact. Medical teachers were more knowledgeable than medical practitioners and health administrators (p = 0.002). Clinicians performed better than public health physicians (p<0.001), whereas public health students performed better than clinical medical students (p<0.001). In community residents, education background significantly affected the knowledge level on disaster medicine (p<0.001). Training needs of disaster medicine were generally high among the surveyed. ‘Lecture’ and ‘practical training’ were preferred teaching methods. The selected key and interested contents on disaster medicine training were similar between health professionals and medical students, while the priorities chosen by local residents were quite different from health professionals and medical students (p<0.001). Conclusions Traditional clinical-oriented medical education might lead to a huge gap between the knowledge level on disaster medicine and the current

  14. Reflection and Outlook for the Future of Addictions Treatment and Training: An Interview with William R. Miller

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Jason B.; Madson, Michael B.

    2006-01-01

    The development of motivational interviewing (MI) has contributed to a significant change in the zeitgeist of substance abuse treatment. Dr. William Miller has been instrumental in the direction MI has taken. Dr. Miller helped develop MI, guide research and training initiatives, and as a result set a solid foundation for the future of MI. In this…

  15. Integration of genomic medicine into pathology residency training: the stanford open curriculum.

    PubMed

    Schrijver, Iris; Natkunam, Yasodha; Galli, Stephen; Boyd, Scott D

    2013-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing methods provide an opportunity for molecular pathology laboratories to perform genomic testing that is far more comprehensive than single-gene analyses. Genome-based test results are expected to develop into an integral component of diagnostic clinical medicine and to provide the basis for individually tailored health care. To achieve these goals, rigorous interpretation of high-quality data must be informed by the medical history and the phenotype of the patient. The discipline of pathology is well positioned to implement genome-based testing and to interpret its results, but new knowledge and skills must be included in the training of pathologists to develop expertise in this area. Pathology residents should be trained in emerging technologies to integrate genomic test results appropriately with more traditional testing, to accelerate clinical studies using genomic data, and to help develop appropriate standards of data quality and evidence-based interpretation of these test results. We have created a genomic pathology curriculum as a first step in helping pathology residents build a foundation for the understanding of genomic medicine and its implications for clinical practice. This curriculum is freely accessible online.

  16. Establishing the need for family medicine training in intimate partner violence screening.

    PubMed

    Pagels, Patti; Kindratt, Tiffany B; Reyna, Guadalupe; Lam, Kenrick; Silver, Mandy; Gimpel, Nora E

    2015-06-01

    In 2012, the USPSTF updated its guidelines and now recommends that all women of childbearing age be screened for IPV and services provided for women who screen positive. Based on these recommendations, objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate IPV knowledge, attitudes, and practices of physicians from different specialties and (2) determine significant differences by medical specialty. We recruited (n = 183) Internal Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Family Medicine (FM) and Obstetrics/Gynecology (OB/GYN) residents and attending physicians to complete a 15-question online survey assessing knowledge, attitudes and current IPV screening practices. We evaluated associations between medical specialty and knowledge, attitudes and practice measures before and after controlling for covariates. Knowledge of how often IPV occurs in society, community resources, and screening tools were significantly different by specialty (all p's < 0.05). A majority of FM physicians (88%) reported that it is a physician's responsibility to find and treat IPV and 97% reported that IPV should be included in their training. Compared to OB/GYN physicians in multivariate analyses, FM physicians were less likely to report they were comfortable discussing IPV with their patients in crude (OR = 0.35; 95% CI = 0.13, 0.94) and adjusted models (OR = 0.20; 95% CI = 0.06, 0.60). FM physicians were also less likely to report screening female patients for IPV before (OR = 0.25; 95% CI = 0.08, 0.86) and after adjusting for confounders (OR = 0.11; 95% CI = 0.03, 0.47). Our results indicate that FM physicians have positive attitudes towards finding and treating IPV yet need enhanced training to improve their comfort level with screening for and discussing IPV with their patients.

  17. Student peer assessment in evidence-based medicine (EBM) searching skills training: an experiment

    PubMed Central

    Eldredge, Jonathan D.; Bear, David G.; Wayne, Sharon J.; Perea, Paul P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Student peer assessment (SPA) has been used intermittently in medical education for more than four decades, particularly in connection with skills training. SPA generally has not been rigorously tested, so medical educators have limited evidence about SPA effectiveness. Methods: Experimental design: Seventy-one first-year medical students were stratified by previous test scores into problem-based learning tutorial groups, and then these assigned groups were randomized further into intervention and control groups. All students received evidence-based medicine (EBM) training. Only the intervention group members received SPA training, practice with assessment rubrics, and then application of anonymous SPA to assignments submitted by other members of the intervention group. Results: Students in the intervention group had higher mean scores on the formative test with a potential maximum score of 49 points than did students in the control group, 45.7 and 43.5, respectively (P = 0.06). Conclusions: SPA training and the application of these skills by the intervention group resulted in higher scores on formative tests compared to those in the control group, a difference approaching statistical significance. The extra effort expended by librarians, other personnel, and medical students must be factored into the decision to use SPA in any specific educational context. Implications: SPA has not been rigorously tested, particularly in medical education. Future, similarly rigorous studies could further validate use of SPA so that librarians can optimally make use of limited contact time for information skills training in medical school curricula. PMID:24163593

  18. A System Approach to Navy Medical Education and Training. Appendix 27. Competency Curriculum for Nuclear Medicine Technician.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-31

    NAVY Quida C. Upchurch, Capt., NC, USN Program Manager Education and Training R&D Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (Code 71G) fo I.t as I ie a s s n d...of what the health care personnel in the Navy’s Medical Department, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery actually do in their occupations; improving the...in vitro counting and scanning instrumentation (Criteria) On tecnical review by supervisor, studies are determined to be accurate; performed

  19. Toward Anatomical Simulation for Breath Training in Mind/Body Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Benjamin; Dilorenzo, Paul; Zordan, Victor; Bakal, Donald

    The use of breath in healing is poorly understood by patients and professionals alike. Dysfunctional breathing is a characteristic of many unexplained symptoms and mind/body medical professionals seek methods for breath training to alleviate such problems. Our approach is to re-purpose and evolve a recently developed anatomically inspired respiration simulation which was created for synthesizing motion in entertainment for the use of visualization in breath training. In mind/body medicine, problems are often created from patients being advised to breathe according to some standard based on pace or volume. However, a breathing pattern that is comfortable and effortless for one person may not have the same benefits for the next person. The breathing rhythm which is most effortless for each person needs to be dynamically identified. To this end, in this chapter, we employ optimization to modify a generic model of respiration to fit the breath patterns of specific individuals. In practice, the corresponding visualization which is specific to individual patients could be used to train proper breath behavior, both by showing specific (abnormal) practice and recommended modification(s).

  20. A model of standardized training in basic life support skills of emergency medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Cimrin, Arif H; Topacoglu, Hakan; Karcioglu, Ozgur; Ozsarac, Murat; Ayrik, Cuneyt

    2005-01-01

    This intervention study was designed to determine the current level of basic life support knowledge and skills of residents in a university-based emergency medicine residency program, and to investigate the potential benefit derived by these residents from a standardized theoretical and practical training session. All residents underwent tests before and after the training session. The residents were asked to perform basic life support on a recording cardiopulmonary resuscitation mannequin. Assessments were made using a 10-item checklist, with the highest score being 17. Each step performed by the resident was scored by an emergency physician for accuracy and effectiveness. Twenty-eight residents participated in the study. According to the modified Berden scale, the pretest and posttest scores were 11.2 +/- 2.9 and 15.6 +/- 1.0, respectively, and the mean difference was 4.36 +/- 2.9 (t test, P<.001). Only 11 residents (39.3%) were rated as "good" or "very good" in the pretest, whereas the corresponding figure in the posttest was 27 (96.4%) (P<.001). Skills, such as checking the airway patency (P<.001), checking breathing (P<.001), appropriate compression rate (P<.003), and delivering 2 effective breaths (P<.001), improved significantly. Depth of chest compression (P<.023) was improved significantly only in residents with fewer than 2 years of experience. The training process should comprise standardized courses to facilitate acquisition of the desired skills.

  1. Understanding Drug Use and Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications » DrugFacts » Understanding Drug Use and Addiction Understanding Drug Use and Addiction Email Facebook Twitter Revised August ... drug addiction and lead productive lives. What Is drug addiction? Addiction is a chronic disease characterized by ...

  2. The residency program in social medicine of Montefiore Medical Center: 37 years of mission-driven, interdisciplinary training in primary care, population health, and social medicine.

    PubMed

    Strelnick, A H; Swiderski, Debbie; Fornari, Alice; Gorski, Victoria; Korin, Eliana; Ozuah, Philip; Townsend, Janet M; Selwyn, Peter A

    2008-04-01

    Founded in 1970 to train physicians to practice in community health centers and underserved areas, the Residency Program in Social Medicine (RPSM) of Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York, has graduated 562 board-eligible family physicians, general internists, and pediatricians whose careers fulfill this mission. The RPSM was a model for federal funding for primary care residency programs and has received Title VII grants during most of its history. The RPSM has tailored its mission and structured its curriculum to promote a community and population orientation and to provide the requisite knowledge and skills for integrating social medicine into clinical practice. Six unique hallmarks of RPSM training are (1) mission-oriented resident recruitment/selection and self-management, (2) interdisciplinary collaborative training among primary care professionals, (3) community-health-center-based and community-oriented primary care education, (4) biopsychosocial and ecological family systems curriculum, (5) the social medicine core curriculum and projects, and (6) grant support through Title VII. These hallmark curricular, training, and funding elements, in which population health is deeply embedded, have been carefully evaluated, regularly revised, and empirically validated since the program's inception. Practice outcomes for RPSM graduates as leaders in and advocates for population health and the care of underserved communities are described and discussed in this case study.

  3. Geriatric medicine fellowship programs: a national study from the Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs' Longitudinal Study of Training and Practice in Geriatric Medicine.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, Gregg A; Bragg, Elizabeth J; Shaull, Ruth W; Goldenhar, Linda M; Lindsell, Christopher J

    2003-07-01

    This report documents the development and growth of geriatric medicine fellowship training in the United States through 2002. A cross-sectional survey of geriatric medicine fellowship programs was conducted in the fall 2001. All allopathic (119) and osteopathic (7) accredited geriatric medicine fellowship-training programs in the United States were involved. Data were collected using self-administered mailed and Web-based survey instruments. Longitudinal data from the American Medical Association (AMA) and the Association of American Medical Colleges' (AAMC) National Graduate Medical Education (GME) Census, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), and the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) were also analyzed. The survey instrument was designed to gather data about faculty, fellows, program curricula, and program directors (PDs). In addition, annual AMA/AAMC data from 1991 to the present was compiled to examine trends in the number of fellowship programs and the number of fellows. The overall survey response rate was 76% (96 of 126 PDs). Most (54%) of the PDs had been in their current position 4 or more years (range: <1-20 years), and 59% of PDs reported that they had completed formal geriatric medicine fellowship training. The number of fellowship programs and the number of fellows entering programs has slowly increased over the past decade. During 2001-02, 338 fellows were training in allopathic programs and seven in osteopathic programs (all years of training). Forty-six percent (n = 44) of responding programs offered only 1-year fellowship-training experiences. PDs reported that application rates for fellowship positions were stable during the academic years (AYs) 1999-2002, with the median number of applications per first year position available in AY 2000-01 being 10 (range: 1-77). In 2001-02, data from the AMA/AAMC National GME Census indicated a fill rate for first-year geriatric medicine fellowship positions of 69% (259 first

  4. Point-of-care ultrasonography as a training milestone for internal medicine residents: the time is now

    PubMed Central

    Sabath, Bruce F.; Singh, Gurkeerat

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care (POC) ultrasonography is considered fundamental in emergency medicine training and recently has become a milestone in critical care fellowship programs as well. Currently, there is no such standard requirement for internal medicine residency programs in the United States. We present a new case and briefly review another case at our institution – a community hospital – in which internal medicine house staff trained in ultrasonography were able to uncover unexpected and critical diagnoses that significantly changed patient care and outcomes. We also review the growing evidence of the application of ultrasound in the diagnosis of a myriad of conditions encountered in general internal medicine as well as the mounting data on the ability of internal medicine residents to apply this technology accurately at the bedside. We advocate that the literature has sufficiently established the role of POC ultrasonography in general internal medicine that there should no longer be any delay in giving this an official place in the development of internal medicine trainees. This may be particularly useful in the community hospital setting where 24-h echocardiography or other sonography may not be readily available. PMID:27802866

  5. EC4 European Syllabus for Post-Graduate Training in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: version 3 - 2005.

    PubMed

    Zerah, Simone; McMurray, Janet; Bousquet, Bernard; Baum, Hannsjorg; Beastall, Graham H; Blaton, Vic; Cals, Marie-Josèphe; Duchassaing, Danielle; Gaudeau-Toussaint, Marie-Françoise; Harmoinen, Aimo; Hoffmann, Hans; Jansen, Rob T; Kenny, Desmond; Kohse, Klaus P; Köller, Ursula; Gobert, Jean-Gérard; Linget, Christine; Lund, Erik; Nubile, Giuseppe; Opp, Matthias; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinon, Georges; Queralto, José M; Reguengo, Henrique; Rizos, Demetrios; Szekeres, Thomas; Vidaud, Michel; Wallinder, Hans

    2006-01-01

    The EC4 Syllabus for Postgraduate Training is the basis for the European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The syllabus: Indicates the level of requirements in postgraduate training to harmonise the postgraduate education in the European Union (EU); Indicates the level of content of national training programmes to obtain adequate knowledge and experience; Is approved by all EU societies for clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. The syllabus is not primarily meant to be a training guide, but on the basis of the overview given (common minimal programme), national societies should formulate programmes that indicate where knowledge and experience is needed. The main points of this programme are: Indicates the level of requirements in postgraduate training to harmonise the postgraduate education in the European Union (EU); Indicates the level of content of national training programmes to obtain adequate knowledge and experience; Is approved by all EU societies for clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. Knowledge in biochemistry, haematology, immunology, etc.; Pre-analytical conditions; Evaluation of results; Interpretations (post-analytical phase); Laboratory management; and Quality insurance management. The aim of this version of the syllabus is to be in accordance with the Directive of Professional Qualifications published on 30 September 2005. To prepare the common platforms planned in this directive, the disciplines are divided into four categories: Indicates the level of requirements in postgraduate training to harmonise the postgraduate education in the European Union (EU); Indicates the level of content of national training programmes to obtain adequate knowledge and experience; Is approved by all EU societies for clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. Knowledge in biochemistry, haematology, immunology, etc.; Pre-analytical conditions; Evaluation of results; Interpretations (post-analytical phase); Laboratory

  6. [Interdisciplinary training opportunities for residents in occupational medicine: the experience of the ERC Tour 2012].

    PubMed

    Toninelli, E; Fostinelli, J; Rosen, M A; Lucchini, R; Apostoli, P

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the experience of the School of Occupational Medicine of the University of Brescia at the current edition of the New York and New Jersey Education and Research Center--Historical Perspectives Tour on Occupational Safety and Health, that involved 5 different industrial and environmental sites, appropriate for understanding the complex occupational health and safety problems. In every site, the participants have interacted with workers and professionals and discussed about the specific work processes, to better understand the risk faced by the workers, occupational pathologies that can occur, personal protective equipment used and preventive measures adopted. This experience has been successful in provide interdisciplinary educations to occupational safety and health professionals in training in order to prepare them for the collaboration and cooperation required to solve the complex occupational health and safety problems they will face in their future careers.

  7. What Do Psychiatric Residents Think of Addiction Psychiatry as a Career?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renner, John A., Jr.; Karam-Hage, Maher; Levinson, Marjorie; Craig, Thomas; Eld, Beatrice

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors attempt to better understand the recent decline in the number of applicants to addiction psychiatry training. Methods: The Corresponding Committee on Training and Education in Addiction Psychiatry of APA's Council on Addiction Psychiatry sent out a 14-question anonymous e-mail survey to all postgraduate-year 2 (PGY-2)…

  8. Point-of-care ultrasound as a competency for general internists: a survey of internal medicine training programs in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Ailon, Jonathan; Mourad, Ophyr; Nadjafi, Maral; Cavalcanti, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Background Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is increasingly used on General Internal Medicine (GIM) inpatient services, creating a need for defined competencies and formalized training. We evaluated the extent of training in POCUS and the clinical use of POCUS among Canadian GIM residency programs. Method Internal Medicine trainees and GIM Faculty at the University of Toronto were surveyed on their clinical use of POCUS and the extent of their training. We separately surveyed Canadian IM Program Directors and Division Directors on the extent of POCUS training in their programs, barriers in the implementation of POCUS curricula, and recommendations for POCUS competencies in IM. Results A majority of IM trainees (90/118, 76%) and GIM Faculty (15/29, 52%) used POCUS clinically. However, the vast majority of resident (111/117, 95%) and GIM Faculty (18/28, 64%) had received limited training. Of the Program Leaders surveyed, half (9/17, 53%) reported POCUS clinical use by their trainees; however only one quarter (4/16, 25%) reported offering formal curricula. Most respondents agreed that POCUS training should be incorporated into IM residency curricula, specifically for procedural guidance. Conclusions A considerable discrepancy exists between the clinical use of POCUS and the extent of formal training among Canadian IM residents and GIM Faculty. We propose that formalized POCUS training should be incorporated into IM residency programs, GIM fellowships, and Faculty development sessions, and identify POCUS skills that could be incorporated into future IM curricula. PMID:28344693

  9. Building interactive virtual environments for simulated training in medicine using VRML and Java/JavaScript.

    PubMed

    Korocsec, D; Holobar, A; Divjak, M; Zazula, D

    2005-12-01

    Medicine is a difficult thing to learn. Experimenting with real patients should not be the only option; simulation deserves a special attention here. Virtual Reality Modelling Language (VRML) as a tool for building virtual objects and scenes has a good record of educational applications in medicine, especially for static and animated visualisations of body parts and organs. However, to create computer simulations resembling situations in real environments the required level of interactivity and dynamics is difficult to achieve. In the present paper we describe some approaches and techniques which we used to push the limits of the current VRML technology further toward dynamic 3D representation of virtual environments (VEs). Our demonstration is based on the implementation of a virtual baby model, whose vital signs can be controlled from an external Java application. The main contributions of this work are: (a) outline and evaluation of the three-level VRML/Java implementation of the dynamic virtual environment, (b) proposal for a modified VRML Timesensor node, which greatly improves the overall control of system performance, and (c) architecture of the prototype distributed virtual environment for training in neonatal resuscitation comprising the interactive virtual newborn, active bedside monitor for vital signs and full 3D representation of the surgery room.

  10. Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety ... prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with ...

  11. A multicenter study of internal medicine residents' perceptions of training, competence, and performance in outpatient HIV care.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Karran A; Cofrancesco, Joseph; Sisson, Stephen; Wu, Albert W; Bass, Eric B; Berkenblit, Gail

    2010-03-01

    Routine HIV screening is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), but it is unknown how well internal medicine residents are trained in HIV risk assessment, testing, counseling, and initial management of HIV patients. We sought to determine internal medicine residents' attitudes about HIV training and the factors that influence their HIV care performance utilizing a cross-sectional survey of 321 second- and third-year internal medicine residents from four programs in Baltimore, Boston, Detroit, and New York City between March and June 2006. Measurements included HIV care experience; attitudes, competency, and adequacy of HIV training; and basic HIV care performance and factors impacting performance. Two hundred twenty-three residents (69%) completed the survey. While 50% of residents reported over 30 HIV inpatient encounters in the past year, the majority of residents had limited outpatient exposure providing care for only 1-5 HIV outpatients. Managing HIV patients was rated an excellent educational opportunity by 89% of residents and 77% planned to care for HIV patients in the future. However, 39% stated that they did not feel competent to provide HIV outpatient care. Higher rates of residents reported deficiency in outpatient HIV training compared to outpatient non-HIV training (p < 0.05) or inpatient HIV training (p < 0.05). Residents reported substandard HIV risk assessment, testing, counseling, and initial management performance. Self-reported proficiency correlated with the number of HIV outpatients cared for and perceived training adequacy. Current residency training in HIV care remains largely inpatient-based and residents frequently rate HIV outpatient training as inadequate.

  12. Examination outcomes for international medical graduates pursuing or completing family medicine residency training in Quebec

    PubMed Central

    MacLellan, Anne-Marie; Brailovsky, Carlos; Rainsberry, Paul; Bowmer, Ian; Desrochers, Micheline

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To review the success of international medical graduates (IMGs) who are pursuing or have completed a Quebec residency training program and examinations. DESIGN We retrospectively reviewed IMGs’ success rates on the pre-residency Collège des médecins du Québec medical clinical sciences written examination and objective structured clinical examination, as well as on the post-residency Certification Examination in Family Medicine. SETTING Quebec. PARTICIPANTS All IMGs taking their examinations between 2001 and 2008, inclusive, and Canadian and American graduates taking their examinations during this same period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Success rates for IMGs on the pre-residency and post-residency examinations, compared with success rates for Canadian and American graduates. RESULTS Success rates on the pre-residency clinical examinations remained below 50% from 2001 to 2008 for IMGs. Similarly, during the same period, the average success rate on the Certification examination was 56.0% for IMGs, compared with 93.5% for Canadian and American medical graduates. CONCLUSION Despite pre-residency competency screening and in-program orientation and supports, a substantial number of IMGs in Quebec are not passing their Certification examinations. Another study is under way to analyze reasons for some IMGs’ lack of success and to find ways to help IMGs complete residency training successfully and pass the Certification examination. PMID:20841596

  13. Librarians in Evidence-Based Medicine Curricula: A Qualitative Study of Librarian Roles, Training, and Desires for Future Development.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Lauren A; Durieux, Nancy; Tannery, Nancy H

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to describe librarians' roles in evidence-based medicine (EBM) from the librarian perspective, identify how librarians are trained to teach, and highlight preferences for professional development. A multiinstitution qualitative study was conducted. Nine medical librarians identified by their faculty as integrated into EBM training were interviewed. Participants' descriptions indicated that they were active in curriculum development, deployment (including teaching activities), and assessment to support EBM. Participants identified direct experience and workshop participation as primary methods of learning to teach. Participants desired continuing development as teachers and requested opportunities for in-person workshops, shadowing physicians, and online training.

  14. [Development of an instrument for the surveillance of quality indicators in specialized training in Preventive Medicine and Public Health].

    PubMed

    Gil-Borrelli, Christian Carlo; Latasa, Pello; Reques, Laura; Alemán, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the process of developing an instrument intended for use in assessing satisfaction with the quality of training in preventive medicine and public health for resident physicians. To develop this instrument, the National Survey of Satisfaction with Medical Residency was adapted by an expert panel consisting of 23 resident physicians in preventive medicine and public health belonging to 9 autonomous communities in Spain. The adaptation of the survey to the specialty rotations included new dimensions and items and was evaluated with a 5-point Likert scale. The most important dimensions were planning and the achievement of specific objectives, supervision, delegation of responsibilities, resources and work environment, personal assessment, encouragement, support, and whether the rotation resulted in a publication or research project, etc. The development and utilization of this tool will enable future trainees in preventive medicine and public health to make an informed choice about their training itineraries.

  15. Meeting the Challenge of Practice Quality Improvement: A Study of Seven Family Medicine Residency Training Practices

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Sabrina M.; Miller, William L.; Shaw, Eric; Looney, Anna; Crabtree, Benjamin F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Incorporating quality improvement (QI) into resident education and clinical care is challenging. This report explores key characteristics shaping the relative success or failure of QI efforts in seven primary care practices serving as family medicine residency training sites. Method The authors used data from the 2002–2008 Using Learning Teams for Reflective Adaptation (ULTRA) study to conduct a comparative case analysis. This secondary data analysis focused on seven residency training practices' experiences with RAP (reflective adaptive process), a 12-week intensive QI process. Field notes, meeting notes, and audiotapes of RAP meetings were used to construct case summaries. A matrix comparing key themes across practices was used to rate practices' QI progress during RAP on a scale of 0 to 3. Results Three practices emerged as unsuccessful (scores of 0–1) and four as successful (scores of 2–3). Larger practices with previous QI experience, faculty with extensive exposure to QI literature, and an office manager, residency director, or medical director who advocated for the process made substantial progress during RAP, succeeding at QI. Smaller practices without these characteristics were unable to do so. Successful practices also engaged residents in the QI process and identified serious problems as potential crises; unsuccessful practices did not. Conclusions Larger residency training practices are more likely to have the resources and characteristics that permit them to create a QI-supportive culture leading to QI success. The authors suggest, however, that smaller practices may increase their chances of success by adopting a developmental approach to QI. PMID:22030767

  16. New paradigm in training of undergraduate clinical skills: the NEPTUNE-CS project at the Split University School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Vladimir J; Hozo, Izet; Rakic, Mladen; Jukic, Marko; Tomic, Snjezana; Kokic, Slaven; Ljutic, Dragan; Druzijanic, Nikica; Grkovic, Ivica; Simunovic, Filip; Marasovic, Dujomir

    2010-10-01

    Clinical skills' training is arguably the weakest point in medical schools' curriculum. This study briefly describes how we at the Split University School of Medicine cope with this problem. We consider that, over the last decades, a considerable advancement in teaching methodologies, tools, and assessment of students has been made. However, there are many unresolved issues, most notably: (i) the institutional value system, impeding the motivation of the teaching staff; (ii) lack of a strong mentoring system; (iii) organization, timing, and placement of training in the curriculum; (iv) lack of publications pertinent to training; and (v) unwillingness of patients to participate in student training. To improve the existing training models we suggest increased institutional awareness of obstacles, as well as willingness to develop mechanisms for increasing the motivation of faculty. It is necessary to introduce changes in the structure and timing of training and to complement it with a catalog, practicum, and portfolio of clinical skills. At Split University School of Medicine, we developed a new paradigm aimed to improve the teaching of clinical skills called "Neptune-CSS," which stands for New Paradigm in Training of Undergraduate Clinical Skills in Split.

  17. The Shame of Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Owen

    2013-01-01

    Addiction is a person-level phenomenon that involves twin normative failures. A failure of normal rational effective agency or self-control with respect to the substance; and shame at both this failure, and the failure to live up to the standards for a good life that the addict himself acknowledges and aspires to. Feeling shame for addiction is not a mistake. It is part of the shape of addiction, part of the normal phenomenology of addiction, and often a source of motivation for the addict to heal. Like other recent attempts in the addiction literature to return normative concepts such as “choice” and “responsibility” to their rightful place in understanding and treating addiction, the twin normative failure model is fully compatible with investigation of genetic and neuroscientific causes of addiction. Furthermore, the model does not re-moralize addiction. There can be shame without blame. PMID:24115936

  18. Medical Education About the Care of Addicted Incarcerated Persons: A National Survey of Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Mark L.; Isaacson, J. Harry; Kahn, Ruth; Mundt, Marlon P.; Manwell, Linda Baier

    2001-06-01

    In June 1998, there were 1.8 million inmates in correctional facilities for adults; 1.2 million in state and federal prisons and 600,000 in municipal/county jails (668 persons per 100,000 U.S. population). Rates of TB, AIDS, mental illness, and substance abuse are 2-13 times higher in persons living in jails and prisons. This study was designed to assess the level of training offered to residents in seven medical specialties in the care of addicted incarcerated persons. The study design involved two stages. The first entailed a mailed survey to 1,831 residency directors in family medicine, internal medicine, osteopathic medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and emergency medicine. The second stage was a telephone interview, about substance use disorders, of faculty listed by the residency directors as teaching residents. The mailed survey was completed by 1,205 residency directors (66%). The 769 faculty from those identified programs, who participated in the telephone interview, reported that only 14% of their residency programs offered lectures or conferences on the care of incarcerated persons, yet 44% of the programs had residents caring for incarcerated persons with substance abuse problems, in a clinical setting. Only 22% offered clinical experiences for residents in a correctional facility.We recognize that our survey of correctional health and substance abuse training is limited, but as such, a greater number of respondents to our survey do not teach residents addiction medicine topics pertaining to prevention, evaluation, intervention, and management of the addicted criminal offender/patient in a correctional setting or give adequate clinical exposure to this special population. The data suggests a need to develop and implement educational programs on medical care for this high-risk and expanding population.

  19. FCPS training in the specialty of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation for physicians in Pakistan: The option less known.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Ahmad Zaheer

    2016-01-01

    There has been a growing demand for rehabilitation services in Pakistan in recent years, likely due to increasing prevalence of disability. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) is a branch of medicine which deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of functional impairments resulting from neuro-musculoskeletal disorders. Physiatrists are physicians who specialize in the specialty of PM&R. College of Physicians and Surgeons of Pakistan started FCPS training in PM&R in the late 1990s. There are various training institutes within and outside Pakistan which are accredited for FCPS training in PM&R. There is a huge vacuum in this specialty in the country likely due to lack of awareness among health care providers. It is considered to be the specialty of the future due to its rapid growth potential, opportunities for sub specializations and unique skills.

  20. Opioid Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain responds to pain. Doctors most often prescribe opioids to relieve pain from toothaches and dental procedures, injuries, surgeries, and chronic conditions such as cancer. Some prescription cough medicines ...

  1. How confident are internal medicine residents in rheumatology versus other common internal medicine clinical skills: an issue of training time or exposure?

    PubMed

    Katz, Steven J; Oswald, Anna E

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine self-confidence of internal medicine (IM) residents regarding rheumatology clinical skills and factors that may affect their confidence. Permission was sought to e-mail a web-based survey to IM residents at all 13 English language Canadian internal medicine programs. Residents were asked to rank self-confidence in rheumatology, cardiology, respirology, and gastroenterology skills. Further questions included site and year of training, career interests, rheumatology experiences, learning opportunities, and assessment frequency. These factors were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Two hundred sixteen residents (21.8%) from all 13 sites responded to the survey. Resident self-confidence in rheumatology diagnoses was 5.24/10, lower than all three comparator subspecialties. Increasing teaching exposure had a more significant impact on confidence in rheumatology than on comparator subspecialties. Increasing year of training had no association with higher self-confidence for rheumatology, in contrast to the increase in confidence seen with increased year of training for each comparator subspecialty. Further analysis demonstrated that the completion of a rheumatology rotation, increasing learning opportunities, annual assessment, and career interest were associated with greater resident self-confidence. Resident self-confidence for rheumatology skills is cautious at best and is lower than other common subspecialties. Self confidence improves with targeted rheumatology clinical experience and teaching, but does not improve solely with higher year of IM training. Furthermore, the impact of rheumatology teaching is greater than that of other common IM subspecialties. This information is critical to the planning and implementation of effective rheumatology curricula within internal medicine residency programs.

  2. [Smoking by people addicted to drugs].

    PubMed

    Gomółka, Ewa; Łabuz, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the paper was to present tobacco addiction problem in group of drugs of abuse addicted patients. The structure of abused drugs and addiction to many substances was described. The material was information from patients treated in substitution program in Krakow. There were 64 persons (22 women and 42 men). All of them used illegal drugs of abuse (opiates, amphetamines, cananbinoids) and used other psychoactive substances. The most often was tobacco (93.7%), alcohol (34.4%), drugs (67.2%) and spices (mephedrone). For most of them tobacco was the first abused addicted substance. The mean age of addiction beginning was 17,6 years for tobacco, 19,5 years for drugs of abuse, 21,8 years for alcohol, 25,7 years for medicines. All patients used more than one substance. 25% of them used drugs of abuse, tobacco, alcohol and medicines. The substances can cause different toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics interactions. The problem of addiction to many substances is complex both in patients diagnostics and treatment.

  3. External Practicum-Year Residency Training in Occupational and Environmental Medicine: the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center Program.

    PubMed

    Emmett, E A; Green-McKenzie, J

    2001-05-01

    We describe a competency-based training program that allows physicians employed full-time in occupational and environmental medicine to satisfy the supervised practicum year of training required by the American Board of Preventive Medicine (ABPM). The program is designed for trainees with greater clinical experience than the 1 clinical year required by the ABPM. To date, 25 physicians from clinic-based, academic, corporate, and government employment across most geographic regions of the United States have been admitted into the program. Most completed a master's in public health (MPH) in a distance-learning, on-job, on-campus, or executive program. The practicum-year training has been highly successful, as evidenced by improvements in resident self-assessment of competency, resident satisfaction with the training, faculty evaluation of resident performance, and success rate in the ABPM examination. The program has opened a new pathway for physicians making a mid-career shift to occupational and environmental medicine to obtain high-quality, in-depth education and board certification.

  4. On-the-Job Evidence-Based Medicine Training for Clinician-Scientists of the Next Generation.

    PubMed

    Leung, Elaine Yl; Malick, Sadia M; Khan, Khalid S

    2013-08-01

    Clinical scientists are at the unique interface between laboratory science and frontline clinical practice for supporting clinical partnerships for evidence-based practice. In an era of molecular diagnostics and personalised medicine, evidence-based laboratory practice (EBLP) is also crucial in aiding clinical scientists to keep up-to-date with this expanding knowledge base. However, there are recognised barriers to the implementation of EBLP and its training. The aim of this review is to provide a practical summary of potential strategies for training clinician-scientists of the next generation. Current evidence suggests that clinically integrated evidence-based medicine (EBM) training is effective. Tailored e-learning EBM packages and evidence-based journal clubs have been shown to improve knowledge and skills of EBM. Moreover, e-learning is no longer restricted to computer-assisted learning packages. For example, social media platforms such as Twitter have been used to complement existing journal clubs and provide additional post-publication appraisal information for journals. In addition, the delivery of an EBLP curriculum has influence on its success. Although e-learning of EBM skills is effective, having EBM trained teachers available locally promotes the implementation of EBM training. Training courses, such as Training the Trainers, are now available to help trainers identify and make use of EBM training opportunities in clinical practice. On the other hand, peer-assisted learning and trainee-led support networks can strengthen self-directed learning of EBM and research participation among clinical scientists in training. Finally, we emphasise the need to evaluate any EBLP training programme using validated assessment tools to help identify the most crucial ingredients of effective EBLP training. In summary, we recommend on-the-job training of EBM with additional focus on overcoming barriers to its implementation. In addition, future studies evaluating the

  5. The state of chronic pain education in geriatric medicine fellowship training programs: results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Debra K; Turner, Gregory H; Hennon, John G; Perera, Subashan; Hartmann, Susanne

    2005-10-01

    A survey of U.S. geriatric medicine fellowship training programs was performed to assess the status of teaching about chronic pain evaluation and management and identify opportunities for improvement. After an initial e-mail query, 43 of 96 programs agreed to participate. A self-administered questionnaire, with items adapted from a 2002 consensus panel statement, was mailed to their 171 fellows-in-training and 43 fellowship directors. Thirty-two programs (33% of nationwide sample) including 79 fellows (30% of nationwide sample) and 25 directors (26% of nationwide sample) returned surveys; 21 institutions returned both faculty and fellow surveys. Overall, directors endorsed the 19 items identified by the consensus panel as essential components of fellowship training, but fellows identified deficiencies, both before and during fellowship training. Specific areas of undereducation included comprehensive musculoskeletal assessment, neuropathic pain evaluation, indications for low back pain imaging, the role of multidisciplinary pain clinics and nonpharmacological modalities, the effect of physical and psychosocial comorbidities in formulating treatment goals, and the effect of aging on analgesic metabolism and prescription. Both groups were generally positive about fellows' abilities to implement pain-related clinical skills. Discrepancies existed between fellowship directors' ratings of importance of teaching individual items and the degree to which teaching was actually done, as well as faculty versus fellow assessments of whether some of the 19 items were taught. Primary care training programs (e.g., internal medicine, family medicine, geriatric medicine) should pay more systematic attention to educating trainees about chronic pain to optimize patient care, decrease suffering, and diminish healthcare expenditures.

  6. Dealing with Addiction (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Dealing With Addiction KidsHealth > For Teens > Dealing With Addiction A A ... is even harder. What Are Substance Abuse and Addiction? The difference between substance abuse and addiction is ...

  7. [Consensus document on ultrasound training in Intensive Care Medicine. Care process, use of the technique and acquisition of professional skills].

    PubMed

    Ayuela Azcárate, J M; Clau-Terré, F; Vicho Pereira, R; Guerrero de Mier, M; Carrillo López, A; Ochagavia, A; López Pérez, J M; Trenado Alvarez, J; Pérez, L; Llompart-Pou, J A; González de Molina, F J; Fojón, S; Rodríguez Salgado, A; Martínez Díaz, M C; Royo Villa, C; Romero Bermejo, F J; Ruíz Bailén, M; Arroyo Díez, M; Argueso García, M; Fernández Fernández, J L

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound has become an essential tool in assisting critically ill patients. His knowledge, use and instruction requires a statement by scientific societies involved in its development and implementation. Our aim are to determine the use of the technique in intensive care medicine, clinical situations where its application is recommended, levels of knowledge, associated responsibility and learning process also implement the ultrasound technique as a common tool in all intensive care units, similar to the rest of european countries. The SEMICYUC's Working Group Cardiac Intensive Care and CPR establishes after literature review and scientific evidence, a consensus document which sets out the requirements for accreditation in ultrasound applied to the critically ill patient and how to acquire the necessary skills. Training and learning requires a structured process within the specialty. The SEMICYUC must agree to disclose this document, build relationships with other scientific societies and give legal cover through accreditation of the training units, training courses and different levels of training.

  8. Communication skills training in postgraduate medicine: the development of a new course.

    PubMed

    Dacre, J; Richardson, J; Noble, L; Stephens, K; Parker, N

    2004-12-01

    It has long been accepted that communication is of central importance in healthcare, and a core aspect of clinical competence. Many educational institutions and Royal Colleges now reflect this and consider communication skills a priority in postgraduate examination. The new examination "Practical Assessment of Clinical and Examination Skills" has replaced the Royal College of Physicians MRCP part 2 clinical and oral examination. This examination now consists of five clinical stations, two of which focus on communication skills. A short course for postgraduate trainees has been designed to address the communication skills requirements of the part 2 clinical examination. The aims, development, and content of the course are described. Emphasis is placed on candidates practising skills with patients and receiving feedback during the course. Evidence suggests that practice with feedback is an essential ingredient of communication skills courses, and is more effective than other methods such as observing experts or video examples, or simply discussing issues in communication. Results of a preliminary evaluation indicate that the course was perceived as valuable by candidates and that the aims, format, and content were appropriate. Although the preliminary evaluation was largely positive, it could be argued that the acid test of the effectiveness of a course is an objective evaluation of skills, observed before and after the course, a development that is being considered for future evaluation of the course. Recommendations for applying this type of training to postgraduate trainees in any branch of medicine are given.

  9. Short training in focused cardiac ultrasound in an Internal Medicine department: what realistic skill targets could be achieved?

    PubMed

    Mozzini, Chiara; Garbin, Ulisse; Fratta Pasini, Anna Maria; Cominacini, Luciano

    2015-02-01

    The importance of focused cardiac ultrasound (FCU) in Internal Medicine care has been recognized by the American Society of Echocardiography. The aim of this study was to test what realistic skill targets could be achieved in FCU, with a relatively short training (theoretical and practical) of 9 h offered to Internal Medicine certification board attending students, and if the addition of further 9 h of training could significantly improve the level of competence. Kappa statistic was used to calculate the inter-observer agreement (trainees/tutor). The agreement between the trainees (who completed the entire training) and the tutor was, respectively, "substantial" (k = 0.71) for the identification of pericardial effusion, "moderate" (k = 0.56-0.54) for the identification of marked right ventricular and left ventricular enlargement, "substantial" (k = 0.77) for the assessment of global cardiac systolic function by visual inspection and "fair" (k = 0.35) for the assessment of size and respiratory change in the diameter of the inferior cave vein (IVC). 18 h training in FCU provided proficiency in obtaining adequate images from the parasternal window without providing the ability to correctly master the apical and subcostal windows. As concerns the interpretative skills, only pericardial effusion and visual estimation of global systolic function could be correctly identified, while ventricular enlargement and IVC prove to be more difficult to evaluate. This study supports incorporating FCU into Internal Medicine fellowship training programs, and should facilitate the design of other similar training courses.

  10. [Psychophysiology of sports addiction (exercises addiction)].

    PubMed

    Krivoshchekov, S G; Lushnikov, O N

    2011-01-01

    Addiction is a prevalent and growing concern in all aspects of our modern society. There are considerable concerns for the growing frequency of addictions to drugs, alcohol, gambling, eating, and even sex. Though exercise is generally accepted as a positive behaviour that has many benefits associated with enhanced physical and psychological wellbeing, there is an increasing awareness that exercise addiction is becoming a common phenomenon. Theories regarding how exercise can become addictive, and studies of withdrawal from exercise are reviewed. Several physiological mechanisms, including endogenous opioids, catecholamines, functional asymmetry of brain activity and thermoregulation have been implicated in exercise dependence.

  11. An Innovative Use of Case Conference to Teach Future Educators in Addiction Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Muvvala, Srinivas B; Marienfeld, Carla; Encandela, John; Petrakis, Ismene; Edens, Ellen Lockard

    2016-06-01

    Objective An innovative course was developed for fellows enrolled in the Yale School of Medicine Addiction Psychiatry program to educate them in key principles of adult learning, apply these principles in a case conference presentation, and to improve skills in providing and receiving feedback. Methods An initial training module on educational skills was followed by individual mentorship to prepare a case presentation. A feedback module provided space to learn and practice skills in feedback delivery. Results The program showed positive results and improved confidence levels of the participants in presenting and providing/receiving feedback. Conclusions Implementing a course designed to improve teaching and feedback skills is feasible in a 1-year Addiction Psychiatry fellowship.

  12. Meeting the challenges of global nuclear medicine technologist training in the 21st century: the IAEA Distance Assisted Training (DAT) program.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Heather E; Nunez, Margarita; Philotheou, Geraldine M; Hutton, Brian F

    2013-05-01

    Many countries have made significant investments in nuclear medicine (NM) technology with the acquisition of modern equipment and establishment of facilities, however, often appropriate training is not considered as part of these investments. Training for NM professionals is continually evolving, with a need to meet changing requirements in the workforce. Even places where established higher education courses are available, these do not necessarily cater to the practical component of training and the ever-changing technology that is central to medical imaging. The continuing advances in NM technology and growth of applications in quantitative clinical assessment place increases the pressure on technologists to learn and practice new techniques. Not only is training to understand new concepts limited but often there is inadequate training in the basics of NM and this can be a major constraint to the effective use of the evolving technology. Developing appropriate training programs for the broader international NM community is one of the goals of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). A particularly successful and relevant development has been the program on 'distance assisted training (DAT) for NM professionals'. The development of DAT was initiated in the 1990s through Australian Government funding, administered under auspices of the IAEA through its Regional Cooperative Agreement, involving most countries in Asia that are Member States of the IAEA. The project has resulted in the development of a set of training modules which are designed for use under direct supervision in the workplace, delivered through means of distance-learning. The program has undergone several revisions and peer reviews with the current version providing a comprehensive training package that is now available online. DAT has been utilized widely in Asia or the Pacific region, Latin America, and parts of Africa and Europe. Currently there are approximately 1000 registered participants

  13. Recreational gamblers with and without parental addiction.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Liana Renée Nelson; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Grant, Jon Edgar

    2012-04-30

    Research has found that children who have parents with an addiction may be more vulnerable to developing psychopathology compared to children without parental addiction. We compared young adult, recreational gamblers with and without parental addiction on measures of gambling behavior and impulsivity. A total of 286 recreational gamblers (defined as having gambled at least five times in the past 12 months) between the ages of 18 and 29 participated in an initial intake of a longitudinal study assessing susceptibility to pathological gambling. Trained staff members interviewed subjects, and subjects completed cognitive testing and self-report measures. Fifty-three subjects (18.53%) reported at least one parent with an addiction (including alcohol and substance dependence and pathological gambling). Subjects with at least one addicted parent were significantly more likely to report problems resulting from gambling, have significantly greater rates of psychiatric comorbidity, and report significantly more current marijuana and tobacco use. Subjects with an addicted parent were not significantly different on measures of impulsivity. These findings suggest that even at a stage of low-risk gambling, before what has been considered a psychopathology arises, those with a possible environmental and/or genetic risk of addiction exhibit a range of problematic behaviors.

  14. NARCOTIC DRUG ADDICTION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    YAHRAES, HERBERT; AND OTHERS

    MUCH HAS BEEN LEARNED IN RECENT YEARS ABOUT THE NATURE OF DRUG ADDICTION, THE FACTORS WHICH LEAD A PERSON INTO ADDICTION, AND THE EFFECTIVE TREATMENT OF PERSONS WHO HAVE BECOME ADDICTED. THIS PAMPHLET SURVEYS THE NEW FINDINGS AND IS INTENDED PRIMARILY FOR (1) THOSE WHO IN THE COURSE OF THEIR PROFESSIONAL DUTIES COME IN CONTACT WITH ADDICTED…

  15. What Is Addiction?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Use Become Addiction? Addiction Risk Factors Does Addiction Run in Families? Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? Next Español English Español PDF Version Download Treatment & Recovery Information Treatment and Recovery Does Drug Treatment Work? ...

  16. Related Addictive Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Tina; Sales, Amos

    This paper provides an overview of addiction related to substance abuse. It provides basic information, prevalence, diagnostic criteria, assessment tools, and treatment issues for eating disorders, compulsive gambling, sex addictions, and work addictions. Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, especially affect adolescents.…

  17. [Recovery from Sexual Addiction].

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    Addiction is a disease that can cause an individual to lose his or her life. However, addiction can be considered a form of self medication or survival skill. If affected individuals attend a mutual aid group, individuals with such addiction can share their common experiences and they are willing to will grow along spiritual lines.

  18. The heroin addict! A personal view.

    PubMed

    Cyngler, Charles

    2002-04-01

    Heroin beckons like the sweet seductive calls of Ulysses' sirens. The alluring nectar of the poppy seed, once experienced is not easy to escape. The greed for pleasure is endless. Gratification begets gratification. This paper explores issues and complications of treatment intervention in heroin addiction. The author is a general practitioner with 25 years experience and special interest in substance abuse medicine.

  19. Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment: A Research-Based Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This booklet can function as a resource for counselors, counselors in training, or anyone else who works with or knows someone who is addicted to drugs. It begins by identifying 13 principles of effective treatment for drug abusers. It then provides answers to 11 frequently asked questions regarding drug addiction treatment. Next it discusses drug…

  20. Treating the Sexually Addicted Client: Establishing a Need for Increased Counselor Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagedorn, W. Bryce; Juhnke, Gerald A.

    2005-01-01

    Seventeen to 37 million Americans struggle with sexual addictions (P. Carnes, 1994b; A. Cooper, D. L. Delmonico, & R. Burg, 2000; B. Morris, 1999; J. L. Wolf, 2000), yet traditionally trained addictions and offender counselors often find themselves unprepared to assist clients who are sexually addicted. This article provides a general overview of…

  1. Training Family Medicine Residents in Effective Communication Skills While Utilizing Promotoras as Standardized Patients in OSCEs: A Health Literacy Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Pagels, Patti; Kindratt, Tiffany; Arnold, Danielle; Brandt, Jeffrey; Woodfin, Grant; Gimpel, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Future health care providers need to be trained in the knowledge and skills to effectively communicate with their patients with limited health literacy. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a curriculum designed to increase residents' health literacy knowledge, improve communication skills, and work with an interpreter. Materials and Methods. Family Medicine residents (N = 25) participated in a health literacy training which included didactic lectures and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Community promotoras acted as standardized patients and evaluated the residents' ability to measure their patients' health literacy, communicate effectively using the teach-back and Ask Me 3 methods, and appropriately use an interpreter. Pre- and postknowledge, attitudes, and postdidactic feedback were obtained. We compared OSCE scores from the group that received training (didactic group) and previous graduates. Residents reported the skills they used in practice three months later. Results. Family Medicine residents showed an increase in health literacy knowledge (p = 0.001) and scored in the adequately to expertly performed range in the OSCE. Residents reported using the teach-back method (77.8%) and a translator more effectively (77.8%) three months later. Conclusions. Our innovative health literacy OSCE can be replicated for medical learners at all levels of training.

  2. Promoting teamwork: an event-based approach to simulation-based teamwork training for emergency medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Michael A; Salas, Eduardo; Wu, Teresa S; Silvestri, Salvatore; Lazzara, Elizabeth H; Lyons, Rebecca; Weaver, Sallie J; King, Heidi B

    2008-11-01

    The growing complexity of patient care requires that emergency physicians (EPs) master not only knowledge and procedural skills, but also the ability to effectively communicate with patients and other care providers and to coordinate patient care activities. EPs must become good team players, and consequently an emergency medicine (EM) residency program must systematically train these skills. However, because teamwork-related competencies are relatively new considerations in health care, there is a gap in the methods available to accomplish this goal. This article outlines how teamwork training for residents can be accomplished by employing simulation-based training (SBT) techniques and contributes tools and strategies for designing structured learning experiences and measurement tools that are explicitly linked to targeted teamwork competencies and learning objectives. An event-based method is described and illustrative examples of scenario design and measurement tools are provided.

  3. The ICCAM platform study: An experimental medicine platform for evaluating new drugs for relapse prevention in addiction. Part B: fMRI description

    PubMed Central

    McGonigle, John; Murphy, Anna; Paterson, Louise M; Reed, Laurence J; Nestor, Liam; Nash, Jonathan; Elliott, Rebecca; Ersche, Karen D; Flechais, Remy SA; Newbould, Rexford; Orban, Csaba; Smith, Dana G; Taylor, Eleanor M; Waldman, Adam D; Robbins, Trevor W; Deakin, JF William; Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Suckling, John

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to set up a robust multi-centre clinical fMRI and neuropsychological platform to investigate the neuropharmacology of brain processes relevant to addiction – reward, impulsivity and emotional reactivity. Here we provide an overview of the fMRI battery, carried out across three centres, characterizing neuronal response to the tasks, along with exploring inter-centre differences in healthy participants. Experimental design: Three fMRI tasks were used: monetary incentive delay to probe reward sensitivity, go/no-go to probe impulsivity and an evocative images task to probe emotional reactivity. A coordinate-based activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis was carried out for the reward and impulsivity tasks to help establish region of interest (ROI) placement. A group of healthy participants was recruited from across three centres (total n=43) to investigate inter-centre differences. Principle observations: The pattern of response observed for each of the three tasks was consistent with previous studies using similar paradigms. At the whole brain level, significant differences were not observed between centres for any task. Conclusions: In developing this platform we successfully integrated neuroimaging data from three centres, adapted validated tasks and applied whole brain and ROI approaches to explore and demonstrate their consistency across centres. PMID:27703042

  4. Allostasis in health and food addiction

    PubMed Central

    De Ridder, Dirk; Manning, Patrick; Leong, Sook Ling; Ross, Samantha; Vanneste, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis is the basis of modern medicine and allostasis, a further elaboration of homeostasis, has been defined as stability through change, which was later modified to predictive reference resetting. It has been suggested that pleasure is related to salience (behavioral relevance), and withdrawal has been linked to allostasis in addictive types. The question arises how the clinical and neural signatures of pleasure, salience, allostasis and withdrawal relate, both in a non-addicted and addicted state. Resting state EEGs were performed in 66 people, involving a food-addicted obese group, a non-food addicted obese group and a lean control group. Correlation analyses were performed on behavioral data, and correlation, comparative and conjunction analyses were performed to extract electrophysiological relationships between pleasure, salience, allostasis and withdrawal. Pleasure/liking seems to be the phenomenological expression that enough salient stimuli are obtained, and withdrawal can be seen as a motivational incentive because due to allostatic reference resetting, more stimuli are required. In addition, in contrast to non-addiction, a pathological, non-adaptive salience attached to food results in withdrawal mediated through persistent allostatic reference resetting. PMID:27876789

  5. Guiding the development of family medicine training in Africa through collaboration with the Medical Education Partnership Initiative.

    PubMed

    Mash, Robert J; de Villiers, Marietjie R; Moodley, Kalay; Nachega, Jean B

    2014-08-01

    Africa's health care challenges include a high burden of disease, low life expectancy, health workforce shortages, and varying degrees of commitment to primary health care on the part of policy makers and government officials. One overarching goal of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) is to develop models of medical education in Sub-Saharan Africa. To do this, MEPI has created a network of universities and other institutions that, among other things, recognizes the importance of supporting training programs in family medicine. This article provides a framework for assessing the stage of the development of family medicine training in Africa, including the challenges that were encountered and how educational organizations can help to address them. A modified "stages of change" model (precontemplation, contemplation, action, maintenance, and relapse) was used as a conceptual framework to understand the various phases that countries go through in developing family medicine in the public sector and to determine the type of assistance that is useful at each phase.

  6. The genetic basis of addictive disorders.

    PubMed

    Ducci, Francesca; Goldman, David

    2012-06-01

    Addictions are common, chronic, and relapsing diseases that develop through a multistep process. The impact of addictions on morbidity and mortality is high worldwide. Twin studies have shown that the heritability of addictions ranges from 0.39 (hallucinogens) to 0.72 (cocaine). Twin studies indicate that genes influence each stage from initiation to addiction, although the genetic determinants may differ. Addictions are by definition the result of gene × environment interaction. These disorders, which are in part volitional, in part inborn, and in part determined by environmental experience, pose the full range of medical, genetic, policy, and moral challenges. Gene discovery is being facilitated by a variety of powerful approaches, but is in its infancy. It is not surprising that the genes discovered so far act in a variety of ways: via altered metabolism of drug (the alcohol and nicotine metabolic gene variants), via altered function of a drug receptor (the nicotinic receptor, which may alter affinity for nicotine but as discussed may also alter circuitry of reward), and via general mechanisms of addiction (genes such as monoamine oxidase A and the serotonin transporter that modulate stress response, emotion, and behavioral control). Addiction medicine today benefits from genetic studies that buttress the case for a neurobiologic origin of addictive behavior, and some general information on familially transmitted propensity that can be used to guide prevention. A few well-validated, specific predictors such as OPRM1, ADH1B, ALDH2, CHRNA5, and CYP26 have been identified and can provide some specific guidance, for example, to understand alcohol-related flushing and upper GI cancer risk (ADH1B and AKLDH2), variation in nicotine metabolism (CYP26), and, potentially, naltrexone treatment response (OPRM1). However, the genetic predictors available are few in number and account for only a small portion of the genetic variance in liability, and have not been integrated

  7. Design Concepts for an Integrated Environmental Medicine Workstation for Prediction, Simulation and Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    officers and health care planners with the systematic evaluation of the environmental threats to health and performance. Analysis of the environmental ...unified environmental preventive medicine decision aid for military health care planners and staff officers. It exploits USARIEM’s institutional... health and performance in Somalia: guidance for small unit leaders. Natick, MA: U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Technical Note

  8. Emergency Medicine Resident Orientation: How Training Programs Get Their Residents Started

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Jillian; Barrie, Michael; Way, David P.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The first formal orientation program for incoming emergency medicine (EM) residents was started in 1976. The last attempt to describe the nature of orientation programs was by Brillman in 1995. Now almost all residencies offer orientation to incoming residents, but little is known about the curricular content or structure of these programs. The purpose of this project was to describe the current composition and purpose of EM resident orientation programs in the United States. Methods In autumn of 2014, we surveyed all U.S. EM residency program directors (n=167). We adapted our survey instrument from one used by Brillman (1995). The survey was designed to assess the orientation program’s purpose, structure, content, and teaching methods. Results The survey return rate was 63% (105 of 167). Most respondents (77%) directed three-year residencies, and all but one program offered intern orientation. Orientations lasted an average of nine clinical (Std. Dev.=7.3) and 13 non-clinical days (Std. Dev.=9.3). The prototypical breakdown of program activities was 27% lectures, 23% clinical work, 16% skills training, 10% administrative activities, 9% socialization and 15% other activities. Most orientations included activities to promote socialization among interns (98%) and with other members of the department (91%). Many programs (87%) included special certification courses (ACLS, ATLS, PALS, NRP). Course content included the following: use of electronic medical records (90%), physician wellness (75%), and chief complaint-based lectures (72%). Procedural skill sessions covered ultrasound (94%), airway management (91%), vascular access (90%), wound management (77%), splinting (67%), and trauma skills (62%). Conclusion Compared to Brillman (1995), we found that more programs (99%) are offering formal orientation and allocating more time to them. Lectures remain the most common educational activity. We found increases in the use of skills labs and specialty

  9. Training the teachers. The clinician-educator track of the University of Washington Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Fellowship Program.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Rosemary; Goodman, Richard B; Kritek, Patricia; Luks, Andrew M; Tonelli, Mark R; Benditt, Joshua

    2015-04-01

    The University of Washington was the first pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship training program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education to create a dedicated clinician-educator fellowship track that has its own National Residency Matching Program number. This track was created in response to increasing demand for focused training in medical education in pulmonary and critical care. Through the Veterans Health Administration we obtained a stipend for a clinician-educator fellow to dedicate 12 months to training in medical education. This takes place predominantly in the second year of fellowship and is composed of several core activities: fellows complete the University of Washington's Teaching Scholars Program, a professional development program designed to train leaders in medical education; they teach in a variety of settings and receive feedback on their work from clinician-educator faculty and the learners; and they engage in scholarly activity, which may take the form of scholarship of teaching, integration, or investigation. Fellows are guided throughout this process by a primary mentor and a mentoring committee. Since funding became available in 2009, two of the three graduates to date have successfully secured clinician-educator faculty positions. Graduates uniformly believe that the clinician-educator track met their training goals better than the research-based track would have.

  10. Does Addiction Run in Families?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Addiction Run in Families? Does Addiction Run in Families? Listen PDF: EasyToRead_WhatIsAddiction_Final_012017.pdf Addiction ... Español English Español "Heart disease runs in some families. Addiction runs in ours." ©istock.com/ Antonio_Diaz ...

  11. A review of addiction.

    PubMed

    Clay, Steven W; Allen, Jason; Parran, Theorore

    2008-07-31

    Addiction to drugs and alcohol is often undiagnosed and untreated. Physicians are often unaware or have negative attitudes regarding these patients, such as the perception that treatment is ineffective. Addiction--psychological dependence with or without tolerance and withdrawal--is essentially compulsive uncontrolled substance use despite physical, psychological, or social consequences. We now have an understanding of the 2 major neurological pathways involved in addiction. First, the mesolimbic dopamine reward pathway, which is essential for survival, can be physically altered by drug abuse to result in uncontrolled cravings. Second, the decision-making prefrontal cortex, which suppresses inappropriate reward response, can also be altered by drug abuse. Thus, accelerated "go" signals and impaired "stop" signals result in uncontrolled use despite severe consequences. Further, addicts can be predisposed to addiction by genetic defects in reward pathway neurotransmission and stress-related developmental brain abnormalities. Relapse to drug use can occur because of stress or cue-related reward pathway stimulation or even by a single drug dose. Individualized treatment of addiction, including pharmacological and cognitive-behavioral interventions, can be as successful as treatment of other chronic diseases. Several pharmaceuticals are available or under study for these disorders. Waiting for the addict to "be ready" for treatment can be dangerous and detoxification alone is often ineffective. The physician's role in treating addiction includes prevention, diagnosis, brief intervention, motivational interviewing, referral, and follow-up care. An understanding of the biological reality of addiction allows physicians to understand addicts as having a brain disease. Further, the reality of effective pharmacological and cognitive-behavioral treatments for addiction allows physicians to be more optimistic in treating addicts. The challenge to the physician is to embrace the

  12. Actress Debra Winger: “Everyone Is Touched By Addiction.” | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... cooperation, and understanding for patients living with the disease of addiction. Why are you participating in the Addiction Performance ... medicine. Who is your audience? Ms. Winger: The Addiction ... from cystic fibrosis, which is a chronic disease. She spent a lot of time at the ...

  13. "Addiction Proneness" and Personality in Heroin Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Jerome J.

    1975-01-01

    A carefully controlled comparison of the personality characteristics of heroin addict (n=27) and nonaddict (n=20) offenders was carried out so as to avoid methodological problems associated with earlier studies. (Editor)

  14. Drug addiction. Part III. Pharmacotherapy of addiction.

    PubMed

    Vetulani, J

    2001-01-01

    The last decade brought a considerable progress in pharmacotherapy of addiction. Basing on recently gained knowledge of mechanisms of development of addiction and the physiology of the brain reward system, several therapeutic strategies have evolved. The strategies aimed at targeting the basic mechanisms of addiction rely on the premises that addiction is caused by adaptive changes in the central nervous system and that craving, which is the main cause of relapse, depends on dopaminergic mechanisms and requires high general excitability. The pharmacological approach involves drugs that reduce neuronal adaptability by inhibiting the calcium entry to neurons both through voltage-gated channels (e.g. nimodipine) and NMDA receptors (e.g. memantine), and drugs that stimulate the inhibitory GABAergic system (gamma-vinyl-GABA, baclofen), Particular attention is paid to the compounds that may attenuate dopaminergic hyperactivity, without considerable suppression of tonic activity of dopaminergic neurons (e.g. BP 897, a partial dopamine D3 receptor antagonist). Specific strategies are aimed at interference with the action of particular drugs of addiction. An important group includes the agonistic therapies (known also as substitution or maintenance therapies) in which a long-acting agonist is used in order to reduce the action of the drugs of high addictive potential (e.g. methadone against heroin addiction or vanoxerine (GBR 12909) against psychostimulants). Other specific strategies aimed at reduction of the transport of molecules of addictive substances into the brain: the approaches involve preparation of antibodies that form complexes unable to cross blood-brain barrier or enzymes accelerating the metabolism of the compounds in the blood (e.g. variants of butyrylcholinesterase). A considerable progress has been made in combating the abuse of legal addictive substances, alcohol (naltrexone, acamprosate) and tobacco (bupropion). The prospects for developing effective

  15. Internet Addiction and Other Behavioral Addictions.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, Alicia Grattan; Hsiao, Ray Chih-Jui; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2016-07-01

    The Internet is increasingly influential in the lives of adolescents. Although there are many positives, there are also risks related to excessive use and addiction. It is important to recognize clinical signs and symptoms of Internet addiction (compulsive use, withdrawal, tolerance, and adverse consequences), treat comorbid conditions (other substance use disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety, depression, and hostility), and initiate psychosocial interventions. More research on this topic will help to provide consensus on diagnostic criteria and further clarify optimal management.

  16. Hands-on – general medicine – Circuit-training in the auditorium – a practical equivalent to a lecture

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Wolfgang A.; Blankenfeld, Hannes; Beck, Anton J.; Frangoulis, Anna-Maria; Vorderwülbecke, Florian; Fleischmann, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Traditional university teaching formats are of limited use when it comes to conveying the inner workings and specific remit of general medicine in a practical way. Small supervised groups present themselves as a plausible and effective alternative for learning to interact with patients in low prevalence areas. Description of the project: A frontal lecture was transformed into an interactive seminar-like lecture for 280 students. Short kick-off presentations served as an introduction to rotating circuit stations. Knowledge, skills and professional attitude specific to general and family medicine were intensively trained by 28 small groups in and around the auditorium by means of activating didactic methods. The small groups were supervised by experienced GP’s trained as tutors. During six days, consisting of 3.5 hour sessions per day, working methods, a large variety of common medical conditions, preventive primary care and care for the elderly were amongst the topics addressed. Results: This new format was successfully implemented and developed with regards to content as well as organisation. Well over 90% of the 274 participating students evaluated tutors’ commitment, coherent delivery of content, learner-oriented atmosphere and practical focus positively. Given the advantages of a small-group learning situation, the somewhat cramped conditions were accepted by 92%. Discussion: The innovative concept was able to work successfully within the specific framework of patient care in a general and family medicine setting. A creative approach to the lack of space managed to mobilise resources for practical small-group work. Being able to work on specific general practice problems in a small-group setting and immediately reflect upon them was rated positively overall. Conclusions: Responsibilities and specific working methods in general practice / family medicine can be trained successfully even with large groups of students when limited space is used

  17. Non-addictive psychoactive drug use: Implications for behavioral addiction.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Mark D

    2011-12-01

    The newly proposed framework for non-addictive psychoactive substances postulated by Müller & Schumann (M&S) provides an interesting and plausible explanation for non-addictive drug use. However, with specific reference to the relevant behavioral addiction literature, this commentary argues that the model may unexpectedly hold utility not only for non-addictive use of drugs, but also for non-addictive use of other potentially addictive behaviors.

  18. Addiction and will

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brian

    2013-01-01

    A hypothesis about the neurobiological bases of drive, drive reduction and will in addictive illness is presented. Drive reduction seems to require both SEEKING and gratification. Will is the everyday term for our experience of drives functioning within us. Addictive drugs take over the will by altering neurotransmission in the SEEKING system. As a result of this biological change, psychological defenses are arrayed that allow partial gratification and reduce anxiety about the consequences of drug use. Repeated partial gratification of the addictive drive creates a cathexis to the drug and the drug seller. It also keeps the addicted person in a permanent state of SEEKING. The cathexis to the drug and drug seller creates a difficult situation for psychoanalytic therapists. The actively addicted patient will have one set of feelings for the analyst, and a split off set of feelings for the drug dealer. Addictive neuroses, which feature a split transference, are contrasted with Freud’s concept of transference and narcissistic neuroses. For treatment of an actively addicted patient, the treater must negotiate the split transference. By analyzing the denial system the relationship with the drug dealer ends and the hostility involved in addictive behavior enters the transference where it can be interpreted. Selling drugs that take over the will is a lucrative enterprise. The addictive drug industry, about the size of the oil and gas industry worldwide, produces many patients in need of treatment. The marketers of addictive drugs understand the psychology of inducing initial ingestion of the drugs, and of managing their addicted populations. The neuropsychoanalytic understanding of addiction might be used to create more effective public health interventions to combat this morbid and mortal illness. PMID:24062657

  19. Addiction and will.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brian

    2013-01-01

    A hypothesis about the neurobiological bases of drive, drive reduction and will in addictive illness is presented. Drive reduction seems to require both SEEKING and gratification. Will is the everyday term for our experience of drives functioning within us. Addictive drugs take over the will by altering neurotransmission in the SEEKING system. As a result of this biological change, psychological defenses are arrayed that allow partial gratification and reduce anxiety about the consequences of drug use. Repeated partial gratification of the addictive drive creates a cathexis to the drug and the drug seller. It also keeps the addicted person in a permanent state of SEEKING. The cathexis to the drug and drug seller creates a difficult situation for psychoanalytic therapists. The actively addicted patient will have one set of feelings for the analyst, and a split off set of feelings for the drug dealer. Addictive neuroses, which feature a split transference, are contrasted with Freud's concept of transference and narcissistic neuroses. For treatment of an actively addicted patient, the treater must negotiate the split transference. By analyzing the denial system the relationship with the drug dealer ends and the hostility involved in addictive behavior enters the transference where it can be interpreted. Selling drugs that take over the will is a lucrative enterprise. The addictive drug industry, about the size of the oil and gas industry worldwide, produces many patients in need of treatment. The marketers of addictive drugs understand the psychology of inducing initial ingestion of the drugs, and of managing their addicted populations. The neuropsychoanalytic understanding of addiction might be used to create more effective public health interventions to combat this morbid and mortal illness.

  20. Drug Testing Incoming Residents and Medical Students in Family Medicine Training: A Survey of Program Policies and Practices

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Paul F.; Semelka, Michael W.; Bigdeli, Laleh

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite well-established negative consequences, high rates of substance use and related disorders continue to be reported. Physicians in training are not immune from this, or the associated risks to their health and careers, while impaired physicians are a threat to patient safety. Objective We surveyed family medicine residency programs' practices relating to drug testing of medical students and incoming residents. The survey asked about the extent to which residency programs are confronted with trainees testing positive for prohibited substances, and how they respond. Methods The survey was sent to the directors of family medicine residency programs. A total of 205 directors (47.2%) completed the survey. Results A majority of the responding programs required drug testing for incoming residents (143, 68.9%). Most programs did not require testing of medical students (161, 81.7%). Few programs reported positive drug tests among incoming residents (9, 6.5%), and there was only 1 reported instance of a positive result among medical students (1, 3.3%). Respondents reported a range of responses to positive results, with few reporting that they would keep open training spots or offer supportive services for a medical student who tested positive. Conclusions Changing laws legalizing certain drugs may require corresponding changes in the focus on drug testing and associated issues in medical training; however, many residency program directors were not aware of their institution's current policies. Programs will need to reexamine drug testing policies as new generations of physicians, growing up under altered legal circumstances concerning drug use, progress to clinical training. PMID:26217424

  1. Addiction to melodrama.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Robert P

    2011-01-01

    Addiction films have been shaped by the internal demands of a commercial medium. Specifically, melodrama, as a genre, has defined the limits of the visual representation of addiction. Similarly, the process of intermedialization has tended to induce a metamorphosis that shapes disparate narratives with diverse goals into a generic filmic form and substantially alters the meanings of the texts. Ultimately, visual representations shape public perceptions of addiction in meaningful ways, privileging a moralistic understanding of drug addiction that makes a complex issue visually uncomplicated by reinforcing "common sense" ideas of moral failure and redemption.

  2. Hidden addiction: Television

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Steve; Moran, Meghan B.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: The most popular recreational pastime in the U.S. is television viewing. Some researchers have claimed that television may be addictive. We provide a review of the definition, etiology, prevention and treatment of the apparent phenomenon of television addiction. Methods: Selective review. Results: We provide a description of television (TV) addiction, including its negative consequences, assessment and potential etiology, considering neurobiological, cognitive and social/cultural factors. Next, we provide information on its prevention and treatment. Discussion and conclusions: We suggest that television addiction may function similarly to substance abuse disorders but a great deal more research is needed. PMID:25083294

  3. Training the Translational Research Teams of the Future: UC Davis - HHMI Integrating Medicine into Basic Science Program

    PubMed Central

    Knowlton, Anne A.; Rainwater, Julie A.; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Bonham, Ann C.; Robbins, John A.; Henderson, Stuart; Meyers, Frederick J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for successful models of how to recruit, train, and retain bench scientists at the earliest stages of their careers into translational research. One recent, promising model is the University of California Davis Howard Hughes Medical Institute Integrating Medicine into Basic Science (HHMI-IMBS) program, part of the HHMI Med into Grad initiative. This article outlines the HHMI-IMBS program’s logic, design, and curriculum that guide the goal of research that moves from bedside to bench. That is, a curriculum that provides graduate students with guided translational training, clinical exposure, team science competencies and mentors from diverse disciplines that will advance the students careers in clinical translational research and re-focusing of research to answer clinical dilemmas. The data indicate that this training program provides an effective, adaptable model for training future translational researchers. HHMI-IMBS students showed improved confidence in conducting translational research, greater interest in a future translational career, and higher levels of research productivity and collaborations than a comparable group of pre-doctoral students. PMID:24127920

  4. Training the translational research teams of the future: UC Davis-HHMI Integrating Medicine into Basic Science program.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Anne A; Rainwater, Julie A; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Bonham, Ann C; Robbins, John A; Henderson, Stuart; Meyers, Frederick J

    2013-10-01

    There is a need for successful models of how to recruit, train, and retain bench scientists at the earliest stages of their careers into translational research. One recent, promising model is the University of California Davis Howard Hughes Medical Institute Integrating Medicine into Basic Science (HHMI-IMBS) program, part of the HHMI Med into Grad initiative. This paper outlines the HHMI-IMBS program's logic, design, and curriculum that guide the goal of research that moves from bedside to bench. That is, a curriculum that provides graduate students with guided translational training, clinical exposure, team science competencies, and mentors from diverse disciplines that will advance the students careers in clinical translational research and re-focusing of research to answer clinical dilemmas. The authors have collected data on 55 HHMI-IMBS students to date. Many of these students are still completing their graduate work. In the current study the authors compare the initial two cohorts (15 students) with a group of 29 control students to examine the program success and outcomes. The data indicate that this training program provides an effective, adaptable model for training future translational researchers. HHMI-IMBS students showed improved confidence in conducting translational research, greater interest in a future translational career, and higher levels of research productivity and collaborations than a comparable group of predoctoral students.

  5. Exercise training as vascular medicine: direct impacts on the vasculature in humans.

    PubMed

    Green, Daniel J

    2009-10-01

    Exercise training decreases cardiovascular risk, but effects on traditional risk factors do not fully account for this benefit. Exercise directly impacts upon arterial shear stress, a stimulus to antiatherogenic adaptation in vascular function and remodeling. This review considers the impact of exercise training on vascular adaptation in large and small arteries in humans.

  6. Outcomes of a Peer Assessment/Feedback Training Program in an Undergraduate Sports Medicine Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marty, Melissa Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Peer assessment/feedback is clearly occurring in athletic training education programs. However, it remains unclear whether students would improve their ability to assess their peers and provide corrective feedback if they received formal training in how to do so. The purpose of this study was to determine the following: (1) if a peer…

  7. A Human Dissection Training Program at Indiana University School of Medicine-Northwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talarico, Ernest F., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    As human cadavers are widely used in basic sciences, medical education, and other training and research venues, there is a real need for experts trained in anatomy and dissection. This article describes a program that gives individuals interested in clinical and basic sciences practical experience working with cadavers. Participants are selected…

  8. The genetics of the opioid system and specific drug addictions

    PubMed Central

    Levran, Orna; Yuferov, Vadim; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Addiction to drugs is a chronic, relapsing brain disease that has major medical, social, and economic complications. It has been established that genetic factors contribute to the vulnerability to develop drug addiction and to the effectiveness of its treatment. Identification of these factors may increase our understanding of the disorders, help in the development of new treatments and advance personalized medicine. In this review we will describe the genetics of the major genes of the opioid system (opioid receptors and their endogenous ligands) in connection to addiction to opioids, cocaine, alcohol and methamphetamines. Particular emphasis is given to association and functional studies of specific variants. We will provide information on the sample populations and the size of each study, as well as a list of the variants implicated in association with addiction-related phenotypes, and with the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy for addiction. PMID:22547174

  9. Historical and cultural aspects of man's relationship with addictive drugs

    PubMed Central

    Crocq, Marc-Antoine

    2007-01-01

    Our taste for addictive psychoactive substances is attested to in the earliest human records. Historically, psychoactive substances have been used by (i) priests in religious ceremonies (eg, amanita muscaria); (ii) healers for medicinal purposes (eg, opium); or (iii) the general population in a socially approved way (eg, alcohol, nicotine, and caffeine). Our forebears refined more potent compounds and devised faster routes of administration, which contributed to abuse. Pathological use was described as early as classical Antiquity. The issue of loss of control of the substance, heralding today's concept of addiction, was already being discussed in the 17th century. The complex etiology of addiction is reflected in the frequent pendulum swings between opposing attitudes on issues that are still currently being debated, such as: is addiction a sin or a disease; should treatment be moral or medical; is addiction caused by the substance; the individual's vulnerability and psychology, or social factors; should substances be regulated or freely available. PMID:18286796

  10. A legislative history of federal assistance for health professions training in primary care medicine and dentistry in the United States, 1963-2008.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, P Preston

    2008-11-01

    This article reviews the legislative history of Title VII of the United States Public Health Service Act. It describes three periods of federal support for health professions training in medicine and dentistry. During the first era, 1963 to 1975, federal support led to an increase in the overall production of physicians and dentists, primarily through grants for construction, renovation, and expansion of schools. The second period, 1976 to 1991, witnessed a shift in federal support to train physicians, dentists, and physician assistants in the fields of primary care defined as family medicine, general internal medicine, and general pediatrics. During this era, divisions of general internal medicine and general pediatrics, and departments of family medicine, were established in nearly every medical and osteopathic medical school. All three disciplines conducted primary care residencies, medical student clerkships, and faculty development programs. The third period, 1992 to present, emphasized the policy goals of caring for vulnerable populations, greater diversity in the health professions, and curricula innovations to prepare trainees for the future practice of medicine and dentistry. Again, Title VII grantees met these policy goals by designing curricula and creating clinical experiences to teach care of the homeless, persons with HIV, the elderly, and other vulnerable populations. Many grantees recruited underrepresented minorities into their programs as trainees and as faculty, and all of them designed and implemented new curricula to address emerging health priorities.This article is part of a theme issue of Academic Medicine on the Title VII health professions training programs.

  11. Does integrated training in evidence-based medicine (EBM) in the general practice (GP) specialty training improve EBM behaviour in daily clinical practice? A cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Kortekaas, M F; Bartelink, M E L; Zuithoff, N P A; van der Heijden, G J M G; de Wit, N J; Hoes, A W

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is an important element in the general practice (GP) specialty training. Studies show that integrating EBM training into clinical practice brings larger benefits than stand-alone modules. However, these studies have neither been performed in GP nor assessed EBM behaviour of former trainees in daily clinical practice. Setting GP specialty training in the Netherlands. Participants All 82 third year GP trainees who started their final third year in 2011 were approached for inclusion, of whom 79 (96%) participated: 39 in the intervention group and 40 in the control group. Intervention Integrated EBM training, in which EBM is embedded closely within the clinical context by joint assignments for the trainee and supervisor in daily practice, and teaching sessions based on dilemmas from actual patient consultations. Comparison Stand-alone EBM training at the institute only. Primary and secondary outcomes Our primary outcome was EBM behaviour, assessed by measuring guideline adherence (incorporating rational, motivated deviation) and information-seeking behaviour. Our secondary outcomes were EBM attitude and EBM knowledge. Data were acquired using logbooks and questionnaires, respectively. Analyses were performed using mixed models. Results Logbook data were available from 76 (96%) of the participating trainees at baseline (7614 consultations), 60 (76%) at the end of the third year (T1, 4973 consultations) and 53 (67%) 1 year after graduation (T2, 3307 consultations). We found no significant differences in outcomes between the 2 groups, with relative risks for guideline adherence varying between 0.96 and 0.99 (95% CI 0.86 to 1.11) at T1, and 0.99 and 1.10 (95% CI 0.92 to 1.25) at T2, and for information-seeking behaviour between 0.97 and 1.16 (95% CI 0.70 to 1.91) and 0.90 and 1.10 (95% CI 0.70 to 1.32), respectively. Conclusions Integrated EBM training compared with stand-alone EBM training does not improve EBM behaviour, attitude

  12. The EC4 European syllabus for post-graduate training in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine: version 4--2012.

    PubMed

    Wieringa, Gijsbert; Zerah, Simone; Jansen, Rob; Simundic, Ana-Maria; Queralto, José; Solnica, Bogdan; Gruson, Damien; Tomberg, Karel; Riittinen, Leena; Baum, Hannsjörg; Brochet, Jean-Philippe; Buhagiar, Gerald; Charilaou, Charis; Grigore, Camelia; Johnsen, Anders H; Kappelmayer, Janos; Majkic-Singh, Nada; Nubile, Giuseppe; O'Mullane, John; Opp, Matthias; Pupure, Silvija; Racek, Jaroslav; Reguengo, Henrique; Rizos, Demetrios; Rogic, Dunja; Špaňár, Július; Štrakl, Greta; Szekeres, Thomas; Tzatchev, Kamen; Vitkus, Dalius; Wallemacq, Pierre; Wallinder, Hans

    2012-08-01

    Laboratory medicine's practitioners across the European community include medical, scientific and pharmacy trained specialists whose contributions to health and healthcare is in the application of diagnostic tests for screening and early detection of disease, differential diagnosis, monitoring, management and treatment of patients, and their prognostic assessment. In submitting a revised common syllabus for post-graduate education and training across the 27 member states an expectation is set for harmonised, high quality, safe practice. In this regard an extended 'Core knowledge, skills and competencies' division embracing all laboratory medicine disciplines is described. For the first time the syllabus identifies the competencies required to meet clinical leadership demands for defining, directing and assuring the efficiency and effectiveness of laboratory services as well as expectations in translating knowledge and skills into ability to practice. In a 'Specialist knowledge' division, the expectations from the individual disciplines of Clinical Chemistry/Immunology, Haematology/Blood Transfusion, Microbiology/ Virology, Genetics and In Vitro Fertilisation are described. Beyond providing a common platform of knowledge, skills and competency, the syllabus supports the aims of the European Commission in providing safeguards to increasing professional mobility across European borders at a time when demand for highly qualified professionals is increasing and the labour force is declining. It continues to act as a guide for the formulation of national programmes supplemented by the needs of individual country priorities.

  13. Pleasure and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Kennett, Jeanette; Matthews, Steve; Snoek, Anke

    2013-01-01

    What is the role and value of pleasure in addiction? Foddy and Savulescu (1) have claimed that substance use is just pleasure-oriented behavior. They describe addiction as “strong appetites toward pleasure” and argue that addicts suffer in significant part because of strong social and moral disapproval of lives dominated by pleasure seeking. But such lives, they claim, can be autonomous and rational. The view they offer is largely in line with the choice model and opposed to a disease model of addiction. Foddy and Savulescu are sceptical of self-reports that emphasize the ill effects of addiction such as loss of family and possessions, or that claim an absence of pleasure after tolerance sets in. Such reports they think are shaped by social stigma which makes available a limited set of socially approved addiction narratives. We will not question the claim that a life devoted to pleasure can be autonomously chosen. Nor do we question the claim that the social stigma attached to the use of certain drugs increases the harm suffered by the user. However our interviews with addicts (as philosophers rather than health professionals or peers) reveal a genuinely ambivalent and complex relationship between addiction, value, and pleasure. Our subjects did not shy away from discussing pleasure and its role in use. But though they usually valued the pleasurable properties of substances, and this played that did not mean that they valued an addictive life. Our interviews distinguished changing attitudes towards drug related pleasures across the course of substance use, including diminishing pleasure from use over time and increasing resentment at the effects of substance use on other valued activities. In this paper we consider the implications of what drug users say about pleasure and value over the course of addiction for models of addiction. PMID:24093020

  14. [Modular training in practical medicine: electronic evaluation of student education in general practice].

    PubMed

    Himmel, W; Kühne, I; Chenot, J-F; Scheer, N; Primas, I; Sigle, J

    2004-07-01

    Effective from spring 2004, new regulations for undergraduate medical education in Germany require a two-week practical training in general practice. Similar to other forms of medical education, this practical training should be regularly evaluated by students. With regard to special conditions of the training, we preferred a web based evaluation. Since adequate models were not available, we designed, implemented and tested an electronic way of evaluation. The following aspects turned out to be of special importance: teamwork, time, data protection and cost. Meanwhile, the evaluation is established and still accessible as demo-version for visitors of the home page. This electronic evaluation of medical training in general practice is highly appropriate for a timely evaluation allowing us to obtain a comparison between students' expectations and actual experience as well as a continuous supervision and to provide feedback to the participating practices. This is an important step for quality assurance of medical education in practices inside and outside the university.

  15. The complexity of team training: what we have learned from aviation and its applications to medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hamman, W

    2004-01-01

    Errors in health care that compromise patient safety are tied to latent failures in the structure and function of systems. Teams of people perform most care delivered today, yet training often remains focused on individual responsibilities. Training programmes for all healthcare workers need to increase the educational experience of working in interdisciplinary teams. The complexities of team training require a multifunctional (systems) approach, which crosses organisational divisions to allow communication, accountability, and creation and maintenance of interdisciplinary teams. This report identifies challenges for medical education in performing the research, identifying performance measurements, and modifying educational curricula for the advancement of interdisciplinary teams, based on the complexity of team training identified in commercial aviation. PMID:15465959

  16. Internet Addiction among Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sargin, Nurten

    2012-01-01

    Each innovation brings along many risks. One of the risks related with the Internet use is Internet addiction. The aim of this study is to examine Internet addiction in adolescence in terms of gender, Internet access at home and grades. The research design used was survey method. The study population consisted of second stage students attending…

  17. Internet Addiction and Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koc, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between university students' internet addiction and psychopathology in Turkey. The study was based on data drawn from a national survey of university students in Turkey. 174 university students completed the SCL-90-R scale and Addicted Internet Users Inventory. Results show that students who use internet six…

  18. Addiction: Choice or Compulsion?

    PubMed Central

    Henden, Edmund; Melberg, Hans Olav; Røgeberg, Ole Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Normative thinking about addiction has traditionally been divided between, on the one hand, a medical model which sees addiction as a disease characterized by compulsive and relapsing drug use over which the addict has little or no control and, on the other, a moral model which sees addiction as a choice characterized by voluntary behavior under the control of the addict. Proponents of the former appeal to evidence showing that regular consumption of drugs causes persistent changes in the brain structures and functions known to be involved in the motivation of behavior. On this evidence, it is often concluded that becoming addicted involves a transition from voluntary, chosen drug use to non-voluntary compulsive drug use. Against this view, proponents of the moral model provide ample evidence that addictive drug use involves voluntary chosen behavior. In this article we argue that although they are right about something, both views are mistaken. We present a third model that neither rules out the view of addictive drug use as compulsive, nor that it involves voluntary chosen behavior. PMID:23966955

  19. Counseling Compulsive Resume Addiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Marshall J.

    Compulsive Resume Addiction (CRA) is a condition where applicants become dependent on their written credentials to get new employment. It is similar to other addictions in that the person manifests short-term, gratification-seeking behavior with the long term cost in self-esteem and self-confidence. Applicants get stuck in thinking that a better…

  20. A brief training module improves recognition of echocardiographic wall-motion abnormalities by emergency medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, Chris; Tommaso, Laura; Kulstad, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Objective. Wall-motion abnormality on echocardiogram is more sensitive in detecting cardiac ischemia than the electrocardiogram, but the use of bedside echocardiography by emergency physicians (EPs) for this purpose does not appear to be widespread, apparently due to limited data on proficiency of EPs for this task. We sought to determine the effect of a brief training module on the ability of EPs to recognize wall motion abnormalities on echocardiograms. Methods. We developed a brief training and testing module and presented it to EPs. After baseline testing of 15 echocardiograms, we presented the 30-minute training module, and administered a new test of 15 different echocardiograms. Physicians were asked to interpret the wall motion as normal or abnormal. Results. 35 EPs over two separate sessions showed significant improvement recognition of wall-motion abnormalities after the brief training module. Median score on the baseline test was 67%, interquartile range (IQR) 53% to 80%, while the median score on the posttraining test was 87%, IQR 80% to 87%, P < .001, independent of time in practice or prior training. Conclusion. With only brief training on how to recognize wall motion abnormalities on echocardiograms, EPs showed significant improvement in ability to identify wall motion abnormalities.

  1. Faculty Training in Evidence-Based Medicine: Improving Evidence Acquisition and Critical Appraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Laura J.; Warde, Carole M.; Boker, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Evidence-based medicine (EBM) integrates published clinical evidence with patient values and clinical expertise, the output of which is informed medical decision making. Key skills for evidence-based practice include acquisition and appraisal of clinical information. Faculty clinicians often lack expertise in these skills and are…

  2. Comparison of pharmacist knowledge, perceptions and training opportunities regarding maternal-fetal medicine in Canada, Qatar and Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Serena; Kitutu, Freddy E.; Rahhal, Ala’a; Abu Samaha, Rana; Wilby, Kyle J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although pharmacists have great potential to modify and optimize drug therapy in pregnancy and lactation, current literature demonstrates that they do not routinely provide this care and often feel ill equipped to do so. The objective of this study was to determine pharmacists’ knowledge and perceptions of maternal-fetal medicine in Canada, Uganda and Qatar. Secondary objectives were to determine factors associated with pharmacists’ knowledge and to characterize training opportunities and resources available to practising pharmacists. Methods: A cross-sectional survey using online software (SurveyMonkey) was sent to the e-mails of potential research participants. Practising pharmacists and resident pharmacists in British Columbia, Canada; the country of Qatar; and the country of Uganda were eligible for inclusion. The survey was designed to assess knowledge and perceptions, and to create a baseline inventory of current practice and information resources used in practice. Results: The mean knowledge assessment scores of pharmacists in Canada, Qatar and Uganda were 62.9%, 53.3%, and 57.7%, respectively (p < 0.05). Pharmacists in British Columbia scored higher on knowledge assessment than pharmacists in Qatar (p < 0.05), but other country comparisons were not significant. No predefined factors (gender, years of experience, practice area or parental status) were found to be significant in determining the knowledge score. More than two-thirds of pharmacists expressed interest in participating in continuing education opportunities in maternal-fetal medicine. Conclusion: Pharmacists have differing levels of knowledge in the area of maternal-fetal medicine. Continuing education and degree curricula should be reviewed and developed to fill the knowledge gaps of student pharmacists and practising pharmacists in maternal-fetal medicine. PMID:25364351

  3. [Addictive behavior disorders].

    PubMed

    Masaki, Daiki; Tsuchida, Hideto; Kitabayashi, Yurinosuke; Tani, Naosuke; Fukui, Kenji

    2007-10-01

    "Addiction" used to remind anyone of the use or abuse of chemical substances. In recent years, however, researchers and clinicians have begun to classify other excessive behaviors including gambling, eating shopping and self-injury into the addictive behavior. Above all, pathological gambling and bulimia nervosa patients often make trouble for psychiatrists and psychologists, not only for their family. On the other hand, the neural substrata underlying substance dependence have been revealed. Especially, it is implicated that the mesolimbic neuron plays a crucial role on the reward system. The recent studies suggest that reduced activation of the reward system might be related to the addictive behaviors such as pathological gambling, binge eating and sexual behavior. Further biological researches about the addictive behavior would help our deeper understanding of its disorders. As to the pharmacotherapy, many studies have demonstrated the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in treating the addictive behaviors.

  4. Attitudes about Addiction: A National Study of Addiction Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadus, Angela D.; Hartje, Joyce A.; Roget, Nancy A.; Cahoon, Kristy L.; Clinkinbeard, Samantha S.

    2010-01-01

    The following study, funded by the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA), utilized the "Addiction Belief Inventory" (ABI; Luke, Ribisl, Walton, & Davidson, 2002) to examine addiction attitudes in a national sample of U.S. college/university faculty teaching addiction-specific courses (n = 215). Results suggest that addiction educators view…

  5. [Cocaine - Characteristics and addiction].

    PubMed

    Girczys-Połedniok, Katarzyna; Pudlo, Robert; Jarząb, Magdalena; Szymlak, Agnieszka

    Cocaine use leads to health, social and legal problems. The aim of this paper is to discuss cocaine action, addicts characteristics, use patterns and consequences, as well as addiction treatment methods. A literature review was based on the Medline, PubMed, Polish Medical Bibliography databases and the Silesian Library resources. The Police and Central Statistical Office statistics, as well as the World Health Organization, the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction and the National Office for Combating Drug Addiction reports were used. Cocaine leads to mood improvement, appetite decrease, physical and intellectual activity enhancement, euphoria, inflated self-esteem, social networking ease and increased sexual desire. Cocaine hydrochloride is mainly used intranasaly, but also as intravenous and subcutaneous injections. Cocaine use and first addiction treatment fall in later age compared to other psychoactive substances. There is a high men to women ratio among addicts. There is a relationship between cocaine addiction, the presence of other disorders and genetic predisposition to addiction development. Polish reports indicate higher popularity of cocaine among people with a high economic and social status. Although Poland is a country with the low percentage of cocaine use, its popularity is growing. The consequences of cocaine use concern somatic and mental health problems, socioeconomic and legal conditions. The drug plays a role in crimes and traffic accidents. Because of the risks associated with cocaine use, it has been listed in a register of drugs attached to the Act on Counteracting Drug Addiction. Addiction treatment includes psychological, pharmacological and harm reduction strategies. Med Pr 2016;67(4):537-544.

  6. Internal medicine and the training of international medical graduates: a time for open discussion and new approaches.

    PubMed

    Levey, G S

    1992-09-01

    The number of foreign national medical graduates entering internal medicine residency training programs in the United States has doubled since 1986. A rigorous, standardized preresidency evaluation of the basic clinical skills and language abilities of international medical graduates should be implemented. Those found to have significant deficits should undertake a preparatory curriculum designed to meet special educational needs before entry into the formal training program. A relevant curriculum might include formal lectures, reading assignments, physical diagnosis sessions, language classes, patient encounter sessions, and a tutorial on U.S medical culture that includes medical ethics and the basics of the our health care system. All or only some of these may be required for any given individual. The Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) could provide many of the methods needed for an evaluation program and work collaboratively with program directors. This new approach to training of international medical graduates will require an evaluation system to to measure its effectiveness. Important questions about the funding of graduate medical education for international medical graduates must also be addressed.

  7. A Comparison between Emergency Medicine Residency Training Programs in the United States and Saudi Arabia from the Residents' Perception

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study was designed to compare the trainees' perception of emergency medicine (EM) training in the United States (US) and Saudi Arabia (SA) and to identify residents' levels of confidence and points of satisfaction in education, procedural skills, and work environment. Method. An IRB-exempt anonymous web-based survey was distributed to five EM residency training programs in the USA and three residency regions in SA. Results. 342 residents were polled with a 20% response rate (16.8% USA and 25.8% SA). The Saudi residents responded less positively to the questions about preparation for their boards' examinations, access to multiple educational resources, and weekly academic activities. The Saudi trainees felt less competent in less common procedures than US trainees. American trainees also more strongly agree that they have more faculty interest in their education compared to the Saudi trainees. The Saudi residents see more patients per hour compared to their US peers. Conclusion. These findings may be due to the differences in training techniques including less formal didactics and simulation experience in SA and more duty hour regulations in the USA. PMID:24563784

  8. Altitude training for elite endurance athletes: A review for the travel medicine practitioner.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Gerard; O'Connor, Rory; Johnston, Niall

    2016-01-01

    High altitude training is regarded as an integral component of modern athletic preparation, especially for endurance sports such as middle and long distance running. It has rapidly achieved popularity among elite endurance athletes and their coaches. Increased hypoxic stress at altitude facilitates key physiological adaptations within the athlete, which in turn may lead to improvements in sea-level athletic performance. Despite much research in this area to date, the exact mechanisms which underlie such improvements remain to be fully elucidated. This review describes the current understanding of physiological adaptation to high altitude training and its implications for athletic performance. It also discusses the rationale and main effects of different training models currently employed to maximise performance. Athletes who travel to altitude for training purposes are at risk of suffering the detrimental effects of altitude. Altitude illness, weight loss, immune suppression and sleep disturbance may serve to limit athletic performance. This review provides an overview of potential problems which an athlete may experience at altitude, and offers specific training recommendations so that these detrimental effects are minimised.

  9. Can credit systems help in family medicine training in developing countries? An innovative concept.

    PubMed

    Raji, J Beulah; Velavan, Jachin; Anbarasi, Sahaya; Grant, Liz

    2014-07-01

    There is irrefutable evidence that health systems perform best when supported by a Family Physician network. Training a critical mass of highly skilled Family Physicians can help developing countries to reach their Millennium Development Goals and deliver comprehensive patient-centered health care to their population. The challenge in developing countries is the need to rapidly train these Family Physicians in large numbers, while also ensuring the quality of the learning, and assuring the quality of training. The experience of Christian Medical College (CMC), Vellore, India and other global examples confirm the fact that training large numbers is possible through well-designed blended learning programs. The question then arises as to how these programs can be standardized. Globally, the concept of the "credit system" has become the watch-word for many training programs seeking standardization. This article explores the possibility of introducing incremental academic certifications using credit systems as a method to standardize these blended learning programs, gives a glimpse at the innovation that CMC, Vellore is piloting in this regard partnering with the University of Edinburgh and analyses the possible benefits and pitfalls of such an approach.

  10. Neural systems implicated in obesity as an addictive disorder: from biological to behavioral mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Erica M; Yokum, Sonja; Potenza, Marc N; Gearhardt, Ashley N

    2016-01-01

    Contributing factors to obesity have been identified, yet prevention and treatment efforts have had limited long-term success. It has recently been suggested that some individuals may experience an addictive-like response to certain foods, such as losing control over consumption and continued consumption despite negative consequences. In support, shared biological and behavioral features seem to exist between "food addiction" and traditional substance-use disorders. "Food addiction" may be another important contributor to obesity. The current chapter reviews existing literature regarding neural systems implicated similarly in obesity and addiction, discusses unique considerations for addictive-like eating, and proposes directions for future research regarding "food addiction" as an emerging construct for addiction medicine.

  11. Evidence-based medicine training during residency: a randomized controlled trial of efficacy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has been widely integrated into residency curricula, although results of randomized controlled trials and long term outcomes of EBM educational interventions are lacking. We sought to determine if an EBM workshop improved internal medicine residents' EBM knowledge and skills and use of secondary evidence resources. Methods This randomized controlled trial included 48 internal medicine residents at an academic medical center. Twenty-three residents were randomized to attend a 4-hour interactive workshop in their PGY-2 year. All residents completed a 25-item EBM knowledge and skills test and a self-reported survey of literature searching and resource usage in their PGY-1, PGY-2, and PGY-3 years. Results There was no difference in mean EBM test scores between the workshop and control groups at PGY-2 or PGY-3. However, mean EBM test scores significantly increased over time for both groups in PGY-2 and PGY-3. Literature searches, and resource usage also increased significantly in both groups after the PGY-1 year. Conclusions We were unable to detect a difference in EBM knowledge between residents who did and did not participate in our workshop. Significant improvement over time in EBM scores, however, suggests EBM skills were learned during residency. Future rigorous studies should determine the best methods for improving residents' EBM skills as well as their ability to apply evidence during clinical practice. PMID:20807453

  12. Sex differences in addictive disorders.

    PubMed

    Fattore, Liana; Melis, Miriam; Fadda, Paola; Fratta, Walter

    2014-08-01

    Gender-dependent differences in the rate of initiation and frequency of misuse of addicting drugs have been widely described. Yet, men and women also differ in their propensity to become addicted to other rewarding stimuli (e.g., sex, food) or activities (e.g., gambling, exercising). The goal of the present review is to summarize current evidence for gender differences not only in drug addiction, but also in other forms of addictive behaviours. Thus, we first reviewed studies showing gender-dependent differences in drug addiction, food addiction, compulsive sexual activity, pathological gambling, Internet addiction and physical exercise addiction. Potential risk factors and underlying brain mechanisms are also examined, with particular emphasis given to the role of sex hormones in modulating addictive behaviours. Investigations on factors allowing the pursuit of non-drug rewards to become pathological in men and women are crucial for designing gender-appropriate treatments of both substance and non-substance addictions.

  13. Brain Stimulation in Addiction.

    PubMed

    Salling, Michael C; Martinez, Diana

    2016-11-01

    Localized stimulation of the human brain to treat neuropsychiatric disorders has been in place for over 20 years. Although these methods have been used to a greater extent for mood and movement disorders, recent work has explored brain stimulation methods as potential treatments for addiction. The rationale behind stimulation therapy in addiction involves reestablishing normal brain function in target regions in an effort to dampen addictive behaviors. In this review, we present the rationale and studies investigating brain stimulation in addiction, including transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and deep brain stimulation. Overall, these studies indicate that brain stimulation has an acute effect on craving for drugs and alcohol, but few studies have investigated the effect of brain stimulation on actual drug and alcohol use or relapse. Stimulation therapies may achieve their effect through direct or indirect modulation of brain regions involved in addiction, either acutely or through plastic changes in neuronal transmission. Although these mechanisms are not well understood, further identification of the underlying neurobiology of addiction and rigorous evaluation of brain stimulation methods has the potential for unlocking an effective, long-term treatment of addiction.

  14. Efficacy of Abbreviated Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training: A Quantitative Review of Behavioral Medicine Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Charles R.; Hoyle, Rick H.

    1993-01-01

    Conducted quantitative review of research in which abbreviated progressive muscle relaxation training (APRT) was used as intervention for psychophysiological and stress-related disorders. Calculated strength of association between APRT and outcome measures for 29 experiments published after 1980. APRT was most strongly associated with improvement…

  15. On Personal and Collective Dimensions of Agency in Doctoral Training: Medicine and Natural Science Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkarainen, Kai Pekka; Wires, Susanna; Keskinen, Jenni; Paavola, Sami; Pohjola, Pasi; Lonka, Kirsti; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate knowledge-creating agency by examining doctoral students' accounts of their pursuits, using structured interviews. We examined all of the talk apparently related to agency of 13 doctoral students taking part in collective doctoral training in two, highly regarded Finnish research communities…

  16. 78 FR 48440 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Service Administration Advisory Committee on Training in Primary... Department of Health and Human Services; the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the... Resources and Services Administration, in any one of the following three ways: (1) Send a request to...

  17. 77 FR 64116 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Committee on Training in Primary... to the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services; the Committee on Health, Education... Resources and Services Administration, Room 9A-27, Parklawn Building, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville,...

  18. Big data and new knowledge in medicine: the thinking, training, and tools needed for a learning health system.

    PubMed

    Krumholz, Harlan M

    2014-07-01

    Big data in medicine--massive quantities of health care data accumulating from patients and populations and the advanced analytics that can give those data meaning--hold the prospect of becoming an engine for the knowledge generation that is necessary to address the extensive unmet information needs of patients, clinicians, administrators, researchers, and health policy makers. This article explores the ways in which big data can be harnessed to advance prediction, performance, discovery, and comparative effectiveness research to address the complexity of patients, populations, and organizations. Incorporating big data and next-generation analytics into clinical and population health research and practice will require not only new data sources but also new thinking, training, and tools. Adequately utilized, these reservoirs of data can be a practically inexhaustible source of knowledge to fuel a learning health care system.

  19. [A Perspective on Innovation for Efficient Medical Practice in View of Undergraduate and Postgraduate Education and Training in Laboratory Medicine].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Tadashi

    2015-10-01

    Continuous advances in medical laboratory technology have driven major changes in the practice of laboratory medicine over the past two decades. The importance of the overall quality of a medical laboratory has been ever-increasing in order to improve and ensure the quality and safety of clinical practice by physicians in any type of medical facility. Laboratory physicians and professional staff should challenge themselves more than ever in various ways to cooperate and contribute with practicing physicians for the appropriate utilization of laboratory testing. This will certainly lead to a decrease in inappropriate or unnecessary laboratory testing, resulting in reducing medical costs. In addition, not only postgraduate, but also undergraduate medical education/training systems must be markedly innovated, considering recent rapid progress in electronic information and communication technologies.

  20. New approaches to addiction treatment based on learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Falk; Dinter, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Preclinical studies suggest that physiological learning processes are similar to changes observed in addicts at the molecular, neuronal, and structural levels. Based on the importance of classical and instrumental conditioning in the development and maintenance of addictive disorders, many have suggested cue-exposure-based extinction training of conditioned, drug-related responses as a potential new treatment of addiction. It may also be possible to facilitate this extinction training with pharmacological compounds that strengthen memory consolidation during cue exposure. Another potential therapeutic intervention would be based on the so-called reconsolidation theory. According to this hypothesis, already-consolidated memories return to a labile state when reactivated, allowing them to undergo another phase of consolidation-reconsolidation, which can be pharmacologically manipulated. These approaches suggest that the extinction of drug-related memories may represent a viable treatment strategy in the future treatment of addiction.

  1. Specialization training in Malawi: a qualitative study on the perspectives of medical students graduating from the University of Malawi College of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a critical shortage of healthcare workers in sub-Saharan Africa, and Malawi has one of the lowest physician densities in the region. One of the reasons for this shortage is inadequate retention of medical school graduates, partly due to the desire for specialization training. The University of Malawi College of Medicine has developed specialty training programs, but medical school graduates continue to report a desire to leave the country for specialization training. To understand this desire, we studied medical students’ perspectives on specialization training in Malawi. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews of medical students in the final year of their degree program. We developed an interview guide through an iterative process, and recorded and transcribed all interviews for analysis. Two independent coders coded the manuscripts and assessed inter-coder reliability, and the authors used an “editing approach” to qualitative analysis to identify and categorize themes relating to the research aim. The University of Pittsburgh Institutional Review Board and the University of Malawi College of Medicine Research and Ethics Committee approved this study and authors obtained written informed consent from all participants. Results We interviewed 21 medical students. All students reported a desire for specialization training, with 12 (57%) students interested in specialties not currently offered in Malawi. Students discussed reasons for pursuing specialization training, impressions of specialization training in Malawi, reasons for staying or leaving Malawi to pursue specialization training and recommendations to improve training. Conclusions Graduating medical students in Malawi have mixed views of specialization training in their own country and still desire to leave Malawi to pursue further training. Training institutions in sub-Saharan Africa need to understand the needs of the country’s healthcare workforce and the needs of their

  2. How are medical students trained to locate biomedical information to practice evidence-based medicine? a review of the 2007–2012 literature

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Lauren A.; Kung, Janice Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study describes how information retrieval skills are taught in evidence-based medicine (EBM) at the undergraduate medical education (UGME) level. Methods: The authors systematically searched MEDLINE, Scopus, Educational Resource Information Center, Web of Science, and Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews for English-language articles published between 2007 and 2012 describing information retrieval training to support EBM. Data on learning environment, frequency of training, learner characteristics, resources and information skills taught, teaching modalities, and instructor roles were compiled and analyzed. Results: Twelve studies were identified for analysis. Studies were set in the United States (9), Australia (1), the Czech Republic (1), and Iran (1). Most trainings (7) featured multiple sessions with trainings offered to preclinical students (5) and clinical students (6). A single study described a longitudinal training experience. A variety of information resources were introduced, including PubMed, DynaMed, UpToDate, and AccessMedicine. The majority of the interventions (10) were classified as interactive teaching sessions in classroom settings. Librarians played major and collaborative roles with physicians in teaching and designing training. Unfortunately, few studies provided details of information skills activities or evaluations, making them difficult to evaluate and replicate. Conclusions: This study reviewed the literature and characterized how EBM search skills are taught in UGME. Details are provided on learning environment, frequency of training, level of learners, resources and skills trained, and instructor roles. Implications: The results suggest a number of steps that librarians can take to improve information skills training including using a longitudinal approach, integrating consumer health resources, and developing robust assessments. PMID:25031559

  3. The Military Training Network for Resuscitative Medicine Programs FY-90 Annual Rept

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    teach the management of multiple-traumatized patients. The ACLS, PALS, and BLS courses are sponsored by the American Heart Association (AHA). These...facilities had to obtain their cardiac resuscitative training from either local American Heart Association affiliates (BLS and ACLS) or from the American Red...in the DOD was completed in late 1982. In 1981 an agreement was prepared between the American Heart Association and the DCD Health Council establishing

  4. New York Medical College Bioterrorism: CDM Disaster Medicine and Emerging Infections Training Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    minimum 2 pilot courses for each course developed  Collection and analysis of assessment data  Preliminary review of findings and determination of next...Delivery of a minimum 2 pilot courses for each course developed  Collection and analysis of assessment data; preliminary review of findings and...Point. The pilot training program developed in this program will be delivered to the target groups (local responders, health care agencies, public

  5. A commentary on the "eating addiction" versus "food addiction" perspectives on addictive-like food consumption.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Erica M; Potenza, Marc N; Gearhardt, Ashley N

    2016-10-27

    The food addiction construct posits that vulnerable individuals may experience an addictive-like response to certain foods, such as those high in fat and refined carbohydrates. Recently, an alternative model to food addiction was proposed, suggesting that the act of eating may be a behavioral addiction that can trigger an addictive-like response in susceptible individuals. One major rationale for the eating addiction framework is that the assessment of food addiction is based on behavioral indicators, such as consuming greater quantities of food than intended and eating certain foods despite negative consequences. It is also suggested that the lack of investigation into which foods and food attributes (e.g., sugar) may have an addictive potential is evidence that food addiction does not parallel a substance-based addiction and more closely resembles a behavioral addiction. The present paper provides a commentary suggesting that the substance-based, food-addiction framework is more appropriate than the behavioral-addiction, eating-addiction perspective to conceptualize addictive-like food consumption. In order to illustrate this point, this manuscript will discuss behavioral components characteristic of all substance-use disorders, preliminary evidence to suggest that all foods are not equally associated with addictive-like eating, and key differences between the hypothesized eating addiction phenotype and the only existing behavioral addiction in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), gambling disorder. Further, this paper will consider implications of applying an addiction label to food versus eating and suggest future research directions to evaluate whether food addiction is a valid and clinically useful construct.

  6. New Medicine for the U.S. Health Care System: Training Physicians for Structural Interventions.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Helena; Metzl, Jonathan M

    2017-03-01

    Structural competency provides a language and theoretical framework to promote institutional-level interventions by clinical practitioners working with community organizations, non-health-sector institutions, and policy makers. The special collection of articles on structural competency in this issue of Academic Medicine addresses the need to move from theory to an appraisal of core educational interventions that operationalize the goals of and foster structural competency. In this Commentary, the authors review the role of clinical practitioners in enhancing population-level health outcomes through collaborations with professionals in fields outside medicine, including the social sciences and law. They describe the core elements of structural competency in preclinical and clinical education, as illustrated by the articles of this special collection: perceiving the structural causes of patients' disease, envisioning structural interventions, and cultivating alliances with non-health-sector agencies that can implement structural interventions. Finally, the authors argue that preparing trainees to form partnerships will empower them to influence the social determinants of their patients' health and reduce health inequalities.

  7. [Online addictive disease].

    PubMed

    Neuenschwander, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Digital media are indispensable in school, profession, family and leisure time. 1 to 6 % of all users show dsyfunctional ans addictive patterns, first of all in online and "social" media. In Switzerland over 80 % of young people own a smartphone and "pocket internet". Time of interaction with online-media (hours/day), as well as peer group pattern are markers for risk of addiction. Active music making and sports are protective factors. Family physicians are important in early recognition of "internet addictive disease". Care-givers with special experience in this field are often successful in reducing time of harmful interaction with the internet. Internet addictive disease is not yet classified in ICD and DSM-5 lists, even though it is an increasing reality.

  8. Heroin addiction and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bashore, R A; Ketchum, J S; Staisch, K J; Barrett, C T; Zimmermann, E G

    1981-06-01

    Pregnant heroin addicts tend to be younger than nonaddicted pregnant patients, unmarried or separated from spouses, and a disproportionately large number are members of minority ethnic groups. Heroin addiction during pregnancy is associated with several significant medical and obstetrical complications and may result in both acute and chronic abnormalities in neonates. Malnutrition, venereal disease, hepatitis, pulmonary complications, preeclampsia and third-trimester bleeding are the most common maternal complications, while fetal death, intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity and withdrawal symptoms affect the fetus and neonate. There is controversy about treating addicts with methadone during pregnancy. The findings of studies in animals suggest that there may be a long-lasting drug-induced syndrome, characterized by growth retardation, delayed motor development and behavior abnormalities in offspring of heroin-addicted or methadone-treated mothers.

  9. The Treatment of Addiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapple, P. A. L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes sociological and medical treatment appropriate to young drug experimenters and addicts. Discusses role of teachers, probation officers, school medical services, and general practitioners. Indicates necessity for long treatment period. Considers whether dependence is a disease of delinquent behavior. (AL)

  10. Biological substrates of addiction

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Max E.; Grueter, Carrie A.

    2014-01-01

    This review is an introduction to addiction, the reward circuitry, and laboratory addiction models. Addiction is a chronic disease hallmarked by a state of compulsive drug seeking that persists despite negative consequences. Most of the advances in addiction research have centered on the canonical and contemporary drugs of abuse, however, addictions to other activities and stimuli also exist. Substances of abuse have the potential to induce long-lasting changes in the brain at the behavioral, circuit and synaptic levels. Addiction-related behavioral changes involve initiation, escalation and obsession to drug seeking and much of the current research is focused on mapping these manifestations to specific neural pathways. Drug abuse is well known to recruit components of the mesolimbic dopamine system, including the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area. In addition, altered function of a wide variety of brain regions is tightly associated with specific manifestations of drug abuse. These regions peripheral to the mesolimbic pathway likely play a role in specific observed comorbidities and endophenotypes that can facilitate, or be caused by, substance abuse. Alterations in synaptic structure, function and connectivity, as well as epigenetic and genetic mechanisms are thought to underlie the pathologies of addiction. In preclinical models, these persistent changes are studied at the levels of molecular pharmacology and biochemistry, ex vivo and in vivo electrophysiology, radiography and behavior. Coordinating research efforts across these disciplines and examining cell type- and circuit-specific phenomena are crucial components for translating preclinical findings to viable medical interventions that effectively treat addiction and related disorders. PMID:24999377

  11. [Neurobiology of addictive behavior].

    PubMed

    Ivlieva, N Iu

    2011-01-01

    Addictive behavior developes after repeated substance use and it typically include a strong desire to take the drug, difficulties in controlling its use, persisting in its use despite harmful consequences, a higher priority given to the drug use than to other activities. Relapse, the resumption of drug taking after periods of abstinence, remains the major problem for the treatment of addiction. The process of drug addiction shares striking commonalities with neural plasticity associated with natural reward learning and memory and is caused primarily by drug-induced sensitization in the brain mesocorticolimbic systems that attribute incentive salience to reward-associated stimuli. The switch from controlled to compulsive drug seeking represents a transition at the neural level from prefrontal cortical to striatal control. Current neurophysiologic evidence suggests that the development of addiction is to some extent due to neurochemical stimulation of the midbrain dopaminergic system that is traditionally considered as a 'common neural currency' for rewards of most kinds. Addictions are a result of the interplay of multiple genetic and environmental factors. They are characterized by phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity as well as polygenicity. Environmental factors are crucial in addiction vulnerability and resistese too.

  12. Is fast food addictive?

    PubMed

    Garber, Andrea K; Lustig, Robert H

    2011-09-01

    Studies of food addiction have focused on highly palatable foods. While fast food falls squarely into that category, it has several other attributes that may increase its salience. This review examines whether the nutrients present in fast food, the characteristics of fast food consumers or the presentation and packaging of fast food may encourage substance dependence, as defined by the American Psychiatric Association. The majority of fast food meals are accompanied by a soda, which increases the sugar content 10-fold. Sugar addiction, including tolerance and withdrawal, has been demonstrated in rodents but not humans. Caffeine is a "model" substance of dependence; coffee drinks are driving the recent increase in fast food sales. Limited evidence suggests that the high fat and salt content of fast food may increase addictive potential. Fast food restaurants cluster in poorer neighborhoods and obese adults eat more fast food than those who are normal weight. Obesity is characterized by resistance to insulin, leptin and other hormonal signals that would normally control appetite and limit reward. Neuroimaging studies in obese subjects provide evidence of altered reward and tolerance. Once obese, many individuals meet criteria for psychological dependence. Stress and dieting may sensitize an individual to reward. Finally, fast food advertisements, restaurants and menus all provide environmental cues that may trigger addictive overeating. While the concept of fast food addiction remains to be proven, these findings support the role of fast food as a potentially addictive substance that is most likely to create dependence in vulnerable populations.

  13. Postgraduate and research programmes in Medicine and Public Health in Rwanda: an exciting experience about training of human resources for health in a limited resources country.

    PubMed

    Kakoma, Jean Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    The area of Human Resources for Health (HRH) is the most critical challenge for the achievement of health related development goals in countries with limited resources. This is even exacerbated in a post conflict environment like Rwanda. The aim of this commentary is to report and share the genesis and outcomes of an exciting experience about training of qualified health workers in medicine and public health as well as setting - up of a research culture for the last nine years (2006 - 2014) in Rwanda. Many initiatives have been taken and concerned among others training of qualified health workers in medicine and public health. From 2006 to 2014, achievements were as follows: launching and organization of 8 Master of Medicine programmes (anesthesiology, family and community medicine, internal medicine, obstetrics & gynecology, otorhinolaryngology, pediatrics, psychiatry and surgery) and 4 Master programmes in public health (MPH, MSc Epidemiology, MSc Field Epidemiology & Laboratory Management, and Master in Hospital and Healthcare Administration); training to completion of more than 120 specialists in medicine, and 200 MPH, MSc Epidemiology, and MSc Field Epidemiology holders; revival of the Rwanda Medical Journal; organization of graduate research training (MPhil and PhD); 3 Master programmes in the pipeline (Global Health, Health Financing, and Supply Chain Management); partnerships with research institutions of great renown, which contributed to the reinforcement of the institutional research capacity and visibility towards excellence in leadership, accountability, and self sustainability. Even though there is still more to be achieved, the Rwanda experience about postgraduate and research programmes is inspiring through close interactions between main stakeholders. This is a must and could allow Rwanda to become one of the rare examples to other more well-to-do Sub - Saharan countries, should Rwanda carry on doing that.

  14. Postgraduate and research programmes in Medicine and Public Health in Rwanda: an exciting experience about training of human resources for health in a limited resources country

    PubMed Central

    Kakoma, Jean Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    The area of Human Resources for Health (HRH) is the most critical challenge for the achievement of health related development goals in countries with limited resources. This is even exacerbated in a post conflict environment like Rwanda. The aim of this commentary is to report and share the genesis and outcomes of an exciting experience about training of qualified health workers in medicine and public health as well as setting - up of a research culture for the last nine years (2006 - 2014) in Rwanda. Many initiatives have been taken and concerned among others training of qualified health workers in medicine and public health. From 2006 to 2014, achievements were as follows: launching and organization of 8 Master of Medicine programmes (anesthesiology, family and community medicine, internal medicine, obstetrics & gynecology, otorhinolaryngology, pediatrics, psychiatry and surgery) and 4 Master programmes in public health (MPH, MSc Epidemiology, MSc Field Epidemiology & Laboratory Management, and Master in Hospital and Healthcare Administration); training to completion of more than 120 specialists in medicine, and 200 MPH, MSc Epidemiology, and MSc Field Epidemiology holders; revival of the Rwanda Medical Journal; organization of graduate research training (MPhil and PhD); 3 Master programmes in the pipeline (Global Health, Health Financing, and Supply Chain Management); partnerships with research institutions of great renown, which contributed to the reinforcement of the institutional research capacity and visibility towards excellence in leadership, accountability, and self sustainability. Even though there is still more to be achieved, the Rwanda experience about postgraduate and research programmes is inspiring through close interactions between main stakeholders. This is a must and could allow Rwanda to become one of the rare examples to other more well-to-do Sub - Saharan countries, should Rwanda carry on doing that. PMID:27303587

  15. Bedside ultrasonography (US), Echoscopy and US point of care as a new kind of stethoscope for Internal Medicine Departments: the training program of the Italian Internal Medicine Society (SIMI).

    PubMed

    Arienti, Vincenzo; Di Giulio, Rosella; Cogliati, Chiara; Accogli, Esterita; Aluigi, Leonardo; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, thanks to the development of miniaturized ultrasound devices, comparable to personal computers, tablets and even to smart phones, we have seen an increasing use of bedside ultrasound in internal medicine departments as a novel kind of ultrasound stethoscope. The clinical ultrasound-assisted approach has proved to be particularly useful in assessing patients with nodules of the neck, dyspnoea, abdominal pain, and with limb edema. In several cases, it has allowed a simple, rapid and precise diagnosis. Since 2005, the Italian Society of Internal Medicine and its Ultrasound Study Group has been holding a Summer School and training courses in ultrasound for residents in internal medicine. A national network of schools in bedside ultrasound was then organized for internal medicine specialists who want to learn this technique. Because bedside ultrasound is a user-dependent diagnostic method, it is important to define the limits and advantages of different new ultrasound devices, to classify them (i.e. Echoscopy and Point of Care Ultrasound), to establish appropriate different levels of competence and to ensure their specific training. In this review, we describe the point of view of the Italian Internal Medicine Society on these topics.

  16. Effect of handoff skills training for students during the medicine clerkship: a quasi-randomized study.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Juan A; Greenberg, Larrie; Amdur, Richard; Gehring, James; Lesky, Linda G

    2016-03-01

    Continuity is critical for safe patient care and its absence is associated with adverse outcomes. Continuity requires handoffs between physicians, but most published studies of educational interventions to improve handoffs have focused primarily on residents, despite interns expected to being proficient. The AAMC core entrustable activities for graduating medical students includes handoffs as a milestone, but no controlled studies with students have assessed the impact of training in handoff skills. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of an educational intervention to improve third-year medical student handoff skills, the durability of learned skills into the fourth year, and the transfer of skills from the simulated setting to the clinical environment. Trained evaluators used standardized patient cases and an observation tool to assess verbal handoff skills immediately post intervention and during the student's fourth-year acting internship. Students were also observed doing real time sign-outs during their acting internship. Evaluators assessed untrained control students using a standardized case and performing a real-time sign-out. Intervention students mean score demonstrated improvement in handoff skills immediately after the workshop (2.6-3.8; p < 0.0001) that persisted into their fourth year acting internship when compared to baseline performance (3.9-3.5; p = 0.06) and to untrained control students (3.5 vs. 2.5; p < 0.001, d = 1.2). Intervention students evaluated in the clinical setting also scored higher than control students when assessed doing real-time handoffs (3.8 vs. 3.3; p = 0.032, d = 0.71). These findings should be useful to others considering introducing handoff teaching in the undergraduate medical curriculum in preparation for post-graduate medical training. Trial Registration Number NCT02217241.

  17. "Eating addiction", rather than "food addiction", better captures addictive-like eating behavior.

    PubMed

    Hebebrand, Johannes; Albayrak, Özgür; Adan, Roger; Antel, Jochen; Dieguez, Carlos; de Jong, Johannes; Leng, Gareth; Menzies, John; Mercer, Julian G; Murphy, Michelle; van der Plasse, Geoffrey; Dickson, Suzanne L

    2014-11-01

    "Food addiction" has become a focus of interest for researchers attempting to explain certain processes and/or behaviors that may contribute to the development of obesity. Although the scientific discussion on "food addiction" is in its nascent stage, it has potentially important implications for treatment and prevention strategies. As such, it is important to critically reflect on the appropriateness of the term "food addiction", which combines the concepts of "substance-based" and behavioral addiction. The currently available evidence for a substance-based food addiction is poor, partly because systematic clinical and translational studies are still at an early stage. We do however view both animal and existing human data as consistent with the existence of addictive eating behavior. Accordingly, we stress that similar to other behaviors eating can become an addiction in thus predisposed individuals under specific environmental circumstances. Here, we introduce current diagnostic and neurobiological concepts of substance-related and non-substance-related addictive disorders, and highlight the similarities and dissimilarities between addiction and overeating. We conclude that "food addiction" is a misnomer because of the ambiguous connotation of a substance-related phenomenon. We instead propose the term "eating addiction" to underscore the behavioral addiction to eating; future research should attempt to define the diagnostic criteria for an eating addiction, for which DSM-5 now offers an umbrella via the introduction on Non-Substance-Related Disorders within the category Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders.

  18. Prescription Pain Medicines - An Addictive Path?

    MedlinePlus

    ... country. According to the 2005 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, the incidence of new nonmedical users of pain relievers is now at 2.2 million Americans aged 12 and older. This is greater than the number of new marijuana abusers (2.1 million). In 2005, more than six ...

  19. Opiate addiction and cocaine addiction: underlying molecular neurobiology and genetics.

    PubMed

    Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Levran, Orna; Reed, Brian; Schlussman, Stefan D; Zhou, Yan; Butelman, Eduardo R

    2012-10-01

    Addictive diseases, including addiction to heroin, prescription opioids, or cocaine, pose massive personal and public health costs. Addictions are chronic relapsing diseases of the brain caused by drug-induced direct effects and persisting neuroadaptations at the epigenetic, mRNA, neuropeptide, neurotransmitter, or protein levels. These neuroadaptations, which can be specific to drug type, and their resultant behaviors are modified by various internal and external environmental factors, including stress responsivity, addict mindset, and social setting. Specific gene variants, including variants encoding pharmacological target proteins or genes mediating neuroadaptations, also modify vulnerability at particular stages of addiction. Greater understanding of these interacting factors through laboratory-based and translational studies have the potential to optimize early interventions for the therapy of chronic addictive diseases and to reduce the burden of relapse. Here, we review the molecular neurobiology and genetics of opiate addiction, including heroin and prescription opioids, and cocaine addiction.

  20. Obstetrical Practice and Training in Canadian Family Medicine: Conserving an Endangered Species

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Michael; Reynolds, J. L.; Boucher, Francois; Malus, Michael; Rosenberg, Ellen

    1984-01-01

    Family practice obstetricians are an endangered species. Our practices and teaching sites must provide the correct attitudinal as well as technical messages to result in a practitioner who will be able to meet the psychosocial and medical needs of the pregnant couple. Family practice obstetrics can be as safe as care given by obstetricians provided that the family practice group functions well, that obstetrical consultants are available and supportive, and assuming that technical approaches are reserved for those truly in need. In rural areas, obstetrical ability is essential, whilst in the urban setting it helps the family physician maintain a practice involving young families. Those trainees who fail to learn basic obstetrical skills (including family centered attitudes and approaches) may in any setting come to feel, belatedly, that their training programs failed in this respect. PMID:21279123

  1. [Training students on research, while studying Pediatrics in the School of Medicine. Teaching experience].

    PubMed

    Eymann, Alfredo; Perez, Lucía; Busaniche, Julio; Cacchiarelli, Nicolás; Ceriani Cernadas, Clara; Wahren, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Research is important during university education. The objective was to describe the teaching of an exercise in clinical research and its perception by students. Medical students conducted a research work in groups coordinated by a tutor. We evaluated the importance the students gave to research learning and we assessed the satisfaction of having participated in the activity in a scale from 1 to 10. Eighty-one students developed 14 research exercises, 44.4% reported having received training in research methodology before and 11.1% had participated in some research study. They assigned a score of 8 out of 10 to the importance of research and 9 out of 10 to the satisfaction of having participated in the activity. The aspects of the exercise in clinical research perceived as positive were that it favoured teamwork and helped students to understand how to conduct a research study.

  2. The Addict in Us all

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Brendan; Holton, Richard

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we contend that the psychology of addiction is similar to the psychology of ordinary, non-addictive temptation in important respects, and explore the ways in which these parallels can illuminate both addiction and ordinary action. The incentive salience account of addiction proposed by Robinson and Berridge (1–3) entails that addictive desires are not in their nature different from many of the desires had by non-addicts; what is different is rather the way that addictive desires are acquired, which in turn affects their strength. We examine these “incentive salience” desires, both in addicts and non-addicts, contrasting them with more cognitive desires. On this account, the self-control challenge faced by addicted agents is not different in kind from that faced by non-addicted agents – though the two may, of course, differ greatly in degree of difficulty. We explore a general model of self-control for both the addict and the non-addict, stressing that self-control may be employed at three different stages, and examining the ways in which it might be strengthened. This helps elucidate a general model of intentional action. PMID:25346699

  3. Treatment of addiction and addiction-related behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Dewey, S.L.; Brodie, J.D.; Ashby, C.R. Jr.

    2000-05-02

    The present invention provides a highly efficient method for treating substance addiction and for changing addiction-related behavior of a primate suffering from substance addiction. The method includes administering to a primate an effective amount of a pharmaceutical composition including gamma vinylGABA. The present invention also provides a method of treatment of nicotine addiction by treating a patient with an effective amount of a composition including gamma vinylGABA.

  4. Treatment of addiction and addiction-related behavior

    DOEpatents

    Dewey, Stephen L.; Brodie, Jonathan D.; Ashby, Jr., Charles R.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a highly efficient method for treating substance addiction and for changing addiction-related behavior of a primate suffering from substance addiction. The method includes administering to a primate an effective amount of a pharmaceutical composition including gamma vinylGABA. The present invention also provides a method of treatment of nicotine addiction by treating a patient with an effective amount of a composition including gamma vinylGABA.

  5. Addiction, the Addict, and Career: Considerations for the Employment Counselor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Matthew D.

    2006-01-01

    Employment counselors have been resistant to working with persons in recovery from addiction except under the strictest of criteria. This article examines the relationship between this resistance and the concepts of addiction and addict. Following this is an examination of substance abuse recovery and practical suggestions on incorporating…

  6. Buprenorphine for opioid addiction

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Walter; Mooney, Larissa; Torrington, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist of the µ-receptor, and is used as a daily dose sublingual tablet or filmstrip for managing opioid addiction. In the USA, the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 made buprenorphine the only opioid medication for opioid addiction that can be prescribed in an office-based setting. Owing to its high affinity for the µ-receptor, buprenorphine inhibits the reinforcing effect of exogenous opioids. The ceiling effect of buprenorphine's µ-agonist activity reduces the potential for drug overdose and confers low toxicity even at high doses. Buprenorphine pharmacotherapy has proven to be a treatment approach that supports recovery from addiction while reducing or curtailing the use of opioids. This article examines buprenorphine pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction, focusing on the situation in the USA, and is based on a review of pertinent literature, and the authors’ research and clinical experience. The references in this paper were chosen according to the authors’ judgment of quality and relevance, and with respect to their familiarity and involvement in related research. PMID:24654720

  7. [Addictions and action systems].

    PubMed

    Loonis, E; Apter, M J

    2000-01-01

    Generalizing from some previous analyses of addiction, and introducing the concept of an action system which governs all actions which are focussed on what Brown (1988) calls "hedonic management", we argue that addictions of every kind involve an action system that displays high salience, low variety and low vicariance. Addictions also involve what Apter (1982) calls the "paratelic state". A study was carried out comparing 31 drug addicts with 29 control subjects in terms of action system variables. To measure these variables, we constructed a new instrument, the Activity-System Drawing Test, and also used the Telic Dominance Scale to measure frequency of paratelic states. Dysphoria was measured by means of the BATE (anxiety), IDA-13 (depression), SEI (self-esteem), and TAS-20 (alexithymia) instruments. Strongly significant differences were found between groups for both action system variables and dysphoria, and there were also strong correlations between both groups of variables. This supports the idea that addictions emerge from systemic properties of the action system.

  8. The Dreams of Heroin Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looney, Maryanne

    1972-01-01

    Few heroin addicts get high'' in their dreams. An exploration of the reasons for this failure provides some clues to the conflicts and other problems that retard an addict's progress in therapy. (Author)

  9. Clinical management of immuno-suppression in athletes associated with exercise training: sports medicine considerations.

    PubMed

    Hackney, Anthony Carl

    2013-01-01

    The Overtraining Syndrome (OTS) is a physically debilitating medical condition that results in athletes being totally compromised in their capacity to perform and compete. Many physiological systems are affected by the process of overtraining and the development of the OTS which results from it; but one system in particular, the immune, is highly susceptible to degradation resulting in a reduction in overall health and physical performance. The aim of this paper is to review; 1) the evidence-based proactive steps and actions to take to greatly reduce the risk of development of an infection or a compromised immune system in athletes; and 2) the course of action for clinicians to take when they are dealing with an athlete displaying overt signs of an infection and, or inflammation. Evidenced reported here within support that it is essential for clinicians to take practical preventative and management steps - actions with athletes (involved in intensive exercise training) in order to help preserve and maintain a healthy and robust immune system if they are going to perform optimally.

  10. Process improvement of pap smear tracking in a women's medicine center clinic in residency training.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, Byron C; Goode, Jeff; Simmons, Kathy

    2011-11-01

    Application of Six-Sigma methodology and Change Acceleration Process (CAP)/Work Out (WO) tools to track pap smear results in an outpatient clinic in a hospital-based residency-training program. Observational study of impact of changes obtained through application of Six-Sigma principles in clinic process with particular attention to prevention of sentinel events. Using cohort analysis and applying Six-Sigma principles to an interactive electronic medical record Soarian workflow engine, we designed a system of timely accession and reporting of pap smear and pathology results. We compared manual processes from January 1, 2007 to February 28, 2008 to automated processes from March 1, 2008 to December 31, 2009. Using the Six-Sigma principles, CAP/WO tools, including "voice of the customer" and team focused approach, no outlier events went untracked. Applying the Soarian workflow engine to track prescribed 7 day turnaround time for completion, we identified 148 pap results in 3,936, 3 non-gynecological results in 15, and 41 surgical results in 246. We applied Six-Sigma principles to an outpatient clinic facilitating an interdisciplinary team approach to improve the clinic's reporting system. Through focused problem assessment, verification of process, and validation of outcomes, we improved patient care for pap smears and critical pathology.

  11. [Expedition medicine].

    PubMed

    Donlagić, Lana

    2009-01-01

    Expedition and wildeness medicine is a term that combines rescue medicine, sport medicine as well as more specific branches as polar or high altitude medicine. It is being intensively studied both at the reaserch institutes and on expeditions. Ophtalmologists are concentrated on the reaserch of HARH (High Altitude Retinal Hemorrhage), neurologists on HACE reaserch (High Altitude Cerebral Edema), psychologists are developing tests to decsribe cognitive functions and many physicians are being trained to work in extreme enviroment. The result of all this effort are numerous new findings in pathophysiology and therapy of altitude illness, increased security on expedition and further development of expeditionism.

  12. Hypotheses regarding the mechanisms of ayahuasca in the treatment of addictions.

    PubMed

    Liester, Mitchell B; Prickett, James I

    2012-01-01

    Ayahuasca is a medicinal plant mixture utilized by indigenous peoples throughout the Amazon River basin for healing purposes. The "vine of the soul" or "vine of death," as it is known in South America, contains a combination of monoamine oxidase inhibitors and N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT). When ingested together, these medicines produce profound alterations in consciousness. Increasingly, ayahuasca is being utilized to treat addictions. However, the mechanism of action by which ayahuasca treats addictions remains unclear. We offer four hypotheses to explain possible biochemical, physiological, psychological, and transcendent mechanisms by which ayahuasca may exert its anti-addiction effects.

  13. Internet Addiction: A Logotherapeutic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Didelot, Mary J.; Hollingsworth, Lisa; Buckenmeyer, Janet A.

    2012-01-01

    Internet addiction (IA) is both the most rapidly growing addiction and the least understood addiction (Watson, 2005). For counselors, treatment issues surrounding the disease are also growing. At the forefront is the lack of understanding concerning treatment protocol to manage the challenging recovery and maintenance stages after IA behavior has…

  14. Addicts - Everything but Human Beings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldorf, Dan; Reinarman, Craig

    1975-01-01

    Popular theories of drug addiction are detailed and found wanting. Naturalistic studies of addicts in their own environments are reviewed in order to demonstrate that addicts do not fit these theories which are supposed to explain them. A plea is made to pay more attention to these ethnographic studies, if more effective and humane laws and social…

  15. Attitudes of Former Drug Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boudouris, James

    1977-01-01

    Characteristics of addicts (N=222) and their own appraisal of which treatment modality they found most successful based upon their own experiences are of primary importance in prescribing a treatment for the addict. For the long-term addict continually in and out of prisons, perhaps methadone maintenance is the solution. (Author)

  16. Treating Internet Addiction with Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: A Thematic Analysis of the Experiences of Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rooij, Antonius J.; Zinn, Mieke F.; Schoenmakers, Tim M.; van de Mheen, Dike

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, one of the major Dutch addiction care organizations initiated a pilot program to explore the possibility of using an existing Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Motivational Interviewing based treatment program ("Lifestyle Training") to treat internet addiction. The current study evaluates this pilot treatment program by providing…

  17. Addiction Studies: Exploring Students' Attitudes toward Research in a Graduate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Raven; Simons, Lori

    2011-01-01

    An exploratory study was conducted to compare addiction studies and community counseling students' attitudes toward research. A survey of 66 addiction studies and 17 community counseling students in graduate programs was used to explore interest and self-efficacy in research and the research training environment. A pre/post test design was used to…

  18. Web based provider education for competency of scope of practice (Best Practice): Medicine Department Safe training is a computer based review program (de' medri).

    PubMed

    Tabriziani, Hossein; Hatcher, Myron; Heetebry, Irene

    2005-12-01

    Medicine Department Safe training is a computer based review program named de'medici and it is an employee training program. This annual review packet serves as a generic training tool. All health-care providers with direct patient care are required by state law to complete a group of 11 modules and pass a mandatory training test to assess proficiency in these areas. They include emergency preparedness, life and fire safety, electrical safety, working safety with hazardous materials, back safety, violence in the workplace, latex allergy prevention, preventing TB in the workplace, preventing AIDS and hepatitis B and C in the workplace, radiation safety, and age related care for health-care workers.

  19. Jumping on the Train of Personalized Medicine: A Primer for Non- Geneticist Clinicians: Part 3. Clinical Applications in the Personalized Medicine Area

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aihua; Meyre, David

    2014-01-01

    The rapid decline of sequencing costs brings hope that personal genome sequencing will become a common feature of medical practice. This series of three reviews aim to help non-geneticist clinicians to jump into the fast-moving field of personalized genetic medicine. In the first two articles, we covered the fundamental concepts of molecular genetics and the methodologies used in genetic epidemiology. In this third article, we discuss the evolution of personalized medicine and illustrate the most recent success in the fields of Mendelian and complex human diseases. We also address the challenges that currently limit the use of personalized medicine to its full potential. PMID:25598768

  20. Drug abuse and addiction.

    PubMed

    Nessa, A; Latif, S A; Siddiqui, N I; Hussain, M A; Hossain, M A

    2008-07-01

    Among the social and medical ills of the twentieth century, substance abuse ranks as on one of the most devastating and costly. The drug problem today is a major global concern including Bangladesh. Almost all addictive drugs over stimulate the reward system of the brain, flooding it with the neurotransmitter dopamine. That produces euphoria and that heightened pleasure can be so compelling that the brain wants that feeling back again and again. However repetitive exposure induces widespread adaptive changes in the brain. As a consequence drug use may become compulsive. An estimated 4.7% of the global population aged 15 to 64 or 184 million people, consume illicit drug annually. Heroin use alone is responsible for the epidemic number of new cases of HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis and drug addicted infant born each year. Department of narcotic control (DNC) in Bangladesh reported in June 2008 that about 5 million drug addicts in the country & addicts spend at least 17 (Seventeen) billion on drugs per year. Among these drug addicts, 91% are young and adolescents population. Heroin is the most widely abused drugs in Bangladesh. For geographical reason like India, Pakistan and Myanmar; Bangladesh is also an important transit root for internationally trafficking of illicit drug. Drug abuse is responsible for decreased job productivity and attendance increased health care costs, and escalations of domestic violence and violent crimes. Drug addiction is a preventable disease. Through scientific advances we now know much more about how exactly drugs work in the brain, and we also know that drug addiction can be successfully treated to help people stop abusing drugs and resume their productive lives. Most countries have legislation designed to criminalize some drugs. To decrease the prevalence of this problem in our setting; increase awareness, promoting additional research on abused and addictive drugs, and exact implementation of existing laws are strongly recommended. We should

  1. Psychostimulant addiction treatment.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Karran A; Epstein, David H; Preston, Kenzie L

    2014-12-01

    Treatment of psychostimulant addiction has been a major, and not fully met, challenge. For opioid addiction, there is strong evidence for the effectiveness of several medications. For psychostimulants, there is no corresponding form of agonist maintenance that has met criteria for regulatory approval or generally accepted use. Stimulant-use disorders remain prevalent and can result in both short-term and long-term adverse consequences. The mainstay of treatment remains behavioral interventions. In this paper, we discuss those interventions and some promising candidates in the search for pharmacological interventions. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'.

  2. Scaling up family medicine training in Gezira, Sudan – a 2-year in-service master programme using modern information and communication technology: a survey study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010 the Gezira Family Medicine Project (GFMP) was initiated in Gezira state, Sudan, designed as an in-service training model. The project is a collaboration project between the University of Gezira, which aims to provide a 2-year master’s programme in family medicine for practicing doctors, and the Ministry of Health, which facilitates service provision and funds the training programme. This paper presents the programme, the teaching environment, and the first batch of candidates enrolled. Methods In this study a self-administered questionnaire was used to collect baseline data at the start of the project from doctors who joined the programme. A checklist was also used to assess the health centres where they work. A total of 188 out of 207 doctors responded (91%), while data were gathered from all 158 health centres (100%) staffed by the programme candidates. Results The Gezira model of in-service family medicine training has succeeded in recruiting 207 candidates in its first batch, providing health services in 158 centres, of which 84 had never been served by a doctor before. The curriculum is community oriented. The mean age of doctors was 32.5 years, 57% were males, and 32% were graduates from the University of Gezira. Respondents stated high confidence in practicing some skills such as asthma management and post-abortion uterine evacuation. They were least confident in other skills such as managing depression or inserting an intrauterine device. The majority of health centres was poorly equipped for management of noncommunicable diseases, as only 10% had an electrocardiography machine (ECG), 5% had spirometer, and 1% had a defibrillator. Conclusions The Gezira model has responded to local health system needs. Use of modern information and communication technology is used to facilitate both health service provision and training. The GFMP represents an example of a large-volume scaling-up programme of family medicine in Africa. PMID:24443978

  3. Addiction as a Systems Failure: Focus on Adolescence and Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Baler, Ruben D.; Volkow, Nora D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Scientific advances in the field of addiction have forever debunked the notion that addiction reflects a character flaw under voluntary control, demonstrating instead that it is a bona fide disease of the brain. The aim of this review is to go beyond this consensus understanding and explore the most current evidence regarding the vast number of genetic, developmental, and environmental factors whose complex interactions modulate addiction risk and trajectory. Method Focusing on childhood and adolescent smoking as a paradigm, we review the important risk factors for the development of addictions, starting at the level of genetics and closing with a focus on sociocultural and policy factors. Results A critical review of the pertinent literature provides a detailed view of the cumulative power of risk and protection factors across different phenomenological levels to modulate the risk of undesirable outcomes, particularly for young people. The result represents a compelling argument for the need to engage in comprehensive, multilevel approaches to promoting health. Conclusions Today, the field of medicine understands more about disease than about health; however it need not be that way. The view of drug addiction as a systems failure should help refocus our general approach to developing dynamic models and early comprehensive interventions that optimize the ways in which we prevent and treat a complex, developmental disorder such as drug addiction. PMID:21421173

  4. [The new types of addiction].

    PubMed

    Semaille, P

    2009-09-01

    Addiction is characterized by the inability to control his consumption of product or control certain behaviors, and the continuation of the behavior despite knowledge of its adverse effects. Addictions to substances like heroin, cocaine, etc., are well known. But other substances potentially addictive are getting more common in Belgium: MDMA, GHB / GBL, Cristal, etc. The existence of addictions without substance (called also behavioral addiction) is well recognized now: gambling addiction seems to be the most common and has been recognized as a disease by WHO, but we can also observe cyberaddiction, addiction to sex, workalholic, addiction to shopping, etc. The screening of poly-addiction or to one substance or one behavior should be systematized in the history of every patient. This screening should be facilitated through the development and validation of a cross scale. Particular attention will be paid to certain groups, both in primary prevention and screening: men, adolescents and young adults, university students or high schools, clubbers, sporting people, prisoners, ethnic minorities, people with mental disorders like depression. Primary care workers, and especially general practitioners, are at the first place to detect those different forms of addiction, can affort appropriate care according to patient's characteristics and type addiction, and to identify high-risk situations for relapse.

  5. Improving addictions treatment outcomes by empowering self and others.

    PubMed

    Wood, Thomas E; Englander-Golden, Paula; Golden, David E; Pillai, Vijayan K

    2010-10-01

    The present research tested the effectiveness of adding an interpersonal, interactive, experiential training programme to addictions treatment that enhances motivation, cognitive-behavioural coping skills, social support, and group cohesiveness. The research was conducted in a co-educational, long-term residential treatment facility for addictive disorders (alcohol and other substances, sexual addiction, eating disorders, compulsive shopping, and gambling) and concomitant psychiatric diagnoses. The added training is co-created by participants. They choose challenging situations important in their lives that are played out as 'movies' in which they play and experience all the parts. Motivation for change, skills to implement positive changes, self-efficacy, empathy, positive support, and group cohesiveness are rooted in their own experiences and the feedback they receive from others, as they behave in empowering and disempowering ways. The training resulted in significant increases in empowering communication, self-esteem and quality of group life in the treatment group and in the family. Many of these results have large effect sizes and are consistent with the findings from prior studies. The results obtained in this study suggest that Say It Straight training can be an effective addition to the treatment of addictions in residential treatment. Future research is needed to determine the long-term effects of this training on relapse.

  6. Religion and addiction.

    PubMed

    Gostečnik, Christian; Cvetek, Mateja; Poljak, Saša; Repič, Tanja; Cvetek, Robert

    2012-12-01

    Religion with its rituals can become an object of addiction, especially when a child while growing up experiences neglect and abuse. It is also very common that such individuals transfer their feelings of anger, rage and sometimes even true hatred to God. Then God becomes the substitute for their displaced vengeance (upon those who abused them as children).

  7. Protein Kinases and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anna M.; Messing, Robert O.

    2011-01-01

    Although drugs of abuse have different chemical structures and interact with different protein targets, all appear to usurp common neuronal systems that regulate reward and motivation. Addiction is a complex disease that is thought to involve drug-induced changes in synaptic plasticity due to alterations in cell signaling, gene transcription, and protein synthesis. Recent evidence suggests that drugs of abuse interact with and change a common network of signaling pathways that include a subset of specific protein kinases. The best studied of these kinases are reviewed here and include extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP-dependent protein kinase, cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5, protein kinase C, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and Fyn tyrosine kinase. These kinases have been implicated in various aspects of drug addiction including acute drug effects, drug self-administration, withdrawal, reinforcement, sensitization, and tolerance. Identifying protein kinase substrates and signaling pathways that contribute to the addicted state may provide novel approaches for new pharma-cotherapies to treat drug addiction. PMID:18991950

  8. A comparison of simulation-based education versus lecture-based instruction for toxicology training in emergency medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Maddry, Joseph K; Varney, Shawn M; Sessions, Daniel; Heard, Kennon; Thaxton, Robert E; Ganem, Victoria J; Zarzabal, Lee A; Bebarta, Vikhyat S

    2014-12-01

    Simulation-based teaching (SIM) is a common method for medical education. SIM exposes residents to uncommon scenarios that require critical, timely actions. SIM may be a valuable training method for critically ill poisoned patients whose diagnosis and treatment depend on key clinical findings. Our objective was to compare medical simulation (SIM) to traditional lecture-based instruction (LEC) for training emergency medicine (EM) residents in the acute management of critically ill poisoned patients. EM residents completed two pre-intervention questionnaires: (1) a 24-item multiple-choice test of four toxicological emergencies and (2) a questionnaire using a five-point Likert scale to rate the residents' comfort level in diagnosing and treating patients with specific toxicological emergencies. After completing the pre-intervention questionnaires, residents were randomized to SIM or LEC instruction. Two toxicologists and three EM physicians presented four toxicology topics to both groups in four 20-min sessions. One group was in the simulation center, and the other in a lecture hall. Each group then repeated the multiple-choice test and questionnaire immediately after instruction and again at 3 months after training. Answers were not discussed. The primary outcome was comparison of immediate mean post-intervention test scores and final scores 3 months later between SIM and LEC groups. Test score outcomes between groups were compared at each time point (pre-test, post-instruction, 3-month follow-up) using Wilcoxon rank sum test. Data were summarized by descriptive statistics. Continuous variables were characterized by means (SD) and tested using t tests or Wilcoxon rank sum. Categorical variables were summarized by frequencies (%) and compared between training groups with chi-square or Fisher's exact test. Thirty-two EM residents completed pre- and post-intervention tests and comfort questionnaires on the study day. Both groups had higher post-intervention mean test

  9. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Journal Scientific Sessions Website FAQ Copyright © 2017 The Society for Vascular Medicine. All Rights Reserved. Phone: +1- ... page Videos Training Programs Journal Access the Journal Society Communications Patient Information Pages Vascular Medicine Journal CME ...

  10. Two Programs for Primary Care Practitioners: Family Medicine Training in an Affiliated University Hospital Program and Primary Care Graduate Training in an Urban Private Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Eugene S.; Piemme, Thomas E.

    1975-01-01

    Eugene Farley describes the University of Rochester and Highland Hospital Family Medicine Program for teaching of primary care internists, primary care pediatricians, and family doctors. Thomas Piemme presents the George Washington University School of Medicine alternative, a 2-year program in an ambulatory setting leading to broad eligibility in…

  11. Carrots and sticks fail to change behavior in cocaine addiction

    PubMed Central

    Ersche, Karen D.; Gillan, Claire M.; Jones, P. Simon; Williams, Guy B.; Ward, Laetitia H. E.; Luijten, Maartje; de Wit, Sanne; Sahakian, Barbara J.; Bullmore, Edward T.; Robbins, Trevor W.

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a major public health problem that is particularly difficult to treat. Without medically proven pharmacological treatments, interventions to change the maladaptive behavior of addicted individuals mainly rely on psychosocial approaches. Here we report on impairments in cocaine-addicted patients to act purposefully toward a given goal and on the influence of extended training on their behavior. When patients were rewarded for their behavior, prolonged training improved their response rate toward the goal but simultaneously rendered them insensitive to the consequences of their actions. By contrast, overtraining of avoidance behavior had no effect on patient performance. Our findings illustrate the ineffectiveness of punitive approaches and highlight the potential for interventions that focus on improving goal-directed behavior and implementing more desirable habits to replace habitual drug-taking. PMID:27313048

  12. The Past, Present, and Future of Nicotine Addiction Therapy.

    PubMed

    Prochaska, Judith J; Benowitz, Neal L

    2016-01-01

    The tobacco addiction treatment field is progressing through innovations in medication development, a focus on precision medicine, and application of new technologies for delivering support in real time and over time. This article reviews the evidence for combined and extended cessation pharmacotherapy and behavioral strategies including provider advice, individual counseling, group programs, the national quitline, websites and social media, and incentives. Healthcare policies are changing to offer cessation treatment to the broad population of smokers. With knowledge of the past and present, this review anticipates what is likely on the horizon in the clinical and public health effort to address tobacco addiction.

  13. The Past, Present, and Future of Nicotine Addiction Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Prochaska, Judith J.; Benowitz, Neal L.

    2016-01-01

    The tobacco addiction treatment field is progressing through innovations in medication development, a focus on precision medicine, and application of new technologies for delivering support in real time and over time. This article reviews the evidence for combined and extended cessation pharmacotherapy and behavioral strategies including provider advice, individual counseling, group programs, the national quitline, websites and social media, and incentives. Healthcare policies are changing to offer cessation treatment to the broad population of smokers. With knowledge of the past and present, this review anticipates what is likely on the horizon in the clinical and public health effort to address tobacco addiction. PMID:26332005

  14. Knowledge of, Attitudes Toward, and Experience of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Western Medicine– and Oriental Medicine–Trained Physicians in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Il; Khang, Young-Ho; Lee, Moo-Song; Kang, Weechang

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. We compared knowledge of, attitudes toward, and experience with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among Western medicine–trained doctors (WMDs) and Oriental medicine–trained doctors (OMDs). Methods. In Korea, 502 WMDs and 500 OMDs were interviewed with a structured questionnaire. Results. OMDs held more favorable attitudes toward CAM than did WMDs. OMDs possessed a deeper understanding of and greater experience with CAM. OMDs more readily endorsed health beliefs congruent with CAM. Conclusions. In the future, CAM can be more readily used by OMDs than by WMDs. Because evidence for the effectiveness of CAM remains sparse, more research is needed for the prudent use of CAM in Korea. An education and training system for potential CAM providers remains to be developed. PMID:12453822

  15. Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Drinking Water Academy provides online training and information to ensure that water professionals, public officials, and involved citizens have the knowledge and skills necessary to protect our drinking water supply.

  16. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, and the Asian Australasian Federation of Pain Societies Joint Committee recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided interventional pain procedures.

    PubMed

    Narouze, Samer N; Provenzano, David; Peng, Philip; Eichenberger, Urs; Lee, Sang Chul; Nicholls, Barry; Moriggl, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in pain medicine for interventional axial, nonaxial, and musculoskeletal pain procedures is rapidly evolving and growing. Because of the lack of specialty-specific guidelines for ultrasonography in pain medicine, an international collaborative effort consisting of members of the Special Interest Group on Ultrasonography in Pain Medicine from the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, and the Asian Australasian Federation of Pain Societies developed the following recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided interventional pain procedures. The purpose of these recommendations is to define the required skills for performing ultrasound-guided pain procedures, the processes for appropriate education, and training and quality improvement. Training algorithms are outlined for practice- and fellowship-based pathways. The previously published American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine and European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy education and teaching recommendations for ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia served as a foundation for the pain medicine recommendations. Although the decision to grant ultrasound privileges occurs at the institutional level, the committee recommends that the training guidelines outlined in this document serve as the foundation for educational training and the advancement of the practice of ultrasonography in pain medicine.

  17. Job Analysis Techniques for Restructuring Health Manpower Education and Training in the Navy Medical Department. Attachment 15. Field Medicine QPCB Task Sort for Field Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technomics, Inc., McLean, VA.

    This publication is Attachment 15 of a set of 16 computer listed QPCB task sorts, by career level, for the entire Hospital Corps and Dental Technician fields. Statistical data are presented in tabular form for a detailed listing of job duties in field medicine. (BT)

  18. Food addiction: detox and abstinence reinterpreted?

    PubMed

    Shriner, Richard L

    2013-10-01

    The senior patient and/or the geriatrician are confronted with a confusing literature describing how patients interested in combating metabolic syndrome, diabesity (diabetes plus obesity) or simple obesity might best proceed. The present paper gives a brief outline of the basic disease processes that underlie metabolic pro-inflammation, including how one might go about devising the most potent and practical detoxification from such metabolic compromise. The role that dietary restriction plays in pro-inflammatory detoxification (detox), including how a modified fast (selective food abstinence) is incorporated into this process, is developed. The unique aspects of geriatric bariatric medicine are elucidated, including the concepts of sarcopenia and the obesity paradox. Important caveats involving the senior seeking weight loss are offered. By the end of the paper, the reader will have a greater appreciation for the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead for geriatric patients who wish to overcome food addiction and reverse pro-inflammatory states of ill-heath. This includes the toxic metabolic processes that create obesity complicated by type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) which collectively we call diabesity. In that regard, diabesity is often the central pathology that leads to the evolution of the metabolic syndrome. The paper also affords the reader a solid review of the neurometabolic processes that effectuate anorexigenic versus orexigenic inputs to obesity that drive food addiction. We argue that these processes lead to either weight gain or weight loss by a tripartite system involving metabolic, addictive and relational levels of organismal functioning. Recalibrating the way we negotiate these three levels of daily functioning often determines success or failure in terms of overcoming metabolic syndrome and food addiction.

  19. Impact of a Faculty Development Program in Addiction Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, William R.; Anderson, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    The Faculty Development Programs (FDP) were intended to increase substance abuse education in mainstream professional training programs by attracting and educating core faculty to teach about addictions. Five psychology faculty in the PhD program at the University of New Mexico participated in the only FDP funded within the discipline of…

  20. Treatment of addiction and addiction-related behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Dewey, Stephen L.; Brodie, Jonathan D.; Ashby, Jr., Charles R.

    2004-12-07

    The present invention provides a highly efficient method for treating substance addiction and for changing addiction-related behavior of a mammal suffering from substance addiction. The method includes administering to a mammal an effective amount of gamma vinylGABA or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. The present invention also provides a method of treatment of cocaine, morphine, heroin, nicotine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, or ethanol addiction by treating a mammal with an effective amount of gamma vinylGABA or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  1. Learning and generalization from reward and punishment in opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Myers, Catherine E; Rego, Janice; Haber, Paul; Morley, Kirsten; Beck, Kevin D; Hogarth, Lee; Moustafa, Ahmed A

    2017-01-15

    This study adapts a widely-used acquired equivalence paradigm to investigate how opioid-addicted individuals learn from positive and negative feedback, and how they generalize this learning. The opioid-addicted group consisted of 33 participants with a history of heroin dependency currently in a methadone maintenance program; the control group consisted of 32 healthy participants without a history of drug addiction. All participants performed a novel variant of the acquired equivalence task, where they learned to map some stimuli to correct outcomes in order to obtain reward, and to map other stimuli to correct outcomes in order to avoid punishment; some stimuli were implicitly "equivalent" in the sense of being paired with the same outcome. On the initial training phase, both groups performed similarly on learning to obtain reward, but as memory load grew, the control group outperformed the addicted group on learning to avoid punishment. On a subsequent testing phase, the addicted and control groups performed similarly on retention trials involving previously-trained stimulus-outcome pairs, as well as on generalization trials to assess acquired equivalence. Since prior work with acquired equivalence tasks has associated stimulus-outcome learning with the nigrostriatal dopamine system, and generalization with the hippocampal region, the current results are consistent with basal ganglia dysfunction in the opioid-addicted patients. Further, a selective deficit in learning from punishment could contribute to processes by which addicted individuals continue to pursue drug use even at the cost of negative consequences such as loss of income and the opportunity to engage in other life activities.

  2. [Environment and addictive behaviors].

    PubMed

    Touzeau, Didier; Raynal, Marie-Line

    2012-12-01

    Consumer society creates the emergence of addictive behaviors and environments of the subject "shape" the use of psychoactive substances. The family approach is to search out a guilt of members to understand family dynamics and enable young people to emancipate themselves from the family model. The social environment contributes to the marginalization of drug users "pathologizing" his conduct. Offer help without preconditions and a relationship based on a therapeutic alliance can contribute decisively to the recovery of an addict. The prison is a place of initiation of use and consumption of psychoactive substances despite the offer of specialized treatment. Measures of risk reduction of HCV/HIV infection and alternatives to incarceration should complete it. At workplace, consumption can be considered as a mean of doping to be more "efficient", but also as an attempt to withstand the stresses and changes in working conditions in the context of individualization and a loss of marks related to the new way of organizing work.

  3. [Neuroscientific basic in addiction].

    PubMed

    Johann-Ridinger, Monika

    2014-10-01

    The growing evidence of Neuroscience leads to a better understanding of cerebral processes in cases of acute or chronic intake of psychotropic substances (ps). Predominantly, structures of the "reward system" contributed to the development of addiction. Chronic consumption of ps provides changing in brain equilibrium and leads to adaptations in the brain architecture. In this article, the complex responses of neurons and neuronal networks are presented in cases of chronic intake of ps. The alterations affect the cognitive, emotional and behavioral processings and influence learning and stress regulation. In summary, all cerebral adaptations are integrated in a complex model of biological, psychological and social factors and therefore, addiction arises as a consequence of combination of individual protecting and risk factors.

  4. Wilderness medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sward, Douglas G.; Bennett, Brad L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human activity in wilderness areas has increased globally in recent decades, leading to increased risk of injury and illness. Wilderness medicine has developed in response to both need and interest. METHODS: The field of wilderness medicine encompasses many areas of interest. Some focus on special circumstances (such as avalanches) while others have a broader scope (such as trauma care). Several core areas of key interest within wilderness medicine are discussed in this study. RESULTS: Wilderness medicine is characterized by remote and improvised care of patients with routine or exotic illnesses or trauma, limited resources and manpower, and delayed evacuation to definitive care. Wilderness medicine is developing rapidly and draws from the breadth of medical and surgical subspecialties as well as the technical fields of mountaineering, climbing, and diving. Research, epidemiology, and evidence-based guidelines are evolving. A hallmark of this field is injury prevention and risk mitigation. The range of topics encompasses high-altitude cerebral edema, decompression sickness, snake envenomation, lightning injury, extremity trauma, and gastroenteritis. Several professional societies, academic fellowships, and training organizations offer education and resources for laypeople and health care professionals. CONCLUSIONS: The future of wilderness medicine is unfolding on multiple fronts: education, research, training, technology, communications, and environment. Although wilderness medicine research is technically difficult to perform, it is essential to deepening our understanding of the contribution of specific techniques in achieving improvements in clinical outcomes. PMID:25215140

  5. A Liberal Account of Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Foddy, Bennett; Savulescu, Julian

    2014-01-01

    Philosophers and psychologists have been attracted to two differing accounts of addictive motivation. In this paper, we investigate these two accounts and challenge their mutual claim that addictions compromise a person’s self-control. First, we identify some incompatibilities between this claim of reduced self-control and the available evidence from various disciplines. A critical assessment of the evidence weakens the empirical argument for reduced autonomy. Second, we identify sources of unwarranted normative bias in the popular theories of addiction that introduce systematic errors in interpreting the evidence. By eliminating these errors, we are able to generate a minimal, but correct account, of addiction that presumes addicts to be autonomous in their addictive behavior, absent further evidence to the contrary. Finally, we explore some of the implications of this minimal, correct view. PMID:24659901

  6. [Therapy in heroin addiction].

    PubMed

    Hosztafi, Sáandor; Fürst, Zsuzsanna

    2014-09-01

    Heroin addiction is one of the most devastating and expensive of public health problems. The most effective treatment is opioid replacement therapy. Replacement of heroin, a short-acting euphoriant with methadone or other opioids that have significantly longer duration of action provides a number of therapeutic benefits. Opioid detoxification has a role in both preventing acute withdrawal and maintaining long-term abstinence. Opioid-based detoxification is based on the principle of cross-tolerance, in which one opioid is replaced with another one that is slowly tapered. For the treatment of heroin addicts a wide range of psychosocial and pharmacotherapeutic treatments are available; of these, methadone maintenance therapy has the most evidence of benefit. Methadone maintenance reduces and/or eliminates the use of heroin, reduces the death rate and criminality associated with heroin use, and allows patients to improve their health and social productivity. In addition, enrollment in methadone maintenance has the potential to reduce the transmission of infectious diseases associated with heroin injection, such as hepatitis and HIV. The principal effects of methadone maintenance are to relieve narcotic craving, suppress the abstinence syndrome, and block the euphoric effects associated with heroin. There is growing interest in expanding treatment into primary care, allowing opioid addiction to be managed like other chronic illnesses. Buprenorphine which is a long-acting partial agonist was also approved as pharmacotherapy for opioid dependence. Opioid antagonists can reduce heroin self-administration and opioid craving in detoxified addicts. Naltrexone, which is a long-acting competitive antagonist at the opioid receptors, blocks the subjective and objective responses produced by intravenous opioids. Naltrexone is employed to accelerate opioid detoxification by displacing heroin and as a maintenance agent for detoxified formerly heroin-dependent patients who want to

  7. Treatment of internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xui-qin; Li, Meng-chen; Tao, Ran

    2010-10-01

    Internet addiction (IA) is a prevalent, highly comorbid, and significantly impairing disorder. Although many psychotherapeutic approaches and psychotropic medications have been recommended and some of the psychotherapeutic approaches and a few pharmacotherapy strategies have been studied, treatment of IA is generally in its early stages. This article reviews theoretical descriptions of psychotherapy and the effects of psychosocial treatment and pharmacologic treatment. We also outline our own treatment model of IA.

  8. Mitoepigenetics and drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Sadakierska-Chudy, Anna; Frankowska, Małgorzata; Filip, Małgorzata

    2014-11-01

    Being the center of energy production in eukaryotic cells, mitochondria are also crucial for various cellular processes including intracellular Ca(2+) signaling and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondria contain their own circular DNA which encodes not only proteins, transfer RNA and ribosomal RNAs but also non-coding RNAs. The most recent line of evidence indicates the presence of 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA); thus, the level of gene expression - in a way similar to nuclear DNA - can be regulated by direct epigenetic modifications. Up to now, very little data shows the possibility of epigenetic regulation of mtDNA. Mitochondria and mtDNA are particularly important in the nervous system and may participate in the initiation of drug addiction. In fact, some addictive drugs enhance ROS production and generate oxidative stress that in turn alters mitochondrial and nuclear gene expression. This review summarizes recent findings on mitochondrial function, mtDNA copy number and epigenetics in drug addiction.

  9. Comparing the Performance of Allopathically and Osteopathically Trained Physicians on the American Board of Family Medicine's Certification Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Thomas R.; Royal, Kenneth D.; Schulte, Bradley M.; Leigh, Terrence

    2009-01-01

    Background: Two medical specialty boards offer certification in family medicine: the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) and the American Osteopathic Board of Family Physicians (AOBFP). The AOBFP certification is offered only to graduates of osteopathic colleges; however, graduates of both osteopathic and allopathic medical schools who have…

  10. The neurobiology of addictive disorders.

    PubMed

    Ross, Stephen; Peselow, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Addiction is increasingly understood as a neurobiological illness where repetitive substance abuse corrupts the normal circuitry of rewarding and adaptive behaviors causing drug-induced neuroplastic changes. The addictive process can be examined by looking at the biological basis of substance initiation to the progression of substance abuse to dependence to the enduring risk of relapse. Critical neurotransmitters and neurocircuits underlie the pathological changes at each of these stages. Enhanced dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens is part of the common pathway for the positively rewarding aspects of drugs of abuse and for initiation of the addictive process. F-Aminobutyric acid,opioid peptides, serotonin, acetylcholine, the endocannabinoids, and glutamate systems also play a role in the initial addictive process. Dopamine also plays a key role in conditioned responses to drugs of abuse, and addiction is now recognized as a disease of pathological learning and memory. In the path from substance abuse to addiction, the neurochemistry shifts from a dopamine-based behavioral system to a predominantly glutamate-based one marked by dysregulated glutamate transmission from the prefrontal cortex to the nucleus accumbens in relation to drug versus biologically oriented stimuli. This is a core part of the executive dysfunction now understood as one of the hallmark features of addiction that also includes impaired decision making and impulse dysregulation.Understanding the neurobiology of the addictive process allows for a theoretical psychopharmacological approach to treating addictive disorders,one that takes into account biological interventions aimed at particular stages of the illness.

  11. [Education for medical students and post-graduates--Training of laboratory medicine at Nihon University Medical School and Surugadai Nihon University Hospital].

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Tatsuyuki

    2011-09-01

    Laboratory medicine is defined as 'a field which analyzes the patients' clinical condition and contributes to the procedures such as diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and prognostic determination'. In other words, it involves not only in every process of medical treatment for patients, but also in the field of preventive medicine and occupational health. Therefore, it is unavoidable for every department to interpret the laboratory data. This necessarily requires all medical students to master laboratory test procedures, comprehend various impediments to the accurate laboratory data, and acquire the basics of the interpretation of laboratory data. During postgraduate training period, they must acquire enough skill of test procedures and determination methods such as Gram stain, and their interpretation of the test results should also be wide and directly connected to the treatment. Physicians who are trained in each particular department and aim to become a laboratory physician are in need of enough understanding of the specialized tests relate to each specialized area. Based on the fact that laboratory physicians involve in all of these educations, this symposium addresses the early training during pre- and post-graduation in Nihon University.

  12. Increasing the number of trained health and safety professionals in agricultural medicine: evaluation of the "building capacity" program, 2007-2013.

    PubMed

    Rudolphi, Josie M; Donham, Kelley J

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The University of Iowa began training health care professionals to care for farmers' occupational health needs since 1974. In order to geographically expand this training to practicing health and safety professionals, the "Building Capacity: A National Resource of Agricultural Medicine Professionals" program was developed and launched in 2006. The model began in 1987 as a program of Iowa's Center for Agricultural Safety and Health. In 2006, with funding from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Great Plains Center for Agricultural Health (GPCAH), the program was expanded beyond the Iowa borders. The principal component of the program, the 40-hour course, Agricultural Medicine: Occupational and Environmental Health for Rural Health Professionals-the Core Course (AMCC) is now being offered to health and safety professionals in nine states in the United States, in Australia, and a modified version presented in Turkey. An initial paper evaluated the first phase of the program, years 2007-2010. This paper compares the first phase (2007-2010) with the second phase (2011-2013), which has involved over 500 health and safety professionals. This paper also describes evaluation of the course and changes resulting from the evaluation. Finally, this paper describes best practices for operating this program and makes recommendations for future courses, as well as other trainings within the field.

  13. Academic Training of Medical Students in Transfusion Medicine, Hemotherapy, and Hemostasis: Results of a Questionnaire-Based Status Report in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Rüdiger E.; Burger, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background As a consequence of the German Transfusion Act and the corresponding Hemotherapeutic Guidelines of the German Medical Association, the National Advisory Committee Blood approved a recommendation (votum 29) in 2003 to specify students’ training in transfusion medicine, hemotherapy, and hemostasis. The objective of this study was to assess the current status of teaching in these fields. Methods A questionnaire-based evaluation was performed at the medical schools in Germany (n = 34). Responses were analyzed by descriptive criteria, except for weekly semester hours of teaching. Results Responses were obtained from 30 medical faculties (88%). Among them, 18 had conducted votum 29 (12 ‘completely’, 6 ‘essentially’), while 7 had done so only ‘in part’ and 5 ‘not at all’. 13 of 30 sites (43%) reported that no faculty-related curriculum in transfusion medicine and hemostasis (hemotherapy) exists. At 28 of 30 medical schools (93%), teaching in transfusion medicine, hemotherapy, and hemostasis is integrated into cross-curricular topics of interdisciplinary programs, including lectures. The corresponding semester hours of teaching per week ranged from 0.5 to 12 h/week. Conclusion Votum 29 is incompletely established. Consequently, academic teaching in transfusion medicine, hemotherapy, and hemostasis requires structural and conceptual improvement to fulfill legal specifications and regulatory constraints. PMID:25254026

  14. Treatment of addiction and addiction-related behavior

    DOEpatents

    Dewey, Stephen L.; Brodie, Jonathan D.; Ashby, Jr., Charles R.

    2005-05-10

    The present invention relates to the use of a composition that increases central nervous system GABA levels in a mammal, for the treatment of addiction to drugs of abuse and modification of behavior associated with addiction to drugs of abuse in said mammal.

  15. Designing evidence-based medicine training to optimize the transfer of skills from the classroom to clinical practice: applying the four component instructional design model.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Lauren A; Cate, Olle Ten; Irby, David M; O'Brien, Bridget C

    2015-11-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) skills, although taught in medical schools around the world, are not optimally practiced in clinical environments because of multiple barriers, including learners' difficulty transferring EBM skills learned in the classroom to clinical practice. This lack of skill transfer may be partially due to the design of EBM training. To facilitate the transfer of EBM skills from the classroom to clinical practice, the authors explore one instructional approach, called the Four Component Instructional Design (4C/ID) model, to guide the design of EBM training. On the basis of current cognitive psychology, including cognitive load theory, the premise of the 4C/ID model is that complex skills training, such as EBM training, should include four components: learning tasks, supportive information, procedural information, and part-task practice. The combination of these four components can inform the creation of complex skills training that is designed to avoid overloading learners' cognitive abilities; to facilitate the integration of the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to execute a complex task; and to increase the transfer of knowledge to new situations. The authors begin by introducing the 4C/ID model and describing the benefits of its four components to guide the design of EBM training. They include illustrative examples of educational practices that are consistent with each component and that can be applied to teaching EBM. They conclude by suggesting that medical educators consider adopting the 4C/ID model to design, modify, and/or implement EBM training in classroom and clinical settings.

  16. Precision in Addiction Care: Does It Make a Difference?

    PubMed Central

    van der Stel, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    This perspective article explores the possibilities of precision in addiction care — even better individually fitted or tailor-made care — and examines what changes we need to make in order to realize sensible progress in epidemiological key figures. The first part gives a short review on the development of addiction care and tries to answer the question of where we stand now and what has been achieved in addiction science through the development and evaluation of interventions in the past decades. Following this analysis, attention will be paid to what lies ahead. This second part focuses on the question of how addiction care can deal with the consequences of the emerging paradigm of personalized or precision medicine, which is based on the fundamental assumption that individual differences matter. Finally, some limitations and conditions as well as tasks and goals for progress are raised. In conclusion, it is argued that integration of addiction care in (mental) health care in the future is desirable. PMID:26604867

  17. Medicine Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    A reference guide to laws, rules, and regulations that govern medical practice in New York State is presented. After an overview of professional regulation in the state, licensing requirements/procedures for medicine are described including education and postgraduate training requirements, state licensing examinations, and application…

  18. Passing on the medicinal chemistry baton: training undergraduates to be industry-ready through research projects between the University of Nottingham and GlaxoSmithKline.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Simon J F; Fray, M Jonathan; McInally, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    In this article we describe a radically different industry-academia collaboration between the School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, and GlaxoSmithKline (GSK), aiming to train students in research and give them an insight into medicinal chemistry as practiced in industry. The project concerns the discovery of potent and selective αvβ6 integrin antagonists to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis; the synthetic chemistry is performed by a group of ten final-year undergraduates and the biological and physicochemical screening data are generated by GSK. The project planning, organisation and operation are discussed, together with some of the challenges and rewards of working with undergraduates.

  19. Visiting Educational Scholarship Training Program at the University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine: A Global Opportunity to Learn.

    PubMed

    Galardi, Nicholas; Ciminero, Matthew; Thaller, Seth; Salgado, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    The Visiting Educational Scholarship Training Program, started by the University of Miami's Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, was designed to uphold the institution's founding mission: the education of our future medical leaders as well as the promotion of health of our local, regional, national, and international communities. It offers the opportunity for international medical students and training physicians to be educated and get exposure to the field of plastic surgery in a United States training institution.

  20. Game Addiction and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Mehmet; Gumus, Yusuf Yasin; Dincel, Sezen

    2016-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between game addiction and academic achievement. The secondary aim was to adapt a self-report instrument to measure game addiction. Three hundred and seventy high school students participated in this study. Data were collected via an online questionnaire that included a brief…

  1. Invertebrate models in addiction research.

    PubMed

    Søvik, Eirik; Barron, Andrew B

    2013-01-01

    While drug addiction is a uniquely human problem, most research examining the biological mechanisms of the transition from substance use to addiction is conducted with vertebrate animal models. Many other fields of neuroscience have greatly benefitted from contributions from simple and manipulable invertebrate model systems. However, the potential of invertebrate research has yet to be fully capitalised on in the field of addiction neuroscience. This may be because of the complexity of addiction and the clinical imperative of addiction research. We argue that the homocentric diagnostic criteria of addiction are no more a hindrance to the use of invertebrate models than they are to vertebrate models. We highlight the strengths of the diversity of different invertebrate model systems in terms of neuroanatomy and molecular machinery, and stress that working with a range of different models will aid in understanding addiction and not be a disadvantage. Finally, we discuss the specific advantages of utilising invertebrate animals for addiction research and highlight key areas in which invertebrates are suited for making unique and meaningful contributions to this field.

  2. Comprehensive Treatment of Addictive Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlesinger, Stephen E.; Horberg, Lawrence K.

    This article describes a practical approach to treating addictive families, designed to help them repair the damage, create more satisfying lives, and prevent long-lasting deleterious effects, commonly associated with "co-dependency" and "children of addicts." This approach is grounded in a developmental model of family recovery which was devised…

  3. Harry Potter: Agency or Addiction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Alice

    2010-01-01

    This article considers limitations on agency for characters in the Harry Potter novels, in particular, how far they are driven by an addictive yearning for their beloved dead. As well as Harry's yearning for his dead parents, Dumbledore's guilt, Snape's longing and Slughorn's craving can be read as evidence of addiction rather than love, while the…

  4. Animal studies of addictive behavior.

    PubMed

    Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Ahmed, Serge H

    2013-04-01

    It is increasingly recognized that studying drug taking in laboratory animals does not equate to studying genuine addiction, characterized by loss of control over drug use. This has inspired recent work aimed at capturing genuine addiction-like behavior in animals. In this work, we summarize empirical evidence for the occurrence of several DSM-IV-like symptoms of addiction in animals after extended drug use. These symptoms include escalation of drug use, neurocognitive deficits, resistance to extinction, increased motivation for drugs, preference for drugs over nondrug rewards, and resistance to punishment. The fact that addiction-like behavior can occur and be studied in animals gives us the exciting opportunity to investigate the neural and genetic background of drug addiction, which we hope will ultimately lead to the development of more effective treatments for this devastating disorder.

  5. Internet addiction in young people.

    PubMed

    Ong, Say How; Tan, Yi Ren

    2014-07-01

    In our technology-savvy population, mental health professionals are seeing an increasing trend of excessive Internet use or Internet addiction. Researchers in China, Taiwan and Korea have done extensive research in the field of Internet addiction. Screening instruments are available to identify the presence of Internet addiction and its extent. Internet addiction is frequently associated with mental illnesses such as anxiety, depression, conduct disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Treatment modalities include individual and group therapies, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), family therapy and psychotropic medications. A significant proportion of Singapore adolescents engaging in excessive Internet use are also diagnosed to have concomitant Internet addiction. Despite the presence of a variety of treatment options, future research in this area is needed to address its growing trend and to minimise its negative psychological and social impact on the individuals and their families.

  6. Internet gaming addiction: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kuss, Daria J

    2013-01-01

    In the 2000s, online games became popular, while studies of Internet gaming addiction emerged, outlining the negative consequences of excessive gaming, its prevalence, and associated risk factors. The establishment of specialized treatment centers in South-East Asia, the US, and Europe reflects the growing need for professional help. It is argued that only by understanding the appeal of Internet gaming, its context, and neurobiologic correlates can the phenomenon of Internet gaming addiction be understood comprehensively. The aim of this review is to provide an insight into current perspectives on Internet gaming addiction using a holistic approach, taking into consideration the mass appeal of online games, the context of Internet gaming addiction, and associated neuroimaging findings, as well as the current diagnostic framework adopted by the American Psychiatric Association. The cited research indicates that the individual’s context is a significant factor that marks the dividing line between excessive gaming and gaming addiction, and the game context can gain particular importance for players, depending on their life situation and gaming preferences. Moreover, the cultural context is significant because it embeds the gamer in a community with shared beliefs and practices, endowing their gaming with particular meaning. The cited neuroimaging studies indicate that Internet gaming addiction shares similarities with other addictions, including substance dependence, at the molecular, neurocircuitry, and behavioral levels. The findings provide support for the current perspective of understanding Internet gaming addiction from a disease framework. The benefits of an Internet gaming addiction diagnosis include reliability across research, destigmatization of individuals, development of efficacious treatments, and the creation of an incentive for public health care and insurance providers. The holistic approach adopted here not only highlights empirical research that

  7. Internet gaming addiction: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kuss, Daria J

    2013-01-01

    In the 2000s, online games became popular, while studies of Internet gaming addiction emerged, outlining the negative consequences of excessive gaming, its prevalence, and associated risk factors. The establishment of specialized treatment centers in South-East Asia, the US, and Europe reflects the growing need for professional help. It is argued that only by understanding the appeal of Internet gaming, its context, and neurobiologic correlates can the phenomenon of Internet gaming addiction be understood comprehensively. The aim of this review is to provide an insight into current perspectives on Internet gaming addiction using a holistic approach, taking into consideration the mass appeal of online games, the context of Internet gaming addiction, and associated neuroimaging findings, as well as the current diagnostic framework adopted by the American Psychiatric Association. The cited research indicates that the individual's context is a significant factor that marks the dividing line between excessive gaming and gaming addiction, and the game context can gain particular importance for players, depending on their life situation and gaming preferences. Moreover, the cultural context is significant because it embeds the gamer in a community with shared beliefs and practices, endowing their gaming with particular meaning. The cited neuroimaging studies indicate that Internet gaming addiction shares similarities with other addictions, including substance dependence, at the molecular, neurocircuitry, and behavioral levels. The findings provide support for the current perspective of understanding Internet gaming addiction from a disease framework. The benefits of an Internet gaming addiction diagnosis include reliability across research, destigmatization of individuals, development of efficacious treatments, and the creation of an incentive for public health care and insurance providers. The holistic approach adopted here not only highlights empirical research that

  8. Fuzzy Logic in Medicine and Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Angela; Nieto, Juan J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a general view of the current applications of fuzzy logic in medicine and bioinformatics. We particularly review the medical literature using fuzzy logic. We then recall the geometrical interpretation of fuzzy sets as points in a fuzzy hypercube and present two concrete illustrations in medicine (drug addictions) and in bioinformatics (comparison of genomes). PMID:16883057

  9. Addiction as excessive appetite.

    PubMed

    Orford, J

    2001-01-01

    The excessive appetite model of addiction is summarized. The paper begins by considering the forms of excessive appetite which a comprehensive model should account for: principally, excessive drinking, smoking, gambling, eating, sex and a diverse range of drugs including at least heroin, cocaine and cannabis. The model rests, therefore, upon a broader concept of what constitutes addiction than the traditional, more restricted, and arguably misleading definition. The core elements of the model include: very skewed consumption distribution curves; restraint, control or deterrence; positive incentive learning mechanisms which highlight varied forms of rapid emotional change as rewards, and wide cue conditioning; complex memory schemata; secondary, acquired emotional regulation cycles, of which 'chasing', 'the abstinence violation effect' and neuroadaptation are examples; and the consequences of conflict. These primary and secondary processes, occurring within diverse sociocultural contexts, are sufficient to account for the development of a strong attachment to an appetitive activity, such that self-control is diminished, and behaviour may appear to be disease-like. Giving up excess is a natural consequence of conflict arising from strong and troublesome appetite. There is much supportive evidence that change occurs outside expert treatment, and that when it occurs within treatment the change processes are more basic and universal than those espoused by fashionable expert theories.

  10. [Immunotherapies for drug addictions].

    PubMed

    Montoya, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Immunotherapies in the form of vaccines (active immunization) or monoclonal antibodies (passive immunization) appear safe and a promising treatment approaches for some substance-related disorders. The mechanism of action of the antibody therapy is by preventing the rapid entry of drugs of abuse into the central nervous system. In theory, immunotherapies could have several clinical applications. Monoclonal antibodies may be useful to treat drug overdoses and prevent the neurotoxic effects of drugs by blocking the access of drugs to the brain. Vaccines may help to prevent the development of addiction, initiate drug abstinence in those already addicted to drugs, or prevent drug use relapse by reducing the pharmacological effects and rewarding properties of the drugs of abuse on the brain. Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies has been investigated for cocaine, methamphetamine, nicotine, and phencyclidine (PCP). Active immunization with vaccines has been studied for cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, and nicotine. These immunotherapies seem promising therapeutic tools and are at different stages in their development before they can be approved by regulatory agencies for the treatment of substance-related disorders. The purpose of this article is to review the current immunotherapy approaches with emphasis on the risks and benefits for the treatment of these disorders.

  11. Sex differences in addiction.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jill B

    2016-12-01

    Women exhibit more rapid escalation from casual drug taking to addiction, exhibit a greater withdrawal response with abstinence, and tend to exhibit greater vulnerability than men in terms of treatment outcome. In rodents, short-term estradiol intake in female rats enhances acquisition and escalation of drug taking, motivation for drugs of abuse, and relapse-like behaviors. There is also a sex difference in the dopamine response in the nucleus accumbens. Ovariectomized female rats exhibit a smaller initial dopamine increase after cocaine treatment than castrated males. Estradiol treatment of ovariectomized female rats enhances stimulated dopamine release in the dorsolateral striatum, but not in the nucleus accumbens, resulting in a sex difference in the balance between these two dopaminergic projections. In the situation where drug-taking behavior becomes habitual, dopamine release has been reported to be enhanced in the dorsolateral striatum and attenuated in the nucleus accumbens. The sex difference in the balance between these neural systems is proposed to underlie sex differences in addiction.

  12. Sex differences in addiction

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jill B.

    2016-01-01

    Women exhibit more rapid escalation from casual drug taking to addiction, exhibit a greater withdrawal response with abstinence, and tend to exhibit greater vulnerability than men in terms of treatment outcome. In rodents, short-term estradiol intake in female rats enhances acquisition and escalation of drug taking, motivation for drugs of abuse, and relapse-like behaviors. There is also a sex difference in the dopamine response in the nucleus accumbens. Ovariectomized female rats exhibit a smaller initial dopamine increase after cocaine treatment than castrated males. Estradiol treatment of ovariectomized female rats enhances stimulated dopamine release in the dorsolateral striatum, but not in the nucleus accumbens, resulting in a sex difference in the balance between these two dopaminergic projections. In the situation where drug-taking behavior becomes habitual, dopamine release has been reported to be enhanced in the dorsolateral striatum and attenuated in the nucleus accumbens. The sex difference in the balance between these neural systems is proposed to underlie sex differences in addiction. PMID:28179811

  13. Glutamine Addiction In Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Javier; Alonso, Francisco J; Matés, José M; Segura, Juan A; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Campos-Sandoval, José A

    2017-03-09

    Cancer cells develop and succeed by shifting to different metabolic programs compared with their normal cell counterparts. One of the classical hallmarks of cancer cells is their higher glycolysis rate and lactate production even in the presence of abundant O2 (Warburg effect). Another common metabolic feature of cancer cells is a high rate of glutamine (Gln) consumption normally exceeding their biosynthetic and energetic needs. The term Gln addiction is now widely used to reflect the strong dependence shown by most cancer cells for this essential nitrogen substrate after metabolic reprogramming. A Gln/glutamate (Glu) cycle occurs between host tissues and the tumor in order to maximize its growth and proliferation rates. The mechanistic basis for this deregulated tumor metabolism and how these changes are connected to oncogenic and tumor suppressor pathways are becoming increasingly understood. Based on these advances, new avenues of research have been initiated to find novel therapeutic targets and to explore strategies that interfere with glutamine metabolism as anticancer therapies. In this review, we provided an updated overview of glutamine addiction in glioma, the most prevalent type of brain tumor.

  14. Modular Applications with Smartphones and Smartpads in Shape, Color and Spectral Measurements for Industry, Biology and Medicine plus Science, Education and Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Dr Dietrich, Prof; Eng Paul-Gerald Dittrich, B.; Düntsch, B. Eng Eric; Kraus, Daniel; Gärtner, Claudia, Dr; Klemm, Dipl-Ing Richard

    2013-09-01

    Aim of the paper is the demonstration of a paradigm shift in shape, color and spectral measurements in industry, biology and medicine as well as in measurement science, education and training. Laboratory applications will be supplemented and replaced by innovative in-field and point-of-care applications. Innovative functional modules are smartphones and/or smartpads supplemented by additional hardware apps and software apps. Specific examples are given for numerous practical applications concerning optodigital methods. The methodological classification distinguishes between different levels for combinations of hardware apps (hwapps) and software apps (swapps) with smartphones and/or smartpads. These methods are fundamental enablers for the transformation from conventional stationary working places in industry, biology, medicine plus science, education and training towards innovative mobile working places with in-field and point-of-care characteristics as well as mobile open online courses MOOCs. The innovative approach opens so far untapped enormous markets for measurement science and engineering. These working conditions will be very common due to their convenience, reliability and affordability. The fundamental enablers are smartphones and/or smartpads. A highly visible advantage of smartphones and/or smartpads is the huge number of their distribution, their worldwide connectivity via Internet and cloud services and the experienced capabilities of their users for practical operations. Young people are becoming the pioneers.

  15. Childhood Food Addiction and the Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Kristy L.; Buser, Juleen K.; Carlisle, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Food addiction among children is a concerning issue. Few empirical studies have examined the relevance of food addiction among pediatric samples, but emerging evidence suggests that some children experience their eating patterns as addictive. The present review will discuss the issue of food addiction among children, and will also attend to the…

  16. Treatment of addiction to ethanol and addictive-related behavior

    DOEpatents

    Dewey, Stephen L.; Brodie, Jonathan D.; Ashby, Jr., Charles R.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a highly efficient method for treating alcohol addiction and for changing addiction-related behavior of a mammal suffering from alcohol addiction. The method includes administering to a mammal an effective amount of gamma vinylGABA or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. In one embodiment, the method of the present invention includes administering to the mammal an effective amount of a composition which increase central nervous system GABA levels wherein the effective amount is sufficient to diminish, inhibit or eliminate behavior associated with craving or use of alcohol.

  17. Personality, addiction, dopamine: insights from Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dagher, Alain; Robbins, Trevor W

    2009-02-26

    In rare instances, patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) may become addicted to their own medication or develop behavioral addictions such as pathological gambling. This is surprising because PD patients typically have a very low incidence of drug abuse and display a personality type that is the polar opposite of the addictive personality. These rare addictive syndromes, which appear to result from excessive dopaminergic medication use, illustrate the link between dopamine, personality, and addiction. We describe the clinical phenomena and attempt to relate them to current models of learning and addiction. We conclude that persistently elevated dopaminergic stimulation promotes the development and maintenance of addictive behaviors.

  18. [The network model is an effective form of training preventive medicine physicians (in case of medical parasitologists)].

    PubMed

    Astanina, S Iu; Dovgalev, A S

    2015-01-01

    Professional medical education is most cost-based when training highly skilled personnel. This is associated with expensive material and technical resources and a high labor-to-output ratio of practicing programs. The network model makes it possible to blaze new trails to achieve the quality of training the staff and the governmental support of its educational programs strengthens the coordination between higher educational establishments, research organizations, and professional learning communities. By using the training of medical parasitologists as an example, the paper shows a network model how to implement the educational program.

  19. [Addiction therapy. Limits, problems, perspectives].

    PubMed

    Kalapos, Miklós Péter

    2014-01-01

    In health care, tending is a process, which offers for the patients a continuous watching on, a control, a treatment, and the prevention of worsening of their medical status as well as the reduction of their complaints. In the article, some fundamental segments of tending in addictology are reviewed, particularly paying attention to whom, how, where and how long to take care. On the basis of literature, the author stresses whatever method is used to treat addict patients it is more beneficial to society than the avoidance of any intervention due to the negligence of the problem. Addictology has lost a lot from its power in Hungary. The author recommends the introduction of the methods of health quality assurance to decrease the effect of negative trends seen in addictology. The paper also deals with special patient groups including homeless clients, adolescents, elderly and pregnant patients as well as health care professionals. The author critically mentions the double communication of society, the dual-face character of politics and has the opinion that competences are not clear making the situation confused. As a mistake of the point of view is it regarded that the addictological problems are classified as to belonging to the authority of psychiatry. It is emphasized that multidisciplinary approach is needed to understand the problem and to treat the client. General screening for addictological diseases does not seem possible in the light of low capacity of the system, but the screening of adolescents and pregnant women is definitely recommended. And finally, a financial support for medicines to prevent craving, a moratorium for the continuous changing of rules and law, the sponsoring of harm reduction programs as well as a better utilization of opportunities offered by local drug coordinating boards are proposed.

  20. Lay theories of heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Furnham, A; Thomson, L

    1996-07-01

    This study examined the structure and determinants of lay people's implicit theories of heroin addiction. A questionnaire was derived from interviews with lay people about their beliefs and theories of heroin addiction and academic literature on the subject. One hundred and forty-four subjects completed the questionnaire, in which they rated 105 statements about the causes, correlates and cures of heroin addiction. The three parts of the questionnaire were individually factor analyzed and a clear, interpretable factor structure emerged for each. The factors seemed similar to explicit academic theories, but the exception was beliefs about cure, which did not show overall support for the most clinically used models. When the three factor analyses were combined into a single 'higher-order' factor analysis four factors emerged, labelled moralistic, psychosocial, sociocultural and drug treatment, which reflect more or less coherent views on the nature of heroin addiction. Subjects' political beliefs was the greatest (demographic and attitudinal) determinant of lay beliefs in these factors, with experience of addiction, addicts, drugs and age also highly correlated. Vote was the main determinant and best predictor of the four 'higher-order' structured lay theories: right-wing voters emphasizing moralistic and individualistic theory and left-wing voters supporting the psychological and societal ideas. Implications for policy and interventions to addicts of these lay theories are considered.

  1. Genetic signatures of heroin addiction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaw-Ji; Liao, Ding-Lieh; Shen, Tsu-Wang; Yang, Hsin-Chou; Chen, Kuang-Chi; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-08-01

    Heroin addiction is a complex psychiatric disorder with a chronic course and a high relapse rate, which results from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Heroin addiction has a substantial heritability in its etiology; hence, identification of individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction may help prevent the occurrence and relapse of heroin addiction and its complications. The study aimed to identify a small set of genetic signatures that may reliably predict the individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction. We first measured the transcript level of 13 genes (RASA1, PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CD74, CEBPB, AUTS2, ENO2, IMPDH2, HAT1, MBD1, and RGS3) in lymphoblastoid cell lines in a sample of 124 male heroin addicts and 124 male control subjects using real-time quantitative PCR. Seven genes (PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CEBPB, ENO2, and HAT1) showed significant differential expression between the 2 groups. Further analysis using 3 statistical methods including logistic regression analysis, support vector machine learning analysis, and a computer software BIASLESS revealed that a set of 4 genes (JUN, CEBPB, PRKCB, ENO2, or CEBPG) could predict the diagnosis of heroin addiction with the accuracy rate around 85% in our dataset. Our findings support the idea that it is possible to identify genetic signatures of heroin addiction using a small set of expressed genes. However, the study can only be considered as a proof-of-concept study. As the establishment of lymphoblastoid cell line is a laborious and lengthy process, it would be more practical in clinical settings to identify genetic signatures for heroin addiction directly from peripheral blood cells in the future study.

  2. Assessing behavioral patterns of Internet addiction and drug abuse among high school students

    PubMed Central

    Nemati, Zeinab; Matlabi, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Background Internet addiction and drug abuse isolate adolescents from their family and friends and cause damage to their health, relations, emotions, and spirit. In the society, adolescents’ addiction extracts high cost on health care, educational failure and mental health services. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the behavioral patterns of Internet and drug addiction among urban and rural students in Urmia, Iran. Methods A sectional and descriptive–analytical approach with stratified sampling method was employed to recruit 385 high school students from urban and rural areas. The Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and the Addiction Acknowledgement Scale (AAS) were used for data collection. Results The total score of Internet addiction among the students was 41.72 ± 17.41. Approximately two-third of the students were not addicted to the Internet. The mean score of the AAS was 1.87 ± 1.23 among boys and 1.75 ± 1.31 among girls. Moreover, 8.31% of the students were prone to abusing substances. A statistically significant relationship was found between mother’s literacy level and Internet addiction behavior of students (p=0.009). Conclusion Concentrating on adolescents’ behavioral patterns and their tendency toward misusing Internet and drugs is a notable procedure. Therefore, focusing on adolescents’ health and institutionalizing appropriate training programs for adolescents and their families are vital. PMID:28182139

  3. Online Tobacco Cessation Training and Competency Assessment for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Practitioners: Protocol for the CAM Reach Web Study

    PubMed Central

    Howerter, Amy; Eaves, Emery R; Hall, John R; Buller, David B; Gordon, Judith S

    2016-01-01

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners, such as chiropractors, acupuncturists, and massage therapists, are a growing presence in the US health care landscape and already provide health and wellness care to significant numbers of patients who use tobacco. For decades, conventional biomedical practitioners have received training to provide evidence-based tobacco cessation brief interventions (BIs) and referrals to cessation services as part of routine clinical care, whereas CAM practitioners have been largely overlooked for BI training. Web-based training has clear potential to meet large-scale training dissemination needs. However, despite the exploding use of Web-based training for health professionals, Web-based evaluation of clinical skills competency remains underdeveloped. Objective In pursuit of a long-term goal of helping CAM practitioners integrate evidence-based practices from US Public Health Service Tobacco Dependence Treatment Guideline into routine clinical care, this pilot protocol aims to develop and test a Web-based tobacco cessation training program tailored for CAM practitioners. Methods In preparation for a larger trial to examine the effect of training on CAM practitioner clinical practice behaviors around tobacco cessation, this developmental study will (1) adapt an existing in-person tobacco cessation BI training program that is specifically tailored for CAM therapists for delivery via the Internet; (2) develop a novel, Web-based tool to assess CAM practitioner competence in tobacco cessation BI skills, and conduct a pilot validation study comparing the competency assessment tool to live video role plays with a standardized patient; (3) pilot test the Web-based training with 120 CAM practitioners (40 acupuncturists, 40 chiropractors, 40 massage therapists) for usability, accessibility, acceptability, and effects on practitioner knowledge, self-efficacy, and competency with tobacco cessation; and (4) conduct

  4. [Neurobiology and genetics of addiction].

    PubMed

    Kiefer, F

    2010-04-01

    Recent results on the neurobiological bases of addictive disorders allow new insights into the etiopathogenesis of addiction to be made and allow targets for new therapeutic strategies to be defined. An important advancement in the understanding of the underlying pathophysiology derives from recent research results, showing similarities between addiction and physiological neural plasticity in learning and memory. These include basic mechanisms involving dopamine, glutamate, and their cellular and molecular targets leading to drug-induced synaptic alterations in the mesolimbic reward system. Genetic factors modulate the individual vulnerability. The challenge of future research will be to generate more efficient and individualized therapies based on the insights from neurobiology and genetics.

  5. Drug addiction and periodontal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Gurpreet Kaur; Gupta, N. D.; Prabhat, K. C.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of drug addiction is increasing globally. Drug abuse damages many parts of the body such as oral cavity, lungs, liver, brain, heart etc., Addicts suffer from physical, psychological, emotional and behavioral problems. Their nutrition is also compromised. There is certainly an impact of all these factors on the health of periodontium. Dentists should be aware of the effects of drugs while treating the drug addicts. This article correlates the studies done on the impact of abused drugs such as alcohol, tobacco, opiates, cannabis, amphetamines etc., on general and periodontal health. PMID:24174750

  6. Wilderness Medicine.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Whitney; Bright, Steven; Burns, Patrick; Townes, David

    2016-03-01

    Wilderness medicine encompasses prevention and treatment of illness and injury, education and training, emergency medical services, and search and rescue in the wilderness. Although traumatic injuries, including minor injuries, outnumber medical illness as the cause of morbidity in the wilderness, basic understanding of the prevention and management of injury and illness, including recognition, identification, treatment, initial management, and stabilization, is essential, in addition to the ability to facilitate evacuation of affected patients. An important theme throughout wilderness medicine is planning and preparation for the best- and worst-case scenarios, and being ready for the unexpected.

  7. The Institute of Medicine's Report on "Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform"--Background, Results, and Follow Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yager, Joel; Greden, John; Abrams, Michael; Riba, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) determined that declines in the psychiatrist-researcher workforce are harming public needs and that significant steps are necessary to alter current trends. Method: The NIMH commissioned the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to examine the undersupply and recommend solutions. The NIMH…

  8. Opiate Addicted and Non-Addicted Siblings in a Slum Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Daniel; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Compares addicted and non-addicted siblings of families residing in and around a slum block in New York. Data supporting an ideographic relative deprivation-differential anticipation" explanation for current opiate addiction in the U. S. was produced. (JM)

  9. Treatment of PCP addiction and PCP addiction-related behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Dewey, Stephen L.; Brodie, Jonathan D.; Ashby, Jr., Charles R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for changing addiction-related behavior of a mammal suffering from addiction to phencyclidine (PCP). The method includes administering to the mammal an effective amount of gamma vinylGABA (GVG) or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, or an enantiomer or a racemic mixture thereof, wherein the effective amount is sufficient to diminish, inhibit or eliminate behavior associated with craving or use of PCP.

  10. Treatment of addiction and addiction-related behavior

    DOEpatents

    Dewey, Stephen L.; Brodie, Jonathan D.; Ashby, Jr., Charles R.

    2003-07-15

    The present invention provides a method for changing addiction-related behavior of a mammal suffering from addiction to a combination of abused drugs. The method includes administering to the mammal an effective amount of gamma vinylGABA (GVG) or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, or an enantiomer or a racemic mixture thereof, wherein the effective amount is sufficient to diminish, inhibit or eliminate behavior associated with craving or use of the combination of abused drugs.

  11. [Neurobiology of addiction].

    PubMed

    Scuvée-Moreau, J

    2013-01-01

    Several psychoactive drugs may induce addiction. Despite distinct pharmacological targets, all have the common property to stimulate the brain reward circuitry, which results in an increase of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. The stimulation induced by drugs of abuse is much more important in intensity and duration than the stimulation induced by natural rewards. The positive reinforcement resulting from this stimulation promotes repeated drug intake, which induces cellular and molecular adaptations in the brain reward circuit and other regions associated with this circuit. Enduring changes are more particularly observed in regions involved in pleasure, motivation, memory, conditioning, executive functions, judgement and self-control. A tolerance to the reinforcing effects of natural rewards is observed in parallel to a hypersensitivity to the motivational effects of drugs and drug-associated stimuli. Behaviour focuses more and more exclusively on drug research and drug consumption. Drug privation can induce a negative emotional state, withdrawal signs and craving which are key elements of relapse

  12. Mechanisms of Nicotine Addiction

    SciTech Connect

    McGehee, Daniel

    2002-06-26

    Nicotine reinforces the use of tobacco products primarily through its interaction with specific receptor proteins within the brain's reward centers. A critical step in the process of addiction for many drugs, including nicotine, is the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine. A single nicotine exposure will enhance dopamine levels for hours, however, nicotinic receptors undergo both activation and then desensitization in minutes, which presents an important problem. How does the time course of receptor activity lead to the prolonged release of dopamine? We have found that persistent modulation of both inhibitory and excitatory synaptic connections by nicotine underlies the sustained increase in dopamine release. Because these inputs express different types of nicotinic receptors there is a coordinated shift in the balance of synaptic inputs toward excitation of the dopamine neurons. Excitatory inputs are turned on while inhibitory inputs are depressed, thereby boosting the brain's reward system.

  13. Mechanisms of Nicotine Addiction

    SciTech Connect

    McGehee, Daniel

    2009-06-26

    Nicotine reinforces the use of tobacco products primarily through its interaction with specific receptor proteins within the brain’s reward centers. A critical step in the process of addiction for many drugs, including nicotine, is the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine. A single nicotine exposure will enhance dopamine levels for hours, however, nicotinic receptors undergo both activation and then desensitization in minutes, which presents an important problem. How does the time course of receptor activity lead to the prolonged release of dopamine? We have found that persistent modulation of both inhibitory and excitatory synaptic connections by nicotine underlies the sustained increase in dopamine release. Because these inputs express different types of nicotinic receptors there is a coordinated shift in the balance of synaptic inputs toward excitation of the dopamine neurons. Excitatory inputs are turned on while inhibitory inputs are depressed, thereby boosting the brain’s reward system.

  14. Does psychosocial competency training for junior physicians working in pediatric medicine improve individual skills and perceived job stress.

    PubMed

    Bernburg, Monika; Baresi, Lisa; Groneberg, David; Mache, Stefanie

    2016-12-01

    Pediatricians' job performance, work engagement, and job satisfaction are essential for both the individual physician and quality of care for their little patients and parents. Therefore, it is important to maintain or possibly augment pediatricians' individual and professional competencies. In this study, we developed and implemented a psychosocial competency training (PCT) teaching different psychosocial competencies and stress coping techniques. We investigated (1) the influence of the PCT on work-related characteristics: stress perception, work engagement, job satisfaction and (2) explored pediatricians' outcomes and satisfaction with PCT. Fifty-four junior physicians working in pediatric hospital departments participated in the training and were randomized in an intervention (n = 26) or a control group (n = 28). In the beginning, at follow-up 1 and 2, both groups answered a self-rated questionnaire on perceived training outcomes and work-related factors. The intervention group showed that their job satisfaction significantly increased while perceived stress scores decreased after taking part in the PCT. No substantial changes were observed with regard to pediatricians' work engagement. Participating physicians evaluated PCT with high scores for training design, content, received outcome, and overall satisfaction with the training.

  15. Optogenetics: potentials for addiction research.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhen Fang Huang; Burdakov, Denis; Sarnyai, Zoltán

    2011-10-01

    Research on the biology of addiction has advanced significantly over the last 50 years expanding our understanding of the brain mechanisms underlying reward, reinforcement and craving. Novel experimental approaches and techniques have provided an ever increasing armory of tools to dissect behavioral processes, neural networks and molecular mechanisms. The ultimate goal is to reintegrate this knowledge into a coherent, mechanistic framework of addiction to help identify new treatment. This can be greatly facilitated by using tools that allow, with great spatial and temporal specificity, to link molecular changes with altered activation of neural circuits and behavior. Such specificity can now be achieved by using optogenetic tools. Our review describes the general principles of optogenetics and its use to understand the links between neural activity and behavior. We also provide an overview of recent studies using optogenetic tools in addiction and consider some outstanding questions of addiction research that are particularly amenable for optogenetic approaches.

  16. [What brings neurobiology to addictions?

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Magalie; Noble, Florence

    2016-12-01

    Addictions are multifactorial, and there are no experimental models replicating all aspects of this pathology. The development of animal models reproducing the clinical symptoms of addictions allows significant advances in the knowledge of the neurobiological processes involved in addiction. Preclinical data highlight different neuroadaptations according to the routes of administration, speeds of injection and frequencies of exposure to drugs of abuse. The neuroadaptations induced by an exposure to drugs of abuse follow dynamic processes in time. Despite significant progresses in the knowledge of neurobiology of addictions allowing to propose new therapeutic targets, the passage of new drugs in clinical is often disappointing. The lack of treatment efficacy reported in clinical trials is probably due to a very important heterogeneity of patients with distinct biological and genetic factors, but also with different patterns of consumption that can lead to different neuroadaptations, as clearly observed in preclinical studies.

  17. Treatment Approaches for Drug Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold ... other medications to treat stimulant (cocaine, methamphetamine) and cannabis (marijuana) addiction. People who use more than one ...

  18. [Addictive behavior among the elderly].

    PubMed

    Menecier, Pascal; Fernandez, Lydia

    2012-12-01

    Addictive behavior still persists among the elderly, mainly concerning substance abuse, such as alcohol, tobacco or psychotropic drugs and addictive practices such as gambling. Illegal substances or cyber-addictions appear much less often. The environment (place of residence or care) and/or economic factors may influence behavior and practices. The incidence of somatic illness or psychiatric disorders, such as cognitive impairment among the elderly patients, complicates even further the presentation of addictive disorders and their treatment. The age factor does not seem to lessen the suffering felt by the patient and care is required in an equal manner for all ages. Prevention (maintenance of personal autonomy and quality of life throughout the ageing process) plays an essential role along with the offer of care. The lack of scientific data such as the absence of validation for adult care among the elderly, leave wide scope for epidemiological, clinical and theoretical research.

  19. Tobacco Addiction: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hatsukami, Dorothy K.; Stead, Lindsay F.; Gupta, Prakash C.

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco use is associated with 5 million deaths per year worldwide and is considered as one of the leading causes of premature death. Comprehensive tobacco control programs can significantly reduce the prevalence of tobacco use. An important component of a comprehensive program is the provision of treatment for tobacco addiction. Treatment involves targeting multiple aspects of addiction including the underlying neurobiology and behavioral processes. Furthermore, building an infrastructure in health systems that encourage and facilitate cessation and expanding the accessibility of treatments are necessary. While current pharmacological and behavioral treatments are effective in improving cessation success, the rate of relapse to smoking remains high, demonstrating the strong addictive nature of nicotine. The future of treatment resides in better patient matching to treatment, combination or novel medications, and conceptualizing nicotine addiction as a chronic disorder which may require long-term treatment. PMID:18555914

  20. Levodopa addiction. A case study.

    PubMed

    Tack, E; De Cuypere, G; Jannes, C; Remouchamps, A

    1988-09-01

    A case is presented of a young woman with a serious addiction to levodopa who over the years developed an extrapyramidal syndrome and chronic paranoid psychotic behaviour. The possible pathophysiological mechanism is discussed.

  1. [Taking care of drug addict in odontology].

    PubMed

    Pirnay, Philippe; Pirnay, Stéphane

    2010-01-01

    In the dental surgery practice, a drug addicted patient declares suffering from high pain and asks with insistence to be examined in emergency. The clinical examination shows a pity overall dental status: an important dental deterioration, a periodontal disease. At the end of the examination, the patient suffering withdrawal syndrome, asks with a high demand up to physical threat, to get a prescription of psychotropic medicines, and especially opiates (high dose buprenorphine). In front of this situation, the dental surgeon will face two aspects: first of all, clinical issues, as taking care of the odontological pathologies, management of the pain and of the withdrawal syndrome and second of all, the legislation issues related to its responsibility of prescription writer and the specific attitude to adjust in front of a patient with withdrawal syndrome at the dental surgery practice.

  2. Substance abuse precedes Internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Sik; Han, Doug Hyun; Kim, Sun Mi; Renshaw, Perry F

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate possible overlapping substance abuse and internet addiction in a large, uniformly sampled population, ranging in age from 13 to 18 years. Participants (N=73,238) in the current study were drawn from the 6th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBWS-V) for students from 400 middle schools and 400 high schools in 16 cities within South Korea. Of adolescent internet users, 85.2% were general users (GU), 11.9% were users with potential risk for internet addiction (PR), and 3.0% were users with high risk for internet addiction (HR). There was a difference in the number of students with alcohol drinking among the GU, PR, and HR groups (20.8% vs 23.1% vs 27.4%). There was a difference in the number of students who smoked among the GS, PR, and HR groups (11.7% vs 13.5% vs 20.4%). There was a difference in the number of students with drug use among the GU, PR, and HR groups (1.7% vs 2.0% vs 6.5%). After adjusting for sex, age, stress, depressed mood, and suicidal ideation, smoking may predict a high risk for internet addiction (OR=1.203, p=0.004). In addition, drug use may predict a high risk for internet addiction (OR=2.591, p<0.001). Because students with a high risk for internet addiction have vulnerability for addictive behaviors, co-morbid substance abuse should be evaluated and, if found, treated in adolescents with internet addiction.

  3. [Addiction, satisfaction, perception and beliefs about the causes of success in Spanish masters athletes].

    PubMed

    A, Zarauz Sancho; F, Ruiz-Juan; F, Arbinaga Ibarzábal

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to know the addiction to training and the relationship between this and the intrinsic satisfaction, perceptions and beliefs about the causes of success in their sport in a heterogeneous sample of 401 Spanish master athletes (over 35 years of age) who completed the questionnaire electronically. Also, get sufficiently robust predictive models, by sex, of their addiction according to these psychological variables. On one hand, it was found that addiction to training was moderate in men and women, and being cause from different causes than in other populations of athletes. On the other, that it was predicted by high ego orientation and/or low task orientation. In addition, each of the less desirable subscales of addiction (tolerance, lack of control and abstinence and craving), although with significant differences by sex, were usually predicted by the also less desirable subscales of intrinsic satisfaction, perception and beliefs on the causes for success. By contrast, the most desirable subscale of addiction (pleasure and relaxation), although predicted by the most desirable and positive subscale of intrinsic satisfaction (fun), there was no gender matching in the prediction by the subscales of perceived beliefs on the causes for success. These data, taken all-together, indicates that their training addiction should be treated fostering task orientation and fun, while trying to reduce as far much as possible ego orientation.

  4. Good Psychometric Properties of the Addiction Version of the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire for Health Care Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Boukje; Golbach, Milou; De Jong, Cor; Schellekens, Arnt

    2016-01-01

    Background Addiction, or substance dependence, is nowadays considered a chronic relapsing condition. However, perceptions of addiction vary widely, also among healthcare professionals. Perceptions of addiction are thought to contribute to attitude and stigma towards patients with addiction. However, studies into perceptions of addiction among healthcare professionals are limited and instruments for reliable assessment of their perceptions are lacking. The Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ) is widely used to evaluate perceptions of illness. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the IPQ: factor structure, internal consistency, and discriminant validity, when applied to evaluate healthcare professionals’ perceptions of addiction. Methods Participants were 1072 healthcare professionals in training and master students from the Netherlands and Indonesia, recruited from various addiction-training programs. The revised version of the IPQ was adapted to measure perceptions of addiction (IPQ-A). Maximum likelihood method was used to explore the best-fit IPQ factor structure. Internal consistency was evaluated for the final factors. The final factor structure was used to assess discriminant validity of the IPQ, by comparing illness perceptions of addiction between 1) medical students from the Netherlands and Indonesia, 2) medical students psychology students and educational science students from the Netherlands, and 3) participants with different training levels: medical students versus medical doctors. Results Factor analysis revealed an eight-factor structure for the perception subscale (demoralization, timeline chronic, consequences, personal control, treatment control, illness coherence, timeline cyclical emotional representations) and a four-factor structure for the attribution subscale (psychological attributions, risk factors, smoking/alcohol, overwork). Internal reliability was acceptable to good. The IPQ-A was able to detect

  5. Which basic communication skills in medicine are learnt spontaneously and which need to be taught and trained?

    PubMed

    Aspegren, Knut; Lønberg-Madsen, Peter

    2005-09-01

    Students in the last semester of medical school and experienced junior doctors with no or little training in communication skills were observed while interviewing or informing simulated patients. There was a remarkable similarity in behaviour between the two categories. Communication skills characteristic of common social conversation were learnt spontaneously, while important professional basic communication skills were not learnt despite 10 or more years of clinical work. These discrepancies and subsequent gaps should be the focus of future training courses at both pre- and postgraduate level.

  6. Cross-Cultural Training in Motivational Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, William R.; Hendrickson, Stacey M. L.; Venner, Kamilla; Bisono, Ani; Daugherty, Mikyta; Yahne, Carolina E.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the cross-cultural transportability of motivational interviewing (MI), an evidence-based addiction treatment method. Free clinical training in MI was offered in separate targeted workshops for 86 African American, Native American, and Spanish-speaking addiction treatment providers. Audiotaped pre- and posttraining clinical…

  7. Addiction: Beyond dopamine reward circuitry

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Tomasi, D.; Telang, F.

    2011-09-13

    Dopamine (DA) is considered crucial for the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, but its role in addiction is much less clear. This review focuses on studies that used PET to characterize the brain DA system in addicted subjects. These studies have corroborated in humans the relevance of drug-induced fast DA increases in striatum [including nucleus accumbens (NAc)] in their rewarding effects but have unexpectedly shown that in addicted subjects, drug-induced DA increases (as well as their subjective reinforcing effects) are markedly blunted compared with controls. In contrast, addicted subjects show significant DA increases in striatum in response to drug-conditioned cues that are associated with self-reports of drug craving and appear to be of a greater magnitude than the DA responses to the drug. We postulate that the discrepancy between the expectation for the drug effects (conditioned responses) and the blunted pharmacological effects maintains drug taking in an attempt to achieve the expected reward. Also, whether tested during early or protracted withdrawal, addicted subjects show lower levels of D2 receptors in striatum (including NAc), which are associated with decreases in baseline activity in frontal brain regions implicated in salience attribution (orbitofrontal cortex) and inhibitory control (anterior cingulate gyrus), whose disruption results in compulsivity and impulsivity. These results point to an imbalance between dopaminergic circuits that underlie reward and conditioning and those that underlie executive function (emotional control and decision making), which we postulate contributes to the compulsive drug use and loss of control in addiction.

  8. Exercise rehabilitation for smartphone addiction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunna

    2013-12-31

    Internet addiction after launching smartphone is becoming serious. Therefore this paper has attempted to sketch out the diverse addiction treatment and then check the feasibility of exercise rehabilitation. The reason to addict the internet or smartphone is personalized individual characters related personal psychological and emotional factors and social environmental factors around them. We have shown that 2 discernible approaches due to 2 different addiction causes: that is behavioral treatment and complementary treatment. In the behavioral treatment, cognitive behavioral approach (CBT) is representative methods for changing additive thoughts and behaviors. Motivational interviewing (MI) is also the brief approach for persons not ready to change their behavior. Mindfulness behavioral cognitive treatment (MBCT) also the adapted treatment based on CBT. There are different types following the emphatic point, mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP) or mindfulness oriented recovery enhancement (MORE). It is apparent that therapeutic recreation, music therapy using drumming activity, and art therapy are useful complementary treatment. Exercise rehabilitation contained the systematic procedures and comprehensive activities compared to previous addiction treatments by contents and techniques. Exercise rehabilitation can treat both physical symptoms at first and mental problems in the next step. So more evidence-based exercise rehabilitation researches need to do, but it is highly probable that exercise rehab can apply for smartphone addiction.

  9. [Relationships between sleep and addiction].

    PubMed

    Cañellas, Francesca; de Lecea, Luis

    2012-01-01

    While it is well known that there is an interaction between sleep disorders and substance abuse, it is certainly more complex than was previously thought. There is a positive relationship both between having a substance use disorder and suffering from a sleep disorder, and vice versa. The effects on sleep depend on the substance used, but it has been shown that both during use and in withdrawal periods consumers have various sleep problems, and basically more fragmented sleep. We know that sleep problems must be taken into account to prevent addiction relapses. Recent research shows that the hypocretinergic system defined by neuropeptide hypocretin / orexin (Hcrt / ox), located in the lateral hypothalamus and involved in, among other things, the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle, may play an important role in addictive behaviors. Different studies have demonstrated interactions between the hypocretinergic system, acute response to stress circuits and reward systems. We also know that selective optogenetic activation of the hypocretinergic system increases the probability of transition from sleep to wakefulness, and is sufficient for initiating an addictive compulsive behavior relapse. Hypocretinergic system activation could explain the hyperarousal associated with stress and addiction. Improved knowledge of this interaction would help us to understand better the mechanisms of addiction and find new strategies for the treatment of addictions.

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of sexual addiction.

    PubMed

    Goodman, A

    1993-01-01

    Following a brief introduction to the concept of addiction, the definition of and diagnostic criteria for sexual addiction are presented. A theoretical framework for treatment of sexual addiction is then outlined, based on an understanding of the underlying addictive process: the compulsive dependence on external actions as a means of regulating one's internal states. Effective treatment addresses both addictive behavior and the addictive process. Addictive sexual behavior is addressed through behavioral symptom management, which includes relapse prevention and other cognitive-behavioral techniques. The addictive process is addressed by enhancing self-regulatory functions through individual psychotherapy, therapeutic group experience, and pharmacotherapy (medication treatment, when indicated). An integrated system for treatment of sexual addiction, which brings together these therapeutic methods in one theoretically coherent, clinically unified approach, is outlined.

  11. What Is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... teens. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialists Have? Pediatric sports medicine specialists are medical ...

  12. Sports Medicine and Athletic Training in the 21st Century: Bridging the Gap between Research and Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guskiewicz, Kevin M.

    2008-01-01

    Sport and recreational activity is a vital part of today's society, and athletic training researchers are playing an important role in gaining a better understanding of how to promote safe and healthy participation for athletes of all ages. This article aims to illustrate the importance of research to prevent and effectively treat sport and…

  13. Revising the formal, retrieving the hidden: Undergraduate curricular reform in medicine and the scientific, institutional, & social transformation of the clinical training environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagosh, Justin J.

    2009-12-01

    In 2004, members of the McGill University Faculty of Medicine began implementing a new curriculum for undergraduate medical education entitled, Physicianship: The Physician as Professional and Healer. The initiative underscores the idea that physician training entails cultivating not only scientific knowledge and technical skill, but a mindset guided by intrinsic principles of doctoring. Although the McGill case exemplifies a wide-spread paradigm shift in medical teaching, there is a dearth of analysis concerning the degree of congruency between the objectives of formal undergraduate curricular revision and the so-called 'hidden curriculum' of the hospital training environment. With Physicianship as a point of departure, this dissertation maps evolutionary patterns in clinical medicine and, using qualitative methods, analyzes the perspectives of twenty physician-educators on curricular reform and the transforming clinical training environment. Physicians interviewed were generally supportive of the new curricular initiative. Concerns were raised, however, that many recent changes within the teaching hospital environment interfere with students' cultivation of professional and healer attributes. These changes were organized into three main themes: scientific, institutional, and social. Physicians expressed concern that what is often considered beneficial for patients is often detrimental for medical training. For example, increased use of diagnostic technologies has improved patient care but reduces opportunities for trainees' clinical skill development. Concern was raised that the concept of selfless service has been undermined through recent shift-work regulations and a culture gap between older and younger generation physicians. Alternatively, some perceived new policies of the clinical environment to be more conducive to physicians' self-care and quality of life. Younger trainees were often described as more competent in managing medical information, more open

  14. Effects and sustainability of trainings for the oral and practical part of the German final exam in medicine.

    PubMed

    Öchsner, Wolfgang; Geiler, Sandra; Huber-Lang, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Zielsetzung: Die vielfältigen Limitationen mündlich-praktischer Prüfungen können bekanntermaßen durch spezifische Trainings günstig beeinflusst werden. Die vorliegende Studie analysiert daher anhand eines Fragebogens die in Ulm durchgeführten Trainings für Staatsexamensprüfer, deren Nachhaltigkeit und mögliche Unterschiede zwischen den Teilnehmer-Subgruppen.Methode: Alle 367 Teilnehmer der bisherigen Ulmer Prüfertrainings (2007 – 20012) wurden per e-Mail angeschrieben. 63 Personen beantworteten die Umfrage, die insgesamt 28 Items zu demografischen Daten und zu Effektivität und Nachhaltigkeit der Trainings enthielt. Ergebnisse: Es ließen sich 6 wesentliche Trainingseffekte nachweisen (Trainingseffekte, die von mindestens zwei Dritteln der Befragungsteilnehmer auf einer Skala von 1 = „trifft zu“ bis 6 = „trifft nicht zu“ mit den Skalenstufen 1 oder 2 beantwortet wurden; kumulierte Prozentzahl in Klammern): Bewusster Umgang mit Stärken und Schwächen mündlicher Prüfungen (71%) Kenntnis von Faktoren mit Einfluss auf die Reliabilität mündlich-praktischer Prüfungen (76%) Kenntnis von Faktoren mit Einfluss auf die Validität mündlich-praktischer Prüfungen (75%) Erhöhung der Sicherheit bei der Aufgabenkonstruktion (68%) Erhöhung der Sicherheit in Bezug auf Prüfungsregularien (75%) Umsetzung des Konzepts des „strukturierten mündlichen Prüfens“ (Festlegung von Themenbereichen, Vorformulierung von Aufgaben und Erwartungshorizonten sowie Bewertungskriterien) (86%)Die Antworten der Teilnehmer, deren Training länger als 2 Jahre zurücklag, unterschieden sich nicht signifikant von den Antwortmittelwerten der übrigen Teilnehmer, was für die Nachhaltigkeit der Trainingseffekte spricht.Teilnehmer ohne relevante Vorerfahrung als Prüfer profitierten signifikant stärker von den Trainings, insbesondere in den Bereichen Stressreduktion, Sicherheit in der Notenfindung und kritischere Notengebung.Schlussfolgerung: Die Studie liefert Hinweise f

  15. Addiction surplus: the add-on margin that makes addictive consumptions difficult to contain.

    PubMed

    Adams, Peter J; Livingstone, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Addictive consumptions generate financial surpluses over-and-above non-addictive consumptions because of the excessive consumption of addicted consumers. This add-on margin or 'addiction surplus' provides a powerful incentive for beneficiaries to protect their income by ensuring addicted consumers keep consuming. Not only that, addiction surplus provides the financial base that enables producers to sponsor activities which aim to prevent public health initiatives from reducing consumption. This paper examines the potency of addiction surplus to engage industry, governments and communities in an on-going reliance on addiction surplus. It then explores how neo-liberal constructions of a rational consumer disguise the ethical and exploitative dynamics of addiction surplus by examining ways in which addictive consumptions fail to conform to notions of autonomy and rationality. Four measures are identified to contain the distorting effects of addiction surplus.

  16. A Framework for the Specificity of Addictions

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Steve; Leventhal, Adam; Bluthenthal, Ricky N.; Freimuth, Marilyn; Forster, Myriam; Ames, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Research over the last two decades suggests that a wide range of substance and behavioral addictions may serve similar functions. Yet, co-occurrence of addictions has only been reported among a minority of addicts. “Addiction specificity” pertains to a phenomenon in which one pattern of addictive behaviors may be acquired whereas another is not. This paper presents the PACE model as a framework which might help explain addiction specificity. Pragmatics, attraction, communication, and expectation (PACE) variables are described, which may help give some direction to future research needs in this arena. PMID:21909314

  17. Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine: an innovative approach to medical education and the training of physician investigators.

    PubMed

    Fishleder, Andrew J; Henson, Lindsey C; Hull, Alan L

    2007-04-01

    Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine (CCLCM) is an innovative, five-year medical education track within Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine (Case) with a focused mission to attract and educate a limited number of highly qualified persons who seek to become physician investigators. CCLCM curriculum governance, faculty appointments and promotions, and admissions committees are integrated with respective Case committees. The CCLCM curriculum is based on faculty-defined professional attributes that graduates are expected to develop. These attributes were used to create curricular and assessment principles that guided the development of an integrated basic science, clinical science, and research curriculum, conducted in an active learning environment. An organ-system approach is used to solidify an understanding of basic science discipline threads in the context of relevant clinical problems presented in PBL and case-based discussion formats. Clinical skills are introduced in the first year as part of the two-year longitudinal experience with a family practice or internal medicine physician. The research program provides all students with opportunities to learn and experience basic and translational research and clinical research before selecting a research topic for their 12- to 15-month master-level thesis project. All Case students participate in required and elective clinical curriculum after the second year, but CCLCM students return to the Cleveland Clinic on selected Friday afternoons for program-specific research and professionalism-learning activities. A unique portfolio-based assessment system is used to assess student achievements in nine competency areas, seven of which reflect the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies.

  18. Salt addiction: a different kind of drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Tekol, Yalcin

    2006-01-01

    Under the headline "drug addiction" the medical world has exclusively been interested in psychoactive drugs. For diagnosis of substance dependence (addiction), DSM-IV-TR has determined seven criteria, and fulfilling at least tree of them signifies addiction. When studied salt intake according to these criteria it is seen that most of them are fulfilled, showing that sodium chloride, which is not classified under the psychoactive drugs, is capable of producing addiction. Namely: at the beginning of salt abstinence, anorexia and slight nausea during meal time (withdrawal symptoms); about 1000-fold difference of per capita salt consumption between several human societies, and life-long continuation of discretional salt intake behaviour (high dose and very long duration of use); difficulty of restriction of salt intake (unsuccessful efforts to cut down or control); lack of success of salt restriction campaigns in hypertensive patients (substance use despite health problem). Additionally, the decrease of salt preferences of individuals whose salt intake are restricted for some time, and vice versa, signifies tolerance. On the other hand, it is evident that as the main culprit of developing systemic hypertension and as producing or promoting some other important health problems, salt intake causes millions of deaths in the world yearly. The recognition of addicting property of salt will facilitate combating these health problems.

  19. Epigenetic mechanisms of drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Nestler, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Drug addiction involves potentially life-long behavioral abnormalities that are caused in vulnerable individuals by repeated exposure to a drug of abuse. The persistence of these behavioral changes suggests that long-lasting changes in gene expression, within particular regions of the brain, may contribute importantly to the addiction phenotype. Work over the past decade has demonstrated a crucial role for epigenetic mechanisms in driving lasting changes in gene expression in diverse tissues, including brain. This has prompted recent research aimed at characterizing the influence of epigenetic regulatory events in mediating the lasting effects of drugs of abuse on the brain in animal models of drug addiction. This review provides a progress report of this still early work in the field. As will be seen, there is robust evidence that repeated exposure to drugs of abuse induces changes within the brain's reward regions in three major modes of epigenetic regulation-histone modifications such as acetylation and methylation, DNA methylation, and non-coding RNAs. In several instances, it has been possible to demonstrate directly the contribution of such epigenetic changes to addiction-related behavioral abnormalities. Studies of epigenetic mechanisms of addiction are also providing an unprecedented view of the range of genes and non-genic regions that are affected by repeated drug exposure and the precise molecular basis of that regulation. Work is now needed to validate key aspects of this work in human addiction and evaluate the possibility of mining this information to develop new diagnostic tests and more effective treatments for addiction syndromes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'NIDA 40th Anniversary Issue'.

  20. Improving childhood malaria treatment and referral practices by training patent medicine vendors in rural south-east Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Malaria remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality among children under five years of age in Nigeria. Most of the early treatments for fever and malaria occur through self-medication with anti-malarials bought over-the-counter (OTC) from untrained drug vendors. Self-medication through drug vendors can be ineffective, with increased risks of drug toxicity and development of drug resistance. Global malaria control initiatives highlights the potential role of drug vendors to improve access to early effective malaria treatment, which underscores the need for interventions to improve treatment obtained from these outlets. This study aimed to determine the feasibility and impact of training rural drug vendors on community-based malaria treatment and advice with referral of severe cases to a health facility. Methods A drug vendor-training programme was carried out between 2003 and 2005 in Ugwuogo-Nike, a rural community in south-east Nigeria. A total of 16 drug vendors were trained and monitored for eight months. The programme was evaluated to measure changes in drug vendor practice and knowledge using exit interviews. In addition, home visits were conducted to measure compliance with referral. Results The intervention achieved major improvements in drug selling and referral practices and knowledge. Exit interviews confirmed significant increases in appropriate anti-malarial drug dispensing, correct history questions asked and advice given. Improvements in malaria knowledge was established and 80% compliance with referred cases was observed during the study period, Conclusion The remarkable change in knowledge and practices observed indicates that training of drug vendors, as a means of communication in the community, is feasible and strongly supports their inclusion in control strategies aimed at improving prompt effective treatment of malaria with referral of severe cases. PMID:19930561

  1. Training in systems pharmacology: predoctoral program in pharmacology and systems biology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Sobie, E A; Jenkins, S L; Iyengar, R; Krulwich, T A

    2010-07-01

    Our recently developed predoctoral training program in pharmacology and systems biology prepares students to become experts in systems-level models of disease that identify therapeutic targets and predict adverse effects or new uses of existing therapeutics. Multiple computational modeling modes are introduced throughout a curriculum that integrates basic cell and molecular sciences with the physiology and pathophysiology of disease states. Problem-based learning exercises enable students from different experimental and computational backgrounds to design experiments and interpret data quantitatively.

  2. Modeling Addictive Consumption as an Infectious Disease.

    PubMed

    Alamar, Benjamin; Glantz, Stanton A

    2006-03-17

    The dominant model of addictive consumption in economics is the theory of rational addiction. The addict in this model chooses how much they are going to consume based upon their level of addiction (past consumption), the current benefits and all future costs. Several empirical studies of cigarette sales and price data have found a correlation between future prices and consumption and current consumption. These studies have argued that the correlation validates the rational addiction model and invalidates any model in which future consumption is not considered. An alternative to the rational addiction model is one in which addiction spreads through a population as if it were an infectious disease, as supported by the large body of empirical research of addictive behaviors. In this model an individual's probability of becoming addicted to a substance is linked to the behavior of their parents, friends and society. In the infectious disease model current consumption is based only on the level of addiction and current costs. Price and consumption data from a simulation of the infectious disease model showed a qualitative match to the results of the rational addiction model. The infectious disease model can explain all of the theoretical results of the rational addiction model with the addition of explaining initial consumption of the addictive good.

  3. The "addicted" spine.

    PubMed

    Spiga, Saturnino; Mulas, Giovanna; Piras, Francesca; Diana, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Units of dendritic branches called dendritic spines represent more than simply decorative appendages of the neuron and actively participate in integrative functions of "spinous" nerve cells thereby contributing to the general phenomenon of synaptic plasticity. In animal models of drug addiction, spines are profoundly affected by treatments with drugs of abuse and represent important sub cellular markers which interfere deeply into the physiology of the neuron thereby providing an example of the burgeoning and rapidly increasing interest in "structural plasticity". Medium Spiny Neurons (MSNs) of the Nucleus Accumbens (Nacc) show a reduced number of dendritic spines and a decrease in TH-positive terminals upon withdrawal from opiates, cannabinoids and alcohol. The reduction is localized "strictly" to second order dendritic branches where dopamine (DA)-containing terminals, impinging upon spines, make synaptic contacts. In addition, long-thin spines seems preferentially affected raising the possibility that cellular learning of these neurons may be selectively hampered. These findings suggest that dendritic spines are affected by drugs widely abused by humans and provide yet another example of drug-induced aberrant neural plasticity with marked reflections on the physiology of synapses, system structural organization, and neuronal circuitry remodeling.

  4. Perspectives on neurocognitive rehabilitation as an adjunct treatment for addictive disorders: From cognitive improvement to relapse prevention.

    PubMed

    Rezapour, Tara; DeVito, Elise E; Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Ekhtiari, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Addiction, as a brain disorder, can be defined with two distinct but interacting components: drug dependency and neurocognitive deficits. Most of the therapeutic interventions in addiction medicine, including pharmacological or psychosocial therapies, that are in clinical use have been mainly focused on directly addressing addictive behaviors, especially drug use and urges to use drugs. In the field of addiction treatment, it is often presumed that drug users' neurocognitive deficits will reverse following abstinence. However, in many cases, neurocognitive deficits are not fully ameliorated following sustained abstinence, and neurocognitive function may further deteriorate in early abstinence. It can be argued that many cognitive functions, such as sustained attention and executive control, are essential for full recovery and long-term abstinence from addiction. Recent advances in cognitive neuroscience have provided scientific foundations for neurocognitive rehabilitation as a means of facilitating recovery from drug addiction. Neurocognitive rehabilitation for drug addicted individuals could be implemented as part of addiction treatment, with highly flexible delivery methods including traditional "paper and pencil" testing, or computer-based technology via laptops, web-based, or smartphones in inpatient and outpatient settings. Despite this promise, there has been limited research into the potential efficacy of neurocognitive rehabilitation as a treatment for drug addiction. Further, many questions including the optimum treatment length, session duration, and necessary treatment adherence for treatment efficacy remain to be addressed. In this chapter, we first introduce cognitive rehabilitation as one of the potential areas to bridge the gap between cognitive neuroscience and addiction medicine, followed by an overview of current challenges and future directions.

  5. Bupreorphine:a new pharmacotherapy for opioid addictions treatment.

    PubMed

    Stock, Christopher; Shum, Jason H

    2004-01-01

    The federal Drug Abuse Treatment Act 2000 (DATA) opened a window of opportunity for patients with the disease of addiction by providing increased access to options for treatment. Previously, only methadone maintenance, approved for use only through specially regulated clinics, was available to treat opioid addiction. DATA allows any physician choosing to take a short specialty training course and become certified to prescribe buprenorphine. Buprenorphine and buprenorphine/ naloxone (Subutex, Suboxone) can be prescribed by certified physicians in a traditional office setting to treat patients with opioid dependence. Clinical studies indicate buprenorphine maintenance is as effective as methadone maintenance in retaining patients in substance abuse treatment and reducing illicit opioid use. Sublingual buprenorphine is more effective than clonidine or clonidine/naltrexone in short-term opioid detoxification treatment. Buprenorphine provides an additional tool to treat opioid addiction and improve the quality of lives of these patients. More physicians are needed to treat patients with addiction. DATA facilitates this by removing existing barriers and increasing access to treatment.

  6. The Globalization of Addiction Research: Capacity Building Mechanisms and Selected Examples

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Richard A.; Woody, George; Kresina, Thomas F.; Gust, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the amount and variety of addiction research around the world has increased substantially. Researchers in the United States, Western Europe, United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia have significantly contributed to knowledge about addiction and its treatment. However, the nature and context of substance use disorders (SUDs) and the populations using drugs are far more diverse than is reflected in studies done in Western cultures. To stimulate new research from a diverse set of cultural perspectives, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has promoted the development of addiction research capacity and skills around the world for over 25 years. This review will describe the programs NIDA has developed to sponsor international research and research fellows and will provide some examples of the work NIDA has supported. NIDA fellowships have allowed 496 individuals from 96 countries to be trained in addiction research. The United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia have recently developed funding to support addiction research to study SUD problems that impact their societies with NIDA guidance.. Examples from Malaysia, Tanzania, Brazil, Russian Federation, Ukraine, Republic of Georgia, Iceland, China, and Vietnam are used to illustrate research being conducted with NIDA support. Health services research, collaboratively funded by NIH and the Department of State, addresses a range of addiction service development questions in low- and middle-income countries. Findings have expanded the understanding of addiction and its treatment and are enhancing the ability of practitioners and policy makers to address SUDs using data to guide their decision-making. PMID:25747927

  7. The impact of Internet and PC addiction in school performance of Cypriot adolescents.

    PubMed

    Siomos, Konstantinos; Paradeisioti, Anna; Hadjimarcou, Michalis; Mappouras, Demetrios G; Kalakouta, Olga; Avagianou, Penelope; Floros, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of a cross-sectional survey designed to ascertain Internet and personal computer (PC) addiction in the Republic of Cyprus. This is a follow-up to a pilot study conducted one year earlier. Data were collected from a representative sample of the adolescent student population of the first and fourth grades of high school. Total sample was 2684 students, 48.5% of them male and 51.5% female. Research material included extended demographics and an Internet security questionnaire, the Young's Diagnostic questionnaire (YDQ), the Adolescent Computer Addiction Test (ACAT). Results indicated that the Cypriot population had comparable addiction statistics with other Greek-speaking populations in Greece; 15.3% of the students were classified as Internet addicted by their YDQ scores and 16.3% as PC addicted by their ACAT scores. Those results are among the highest in Europe. Our results were alarming and have led to the creation of an Internet and PC addiction prevention program which will focus on high-school professor training and the creation of appropriate prevention material for all high-schools, starting immediately after the conclusion of the pan-Cypriot survey, focusing especially on those areas where the frequency of addictive behaviors will be highest.

  8. The globalization of addiction research: capacity-building mechanisms and selected examples.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Richard A; Woody, George; Kresina, Thomas F; Gust, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, the amount and variety of addiction research around the world has increased substantially. Researchers in Australia, Canada, United Kingdom, United States, and western Europe have significantly contributed to knowledge about addiction and its treatment. However, the nature and context of substance use disorders and the populations using drugs are far more diverse than is reflected in studies done in Western cultures. To stimulate new research from a diverse set of cultural perspectives, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has promoted the development of addiction research capacity and skills around the world for over 25 years. This review will describe the programs NIDA has developed to sponsor international research and research fellows and will provide some examples of the work NIDA has supported. NIDA fellowships have allowed 496 individuals from 96 countries to be trained in addiction research. The United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia have recently developed funding to support addiction research to study, with advice from NIDA, the substance use disorder problems that affect their societies. Examples from Malaysia, Tanzania, Brazil, Russian Federation, Ukraine, Republic of Georgia, Iceland, China, and Vietnam are used to illustrate research being conducted with NIDA support. Health services research, collaboratively funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and Department of State, addresses a range of addiction service development questions in low- and middle-income countries. Findings have expanded the understanding of addiction and its treatment, and are enhancing the ability of practitioners and policy makers to address substance use disorders.

  9. Effects of Six Weeks of Medicine Ball Training on Throwing Velocity, Throwing Precision, and Isokinetic Strength of Shoulder Rotators in Female Handball Players.

    PubMed

    Raeder, Christian; Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Ferrauti, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of 6 weeks of medicine ball training (MBT) on throwing velocity, throwing precision, and isokinetic strength of shoulder rotators in competitive female handball players. Twenty-eight players (mean ± SD; age: 20.8 ± 3.3 years, height: 170.5 ± 5.6 cm, body mass: 65.2 ± 8.0 kg) were randomly assigned to an MBT group (TG; n = 15) and a control group (CG; n = 13). TG performed a supervised MBT program, 3 times a week for a total of 6 weeks, focusing on handball-specific movement patterns. Both groups, TG and CG, also conducted a supervised shoulder injury prevention program with elastic tubes, as part of the warm-up, finishing with regular handball throws. Results showed a significant group × time interaction in throwing velocity (p < 0.001) with the TG posttest results being significantly higher compared with CG (d = 2.1), and also a significant main time effect (p < 0.001), with an increase in throwing velocity of 14% (d = 3.0) and 3.7% (d = 0.3) for both TG and CG, respectively. Throwing precision did not significantly differ between groups and time points. Isokinetic strength measures revealed a significant group × time interaction (p ≤ 0.05) with the TG posttest results being significantly higher compared with CG (d = 0.9) and also a significant main time effect (p < 0.01) with an increase of 15% (d = 0.9) in concentric shoulder internal rotation at 180°·s⁻¹ in the dominant arm in TG, whereas no significant changes occurred in CG. The present results indicate that 6 weeks of MBT elicit significant improvements in functional performance (i.e., throwing velocity) in female handball players, whereas throwing precision remained unaffected. Medicine ball training exercises seem to be a useful and inexpensive strength training strategy in enhancing functional performance by closely mimicking sport-specific movement activities.

  10. [Does really sex addiction exist?].

    PubMed

    Echeburúa, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Hypersexual Disorder has been proposed as a new psychiatric disorder for DSM-V, characterized by an increased frequency and intensity of sexually motivated fantasies, arousal, urges, and enacted behavior in association with an impulsivity component. Excessive appetitive and consummatory behaviors, including hypersexuality, can become a non-chemical addiction. Sexual addiction afflicts people having paraphilic or nonparaphilic behaviors associated with progressive risk-taking sexual behaviors, escalation or progression of sexual behaviors (tolerance), loss of control and significant adverse psychosocial consequences, such as unplanned pregnancy, pair-bond dysfunction, marital separation, financial problems and sexually transmitted diseases including HIV. The most common behaviors involved in sexual addiction are fantasy sex, compulsive masturbation, pornography, cybersex, voyeuristic sex, anonymous sex and multiple sexual partners. These behaviors are intended to reduce anxiety and other dysphoric affects (e.g., shame and depression). Axis I psychiatric diagnosis, especially mood disorders, psychoactive substance abuse disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorders, are common comorbid disorders with sexual addiction. There are significant gaps in the current scientific knowledge base regarding the clinical course, development risk factors and family history and data on women with sexual addiction are lacking.

  11. Meperidine addiction or treatment frustration?

    PubMed

    Hung, C I; Liu, C Y; Chen, C Y; Yang, C H; Yeh, E K

    2001-01-01

    There have been few studies of the psychiatric characteristics of analgesics addiction. The physician's perceptions that patients were addicted to analgesics might be partially attributable to frustration with poor response to treatment. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the medical records of 20 subjects (15 male and 5 female) who were perceived as having addiction to meperidine by general physicians. The most common medical diagnosis among these patients was chronic pancreatitis (7/20). Among them, five had a past history of suicide attempt and three had self-injury behavior during the index admission. The fact that subjects were perceived as being addicted might be attributable to a vicious cycle of the following factors: 1) chronic intractable pain; 2) poor staff-patient relationship; 3) lower pain threshold or tolerance due to anxiety or depression; 4) patients with a history or tendency of substance abuse; 5) placebo use and inadequate analgesics regimen. The findings of this study suggest that the importance of the following diagnostic and treatment procedures in these patients: 1) suicide risk should be evaluated; 2) comorbid psychiatric diseases should be treated; 3) factors that cause a vicious cycle in pain control should be identified; 4) misconceptions of opiate analgesics among medical staff should be discussed; 5) poor staff-patient relationship should be managed aggressively; and 6) "addiction" is a critical diagnosis that should be avoided if possible.

  12. The addictive dimensionality of obesity.

    PubMed

    Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gene-Jack; Tomasi, Dardo; Baler, Ruben D

    2013-05-01

    Our brains are hardwired to respond and seek immediate rewards. Thus, it is not surprising that many people overeat, which in some can result in obesity, whereas others take drugs, which in some can result in addiction. Though food intake and body weight are under homeostatic regulation, when highly palatable food is available, the ability to resist the urge to eat hinges on self-control. There is no homeostatic regulator to check the intake of drugs (including alcohol); thus, regulation of drug consumption is mostly driven by self-control or unwanted effects (i.e., sedation for alcohol). Disruption in both the neurobiological processes that underlie sensitivity to reward and those that underlie inhibitory control can lead to compulsive food intake in some individuals and compulsive drug intake in others. There is increasing evidence that disruption of energy homeostasis can affect the reward circuitry and that overconsumption of rewarding food can lead to changes in the reward circuitry that result in compulsive food intake akin to the phenotype seen with addiction. Addiction research has produced new evidence that hints at significant commonalities between the neural substrates underlying the disease of addiction and at least some forms of obesity. This recognition has spurred a healthy debate to try and ascertain the extent to which these complex and dimensional disorders overlap and whether or not a deeper understanding of the crosstalk between the homeostatic and reward systems will usher in unique opportunities for prevention and treatment of both obesity and drug addiction.

  13. Longer Addiction Treatment Is Better, Study Confirms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Human Services. More Health News on: Drug Abuse Opioid Abuse and Addiction Prescription Drug Abuse Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Drug Abuse Opioid Abuse and Addiction Prescription Drug Abuse About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs ...

  14. Behavioral Therapy, Incentives Enhance Addiction Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Behavioral Therapy, Incentives Enhance Addiction Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents For ... their addiction to marijuana can benefit from a treatment program that combines motivational incentives with cognitive-behavioral ...

  15. Signs of Alcohol Abuse and Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Signs of Alcohol Abuse and Addiction Signs of Alcohol Abuse and Addiction Listen ©istock.com/ KatarzynaBialasiewicz People who drink too much alcohol might forget things that happened when they were ...

  16. Human Trafficking, Mental Illness, and Addiction: Avoiding Diagnostic Overshadowing.

    PubMed

    Stoklosa, Hanni; MacGibbon, Marti; Stoklosa, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews an emergency department-based clinical vignette of a trafficked patient with co-occurring pregnancy-related, mental health, and substance use disorder issues. The authors, including a survivor of human trafficking, draw on their backgrounds in addiction care, human trafficking, emergency medicine, and psychiatry to review the literature on relevant general health and mental health consequences of trafficking and propose an approach to the clinical complexities this case presents. In their discussion, the authors explicate the deleterious role of implicit bias and diagnostic overshadowing in trafficked patients with co-occurring addiction and mental illness. Finally, the authors propose a trauma-informed, multidisciplinary response to potentially trafficked patients.

  17. Hypothalamic opioid-melanocortin appetitive balance and addictive craving.

    PubMed

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Whilst the parallels between drug and food craving are receiving increasing attention, the recently elucidated complex physiology of the hypothalamic appetite regulatory centres has been largely overlooked in the efforts to understand drug craving which is one of the most refractory and problematic aspects of drug and behavioural addictions. Important conceptual gains could be made by researchers from both appetite and addiction neuroscience if they were to have an improved understanding of each others' disciplines. It is well known in addiction medicine that the use of many substances is elevated in opiate dependency. There is voluminous evidence of very high rates of drug use in opiate agonist maintained patients, and the real possibility exists that opiate agonist therapy therefore increases drug craving. Conversely, opiate antagonist therapy with naloxone or naltrexone has been shown to reduce most chemical and behavioural addictions, and naltrexone is now being developed together with bupropion as the anti-obesity drug "Contrave". Hypothalamic melanocortins, particularly α-MSH, are known to constitute the main brake to consumptive behaviour of food. There is a well described antagonism between melanocortins and opioids at many loci including the hypothalamus. Administration of exogenous opiates is known to both suppress α-MSH and to stimulate hedonic food consumption. Opiate maintenance programs are associated with weight gain. As monoamines, opioids and cannabinoids are known to be involved in appetite regulation, and as endorphin opioids are known to be perturbed in other addictions, further exploration of the hypothalamic appetite regulatory centre would appear to be an obvious, albeit presently largely overlooked, locus in which to study drug and other craving mechanisms.

  18. [The place of cyber addiction in teenagers' addictive behavior].

    PubMed

    Valleur, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The easy access which modern teenagers have to new technologies favours their excessive use of video games, as they seek to escape potential existential difficulties. This harmful aspect should not mask the creative potential of games for the majority of teenagers. Treatment for young people with a gaming addiction is based on psychotherapy and takes into account the family dimension of the problem. This article presents an interview with Marc Valleur, a psychiatrist and head physician at Marmottan hospital specialising in the care and support of people with addictions.

  19. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity: University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC): Development, Evolution, and Direction

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    A historical summary is provided of the evolution of the University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC) since its origins in 1988. Begun as an NIH research center within a Department of Psychiatry and focused solely on alcohol and aging, early work emphasized treatment efficacy, differential outcome studies, and characterization of the neurophysiological and behavioral manifestations of chronic alcoholism. Over the last fifteen years, UMARC has extended its research focus along a number of dimensions: Its developmental reach has been extended etiologically by studies of risk early in the life span, and by way of work on earlier screening and the development of early, brief treatment interventions. The addiction focus has expanded to include other drugs of abuse. Levels of analysis have also broadened, with work on the molecular genetics and brain neurophysiology underlying addictive processes on the one hand, and examination of the role of the social environment in long term course of disorder on the other. Activities have been facilitated by several research training programs and by collaborative relationships with other universities around the United States and in Poland. Since 2002, a program for research infrastructure development and collaboration has been carried on, initially with Poland and more recently with Ukraine, Latvia, and Slovakia. A blueprint for the future includes expanded characterization of the neurobiology and genetics of addictive processes, the developmental environment, as well as programmatic work to address the public health implications of our ability to identify risk for disorder very early in life. PMID:20331547

  20. A Meaning-Centered Therapy for Addictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a treatment for addictions, based on the idea that addiction is a response to living a life that has little personal meaning. First, it presents the theory of Meaning-Centered Therapy (MCT) as developed by Paul Wong, particularly the need to understand intoxication from the addict's perspective. Next, it presents the…