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Sample records for addiction pain management

  1. Prevention of addiction in pain management

    DOEpatents

    Dewey, Stephen L.; Brodie, Jonathan D.; Ashby, Jr., Charles R.

    2005-09-06

    The present invention provides a composition for treating pain. The composition includes a pharmaceutically acceptable analgesic and a GABAergic agent, such as gamma vinyl GABA, effective in reducing or eliminating the addictive liability of the analgesic. The invention also includes a method for reducing or eliminating the addictive

  2. [The Perioperative Management of Pain in Patients Who Are Addicted to Heroin].

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Yi; Weng, Chia-Hsing; Hsu, Yu-Ping; Lin, Pao-Chen

    2015-06-01

    Heroin addicts admitted to the hospital for surgery should be treated as high-risk patients because these patients face a significantly higher risk of experiencing severe drug withdrawal symptoms and of pain management complications during hospitalization. The lack of proper pain management often suffered by heroin addicts during hospitalization has been attributed to care providers' insufficient knowledge regarding opioid medications and their addicting effects as well as fears that opioid medications may cause addiction symptoms to reemerge. The objective of this article is to illustrate the pain management process across the entire hospitalization period for heroin-addicted patients undergoing surgical procedures. This process includes management of the heroin-related physical and psychological reactions from surgery, of the mechanism of pain induced specifically from surgery, and of the heroin addiction during the surgical procedure and subsequent clinical management and nursing care. It is hoped that this article assists healthcare providers to better understand the need for the proper pain management and care of heroin-addicted surgical patients over the entire period of hospitalization and thus the enhancement of the overall quality and safety of patient care management procedures. PMID:26073959

  3. Internet resources on managing chronic nonmalignant pain with opioids: the risks of addiction.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anita

    2010-03-01

    Chronic nonmalignant pain affects approximately 20% of the population. Internet resources for management of chronic pain have expanded in response to this growing population of chronic nonmalignant pain patients. As providers, it is necessary that we also are aware of what resources are available, particularly for patients with opioid use and possible addiction. Physicians need to be aware of the factors associated with opioids and take steps to mitigate the risk of abuse by individual patients. Discontinuation of opioid therapy needs to be adequately and appropriately addressed in patients with aberrant behavior and treated. This includes proper screening and monitoring and the use of emerging agents that will effectively control pain and are associated with a lower risk of abuse. PMID:20345206

  4. Pain Raises Risk of Opioid Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160033.html Pain Raises Risk of Opioid Addiction Men and younger people had higher odds of ... had a 41 percent higher risk of opioid addiction than those with no pain. That increased risk ...

  5. Coexisting addiction and pain in people receiving methadone for addiction.

    PubMed

    St Marie, Barbara

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to examine the narratives of people who experience chronic pain (lasting 6 months or more) and were receiving methadone for the treatment of their opiate addiction through a major methadone clinic. This paper featured the pathway of how the participants developed chronic pain and addiction, and their beliefs of how prescription opioids would impact their addiction in the future. Thirty-four participants who experienced chronic pain and received methadone for treatment of opiate addiction were willing to tell the story of their experiences. The findings in three areas are presented: (a) whether participants experienced addiction first or pain first and how their exposures to addictive substances influenced their experiences, (b) the significance of recreational drug use and patterns of abuse behaviors leading to chronic pain, and (c) participants' experiences and beliefs about the potential for abuse of prescription opioid used for treatment of pain. PMID:23858068

  6. Coexisting Addiction and Pain in People Receiving Methadone for Addiction

    PubMed Central

    St. Marie, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to examine the narratives of people who experience chronic pain (lasting 6 months or more) and were receiving methadone for the treatment of their opiate addiction through a major methadone clinic. This paper featured the pathway of how the participants developed chronic pain and addiction, and their beliefs of how prescription opioids would impact their addiction in the future. Thirty-four participants who experienced chronic pain and received methadone for treatment of opiate addiction were willing to tell the story of their experiences. The findings in three areas are presented: (a) whether participants experienced addiction first or pain first and how their exposures to addictive substances influenced their experiences, (b) the significance of recreational drug use and patterns of abuse behaviors leading to chronic pain, and (c) participants’ experiences and beliefs about the potential for abuse of prescription opioid used for treatment of pain. PMID:23858068

  7. Chronic pain, substance abuse and addiction.

    PubMed

    Compton, Peggy; Athanasos, Peter

    2003-09-01

    Health care professionals face numerous challenges in assessing and treating chronic pain patients with a substance abuse history. Societal perspectives on morality and criminality, imprecise addiction terminology, litigation fears, and genuine concern for a patient's relapse into or escalation of substance abuse result in unrelieved and under-relieved pain in precisely the population that--as increasing evidence indicates--is generally intolerant of pain. Before adequate pain relief can occur in chronic pain patients with current or past substance abuse issues, it is imperative that the clinician recognize addiction as a disease with known symptoms and treatments. Further, the clinician must realize the difference between true addiction and similar conditions, so the patient's condition can be monitored and regulated properly. Although clinicians are often reluctant to medicate with opioids, it is always best to err on the side of adequate pain relief. Withholding opioids from chronic pain patients in order to avoid the onset or relapse of addiction is contrary to the growing body of evidence and results only in unnecessary pain for the patient. Chronic pain in patients with a history of addictive disease can be treated successfully with opiate analgesia; it just requires caution and careful monitoring of medication use. If addiction is treated as a known risk when providing opioid analgesia to a recovering addict, its development can be minimized while pain relief is provided. PMID:14567207

  8. Treating Pain in Addicted Patients: Recommendations from an Expert Panel

    PubMed Central

    Cheatle, Martin; Wunsch, Martha; Skoufalos, Alexis; Reddy, Yeshwant

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Clinicians may face pragmatic, ethical, and legal issues when treating addicted patients. Equal pressures exist for clinicians to always address the health care needs of these patients in addition to their addiction. Although controversial, mainly because of the lack of evidence regarding their long-term efficacy, the use of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain management is widespread. Their use for pain management in the addicted population can present even more challenges, especially when evaluating the likelihood of drug-seeking behavior. As the misuse and abuse of opioids continues to burgeon, clinicians must be particularly vigilant when prescribing chronic opioid therapy. The purpose of this article is to summarize recommendations from a recent meeting of experts convened to recommend how primary care physicians should approach treatment of chronic pain for addicted patients when an addiction specialist is not available for a referral. As there is a significant gap in guidelines and recommendations in this specific area of care, this article serves to create a foundation for expanding chronic pain guidelines in the area of treating the addicted population. This summary is designed to be a practical how-to guide for primary care physicians, discussing risk assessment, patient stratification, and recommended therapeutic approaches. (Population Health Management 2014;17:79–89) PMID:24138341

  9. Pain Control in the Presence of Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Lumermann, Leandro; Zhu, Richard; Kodumudi, Gopal; Elhassan, Amir O; Kaye, Alan David

    2016-05-01

    Drug addiction is present in a significant proportion of the population in the USA and worldwide. Drug addiction can occur with the abuse of many types of substances including cocaine, marijuana, stimulants, alcohol, opioids, and tranquilizers. There is a high likelihood that clinicians will encounter patients with substance abuse disorders on a regular basis with the prevalence of the use of illicit substances and the high rate of abuse of prescription drugs. The use of abuse deterrent formulations of prescription opioid agents, pill counts, and urine drug abuse screenings are all useful strategies. Optimum pain management of patients with addiction in the outpatient and inpatient setting is essential to minimize pain states. Careful selection of medications and appropriate oversight, including drug agreements, can reduce drug-induced impairments, including sleep deficits and diminished physical, social, and sexual functioning. This review, therefore, discusses the prevalence of illicit and prescription drug addiction, the challenges of achieving optimum pain control, and the therapeutic approaches to be considered in this challenging population. More research is warranted to develop improved therapies and routes of treatments for optimum pain relief and to prevent the development of central sensitization, chronic pain, and impaired physical and social functioning in patients with drug addiction. PMID:27068665

  10. Chronic Pain May Trigger Many Cases of Painkiller Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Pain May Trigger Many Cases of Painkiller Addiction: Survey Drug counselors should consider whether people are ... a major driver behind the recent surge in addiction to prescription painkillers, a new survey finds. Opioid ...

  11. Buprenorphine-naloxone therapy in pain management.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelly Yan; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2014-05-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (bup/nal in 4:1 ratio; Suboxone; Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Incorporation, Richmond, VA) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for outpatient office-based addiction treatment. In the past few years, bup/nal has been increasingly prescribed off-label for chronic pain management. The current data suggest that bup/nal may provide pain relief in patients with chronic pain with opioid dependence or addiction. However, the unique pharmacological profile of bup/nal confers it to be a weak analgesic that is unlikely to provide adequate pain relief for patients without opioid dependence or addiction. Possible mechanisms of pain relief by bup/nal therapy in opioid-dependent patients with chronic pain may include reversal of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and improvement in opioid tolerance and addiction. Additional studies are needed to assess the implication of bup/nal therapy in clinical anesthesia and perioperative pain management. PMID:24509068

  12. BUPRENORPHINE-NALXONE THERAPY IN PAIN MANAGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kelly Yan; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2014-01-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (bup/nal in 4:1 ratio; Suboxone®, Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Incorporation, Richmond, VA) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for outpatient office-based addiction treatment. In the past few years, bup/nal has been increasingly prescribed off-label for chronic pain management. The current data suggests that bup/nal may provide pain relief in chronic pain patients with opioid dependence or addiction. However, the unique pharmacological profile of bup/nal confers it to be a weak analgesic that is unlikely to provide adequate pain relief for patients without opioid dependence or addiction. Possible mechanisms of pain relief by bup/nal therapy in opioid-dependent chronic pain patients may include reversal of opioid-induced hyperalgesia as well as improvement in opioid tolerance and addiction. Additional studies are needed to assess the implication of bup/nal therapy in clinical anesthesia and perioperative pain management. PMID:24509068

  13. Common Brain Mechanisms of Chronic Pain and Addiction.

    PubMed

    Elman, Igor; Borsook, David

    2016-01-01

    While chronic pain is considered by some to be a CNS disease, little is understood about underlying neurobiological mechanisms. Addiction models have heuristic value in this regard, because both pain and addictive disorders are characterized by impaired hedonic capacity, compulsive drug seeking, and high stress. In drug addiction such symptomatology has been attributed to reward deficiency, impaired inhibitory control, incentive sensitization, aberrant learning, and anti-reward allostatic neuroadaptations. Here we propose that similar neuroadaptations exist in chronic pain patients. PMID:26748087

  14. Chronic Imperceptible Pain as a Cause of Addiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Arthur P.; Guglielmo, Robert

    1985-01-01

    Argues that acute, chronic pain, whether arising from environmental or psychological contexts, is a necessary condition of addiction; conditioning and neurochemical changes are assigned a catalyzing role. Inadequate self-esteem is thought to be a common source of imperceptible pain, and therefore a cause of addiction. (Author/ABL)

  15. Pain Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... the brain played a role in producing the perception of pain. In the 19th century, physician-scientists ... they are experiencing. Discoveries of differences in pain perceptions and responses to treatment by gender has have ...

  16. Palliative care - managing pain

    MedlinePlus

    End of life - pain management; Hospice - pain management ... Bookbinder M, McHugh ME. Symptom management in palliative care and end of life care. Nurs Clin North Am . 2010;45:271-327. Mercadente S. Challenging pain problems. In: ...

  17. Pain management in the pediatric surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Vance Y; Zenger, David; Steele, Scott R

    2012-06-01

    Surgeons performing painful, invasive procedures in pediatric patients must be cognizant of both the potential short- and long-term detrimental effects of inadequate analgesia. This article reviews the available tools, sedation procedures, the management of intraoperative, postoperative, and postprocedural pain, and the issues surrounding neonatal addiction. PMID:22595704

  18. Chronic Pain May Trigger Many Cases of Painkiller Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain. "While the association between chronic pain and drug addiction has been observed in prior studies, this study goes one step further to quantify how many of these patients are using these ... positive for illegal drug use and prescription drug abuse," Alford said in ...

  19. Management of pain in older adults.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, Thomas A

    2005-03-01

    The elderly are often untreated or undertreated for pain. Barriers to effective management include challenges to proper assessment of pain; underreporting on the part of patients; atypical manifestations of pain in the elderly; a need for increased appreciation of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes of aging; and misconceptions about tolerance and addiction to opioids. Physicians can effectively manage pain in the elderly by understanding different types of pain (nociceptive and neuropathic), and appropriate use of nonopioid, opioid, and adjuvant medications. Opioids have become more widely accepted for treating older adults who have persistent pain, but their use requires physicians have an understanding of prevention and management of side effects, opioid titration and withdrawal, and careful monitoring. Placebo use is unwarranted and unethical. Nonpharmacologic approaches to pain management are essential and include osteopathic manipulative treatment, cognitive behavioral therapy, exercise, and spiritual interventions. The holistic and interdisciplinary approach of osteopathic medicine offers an approach that can optimize effective pain management in older adults. PMID:18154193

  20. Classification and identification of opioid addiction in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Højsted, Jette; Nielsen, Per Rotbøll; Guldstrand, Sally Kendall; Frich, Liv; Sjøgren, Per

    2010-11-01

    Addiction is a feared consequence of long-term opioid treatment of chronic pain patients. The ICD-10 and DSM-IV diagnostic addiction criteria may not be appropriate in these patients. Therefore Portenoy's criteria (PC) were launched. The aim was to estimate the prevalence of addiction, to investigate whether PC were applicable and to compare these criteria with the ICD-10 criteria. The study was cross-sectional and included 253 patients with chronic pain at a tertiary pain centre. Patients were screened for addiction by a physician and a nurse. The addiction prevalence was 14.4% according to ICD-10 and 19.3% according to PC. A significant difference between the prevalence of addiction according to ICD-10 and to PC was found. The inter-rater reliability was 0.95 for ICD-10 and 0.93 for PC. The sensitivity of PC was 0.85 and the specificity was 0.96. According to PC patients classified as addicted were treated with significantly higher opioid doses, drank more alcohol, smoked more tobacco, used benzodiazepines and had higher levels of depression. According to ICD-10 patients classified as addicted used higher doses of opioids, drank more alcohol and had higher scores of anxiety and depression. High opioid doses, concomitant use of alcohol and younger age were risk factors. The risk profile for PC was different to ICD-10 by adding risk factors as concomitant use of benzodiazepines, having depression and low educational level. PC seems to be appropriate for diagnosing addiction in opioid treated pain patients and seems to be more sensitive and specific than ICD-10 criteria. PMID:20494598

  1. American Society for Pain Management Nursing Position Statement: Pain Management in Patients with Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, June; Coggins, Candace; Compton, Peggy; Hagan, Susan; Matteliano, Deborah; Stanton, Marsha; St. Marie, Barbara; Strobbe, Stephen; Turner, Helen N.

    2013-01-01

    The American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) has updated its position statement on managing pain in patients with substance use disorders. This position statement is endorsed by the International Nurses Society on Addictions (IntNSA) and includes clinical practice recommendations based on current evidence. It is the position of ASPMN and IntNSA that every patient with pain, including those with substance use disorders, has the right to be treated with dignity, respect, and high quality pain assessment and management. Failure to identify and treat the concurrent conditions of pain and substance use disorders will compromise the ability to treat either condition effectively. Barriers to caring for these patients include stigmatization, misconceptions, and limited access to providers skilled in these two categories of disorders. Topics addressed in this position statement include the scope of substance use and related disorders, conceptual models of addiction, ethical considerations, addiction risk stratification, and clinical recommendations. PMID:22929604

  2. American Society for Pain Management Nursing Position Statement: Pain Management in Patients with Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, June; Coggins, Candace; Compton, Peggy; Hagan, Susan; Matteliano, Deborah; Stanton, Marsha; St. Marie, Barbara; Strobbe, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) has updated its position statement on managing pain in patients with substance use disorders. This position statement is endorsed by the International Nurses Society on Addictions (IntNSA) and includes clinical practice recommendations based on current evidence. It is the position of ASPMN and IntNSA that every patient with pain, including those with substance use disorders, has the right to be treated with dignity, respect, and high quality pain assessment and management. Failure to identify and treat the concurrent conditions of pain and substance use disorders will compromise the ability to treat either condition effectively. Barriers to caring for these patients include stigmatization, misconceptions, and limited access to providers skilled in these two categories of disorders. Topics addressed in this position statement include the scope of substance use and related disorders, conceptual models of addiction, ethical considerations, addiction risk stratification, and clinical recommendations. PMID:24335741

  3. Pain assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Leith, B A

    1999-09-01

    Little research is currently available related to pain management by neuroscience nurses. However, due to concerns about the potential for altering neurological status, some neurosurgery patients may not receive optimal pain management. This paper describes findings from a pain related survey which was distributed during the Canadian Association of Neuroscience Nurses June 1998 national conference. The survey was intended to assess Canadian neuroscience nurses pain management knowledge and to explore pain management techniques after intracranial surgery. While 60% of respondents answered four pain assessment and management case study related questions correctly, some respondents rated pain differently when it was expressed by a smiling or grimacing patient. The most common methods for pain control after intracranial surgery included intermittent codeine and/or morphine, often by intramuscular injection. Findings from this study suggest that some neuroscience nurses require further education about pain management and that many patients do not receive optimal pain management after intracranial surgery. PMID:10732518

  4. Prescription Pain Medicines - An Addictive Path?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for addiction to these drugs, which include codeine, morphine, oxycodone (OxyContin), hydrocodone (Vicodin), and meperidine (Demerol). The ... the receptors in the brain affected by heroin, morphine, and prescription painkillers. The tablets relieve drug cravings ...

  5. Pain volatility and prescription opioid addiction treatment outcomes in patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Worley, Matthew J; Heinzerling, Keith G; Shoptaw, Steven; Ling, Walter

    2015-12-01

    The combination of prescription opioid dependence and chronic pain is increasingly prevalent and hazardous to public health. Variability in pain may explain poor prescription opioid addiction treatment outcomes in persons with chronic pain. This study examined pain trajectories and pain volatility in patients with chronic pain receiving treatment for prescription opioid addiction. We conducted secondary analyses of adults with chronic pain (n = 149) who received buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP/NLX) and counseling for 12 weeks in an outpatient, multisite clinical trial. Good treatment outcome was defined as urine-verified abstinence from opioids at treatment endpoint (Week 12) and during at least 2 of the previous 3 weeks. Pain severity significantly declined over time during treatment (b = -0.36, p < .001). Patients with greater pain volatility were less likely to have a good treatment outcome (odds ratio = 0.55, p < .05), controlling for baseline pain severity and rate of change in pain over time. A 1 standard deviation increase in pain volatility was associated with a 44% reduction in the probability of endpoint abstinence. The significant reduction in subjective pain during treatment provides observational support for the analgesic effects of BUP/NLX in patients with chronic pain and opioid dependence. Patients with greater volatility in subjective pain during treatment have increased risk of returning to opioid use by the conclusion of an intensive treatment with BUP/NLX and counseling. Future research should examine underlying mechanisms of pain volatility and identify related therapeutic targets to optimize interventions for prescription opioid addiction and co-occurring chronic pain. PMID:26302337

  6. Understanding pain, part 2: pain management.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Helen

    This article is the second in a two-part series which explores pain and its management from a physiological perspective. Nurses play an important role in assessing and managing pain. Effective pain management by nurses requires them to have an understanding of the biological basis of the pain interventions which may be used to control pain. This article emphasizes the importance of pain assessment as a precursor for effective pain management and explores the biological basis of pain interventions which contribute to pain control. The role of non-pharmacological approaches in alleviating pain and their actions which contribute to pain relief are explored. The three main types of pharmaceutical agents used, non-opioids, opioids and adjuvant drugs, are introduced and their mechanisms of actions discussed. PMID:16224328

  7. Managing phantom pain.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Singh, Vijay

    2004-07-01

    Since the first medical description of post-amputation phenomena reported by Ambrose Paré, persistent phantom pain syndromes have been well recognized. However, they continue to be difficult to manage. The three most commonly utilized terms include phantom sensation, phantom pain, and stump pain. Phantom limb sensation is an almost universal occurrence at some time during the first month following surgery. However, most phantom sensations generally resolve after two to three years without treatment, except in the cases where phantom pain develops. The incidence of phantom limb pain has been reported to vary from 0% to 88%. The incidence of phantom limb pain increases with more proximal amputations. Even though phantom pain may diminish with time and eventually fade away, it has been shown that even two years after amputation, the incidence is almost the same as at onset. Consequently, almost 60% of patients continue to have phantom limb pain after one year. In addition, phantom limb pain may also be associated with multiple pain problems in other areas of the body. The third symptom, stump pain, is located in the stump itself. The etiology and pathophysiological mechanisms of phantom pain are not clearly defined. However, both peripheral and central neural mechanisms have been described, along with superimposed psychological mechanisms. Literature describing the management of phantom limb pain or stump pain is in its infancy. While numerous treatments have been described, there is little clinical evidence supporting drug therapy, psychological therapy, interventional techniques or surgery. This review will describe epidemiology, etiology and pathophysiological mechanisms, risk factors, and treatment modalities. The review also examines the effectiveness of various described modalities for prevention, as well as management of established phantom pain syndromes. PMID:16858476

  8. Pain management in newborns.

    PubMed

    Hall, Richard W; Anand, Kanwaljeet J S

    2014-12-01

    As a standard of care for preterm/term newborns effective pain management may improve their clinical and neurodevelopmental outcomes. Neonatal pain is assessed using context-specific, validated, and objective pain methods, despite the limitations of currently available tools. Therapeutic approaches reducing invasive procedures and using pharmacologic, behavioral, or environmental measures are used to manage neonatal pain. Nonpharmacologic approaches like kangaroo care, facilitated tucking, non-nutritive sucking, sucrose, and others can be used for procedural pain or adjunctive therapy. Local/topical anesthetics, opioids, NSAIDs/acetaminophen and other sedative/anesthetic agents can be incorporated into NICU protocols for managing moderate/severe pain or distress in all newborns. PMID:25459780

  9. Pain and suicidality: insights from reward and addiction neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Elman, Igor; Borsook, David; Volkow, Nora D

    2013-10-01

    Suicidality is exceedingly prevalent in pain patients. Although the pathophysiology of this link remains unclear, it may be potentially related to the partial congruence of physical and emotional pain systems. The latter system's role in suicide is also conspicuous during setbacks and losses sustained in the context of social attachments. Here we propose a model based on the neural pathways mediating reward and anti-reward (i.e., allostatic adjustment to recurrent activation of the reward circuitry); both are relevant etiologic factors in pain, suicide and social attachments. A comprehensive literature search on neurobiology of pain and suicidality was performed. The collected articles were critically reviewed and relevant data were extracted and summarized within four key areas: (1) physical and emotional pain, (2) emotional pain and social attachments, (3) pain- and suicide-related alterations of the reward and anti-reward circuits as compared to addiction, which is the premier probe for dysfunction of these circuits and (4) mechanistically informed treatments of co-occurring pain and suicidality. Pain-, stress- and analgesic drugs-induced opponent and proponent states of the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathways may render reward and anti-reward systems vulnerable to sensitization, cross-sensitization and aberrant learning of contents and contexts associated with suicidal acts and behaviors. These findings suggest that pain patients exhibit alterations in the brain circuits mediating reward (depressed function) and anti-reward (sensitized function) that may affect their proclivity for suicide and support pain and suicidality classification among other "reward deficiency syndromes" and a new proposal for "enhanced anti-reward syndromes". We suggest that interventions aimed at restoring the balance between the reward and anti-reward networks in patients with chronic pain may help decreasing their suicide risk. PMID:23827972

  10. Pain and suicidality: Insights from reward and addiction neuroscience

    PubMed Central

    Elman, Igor; Borsook, David; Volkow, Nora D.

    2016-01-01

    Suicidality is exceedingly prevalent in pain patients. Although the pathophysiology of this link remains unclear, it may be potentially related to the partial congruence of physical and emotional pain systems. The latter system’s role in suicide is also conspicuous during setbacks and losses sustained in the context of social attachments. Here we propose a model based on the neural pathways mediating reward and anti-reward (i.e., allostatic adjustment to recurrent activation of the reward circuitry); both are relevant etiologic factors in pain, suicide and social attachments. A comprehensive literature search on neurobiology of pain and suicidality was performed. The collected articles were critically reviewed and relevant data were extracted and summarized within four key areas: (1) physical and emotional pain, (2) emotional pain and social attachments, (3) pain-and suicide-related alterations of the reward and anti-reward circuits as compared to addiction, which is the premier probe for dysfunction of these circuits and (4) mechanistically informed treatments of co-occurring pain and suicidality. Pain-, stress- and analgesic drugs-induced opponent and proponent states of the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathways may render reward and anti-reward systems vulnerable to sensitization, cross-sensitization and aberrant learning of contents and contexts associated with suicidal acts and behaviors. These findings suggest that pain patients exhibit alterations in the brain circuits mediating reward (depressed function) and anti-reward (sensitized function) that may affect their proclivity for suicide and support pain and suicidality classification among other “reward deficiency syndromes” and a new proposal for “enhanced anti-reward syndromes”. We suggest that interventions aimed at restoring the balance between the reward and anti-reward networks in patients with chronic pain may help decreasing their suicide risk. PMID:23827972

  11. Pain Management in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Richard W.; Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Effective pain management is a desirable standard of care for preterm and term newborns and may potentially improve their clinical and neurodevelopmental outcomes. Neonatal pain should be assessed routinely using context-specific, validated and objective pain methods, despite the limitations of currently available tools. Reducing invasive procedures, and using pharmacological, behavioral or environmental measures can be used to manage neonatal pain. Non-pharmacologic approaches include kangaroo care, facilitated tucking, non-nutritive sucking, sucrose and other sweeteners, massage and acupuncture therapy. They are used for procedures causing acute, transient, or mild pain, or as adjunctive therapy for moderate or severe pain. Local and topical anesthetics can reduce the acute pain caused by skin-breaking or mucosa-injuring procedures. Opioids form the mainstay for treatment of severe pain; morphine and fentanyl are the most commonly used drugs, although other opioids are also available. Non-opioid drugs include various sedatives and anesthetic agents, mostly used as adjunctive therapy in ventilated neonates. Acetaminophen, ibuprofen and other drugs are used for neonates, although their efficacy and safety remains unproven. Approaches for implementing an effective pain management program in the Neonatal ICU are summarized, together with practical protocols for procedural, postoperative, and mechanical ventilation-associated neonatal pain and stress. PMID:25459780

  12. Drug management of pain in cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Tuttle, C B

    1985-01-01

    Chronic severe cancer pain is often not well controlled because both patient and physician have a poor understanding of the nature of the pain and of the actions of various potent analgesics. Physicians often fail to tailor analgesic dosages to the needs of the individual and unnecessarily limit the dosage because they have an ill founded fear that the patient will become addicted. The basis of rational management of cancer pain with drugs is an appropriate analgesic given regularly in doses adequate to suppress pain continuously. This review compares the potent analgesics and identifies and discusses those that have a role in treating chronic cancer pain. It emphasizes the value of morphine sulfate and gives information on starting and individualizing dosages and managing side effects. PMID:2856896

  13. Hypnosis for pain management.

    PubMed

    Valente, Sharon M

    2006-02-01

    Nurses are in a key position to learn and use hypnosis with patients to reduce pain and enhance self-esteem. However, most nurses lack knowledge about the clinical effectiveness of hypnosis and may seek continuing education to become skilled in its use. Painful procedures, treatments, or diseases remain a major nursing challenge, and nurses need complementary ways to relieve pain from surgery, tumors, injuries, and chemotherapy. This article examines the evidence base related to hypnosis for pain management, as well as how to assess and educate patients about hypnosis. PMID:16526529

  14. Managing Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Jones, Robert Carter Wellford; Lawson, Erin; Backonja, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) arises from injuries or diseases affecting the somatosensory component of the nervous system at any level of the peripheral or central nervous system. NP is diagnosed based on common neurologic signs and symptoms. NP is best treated with a combination of multiple therapeutic approaches, and treatments include conservative, complementary, medical, interventional, and surgical treatment modalities. Goals of treatment are the same as in pain management and include improvement in pain control and in coping skills as well as restoration of functional status. Most patients with NP benefit most from an individualized, multimodal approach that emphasizes both pain and function. PMID:26614725

  15. Palliative care - managing pain

    MedlinePlus

    Palliative care helps people with serious illnesses feel better. One of the problems a serious illness can cause ... Bookbinder M, McHugh ME. Symptom management in palliative care and ... Challenging pain problems. In: Walsh D, Caraceni AT, Fainsinger ...

  16. How Is Pain Managed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Pain Management Nutrition and Exercise Holistic Care Pathology Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms Islet Cell Tumors & Endocrine ... 410-933-7262 Site Map Policies & Credits News Pathology Home Goldman Center © 2016 Johns Hopkins University

  17. Neonatal pain management

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Tarun; Shepherd, Ed; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    The past 2-3 decades have seen dramatic changes in the approach to pain management in the neonate. These practices started with refuting previously held misconceptions regarding nociception in preterm infants. Although neonates were initially thought to have limited response to painful stimuli, it was demonstrated that the developmental immaturity of the central nervous system makes the neonate more likely to feel pain. It was further demonstrated that untreated pain can have long-lasting physiologic and neurodevelopmental consequences. These concerns have resulted in a significant emphasis on improving and optimizing the techniques of analgesia for neonates and infants. The following article will review techniques for pain assessment, prevention, and treatment in this population with a specific focus on acute pain related to medical and surgical conditions. PMID:25538531

  18. Postoperative pain management

    PubMed Central

    Kolettas, Alexandros; Lazaridis, George; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Karavergou, Anastasia; Pataka, Athanasia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Mpakas, Andreas; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Fassiadis, Nikolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative pain is a very important issue for several patients. Indifferent of the surgery type or method, pain management is very necessary. The relief from suffering leads to early mobilization, less hospital stay, reduced hospital costs, and increased patient satisfaction. An individual approach should be applied for pain control, rather than a fix dose or drugs. Additionally, medical, psychological, and physical condition, age, level of fear or anxiety, surgical procedure, personal preference, and response to agents given should be taken into account. The major goal in the management of postoperative pain is minimizing the dose of medications to lessen side effects while still providing adequate analgesia. Again a multidisciplinary team approach should be pursued planning and formulating a plan for pain relief, particularly in complicated patients, such as those who have medical comorbidities. These patients might appear increase for analgesia-related complications or side effects. PMID:25774311

  19. Postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Nett, Michael P

    2010-09-01

    Although the long-term results following traditional total joint arthroplasty are excellent, postoperative pain management has been suboptimal. Under-treatment of pain is a focus of growing concern to the orthopedic community. Poorly controlled postoperative pain leads to undesirable outcomes, including immobility, stiffness, myocardial ischemia, atelectasis, pneumonia, deep venous thrombosis, anxiety, depression, and chronic pain. Over the past decade, the attempt to minimize postoperative complications, combined with the move toward minimally invasive surgery and early postoperative mobilization, has made pain management a critical aspect of joint replacement surgery. Effective protocols are currently available; all include a multimodal approach. Debate continues regarding the ideal approach; however, reliance on narcotic analgesia alone is suboptimal. PMID:20839719

  20. Pain management in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Jacob, E

    2001-12-01

    The unpredictable, recurrent, intense, and frequently persistent nature of pain associated with sickle cell disease poses a difficult challenge in terms of management. A wide variability exists in the way painful episodes are managed. Variations in practice reflect different views about the suitability of opioids, the efficacy of parenteral administration, and the risk of dependence on opioids. Consequently, the acute and chronic pain associated with sickle cell disease often is undertreated or inappropriately managed. Although medical staff fear that patients might abuse pain medication and become psychologically dependent, patients are more concerned about the side effects associated with analgesics. Some patients may persuade staff to give them more analgesics, engage in clock-watching, and request specific medications or dosages; these patients often are perceived as manipulative or demanding. However, these patients are knowledgeable about their medications and doses that have worked in the past. Requests for specific medications and dosages should not be interpreted as indications of drug-seeking behavior, but clinicians should communicate with these patients, make accurate assessments, and provide adequate doses of opioid analgesics. The American Pain Society recognized that the undertreatment of pain and inappropriate management of pain in sickle cell disease seem to be common. A Clinical Practice Guideline was developed to provide evidence-based recommendations that could potentially improve pain management. The purpose of this report is to describe the pharmacologic strategies used to manage pain associated with sickle cell disease, examine issues and challenges related to pain management as well as concerns and fears related to addiction, and explain the administration of opioids as recommended by the American Pain Society. PMID:11748547

  1. Nonpharmacologic interventions for pain management.

    PubMed

    Doody, S B; Smith, C; Webb, J

    1991-03-01

    Managing pain is a complex and inexact science. Acute and chronic pain physically and psychologically affects and disables an overwhelming number of people. Nonpharmacologic interventions for pain management have been reviewed. These methods can be used independently or in combination with other nonpharmacologic or pharmacologic methods of pain control. The goals of nonpharmacologic interventions for pain management include the reduction of pain, minimal adverse effects, and allowing patients to become active participants in their own care. Nurses are called on many times to comfort patients in pain. It is through their expertise and intervention that the goals of pain management succeed. PMID:2043331

  2. Perioperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Pyati, Srinivas; Gan, Tong J

    2007-01-01

    The under-treatment of postoperative pain has been recognised to delay patient recovery and discharge from hospital. Despite recognition of the importance of effective pain control, up to 70% of patients still complain of moderate to severe pain postoperatively. The mechanistic approach to pain management, based on current understanding of the peripheral and central mechanisms involved in nociceptive transmission, provides newer options for clinicians to manage pain effectively. In this article we review the rationale for a multimodal approach with combinations of analgesics from different classes and different sites of analgesic administration. The pharmacological options of commonly used analgesics, such as opioids, NSAIDs, paracetamol, tramadol and other non-opioid analgesics, and their combinations is discussed. These analgesics have been shown to provide effective pain relief and their combinations demonstrate a reduction in opioid consumption. The basis for using non-opioid analgesic adjuvants is to reduce opioid consumption and consequently alleviate opioid-related adverse effects. We review the evidence on the opioid-sparing effect of ketamine, clonidine, gabapentin and other novel analgesics in perioperative pain management. Most available data support the addition of these adjuvants to routine analgesic techniques to reduce the need for opioids and improve quality of analgesia by their synergistic effect. Local anaesthetic infiltration, epidural and other regional techniques are also used successfully to enhance perioperative analgesia after a variety of surgical procedures. The use of continuous perineural techniques that offer prolonged analgesia with local anaesthetic infusion has been extended to the care of patients beyond hospital discharge. The use of nonpharmacological options such as acupuncture, relaxation, music therapy, hypnosis and transcutaneous nerve stimulation as adjuvants to conventional analgesia should be considered and incorporated to

  3. Pain management in photoepilation.

    PubMed

    Aimonetti, Jean-Marc; Ribot-Ciscar, Edith

    2016-06-01

    The hair follicle is a complex, hormonally active structure with permanent and cyclically renewed parts which are highly innervated by myelinated and unmyelinated afferent fibers. Hair removal, a very ancient practice, affects this sensory network and causes both acute and diffuse pain associated with inflammatory reaction. Optic permanent hair removal is becoming a popular alternative to traditional methods such as shaving, waxing, among other methods. These optical removal devices thermally destroy the target chromophore, that is, melanin, without damaging the surrounding skin. The increase in the skin surface temperature causes mild-to-severe pain, and optical hair removal has to be combined with pain relieving devices. Pain management relies on topical anesthetic agents, cooling devices, or non-noxious cutaneous stimulation whose mechanisms of action and efficiency are discussed in this article. PMID:26589969

  4. Hypnosis and pain management.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Suresh K; Kaur, Jasbir

    2006-06-01

    Nurses have used complementary therapies for many years to relieve anxiety, promote comfort, and reduce or alleviate pain. Physical therapies are most commonly used in our scenario but behavioral approach had been less customary, since familiarity of health personnel is very less (36%) with these techniques (Zaza et al, 1999). Hypnosis is empirically proved best therapy for pain management. Hypnosis is a process involving a hypnotist and a subject who agrees to be hypnotized. Being hypnotized is usually characterized by intense concentration, extreme relaxation and high suggestibility. This paper initially address hypnosis from an historical perspective to give the reader a decent background in which to view current trends in research in the field. Then will explain how hypnosis work followed by the empirical evidences and problems encountered in use of hypnosis when used for pain management. PMID:17058581

  5. Pain Management: Post-Amputation Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... common complaints heard by the staff of the Amputee Coalition, and how to manage the pain is ... one of the frequent topics of conversation at amputee support group meetings and on amputee discussion list ...

  6. Managing chronic pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Barrie, Janette; Loughlin, Diane

    2014-10-21

    The management of chronic pain is complex. Services and support for people living with chronic pain are variable despite the publication of a number of reports highlighting the problem. Due to the epidemiology of pain, nurses deliver care to patients with persistent pain in a variety of settings. It is important that nurses have the knowledge, skills and correct attitude to deliver compassionate, person-centred care, in line with best practice in chronic pain management. PMID:25315569

  7. Addiction Severity Index in a chronic pain sample receiving opioid therapy

    PubMed Central

    Saffier, Kenneth; Colombo, Cynthia; Brown, David; Mundt, Marlon P.; Fleming, Michael F.

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of chronic pain with opioids remains controversial. Physicians are concerned about addiction and drug diversion, and there is limited empirical information on using opioids with chronic pain patients. This report presents data collected on the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) in a sample of patients (n=908) receiving opioids from their primary care physicians. The ASI provides clinically important information about patients receiving opioid therapy. The ASI consists of seven subscales including medical, alcohol, drug, employment/support, legal, family/social, and psychiatric domains. Clinically relevant findings include a high ASI medical score (0.87), high psychiatric severity score (0.27), lifetime treatment of alcohol problems (reported by 22% of males), 5.6% prior delirium tremens, 10.1% prior treatment for drug problems, 12.1% prior drug overdose, 28% drunk driving citations; 40.3% of females had serious suicidal thoughts, and 23.8% suicide attempts. The ASI provides important information that can help primary care physicians manage chronic pain patients receiving opioid therapy. PMID:17376639

  8. Rules and Values: A Coordinated Regulatory and Educational Approach to the Public Health Crises of Chronic Pain and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Comerci, George D.; Landen, Michael; Loring, Larry; Jenkusky, Steven M.; Arora, Sanjeev; Kalishman, Summers; Marr, Lisa; Camarata, Chris; Duhigg, Daniel; Dillow, Jennifer; Koshkin, Eugene; Taylor, Denise E.; Geppert, Cynthia M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain and opioid addiction are 2 pressing public health problems, and prescribing clinicians often lack the skills necessary to manage these conditions. Our study sought to address the benefits of a coalition of an academic medical center pain faculty and government agencies in addressing the high unintentional overdose death rates in New Mexico. New Mexico’s 2012–2013 mandated chronic pain and addiction education programs studied more than 1000 clinicians. Positive changes were noted in precourse and postcourse surveys of knowledge, self-efficacy, and attitudes. Controlled substance dispensing data from the New Mexico Board of Pharmacy also demonstrated safer prescribing. The total morphine and Valium milligram equivalents dispensed have decreased continually since 2011. There was also a concomitant decline in total drug overdose deaths. PMID:24922121

  9. Pain Management: Part 1: Managing Acute and Postoperative Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Safe and effective management of acute dental pain can be accomplished with nonopioid and opioid analgesics. To formulate regimens properly, it is essential to appreciate basic pharmacological principles and appropriate dosage strategies for each of the available analgesic classes. This article will review the basic pharmacology of analgesic drug classes, including their relative efficacy for dental pain, and will suggest appropriate regimens based on pain intensity. Management of chronic pain will be addressed in the second part of this series. PMID:20553137

  10. [Latest pain management for painful bony metastases].

    PubMed

    Ikenaga, Masayuki

    2006-04-01

    Pain management for painful bony metastases is the most important problem for symptom relief of terminally-ill cancer patients. Pathological fractures often decrease the activity of daily life (ADL) of patients, and cause deterioration of the quality of life (QOL) and prognosis. Basically pharmacological therapies of the World Health Organization (WHO) method are essential for symptom relief from cancer pain. This article provides the latest pain managements (palliative irradiation, bisphosphonate, orthopedic surgery, percutaneous vertebroplasty and radiopharmaceutical therapy) of bony metastases, and mentions the indications and the problems of these interventions. In consideration to prognosis, the QOL and patient's needs, medical staffs have to perform multidisciplinary approach for providing suitable palliative care. PMID:16582515

  11. Pain assessment: the cornerstone to optimal pain management

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Pain assessment is critical to optimal pain management interventions. While pain is a highly subjective experience, its management necessitates objective standards of care. The WILDA approach to pain assessment—focusing on words to describe pain, intensity, location, duration, and aggravating or alleviating factors—offers a concise template for assessment in patients with acute and chronic pain. PMID:16389388

  12. The Downward Spiral of Chronic Pain, Prescription Opioid Misuse, and Addiction: Cognitive, Affective, and Neuropsychopharmacologic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Eric L.; Froeliger, Brett; Zeidan, Fadel; Partin, Kaitlyn; Howard, Matthew O.

    2013-01-01

    Prescription opioid misuse and addiction among chronic pain patients are emerging public health concerns of considerable significance. Estimates suggest that more than 10% of chronic pain patients misuse opioid analgesics, and the number of fatalities related to nonmedical or inappropriate use of prescription opioids is climbing. Because the prevalence and adverse consequences of this threat are increasing, there is a pressing need for research that identifies the biobehavioral risk chain linking chronic pain, opioid analgesia, and addictive behaviors. To that end, the current manuscript draws upon current neuropsychopharmacologic research to provide a conceptual framework of the downward spiral leading to prescription opioid misuse and addiction among chronic pain patients receiving opioid analgesic pharmacotherapy. Addictive use of opioids is described as the outcome of a cycle initiated by chronic pain and negative affect and reinforced by opioidergic-dopamingeric interactions, leading to attentional hypervigilance for pain and drug cues, dysfunctional connectivity between self-referential and cognitive control networks in the brain, and allostatic dysregulation of stress and reward circuitry. Implications for clinical practice are discussed; multimodal, mindfulness-oriented treatment is introduced as a potentially effective approach to disrupting the downward spiral and facilitating recovery from chronic pain and opioid addiction. PMID:23988582

  13. Ethnic differences in pain and pain management

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Claudia M; Edwards, Robert R

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Considerable evidence demonstrates substantial ethnic disparities in the prevalence, treatment, progression and outcomes of pain-related conditions. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying these group differences is of crucial importance in reducing and eliminating disparities in the pain experience. Over recent years, accumulating evidence has identified a variety of processes, from neurophysiological factors to structural elements of the healthcare system, that may contribute to shaping individual differences in pain. For example, the experience of pain differentially activates stress-related physiological responses across various ethnic groups, members of different ethnic groups appear to use differing coping strategies in managing pain complaints, providers’ treatment decisions vary as a function of patient ethnicity and pharmacies in predominantly minority neighborhoods are far less likely to stock potent analgesics. These diverse factors, and others may all play a role in facilitating elevated levels of pain-related suffering among individuals from ethnic minority backgrounds. Here, we present a brief, nonexhaustive review of the recent literature and potential physiological and sociocultural mechanisms underlying these ethnic group disparities in pain outcomes. PMID:23687518

  14. The Pain Management in Orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Nandita; Shetty, Siddarth; Ahmed, Junaid; Shenoy K., Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Pain and discomfort are the frequent side-effects of the orthodontic therapy with fixed appliances. The people who experience orthodontic pain are likely to self-medicate with nonprescription pain relievers before seeing the dentist. It is imperative for an orthodontist to address questions that might arise in a clinical setting from the viewpoint of the clinicians and the patients/parents. This article will provide an overview of the current management strategies which are employed for alleviating orthodontic pain. PMID:23905155

  15. Management of chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Richard L; Roberts, Timothy T; Papaliodis, Dean N; Mulligan, Michael T; Dubin, Andrew H

    2014-02-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain results from a complex interplay of mechanical, biochemical, psychological, and social factors. Effective management is markedly different from that of acute musculoskeletal pain. Understanding the physiology of pain transmission, modulation, and perception is crucial for effective management. Pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies such as psychotherapy and biofeedback exercises can be used to manage chronic pain. Evidence-based treatment recommendations have been made for chronic pain conditions frequently encountered by orthopaedic surgeons, including low back, osteoarthritic, posttraumatic, and neuropathic pain. Extended-release tramadol; select tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and anticonvulsants; and topical medications such as lidocaine, diclofenac, and capsaicin are among the most effective treatments. However, drug efficacy varies significantly by indication. Orthopaedic surgeons should be familiar with the widely available safe and effective nonnarcotic options for chronic musculoskeletal pain. PMID:24486756

  16. Pain Management Following Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... syrinx expands, it can result in pain along time to work out how to best manage your pain. An with an increased loss of sensory and motor function. effective pain management program depends on the type of pain you ...

  17. TelePain: A Community of Practice for Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Meins, Alexa R.; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.; Eaton, Linda; Gordon, Debra; Theodore, Brian; Tauben, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Comprehensive pain management services are primarily located in urban areas, limiting specialist consultation opportunities for community healthcare providers. A community of practice (CoP) for pain management could create opportunities for consultation by establishing professional relationships between community healthcare providers and pain management specialists. A CoP is a group of people with a common concern, set of problems, or a passion for something they do. Members of a CoP for pain management increase their knowledge of evidence-based pain management strategies in a way that is meaningful and relevant. In this article, we provide evidence that TelePain, an interdisciplinary, case-based pain management teleconference consultation program through the University of Washington, qualifies as a CoP and present preliminary evidence of TelePain's effectiveness as a CoP for pain management. Methods Specific behaviors and conversations gathered through participant observation during TelePain sessions were analyzed based on the 14 indicators Wegner developed to evaluate the presence of a CoP. To demonstrate preliminary effectiveness of TelePain as a CoP for pain management, descriptive statistics were used to summarize TelePain evaluation forms. Results TelePain is an example of a successful CoP for pain management as demonstrated by the presence of Wegner's 14 indicators. Additionally, evaluation forms showed that TelePain enhanced community healthcare providers' knowledge of pain management strategies and that continued participation in TelePain lead to community healthcare providers' increased confidence in their ability to provide pain management. Conclusion TelePain, a CoP for pain management, facilitates multidisciplinary collaboration and allows members to develop interdisciplinary care plans for complex pain patients through case study discussions. Evidence-based pain management strategies gained through CoP membership could be disseminated to

  18. Nonpharmacologic pain management in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J A; Repp, E C

    1984-12-01

    This article has presented the critical elements of arthritic pain, the role of nonpharmacologic pain management, and a selection of techniques for therapeutic pain management. The author believes that these techniques are particularly suited to nursing intervention. Nursing is concerned with the total person and nonpharmacological techniques involve the total person in developing self-help coping strategies. The nurse interested in pursuing nonpharmacologic pain management techniques will find the outline, with explanation of "Skill Training: Summary of Training for Role Playing" to be particularly helpful. Further reading will enable the nurse to become familiar with and to pursue interventions of particular interest. PMID:6393064

  19. Pediatric pain management.

    PubMed

    Lederhaas, G

    1997-01-01

    It is now recognized that from the newborn period onwards, children are capable of experiencing pain. This includes the premature infant. The challenge for healthcare providers is to incorporate methods of pain assessment and treatment into their daily practices. The child's understanding of pain closely follows the cognitive and behavioral model developed by Jean Piaget. Based on these developmental stages, pain assessment measures have been developed. Pharmacologic advances have accompanied this improved understanding of infant, child, and adolescent psychology. While acute pain accounts for the majority of children's experiences, recurrent/chronic pain states do occur (e.g. sickle cell related and neuropathic) and can be effectively treated. PMID:9037997

  20. Peripartum pain management in opioid dependent women

    PubMed Central

    Höflich, Anna S.; Langer, Martin; Jagsch, Reinhold; Bäwert, Andjela; Winklbaur, Bernadette; Fischer, Gabriele; Unger, Annemarie

    2011-01-01

    Increased pain sensitivity and the development of opioid tolerance complicate the treatment of pain experienced by opioid maintained pregnant women during delivery and the perinatal period. The aim of the present study was to investigate differences in pain management of opioid maintained compared to non-dependent pregnant women during delivery and the postpartum period. 40 deliveries of 37 opioid dependent women enrolled in a double-blind, double-dummy randomized controlled trial (RCT) examining the safety and efficacy of methadone (mean dose at the time of delivery = 63.89 mg) and buprenorphine (mean dose at the time of delivery = 14.05 mg) during pregnancy were analyzed and participants were matched to a non-dependent comparison group of 80 pregnant women. Differences in pain management (opioid and non-opioid analgesic medication) during delivery and perinatal period were analyzed. Following cesarean delivery opioid maintained women received significantly less opioid analgesics (day of delivery p = 0.038; day 1: p = 0.02), NSAIDs were administered more frequently to opioid dependent patients than to the comparison group during cesarean section and on the third day postpartum. Significantly higher nicotine consumption in the group of opioid dependent women had a strong influence on the retrieved results, and might be considered as an independent factor of altered pain experience. Differences in pain treatment became evident when comparing opioid maintained women to healthy controls. These differences might be based on psychosocial consequences of opioid addiction along with the lack of an interdisciplinary consensus on pain treatment protocols for opioid dependent patients. PMID:22396085

  1. The pain management approach to chronic pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Rapkin, A J; Kames, L D

    1987-05-01

    Chronic pelvic pain remains a difficult management problem that is often refractory to traditional medical or surgical therapy. The pain management center approach used successfully for the treatment of cancer pain and headache can be adapted to the treatment of chronic pelvic pain. The results of this pilot study suggest that the multidisciplinary techniques of pain management promise to be an effective modality for the treatment of chronic pelvic pain. PMID:2439689

  2. Molecular Genetic Testing in Pain and Addiction: Facts, Fiction and Clinical Utility

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kenneth; Hauser, Mary; Fratantonio, James; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D.

    2015-01-01

    The Brain Reward Cascade (BRC) is an interaction of neurotransmitters and their respective genes to control the amount of dopamine released within the brain. Any variations within this pathway, whether genetic or environmental (epigenetic), may result in addictive behaviors as well as altered pain tolerance. While there are many studies claiming a genetic association with addiction and other behavioral infractions, defined as Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS), not all are scientifically accurate and in some case just wrong. Albeit our bias, we discuss herein the facts and fictions behind molecular genetic testing in RDS (including pain and addiction) and the significance behind the development of the Genetic Addiction Risk Score (GARSPREDX™), the first test to accurately predict one's genetic risk for RDS. PMID:26807291

  3. Managing pain during labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... is good to prepare yourself for natural childbirth. Natural Childbirth The pain felt during childbirth is different for every woman. Some women choose natural childbirth, or giving birth without medicine for pain. ...

  4. Addictive behaviors related to opioid use for chronic pain: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Højsted, Jette; Ekholm, Ola; Kurita, Geana Paula; Juel, Knud; Sjøgren, Per

    2013-12-01

    The growing body of research showing increased opioid use in patients with chronic pain coupled with concerns regarding addiction encouraged the development of this population-based study. The goal of the study was to investigate the co-occurrence of indicators of addictive behaviors in patients with chronic non-cancer pain in long-term opioid treatment. The study combined data from the individual-based Danish Health Survey in 2010 and the official Danish health and socio-economic, individual-based registers. From a simple random sample of 25,000 adults (16 years or older) living in Denmark, 13,281 individuals were analyzed through multiple logistic regression analyses to assess the association between chronic pain (lasting ≥6 months), opioid use, health behavior, and body mass index. Six potential addictive behaviors were identified: daily smoking; high alcohol intake; illicit drug use in the past year; obesity; long-term use of benzodiazepines; and long-term use of benzodiazepine-related drugs. At least 2 of the 6 addictive behaviors were observed in 22.6% of the long-term opioid users with chronic pain compared with 11.5% of the non-opioid users with chronic pain and 8.9% of the individuals without chronic pain. Thus, a strong association was demonstrated between long-term opioid use and the clustering of addictive behaviors. An intricate relationship between chronic pain, opioid use, and addictive behaviors was observed in this study, which deserves both clinical attention and further research. PMID:23906554

  5. A Clinical Trial Comparing Tapering Doses of Buprenorphine with Steady Doses for Chronic Pain and Co-existent Opioid Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Blondell, Richard D.; Ashrafioun, Lisham; Dambra, Christina M.; Foschio, Elisa M.; Zielinski, Amy L.; Salcedo, Daniel M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Effective strategies are needed to manage individuals with chronic non-cancer pain and coexistent opioid addiction. This study compared opioid discontinuation and opioid replacement protocols. Methods We planned to enroll 60 individuals into an open-label trial who had been treated with opioids for chronic non-cancer pain, and who also had opioid addiction. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two 6-month treatment protocols of buprenorphine/naloxone sublingual tablets: 1) tapering doses for opioid weaning or “detoxification” (active comparator group) or 2) steady doses for opioid replacement (experimental group). They were followed monthly for the study outcomes: completion of the 6-month treatment protocol and self-reported pain control, physical functioning, alcohol consumption and illicit drug use. Results Enrollment was terminated after enrolling 12 participants because none of the 6 assigned to receive tapering doses could successfully complete the protocol (5 were given steady doses and 1 was admitted to an inpatient chemical dependency treatment program); whereas, of the 6 assigned to receive steady doses, 5 completed the protocol (1 withdrew). This difference between the 2 treatment conditions was significant (P = 0.015). Of the 10 participants who completed the 6 month follow-up, 8 reported improved pain control and physical functioning and 5 used alcohol and/or illicit drugs. Conclusions We conclude that over 6 months, these participants with chronic pain and co-existent opioid addiction were more likely to adhere to an opioid replacement protocol than an opioid weaning protocol and that opioid replacement therapy with steady doses of buprenorphine/naloxone is associated with improved pain control and physical functioning. PMID:20959867

  6. Pain Management Part II: Pharmacologic Management of Chronic Orofacial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ganzberg, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The pharmacologic management of chronic orofacial pain involves the use of medications not used routinely in dental practice. Additionally, many drugs are used for long periods of time necessitating careful monitoring for adverse effects and potential drug interactions. This article will review commonly used medications for chronic orofacial pain and highlight important areas of concern. PMID:20843228

  7. The affective dimension of pain as a risk factor for drug and alcohol addiction.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Dana M; McGinn, M Adrienne; Itoga, Christy A; Edwards, Scott

    2015-12-01

    Addiction, or substance use disorder (SUD), is a devastating psychiatric disease composed of multiple elemental features. As a biobehavioral disorder, escalation of drug and/or alcohol intake is both a cause and consequence of molecular neuroadaptations in central brain reinforcement circuitry. Multiple mesolimbic areas mediate a host of negative affective and motivational symptoms that appear to be central to the addiction process. Brain stress- and reinforcement-related regions such as the central amygdala (CeA), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and nucleus accumbens (NAc) also serve as central processors of ascending nociceptive input. We hypothesize that a sensitization of brain mechanisms underlying the processing of persistent and maladaptive pain contributes to a composite negative affective state to drive the enduring, relapsing nature of addiction, particularly in the case of alcohol and opioid use disorder. At the neurochemical level, pain activates central stress-related neuropeptide signaling, including the dynorphin and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) systems, and by this process may facilitate negative affect and escalated drug and alcohol use over time. Importantly, the widespread prevalence of unresolved pain and associated affective dysregulation in clinical populations highlights the need for more effective analgesic medications with reduced potential for tolerance and dependence. The burgeoning epidemic of prescription opioid abuse also demands a closer investigation into the neurobiological mechanisms of how pain treatment could potentially represent a significant risk factor for addiction in vulnerable populations. Finally, the continuing convergence of sensory and affective neuroscience fields is expected to generate insight into the critical balance between pain relief and addiction liability, as well as provide more effective therapeutic strategies for chronic pain and addiction. PMID:26008713

  8. [Physiological Basis of Pain Mechanisms for Pain Management].

    PubMed

    Kawamata, Mikito

    2016-05-01

    Physician anesthesiologists should ensure a future leadership position in perioperative medicine and pain medicine. In order to establish the missions, anesthesiologists need to know how to relieve pain in surgical patients, critically ill patients and patients with cancer and non-cancer chronic pain. Thus, anesthesiologists should realize physiology of pain representation from pain management I will review physiological basis of pain mechanisms in this manuscript which includes 1) evolutional aspect of pain perception, 2) transduction of noxious stimuli, 3) the types of nociceptors and conduction of noxious stimuli, 4) the ascending pathway of pain and central modulation of pain, 5) the descending inhibitory pain system, and 6) various types of pain. Finally, anesthesiologists should manage pain from physiological basis of pain mechanisms. PMID:27319092

  9. Clinical management of radicular pain.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2015-06-01

    This review provides an overview of the diagnosis and treatment strategies for the management of radicular pain. While it is not as common as axial spinal pain, radicular pain combines the advantage of leveraging appropriate diagnostic strategies and definitive treatments with well-informed outcome measures. Multiple diagnostic measures include not only history and physical examination, but also imaging. The treatment modalities include pharmacologic management, physical and rehabilitation measures, interventional techniques and surgical treatments. Here, the authors describe the prevalence and pathophysiology of radicular pain, risk factors, diagnostic strategies, treatment modalities and the evidence for these management strategies. Finally, the authors show the efficacy of conservative management, despite surgical management being the gold standard. PMID:25982996

  10. Ethical issues in the management of chronic nonmalignant pain.

    PubMed

    Pappagallo, M; Heinberg, L J

    1997-01-01

    Chronic pain represents a challenge to patients, families, employers, and the physicians who care for these individuals. Opioids remain the mainstay of the analgesic medications for the treatment of both acute and chronic pain. Controlled release preparations of morphine, oxycodone, fentanyl and long acting opioid agents such as methadone and levorphanol have been medically and ethically accepted in managing chronic cancer pain. However, the continued use of these medications for patients with chronic noncancer pain has been fiercely debated. This article attempts to reconcile the medical and ethical dilemma of using opioid medications for chronic noncancer pain. Growing clinical experience in the field of pain medicine has helped to clarify: (1) the misunderstanding of addiction, physical dependence and analgesic tolerance, (2) the misconception that chronic opioid therapy inevitably causes personality changes, depression, and impairment of cognitive and physical function, (3) the lack of information on the correct use of opioid analgesics with regard to titration and management of related side effects. The behavioral management of pain patients undergoing chronic opioid therapy is also discussed. A protocol for optimal patient management is proposed. Particular emphasis is given to the consent form, behavioral contracting, and the consequences of noncompliance. The importance of psychologic evaluation before a long-term opioid trial, to minimize future complications, is stressed. Although most patients on the opioid regimen do well, special attention must be given to patients with current addiction, a past history of addiction, or current misuse of opioid medications. Pharmacologic and conservative interventions are often warranted in those patients with significant behavioral problems. If such strategies fail, and chronic opioid therapy is deemed necessary, some treatment guidelines are offered. PMID:9311061

  11. [Pain management and music therapy].

    PubMed

    Hoareau, Sophie Gwenaelle; De Diego, Emmanuelle; Guétin, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The benefit of music in the treatment of pain is now recognised. The U sequence is a music therapy technique specifically developed for this purpose. It improves the overall management of pain and facilitates patient support. Its standardised use by caregivers has been made possible thanks to the development of a digital application. PMID:26743370

  12. Cryoanalgesia in interventional pain management.

    PubMed

    Trescot, Andrea M

    2003-07-01

    Cryoneuroablation, also known as cryoanalgesia or cryoneurolysis, is a specialized technique for providing long-term pain relief in interventional pain management settings. Modern cryoanalgesia traces its roots to Cooper et al who developed in 1961, a device that used liquid nitrogen in a hollow tube that was insulated at the tip and achieved a temperature of - 190 degrees C. Lloyd et al proposed that cryoanalgesia was superior to other methods of peripheral nerve destruction, including alcohol neurolysis, phenol neurolysis, or surgical lesions. The application of cold to tissues creates a conduction block, similar to the effect of local anesthetics. Long-term pain relief from nerve freezing occurs because ice crystals create vascular damage to the vasonervorum, which produces severe endoneural edema. Cryoanalgesia disrupts the nerve structure and creates wallerian degeneration, but leaves the myelin sheath and endoneurium intact. Clinical applications of cryoanalgesia extend from its use in craniofacial pain secondary to trigeminal neuralgia, posterior auricular neuralgia, and glossopharyngeal neuralgia; chest wall pain with multiple conditions including post-thoracotomy neuromas, persistent pain after rib fractures, and post herpetic neuralgia in thoracic distribution; abdominal and pelvic pain secondary to ilioinguinal, iliohypogastric, genitofemoral, subgastric neuralgia; pudendal neuralgia; low back pain and lower extremity pain secondary to lumbar facet joint pathology, pseudosciatica, pain involving intraspinous ligament or supragluteal nerve, sacroiliac joint pain, cluneal neuralgia, obturator neuritis, and various types of peripheral neuropathy; and upper extremity pain secondary to suprascapular neuritis and other conditions of peripheral neuritis. This review describes historical concepts, physics and equipment, various clinical aspects, along with technical features, indications and contraindications, with clinical description of multiple conditions

  13. Spirituality and Religion in Pain and Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Dedeli, Ozden; Kaptan, Gulten

    2013-01-01

    Pain relief is a management problem for many patients, their families, and the medical professionals caring for them. Although everyone experiences pain to some degree, responses to it vary from one person to another. Recognizing and specifying someone else’s pain is clinically a well know challenge. Research on the biology and neurobiology of pain has given us a relationship between spirituality and pain. There is growing recognition that persistent pain is a complex and multidimensional experience stemming from the interrelations among biological, psychological, social, and spiritual factors. Patients with pain use a number of cognitive and behavioral strategies to cope with their pain, including religious/spiritual factors, such as prayers, and seeking spiritual support to manage their pain. This article provides an overview of the complex phenomenon of pain, with a focus on spiritual and religious issues in pain management. PMID:26973914

  14. EAU guidelines on pain management.

    PubMed

    Francesca, Francesco; Bader, Pia; Echtle, Dieter; Giunta, Francesco; Williams, John

    2003-10-01

    Pain is the most common symptom of any illness; the physician's therapeutic task is twofold: to discover and treat the cause of pain and the pain itself, whether or not the underlying cause is treatable, to provide relief and reduce the suffering caused by pain. Although we use the term of pain to define all sensations that hurt or are unpleasant, actually two quite different kinds of pain exist. The first (nociceptive) is associated with tissue damage or inflammation, the second (neuropathic) results from a lesion to the peripheral or central nervous systems. Pain can also be divided in acute and chronic. Caregivers are to face pain in two main settings: after surgery and in cancer patients. These tasks require a multidisciplinary team, able to properly assess and treat pain. Postoperative pain is to be treated early and aggressively. Several drug options are available, to be tailored on the surgical procedure and the patient. Pain in cancer patients consists of different aspects: it can be caused by the cancer itself or may be secondary to muscular spasm or cancer treatments. The management involves mainly pharmacotherapy, but also primary treatments as surgery, radiochemotherapy or even antibiotics can provide an adequate relief. Analgesics are to be employed according to an ascending scale, but other options can be combined to improve the outcome when a satisfactory balance between relief and side effects is not achieved; they include invasive techniques, physical and psychological therapy. The mainstay of pain management entails a interdisciplinary cooperation; it requires a full knowledge of the methods of evaluation and treatment of this condition. PMID:14499670

  15. Managing pain during labor

    MedlinePlus

    A systemic analgesic is a pain medicine that is injected into your vein or muscle. This medicine acts on your entire ... away, but it will be dulled. With systemic analgesics, some women have an easier labor and feel ...

  16. Treatments for Managing Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle massage. Electrical stimulation - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is the most common form of electrical stimulation ... painful and does not require needles or medicine. TENS consists of a small, battery-operated device that ...

  17. Pain Management Programs

    MedlinePlus

    ... the pain, but it takes a holistic approach meaning who you are and how you feel is as much a part of shaping your treatment as your physical self. The Team is made up of: "Patient" (person with ... members may ...

  18. Safe management of chronic pain in pregnancy in an era of opioid misuse and abuse.

    PubMed

    Pritham, Ursula A; McKay, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Safe and effective management of chronic pain in pregnancy is challenging. Use of over-the-counter analgesics, opioids, opioid substitution therapies, complementary and alternative therapies, antidepressants, and anxiolytics each have benefits and risks for the mother and neonate that must be considered. Because of their potency, opioids are often used despite associated risks for adverse effects, abuse, diversion, and addiction. Development of a pain management protocol for the counsel and care of pregnant women with pain is necessary. PMID:25123962

  19. Screening for addiction in patients with chronic pain and "problematic" substance use: evaluation of a pilot assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Compton, P; Darakjian, J; Miotto, K

    1998-12-01

    Assessing for the presence of addiction in the chronic pain patient receiving chronic opioid analgesia is a challenging clinical task. This paper presents a recently developed screening tool for addictive disease in chronic pain patients, and pilot efficacy data describing its ability to do so. In a small sample of patients (n = 52) referred from a multidisciplinary pain center for "problematic" medication use, responses to the screening questionnaire were compared between patients who met combined diagnostic criteria for a substance use disorder and those who did not, as assessed by a trained addiction medicine specialist. Responses of addicted patients significantly differed from those of nonaddicted patients on multiple screening items, with the two groups easily differentiated by total questionnaire score. Further, three key screening indicators were identified as excellent predictors for the presence of addictive disease in this sample of chronic pain patients. PMID:9879160

  20. [Addiction].

    PubMed

    Besson, J; Grivel, J; Tomei, A; Gothuey, I; Andronicos, M; Babel, H; Nunweiler, S

    2013-01-01

    What's new in addiction medicine in 2012? The news are presented according three axes: first, in the field of neuroscience, the process of extinction of addiction memories. Then in the clinical field, a reflexion is reported on how to treat addiction in psychiatric hospitals. At last, in the area of teaching, an e-learning development with a virtual patient shows a great interest in addiction psychiatry. PMID:23367696

  1. Acute pain management in children

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Susan T; Hannallah, Raafat S

    2010-01-01

    The greatest advance in pediatric pain medicine is the recognition that untreated pain is a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality after surgical trauma. Accurate assessment of pain in different age groups and the effective treatment of postoperative pain is constantly being refined; with newer drugs being used alone or in combination with other drugs continues to be explored. Several advances in developmental neurobiology and pharmacology, knowledge of new analgesics and newer applications of old analgesics in the last two decades have helped the pediatric anesthesiologist in managing pain in children more efficiently. The latter include administering opioids via the skin and nasal mucosa and their addition into the neuraxial local anesthetics. Systemic opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and regional analgesics alone or combined with additives are currently used to provide effective postoperative analgesia. These modalities are best utilized when combined as a multimodal approach to treat acute pain in the perioperative setting. The development of receptor specific drugs that can produce pain relief without the untoward side effects of respiratory depression will hasten the recovery and discharge of children after surgery. This review focuses on the overview of acute pain management in children, with an emphasis on pharmacological and regional anesthesia in achieving this goal. PMID:21197314

  2. Long-Term High-dose Oral Morphine in Phantom Limb Pain with No Addiction Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Garg, Rakesh; Bharati, Sachidanand Jee; Gupta, Nishkarsh; Bhatanagar, Sushma; Mishra, Seema; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic phantom limb pain (PLP) is a type of neuropathic pain, which is located in the missing/amputated limb. Phantom pain is difficult to treat as the exact basis of pain mechanism is still unknown. Various methods of treatment for PLP have been described, including pharmacological (NSAIDs, opioids, antiepileptic, antidepressants) and non-pharmacological (TENS, sympathectomy, deep brain stimulation and motor cortex stimulation). Opioids are used for the treatment of neuropathic pain and dose of opioid is determined based on its effect and thus there is no defined ceiling dose for opioids. We report a case where a patient receiving high-dose oral morphine for chronic cancer pain did not demonstrate signs of addiction. PMID:25709194

  3. Long-Term High-dose Oral Morphine in Phantom Limb Pain with No Addiction Risk.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Garg, Rakesh; Bharati, Sachidanand Jee; Gupta, Nishkarsh; Bhatanagar, Sushma; Mishra, Seema; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh

    2015-01-01

    Chronic phantom limb pain (PLP) is a type of neuropathic pain, which is located in the missing/amputated limb. Phantom pain is difficult to treat as the exact basis of pain mechanism is still unknown. Various methods of treatment for PLP have been described, including pharmacological (NSAIDs, opioids, antiepileptic, antidepressants) and non-pharmacological (TENS, sympathectomy, deep brain stimulation and motor cortex stimulation). Opioids are used for the treatment of neuropathic pain and dose of opioid is determined based on its effect and thus there is no defined ceiling dose for opioids. We report a case where a patient receiving high-dose oral morphine for chronic cancer pain did not demonstrate signs of addiction. PMID:25709194

  4. Neurophysiological mechanisms in acceptance and commitment therapy in opioid-addicted patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Rachel F; Potter, Jennifer S; Robin, Donald A

    2016-04-30

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) has been effectively utilized to treat both chronic pain and substance use disorder independently. Given these results and the vital need to treat the comorbidity of the two disorders, a pilot ACT treatment was implemented in individuals with comorbid chronic pain and opioid addiction. This pilot study supported using neurophysiology to characterize treatment effects and revealed that, following ACT, participants with this comorbidity exhibited reductions in brain activation due to painful stimulus and in connectivity at rest. PMID:27107155

  5. Orofacial pain management: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Uyanik, James M

    2014-01-01

    Some of the most prevalent and debilitating pain conditions arise from the structures innervated by the trigeminal system (head, face, masticatory musculature, temporomandibular joint and associated structures). Orofacial pain (OFP) can arise from different regions and etiologies. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the most prevalent orofacial pain conditions for which patients seek treatment. Temporomandibular disorders include a number of clinical problems that involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or both. Trigeminal neuropathic pain conditions can arise from injury secondary to dental procedures, infection, neoplasias, or disease or dysfunction of the peripheral and/or central nervous system. Neurovascular disorders, such as primary headaches, can present as chronic orofacial pain, such as in the case of facial migraine, where the pain is localized in the second and third division of the trigeminal nerve. Together, these disorders of the trigeminal system impact the quality of life of the sufferer dramatically. A multidisciplinary pain management approach should be considered for the optimal treatment of orofacial pain disorders including both non-pharmacological and pharmacological modalities. PMID:24591846

  6. Orofacial pain management: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Uyanik, James M

    2014-01-01

    Some of the most prevalent and debilitating pain conditions arise from the structures innervated by the trigeminal system (head, face, masticatory musculature, temporomandibular joint and associated structures). Orofacial pain (OFP) can arise from different regions and etiologies. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the most prevalent orofacial pain conditions for which patients seek treatment. Temporomandibular disorders include a number of clinical problems that involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or both. Trigeminal neuropathic pain conditions can arise from injury secondary to dental procedures, infection, neoplasias, or disease or dysfunction of the peripheral and/or central nervous system. Neurovascular disorders, such as primary headaches, can present as chronic orofacial pain, such as in the case of facial migraine, where the pain is localized in the second and third division of the trigeminal nerve. Together, these disorders of the trigeminal system impact the quality of life of the sufferer dramatically. A multidisciplinary pain management approach should be considered for the optimal treatment of orofacial pain disorders including both non-pharmacological and pharmacological modalities. PMID:24591846

  7. [Chronic pain management: societal impact].

    PubMed

    Serrie, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a real issue of public health, quality and evolution of a system of health test: this is a major social problem. Pain management meets a humanistic, ethical purpose and dignity of man because of the physical and psychological implications. It induces a disability which excludes the patient of society gradually or suddenly. The physical pain and mental suffering to all ages of life make more vulnerable people weakened by disease. Rebel chronic pain are sources of disability, disabilities, disability and major alterations in the quality of life. All of these data shows the impact of pain and its intensity on the professional conditions, on professional activity and productivity, on the use of care systems (very significant increase in medical consultations, hospitalizations), as well as on the mental and physical health. These results confirmed analyses which consider that the unrelieved pain has a major economic impact on care systems and constitutes a public health problem with around two thirds of persons professionally impacted by pain. The progress of medicine has helped the healing of certain serious diseases, but also favoured acute diseases to turn to chronic diseases. The result is an increase in of lifetime sometimes without disease, but this survival may be also accompanied by disease or disability. Progress, pain and suffering, the end of life, ethics will be the core of the basic thoughts of tomorrow. PMID:27509674

  8. Managing chronic pain in family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Librach, S. L.

    1993-01-01

    Pain is common in family practice. In dealing with chronic pain, both the family physician and the patient often have problems in defining and in understanding the origin of chronic pain and in providing effective pain relief. This article explores a practical, holistic approach to understanding and managing chronic pain. PMID:8471902

  9. Management of chronic pain with chronic opioid therapy in patients with substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Ping; Compton, Peggy

    2013-01-01

    Substance use disorders (SUDs), whether active or in remission, are often encountered in patients with chronic nonmalignant pain. Clinicians are challenged when managing chronic pain while facing substance abuse issues during the course of chronic opioid therapy (COT). Further, the interrelated behavioral symptomatology of addiction and chronic pain suggests that if one disorder is untreated, effective treatment of the other in not possible. Incomplete understanding of the overlapping presentations of the two disorders, coupled with insufficient management of both conditions, leads to undertreated pain and premature discharge of SUD patients from pain treatment. In order to achieve pain relief and optimal functionality, both conditions need to be carefully managed. This paper reviews the prevalence of SUDs in chronic pain patents; the overlapping presentation of the two disorders; risk factors and stratification for addiction; identification of addiction in the chronic pain population; and suggestions for treating patients with COT, with an emphasis on relapse prevention. With appropriate assessment and treatment, COT for chronic pain patients with a history of SUD can be successful, leading to improved functionality and quality of life. PMID:24341916

  10. Improving the management of postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Layzell, Mandy

    Despite developments in knowledge of pain control, many patients still experience unnecessary postoperative pain. This article reports on an audit of postoperative pain and its management in one trust. The results led to the development of a new system using standard prescriptions to empower nurses to manage patients' pain. PMID:16010842

  11. Pain and the ethics of pain management.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R B

    1984-01-01

    In this article I clarify the concepts of 'pain', 'suffering', 'pains of body', 'pains of soul'. I explore the relevance of an ethic to the clinical setting which gives patients a strong prima facie right to freedom from unnecessary and unwanted pain and which places upon medical professionals two concomitant moral obligations to patients. First, there is the duty not to inflict pain and suffering beyond what is necessary for effective diagnosis, treatment and research. Next, there is the duty to do all that can be done to relieve all the pain and suffering which can be alleviated. I develop in some detail that individuality of pain sensitivity must be taken into account in fulfilling these obligations. I explore the issue of the relevance of informed consent and the right to refuse treatment to the matter of pain relief. And I raise the question of what conditions, if any, should override the right to refuse treatment where pain relief is of paramount concern. PMID:6710192

  12. Addiction.

    PubMed

    Naim-Feil, Jodie; Zangen, Abraham

    2013-01-01

    Drug and alcohol addiction is a debilitating disorder characterized by persistent drug-seeking behaviors despite negative physiological, medical, or social consequences. Neurobiological models of addiction propose that the reinforcing effects of addictive drugs are associated with altered neurotransmission within the reward 'mesocorticolimbic' circuitry in the brain. Immense efforts are therefore designed to target the mesocorticolimbic circuitry in attenuating drug dependence and addiction-related behaviors. Yet, to date, most addiction treatments have demonstrated only limited success in reducing addiction-related behaviors. Accumulating and compelling evidence suggests that novel nonsurgical brain stimulation techniques, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation, could serve as promising tools for indexing altered neurotransmission associated with repetitive drug use, and moreover, may hold therapeutic potential for the treatment of drug dependence and addiction-related behaviors. This chapter reviews and discusses the current and potential applications of such techniques in the study and treatment of addiction; we focus on a number of common drugs of abuse, including nicotine, alcohol, cocaine, cannabis, and ecstasy. PMID:24112928

  13. Managing addiction in advanced cancer patients: why bother?

    PubMed

    Passik, S D; Theobald, D E

    2000-03-01

    The management of addiction in patients with advanced cancer can be time-consuming, labor-intensive, and difficult. Some clinicians believe that it is not worth the effort, due in part to a failure to appreciate the deleterious impact of addiction on palliative care efforts and a view of addiction as intractable in any case. Indeed, it is possible that some clinicians perceive addiction not only fatalistically but, because of common misconceptions, believe that managing or attempting to decrease the patient's use of alcohol or illicit substances would be tantamount to depriving a dying patient of a source of pleasure. In this paper, we argue that managing addiction is an essential aspect of palliative care for chemically-dependent and alcoholic patients. The goal of such efforts is not complete abstinence, but exerting enough control over illicit drug and alcohol use to allow palliative care interventions to decrease suffering. To illustrate this view, we describe two patients with chemical-dependency. We highlight the impact of unchecked substance abuse on patients' perpetuation of their own suffering, the complication of symptom management, the diagnosis and treatment of mood/anxiety disorders, and the effect on the patients' family and caregivers. PMID:10760628

  14. Smartphone applications for pain management.

    PubMed

    Rosser, Benjamin A; Eccleston, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Smartphone applications (or apps) are becoming increasingly popular. The lack of regulation or guidance for health-related apps means that the validity and reliability of their content is unknown. We have conducted a review of available apps relating to the generic condition of pain. The official application stores for five major smartphone platforms were searched: iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Nokia/Symbian and Windows Mobile. Apps were included if they reported a focus on pain education, management or relief, and were not solely aimed at health-care professionals (HCPs). A total of 111 apps met the inclusion criteria. The majority of apps reviewed claimed some information provision or electronic manual component. Diary tracking of pain variables was also a common feature. There was a low level of stated HCP involvement in app development and content. Despite an increasing number of apps being released, the frequency of HCP involvement is not increasing. Pain apps appear to be able to promise pain relief without any concern for the effectiveness of the product, or for possible adverse effects of product use. In a population often desperate for a solution to distressing and debilitating pain conditions, there is considerable risk of individuals being misled. PMID:21844177

  15. Nurses' attitudes towards management of pain.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, G; McLauchlan, A

    This research was carried out to discover nurses' attitudes towards and perceptions of post-operative pain management; knowledge of pain assessment; awareness of different methods of pain relief; and view of the necessity for education in post-operative pain management. The major findings of the research correlated with the authors' observations while undertaking audit. That is, that there is a need for conformity of pain assessment and pain scoring. It also showed a need for a focused education programme in postoperative pain management. PMID:7984461

  16. Perioperative management in children with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Meredith R; Golianu, Brenda

    2016-08-01

    Children with chronic pain often undergo surgery and effective perioperative management of their pain can be challenging. Identification of the pediatric chronic pain patient preoperatively and development of a perioperative pain plan may help ensure a safer and more comfortable perioperative course. Successful management usually requires multiple different classes of analgesics, regional anesthesia, and adjunctive nonpharmacological therapies. Neuropathic and oncological pain can be especially difficult to treat and usually requires an individualized approach. PMID:27370517

  17. Managing your chronic back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  18. The influence of addiction risk on nursing students’ expectations of patients’ pain reports: A clinical vignette approach

    PubMed Central

    Miceli, Paula C; Katz, Joel

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the influence of addiction risk (substance abuse history [SAH]) and pain relief (PR) on nursing and non-nursing students’ perceptions of pain in a postoperative vignette patient. METHODS: Using a 2×2 design, the independent variables SAH (present/+, absent/–) and PR (adequate, little) were varied systematically to produce four vignettes. Participants were randomly assigned to receive one of the four vignettes that described a 45-year-old man after a total hip replacement. Participants rated the vignette patient’s experienced and reported pain intensity (PI) on a 0 mm to 100 mm visual analogue scale and addiction risk on a 0 mm to 100 mm visual analogue scale. A pain congruence (PC) score was calculated (PC = reported PI – experienced PI), and was interpreted as congruent (±2 mm) or incongruent (+2 mm to +100 mm for expected pain over-reporting; −2 mm to −100 mm for expected pain under-reporting). RESULTS: Responses from undergraduate nursing (n=89) and non-nursing (n=88) students were analyzed. The estimated addiction risk was significantly lower in nursing (14% to 45%) versus non-nursing students (50%). Nursing students’ mean PC scores were not significantly altered by SAH alone. Expectations of pain over-reporting were observed under conditions of SAH+/adequate PR, but not SAH+/little PR. In non-nursing students, SAH and PR were significant and independent factors influencing mean PC scores in the direction of pain over-reporting. CONCLUSION: Under most conditions, nursing students expected pain under-reporting by the postoperative vignette patient. However, nursing students did expect pain to be over-reported when addiction risk was high and PR was adequate. These data suggest that nursing students’ expectations regarding pain over- and under-reporting were sensitive to perceptions of addiction risk, but involved additional factors (eg, level of PR). PMID:19547762

  19. Difficult decisions: managing chronic neuropathic pain with opioids.

    PubMed

    England, John D; Franklin, Gary M

    2012-02-01

    The decision to use opioids to treat chronic neuropathic pain is complex and somewhat controversial. Although opioid therapy may be appropriate for some patients with chronic neuropathic pain, physicians must implement strategies to reduce opioid abuse, addiction, and diversion. The decision to use chronic opioids should be made proactively with institution of best practices to ensure safe and effective use. As with all aspects of chronic pain management, better education of both health care providers and patients is necessary. Fortunately, specific recommendations for the safe and effective use of opioids are now available in several recently published guidelines. The best practices embodied in these guidelines should be considered for widespread adoption by both individual providers and health care systems. PMID:22810077

  20. Cancer pain management-current status

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Deepak; Rastogi, V; Ahuja, Vanita

    2011-01-01

    Cancer pain is still one of the most feared entities in cancer and about 75% of these patients require treatment with opioids for severe pain.The cancer pain relief is difficult to manage in patients with episodic or incidental pain, neuropathic pain, substance abuse and with impaired cognitive or communication skills. This non-systematic review article aims to discuss reasons for under treatment, tools of pain assessment, cancer pain and anxiety and possibly carve new approaches for cancer pain management in future. The current status of World Health Organization analgesic ladder has also been reviewed. A thorough literature search was carried out from 1998 to 2010 for current status in cancer pain management in MEDLINE, WHO guidelines and published literature and relevant articles have been included. PMID:21772673

  1. Pharmacogenetics and Personalized Medicine in Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Webster, Lynn R; Belfer, Inna

    2016-09-01

    Genetic research heralds a new therapeutic approach to pain management. Increasing literature demonstrates individual genetic vulnerabilities to specific pain types and mechanisms, partially explaining differing responses to similar pain stimuli. Furthermore, analgesics demonstrate great variability among carriers of different genotypes. Family history and genotyping promise to play an important role in the future approach to pain therapies. As advances continue in the genetics of pain and analgesia, pharmacotherapy will depend more on an individualized, targeted approach and less on empiricism. PMID:27514464

  2. A randomized controlled trial of a nurse-administered educational intervention for improving cancer pain management in ambulatory settings.

    PubMed

    Yates, Patsy; Edwards, Helen; Nash, Robyn; Aranda, Sanchia; Purdie, David; Najman, Jake; Skerman, Helen; Walsh, Anne

    2004-05-01

    The persistence of negative attitudes towards cancer pain and its treatment suggests there is scope for identifying more effective pain education strategies. This randomized controlled trial involving 189 ambulatory cancer patients evaluated an educational intervention that aimed to optimize patients' ability to manage pain. One week post-intervention, patients receiving the pain management intervention (PMI) had a significantly greater increase in self-reported pain knowledge, perceived control over pain, and number of pain treatments recommended. Intervention group patients also demonstrated a greater reduction in willingness to tolerate pain, concerns about addiction and side effects, being a "good" patient, and tolerance to pain relieving medication. The results suggest that targeted educational interventions that utilize individualized instructional techniques may alter cancer patient attitudes, which can potentially act as barriers to effective pain management. PMID:15140463

  3. Pharmacological pain management in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Olesen, Søren S; Juel, Jacob; Graversen, Carina; Kolesnikov, Yuri; Wilder-Smith, Oliver HG; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2013-01-01

    Intense abdominal pain is a prominent feature of chronic pancreatitis and its treatment remains a major clinical challenge. Basic studies of pancreatic nerves and experimental human pain research have provided evidence that pain processing is abnormal in these patients and in many cases resembles that seen in neuropathic and chronic pain disorders. An important ultimate outcome of such aberrant pain processing is that once the disease has advanced and the pathophysiological processes are firmly established, the generation of pain can become self-perpetuating and independent of the initial peripheral nociceptive drive. Consequently, the management of pain by traditional methods based on nociceptive deafferentation (e.g., surgery and visceral nerve blockade) becomes difficult and often ineffective. This novel and improved understanding of pain aetiology requires a paradigm shift in pain management of chronic pancreatitis. Modern mechanism based pain treatments taking into account altered pain processing are likely to increasingly replace invasive therapies targeting the nociceptive source, which should be reserved for special and carefully selected cases. In this review, we offer an overview of the current available pharmacological options for pain management in chronic pancreatitis. In addition, future options for pain management are discussed with special emphasis on personalized pain medicine and multidisciplinarity. PMID:24259960

  4. Development and implementation of a telehealth-enhanced intervention for pain and symptom management.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Linda H; Gordon, Debra B; Wyant, Sheryl; Theodore, Brian R; Meins, Alexa R; Rue, Tessa; Towle, Cara; Tauben, David; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2014-07-01

    Managing chronic pain effectively is often challenging for health care providers and patients. Telehealth technologies can bridge geographic distance and improve patients' quality of care in communities where access to pain specialists has previously been unavailable. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a telehealth intervention (TelePain) designed to address the need for pain specialist consultation regarding pain and symptom management issues in non-academic medical centers. We describe the theoretical foundation and development of a multifaceted intervention using a cluster randomized clinical trial design. Health care providers and their patients with chronic pain are enrolled in the study. Patient participants receive the intervention (report of symptoms and receipt of a pain graph) weekly for 8 weeks and are contacted at 12 weeks for completion of post-intervention follow-up measures. Their providers attend TelePain sessions which involve a didactic presentation on an evidence-based topic related to pain management followed by patient case presentations and discussion by community clinicians. Symptom management recommendations for each patient case are made by a panel of pain specialists representing internal medicine, addiction medicine, rehabilitation medicine, anesthesiology, psychiatry, and nursing. The outcomes assessed in this randomized trial focus on pain intensity, pain's interference on function and sleep, and anxiety, depression, and cost-effectiveness. Some of the challenges and lessons that we have learned early in implementing the TelePain intervention are also reported. PMID:24846620

  5. New Pain Management Options for the Surgical Patient on Methadone and Buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sudipta; Arulkumar, Sailesh; Cornett, Elyse M; Gayle, Julie A; Flower, Ronda R; Fox, Charles J; Kaye, Alan D

    2016-03-01

    Perioperative management of patients receiving opioid addiction therapy presents a unique challenge for the anesthesiologist. The goal of pain management in this patient population is to effectively manage postoperative pain, to improve patient satisfaction and outcomes, and to reduce the cost of health care. Multimodal analgesics, including nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs, intravenous acetaminophen, gabapentanoid agents, and low-dose ketamine infusions, have been used to improve postoperative pain and to reduce postoperative opioid use. Patients on long-term opioid management therapy with methadone and buprenorphine require special considerations. Recommendations and options for treating postoperative pain in patients on methadone and buprenorphine are outlined below. Other postoperative pain management options include patient-controlled analgesia, intravenous, and transdermal, in addition to neuraxial and regional anesthesia techniques. Special patient populations include the parturient on long-term opioid therapy. Recommendations for use of opioids in these patients during labor and delivery and in the postpartum period are discussed. PMID:26879874

  6. Chronic pain management: nonpharmacological therapies for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ku-Lang; Fillingim, Roger; Hurley, Robert W; Schmidt, Siegfried

    2015-05-01

    Nonpharmacologic therapies have become a vital part of managing chronic pain (CP). Although these can be used as stand-alone therapies, nonpharmacologic treatments often are used to augment and complement pharmacologic treatments (ie, multimodal therapy). Nonpharmacologic approaches can be classified as behavioral, cognitive, integrative, and physical therapies. Core principles in developing a treatment plan are explaining the nature of the CP condition, setting appropriate goals, and developing a comprehensive treatment approach and plan for adherence. Clinicians should become familiar with these interventions so that they can offer patients flexibility in the pain management approach. Effective noninvasive treatment modalities for CP include behavioral therapy for short-term pain relief; cognitive behavioral therapy for reducing long-term pain and disability; hypnosis as adjunctive therapy; guided imagery, diaphragmatic breathing, and muscle relaxation, especially for cancer-related pain; mindfulness-based stress reduction for patients with chronic low back pain; acupuncture for multiple pain conditions; combination manipulation, manual therapy, endurance exercise, stretching, and strengthening for chronic neck pain; animal-assisted therapy; and S-adenosyl-L-methionine for joint pain. Guidelines for use of these treatment modalities are based on expert panel recommendations in combination with data from randomized controlled trials. PMID:25970869

  7. Nurses management of post-operative pain.

    PubMed

    Buckley, H

    2000-06-01

    Nurses have the responsibility of adequately managing patients' post-operative pain. This literature review assesses whether nurses' management of post-operative pain is adequate or not, according to the literature findings. The findings reveal that nurses' management of patients' post-operative pain is not adequate and implies the concurrent need for improved nurse education and practice. The findings also indicate a need for ongoing research of this phenomenon. PMID:11855003

  8. Approach to managing musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Richard H.; Choquette, Denis; Craig, Brian N.; De Angelis, Carlo; Habal, Flavio; Fulthorpe, Gordon; Stewart, John I.; Turpie, Alexander G.G.; Davis, Paul

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To provide family physicians and pharmacists with practical, evidence- and expertise-based guidance on choosing the safest approach to using analgesics to manage patients with musculoskeletal pain. SOURCES OF INFORMATION Health care providers from family practice, rheumatology, gastroenterology, hepatology, internal medicine, and pharmacy participated in an educational needs assessment regarding the management of pain and the safety of commonly used analgesics. Feedback from one-on-one interviews was compiled and distributed to participants who selected key topics. Topics chosen formed the basis for the discussions of this multidisciplinary panel that reviewed data on the safety of analgesics, particularly in regard to comorbidity and concurrent use with other therapies. MAIN MESSAGE Treatment should begin with an effective analgesic with the best safety profile at the lowest dose and escalate to higher doses and different analgesics as required. Acetaminophen is a safe medication that should be considered first-line therapy. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with potential adverse gastrointestinal, renal, hepatic, and cardiovascular effects. Physicians should not prescribe NSAIDs before taking a careful history and doing a physical examination so they have the information they need to weigh the risks (adverse effects and potential drug interactions) and benefits for individual patients. CONCLUSION Taking a complete and accurate history and doing a physical examination are essential for choosing the safest analgesic for a particular patient. PMID:17872814

  9. Development and Implementation of a Telehealth-Enhanced Intervention for Pain and Symptom Management

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Linda H.; Gordon, Debra B.; Wyant, Sheryl; Theodore, Brian R.; Meins, Alexa R.; Rue, Tessa; Towle, Cara; Tauben, David; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.

    2014-01-01

    Managing chronic pain effectively is often challenging for health care providers and patients. Telehealth technologies can bridge geographic distance and improve patients' quality of care in communities where access to pain specialists has previously been unavailable. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a telehealth intervention (TelePain) designed to address the need for pain specialist consultation regarding pain and symptom management issues in non-academic medical centers. We describe the theoretical foundation and development of a multifaceted intervention using a cluster randomized clinical trial design. Health care providers and their patients with chronic pain are enrolled in the study. Patient participants receive the intervention (report of symptoms and receipt of a pain graph) weekly for 8 weeks and are contacted at 12 weeks for completion of post-intervention follow-up measures. Their providers attend Telepain sessions which involve a didactic presentation on an evidence-based topic related to pain management followed by patient case presentations and discussion by community clinicians. Symptom management recommendations for each patient case are made by a panel of pain specialists representing internal medicine, addiction medicine, rehabilitation medicine, anesthesiology, psychiatry, and nursing. The outcomes assessed in this randomized trial focus on pain intensity, pain's interference on function and sleep, and anxiety, depression, and cost-effectiveness. Some of the challenges and lessons that we have learned early in implementing the TelePain intervention are also reported. PMID:24846620

  10. Understanding and managing burn pain: Part 2.

    PubMed

    Connor-Ballard, Patricia A

    2009-05-01

    Despite advances in treatment of burn injuries and their consequent pain, wound care is the main source of the pain associated with burn injury. This two-part article explores burn pain and its treatment from a nursing perspective. Last month, Part 1 provided an overview of burn injury and addressed the wound care-related causes of burn pain, as well as its assessment and treatment. Part 2, presented here, provides a more in-depth discussion of pain management; topical medications and the psychological aspects of burn pain are also discussed. PMID:19411907

  11. Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives on Money Management by Addicts

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Marc I.

    2012-01-01

    How addicts manage their funds can be understood from studies of the neurobiology of impulsive spending, contingency management, self-reported expenditures, behavioral economics and anthropology. To show how these differing perspectives can provide theoretical explanations for observed behavior, they were applied to the question of when extra “windfall” funds are spent on substances of abuse. The treatment implications of Behavioral Economic and related approaches include targeting behavioral mechanisms of substance use with money management-based interventions, configuration of reinforcers other than substance use, and therapeutically framing the choice between abstinence and alcohol use. PMID:22211461

  12. Approach to pain management in chronic opioid users undergoing orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Devin, Clinton J; Lee, Dennis S; Armaghani, Sheyan J; Bible, Jesse; Shau, David N; Martin, Peter R; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M

    2014-10-01

    Opioids are commonly used for the management of pain in patients with musculoskeletal disorders; however, national attention has highlighted the potential adverse effects of the use of opioid analgesia in this and other nonmalignant pain settings. Chronic opioid users undergoing orthopaedic surgery represent a particularly challenging patient population in regard to their perioperative pain control and outcomes. Preoperative evaluation provides an opportunity to estimate a patient's preoperative opioid intake, discuss pain-related fears, and identify potential psychiatric comorbidities. Patients using high levels of opioids may also require referral to an addiction specialist. Various regional blockade and pharmaceutical options are available to help control perioperative pain, and a multimodal pain management approach may be of particular benefit in chronic opioid users undergoing orthopaedic surgery. PMID:25281256

  13. Pain management in trauma: A review study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Alireza; Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad; Heidari Zadie, Zahra; Euasobhon, Pramote; Ketumarn, Penkae; Karbasfrushan, Ali; Amini-Saman, Javad; Mohammadi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Pain in trauma has a role similar to the double-edged sword. On the one hand, pain is a good indicator to determine the severity and type of injury. On the other hand, pain can induce sever complications and it may lead to further deterioration of the patient. Therefore, knowing how to manage pain in trauma patients is an important part of systemic approach in trauma. The aim of this manuscript is to provide information about pain management in trauma in the Emergency Room settings. Methods: In this review we searched among electronic and manual documents covering a 15-yr period between 2000 and 2016. Our electronic search included Pub Med, Google scholar, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases. We looked for articles in English and in peer-reviewed journals using the following keywords: acute pain management, trauma, emergency room and injury. Results: More than 3200 documents were identified. After screening based on the study inclusion criteria, 560 studies that had direct linkage to the study aim were considered for evaluation based World Health Organization (WHO) pain ladder chart. Conclusions: To provide adequate pain management in trauma patients require: adequate assessment of age-specific pharmacologic pain management; identification of adequate analgesic to relieve moderate to severe pain; cognizance of serious adverse effects of pain medications and weighting medications against their benefits, and regularly reassessing patients and reevaluating their pain management regimen. Patient-centered trauma care will also require having knowledge of barriers to pain management and discussing them with the patient and his/her family to identify solutions. PMID:27414816

  14. Pain management in patients with vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Seretny, M; Colvin, L A

    2016-09-01

    Vascular disease covers a wide range of conditions, including arterial, venous, and lymphatic disorders, with many of these being more common in the elderly. As the population ages, the incidence of vascular disease will increase, with a consequent increase in the requirement to manage both acute and chronic pain in this patient population. Pain management can be complex, as there are often multiple co-morbidities to be considered. An understanding of the underlying pain mechanisms is helpful in the logical direction of treatment, particularly in chronic pain states, such as phantom limb pain or complex regional pain syndrome. Acute pain management for vascular surgery presents a number of challenges, including coexisting anticoagulant medication, that may preclude the use of regional techniques. Within the limited evidence base, there is a suggestion that epidural analgesia provides better pain relief and reduced respiratory complications after major vascular surgery. For carotid endarterectomy, there is again some evidence supporting the use of local anaesthetic analgesia, either by infiltration or by superficial cervical plexus block. Chronic pain in vascular disease includes post-amputation pain, for which well-known risk factors include high pain levels before amputation and in the immediate postoperative period, emphasizing the importance of good pain control in the perioperative period. Complex regional pain syndrome is another challenging chronic pain syndrome with a wide variety of treatment options available, with the strongest evidence being for physical therapies. Further research is required to gain a better understanding of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in pain associated with vascular disease and the best analgesic approaches to manage it. PMID:27566812

  15. Integrating Pain Management in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, Robert N.; Edwards, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    There is much evidence to suggest that psychological and social issues are predictive of pain severity, emotional distress, work disability, and response to medical treatments among persons with chronic pain. Psychologists can play an important role in the identification of psychological and social dysfunction and in matching personal characteristics to effective interventions as part of a multidisciplinary approach to pain management, leading to a greater likelihood of treatment success. The assessment of different domains using semi-structured clinical interviews and standardized self-report measures permits identification of somatosensory, emotional, cognitive, behavioral and social issues in order to facilitate treatment planning. We briefly describe measures to assess constructs related to pain and intervention strategies for the behavioral treatment of chronic pain and discuss related psychiatric and substance abuse issues. Finally, we offer a future look at the role of integrating pain management in clinical practice in the psychological assessment and treatment for persons with chronic pain. PMID:22383018

  16. Pain management in critically ill obese patients.

    PubMed

    Astle, Sonia M

    2009-09-01

    Achieving pain control in critically ill patients is a challenging problem for the health care team, which becomes more challenging in morbidly obese patients. Obese patients may experience drug malabsorption and distribution, which may lead to either subtherapeutic or toxic drug levels. To manage pain effectively for the critically ill obese patient, nurses must have an understanding of how obesity alters a patient's physiologic response to injury and illness. In addition, nurses must be knowledgeable about physiologic pain mechanisms, types and manifestations of pain, differing patterns of drug absorption and distribution, pharmacokinetic properties of analgesic medications, and pain management strategies. This article explores factors affecting pharmacokinetics in obese patients, trends in pain management, and treatment strategies for the obese patient. PMID:19840712

  17. Management of Pain in Complex Nerve Injuries.

    PubMed

    Davis, Gabrielle; Curtin, Catherine M

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic nerve injuries can be devastating and life-changing events, leading to functional morbidity and psychological stress and social constraints. Even in the event of a successful surgical repair with recovered motor function, pain can result in continued disability and poor quality of life. Pain after nerve injury can also prevent recovery and return to preinjury life. It is difficult to predict which patients will develop persistent pain; once incurred, pain can be even challenging to manage. This review seeks to define the types of pain following peripheral nerve injuries, investigate the pathophysiology and causative factors, and evaluate potential treatment options. PMID:27094896

  18. Management of a blind painful eye.

    PubMed

    Merbs, Shannath L

    2006-06-01

    Debilitating ocular pain poses a significant challenge to the ophthalmologist. When the pain is intractable and the eye has very poor vision and is disfigured, surgical removal of the eye has traditionally been the definitive treatment of choice. Because many people are uncomfortable psychologically with removal of their eye, however painful, and other patients are not good surgical candidates, an alternative to enucleation is sometimes warranted, and injection of a neurolytic substance can often induce long-lasting anesthesia for a blind painful eye. This article reviews a range of options for management of blind painful eye from anesthesia to enucleation. PMID:16701166

  19. Problems and Barriers in Ensuring Effective Acute and Post-Operative Pain Management--an International Perspective.

    PubMed

    Mędrzycka-Dąbrowska, Wioletta; Dąbrowski, Sebastian; Basiński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Pain management originated at the turn of the 1960s and 70s in the United States, and spread to Western Europe almost a decade later. It is estimated today that a lack of adequate pain management affects 80% of the global population, and is a serious problem in over 150 countries. At the national level, the greatest burden of inadequate pain management is borne by the elderly, pregnant and breastfeeding women, children, people coping with addictions to harmful substances, and the mentally ill. In spite of enormous progress, there are still significant barriers to comprehensive pain management. Pain management should be considered a priority. It is an interdisciplinary task requiring the cooperation of the whole medical staff. The current review of literature revealed a number of factors limiting the possibility of achieving effective pain management, related to healthcare systems, medical staff and patients. PMID:26768644

  20. Pain Management After Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Lisa T; Corbiere, Nicole C; DeLisle, Jay A; Clark, Alexander Martin; Kuxhaus, Laurel

    2016-06-01

    Controlling pain after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) is critical to minimizing complications, decreasing costs, and expediting patients' return to function. We implemented a TJA multimodal pain management protocol at a Level III trauma center in a small, rural community in New York. We retrospectively reviewed 266 patient charts and collected patient demographics, pain management information, and discharge data. Our primary goals were to quantify the total number of narcotic medication doses used and length of hospital stay. The multimodal pain management protocol significantly reduced the number of narcotic doses used (P < .01). Hospital length of stay decreased slightly; although not statistically significant (P = .25), this may be clinically significant. Gender, age, and type of arthroplasty (ie, knee, hip) were not significant factors. A multimodal approach to pain management after TJA can reduce narcotic use and hospital length of stay, thereby also reducing the incidence of side effects from narcotics. PMID:27234795

  1. Managing Pediatric Pain in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Benoit; Trottier, Evelyne D

    2016-08-01

    Far more attention is now given to pain management in children in the emergency department (ED). When a child arrives, pain must be recognized and evaluated using a pain scale that is appropriate to the child's development and regularly assessed to determine whether the pain intervention was effective. At triage, both analgesics and non-pharmacological strategies, such as distraction, immobilization, and dressing should be started. For mild pain, oral ibuprofen can be administered if the child has not received it at home, whereas ibuprofen and paracetamol are suitable for moderate pain. For patients who still require pain relief, oral opioids could be considered; however, many EDs have now replaced this with intranasal fentanyl, which allows faster onset of pain relief and can be administered on arrival pending either intravenous access or definitive care. Intravenous opioids are often required for severe pain, and paracetamol or ibuprofen can still be considered for their likely opioid-sparing effects. Specific treatment should be used for patients with migraine. In children requiring intravenous access or venipuncture, non-pharmacological and pharmacological strategies to decrease pain and anxiety associated with needle punctures are mandatory. These strategies can also be used for laceration repairs and other painful procedures. Despite the gaps in knowledge, pain should be treated with the most up-to-date evidence in children seen in EDs. PMID:27260499

  2. Assessment and management of pain in infants

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, P; Mathew, J

    2003-01-01

    Infants, including newborn babies, experience pain similarly and probably more intensely than older children and adults. They are also at risk of adverse long term effects on behaviour and development, through inadequate attention towards pain relief in early life. However, the issue of analgesia in young babies has been largely neglected in most clinical settings, despite subjecting them to painful diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Several therapeutic and preventive strategies, including systemic and local pharmacological and non-pharamacological interventions, are reported to be effective in relieving pain in infants. A judicious application of these interventions, backed by awareness and sensitivity to pain perception, on the part of the caregivers is likely to yield the best results. This article is a review of the mechanisms of pain perception, objective assessment, and management strategies of pain in infants. PMID:12954954

  3. Comparative legal aspects of pain management.

    PubMed

    Vansweevelt, T

    2008-12-01

    Administering pain medication to terminal patients can cause legal problems when it has a life-shortening effect, because according to some authors it equates with manslaughter. The legal basis of the acceptance of pain alleviation with life-shortening effect can be found on the grounds of necessity. In different countries physicians have been prosecuted because of their pain management, which to the public prosecutor was in fact a sort of euthanasia. On the other hand, it is not unknown that physicians administer opioids to mask euthanasia. Pain management needs some rules, which can reassure the physician who alleviates pain. The physician who alleviates pain with life-shortening effect will have to act with due care to avoid a liability risk. This implies at least an informed consent, to observe the proportionality rule, and to keep a medical record. PMID:19202862

  4. Using hypnosis with children for pain management.

    PubMed

    Valente, S M

    1991-01-01

    Although nurses are in a strategic position to use hypnosis to manage a child's cancer pain, many lack the knowledge, the skill, or the exposure to the clinical effectiveness of hypnosis. Hypnosis has been a potent analgesic and anesthetic agent for more than 100 years; it reduces a child's cancer pain and the pain associated with painful procedures. Nurses can use hypnosis to help children diminish pain and cope with lumbar punctures (LPs), bone marrow aspirations (BMAs), and nausea or vomiting from chemotherapy. This article's purpose is to discuss myths, contraindications, research, processes, and effectiveness of hypnosis as a strategy for managing the cancer pain of school-age children. Vignettes from the author's clinical practice illustrate concepts and procedures. PMID:2067959

  5. Orofacial pain syndromes: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Klasser, Gary D

    2014-11-01

    Patients will often visit their primary medical practitioner with orofacial pain complaints. Hence, it is important to recognize and have an understanding of these conditions to properly evaluate and potentially manage these disorders. If the practitioner is uncertain or uncomfortable with these conditions, then patient referral to a knowledgeable health care practitioner should be considered for further evaluation and management. In this article, the evaluation and management of various neuropathic, neurovascular, and vascular pains are discussed. PMID:25443681

  6. Managing Neuropathic Pain in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Disorders of the somatosensory system such as neuropathic pain are common in people with chronic neurologic and musculoskeletal diseases, yet these conditions remain an underappreciated morbidity in veterinary patients. This is likely because assessment of neuropathic pain in people relies heavily on self-reporting, something our veterinary patients are not able to do. The development of neuropathic pain is a complex phenomenon, and concepts related to it are frequently not addressed in the standard veterinary medical curriculum such that veterinarians may not recognize this as a potential problem in patients. The goals of this review are to discuss basic concepts in the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain, provide definitions for common clinical terms used in association with the condition, and discuss pharmacological treatment options for dogs with neuropathic pain. The development of neuropathic pain involves key mechanisms such as ectopic afferent nerve activity, peripheral sensitization, central sensitization, impaired inhibitory modulation, and pathologic activation of microglia. Treatments aimed at reducing neuropathic pain are targeted at one or more of these mechanisms. Several drugs are commonly used in the veterinary clinical setting to treat neuropathic pain. These include gabapentin, pregabalin, amantadine, and amitriptyline. Proposed mechanisms of action for each drug, and known pharmacokinetic profiles in dogs are discussed. Strong evidence exists in the human literature for the utility of most of these treatments, but clinical veterinary-specific literature is currently limited. Future studies should focus on objective methods to document neuropathic pain and monitor response to therapy in veterinary patients. PMID:26942185

  7. Safely Managing Chronic Pain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Chronic Pain Safely Managing Chronic Pain Past Issues / Spring 2011 Table of Contents Helping ... can help, as well. The Two Faces of Pain: Acute and Chronic What is pain? The International ...

  8. Hypnosis: adjunct therapy for cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Kravits, Kathy

    2013-03-01

    Pain is a symptom associated with prolonged recovery from illness and procedures, decreased quality of life, and increased health-care costs. While there have been advances in the management of cancer pain, there is a need for therapeutic strategies that complement pharmaceutical management without significantly contributing to the side-effect profile of these agents. Hypnosis provides a safe and efficacious supplement to pharmaceutical management of cancer pain. One barrier to the regular use of hypnosis is health-care providers' lack of current knowledge of the efficacy and safety of hypnosis. Advanced practitioners who are well-informed about hypnosis have an opportunity to increase the treatment options for patients who are suffering with cancer pain by suggesting to the health-care team that hypnosis be incorporated into the plan of care. Integration of hypnosis into the standard of care will benefit patients, caregivers, and survivors by reducing pain and the suffering associated with it. PMID:25031986

  9. Hypnosis: Adjunct Therapy for Cancer Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Kravits, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a symptom associated with prolonged recovery from illness and procedures, decreased quality of life, and increased health-care costs. While there have been advances in the management of cancer pain, there is a need for therapeutic strategies that complement pharmaceutical management without significantly contributing to the side-effect profile of these agents. Hypnosis provides a safe and efficacious supplement to pharmaceutical management of cancer pain. One barrier to the regular use of hypnosis is health-care providers’ lack of current knowledge of the efficacy and safety of hypnosis. Advanced practitioners who are well-informed about hypnosis have an opportunity to increase the treatment options for patients who are suffering with cancer pain by suggesting to the health-care team that hypnosis be incorporated into the plan of care. Integration of hypnosis into the standard of care will benefit patients, caregivers, and survivors by reducing pain and the suffering associated with it. PMID:25031986

  10. The SAMS: Smartphone Addiction Management System and verification.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heyoung; Ahn, Heejune; Choi, Samwook; Choi, Wanbok

    2014-01-01

    While the popularity of smartphones has given enormous convenience to our lives, their pathological use has created a new mental health concern among the community. Hence, intensive research is being conducted on the etiology and treatment of the condition. However, the traditional clinical approach based surveys and interviews has serious limitations: health professionals cannot perform continual assessment and intervention for the affected group and the subjectivity of assessment is questionable. To cope with these limitations, a comprehensive ICT (Information and Communications Technology) system called SAMS (Smartphone Addiction Management System) is developed for objective assessment and intervention. The SAMS system consists of an Android smartphone application and a web application server. The SAMS client monitors the user's application usage together with GPS location and Internet access location, and transmits the data to the SAMS server. The SAMS server stores the usage data and performs key statistical data analysis and usage intervention according to the clinicians' decision. To verify the reliability and efficacy of the developed system, a comparison study with survey-based screening with the K-SAS (Korean Smartphone Addiction Scale) as well as self-field trials is performed. The comparison study is done using usage data from 14 users who are 19 to 50 year old adults that left at least 1 week usage logs and completed the survey questionnaires. The field trial fully verified the accuracy of the time, location, and Internet access information in the usage measurement and the reliability of the system operation over more than 2 weeks. The comparison study showed that daily use count has a strong correlation with K-SAS scores, whereas daily use times do not strongly correlate for potentially addicted users. The correlation coefficients of count and times with total K-SAS score are CC = 0.62 and CC =0.07, respectively, and the t-test analysis for the

  11. The effects of self-pain management on the intensity of pain and pain management methods in arthritic patients.

    PubMed

    Parlar, Serap; Fadiloglu, Cicek; Argon, Gulumser; Tokem, Yasemin; Keser, Gokhan

    2013-09-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of pain management education on the intensity of pain and frequency of utilization of pain management methods in two groups of patients with arthritis of different pathogenesis and clinical features, and to compare whether a significant difference existed between the two groups. The study was carried out between September 2007 and June 2008 on 30 female patients with gonarthrosis and 30 female patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) followed at the rheumatology outpatient clinic of a university hospital. Data on sociodemographic characteristics and those related with the illness were collected using a special survey. Each patient was given information about the features, causes, and treatment of the arthritis and how to cope with pain, emphasizing the importance of pain management methods. The intensity of pain and efficacy of pain management methods were assessed using the McGill Pain Questionnaire and the Pain Management Inventory at baseline and the second and sixth weeks after the education. The SPSS (v15.0) statistical package was used for statistical analysis. After education, significant improvements in pain intensity scores compared with baseline scores were observed in both groups (p < .05), and there was no significant difference between the RA and gonarthrosis groups. Among the various pain management methods, the education program led to significantly more utilization of massaging the painful area, exercising, and using complementary methods to control stress in both groups of patients, and there was no significant difference between the groups. In conclusion, the pain management education given in this study alleviated the intensity of pain and significantly increased the use of some pain management methods in both gonarthrosis and RA cases. PMID:23972864

  12. Management of Chronic Facial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christopher G.; Dellon, A. Lee; Rosson, Gedge D.

    2009-01-01

    Pain persisting for at least 6 months is defined as chronic. Chronic facial pain conditions often take on lives of their own deleteriously changing the lives of the sufferer. Although much is known about facial pain, it is clear that those physicians who treat these conditions should continue elucidating the mechanisms and defining successful treatment strategies for these life-changing conditions. This article will review many of the classic causes of chronic facial pain due to the trigeminal nerve and its branches that are amenable to surgical therapies. Testing of facial sensibility is described and its utility introduced. We will also introduce some of the current hypotheses of atypical facial pain and headaches secondary to chronic nerve compressions and will suggest possible treatment strategies. PMID:22110799

  13. Pain management in patients with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Achterberg, Wilco P; Pieper, Marjoleine JC; van Dalen-Kok, Annelore H; de Waal, Margot WM; Husebo, Bettina S; Lautenbacher, Stefan; Kunz, Miriam; Scherder, Erik JA; Corbett, Anne

    2013-01-01

    There are an estimated 35 million people with dementia across the world, of whom 50% experience regular pain. Despite this, current assessment and treatment of pain in this patient group are inadequate. In addition to the discomfort and distress caused by pain, it is frequently the underlying cause of behavioral symptoms, which can lead to inappropriate treatment with antipsychotic medications. Pain also contributes to further complications in treatment and care. This review explores four key perspectives of pain management in dementia and makes recommendations for practice and research. The first perspective discussed is the considerable uncertainty within the literature on the impact of dementia neuropathology on pain perception and processing in Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, where white matter lesions and brain atrophy appear to influence the neurobiology of pain. The second perspective considers the assessment of pain in dementia. This is challenging, particularly because of the limited capacity of self-report by these individuals, which means that assessment relies in large part on observational methods. A number of tools are available but the psychometric quality and clinical utility of these are uncertain. The evidence for efficient treatment (the third perspective) with analgesics is also limited, with few statistically well-powered trials. The most promising evidence supports the use of stepped treatment approaches, and indicates the benefit of pain and behavioral interventions on both these important symptoms. The fourth perspective debates further difficulties in pain management due to the lack of sufficient training and education for health care professionals at all levels, where evidence-based guidance is urgently needed. To address the current inadequate management of pain in dementia, a comprehensive approach is needed. This would include an accurate, validated assessment tool that is sensitive to different types of pain and therapeutic

  14. Photodynamic therapy--aspects of pain management.

    PubMed

    Fink, Christine; Enk, Alexander; Gholam, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a highly effective and safe treatment method for actinic keratoses with an excellent cosmetic outcome and is commonly used for the therapy of large areas of photodamaged skin with multiple clinically manifest and subclinical lesions. However, the major drawback of photodynamic therapy is the pain experienced during the treatment that can be intense and sometimes even intolerable for patients, requiring interruption or termination of the process. Several strategies for controlling pain during photodynamic therapy have been studied but few effective methods are currently available. Therefore, this review puts the spotlight on predictors on pain intensity and aspects of pain management during photodynamic therapy. PMID:25640485

  15. Intravenous infusions in chronic pain management.

    PubMed

    Kosharskyy, Boleslav; Almonte, Wilson; Shaparin, Naum; Pappagallo, Marco; Smith, Howard

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, millions of Americans are affected by chronic pain, which adds heavily to national rates of morbidity, mortality, and disability, with an ever-increasing prevalence. According to a 2011 report titled Relieving Pain in America: A Blueprint for Transforming Prevention, Care, Education, and Research by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, pain not only exacts its toll on people's lives but also on the economy with an estimated annual economic cost of at least $560 - 635 billion in health care costs and the cost of lost productivity attributed to chronic pain. Intravenous infusions of certain pharmacologic agents have been known to provide substantial pain relief in patients with various chronic painful conditions. Some of these infusions are better, and although not necessarily the first therapeutic choice, have been widely used and extensively studied. The others show promise, however are in need of further investigations. This article will focus on non-opiate intravenous infusions that have been utilized for chronic painful disorders such as fibromyalgia, neuropathic pain, phantom limb pain, post-herpetic neuralgia, complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS), diabetic neuropathy, and central pain related to stroke or spinal cord injuries. The management of patients with chronic pain conditions is challenging and continues to evolve as new treatment modalities are explored and tested. The following intravenous infusions used to treat the aforementioned chronic pain conditions will be reviewed: lidocaine, ketamine, phentolamine, dexmedetomidine, and bisphosphonates. This overview is intended to familiarize the practitioner with the variety of infusions for patients with chronic pain. It will not, however, be able to provide guidelines for their use due to the lack of sufficient evidence. PMID:23703410

  16. Managing co-occurring substance use and pain disorders.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Karen; Kaufman, Aaron; Kong, Alexander; Jun, Grace; Schwartz, Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    The safest pain treatment strategy for an individual at risk or recovering from addiction is a nonopioid and benzodiazepine-free approach. If an opioid treatment is necessary, the extent of the risk can be stratified by the use of a biopsychosocial assessment and opioid screening tools. Individuals at high risk should have the greatest amount of structure and monitoring. A written informed consent and treatment agreement can provide a framework for the patient and the patient’s family, as well as the clinician. The structure of treatment should specify only that one prescribing physician will write a limited supply of opioids, without refills, until the analgesic efficacy, adverse events, and goals for functional restoration can be assessed. An additional recommendation is that prescriptions should be filled at the same pharmacy with no refill by phone or opportunity for replacement because of loss, damage, or stolen medications. Additionally, random urine drug screens and PDMP reports obtained will help determine if the patient is taking other substances, as well as monitor the patient’s medication use patterns. It is important to assess for risk factors in treating chronic pain with opioids; clinicians need to have a realistic appreciation of the resources available to them and the types of patients that can be managed in their practice. Chronic pain treatment with opioids should not be undertaken in patients who are currently addicted to illicit substances or alcohol. With the support of family and friends, ideally the patient can be motivated to participate in an intensive substance abuse treatment. In patients without an immediate risk, precautionary steps should be taken when prescribing opioids. Clinicians and patients need to review the risk factors for opioid-related problems including younger age, benzodiazepine use, and comorbid conditions such as depression, anxiety, and heavy smoking. Both the provider and the patient need a personal investment in

  17. Chronic pain management in pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Coluzzi, F; Valensise, H; Sacco, M; Allegri, M

    2014-02-01

    During pregnancy most of women will experience some kind of pain, either as a result of a pre-existing condition (low back pain, headache, fibromyalgia, and rheumatoid arthritis) or as a direct consequence of pregnancy (weight gain, postural changes, pelvic floor dysfunction, hormonal factors). However, chronic pain management during pregnancy and lactation remains a challenge for clinicians and pregnant women are at risk of undertreatment for painful conditions, because of fear about use of drugs during pregnancy. Few analgesic drugs have been demonstrated to be absolutely contraindicated during pregnancy and breastfeeding, but studies in pregnant women are not available for most of pain medications. The aim of this paper is to review the safety profile in pregnancy or lactation of the commonly prescribed pain medications and non-pharmacological treatments. In addition to the conventional classifications from the Food and Drug Administration and the American Academy of Paediatrics, authors analyzed the currently available clinical data from literature. PMID:23857445

  18. Options for perioperative pain management in neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Kai, Alice M; Tran, Daniel; Kodumudi, Gopal; Legler, Aron; Ayrian, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Moderate-to-severe pain following neurosurgery is common but often does not get attention and is therefore underdiagnosed and undertreated. Compounding this problem is the traditional belief that neurosurgical pain is inconsequential and even dangerous to treat. Concerns about problematic effects associated with opioid analgesics such as nausea, vomiting, oversedation, and increased intracranial pressure secondary to elevated carbon dioxide tension from respiratory depression have often led to suboptimal postoperative analgesic strategies in caring for neurosurgical patients. Neurosurgical patients may have difficulty or be incapable of communicating their need for analgesics due to neurologic deficits, which poses an additional challenge. Postoperative pain control should be a priority, because pain adversely affects recovery and patient outcomes. Inconsistent practices and the quality of current analgesic strategies for neurosurgical patients still leave room for improvement. Given the complexity of postoperative pain management for these patients, multimodal strategies are often required to optimize pain control and at the same time limit undesired side effects. PMID:26929661

  19. The management of pain in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Fetrow, K O

    1989-01-01

    The three general methods of treating pain are pharmacologic, physical and psychological. The goal of medical management of the patient with pain and inflammation is to relieve these symptoms with minimal side effects and inconvenience. Pain associated with inflammation may be relieved with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including aspirin. All NSAIDs relieve pain and stiffness in a similar manner; their primary action appears to be the inhibition of the cyclo-oxygenase system in the arachidonic acid cascade. When prescribing NSAIDs for orthopaedic pain and inflammation, it seems sensible to start with aspirin because of its low cost and safety at analgesic doses. However, if safety and low incidence of side effects are the most important factors in determining appropriate therapy, newer NSAIDs such as ketoprofen will be preferred. The relief of pain is an important aspect of postoperative care. Parenteral and oral opiates serve as the standard against which other therapies for severe pain are compared. When pain cannot be adequately controlled with intramuscular or subcutaneous opiates, intravenous opiates controlled by the patient (patient-controlled analgesia) are often useful. Relatively small doses of epidural or intrathecal opiates can also be used to achieve postoperative pain relief. Thus, treatment for orthopaedic pain begins with NSAIDs, followed by an oral opiate combined with acetaminophen, aspirin, or another NSAID. If these regimens are ineffective, oral opiates followed by parenteral opiates may be tried. PMID:2520438

  20. Nursing documentation of postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Idvall, Ewa; Ehrenberg, Anna

    2002-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that nursing documentation is often deficient in its recording of pain assessment and treatment. In Sweden, documentation of the care process, including assessment, is a legal obligation. The aim of this study was to describe nursing documentation of postoperative pain management and nurses' perceptions of the records in relation to current regulations and guidelines. The sample included nursing records of postoperative care on the second postoperative day from 172 patients and 63 Registered Nurses from surgical wards in a central county hospital in Sweden. The records were reviewed for content and comprehensiveness based on regulations and guidelines for postoperative pain management. Three different auditing instruments were used. The nurses were asked if the documentation concurred with current regulations and guidelines. The result showed that pain assessment was based mainly on patients' self-report, but less than 10% of the records contained notes on systematic assessment with a pain assessment instrument. Pain location was documented in 50% of the records and pain character in 12%. About 73% of the nurses reported that the documentation concurred with current regulations and guidelines. The findings indicate that significant flaws existed in nurses' recording of postoperative pain management, of which the nurses were not aware. PMID:12427178

  1. Managing your chronic back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... work. Some may be emotional, like a difficult relationship. Reducing stress can improve your physical and emotional ... It is important to have strong relationships with friends and ... your back pain makes it hard to get through the day. Take time ...

  2. Pain Management and the Amputee

    MedlinePlus

    ... into plain language by Helen Osborne, 2006 Health Literacy Consulting, www.healthliteracy.com By Partners Against Pain® ... to the amputees who have them. They are physical, not psychological or all in your head . There ...

  3. The Evaluation of Undergraduate Nursing Students' Knowledge of Post-op Pain Management after Participation in Simulation.

    PubMed

    Evans, Cecile B; Mixon, Diana K

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to assess undergraduate nursing students' pain knowledge after participation in a simulation scenario. The Knowledge and Attitudes of Survey Regarding Pain (KASRP) was used to assess pain knowledge. In addition, reflective questions related to the simulation were examined. Student preferences for education method and reactions to the simulation (SIM) were described. Undergraduate nursing students' knowledge of pain management is reported as inadequate. An emerging pedagogy used to educate undergraduate nurses in a safe, controlled environment is simulation. Literature reports of simulation to educate students' about pain management are limited. As part of the undergraduate nursing student clinical coursework, a post-operative pain management simulation, the SIM was developed. Students were required to assess pain levels and then manage the pain for a late adolescent male whose mother's fear of addiction was a barrier to pain management. The students completed an anonymous written survey that included selected questions from the KASRP and an evaluation of the SIM experience. The students' mean KASRP percent correct was 70.4% ± 8.6%. Students scored the best on items specific to pain assessment and worst on items specific to opiate equivalents and decisions on PRN orders. The students' overall KASRP score post simulation was slightly better than previous studies of nursing students. These results suggest that educators should consider simulations to educate about pain assessment and patient/family education. Future pain simulations should include more opportunities for students to choose appropriate pain medications when provided PRN orders. PMID:26697818

  4. Therapeutic strategies for cancer pain management.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, T. W.; Spiro, K.; Jay, L. L.

    1990-01-01

    Clinical issues related to treating the oncology pain patient have gained considerable attention in the medical and health care literature. Addressed are management strategies which focus specifically on cognitive-behavioral, psychosocial, and pharmacologic approaches to treating the oncology pain patient. Each strategy possesses unique qualities that can benefit the care and management of the cancer patient and provide a better understanding of the disease entity and the patient's ability to develop coping strategies that may be effective in understanding and confronting pain associated with cancer. PMID:2097904

  5. Update on extended-release opioids in pain management.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Chronic pain is frequently treated with our most potent analgesics, the opioids. While immediate-release opioids given every 3 - 4 h provide adequate analgesia for most patients with cancer pain and some patients with chronic nonmalignant pain, extended-release (ER) opioid formulations have been developed in the hope that patients with chronic pain would have improved analgesia, reduced side effects, more convenience, improved compliance, improved sleep and reduced nighttime pain. A more recent goal of the ER opioid product is to reduce prescription opioid addiction risk. This editorial will review the evidence that modern ER opioid formulations have advanced toward these goals. PMID:24299558

  6. Diagnosis and management of trigeminal neuropathic pains.

    PubMed

    Napeñas, Joel J; Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2011-07-01

    SUMMARY Trigeminal neuropathic pains have presented diagnostic and therapeutic challenges to providers. In addition, knowledge of pathophysiology, current classification systems, taxonomy and phenotyping of these conditions are incomplete. While trigeminal neuralgia is the most identifiable and studied, other conditions are being recognized and require distinct management approaches. Furthermore, other facial pain conditions such as atypical odontalgia and burning mouth syndrome are now considered to have neuropathic elements in their etiology. This article reviews current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of neuropathic pain conditions involving the trigeminal nerve, to include: trigeminal neuralgia, trigeminal neuropathic pain (with traumatically induced neuralgia and atypical odontalgia) and burning mouth syndrome. Treatment modalities are reviewed based on current and best available evidence. Trigeminal neuralgia is managed with anticonvulsant drugs as the first line, with surgical options providing variable results. Trigeminal neuropathic pain is managed medically based on the guidelines for other neuropathic pain conditions. Burning mouth syndrome is also treated with a number of neuropathic medications, both topical and systemic. In all these conditions, patients need to be thoroughly educated about their condition, involved in its management, and be provided with supportive and adjunctive treatment resources. PMID:24645661

  7. Current issues in postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Narinder

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative pain has been poorly managed for decades. Recent surveys from USA and Europe do not show any major improvement. Persistent postoperative pain is common after most surgical procedures, and after thoracotomy and mastectomy, about 50% of patients may experience it. Opioids remain the mainstay of postoperative pain treatment in spite of strong evidence of their drawbacks. Multimodal analgesic techniques are widely used but new evidence is disappointing. Regional anaesthetic techniques are the most effective methods to treat postoperative pain. Current evidence suggests that epidural analgesia can no longer be considered the 'gold standard'. Perineural techniques are good alternatives for major orthopaedic surgery but remain underused. Infiltrative techniques with or without catheters are useful for almost all types of surgery. Simple surgeon-delivered local anaesthetic techniques such as wound infiltration, preperitoneal/intraperitoneal administration, transversus abdominis plane block and local infiltration analgesia can play a significant role in improvement of postoperative care, and the last of these has changed orthopaedic practice in many institutions. Current postoperative pain management guidelines are generally 'one size fits all'. It is well known that pain characteristics such as type, location, intensity and duration vary considerably after different surgical procedures. Procedure-specific postoperative pain management recommendations are evidence based, and also take into consideration the role of anaesthetic and surgical techniques, clinical routines and risk-benefit aspects. The role of acute pain services to improve pain management and outcome is well accepted but implementation seems challenging. The need for upgrading the role of surgical ward nurses and collaboration with surgeons to implement enhanced recovery after surgery protocols with regular audits to improve postoperative outcome cannot be overstated. PMID:26509324

  8. The role of a pharmacist in ambulatory cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Ratka, Anna

    2002-06-01

    Cancer pain is progressive and complex. The multidimensional character of cancer pain requires comprehensive management by a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals. Pharmacotherapy is a cornerstone of cancer pain management. Pharmacists who are engaged in ambulatory cancer pain management can play a pivotal role in the pharmacotherapy of cancer pain by optimizing medication therapy, monitoring outcomes, enhancing adherence through patient education regarding drug use, pain and symptom control, educating other health professionals and students, and conducting research. To fully meet the therapeutic challenges of cancer pain, pharmacists need to improve their knowledge and attitudes about cancer pain and pain medications. PMID:12003689

  9. Pain management and health care policy.

    PubMed

    Naccache, Nicole; Abou Zeid, Hicham; Nasser Ayoub, Eliane; Antakly, Marie-Claire

    2008-01-01

    Opioid analgesics are essential for the management of moderate to severe pain. In spite of their documented effectiveness, opioids are often underutilized, a factor which has contributed significantly to the undertreatment of pain. Many countries have developed true national policies on cancer pain and palliative care, and in others only guidelines for care have been developed. Ideally, national policies facilitate and legislate not only a patient's right to care, but also the necessary components of education and drug availability which are so critical for the appropriate achievement of public health programs. PMID:19534079

  10. Management of Hip Pain in Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Ward, Derek; Parvizi, Javad

    2016-07-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of hip pain in the young adult remains a challenge. Recently, understanding of a few specific hip conditions has improved; most notably femoroacetabular impingement. The differential diagnosis of hip pain has also expanded significantly, offering new challenges and opportunities. Along with the diagnostic dilemma, optimal treatment strategies for many conditions have yet to be proven and are current areas of important inquiry. This article reviews the current research on hip pain in the young adult and presents an overview of diagnostic and management strategies. PMID:27241373

  11. Management of opioid addiction with buprenorphine: French history and current management.

    PubMed

    Poloméni, Pierre; Schwan, Raymund

    2014-01-01

    The way in which opioid addiction is managed in France is unique, as it is based on the prescription of buprenorphine by general practitioners and is dispensed by retail pharmacies. This policy has had a direct, positive impact on the number of deaths caused by heroin overdose, which was reduced by four-fifths between 1994 and 2002. In addition, certain associated comorbidities, such as infection with the human immunodeficiency virus, have also been reduced; the incidence of acquired immune deficiency syndrome in intravenous drug users fell from 25% in the mid-1990s to 6% in 2010. Since the implementation of this French model of opioid management, major scientific progress has been made, leading to a better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of addiction and of the management modalities required for its treatment. However, despite notable advances in scientific knowledge and in the implementation of devices, opioid addiction remains a major public health care issue in France, with 275,000-360,000 "problem drug users" being reported in 2011. The situation is still particularly worrying due to psychoactive substance use and misuse of opioid substitution treatments. Since 2003, there has been a persistent increase in the number of deaths and comorbidities related to opioid addiction, principally hepatitis C virus infection, which affects up to 40% of intravenous drug users. In France, the direct involvement of general practitioners in the management of opioid addiction is indisputable. Nevertheless, management could be optimized through better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of the disease, better knowledge of the pharmacology of opioid substitution treatments, and clear definition of short-, medium- and long-term treatment objectives. Data related to the management of opioid addiction by general practitioners in France have been published in 2005. Since then, the context has changed, other drugs were launched on the market such as

  12. The evolution of chronic opioid therapy and recognizing addiction.

    PubMed

    Daum, Akiva M; Berkowitz, Oren; Renner, John A

    2015-05-01

    Chronic pain is one of the most common complaints in the United States. Opioids have become a frequently prescribed treatment for patients with chronic nonmalignant pain. Concurrently, opioid use disorders have risen to epidemic levels. Studies investigating iatrogenic opioid addiction have been of limited quality. Aberrant drug-related behaviors may be warning signs of impending addiction. Proper screening and close monitoring are essential for managing patients on opioids for chronic nonmalignant pain. PMID:25853674

  13. [Physiotherapy and physical therapy in pain management].

    PubMed

    Egan, M; Seeger, D; Schöps, P

    2015-10-01

    Patients attend physiotherapy and physical therapy (PT) due to pain problems and/or functional impairments. Although the main focus for therapists has traditionally been physical examination and treatment of tissue structures and biomechanics, over the last few decades a growing body of research has highlighted the importance of central nervous system processing and psychosocial contributors to pain perception. Treatment with PT aims to reduce disability and suffering by reducing pain and increasing tolerance to movement. In Germany, pain management conducted by physiotherapists is currently undergoing major changes. Firstly, PT education is transitioning from a vocational to a degree level and additionally new concepts for improved multidisciplinary treatment approaches are being developed. However, there still remain substantial differences between therapists working in multidisciplinary pain clinics and those following medical referral in private practices. This article provides information on how national and international impulses have contributed to the development of different concepts of passive therapies and active/functional pain rehabilitation in Germany. In the future PT will need to provide more evidence about efficiency and modes of actions for different treatment options to selectively reason the application to patients with acute, subacute and chronic pain. PMID:26373552

  14. Health Care Experiences when Pain Substance Use Disorder Coexist: “Just Because I’m an Addict Doesn’t Mean I Don’t Have Pain

    PubMed Central

    St Marie, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report the healthcare experiences of 34 individuals with coexisting substance use disorder (SUD) and chronic pain. Design Narrative inquiry qualitative study of 90-minute interviews. Setting: Midwest metropolitan methadone clinic. Subjects All individuals had SUD, were treated for SUD with methadone. They all self- identified as having pain greater than 6 months. Methods This qualitative design allowed exploration of how participants made sense of events related to living with SUD and chronic pain. Narrative inquiry gives a consistent story from the participants’ perspective and researchers can perform additional analysis using the storyline. Thematic analysis occurred of their healthcare experiences. Results Results revealed that participants (a) spoke about how they used deception to obtain opioids when their addiction was out of control, (b) were disturbed by health care providers having little understanding or ability to help them with their painful condition, (c) felt they wanted to abuse opiates again when receiving poor treatment by the health care team, (d) related what went well in their health care to help them maintain their sobriety, and (e) recommended improvements on health care interventions that included effective treatment of pain. Conclusions Coexisting chronic pain and SUD create unique health care needs by mutually activating and potentiating the other. There are very few comparable studies exploring the experiences of individuals when pain and substance use disorder coexist. The health care team can better develop treatment plans and test interventions sensitive to their unique needs when they understand the experiences of this population. PMID:25041442

  15. [Pain management in patients with liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Antonio; Moreno, Luis A

    2014-01-01

    Pain management in patients with liver cirrhosis is a real challenge and is often inadequate due to a lack of therapeutic efficacy or the high incidence of adverse effects. The focus of treatment differs depending on whether the pain is acute or chronic and involves understanding the causative pathophysiological mechanism. Analgesics should be started with the minimum effective dose and should be titrated slowly with avoidance of polypharmacy. Adverse effects must be monitored, especially sedation and constipation, which predispose the patient to the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The first-line drug is paracetamol, which is safe at doses of 2-3g/day. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents are contraindicated because they can cause acute renal failure and/or gastrointestinal bleeding. Tramadol is a safe option for moderate-severe pain. The opioids with the best safety profile are fentanyl and hydromorphone, with methadone as an alternative. Topical treatment can reduce oral drug consumption. In neuropathic pain the first-line therapeutic option is gabapentin. The use of antidepressants such as amitriptyline can be considered in some patients. Interventional techniques are a valuable tool in moderate to severe pain, since they allow a reduction in drug therapy and consequently its adverse effects. Psychological treatment, physical therapy and rehabilitation should be considered as part of multimodality therapy in the management of chronic pain. PMID:24309482

  16. [Pain management of cognitively impaired patients].

    PubMed

    Czarnecki, K; Brauer, H; Köberlein, J

    2014-04-01

    Pain is a significant problem in clinical practice and its control is one of the most important challenging aspects as pain has a major impact on patients' quality of life and health care costs. Particularly vulnerable persons, like cognitively impaired patients are challenging for pain management and underline its increasing relevance.National and international studies showed significant differences concerning pain therapy between cognitively impaired and cognitively intact patients. A possible cause of this may be that patients who are cognitively impaired are only in a restricted way able to express their pain. Furthermore, knowledge gaps and reservations concerning the effect and dosage of analgesics among cognitively impaired patients could be identified on the involved professions.Further investigations in Germany are needed as deficient treatment remains a persistent problem and evidence-based data are missing. These investigations should describe the status quo of pain management for cognitively impaired patients and provide information which processes have to be adapted to the needs of these vulnerable patients. PMID:24668438

  17. Effective pain management and improvements in patients' outcomes and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Diane

    2015-06-01

    Adequate pain management is a compelling and universal requirement in health care. Despite considerable advancements, the adverse physiological and psychological implications of unmanaged pain remain substantially unresolved. Ineffective pain management can lead to a marked decrease in desirable clinical and psychological outcomes and patients' overall quality of life. Effective management of acute pain results in improved patient outcomes and increased patient satisfaction. Although research and advanced treatments in improved practice protocols have documented progressive improvements in management of acute and postoperative pain, little awareness of the effectiveness of best practices persists. Improved interventions can enhance patients' attitudes to and perceptions of pain. What a patient believes and understands about pain is critical in influencing the patient's reaction to the pain therapy provided. Use of interdisciplinary pain teams can lead to improvements in patients' pain management, pain education, outcomes, and satisfaction. PMID:26033099

  18. Managing chronic pain in survivors of torture.

    PubMed

    Amris, Kirstine; Williams, Amanda C de C

    2015-01-01

    All generalist and specialist clinicians are likely to encounter torture survivors among refugees and asylum seekers. A minority of people survive torture and a smaller minority reach a developed country; those who do tend to be the more resilient and resourceful. They have many health, social and welfare problems; persistent pain in the musculoskeletal system is one of the most common. There is little specific evidence on pain in survivors of torture; the guidelines on interdisciplinary specialist management are applicable. Most of the literature on refugee survivors of torture has an exclusive focus on psychological disorders, with particularly poor understanding of pain problems. This article summarizes the current status of assessment and treatment of pain problems in the torture survivor. PMID:25537694

  19. Interview: 21st century battlefield pain management.

    PubMed

    Buckenmaier, Colonel Chester 'trip'

    2013-07-01

    Colonel Chester 'Trip' Buckenmaier 3rd, MD, speaks to Dominic Chamberlain, Assistant Commissioning Editor: Colonel Buckenmaier is the current Director of the Defense and Veterans Center for Integrative Pain Management (MD, USA) and Fellowship Director of the Acute Pain Medicine and Regional Anesthesia program at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Washington DC (USA). He is an Associate Professor in Anesthesiology at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda (MD, USA), and a Diplomat with the American Board of Anesthesiology. He attended Catawba College (NC, USA), on a Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) scholarship, graduating with a degree in Biology and Chemistry in 1986. He then attended East Carolina University in Greenville (NC, USA), receiving a Master in Science in Biology in 1988. In 1992, he graduated from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, completing his Anesthesia Residency at Walter Reed. In addition, he completed a 1-year Fellowship in Regional Anesthesia at Duke University (NC, USA) in 2002, resulting in the creation of the only Acute Pain Medicine Fellowship in the US military at Walter Reed (Washington, DC, USA). In September 2003, he deployed with the 21st Combat Support Hospital to Balad (Iraq), and demonstrated that the use of advanced regional anesthesia can be accomplished in a forward deployed environment. He performed the first successful continuous peripheral nerve block for pain management in a combat support hospital. In April 2009, he deployed to Camp Bastion (Afghanistan) with the British military and ran the first acute pain service in a theater of war. The Defense and Veterans Center for Integrative Pain Medicine (DVCIPM) is dedicated to improving pain management throughout the continuum of care for service personnel and their families. PMID:24654812

  20. E-cigarettes for the management of nicotine addiction

    PubMed Central

    Knight-West, Oliver; Bullen, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we discuss current evidence on electronic cigarettes (ECs), a rapidly evolving class of nicotine delivery system, and their role in managing nicotine addiction, specifically in helping smokers to quit smoking and/or reduce the amount of tobacco they smoke. The current evidence base is limited to three randomized trials (only one compares ECs with nicotine replacement therapy) and a growing number of EC user surveys (n=6), case reports (n=4), and cohort studies (n=8). Collectively, these studies suggest modest cessation efficacy and a few adverse effects, at least with the short-term use. On this basis, we provide advice for health care providers on providing balanced information for patients who enquire about ECs. More research, specifically well-conducted large efficacy trials comparing ECs with standard smoking cessation management (eg, nicotine replacement therapy plus behavioral support) and long-term prospective studies for adverse events, are urgently needed to fill critical knowledge gaps on these products. PMID:27574480

  1. E-cigarettes for the management of nicotine addiction.

    PubMed

    Knight-West, Oliver; Bullen, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we discuss current evidence on electronic cigarettes (ECs), a rapidly evolving class of nicotine delivery system, and their role in managing nicotine addiction, specifically in helping smokers to quit smoking and/or reduce the amount of tobacco they smoke. The current evidence base is limited to three randomized trials (only one compares ECs with nicotine replacement therapy) and a growing number of EC user surveys (n=6), case reports (n=4), and cohort studies (n=8). Collectively, these studies suggest modest cessation efficacy and a few adverse effects, at least with the short-term use. On this basis, we provide advice for health care providers on providing balanced information for patients who enquire about ECs. More research, specifically well-conducted large efficacy trials comparing ECs with standard smoking cessation management (eg, nicotine replacement therapy plus behavioral support) and long-term prospective studies for adverse events, are urgently needed to fill critical knowledge gaps on these products. PMID:27574480

  2. Effectiveness of pain management following electrical injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Adrienne L K; Gomez, Manuel; Fish, Joel S

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of pain management after electrical injury. A retrospective hospital chart review was conducted among electrically injured patients discharged from the outpatient burn clinic of a rehabilitation hospital (July 1, 1999, to July 31, 2008). Demographic data, numeric pain ratings (NPRs) at initial assessment and discharge, medications, nonpharmacologic modalities, and their effects before admission and after rehabilitation were collected. Pain management effects were compared between high (> or =1000 v) and low (<1000 v) voltage, and between electrical contact and electrical flash patients, using Student's t-test and chi, with a P < .05 considered significant. Of 82 electrical patients discharged during the study period, 27 were excluded because of incomplete data, leaving 55 patients who had a mean age +/-SD of 40.7 +/- 11.3 years, TBSA of 19.2 +/- 22.7%, and treatment duration of 16.5 +/- 15.7 months. The majority were men (90.9%), most injuries occurred at work (98.2%), mainly caused by low voltage (n = 32, 58.2%), and the rest caused by high voltage (n = 18, 32.7%). Electrical contact was more common (54.5%) than electrical flash (45.5%). Pain was a chief complaint (92.7%), and hands were the most affected (61.8%), followed by head and neck (38.2%), shoulders (38.2%), and back torso (38.2%). Before rehabilitation, the most common medication were opioids (61.8%), relieving pain in 82.4%, followed by acetaminophen (47.3%) alleviating pain in 84.6%. Heat treatment was the most common nonpharmacologic modality (20.0%) relieving pain in 81.8%, followed by massage therapy (14.5%) alleviating pain in 75.0%. During the rehabilitation program, antidepressants were the most common medication (74.5%), relieving pain in 22.0%, followed by nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (61.8%), alleviating pain in 70.6%. Massage therapy was the most common nonpharmacologic modality (60.0%), alleviating pain in 75.8%, and then

  3. The Role of Acupuncture in Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shilpadevi; Sen, Sudipta; Bral, Matthew; Reddy, Shanthi; Bradley, Kevin K; Cornett, Elyse M; Fox, Charles J; Kaye, Alan David

    2016-03-01

    Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese practice of medicine that has gained popularity in Western culture and around the world. It involves the insertion of thin needles into the skin to stimulate nerves, muscles, and connective tissues throughout the body with the goal of alleviating pain, tension, and stress. More broadly, acupuncture is actually a family of different procedures. Conceptually, it is believed to stimulate the body's meridians, or energy-carrying channels, in an attempt to correct imbalances and to restore health. These benefits are thought to be derived from the proximity of acupoints with nerves through intracellular calcium ions. This lesson outlines a brief history of acupuncture and how it may be used to treat various types of physical and emotional pain and specific conditions, including overactive bladder and psoriasis. Acupuncture has been demonstrated to enhance endogenous opiates, such as dynorphin, endorphin, encephalin, and release corticosteroids, relieving pain and enhancing the healing process. There are associated risks; however, serious side effects are rare. When compared to traditional methods of pain management, more studies are warranted in order to establish the efficacy of acupuncture and its place in pain management. PMID:26896946

  4. Analysis of patient-related barriers in cancer pain management in Turkish patients.

    PubMed

    Bağçivan, Gülcan; Tosun, Nuran; Kömürcü, Seref; Akbayrak, Nalan; Ozet, Ahmet

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Barriers Questionnaire II (BQ-II) for Turkish patients and to define the patient-related barriers to cancer pain management in Turkey. For this, 170 patients with cancer who used or were still using analgesic medication for pain related to cancer participated in the study. It was found that patients have beliefs that may be barriers to optimal pain management, mostly in relation to addiction, and to a small extent, physical side effects. It was ascertained that male, unmarried patients, patients with cancer who also have another chronic disease, patients whose "average pain" intensity is more than 5 for the past 24 hours, and patients who use an inadequate analgesic have more beliefs that may be barriers to optimal pain management. It was concluded that the BQ-II is a valid and reliable scale in Turkey for defining patient-related barriers to cancer pain management. PMID:19692202

  5. [Optimal Postoperative Pain Management After Tonsillectomy: An Unsolved Problem].

    PubMed

    Guntinas-Lichius, O; Geißler, K; Preußler, N-P; Meißner, W

    2016-01-01

    Tonsillectomy is one of the most painful surgical procedures. Unfortunately, it is not unusual that the patient hear statement like: "There is no way around" or "You receive already enough pain killers". Asking the anesthetist or the otorhinolaryngologist, one may get to hear: "Pain after tonsillectomy is not a real problem. We have a reliable pain management protocol". In contradiction, many clinical studies are showing that many patients have persistent and even severe pain after tonsillectomy despite postoperative pain therapy. Considering the results of many controlled clinical trials analyzing manifold varieties of pain management regimes it becomes obvious that there is no standard pain therapy after tonsillectomy with reliable proof of sufficient pain suppression. This review wants to give an overview on the current status of clinical research on pain measurement methods and pain management after tonsillectomy. PMID:26756653

  6. Practical Guide to the Management of Acute and Chronic Pain in the Presence of Drug Tolerance for the Healthcare Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Singh-Gill, Harman; Kodumudi, Gopal; Kaye, Aaron Joshua; Urman, Richard D.; Kaye, Alan David

    2014-01-01

    Background Drug tolerance has been on the rise in recent years worldwide, and consequently, pain management in our population has become challenging. Methods Discussed in this review are commonly abused drugs and considerations for treating acute and chronic pain states in patients with substance disorders. Results After marijuana, alcohol, and tobacco, the most widely abused substances are oxycodone (Oxycontin), diazepam (Valium), and methylphenidate (Ritalin). Urine testing can detect metabolites of drugs used by patients and is useful for assessing drug abuse, medication diversion, and drug interactions. The comprehensive treatment of pain in a patient with addictive disorder or tolerance must address 3 issues: the patient's addiction, any associated psychiatric conditions, and the patient's pain. Eliciting a detailed history of drug abuse—illicit drugs as well as prescription drugs—and ascertaining if the patient is currently enrolled in a methadone maintenance program for the treatment of drug addiction is vital. Conclusion Medical observation, supportive care, multidisciplinary pain management, and timely interventions as necessary are the keys to safe outcomes in these patients. PMID:25249810

  7. Trends in management of myofacial pain

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Uma Shanker; Kumar, Lakshya; Mehta, Gagan; Singh, Nimisha; Singh, Geeta; Singh, Mayank; Yadav, Hemant Kumar

    2014-01-01

    We systematically reviewed the myofascial pain publications in the literature. The aim of this article is to review the methods of management and their outcome and factors associated with prognosis. The topics of interest in the diagnostic process are myofascial trigger points electromyography, jaw tracking, joint sound recorder, sonography, and vibratography, exclusion of other orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders. Management modalities are occlusal therapy, physiotherapy, multidimensional rehabilitation antinociceptive therapy, anti-inflammatory and analgesics, muscle relaxants, stretch, and spray technique, transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation, and in severe cases botulinum toxin may be tried. The disease required interdisciplinary interaction in terms of occlusal therapy, antinociceptive therapy and physiotherapy because management of the disease may be influenced by the specialist primarily treating the patients. PMID:25937719

  8. Review of perioperative pain management of opioid-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Mitra, Sukanya; Kai, Alice M; Kodumudi, Gopal; Gritsenko, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Opioid dependence can occur due to prescription opioid use, recreational opioid use, or as a result of opioid use for the treatment of drug addiction. Pain control in these patients is truly a challenge. It is important to understand the patient's condition such as the phenomenon of drug dependence, drug addiction, and pseudoaddiction to provide effective analgesia. This may be accomplished using appropriate multimodal therapies and by treatment of coexisting diseases such as anxiety. The goal is to provide effective analgesia, prevent cognitive and emotional problems, and produce a positive postoperative rehabilitation process. Multimodal options include pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches, psychological support, and interventional pain procedures, all focused toward providing optimal pain control while preventing undertreatment, withdrawal symptoms, and other complications. PMID:27575830

  9. Post-Craniotomy Pain Management: Beyond Opioids.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Lauren K; Naik, Bhiken I; Nemergut, Edward C; Durieux, Marcel E

    2016-10-01

    Craniotomy pain may be severe and is often undertreated. Pain management following craniotomy is a balancing act of achieving adequate analgesia but avoiding sedation, respiratory depression, hypercapnia, nausea and vomiting, and hypertension. Opioids are a first-line analgesic therapy; however, concern that opioid-related adverse effects (sedation, respiratory depression) may interfere with neurologic assessment and increase intracranial pressure has limited use of these drugs for intracranial surgery. Non-opioid analgesics avoid these effects and may be useful as part of a multimodal regimen for post-craniotomy pain. Regional scalp blocks, paracetamol, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are beneficial in the early post-operative period. Recent studies suggest a role for novel analgesics: dexmedetomidine, gabapentinoids, and ketamine, though additional studies are necessary. PMID:27604271

  10. A Proposed Model of the Effective Management of Children's Pain.

    PubMed

    Simons, Joan

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the various factors that contribute to the delivery of effective pain management. The current picture of pain management is complex and contradictory, with children in the hospital still experiencing unnecessary pain, nurses reporting better pain care than is evidenced, and parents who are reluctant to report their child's pain. There is a real need to focus on areas of excellence where pain management innovations have been successfully implemented. Five hospitals were visited in three countries: the United Kingdom, Sweden, and Australia, spending a week in each country. In all, 28 health care professionals were interviewed exploring innovations in pain management; the effect of improvements on children, parents, and nurses; and what helped and hindered the delivery of effective pain management. Better pain management provides nurses with confidence, which in turn gives children and parents confidence in their care and reduces anxiety for nurses. Resources, on the other hand, were a common issue in relation to obstacles to innovation. A recurring theme in all areas visited was the issue of culture and how it affected both negatively and positively on the management of children's pain. Strong leadership was integral to moving practice forward and to introducing the innovations that led to effective pain management. The key findings identified that underpin the effective management of children's pain are effective leadership, resources, and confidence; the consequences are less stress for children and nurses, more trusting relationships, and greater job satisfaction. A model of effective pain management is proposed. PMID:26256220

  11. Nurse case management program of chronic pain patients treated with methadone.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Louise; Pereira, John Xavier; Shir, Yoram

    2007-09-01

    Methadone treatment in chronic pain patients is still limited owing to misconceptions about addiction, safety, and its unique pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Nevertheless, patients with chronic noncancer pain are frequently treated with methadone at our Pain Centre either as the first opioid of choice, for specific pain conditions, or as a second-line opioid in patients developing tolerance or intractable side effects with other opioids. The aim of this study was to examine whether a nurse case management program of chronic pain patients treated with methadone is feasible and safe in trying to improve patients' care in an ambulatory setting. This program consisted of three phases: initial primary education session, telephone follow-up during methadone titration, and a subsequent maintenance period. The nurse case manager functioned autonomously and when required reported to and consulted the physician. The study included 75 subjects and was done over a nine-month period by completing follow-up questionnaires for every call. Of a total of 194 recorded calls, 41% were unscheduled. Forty-four percent of phone calls resulted in a methadone increase and 11% led to a decrease or cessation of methadone. No patients developed serious morbidity or mortality. Fifty-seven percent of patients were either satisfied or very satisfied with their treatment. A nurse-led case management program of methadone in chronic pain patients can improve patient care in an ambulatory setting. PMID:17723930

  12. CE: Intrathecal Pumps for Managing Cancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Textor, Laura Hanssen

    2016-05-01

    : It is estimated that more than 1.6 million new cases of cancer were diagnosed in the United States in 2014. Among patients with cancer, moderate to severe pain is prevalent and can be refractory, even with the use of systemic opioids, which may cause adverse effects that are difficult to manage at the doses required to control pain. When delivered intrathecally, however, opioids and adjuvant analgesics may provide greater pain relief at dramatically lower doses and with fewer adverse effects. Although the use of intrathecal drug delivery systems for cancer pain management has increased dramatically over the past several years and is expected to continue growing, patients with intrathecal pumps often report interactions with nurses unfamiliar with the technology. This article provides an overview of intrathecal pump therapy and explains how it prolongs duration of action and improves the efficacy of certain analgesics while reducing their adverse effects. The author discusses the costs involved, the patients most likely to derive benefit, the types of pumps currently used in the United States, the medications that can be delivered intrathecally, the potential risks and complications associated with intrathecal therapy, and the nursing care required by patients who use an intrathecal pump. PMID:27082422

  13. Chronic pain management as a barrier to pediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lindsay A; Meinert, Elizabeth; Baker, Kimberly; Knapp, Caprice

    2013-12-01

    Pain is common as a presenting complaint to outpatient and emergency departments for children, yet pain management represents one of the children's largest unmet needs. A child may present with acute pain for an intermittent issue or may have acute or chronic pain in the setting of chronic illness. The mainstay of treatment for pain uses a stepwise approach for pain management, such as set up by the World Health Organization. For children with life-limiting illnesses, the Institute of Medicine guidelines recommends referral upon diagnosis for palliative care, meaning that the child receives comprehensive services that include pain control in coordination with curative therapies; yet barriers remain. From the provider perspective, pain can be better addressed through a careful assessment of one's own knowledge, skills, and attitudes. The key components of pain management in children are multimodal, regardless of the cause of the pain. PMID:23329083

  14. Childhood functional abdominal pain: mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Korterink, Judith; Devanarayana, Niranga Manjuri; Rajindrajith, Shaman; Vlieger, Arine; Benninga, Marc A

    2015-03-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is one of the most common clinical syndromes encountered in day to day clinical paediatric practice. Although common, its definition is confusing, predisposing factors are poorly understood and the pathophysiological mechanisms are not clear. The prevailing viewpoint in the pathogenesis involves the inter-relationship between changes in hypersensitivity and altered motility, to which several risk factors have been linked. Making a diagnosis of functional abdominal pain can be a challenge, as it is unclear which further diagnostic tests are necessary to exclude an organic cause. Moreover, large, well-performed, high-quality clinical trials for effective agents are lacking, which undermines evidence-based treatment. This Review summarizes current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, risk factors and diagnostic work-up of functional abdominal pain. Finally, management options for children with functional abdominal pain are discussed including medications, dietary interventions, probiotics and psychological and complementary therapies, to improve understanding and to maximize the quality of care for children with this condition. PMID:25666642

  15. Evaluation of Evidence-based Nursing Pain Management Practice.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenjia; Eaton, Linda H; Gordon, Debra B; Hoyle, Christine; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2015-08-01

    It is important to ensure that cancer pain management is based on the best evidence. Nursing evidence-based pain management can be examined through an evaluation of pain documentation. The aim of this study was to modify and test an evaluation tool for nursing cancer pain documentation, and describe the frequency and quality of nursing pain documentation in one oncology unit via the electronic medical system. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used for this study at an oncology unit of an academic medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Medical records were examined for 37 adults hospitalized during April and May 2013. Nursing pain documentations (N = 230) were reviewed using an evaluation tool modified from the Cancer Pain Practice Index to consist of 13 evidence-based pain management indicators, including pain assessment, care plan, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, monitoring and treatment of analgesic side effects, communication with physicians, and patient education. Individual nursing documentation was assigned a score ranging from 0 (worst possible) to 13 (best possible), to reflect the delivery of evidence-based pain management. The participating nurses documented 90% of the recommended evidence-based pain management indicators. Documentation was suboptimal for pain reassessment, pharmacologic interventions, and bowel regimen. The study results provide implications for enhancing electronic medical record design and highlight a need for future research to understand the reasons for suboptimal nursing documentation of cancer pain management. For the future use of the data evaluation tool, we recommend additional modifications according to study settings. PMID:26256215

  16. A Cognitive-Behavioral Approach to Chronic Pain Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Lynda D.; Haverkamp, Beth E.

    1995-01-01

    Provides counselors with an introduction to the role of psychosocial processes in the experience of pain and offers assessment and intervention recommendations based on a cognitive-behavioral therapy approach to pain management. (JPS)

  17. Safely Managing Chronic Pain | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... filming of the movie Syriana, the internationally known actor tore the dura tissue that surrounds the brain ... constant pain. Finally, diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, the actor and TV host has been managing his pain ...

  18. Practical management of complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Eric S

    2009-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) describes a diversity of painful conditions following trauma, coupled with abnormal regulation of blood flow and sweating, trophic changes, and edema of skin. The excruciating pain and diverse autonomic dysfunctions in CRPS are disproportionate to any inciting and recovering event. CRPS type I is formerly identified as "reflex sympathetic dystrophy." CRPS type II is the new term for "causalgia" that always coexists with documented nerve injury. The present diagnostic criteria of CRPS I and II depend solely on meticulous history and physical examination without any confirmation by specific test procedure (or gold standard). There are only few clinical studies with large-scale randomized trials of pharmacologic agents on the treatment of CRPS. Bisphosphonates have been studied in multiple controlled trials, based on theoretical benefit of bone resorption, to offer pain relief and functional improvement in patients with CRPS. Many current rationales in treatment of CRPS (such as topical agents, antiepileptic drugs, tricyclic antidepressants, and opioids) are mainly dependent on efficacy originate in other common conditions of neuropathic pain. There are additional innovative therapies on CRPS that are still in infancy. No wonder all the treatment of individual CRPS case nowadays is pragmatic at best. Although the interventional therapies in CRPS (such as nerve blockade, sympathetic block, spinal cord and peripheral nerve stimulation, implantable spinal medication pumps, and chemical and surgical sympathectomy) may offer more rapid response, yet it is still controversial with unpredictable outcome. Nevertheless, we need to start pain management immediately with the ambition to restore function in every probable case of CRPS. An interdisciplinary setting with comprehensive approach (pharmacologic, interventional, and psychological in conjunction with rehabilitation pathway) has been proposed as protocol in the practical management

  19. Assessing and Managing Sleep Disturbance in Patients with Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Cheatle, Martin D; Foster, Simmie; Pinkett, Aaron; Lesneski, Matthew; Qu, David; Dhingra, Lara

    2016-06-01

    Chronic pain is associated with symptoms that may impair a patient's quality of life, including emotional distress, fatigue, and sleep disturbance. There is a high prevalence of concomitant pain and sleep disturbance. Studies support the hypothesis that sleep and pain have a bidirectional and reciprocal relationship. Clinicians who manage patients with chronic pain often focus on interventions that relieve pain, and assessing and treating sleep disturbance are secondary or not addressed. This article reviews the literature on pain and co-occurring sleep disturbance, describes the assessment of sleep disturbance, and outlines nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic treatment strategies to improve sleep in patients with chronic pain. PMID:27208716

  20. Biopsychosocial Approach to Assessing and Managing Patients with Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Cheatle, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain affects nearly one-third of the American population. Chronic pain can lead to a variety of problems for a pain sufferer, including developing secondary medical problems, depression, functional and vocational disability, opioid abuse and suicide. Current pain care models are deficient in providing a necessary comprehensive approach. Most patients with chronic pain are managed by primary care clinicians who are typically ill prepared to effectively and efficiently manage these cases. A biopsychosocial approach to evaluate and treat chronic pain is clinically and economically efficacious, but unique delivery systems are required to meet the challenge of access to specialty care. PMID:26614718

  1. When medication is not enough: nonpharmacologic management of pain.

    PubMed

    Gatlin, Christine G; Schulmeister, Lisa

    2007-10-01

    Patients with cancer commonly experience pain, which typically is controlled pharmacologically. Despite advances in pain management, pain continues to be undertreated. Nonpharmacologic measures may effectively manage pain but often are overlooked or underused. Nurses who are familiar with simple, noninvasive, nonpharmacologic measures, such as patient positioning, thermal measures, massage therapy, aromatherapy, and mind-body therapies, can identify and educate patients who may benefit from nonpharmacologic interventions. PMID:17962177

  2. Status of Neonatal Pain Assessment and Management in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razeq, Nadin M; Akuma, Akuma O; Jordan, Sue

    2016-08-01

    Current pain assessment and management in neonates need to be fully described before neonatal pain care can be optimized. This study's purpose was to report neonatal nurses' knowledge, existing pain assessment practice, and pharmacological pain management of neonates in Jordan. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted. Eighteen neonatal intensive care units in Jordan were included in the study. One hundred eighty-four neonatal nurses participated. Questionnaires were distributed by and returned to the neonatal intensive care units' managers between June and August 2014. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to present study results. Of 240 questionnaires distributed, 184 useable responses were returned. Nurses' knowledge regarding neonates' neurological development, nociception, and need for neonatal pain management was suboptimal. The analgesics most commonly used to treat neonatal pain were acetaminophen (52%) and lidocaine (45%). Benzodiazepines, phenobarbitone, and muscles relaxants were also used. Most nurses (54%-97%) reported that pain emanating from most painful procedures was never or rarely treated. Circumcision, lumbar punctures, and chest tube insertion were assigned the highest pain scores (≥9), but were rarely accompanied by analgesia. Pain assessment scales were more likely to be used, and procedural pain was more likely to be treated, in private hospitals than public hospitals. Neonates who require special care still suffer unnecessary pain that could be avoided and managed by following best practice recommendations. Disparities between developed and developing countries in quality of neonatal pain care appear to exist. Resources for education and routine care are needed to address these discrepancies. PMID:27108085

  3. Treating Chronic Pain in Veterans Presenting to an Addictions Treatment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilgen, Mark A.; Haas, Elizabeth; Czyz, Ewa; Webster, Linda; Sorrell, John T.; Chermack, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pain and substance use disorders frequently co-occur. The pharmacological treatment of pain is complicated in individuals with substance use disorders because of the potential for abuse and diversion of many prescription pain medications. One potential approach is to use a combination of cognitive-behavioral and acceptance-based strategies…

  4. Management of lumbar zygapophysial (facet) joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A; Falco, Frank JE; Boswell, Mark V

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic validity and therapeutic value of lumbar facet joint interventions in managing chronic low back pain. METHODS: The review process applied systematic evidence-based assessment methodology of controlled trials of diagnostic validity and randomized controlled trials of therapeutic efficacy. Inclusion criteria encompassed all facet joint interventions performed in a controlled fashion. The pain relief of greater than 50% was the outcome measure for diagnostic accuracy assessment of the controlled studies with ability to perform previously painful movements, whereas, for randomized controlled therapeutic efficacy studies, the primary outcome was significant pain relief and the secondary outcome was a positive change in functional status. For the inclusion of the diagnostic controlled studies, all studies must have utilized either placebo controlled facet joint blocks or comparative local anesthetic blocks. In assessing therapeutic interventions, short-term and long-term reliefs were defined as either up to 6 mo or greater than 6 mo of relief. The literature search was extensive utilizing various types of electronic search media including PubMed from 1966 onwards, Cochrane library, National Guideline Clearinghouse, clinicaltrials.gov, along with other sources including previous systematic reviews, non-indexed journals, and abstracts until March 2015. Each manuscript included in the assessment was assessed for methodologic quality or risk of bias assessment utilizing the Quality Appraisal of Reliability Studies checklist for diagnostic interventions, and Cochrane review criteria and the Interventional Pain Management Techniques - Quality Appraisal of Reliability and Risk of Bias Assessment tool for therapeutic interventions. Evidence based on the review of the systematic assessment of controlled studies was graded utilizing a modified schema of qualitative evidence with best evidence synthesis, variable from level I to level V

  5. Patient-related barriers to pain management in ambulatory AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, W; Passik, S; McDonald, M V; Rosenfeld, B; Smith, M; Kaim, M; Funesti-Esch, J

    1998-05-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that pain is dramatically undertreated among patients with AIDS and that opioids in particular are rarely prescribed. To date, however, there has been no systematic attempt to examine patient-related barriers to the management of pain in AIDS. This study examines potential patient-related barriers to pain management in patients with AIDS using the Barriers Questionnaire (Ward et al., Pain, 52 (1993) 319-324), and assesses gender, racial, and other demographic differences in the endorsement of these barriers. We surveyed 199 ambulatory patients with AIDS, recruited from numerous sites in New York City, as part of an ongoing study of pain and quality of life in ambulatory AIDS patients. In addition to obtaining demographic and medical data, we administered a number of self-report questionnaires including the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), the Brief Symptom Index (BSI), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS). Barriers to pain management were assessed using a modified version of the Barriers Questionnaire (BQ), including the original 27 questions from this self-report instrument along with an additional 12 items developed for an AIDS population. Results indicated that the most frequently endorsed BQ items were those concerning the addiction potential of pain medications and physical discomfort associated with opioid administration (e.g. injections) or side effects (e.g. nausea, constipation). There were no associations between age, gender, or HIV transmission risk factor and total scores on the BQ; however, Caucasian patients endorsed significantly fewer BQ items than did non-Caucasian patients and years of education was negatively correlated with BQ scores. Scores on the BQ were also significantly correlated with number of physical symptoms (MSAS) and scores on several self-report measures of psychological distress (the BSI Global Distress Index, BDI total scores). Patient

  6. Nurses' strategies for managing pain in the postoperative setting.

    PubMed

    Manias, Elizabeth; Bucknall, Tracey; Botti, Mari

    2005-03-01

    Acute pain is a significant problem in the postoperative setting. Patients report a lack of information about pain-control measures and ineffective pain control. Nurses continue to rely on pharmacologic measures and tend to under-administer analgesics. The purpose of this study was to determine the strategies nurses used to manage patients' pain in the postoperative setting. It also sought to examine the effect of context, including organization of care, nurses' prioritization of work activities, and pressures during a working shift, on their pain-management strategies. An observational design was used in two surgical units of a metropolitan teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Six fixed observation times were identified as key periods for pain activities, each comprising a 2-hour duration. An observation period was examined at least 12 times, resulting in the completion of 74 observations and the identification of 316 pain cases. Fifty-two nurses were observed during their normal day's work with postoperative patients. Six themes were identified: managing pain effectively; prioritizing pain experiences for pain management; missing pain cues for pain management; regulators and enforcers of pain management; preventing pain; and reactive management of pain. The findings highlighted the critical nature of communication between clinicians and patients and among clinicians. It also demonstrated the influence of time on management strategies and the relative importance that nurses place on nonpharmacologic measures in actual practice. This research, which portrays what happens in actual clinical practice, has facilitated the identification of new data that were not evident from other research studies. PMID:15917741

  7. Oxycodone controlled release in cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Biancofiore, Giuseppe

    2006-09-01

    illustrations of a lower incidence of side-effects in the central nervous system. It is therefore possible to conclude that oxycodone represents a valid alternative to morphine in the management of moderate to severe cancer pain, also as first-line treatment. PMID:18360598

  8. An introduction to the biopsychosocial complexities of managing wound pain.

    PubMed

    Richardson, C

    2012-06-01

    Using the Manchester pain management model (PAIN), this review discusses the care of acute and chronic wounds, focussing on the particular skills required to manage pain associated with different types of wounds, and addressing the important area of dressing change. Acute and chronic wounds can be associated with either acute or chronic pain, making management of wound pain a significant challenge. Pain can be of either nociceptive or neuropathic origin, and the longer it has been present, the more likely that psychological, social or cultural determinants influence the reactions seen in the patient. Understanding the biopsychosocial and cultural elements of pain enables the practitioner to prepare, assess, intervene and normalise effectively, during all aspects of wound care management. Utilising individualised evidence-based practice is essential to ensure that high-quality care is delivered in this key area. PMID:22886291

  9. Managing Heroin Addiction in an Outpatient Setting: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Malliarakis, Kate Driscoll

    2015-12-01

    Heroin use may be under-recognized among older adults. Baby Boomers are the largest age as well as the largest drug-using cohort in modern history. Although some drug users age out of their addiction, others do not. Nurses caring for older adults may come into contact with heroin users due to associated conditions or sequelae of their drug use that cause them to seek care. Few nurses are prepared to provide the care needed when heroin use accompanies other health problems. Using an individual example, the current article provides guidance for identifying heroin addiction, essential information about heroin use, and resources for guiding patients to experts for the comprehensive care needed for recovery. PMID:26594950

  10. Pain management among medical in-patients in Blantyre, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Muula, Adamson S; Misiri, Humphreys E

    2009-01-01

    Background Pain is a leading symptom which influences patients to seek medical attention. The management of pain among patients attending in-patient care in southern African countries has been little described. Information regarding the prevalence of pain and the quality of its management may be useful in guiding clinical decisions, training of health workers and health care quality improvements. Methods A hospital-based audit was conducted to estimate the prevalence of pain and examine the quality of its management among patients admitted to adult medical wards at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi in 2004. Data were abstracted from ward charts of consecutive patients' who had been either been discharged or had died within a specified period. Characteristics of interest included; socio-demographic data, presence or absence of pain at admission, characterization or description of pain when present, and drug treatment given. Data were analyzed to obtain frequencies and proportions of the characteristics and assess the prevalence of pain and quality of care. Results A total of 121 patients' case notes were reviewed and the prevalence of pain was recorded for 91 (75.2%) of the patients. Clinicians had recorded pertinent information regarding pain management with the following frequency: pain severity or intensity 5/91 (5.5%), alleviating factors 5 (5.5%), pain radiation 7 (7.7%), exacerbating factors in 9 (9.9%) and periodicity in 43 (47.3%) of the cases. Males with pain were more than 3 times more likely to receive analgesic as compared to females, p < 0.01. Paracetamol was the commonest analgesic prescribed. Conclusion Inadequate management of pain among patients attending medical wards at QECH was found. There is need for prospective studies to further characterize pain management and identify pain management gaps in Malawi. Interviews of clinicians and documentation of observations within clinical practice are likely to be of value. PMID

  11. Satisfaction with and Perception of Pain Management among Palliative Patients with Breakthrough Pain: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Pathmawathi, Subramanian; Beng, Tan Seng; Li, Lee Mei; Rosli, Roshaslina; Sharwend, Supermanian; Kavitha, Rasaiah R; Christopher, Boey Chiong Meng

    2015-08-01

    Breakthrough pain is a significant contributor to much suffering by patients. The experience of intense pain may interfere with, and affect, daily life functioning and has major consequences on patients' well-being if it is not well managed. The area of breakthrough pain has not been fully understood. This study thus aimed to explore the experiences of breakthrough pain among palliative patients. A qualitative study based on a series of open-ended interviews among 21 palliative patients suffering from pain at an urban tertiary hospital in Malaysia was conducted. Five themes were generated: (i) pain viewed as an unbearable experience causing misery in the lives of patients, (ii) deterioration of body function and no hope of recovery, (iii) receiving of inadequate pain management for pain, (iv) insensitivity of healthcare providers toward patients' pain experience, and (v) pain coping experiences of patients. The findings revealed that nonpharmacologic approaches such as psychosocial support should be introduced to the patients. Proper guidance and information should be given to healthcare providers to improve the quality of patient care. Healthcare providers should adopt a sensitive approach in caring for patients' needs. The aim is to meet the needs of the patients who want to be pain free or to attain adequate relief of their pain for breakthrough pain. PMID:26256219

  12. Pain management. Theological and ethical principles governing the use of pain relief for dying patients. Task Force on Pain Management, Catholic Health Association.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    Pain management is a societal problem because of concerns about the use of drugs, the belief that patients are not good judges of the severity of their pain, and an alarming level of ignorance about pain and its treatment among physicians, nurses, and other healthcare providers. The result is that patients suffer pain unnecessarily, even up to the point of their death. Pain management is also a clinical-practice problem. Courses in pain and symptom management are not readily available to medical and nursing students. And in clinical practice, good pain assessment is not easy to accomplish because pain is so subjective. Fortunately, with education, doctors and nurses can vastly improve their ability to assess and manage patients' pain. Additional problems in pain management relate to the manner in which healthcare is provided today: an acute disease-oriented model of hospital care, frequent transfers, fragmented care, inadequate reimbursement, market forces that drive up costs, and maldistribution of clinical services. In improving their ability to manage pain, professionals must understand the difference between pain and suffering, acute and chronic pain, and the sensory and emotional aspects of pain. Guiding principles include Church teaching and ethical principles, such as patient self-determination, holistic care, the principle of beneficence, distributive justice, and the common good. Pain management strategies that will be instrumental in formulating effective responses to these problems include expanding professional and community education, affording pain funding priority, establishing institutional policies and protocols, forming clinical teams, encouraging hospice and home care, and requiring accreditation in pain and symptom management. PMID:10145758

  13. Internet addiction: definition, assessment, epidemiology and clinical management.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Martha; Black, Donald W

    2008-01-01

    Internet addiction is characterized by excessive or poorly controlled preoccupations, urges or behaviours regarding computer use and internet access that lead to impairment or distress. The condition has attracted increasing attention in the popular media and among researchers, and this attention has paralleled the growth in computer (and Internet) access. Prevalence estimates vary widely, although a recent random telephone survey of the general US population reported an estimate of 0.3-0.7%. The disorder occurs worldwide, but mainly in countries where computer access and technology are widespread. Clinical samples and a majority of relevant surveys report a male preponderance. Onset is reported to occur in the late 20s or early 30s age group, and there is often a lag of a decade or more from initial to problematic computer usage. Internet addiction has been associated with dimensionally measured depression and indicators of social isolation. Psychiatric co-morbidity is common, particularly mood, anxiety, impulse control and substance use disorders. Aetiology is unknown, but probably involves psychological, neurobiological and cultural factors. There are no evidence-based treatments for internet addiction. Cognitive behavioural approaches may be helpful. There is no proven role for psychotropic medication. Marital and family therapy may help in selected cases, and online self-help books and tapes are available. Lastly, a self-imposed ban on computer use and Internet access may be necessary in some cases. PMID:18399706

  14. Spinal cord injury pain: mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Baastrup, Cathrine

    2012-06-01

    Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) may experience several types of chronic pain, including peripheral and central neuropathic pain, pain secondary to overuse, painful muscle spasms, and visceral pain. An accurate classification of the patient's pain is important for choosing the optimal treatment strategy. In particular, neuropathic pain appears to be persistent despite various treatment attempts. In recent years, we have gained increasing knowledge of SCI pain mechanisms from experimental models and clinical studies. Nevertheless, treatment remains difficult and inadequate. In line with the recommendations for peripheral neuropathic pain, evidence from randomized controlled treatment trials suggests that tricyclic antidepressants and pregabalin are first-line treatments. This review highlights the diagnosis and classification of SCI pain and recent improvements in the understanding of underlying mechanisms, and provides an update on treatment of SCI pain. PMID:22392531

  15. Laparoscopic surgery: a narrative review of pharmacotherapy in pain management.

    PubMed

    Sjövall, Sari; Kokki, Merja; Kokki, Hannu

    2015-11-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is widespread, and an increasing number of surgeries are performed laparoscopically. Early pain after laparoscopy can be similar or even more severe than that after open surgery. Thus, proactive pain management should be provided. Pain after laparoscopic surgery is derived from multiple origins; therefore, a single agent is seldom sufficient. Pain is most effectively controlled by a multimodal, preventive analgesia approach, such as combining opioids with non-opioid analgesics and local anaesthetics. Wound and port site local anaesthetic injections decrease abdominal wall pain by 1-1.5 units on a 0-10 pain scale. Inflammatory pain and shoulder pain can be controlled by NSAIDs or corticosteroids. In some patient groups, adjuvant drugs, ketamine and α2-adrenergic agonists can be helpful, but evidence on gabapentinoids is conflicting. In the present review, the types of pain that need to be taken into account while planning pain management protocols and the wide range of analgesic options that have been assessed in laparoscopic surgery are critically assessed. Recommendations to the clinician will be made regarding how to manage acute pain and how to prevent persistent postoperative pain. It is important to identify patients at the highest risk for severe and prolonged post-operative pain, and to have a proactive strategy in place for these individuals. PMID:26493289

  16. Standardization of pain management in the postanesthesia care unit.

    PubMed

    Knowles, R

    1996-12-01

    A project is described in which a standard in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) for managing patients with acute pain was implemented. The nurses' documentation and their perceptions concerning pain management were assessed. The data collected from the pre-questionnaires showed misconceptions about pain medication, lack of knowledge about measurement tools, and value systems that were inconsistent with recognizing a comfortable and safe "comfort level" of pain for patients. The pre-audit of PACU nursing documents showed that the assessment of pain was noted in terms of presence or absence but not quantified by the use of a measurement standard. After the implementation of a pain standard, results of the post-questionnaires showed changes in behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge that showed significant increases in the use of a numerical or visual pain tool, and an increase in documented evaluation of pain. PMID:9069862

  17. An update on the management of chronic lumbar discogenic pain.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2015-09-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease without disc herniation, also known as discogenic pain, is an elusive diagnosis of chronic low back pain. Lumbar provocation discography and fusion surgery have been frequently utilized for several decades as the gold standards for the diagnosis and treatment of symptomatic lumbar discogenic pain, though controversial, based on conjecture, rather than evidence. In addition to lumbar fusion, various other operative and nonoperative modalities of treatments are available in managing chronic lumbar discogenic pain. This review provides an updated assessment of the management of chronic lumbar discogenic pain with a critical look at the many modalities of treatments that are currently available. PMID:26255722

  18. Drug Management of Visceral Pain: Concepts from Basic Research

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mellar P.

    2012-01-01

    Visceral pain is experienced by 40% of the population, and 28% of cancer patients suffer from pain arising from intra- abdominal metastasis or from treatment. Neuroanatomy of visceral nociception and neurotransmitters, receptors, and ion channels that modulate visceral pain are qualitatively or quantitatively different from those that modulate somatic and neuropathic pain. Visceral pain should be recognized as distinct pain phenotype. TRPV1, Na 1.8, and ASIC3 ion channels and peripheral kappa opioid receptors are important mediators of visceral pain. Mu agonists, gabapentinoids, and GABAB agonists reduce pain by binding to central receptors and channels. Combinations of analgesics and adjuvants in animal models have supra-additive antinociception and should be considered in clinical trials. This paper will discuss the neuroanatomy, receptors, ion channels, and neurotransmitters important to visceral pain and provide a basic science rationale for analgesic trials and management. PMID:22619712

  19. Evaluating pain management delivered by direct care nurses.

    PubMed

    Tapp, Jane; Kropp, Denise

    2005-01-01

    It is difficult to assess the effectiveness of the delivery of pain management care because pain management is a complex process. This article describes a quality assurance study that was conducted on a surgical unit at a community teaching hospital, which is a member of a 1200 licensed inpatient beds multihospital system, to determine the effectiveness of pain management at the unit level. For the study, a Chart Audit Analysis Tool was developed and used to review second postoperative day charts of patients who had undergone a major abdominal surgery. The Chart Audit Analysis Tool quantifies by weighted indicators 2 outcomes measures, nurses' care delivery and pharmacologic management. The Chart Audit Analysis Tool, along with the results of a test of the nurses' knowledge and attitudes about pain management, provides nurse managers a quick and easy method to identify strengths and weaknesses of pain management at the unit level. PMID:15839297

  20. Reflecting on pain management for patients with osteoarthritis and other rheumatic disorders: there's more to pain management than managing pain

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Danielle; Chang, Eric Y; Pang, Winnie; Shinada, Shuntaro; Panush, Richard S

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Medical progress is measured by advances in science and technology. The pace of discovery will surely accelerate. We are increasingly challenged not only to assimilate new information, but also to reconcile our learning with our art. We present the common clinical problem of managing pain in osteoarthritis as a paradigm for this dilemma in contemporary patient care. We do not yet have the understanding and interventions to do this optimally for all with osteoarthritis, leaving us with uncertainties as we struggle to care for these patients. In a world of growing complexity and sophistication we must not overlook the person who is our patient. It is easy to be seduced by electronic and informational advances, to be entranced by machinery, and to forget the unique individuality and needs of each patient. Osler taught that “the practice of medicine is an art, based on science”. This doesn't change. PMID:24654815

  1. Reflecting on pain management for patients with osteoarthritis and other rheumatic disorders: there's more to pain management than managing pain.

    PubMed

    Perret, Danielle; Chang, Eric Y; Pang, Winnie; Shinada, Shuntaro; Panush, Richard S

    2013-07-01

    SUMMARY Medical progress is measured by advances in science and technology. The pace of discovery will surely accelerate. We are increasingly challenged not only to assimilate new information, but also to reconcile our learning with our art. We present the common clinical problem of managing pain in osteoarthritis as a paradigm for this dilemma in contemporary patient care. We do not yet have the understanding and interventions to do this optimally for all with osteoarthritis, leaving us with uncertainties as we struggle to care for these patients. In a world of growing complexity and sophistication we must not overlook the person who is our patient. It is easy to be seduced by electronic and informational advances, to be entranced by machinery, and to forget the unique individuality and needs of each patient. Osler taught that "the practice of medicine is an art, based on science". This doesn't change. PMID:24654815

  2. Multimodal pain management and the future of a personalized medicine approach to pain.

    PubMed

    Manworren, Renee C B

    2015-03-01

    In the soon-to-be-released clinical practice guidelines from the American Pain Society, multimodal analgesia is recommended for pain management after all surgical procedures. Multimodal analgesia is a surgery-specific population-based approach to optimize pain relief by treating pain through multiple mechanisms along multiple sites of the nociceptive pathway. The reliance on multiple medications and therapies inherent to the multimodal approach also may address individual patient differences in analgesic pharmacogenetics (ie, the influence of allelic differences in single genes and the associated variability in specific medication responses). Perioperative nurses may see a shift from surgery-specific population-based multimodal analgesic protocols to a personalized medicine approach as knowledge of the genetic influences of analgesic metabolism and pain sensitivity is translated into clinical practice. Personalized medicine is proposed as an individualized pain management treatment plan that eventually may be based on each patient's genetic coding for metabolism of analgesics and pain sensitivity. PMID:25707723

  3. Clinical Management of Pain in Advanced Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Claribel P.L.; MacLeod, Nicholas; Laird, Barry J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer in the world and pain is its most common symptom. Pain can be brought about by several different causes including local effects of the tumor, regional or distant spread of the tumor, or from anti-cancer treatment. Patients with lung cancer experience more symptom distress than patients with other types of cancer. Symptoms such as pain may be associated with worsening of other symptoms and may affect quality of life. Pain management adheres to the principles set out by the World Health Organization’s analgesic ladder along with adjuvant analgesics. As pain can be caused by multiple factors, its treatment requires pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures from a multidisciplinary team linked in with specialist palliative pain management. This review article examines pain management in lung cancer. PMID:23115483

  4. Surgeons' aims and pain assessment strategies when managing paediatric post-operative pain: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Twycross, Alison M; Williams, Anna M; Finley, G Allen

    2015-12-01

    Children experience moderate to severe pain post-operatively. Nurses have been found to have a variety of aims in this context. Surgeons' aims when managing post-operative pain have not been explored. This qualitative study set out to explore paediatric surgeons' aims when managing post-operative pain in one paediatric hospital in Canada. Consultant surgeons (n = 8) across various specialities took part in semi-structured interviews. Surgeons' overarching aim was to keep the child comfortable. Various definitions of comfortable were given, relating to the child's experience of pain itself and their ability to undertake activities of daily living. Children's behavioural pain cues seem to be a primary consideration when making treatment decisions. Parents' views regarding their child's pain were also seen as important, suggesting children may not be seen as competent to make decisions on their own behalf. The need to maintain a realistic approach was emphasised and pain management described as a balancing act. Surgeons may draw on both tacit and explicit knowledge when assessing children's pain. There appears to be an expectation among surgeons that some pain is to be expected post-operatively and that the diagnostic value of pain may, in some cases, supersede concerns for the child's pain experience. PMID:24728398

  5. Managing Chronic Pain in Children and Adolescents: A Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    Landry, Bradford W; Fischer, Philip R; Driscoll, Sherilyn W; Koch, Krista M; Harbeck-Weber, Cynthia; Mack, Kenneth J; Wilder, Robert T; Bauer, Brent A; Brandenburg, Joline E

    2015-11-01

    Chronic pain in children and adolescents can be difficult for a single provider to manage in a busy clinical setting. Part of this difficulty is that pediatric chronic pain not only impacts the child but also the families of these children. In this review article, we discuss etiology and pathophysiology of chronic pain, along with variables that impact the severity of chronic pain and functional loss. We review diagnosis and management of selected chronic pain conditions in pediatric patients, including headache, low back pain, hypermobility, chronic fatigue, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, and complex regional pain syndrome. For each condition, we create a road map that contains therapy prescriptions, exercise recommendations, and variables that may influence pain severity. Potential medications for these pain conditions and associated symptoms are reviewed. A multidisciplinary approach for managing children with these conditions, including pediatric pain rehabilitation programs, is emphasized. Lastly, we discuss psychological factors and interventions for pediatric chronic pain and potential complementary and alternative natural products and interventions. PMID:26568508

  6. Management of chronic pain in osteoporosis: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Paolucci, Teresa; Saraceni, Vincenzo Maria; Piccinini, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) is a pathological condition that manifests clinically as pain, fractures, and physical disability, resulting in the loss of independence and the need for long-term care. Chronic pain is a multidimensional experience with sensory, affective, and cognitive aspects. Age can affect each of these dimensions and the pain that is experienced. In OP, chronic pain appears to have sensory characteristics and properties of nociceptive and neuropathic pain. Its evaluation and treatment thus require a holistic approach that focuses on the specific characteristics of this population. Pain management must therefore include pharmacological approaches, physiotherapy interventions, educational measures, and, in rare cases, surgical treatment. Most rehabilitative treatments in the management of patients with OP do not evaluate pain or physical function, and there is no consensus on the effects of rehabilitation therapy on back pain or quality of life in women with OP. Pharmacological treatment of pain in patients with OP is usually insufficient. The management of chronic pain in patients with OP is complicated with regard to its diagnosis, the search for reversible secondary causes, the efficacy and duration of oral bisphosphonates, and the function of calcium and vitamin D. The aim of this review is to discuss the most appropriate solutions in the management of chronic pain in OP. PMID:27099529

  7. Arthritis and pain. Psychosocial aspects in the management of arthritis pain.

    PubMed

    Backman, Catherine L

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize psychosocial factors associated with arthritis pain and highlight recent evidence for psychosocial approaches to managing arthritis pain. By definition, psychosocial factors refer to two dimensions of experience: the psychological (cognitive, affective) and social (interacting with others, engaging in life activities). Psychosocial factors influence the perception of pain and the presence of pain influences psychological well-being and social participation. After discussing the impact of arthritis pain on participation in work, family life, and leisure, evidence for psychosocial interventions is summarized, emphasizing reviews and studies published from January 2000 to August 2006. PMID:17169138

  8. Current practices in cancer pain management in Asia: a survey of patients and physicians across 10 countries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Chul; Ahn, Jin Seok; Calimag, Maria Minerva P; Chao, Ta Chung; Ho, Kok Yuen; Tho, Lye Mun; Xia, Zhong-Jun; Ward, Lois; Moon, Hanlim; Bhagat, Abhishek

    2015-08-01

    In order to implement more effective policies for cancer pain management, a better understanding of current practices is needed. Physicians managing cancer pain and patients experiencing cancer pain were randomly surveyed across 10 Asian countries to assess attitudes and perceptions toward cancer pain management. A total of 463 physicians (77.3% oncologists) with a median experience of 13 years were included. Medical school training on opioid use was considered inadequate by 30.5% of physicians and 55.9% indicated ≤ 10 h of continuing medical education (CME). Of the 1190 patients included, 1026 reported moderate-to-severe pain (median duration, 12 months). Discordance was observed between physician and patient outcomes on pain assessment with 88.3% of physicians reporting pain quantification, while 49.5% of patients claimed that no scale was used. Inadequate assessment of pain was recognized as a barrier to therapy optimization by 49.7% of physicians. Additional barriers identified were patients' reluctance owing to fear of addiction (67.2%) and adverse events (65.0%), patients' reluctance to report pain (52.5%), excessive regulations (48.0%) and reluctance to prescribe opioids (42.8%). Opioid use was confirmed only in 53.2% (286/538) of patients remembering their medication. Pain affected the activities of daily living for 81.3% of patients. These findings highlight the need for better training and CME opportunities for cancer pain management in Asia. Collaborative efforts between physicians, patients, policy makers, and related parties may assist in overcoming the barriers identified. Addressing the opioid stigma and enhancing awareness is vital to improving current standards of patient care. PMID:25914253

  9. Current practices in cancer pain management in Asia: a survey of patients and physicians across 10 countries

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Chul; Ahn, Jin Seok; Calimag, Maria Minerva P; Chao, Ta Chung; Ho, Kok Yuen; Tho, Lye Mun; Xia, Zhong-Jun; Ward, Lois; Moon, Hanlim; Bhagat, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    In order to implement more effective policies for cancer pain management, a better understanding of current practices is needed. Physicians managing cancer pain and patients experiencing cancer pain were randomly surveyed across 10 Asian countries to assess attitudes and perceptions toward cancer pain management. A total of 463 physicians (77.3% oncologists) with a median experience of 13 years were included. Medical school training on opioid use was considered inadequate by 30.5% of physicians and 55.9% indicated ≤10 h of continuing medical education (CME). Of the 1190 patients included, 1026 reported moderate-to-severe pain (median duration, 12 months). Discordance was observed between physician and patient outcomes on pain assessment with 88.3% of physicians reporting pain quantification, while 49.5% of patients claimed that no scale was used. Inadequate assessment of pain was recognized as a barrier to therapy optimization by 49.7% of physicians. Additional barriers identified were patients’ reluctance owing to fear of addiction (67.2%) and adverse events (65.0%), patients’ reluctance to report pain (52.5%), excessive regulations (48.0%) and reluctance to prescribe opioids (42.8%). Opioid use was confirmed only in 53.2% (286/538) of patients remembering their medication. Pain affected the activities of daily living for 81.3% of patients. These findings highlight the need for better training and CME opportunities for cancer pain management in Asia. Collaborative efforts between physicians, patients, policy makers, and related parties may assist in overcoming the barriers identified. Addressing the opioid stigma and enhancing awareness is vital to improving current standards of patient care. PMID:25914253

  10. Acute pain management curriculum for emergency medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Motov, Sergey M; Marshall, John P

    2011-10-01

    Pain is the most common reason people visit emergency departments (EDs); this implies that emergency physicians (EPs) should be experts in managing acute painful conditions. The current trend in the literature, however, demonstrates that EPs possess inadequate knowledge and lack formal training in acute pain management. The purpose of this article is to create a formal educational curriculum that would assist emergency medicine (EM) residents in proper assessment and treatment of acute pain, as well as in providing a solid theoretical and practical knowledge base for managing acute pain in the ED. The authors propose a series of lectures, case-oriented study groups, practical small group sessions, and class-specific didactics with the goal of enhancing the theoretical and practical knowledge of acute pain management in the ED. PMID:21692900

  11. Herbal medicines for the management of opioid addiction: safe and effective alternatives to conventional pharmacotherapy?

    PubMed

    Ward, Jeanine; Rosenbaum, Christopher; Hernon, Christina; McCurdy, Christopher R; Boyer, Edward W

    2011-12-01

    Striking increases in the abuse of opioids have expanded the need for pharmacotherapeutic interventions. The obstacles that confront effective treatment of opioid addiction - shortage of treatment professionals, stigma associated with treatment and the ability to maintain abstinence - have led to increased interest in alternative treatment strategies among both treatment providers and patients alike. Herbal products for opioid addiction and withdrawal, such as kratom and specific Chinese herbal medications such as WeiniCom, can complement existing treatments. Unfortunately, herbal treatments, while offering some advantages over existing evidence-based pharmacotherapies, have poorly described pharmacokinetics, a lack of supportive data derived from well controlled clinical trials, and severe toxicity, the cause for which remains poorly defined. Herbal products, therefore, require greater additional testing in rigorous clinical trials before they can expect widespread acceptance in the management of opioid addiction. PMID:22133323

  12. Pain assessment and management strategies for elderly patients.

    PubMed

    MacSorley, Robyn; White, Jill; Conerly, Vicki H; Walker, Jean T; Lofton, Susan; Ragland, Gaye; Davey, DeBrynda; Robertson, Amy

    2014-05-01

    Home healthcare nurses play a critical role in pain assessment and management in elderly patients. People 65 years of age and older are the largest consumers of prescription and nonprescription pain medications in the United States and are at increased risk for adverse reactions and inadequate pain management. This article seeks to explore strategies to assist hospice and home healthcare nurses in assessing and managing elderly patients' pain. The goal is to provide tools to assist nurses in streamlining elderly patient care and improving quality of life while decreasing mortality and morbidity for this patient population. PMID:24802598

  13. Pharmacological management of pain after intracranial surgery.

    PubMed

    Leith, B

    1998-08-01

    Some healthcare professionals continue to believe that patients experience minimal pain and discomfort after intracranial surgery. However, clinical experience indicates that many patients experience significant pain after craniotomy. Despite research which supports the use of morphine as a method of pain control after intracranial surgery, some healthcare professionals continue to administer only codeine, which may be ineffective. Inadequate pain control can be associated with a variety of negative physiological and psychological consequences. Neuroscience nurses are challenged to re-evaluate their current beliefs and practices related to pain and pain control after intracranial surgery. PMID:9791776

  14. State Policies Regulating the Practice of Pain Management: Statutes, Rules, and Guidelines That Shape Pain Care.

    PubMed

    Twillman, Robert K; Gilson, Aaron M; Duensing, Kathryn N

    2016-06-01

    In response to increased awareness of prescription opioid misuse, abuse, addiction, diversion, and overdose, states have promulgated a large number of public policies intended to regulate the practice of pain medicine. Nearly every state now has at least 1 type of policy; others only provide recommendations to physicians. This article reviews the existing policies and extracts specific provisions within each of them. Although there are many similarities across policies, unique features are found in some and are specifically reviewed. This review can serve as a quick reference for policymakers and as a guide for researchers interested in the impacts of such policies. PMID:27208718

  15. Pain mechanisms and the management of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Alexander, J; Black, A

    1992-04-01

    The nociceptive system is not fixed, but changes in response to its input and activity. This 'plasticity' comprises dynamic developments of both pro- and antinociceptive processes. Recent advances in the understanding of these processes have important implications for the treatment of persistent neuropathic pain. PMID:1623250

  16. Adherence of pain assessment to the German national standard for pain management in 12 nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Osterbrink, Jürgen; Bauer, Zsuzsa; Mitterlehner, Barbara; Gnass, Irmela; Kutschar, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain is very common among nursing home residents. The assessment of pain is a prerequisite for effective multiprofessional pain management. Within the framework of the German health services research project, ‘Action Alliance Pain-Free City Muenster’, the authors investigated pain assessment adherence according to the German national Expert Standard for Pain Management in Nursing, which is a general standard applicable to all chronic/acute pain-affected persons and highly recommended for practice. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the state of pain assessment and to identify need for improvement in 12 nursing homes in a German city. METHODS: In the present study, the authors used an ex-post-facto design (survey methodology). Available written policies for routine pain assessment in residents ≥65 years of age were reviewed and a standardized online survey completed by 151 of 349 nurses in 12 nursing home facilities was conducted between September 2010 and April 2011. RESULTS: Most of the included nursing homes provided written policies for pain assessment, and the majority of nurses reported that they assess and regularly reassess pain. However, observational tools for residents with severe cognitive impairment and written reassessment schedules were lacking in many facilities or were inconsistent. CONCLUSIONS: Essentially, pain assessment appeared to be feasible in the majority of the German nursing homes studied. However, the absence or inconsistency of reassessment schedules indicate that pain management guidelines should include a detailed and explicit reassessment schedule for the heterogenic needs of nursing home residents. For residents with severe cognitive impairment, assessment tools are needed that are simple to use and clearly indicate the presence or absence of pain. PMID:24851238

  17. Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Interventional Pain Management in Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Sushma; Gupta, Maynak

    2015-01-01

    Intractable cancer pain not amenable to standard oral or parenteral analgesics is a horrifying truth in 10–15% of patients. Interventional pain management techniques are an indispensable arsenal in pain physician's armamentarium for severe, intractable pain and can be broadly classified into neuroablative and neuromodulation techniques. An array of neurolytic techniques (chemical, thermal, or surgical) can be employed for ablation of individual nerve fibers, plexuses, or intrathecalneurolysis in patients with resistant pain and short life-expectancy. Neuraxial administration of drugs and spinal cord stimulation to modulate or alter the pain perception constitutes the most frequently employed neuromodulation techniques. Lately, there is a rising call for early introduction of interventional techniques in carefully selected patients simultaneously or even before starting strong opioids. After decades of empirical use, it is the need of the hour to head towards professionalism and standardization in order to secure credibility of specialization and those practicing it. Even though the interventional management has found a definite place in cancer pain, there is a dearth of evidence-based practice guidelines for interventional therapies in cancer pain. This may be because of paucity of good quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating their safety and efficacy in cancer pain. Laying standardized guidelines based on existing and emerging evidence will act as a foundation step towards strengthening, credentialing, and dissemination of the specialty of interventional cancer pain management. This will also ensure an improved decision-making and quality of life (QoL) of the suffering patients. PMID:26009665

  18. Evidence-based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Interventional Pain Management in Cancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Sushma; Gupta, Maynak

    2015-01-01

    Intractable cancer pain not amenable to standard oral or parenteral analgesics is a horrifying truth in 10-15% of patients. Interventional pain management techniques are an indispensable arsenal in pain physician's armamentarium for severe, intractable pain and can be broadly classified into neuroablative and neuromodulation techniques. An array of neurolytic techniques (chemical, thermal, or surgical) can be employed for ablation of individual nerve fibers, plexuses, or intrathecalneurolysis in patients with resistant pain and short life-expectancy. Neuraxial administration of drugs and spinal cord stimulation to modulate or alter the pain perception constitutes the most frequently employed neuromodulation techniques. Lately, there is a rising call for early introduction of interventional techniques in carefully selected patients simultaneously or even before starting strong opioids. After decades of empirical use, it is the need of the hour to head towards professionalism and standardization in order to secure credibility of specialization and those practicing it. Even though the interventional management has found a definite place in cancer pain, there is a dearth of evidence-based practice guidelines for interventional therapies in cancer pain. This may be because of paucity of good quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating their safety and efficacy in cancer pain. Laying standardized guidelines based on existing and emerging evidence will act as a foundation step towards strengthening, credentialing, and dissemination of the specialty of interventional cancer pain management. This will also ensure an improved decision-making and quality of life (QoL) of the suffering patients. PMID:26009665

  19. Evaluation of Evidence-Based Nursing Pain Management Practice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wenjia; Eaton, Linda H.; Gordon, Debra B.; Hoyle, Christine; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is important to ensure that cancer pain management is based on the best evidence. Nursing evidence-based pain management can be examined through an evaluation of pain documentation. Aims This study aimed to (a) modify and test an evaluation tool for nursing cancer pain documentation, and (b) describe the frequency and quality of nursing pain documentation in one oncology unit via electronic medical system. Design and Setting A descriptive cross-sectional design was used for this study at an oncology unit of an academic medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Methods Medical records were examined for 37 adults hospitalized during April and May of 2013. Nursing pain documentations (N = 230) were reviewed using an evaluation tool modified from the Cancer Pain Practice Index to consist of 13 evidence-based pain management indicators, including pain assessment, care plan, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, monitoring and treatment of analgesic side effects, communication with physicians, and patient education. Individual nursing documentation was assigned a score from 0 (worst possible) to 13 (best possible), to reflect the delivery of evidence-based pain management. Results The participating nurses documented 90% of the recommended evidence-based pain management indicators. Documentation was suboptimal for pain reassessment, pharmacologic interventions, and bowel regimen. Conclusions The study results provide implications for enhancing electronic medical record design and highlight a need for future research to understand the reasons for suboptimal nursing documentation of cancer pain management. For the future use of the data evaluation tool, we recommend additional modifications according to study settings. PMID:26256215

  20. Paediatric Pain Management: Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Jennie C.I; Zeltzer, Lonnie K.

    2008-01-01

    Children undergo acute painful procedures and many also experience chronic pain. Due to their developing systems, infants and children may be at greater risk than adults for protracted pain sensitivity. There is a need to manage acute and chronic paediatric pain to reduce children's suffering and to prevent future pain problems. Consistent with a biopsychosocial perspective, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) should be considered in management of acute and chronic paediatric pain. Although research is limited for paediatric pain, CAM interventions receiving the most empirical attention include hypnotherapy, acupuncture and music therapy. Evidence also exists for the therapeutic benefits of yoga, massage, humor therapy and the use of certain biological based therapies. PMID:26525515

  1. Paediatric Pain Management: Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Evans, Subhadra; Tsao, Jennie C I; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2008-09-01

    Children undergo acute painful procedures and many also experience chronic pain.Due to their developing systems, infants and children may be at greater risk than adults for protracted pain sensitivity.There is a need to manage acute and chronic paediatric pain to reduce children's suffering and to prevent future pain problems.Consistent with a biopsychosocial perspective, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) should be considered in management of acute and chronic paediatric pain.Although research is limited for paediatric pain, CAM interventions receiving the most empirical attention include hypnotherapy, acupuncture and music therapy. Evidence also exists for the therapeutic benefits of yoga, massage, humor therapy and the use of certain biological based therapies. PMID:26525515

  2. Improving the Management of Pain in Hospitalized Adults

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, R. Sean; Meier, Diane E.; Fischberg, Daniel; Moore, Carlton; Degenholtz, Howard; Litke, Ann; Maroney-Galin, Catherine; Siu, Albert L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pain is a major quality issue. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a series of interventions on pain management. Methods This controlled clinical trial (April 1, 2002, to February 28, 2003) involved the staggered implementation of 3 interventions into 2 blocks of matched hospital units. The setting was an 1171-bed hospital. A total of 3964 adults were studied. Interventions included education, standardized pain assessment using a 1- or 4-item (enhanced) pain scale, audit and feedback of pain scores to nursing staff, and a computerized decision support system. The main outcome measures were pain assessment and severity and analgesic prescribing. Results Units using enhanced pain scales had significantly higher pain assessment rates than units using 1-item pain scales (64% vs 32%; P<.001), audit and feedback of pain results was associated with increases in pain assessment rates compared with units in which audit and feedback was not used (85% vs 64%; P<.001), and the addition of the computerized decision support system was associated with significant increases in pain assessment only when compared with units without audit and feedback (79% vs 64%; P<.001). The enhanced pain scale was associated with significant increases in prescribing of World Health Organization step 2 or 3 analgesic for patients with moderate or severe pain compared with the 1-item scale (83% vs 66%; P=.01). The interventions did not improve pain scores. Conclusions A clinically meaningful pain assessment instrument combined with either audit and feedback or a computerized decision support system improved pain documentation to more than 80%. The enhanced pain scale was associated with improved analgesic prescribing. Future interventions should be directed toward altering physician behavior related to titration of opioid analgesics. PMID:16682579

  3. Availability and Utilization of Opioids for Pain Management: Global Issues

    PubMed Central

    Manjiani, Deepak; Paul, D. Baby; Kunnumpurath, Sreekumar; Kaye, Alan David; Vadivelu, Nalini

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain can significantly influence an individual's health status and can have serious negative consequences: poor nutrition, decreased appetite, abnormal sleep patterns, fatigue, and impairment of daily living activities. Pain can cause psychological impairment and decrease healing and recovery from injuries and illness. A hallmark of many chronic conditions, pain affects more patients' lives than diabetes mellitus, heart disease, and cancer combined. However, many chronic sufferers do not have access to effective pain management for a variety of reasons, including limited access, restrictions, and personal and cultural biases. Methods This review summarizes issues of access, distribution, and cultural bias with regard to opioid agents and seeks to clarify the challenges related to opioid delivery. The considerable negative physical and mental consequences of chronic pain are discussed for the general and palliative care population. Results Opioids are an effective treatment for various intractable painful conditions, but problems in global opioid access for safe and rational use in pain management contribute to unnecessary suffering. These problems persist despite increased understanding in recent years of the pathophysiology of pain. Conclusions Comprehensive guidelines for goal-directed and patient-friendly chronic opiate therapy will potentially enhance the outlook for future chronic pain management. The improvement of pain education in undergraduate and postgraduate training will benefit patients and clinicians. The promise of new medications, along with the utilization of multimodal approaches, has the potential to provide effective pain relief to future generations of sufferers. PMID:24940131

  4. An algorithmic approach for clinical management of chronic spinal pain.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Helm, Standiford; Singh, Vijay; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Datta, Sukdeb; Hayek, Salim M; Fellows, Bert; Boswell, Mark V

    2009-01-01

    Interventional pain management, and the interventional techniques which are an integral part of that specialty, are subject to widely varying definitions and practices. How interventional techniques are applied by various specialties is highly variable, even for the most common procedures and conditions. At the same time, many payors, publications, and guidelines are showing increasing interest in the performance and costs of interventional techniques. There is a lack of consensus among interventional pain management specialists with regards to how to diagnose and manage spinal pain and the type and frequency of spinal interventional techniques which should be utilized to treat spinal pain. Therefore, an algorithmic approach is proposed, providing a step-by-step procedure for managing chronic spinal pain patients based upon evidence-based guidelines. The algorithmic approach is developed based on the best available evidence regarding the epidemiology of various identifiable sources of chronic spinal pain. Such an approach to spinal pain includes an appropriate history, examination, and medical decision making in the management of low back pain, neck pain and thoracic pain. This algorithm also provides diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to clinical management utilizing case examples of cervical, lumbar, and thoracic spinal pain. An algorithm for investigating chronic low back pain without disc herniation commences with a clinical question, examination and imaging findings. If there is evidence of radiculitis, spinal stenosis, or other demonstrable causes resulting in radiculitis, one may proceed with diagnostic or therapeutic epidural injections. In the algorithmic approach, facet joints are entertained first in the algorithm because of their commonality as a source of chronic low back pain followed by sacroiliac joint blocks if indicated and provocation discography as the last step. Based on the literature, in the United States, in patients without disc

  5. Effectiveness of an interdisciplinary pain management program for the treatment of chronic pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Kames, L D; Rapkin, A J; Naliboff, B D; Afifi, S; Ferrer-Brechner, T

    1990-04-01

    Chronic pelvic pain has rarely been discussed in the pain management literature, although it is extremely common in general gynecological practice and often refractory to traditional medical and surgical therapy. A chronic pelvic pain program was developed to offer an alternative treatment approach for women for whom standard gynecological procedures were inappropriate or unsuccessful. Sixteen subjects completed the full 6-8 week interdisciplinary program, which included both somatic and behavioral therapies. Compared to a waiting list control the results showed a dramatic decrease in reported levels of pain following treatment. Anxiety and depression also decreased and psychosocial functioning improved, including return to work, increased social activities, and improved sexual activity. The outcome suggests that the interdisciplinary pain management approach is effective for the treatment of chronic pelvic pain. PMID:2352765

  6. Road map for pain management in pancreatic cancer: A review.

    PubMed

    Lahoud, Marie José; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Antoun, Joelle; El Osta, Lana; Ghosn, Marwan

    2016-08-15

    Beside its poor prognosis and its late diagnosis, pancreatic cancer remains one of the most painful malignancies. Optimal management of pain in this cancer represents a real challenge for the oncologist whose objective is to ensure a better quality of life to his patients. We aimed in this paper to review all the treatment modalities incriminated in the management of pain in pancreatic cancer going from painkillers, chemotherapy, radiation therapy and interventional techniques to agents under investigation and alternative medicine. Although specific guidelines and recommendations for pain management in pancreatic cancer are still absent, we present all the possible pain treatments, with a progression from medical multimodal treatment to radiotherapy and chemotherapy then interventional techniques in case of resistance. In addition, alternative methods such as acupuncture and hypnosis can be added at any stage and seems to contribute to pain relief. PMID:27574552

  7. Road map for pain management in pancreatic cancer: A review

    PubMed Central

    Lahoud, Marie José; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Antoun, Joelle; El Osta, Lana; Ghosn, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    Beside its poor prognosis and its late diagnosis, pancreatic cancer remains one of the most painful malignancies. Optimal management of pain in this cancer represents a real challenge for the oncologist whose objective is to ensure a better quality of life to his patients. We aimed in this paper to review all the treatment modalities incriminated in the management of pain in pancreatic cancer going from painkillers, chemotherapy, radiation therapy and interventional techniques to agents under investigation and alternative medicine. Although specific guidelines and recommendations for pain management in pancreatic cancer are still absent, we present all the possible pain treatments, with a progression from medical multimodal treatment to radiotherapy and chemotherapy then interventional techniques in case of resistance. In addition, alternative methods such as acupuncture and hypnosis can be added at any stage and seems to contribute to pain relief. PMID:27574552

  8. Opioid use for Chronic Pain Management in Italy: Results from the Orthopedic Instant Pain Survey Project

    PubMed Central

    Fanelli, Guido; Cherubino, Paolo; Compagnone, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a common symptom in orthopedic patients, but is managed sub-optimally, partly due to scarce opioid use in severe cases. The aim of the Orthopedic Instant Pain Survey (POIS) was to evaluate changes in pain management in Italian orthopedic practice 2 years after a legislative change (Law 38/2010) simplifying opioid access for pain control. A web-based survey on the knowledge of this law and trends observed in clinical practice for severe pain treatment was administered to 143 Italian orthopedic specialists. In total, 101 (70%) respondents showed a high level of knowledge. Nevertheless, 54.5% stated that they do not use opioids for severe osteo-articular pain management. Main barriers to opioid use are fear of adverse events (61.4%), especially nausea/vomiting and constipation, and patient resistance (29.7%). A modest knowledge of pain classification was also demonstrated. Opioid use remains very limited in Italian orthopedic practice. Physicians’ fear of side effects showed poor knowledge of strategies for effective management of opioid-related adverse events, such as combined oral prolonged-release oxycodone/naloxone. Continuing educational programs could improve delivery of evidence-based pain management. PMID:25002934

  9. [Nursing management of wound care pain].

    PubMed

    Chin, Yen-Fan

    2007-06-01

    Wound care is an important step in promoting wound healing, but it may cause wound care pain. This article aims to explore factors influencing wound care pain and the effectiveness of various interventions to alleviate it. Five major factors that influence wound care pain include inappropriate dressing change techniques, inflammation response, emotion, cognition, and social-cultural factors. Nurses should apply appropriate dressings and dressing change techniques to relieve wound care pain. Music therapy and aromatherapy can alleviate wound pain after dressing change. But distraction techniques should be used in conjunction with consideration of the needs of the individual subject. PMID:17554674

  10. Evaluating the implementation of a pain management flow sheet.

    PubMed

    Joyce, B A; Keck, J F; Gerkensmeyer, J E

    1999-10-01

    This study evaluated the outcome of implementing a pain flow sheet, using protocols derived from the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR) guidelines for pain management, for children recovering from surgery. Findings indicated the flow sheet was not used as designed; thus, implementing the flow sheet did not result in increased documentation of pain assessments, interventions, and outcomes, except in the increased documentation of nonpharmacological interventions for pain management. Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation Theory gives insight as to why this occurred and provides rationale for more intensive in-service education when new innovations are implemented. PMID:10554443

  11. Targeting voltage-gated calcium channels for neuropathic pain management

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Danielle; Luo, Z. David

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) play obligatory roles in diverse physiological functions. Pathological conditions leading to changes in their biophysical properties and expression levels may cause malfunctions of VGCC mediated activities, resulting in disease states. It is believed that changes in VGCC properties under pain-inducing conditions may play a causal role in the development of chronic pain, including nerve injury-induced pain, or neuropathic pain. Over the past decades, preclinical and clinical research in developing VGCC blockers or modulators for chronic pain management has been fruitful, leading to some US Food and Drug Administration approved drugs currently available for chronic pain management. However, their efficacy in pain relief is limited in some patients and their long-term use is limited by their side effect profiles. Certainly, there is room for improvement in developing more subtype specific VGCC blockers or modulators for chronic pain conditions. In this review, we summarized the most recent preclinical and clinical studies related to chronic pain medications acting on the VGCC. We also included clinical trials aiming to expand the application of approved VGCC drugs to different pain states derived from various pathological conditions, as well as drug combination therapies trying to improve the efficacies and side effect profiles of current pain medications. PMID:19789072

  12. Pain assessment and management in surgical nursing: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Bell, Liz; Duffy, Anita

    Although postoperative pain assessment and management is an integral part of surgical nursing practice, it remains ad hoc despite numerous costly empirical research studies. Patients have a right to pain relief; however, the barriers to assessing and managing patient pain in practice have not as yet been overcome. A literature review to establish the main barriers to effective postoperative pain relief in clinical practice was carried out. The findings suggest that time management, and attitudes and beliefs of both patients and nurses are significant factors hampering practice. The authors conclude that future research in this area is futile, and suggest that nurses should focus on auditing their own practice to improve the effectiveness of pain management in practice and enhance standards of care. PMID:19223798

  13. Current Challenges in Pain Management in Hip Fracture Patients.

    PubMed

    Sanzone, Anthony G

    2016-05-01

    The high incidence of hip fracture, together with considerable associated morbidity, mortality, and cost of care, makes this injury a major clinical challenge. Of particular importance is the pain associated with hip fracture, which can have potentially severe consequences and may lead to delayed recovery. The prevailing opioid-dependent model of analgesia, however, presents multiple drawbacks and risks that can compromise outcomes in the hip fracture population. The pain management process has essential preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative components, yet data on the comparative effectiveness of different pain management interventions in patients undergoing surgery for hip fracture are not clear cut. A Cochrane database review that included 83 different pain management studies indicated that there are not enough well-designed studies to show unequivocally which pain management approaches work well after hip fracture surgery. Yet a growing body of data on certain interventions, such as nerve blocks and multimodal analgesia, supports consideration of these options. PMID:27101319

  14. Managing chronic pain with nonopioid analgesics: a multidisciplinary consult.

    PubMed

    Clauw, Daniel; McCarberg, Bill H

    2012-05-01

    As detailed in this online CME activity (www.cmeaccess.com/AJM/ChronicPain04), determining pain mechanism is an important aspect guiding treatment selection for chronic musculoskeletal pain states. Although broad classifications provide a framework, any combination of mechanisms may be present in a chronic pain patient, and there is growing evidence that pain states generally considered nociceptive may also involve elements of augmented central nervous system pain processing. Nonopioid analgesics, including serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), tricyclic antidepressants, and alpha-2-delta ligand anticonvulsants, are the treatments of choice for fibromyalgia and other central neuropathic pain states. Additionally, studies have now shown that certain SNRIs can be effective in treating "classic" nociceptive pain states, such as osteoarthritis, and also are effective for low back pain. In addition to considering biological mechanisms, chronic pain management also involves recognizing and evaluating the contribution of psychological and sociocultural factors that can influence pain chronicity and patient prognosis. A multimodal/multidisciplinary approach incorporating pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapy into a program that includes more than 1 discipline is important to improve outcomes in patients with chronic pain. PMID:22482859

  15. Topical capsaicin formulations in the management of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Mark; Pasvankas, George

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the scientific and clinical evidence supporting the use of topical formulations containing the pungent principle of chili peppers--capsaicin, for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain. Given the limitations of current oral and parenteral therapies for the management of pain arising from various forms of nerve injury, alternate therapeutic approaches that are not associated with systemic adverse events that limit quality of life, impair function, or threaten respiratory depression are critically needed. Moreover, neuropathic conditions can be complicated by progressive changes in the central and peripheral nervous system, leading to persistent reorganization of pain pathways and chronic neuropathic pain. Recent advances in the use of high-dose topical capsaicin preparations hold promise in managing a wide range of painful conditions associated with peripheral neuropathies and may in fact help reduce suffering by reversing progressive changes in the nervous system associated with chronic neuropathic pain conditions. PMID:24941666

  16. Idiopathic scoliosis: managing pain before and after spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Bray, Lucy; Craske, Jennie

    2015-12-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis surgery is performed to correct a curvature of the spine. This is a painful surgical procedure which is carried out on otherwise healthy young people. This article reports on a small evaluation project which focused on young people's opinions and experiences of their pain information needs, pain management and pain assessment. Nine young people completed written activity sheets before and after scoliosis surgery. Most of the information provided on the activity sheets involved positive comments about the surgical experience although some indicated that the management of pain continued to be a challenge after spinal surgery. The project has highlighted that there is more work to be done to ensure that young people are prepared for surgery and they are helped to convey their experiences of pain to health professionals during their treatment and recovery. PMID:26654026

  17. Sickle cell disease pain management and the medical home.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Jean L; Oyeku, Suzette O

    2013-01-01

    Pain is the most common cause for hospitalization and acute morbidity in sickle cell disease (SCD). The consequences of SCD-related pain are substantial, affecting both the individual and the health care system. The emergence of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) provides new opportunities to align efforts to improve SCD management with innovative and potentially cost-effective models of patient-centered care. The Department of Health and Human Services has designated SCD as a priority area with emphasis on creating PCMHs for affected patients. The question for patients, clinicians, scientists, and policy-makers is how the PCMH can be designed to address pain, the hallmark feature of SCD. This article provides a framework of pain management within the PCMH model. We present an overview of pain and pain management in SCD, gaps in pain management, and current care models used by patients and discuss core PCMH concepts and multidisciplinary team-based PCMH care strategies for SCD pain management. PMID:24319216

  18. The Infusaid Pump in the Management of Intractable Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, D'Orsay D.; DeWitty, Robert L.; Dennis, Gary C.

    1987-01-01

    At Howard University Hospital, nine terminally ill cancer patients with chronic pain have been treated with continuous intrathecal infusion of morphine delivered by the implantable Infusaid pump. The case of a patient treated at Howard University Hospital with this method of pain management is presented. Following Infusaid pump insertion, the patient lived for 22 months and obtained substantial relief of his cancer pain with no adverse side effects. PMID:3573060

  19. Risk factors for opioid overdose and awareness of overdose risk among veterans prescribed chronic opioids for addiction or pain

    PubMed Central

    Wilder, Christine M.; Miller, Shannon C.; Tiffany, Elizabeth; Winhusen, Theresa; Winstanley, Erin L.; Stein, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rising overdose fatalities among US veterans suggest veterans taking prescription opioids may be at risk for overdose. However, it is unclear whether veterans prescribed chronic opioids are aware of this risk. Objectives The objective of this study was to identify risk factors and determine awareness of risk for opioid overdose in veterans treated with opioids for chronic pain, using veterans treated with methadone or buprenorphine for opioid use disorder as a high-risk comparator group. Methods Ninety veterans on chronic opioid medication for either opioid use disorder or pain management completed a questionnaire assessing risk factors, knowledge, and self-estimate of risk for overdose. Results Nearly all veterans in both groups had multiple overdose risk factors although individuals in the pain management group had on average a significantly lower total number of risk factors than did individuals in the opioid use disorder group (5.9 v. 8.5, p<0.0001). On average, participants treated for pain management scored slightly but significantly lower on knowledge of opioid overdose risk factors (12.1 v. 13.5, p<0.01). About 70% of participants, regardless of group, believed their overdose risk was below that of the average American adult. There was no significant relationship between self-estimate of overdose risk and either number or knowledge of opioid overdose risk factors. Discussion Our results suggest that veterans in both groups underestimated their risk for opioid overdose. Expansion of overdose education to include individuals on chronic opioids for pain management and a shift in educational approaches to overdose prevention may be indicated. PMID:26566771

  20. Risk factors for opioid overdose and awareness of overdose risk among veterans prescribed chronic opioids for addiction or pain.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Christine M; Miller, Shannon C; Tiffany, Elizabeth; Winhusen, Theresa; Winstanley, Erin L; Stein, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Rising overdose fatalities among U.S. veterans suggest veterans taking prescription opioids may be at risk for overdose. However, it is unclear whether veterans prescribed chronic opioids are aware of this risk. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors and determine awareness of risk for opioid overdose in veterans treated with opioids for chronic pain, using veterans treated with methadone or buprenorphine for opioid use disorder as a high-risk comparator group. In the current study, 90 veterans on chronic opioid medication, for either opioid use disorder or pain management, completed a questionnaire assessing risk factors, knowledge, and self-estimate of risk for overdose. Nearly all veterans in both groups had multiple overdose risk factors, although individuals in the pain management group had on average a significantly lower total number of risk factors than did individuals in the opioid use disorder group (5.9 versus 8.5, p < .0001). On average, participants treated for pain management scored slightly but significantly lower on knowledge of opioid overdose risk factors (12.1 versus 13.5, p < .01). About 70% of participants, regardless of group, believed their overdose risk was below that of the average American adult. There was no significant relationship between self-estimate of overdose risk and either number or knowledge of opioid overdose risk factors. Our results suggest that veterans in both groups underestimated their risk for opioid overdose. Expansion of overdose education to include individuals on chronic opioids for pain management and a shift in educational approaches to overdose prevention may be indicated. PMID:26566771

  1. Chronic pain management strategies used by low income overweight Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Rutledge, Dana N; Cantero, Patricia J; Ruiz, Jeanette E

    2013-01-01

    Objectives In group interviews, we examined strategies used to manage chronic pain from the perspective of the individual. Methods Sixteen low income overweight Latino adults participated in two group interviews facilitated by a trained moderator who inquired about the type of chronic pain suffered by participants, followed by more specific questions about pain management. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim (Spanish), back-translated into English, and analyzed using thematic analysis. Results Participants’ pain varied in type, location, and intensity. Participants discussed pain-related changes in activities and social life, and difficulties with health care providers, and as a result, we discovered five major themes: Pain-related Life Alterations, Enduring the Pain, Trying Different Strategies, Emotional Suffering, and Encounters with Health Care System/Providers. Discussion Findings indicated that there are opportunities for providers to improve care for low income overweight Latinos with chronic pain by listening respectfully to how pain alters their daily lives and assisting them in feasible self management strategies. PMID:23129787

  2. Evaluation and Management of SCI-Associated Pain.

    PubMed

    Saulino, Michael; Averna, Justin F

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological condition. Treatment of SCI-related pain is challenging for the treating physician, as normal neural pathways are disrupted. Patients with SCI consistently rate pain as one of the most difficult problems associated with their injury. SCI-related pain can be refractory and complete relief is often not possible. The multidimensional nature of SCI-related pain affects the neural system including autonomic nervous system deregulation and can alter metabolic and biochemical processes throughout the body. Co-morbid psychological illnesses such as depression and adjustment disorder are seen in a significant percentage of patients. Despite a better understanding of the underlying pain mechanisms and advances in procedural, pharmacologic, and non-pharmacologic therapies, treatment of pain after SCI remains elusive. This manuscript reviews the current evidence-based evaluation and management of the SCI patient with the overarching goal of providing appropriate and effective management of their pain. In particular, additional well-designed studies are needed to help elucidate effective treatments for SCI-related neuropathic pain in an effort to help provide these patients with better management of their pain and improve their quality of life. PMID:27474095

  3. Bertolotti Syndrome: A Diagnostic and Management Dilemma for Pain Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anil; Jain, Suruchi; Shamshery, Chetna

    2013-01-01

    Background Bertolotti's syndrome (BS), a form of lumbago in lumbosacral transitional vertebrae, is an important cause of low back pain in young patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the etiology of low back pain and the efficacy of treatment offered to patients with BS. Methods All patients of BS Castellvi type1a during a period of 6 months were enrolled in the study. The patients underwent interventional pain procedures for diagnosis and pain relief. Response to the therapy was assessed based on VAS and ODI scores. A 50% decrease in VAS score or a VAS score less than 3 would be considered adequate pain relief. Results All 20 patients diagnosed with BS during the 6-month observation period had scoliosis. Common causes of back pain were the ipsilateral L5-S1 facet joint, neoarticulation, the SI joint, and disc degeneration. Responses to various interventions for pain relief were different and inconsistent from patient to patient. In particular, responses to interventions for neoarticular pain were generally poor. Conclusions Pain in patients with BS does not usually respond to interventional pain treatment. A very dynamic treatment approach must be pursued while managing BS patients, and the treatment plan must be individualized at various stages in order to obtain satisfactory pain relief. PMID:24156003

  4. Pediatric pain management: the multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    Odell, Shannon; Logan, Deirdre E

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pain in children and adolescents is a growing problem and one that is increasingly being addressed with multidisciplinary treatment teams. This review summarizes different multidisciplinary clinics, focusing specifically on intensive pediatric pain rehabilitation centers. This review offers a summary of the challenges faced by these programs and areas for future study. PMID:24250232

  5. Pain management in patients following limb amputation.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Suzanne

    Phantom limb pain is common in patients who have amputations. This article outlines the different theories that explain the pathophysiology of phantom limb pain, including peripheral, spinal and central mechanisms. Treatment options are targeted at addressing these mechanisms, combining analgesic techniques with physical and psychological rehabilitation. PMID:21287925

  6. [Managing the pain linked to diabetes].

    PubMed

    Leridon, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain due to insulin injections and the self-monitoring of blood glucose is a daily reality for children and adolescents with diabetes. Support groups are organised by the nurse who gives personalised advice to young patients and their parents, in order to relieve the pain and overcome any difficulties. PMID:26776689

  7. Managing low back pain second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkaldy-Willis, W.H. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 26 chapters. Some of the titles are: Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine; Diagnostic techniques; The site and nature of the lesion; The anatomy of the lumbosacral spine; The perception of pain; Differential diagnosis of low back pain; and A comprehensive outline of treatment.

  8. The Cognitive-Behavioral Management of Pain: Neurophysiological Relevancies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Christopher I.

    Traditional medical interventions for the management of pain have consisted largely of either pharmacological treatments or surgery to interrupt the involved neural pathways. The results of these procedures have been largely unsatisfactory because of debilitating side effects and recurrence of pain. Investigations of a host of psychological…

  9. Recent Advances in Postoperative Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Mitra, Sukanya; Narayan, Deepak

    2010-01-01

    Good pain control after surgery is important to prevent negative outcomes such as tachycardia, hypertension, myocardial ischemia, decrease in alveolar ventilation, and poor wound healing. Exacerbations of acute pain can lead to neural sensitization and release of mediators both peripherally and centrally. Clinical wind up occurs from the processes of N-Methyl D-Aspartate (NMDA) activation, wind up central sensitization, long-term potentiation of pain (LTP), and transcription-dependent sensitization. Advances in the knowledge of molecular mechanisms have led to the development of multimodal analgesia and new pharmaceutical products to treat postoperative pain. The new pharmacological products to treat postoperative pain include extended-release epidural morphine and analgesic adjuvants such as capsaicin, ketamine, gabapentin, pregabalin dexmetomidine, and tapentadol. Newer postoperative patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) in modes such as intranasal, regional, transdermal, and pulmonary presents another interesting avenue of development. PMID:20351978

  10. Psychological and behavioral approaches to cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Syrjala, Karen L; Jensen, Mark P; Mendoza, M Elena; Yi, Jean C; Fisher, Hannah M; Keefe, Francis J

    2014-06-01

    This review examines evidence for psychological factors that affect pain across the cancer continuum from diagnosis through treatment and long-term survivorship or end of life. Evidence is convincing that emotional distress, depression, anxiety, uncertainty, and hopelessness interact with pain. Unrelieved pain can increase a desire for hastened death. Patients with cancer use many strategies to manage pain, with catastrophizing associated with increased pain and self-efficacy associated with lower pain reports. A variety of psychological and cognitive behavioral treatments can reduce pain severity and interference with function, as indicated in multiple meta-analyses and high-quality randomized controlled trials. Effective methods include education (with coping skills training), hypnosis, cognitive behavioral approaches, and relaxation with imagery. Exercise has been tested extensively in patients with cancer and long-term survivors, but few exercise studies have evaluated pain outcomes. In survivors post-treatment, yoga and hypnosis as well as exercise show promise for controlling pain. Although some of these treatments effectively reduce pain for patients with advanced disease, few have been tested in patients at the end of life. Given the clear indicators that psychological factors affect cancer pain and that psychological and behavioral treatments are effective in reducing varying types of pain for patients with active disease, these methods need further testing in cancer survivors post-treatment and in patients with end-stage disease. Multidisciplinary teams are essential in oncology settings to integrate analgesic care and expertise in psychological and behavioral interventions in standard care for symptom management, including pain. PMID:24799497

  11. Pain Management in the Individual with Serious Illness and Comorbid Substance Use Disorder.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Anne F; Broglio, Kathleen

    2016-09-01

    Pain is a common occurrence in individuals with serious illnesses. Effective pain management can be complicated when the individual has a comorbid substance use disorder. Comprehensive pain assessment includes opioid risk screening to provide safe and effective pain management. An appropriate, safe treatment plan includes the use of "universal precautions" commonly used in managing chronic pain. PMID:27497017

  12. Spinal Cord Stimulation in Pain Management: A Review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation has become a widely used and efficient alternative for the management of refractory chronic pain that is unresponsive to conservative therapies. Technological improvements have been considerable and the current neuromodulation devices are both extremely sophisticated and reliable in obtaining good results for various clinical situations of chronic pain, such as failed back surgery syndrome, complex regional pain syndrome, ischemic and coronary artery disease. This technique is likely to possess a savings in costs compared with alternative therapy strategies despite its high initial cost. Spinal cord stimulation continues to be a valuable tool in the treatment of chronic disabling pain. PMID:22787543

  13. Pain Self-Management in HIV-infected Individuals with Chronic Pain: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Merlin, Jessica S.; Walcott, Melonie; Kerns, Robert; Bair, Matthew J.; Burgio, Kathryn L.; Turan, Janet M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chronic pain in individuals with HIV is a common, impairing condition. Behavioral interventions for chronic pain specifically tailored to this population have yet to be developed. We assert that understanding self-management strategies already used by persons living with these conditions is an essential first step, and is the objective of this investigation. Design We conducted a thematic analysis of qualitative data from 25 in-depth interviews with individuals with HIV and chronic pain. Results The primary pain self-management strategies articulated by participants were: physical activity; cognitive and spiritual strategies; spending time with family and friends and social support; avoidance of physical/social activity; medication-centric pain management; and substance use. Conclusions Some of these strategies may be viewed as beneficial and overlap with known HIV self-management strategies (cognitive strategies), whereas others may have negative health consequences (substance use). Interventions that incorporate healthy self-management strategies may be particularly effective in improving both HIV and pain outcomes. PMID:25645646

  14. A primer for billing in interventional pain management.

    PubMed

    Yong, R Jason; Nelson, Ehren R; Urman, Richard D; Kaye, Alan David

    2015-01-01

    The surge of interest in pain from many types of physicians over the past few decades has resulted in a specialty with unique challenges. In response to the growth in pain medicine, pain fellowships have emerged to appropriately diagnose and to treat a wide variety of pain conditions. Despite improvements and standardization among pain fellowships, education in the basics of billing and coding is typically limited. Though courses on proper billing practices exist within the specialty of pain medicine, many new practitioners are challenged by clinical responsibilities with limited training with regards to billing and coding of pain services. Inaccurate billing and coding can result in financial issues and legal ramifications. ICD-10, which is expected later this year, will present additional challenges to effective billing and coding. In summary, there are frequent changes to the rules and regulations governing pain management that can significantly impact practice management. Strong consideration should be made by stakeholders in any pain practitioner to attend regular educational meetings and take steps necessary for continued compliance, efficiency, quality, and profitability. A basic primer on concepts related to billing and code terminology, therefore, is presented for clinicians. PMID:26062319

  15. Diffusion of pain management research into nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Dooks, P

    2001-04-01

    The promotion of evidence based practice is a challenge within nursing. Pain management is a prime example of this practice research gap. There is solid evidence for 20 years to promote positive change in our methods of pain management, yet outdated approaches are still amazingly evident. Even among oncology nurses, who place a high value on promoting patient comfort, there is a lack of evidence-based pain management. Rogers' Diffusion of Innovation Theory provides an interesting framework for examining the issues and possible solutions to this complex problem. Rogers' theory examines how changes diffuse through a social system over time and also exposes some of the barriers and facilitators to this process. The theory looks at adopters, the nature of the innovation, the social system, and communication patterns. Identifying the barriers of the past will help nursing to overcome these same barriers and increase the adoption of evidence-based pain management approaches in the future. PMID:11318267

  16. Integrated Approach for Pain Management in Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Geroin, Christian; Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Bruno, Veronica; Smania, Nicola; Tinazzi, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Pain, one of the most frequent nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD), is recognized as an important component of the illness that adversely affects patient quality of life. The aims of this review are to summarize the current knowledge on the clinical assessment and to provide a detailed overview of the evidence-based pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic approaches to treating pain. Results of a literature search include studies investigating pain/sensory abnormalities in PD. The effects of levodopa administration, deep brain stimulation (DBS), pallidotomy, spinal cord stimulation, rehabilitation, and complementary/alternative medicine are reviewed critically. PD patients have altered pain and sensory thresholds; levodopa and DBS improve pain and change sensory abnormalities toward normal levels through antinociceptive and/or modulatory effects that remain unknown. A wide range of nonpharmacologic approaches require further investigation. A multidisciplinary approach is fundamental in managing pain syndromes in PD. PMID:26879763

  17. Understanding Placebo and Nocebo Responses for Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Colloca, Luana; Grillon, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Placebo analgesia makes individuals experience relief of their pain simply by virtue of the anticipation of a benefit. A reduction of pain can occur also when placebos follow the administration of active and effective painkillers. In fact, studies indicate that placebos mimic the action of active treatments and promote the endogenous release of opioids in both humans and animals. Finally, social support and observational learning also lead to analgesic effects. Thus, different psychological factors and situations induce expectations of analgesia facilitating the activation of the top-down systems for pain control along with the release of endogenous mediators crucially involved in placebo-induced benefits. Recent scientific investigation in the field of brain imaging is opening new avenues to understanding the cognitive mechanisms and neurobiological substrates of expectation-induced pain modulation. Gaining deeper knowledge of top-down mechanisms of pain modulation has enormous implications for personalizing and optimizing pain management. PMID:24771206

  18. Dynamic cancer pain management outcomes: the relationship between pain severity, pain relief, functional interference, satisfaction and global quality of life over time.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Shirley S; Chang, Victor T; Kasimis, Basil

    2002-03-01

    To examine the relationship between different cancer pain management outcomes over time, 74 patients with the worst cancer related pain rated as four or greater on an 11-point numeric scale were followed weekly with the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and the satisfaction questionnaire and global visual analogue scale quality of life (VASQOL) for 3 weeks. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed at weekly time points. The analyses indicated that pain outcomes can be categorized into separate QOL and satisfaction paths linked by the worst pain severity. In the QOL path, the worst pain severity predicted a pain interference score, which consistently predicted VASQOL. For the satisfaction path, independent predictors were pain relief at Week 1, and worst pain severity and changes in worst pain severity at Week 2. No variables predicted satisfaction at Week 3. The data suggest that satisfaction and quality of life may be independent outcomes of pain management. The timing of assessment may itself be important. PMID:11888717

  19. Pediatric Oncology: Managing Pain at the End of Life.

    PubMed

    Snaman, Jennifer M; Baker, Justin N; Ehrentraut, Jennifer H; Anghelescu, Doralina L

    2016-06-01

    Pain is a common and highly distressing symptom in pediatric patients with advanced malignancies. Prompt recognition, assessment, and treatment of pain are necessary, especially at the end of life. Opioid medications remain the mainstay of treatment of malignant pain in children at the end of life and the amount of opioids required for adequate pain control in patients is highly variable. Nonpharmacological approaches including behavioral and physical approaches in addition to non-opioid pain medications should be used when possible to augment pain control. Identification and treatment of any underlying pathology is important and use of adjuvant medications based on pathophysiology and source of pain should be considered. In cases where adequate pain control is not achieved through these multiple modalities, an interdisciplinary approach including potential interventional techniques and alternative treatments is required. This multimodal approach to pain management is best provided by interdisciplinary teams, as these teams can best address the complex causes of pain and associated distress that occurs in patients and within families. PMID:26951239

  20. Managing Osteoarthritis Pain with Medicines: A Review of the Research for Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... a> Consumer Summary – Feb. 15, 2012 Managing Osteoarthritis Pain With Medicines: A Review of the Research for ... or have injured a joint. Why manage the pain of osteoarthritis? Osteoarthritis can be very painful and ...

  1. Pediatric pain management: More opportunities for better comfort

    PubMed Central

    Aleyadhy, Ayman A; Temsah, Mohamed-Hani; Alhaboob, Ali N; Hasan, Gamal M; Babiker, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric pain assessment is vital for optimal pediatric practice. After a year of implementation of pediatric pain assessment tools at a tertiary university hospital (King Saud University Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia), the physicians in the Department of Pediatrics were invited to participate in an interactive lecture about pediatric pain management to assess their awareness about using these tools. Their responses demonstrated that almost half of them were not using any pain scale in their daily practice. These findings highlight the need for a new strategy of implementation. The improvement of pain assessment and management necessitates extensive educational campaign for all health care providers and early audit in order to improve the physicians’ awareness and compliance with these changes.

  2. Determinants of nurses' knowledge gap on pain management in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Aziato, Lydia; Adejumo, Oluyinka

    2014-03-01

    There are concerns about adequacy of nurses' knowledge and skill in effective pain management since effective pain management promotes early recovery after surgery. This study explores factors that accounted for Ghanaian nurses' inadequate knowledge of postoperative pain management using a focused ethnographic design for data collection at a tertiary teaching hospital in Ghana. Fourteen nurses designated as key informants with different backgrounds as nurse educators and leaders were purposively sampled to participate. Data were collected through in-depth individual interviews; all interviews were conducted in English, audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. The study revealed that nurses' inadequate pain management knowledge might have resulted from curriculum gaps during training; inadequate clinical supervision, study days, and workshops for practising nurses; lack of funding for organising regular workshops; and, negative attitudes of nurses whereby new information learned at workshops was not readily applied in clinical practice. It was concluded that nursing curricula at all levels of training in Ghana should incorporate credit-bearing courses on pain management, and appropriate pain management education programmes should be instituted for practising nurses. Regular monitoring and evaluation of the impact of such education programs is required. PMID:24011564

  3. Hypnosis: an alternative in pain management for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Hrezo, R J

    1998-12-01

    Hypnosis and the trance phenomenon is an age-old tool for the treatment of a variety of conditions, including pain. Medically accepted for over 50 years as a legitimate therapy, research continues into its mechanisms and actions. In this article, its origins, history, theoretical basis, and various uses are discussed. Case presentations from the author are provided, showing its use for a variety of pain management scenarios. Sample hypnotic scripts allow the reader to better visualize the applicability of hypnotic suggestion to general inductions and pain management. References are provided for individuals seeking further information and/or training in hypnosis. PMID:10214224

  4. Do ventilated neonates require pain management?

    PubMed

    Hall, R Whit; Boyle, Elaine; Young, Thomas

    2007-10-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a stressful experience in neonates resulting in changes in neuroendocrine parameters, pain scores, and physiologic responses. Assisted ventilation in neonates is presumed to be associated with chronic repetitive pain, which in turn is associated with adverse long-term sequelae. Reasons to routinely sedate ventilated neonates include improved ventilator synchrony, improved pulmonary function, and decreased neuroendocrine responses, including cortisol, beta-endorphine, and catecholamines. Reasons not to treat include the well-known adverse side effects of pain medication, especially the opiates, including hypotension from morphine, chest wall rigidity from fentanyl, and tolerance, dependence, and withdrawal from both opiates and benzodiazepines. Additionally, adverse effects such as death and IVH are not improved with preemptive treatment. Chronic pain assessment is poorly validated and difficult to assess in this population, and most studies have evaluated only acute pain scores. If patients are treated, opiates are the most common class of drugs, with morphine the most well studied. Fentanyl may be advantageous in hypotensive, younger neonates because it has fewer cardiovascular effects. The benzodiazepines, midazolam and lorazepam, have been used in ventilated neonates, but midazolam has been associated with adverse effects in one small study so concern remains regarding its use. Significant gaps in our knowledge exist, especially in regard to long-term effects of treatment, or lack thereof, and in the assessment of the chronic pain associated with assisted ventilation. PMID:17905183

  5. Managing a chronic pain patient in the perioperative period.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    The chronic pain patient with and without chronic opioid medication is at risk for under- and overtreatment perioperatively. Careful planning of the perioperative period by the anesthesiologist, the pain service and the surgeon is crucial. Epidural analgesia requires reduction of preoperative opioid doses to a maximum of 50% to avoid withdrawal as well as continuous postanesthesia care unit-monitoring for the first 24 hours. Brief cognitive behavioral interventions pre- and postoperatively contribute to successful pain management. The perioperative period may be used to re-evaluate the patient's opioid requirements. A follow-up by an experienced pain management service should be available after discharge of the chronic pain patient. Individualized assessment by a pain management team is necessary for this increasing group of patients. This report is adapted from paineurope 2013; Issue 2, ©Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd., and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, LTD. and is distributed free of charge to healthcare professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be accessed via the website: http://www.paineurope.com at which European health professionals can register online to receive copies of the quarterly publication. PMID:24303836

  6. Neonatal pain management: still in search of the Holy Grail

    PubMed Central

    Allegaert, Karel; van den Anker, John N.

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate pain management but also inappropriate use of analgesics in early infancy has negative effects on neurodevelopmental outcome. As a consequence, neonatal pain management is still in search for the Holy Grail. At best, effective pain management is based on prevention, assessment, and treatment followed by a re-assessment of the pain to determine if additional treatment is still necessary. Unfortunately, epidemiological observations suggest that neonates are undergoing painful procedures very frequently, unveiling the need for effective preventive, non-pharmacological strategies. In addition, assessment is still based on validated, multimodal, but subjective pain assessment tools. Finally, in neonatal intensive care units, there is a shift in clinical practices (e.g., shorter intubation and ventilation), and this necessitates the development and validation of new pharmacological treatment modalities. To illustrate this, a shift in the use of opioids to paracetamol has occurred and short-acting agents (remifentanil, propofol) are more commonly administered to neonates. In addition to these new modalities and as part of a more advanced approach of the developmental pharmacology of analgesics, pharmacogenetics also emerged as a tool for precision medicine in neonates. To assure further improvement of neonatal pain management the integration of pharmacogenetics with the usual covariates like weight, age and/or disease characteristics is needed. PMID:27087155

  7. Neonatal pain management: still in search for the Holy Grail.

    PubMed

    Allegaert, Karel; van den Anker, John N

    2016-07-01

    Inadequate pain management but also inappropriate use of analgesics in early infancy has negative effects on neurodevelopmental outcome. As a consequence, neonatal pain management is still in search for the Holy Grail. At best, effective pain management is based on prevention, assessment, and treatment followed by a re-assessment of the pain to determine if additional treatment is still necessary. Unfortunately, epidemiological observations suggest that neonates are undergoing painful procedures very frequently, unveiling the need for effective preventive, non-pharmacological strategies. In addition, assessment is still based on validated, multimodal, but subjective pain assessment tools. Finally, in neonatal intensive care units, there is a shift in clinical practices (e.g., shorter intubation and ventilation), and this necessitates the development and validation of new pharmacological treatment modalities. To illustrate this, a shift in the use of opioids to paracetamol has occurred and short-acting agents (remifentanil, propofol) are more commonly administered to neonates. In addition to these new modalities and as part of a more advanced approach of the developmental pharmacology of analgesics, pharmacogenetics also emerged as a tool for precision medicine in neonates. To assure further improvement of neonatal pain management the integration of pharmacogenetics with the usual covariates like weight, age and/or disease characteristics is needed. PMID:27087155

  8. Restructuring reward processing with Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement: novel therapeutic mechanisms to remediate hedonic dysregulation in addiction, stress, and pain.

    PubMed

    Garland, Eric L

    2016-06-01

    Though valuation processes are fundamental to survival of the human species, hedonic dysregulation is at the root of an array of maladies, including addiction, stress, and chronic pain, as evidenced by the allostatic shift in the relative salience of natural reward to drug reward observed among persons with severe substance use disorders. To address this crucial problem, novel interventions are needed to restore hedonic regulatory processes gone awry in persons exhibiting addictive behaviors. This article describes a theoretical rationale and empirical evidence for the effects of one such new intervention, Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement (MORE), on top-down and bottom-up mechanisms implicated in cognitive control and hedonic regulation. MORE is innovative and distinct from extant mindfulness-based interventions in that it unites traditional mindfulness meditation with reappraisal and savoring strategies designed to reverse the downward shift in salience of natural reward relative to drug reward, representing a crucial tipping point to disrupt the progression of addiction-a mechanistic target that no other behavioral intervention has been designed to address. Though additional studies are needed, clinical and biobehavioral data from several completed and ongoing trials suggest that MORE may exert salutary effects on addictive behaviors and the neurobiological processes that underpin them. PMID:27037786

  9. Predictors of Pain Management among American Indian Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Felicia; Nandy, Karabi; Cadogan, Mary; Itty, Tracy; Warda, Umme; Martinez, Fernando; Quan, Ann

    2016-01-01

    There is little research on cancer symptom management among Indigenous populations. This paper reports on the predictors of cancer pain management among American Indian cancer patients/survivors and their caregivers/family. The intervention was a symptom management toolkit delivered via traditional talking circles vs. standard care (control) at eight randomized reservation and urban clinic sites in the Southwest. Participants (N=184) were American Indian adults diagnosed with cancer and/or caregiver/family members. The primary outcome measure collected via pre-test and post-test questionnaires was the ability to manage cancer pain. Significant differences at post-test were the ability to manage cancer-related pain (p=.02) and a close relationship (p=.0018) that proved significant for intervention participants and was instrumental in fostering their ability to manage pain. The study also showed improvement in the desire and ability to improve cancer pain management among intervention participants. Programs targeting American Indians should use culturally appropriate education to improve management of cancer-related symptoms. PMID:27180700

  10. POSTOPERATIVE PAIN: MANAGEMENT AND DOCUMENTATION BY IRANIAN NURSES

    PubMed Central

    Rafati, Foozieh; Soltaninejad, Maryam; Aflatoonian, Mohamad Reza; Mashayekhi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pain is one of the most common symptoms experienced by patients after surgeries. Inadequate postoperative pain management is an international problem and the need to improve its management is well documented. The aim of the study was to assess nursing reports related to the patients’ pain intensity and quality, concomitant symptoms, use of scales in pain assessment, and compliance with the national guideline after surgery. Methods: This study was a retrospective cohort; samples were nurse records of patients who had elective surgery. Result: Only 6% of the patients’ pain records included pain intensity which was not measured with standard scales. More than half of all injections were opioid analgesic which is in contrast to the guidelines of the Iranian Ministry of Health. Pain assessment was higher in women and by nurses with more than 15 years of working experience. Conclusion: to conclude, the patients’ pain was not assessed properly in terms of intensity, quality, and associated symptoms. Therefore, training and motivating nurses is very important in this context and should be incorporated in nurses’ academic and continuous educational courses. PMID:27047265

  11. The Challenges of Perioperative Pain Management in Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Scuderi, Giles R

    2015-10-01

    Despite advances in the understanding of postoperative pain, approximately 80% of surgical patients still experience a meaningful level of pain, which can result in unnecessary stress and suffering; compromise the patient's progress, recovery, and outcome; and lead to poor function and the development of chronic pain. In arthroplasty patients, the goals of pain management include improving comfort and satisfaction, enabling patients to ambulate and move their joints soon after surgery, and, where appropriate, reducing the hospital length of stay. Opioid medications have been used for many years as the mainstay of pain management. These drugs, however, are associated with a range of adverse effects and complications, which can lead to increased hospital length of stay or readmission. Furthermore, as-needed administration of opioids allows for the repeated return of pain after the operation as each dose wears off. A balanced multimodal approach that combines different anesthetic and analgesic modalities in a rational way to target the distinct pain pathways, rather than relying predominantly on opioid drugs, is essential for effective control of postoperative pain, avoiding the risk of opioid-related adverse events and complications, reducing length of stay, and improving longterm outcomes. PMID:26447428

  12. Military Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain and Psychiatric Comorbidity: Is Better Pain Management the Answer?

    PubMed

    McGeary, Cindy A; McGeary, Donald D; Moreno, Jose; Gatchel, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain, such as low back pain, often appears in the presence of psychiatric comorbidities (e.g., depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)), especially among U.S. military service members serving in the post-9/11 combat era. Although there has been much speculation about how to best address pain/trauma psychiatric symptom comorbidities, there are little available data to guide practice. The present study sought to examine how pre-treatment depression and PTSD influence outcomes in a functional restoration pain management program using secondary analysis of data from the Department of Defense-funded Functional and Orthopedic Rehabilitation Treatment (FORT) trial. Twenty-eight FORT completers were analyzed using a general linear model exploring how well depression and PTSD symptoms predict post-treatment pain (Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain rating), disability (Oswestry Disability Index; Million Visual Analog Scale), and functional capacity (Floor-to-Waist and Waist-to-Eye Level progressive isoinertial lifting evaluation scores) in a sample of active duty military members with chronic musculoskeletal pain and comorbid depression or PTSD symptoms. Analysis revealed that pre-treatment depression and PTSD symptoms did not significantly predict rehabilitation outcomes from program completers. Implications of these findings for future research on trauma-related pain comorbidities are discussed. PMID:27417626

  13. Patients' perceptions of pain management and use of coping strategies.

    PubMed

    Tasso, Kay; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S

    2004-01-01

    As a result of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations accreditation standards for 2001, pain management for hospitalized patients has become a top priority of healthcare facilities. In addition to using the traditional pharmacological approach to pain management, many patients also use complementary or alternative medicine (CAM) treatments. However, CAM treatments may not be discussed or offered to patients by healthcare providers who lack awareness about these alternatives. The purpose of this study was to assess patients' perceptions of pain, their beliefs about the use of pharmacological and CAM pain management techniques, and their satisfaction with pain management. Researchers verbally administered a survey to patients by using a combination of open-ended questions and a 0-10 rating scale, and they recorded their responses. This study was conducted in a not-for-profit teaching hospital in the southeast United States. Convenience sampling was used to select the 137 patients who completed the surveys. No treatment intervention was provided. Pharmacological treatment was the primary method expected and used by the majority of patients for pain management. Chi-squared statistics were used to analyze nonparametric data. An analysis of variance was used to analyze parametric data. The frequency with which nonpharmacological CAM options were used ranged from 6 to 34 percent. The most commonly used CAM method was distraction, such as watching television or reading. PMID:15898400

  14. Breast cancer pain management - A review of current & novel therapies

    PubMed Central

    Satija, Aanchal; Ahmed, Syed Mehmood; Gupta, Rahul; Ahmed, Arif; Rana, Shiv Pratap Singh; Singh, Suraj Pal; Mishra, Seema; Bhatnagar, Sushma

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers amongst women in the world. Unfortunately, even after adequate treatment, some patients experience severe pain either due to disease progression or due to treatment related side effects. The persistent pain causes a negative physical and psychosocial impact on patients’ lives. Current rational pain management is patient-centred and requires a thorough psychological assessment. Usually adequate analgesia is achieved by adopting the WHO's three step analgesic ladder. As the disease progresses, the pain experienced by the patient also increases. This necessitates the administration of opioids and adjuvant analgesics to the breast cancer patients experiencing severe pain. However, opioid use is associated with intolerable side effects like constipation, nausea, vomiting, fear of dependence, and tolerance. Concomitant medications are required to combat these unacceptable side effects. Adjuvant analgesics need to be added to provide adequate and satisfactory analgesia. These factors worsen the psychological state of patients and deteriorate their quality of life. Hence, there is a need to develop therapeutic modalities to provide adequate analgesia with minimum side effects. This review article focuses on the current treatments available for cancer pain management, their limitations, and novel targets and non-pharmacological measures under investigation which have the potential to produce a radical change in pain management measures for the breast cancer patients. PMID:24718395

  15. Optimal management of breakthrough cancer pain (BCP).

    PubMed

    Escobar, Y; Mañas, A; Juliá, J; Gálvez, R; Zaragozá, F; Margarit, C; López, R; Casas, A; Antón, A; Cruz, J J

    2013-07-01

    Breakthrough cancer pain (BCP) is common in patients with cancer, causing a negative impairment in quality of life. Recent diagnostic criteria allow for differentiation of background chronic pain and BCP, for which proportion of unpredictable episodes is very high. Five characteristics define BCP: rapid onset, high intensity, maximum intensity (minutes), mean duration 30 min, and unpredictable onset. Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid characterized by rapid absorption and start of the analgesic effects. In addition to comparing some of the marked differences between the four pharmaceutical forms of fentanyl marketed in Spain, this paper discusses the data collected in a comprehensive clinical trial program with fentanyl pectin nasal spray (FPNS), a formulation that takes advantage of the intranasal route and the PecSys™ technology. The FPNS formulation achieves analgesic action 5 min after application and significant pain relief at 10 min. FPNS, therefore, has key features to be an optimal treatment for BCP. PMID:23263914

  16. Interpersonal Responses and Pain Management Within the US Military.

    PubMed

    McGeary, Cindy A; Blount, Tabatha H; Peterson, Alan L; Gatchel, Robert J; Hale, Willie J; McGeary, Donald D

    2016-06-01

    Purpose Chronic pain poses a significant problem for the US military. The benefits of self-management treatments for chronic pain are well-documented, but interpersonal responses also influence physical and psychological health and may not be addressed through self-management treatments alone. The current study examines whether perceived interpersonal responses to pain, as measured by the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI), change as a result of participation in an intensive pain management program. It was hypothesized that interpersonal responses to pain would be significantly correlated to psychosocial and physical pain outcomes and that interpersonal responses to pain would change significantly for completers of a functional restoration (FR) program compared to those who were randomized to treatment-as-usual in the military medical system. Methods Forty-four participants were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups. One treatment group received FR (n = 26) and the other group received treatment-as-usual (n = 18). Significant other responses to chronic pain were measured by the MPI (Pain 23(4):345-356, 1985). Participants also completed measures of impacted quality of life, reported disability, psychological distress, fear avoidance, pain interference, and physical activity. Results Perceived higher punishing responses from a significant other were significantly related to worse physical health-related quality of life (p = .037), work-related fear avoidance (p = .008), pain interference (p = .026), affective distress (p = .039), and pain while lifting (p = .017). Perceived higher solicitous responses from significant others were significantly associated with lower mental health-related quality of life (p = .011), household activity (p = 017), general activity (p = .042), self-reported disability (p = .030), lifting capacity (p = .005), and aerobic capacity (p = .009). Conclusions While findings are preliminary and of limited

  17. Acute pain management in opioid-tolerant patients: a growing challenge.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, C A; Roberts, L J; Somogyi, A A; MacIntyre, P E

    2011-09-01

    In Australia and New Zealand, in parallel with other developed countries, the number of patients prescribed opioids on a long-term basis has grown rapidly over the last decade. The burden of chronic pain is more widely recognised and there has been an increase in the use of opioids for both cancer and non-cancer indications. While the prevalence of illicit opioid use has remained relatively stable, the diversion and abuse of prescription opioids has escalated, as has the number of individuals receiving methadone or buprenorphine pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction. As a result, the proportion of opioid-tolerant patients requiring acute pain management has increased, often presenting clinicians with greater challenges than those faced when treating the opioid-naïve. Treatment aims include effective relief of acute pain, prevention of drug withdrawal, assistance with any related social, psychiatric and behavioural issues, and ensuring continuity of long-term care. Pharmacological approaches incorporate the continuation of usual medications (or equivalent), short-term use of sometimes much higher than average doses of additional opioid, and prescription of non-opioid and adjuvant drugs, aiming to improve pain relief and attenuate opioid tolerance and/or opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Discharge planning should commence at an early stage and may involve the use of a 'Reverse Pain Ladder' aiming to limit duration of additional opioid use. Legislative requirements may restrict which drugs can be prescribed at the time of hospital discharge. At all stages, there should be appropriate and regular consultation and liaison with the patient, other treating teams and specialist services. PMID:21970125

  18. Management of pain in pre-hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Parker, Michael; Rodgers, Antony

    2015-06-01

    Assessment and management of pain in pre-hospital care settings are important aspects of paramedic and clinical team roles. As emergency department waiting times and delays in paramedic-to-nurse handover increase, it becomes more and more vital that patients receive adequate pre-hospital pain relief. However, administration of analgesia can be inadequate and can result in patients experiencing oligoanalgesia, or under-treated pain. This article examines these issues along with the aetiology of trauma and the related socioeconomic background of traumatic injury. It reviews validated pain-assessment tools, outlines physiological responses to traumatic pain and discusses some of the misconceptions about the provision of effective analgesia in pre-hospital settings. PMID:26050779

  19. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars. PMID:26309385

  20. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars. PMID:26309385

  1. A decision-making framework for adaptive pain management.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Feng; LeBoulluec, Aera Kim; Zeng, Li; Chen, Victoria C P; Gatchel, Robert J

    2014-09-01

    Pain management is a critical international health issue. The Eugene McDermott Center for Pain Management at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center conducted a two-stage interdisciplinary pain management program that considers a wide variety of treatments. Prior to treatment (beginning of Stage 1), an evaluation records the patient's pain characteristics, medical history and related health parameters. A treatment regime is then determined. At the midpoint of the program (beginning of Stage 2), an evaluation is conducted to determine if an adjustment in the treatment should be made. A final evaluation is conducted at the end of the program to assess final outcomes. We structure this decision-making process using dynamic programming (DP) to generate adaptive treatment strategies for this two-stage program. An approximate DP solution method is employed in which state transition models are constructed empirically based on data from the pain management program, and the future value function is approximated using state space discretization based on a Latin hypercube design and artificial neural networks. The optimization seeks for treatment plans that minimize treatment dosage and pain levels simultaneously. PMID:23974825

  2. Strategies Aimed at Preventing Chronic Post-surgical Pain: Comprehensive Perioperative Pain Management after Total Joint Replacement Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Woodhouse, Linda J.; Kennedy, Deborah; Stratford, Paul; Katz, Joel

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Chronic post-surgical pain (CPSP) is a frequent outcome of musculoskeletal surgery. Physiotherapists often treat patients with pain before and after musculoskeletal surgery. The purposes of this paper are (1) to raise awareness of the nature, mechanisms, and significance of CPSP; and (2) to highlight the necessity for an inter-professional team to understand and address its complexity. Using total joint replacement surgeries as a model, we provide a review of pain mechanisms and pain management strategies. Summary of Key Points: By understanding the mechanisms by which pain alters the body's normal physiological responses to surgery, clinicians selectively target pain in post-surgical patients through the use of multi-modal management strategies. Clinicians should not assume that patients receiving multiple medications have a problem with pain. Rather, the modern-day approach is to manage pain using preventive strategies, with the aims of reducing the intensity of acute postoperative pain and minimizing the development of CPSP. Conclusions: The roles of biological, surgical, psychosocial, and patient-related risk factors in the transition to pain chronicity require further investigation if we are to better understand their relationships with pain. Measuring pain intensity and analgesic use is not sufficient. Proper evaluation and management of risk factors for CPSP require inter-professional teams to characterize a patient's experience of postoperative pain and to examine pain arising during functional activities. PMID:22654235

  3. The impact of pain on quality of life and the unmet needs of pain management: results from pain sufferers and physicians participating in an Internet survey.

    PubMed

    McCarberg, Bill H; Nicholson, Bruce D; Todd, Knox H; Palmer, Trish; Penles, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    Pain is one of the most common medical complaints, but despite its prevalence, many individuals still suffer with unrelieved or undertreated pain. This marketing research survey was designed to determine the physical, psychological, and economic impact pain has on the lives of individuals suffering with pain and to identify the unmet needs of patients who have taken opioid medications to treat their pain. In addition, the survey sought to address the challenges physicians face when treating patients with pain. Pain sufferers were recruited through e-mail invitation to an Internet survey; 173,854 invitations were sent out, 22,018 people responded (12.7%), and 606 met the criteria for inclusion in the survey as pain sufferers. Of these, 359 people had moderate to moderately severe chronic pain and 247 people had moderate to moderately severe acute pain. Additionally, physicians currently treating pain were recruited through e-mail and postal mail invitations and 492 met eligibility criteria: 241 specialists (orthopedic or general surgeons, pain specialists or anesthesiologists), 125 primary care, and 126 emergency medicine physicians. Results of this survey supported what many physicians observe in their practice and hear from their patients, that pain has a negative impact on daily activities in the majority of pain sufferers. Many chronic pain sufferers reported that pain had deleterious effects on their mental health, employment status, sleep, and personal relationships. The impact of pain on patient quality of life and the unmet needs in pain management were recognized by the majority of physicians surveyed, with inadequate pain control, end-of-dose pain, and side effects associated with increased dosing reported as negative factors influencing their choice of pain medication. In conclusion, effective communication between physicians and patients is encouraged to not only improve overall pain management but also to establish shared treatment goals with functional

  4. Pain Management in Pregnancy: Multimodal Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shalini; Banh, Esther T.; Koury, Katharine; Bhatia, Gaurav; Nandi, Roneeta; Gulur, Padma

    2015-01-01

    Nonobstetrical causes of pain during pregnancy are very common and can be incapacitating if not treated appropriately. Recent reports in the literature show that a significant percentage of pregnant women are treated with opioids during pregnancy. To address common pain conditions that present during pregnancy and the available pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment options, for each of the pain conditions identified, a search using MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases was performed. The quality of the evidence was evaluated in the context of study design. This paper is a narrative summary of the results obtained from individual reviews. There were significant disparities in the studies in terms of design, research and methodology, and outcomes analyzed. There is reasonable evidence available for pharmacological approaches; however, these are also associated with adverse events. Evidence for nonpharmacological approaches is limited and hence their efficacy is unclear, although they do appear to be primarily safe. A multimodal approach using a combination of nonpharmacological and pharmacological options to treat these pain conditions is likely to have the most benefit while limiting risk. Research trials with sound methodology and analysis of outcome data are needed. PMID:26448875

  5. Toward an understanding of the rationale for the use of dietary supplementation for chronic pain management: the serotonin model.

    PubMed

    Haze, J J

    1991-10-01

    The use of dietary metabolic precursors to neurotransmitter in the management of chronic pain patients has received critical attention for several years. As pain evolves from acute to chronic, different neuronal pathways are used and diverse areas of the brain become involved in pain perception and modulation. The serotonergic system serves as a useful model for understanding the effect of metabolic precursors. Oral L-tryptophan administration decreases the perception of pain, appearing to act synergistically with the enkephalins and endorphins. Drugs that either increase the serotonin level or block reuptake are associated with decreased pain perception, increased pain threshold, and improved sleep. From a therapeutic standpoint, dietary modification would appear to be attractive, due to its low economic basis, decreased risk of addiction and dependence, as well as simplicity. However, potential risk from toxicity is only recently being recognized, along with difficulty in reliability of analgesic effect from one patient to another. Currently, L-tryptophan is unavailable for therapeutic use in the United States and is not recommended implicitly or explicitly by the author because of its potential health risk. PMID:1687935

  6. Management of insomnia in patients with chronic pain conditions.

    PubMed

    Stiefel, Frederic; Stagno, Daniele

    2004-01-01

    The management of insomnia in patients experiencing chronic pain requires careful evaluation, good diagnostic skills, familiarity with cognitive-behavioural interventions and a sound knowledge of pharmacological treatments. Sleep disorders are characterised by a circular interrelationship with chronic pain such that pain leads to sleep disorders and sleep disorders increase the perception of pain. Sleep disorders in individuals with chronic pain remain under-reported, under-diagnosed and under-treated, which may lead--together with the individual's emotional, cognitive and behavioural maladaptive responses--to the frequent development of chronic sleep disorders. The moderately positive relationship between pain severity and sleep complaints, and the specificity of pain-related arousal and mediating variables such as depression, illustrate that insomnia in relation to chronic pain is multifaceted and poorly understood. This may explain the limited success of the available treatments. This article discusses the evaluation of patients with chronic pain and insomnia and the available pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions to manage the sleep disorder. Non-pharmacological interventions should not be considered as single interventions, but in association with one another. Some non-pharmacological interventions especially the cognitive and behavioural approaches, can be easily implemented in general practice (e.g. stimulus control, sleep restriction, imagery training and progressive muscle relaxation). Hypnotics are routinely prescribed in the medically ill, regardless of their adverse effects; however, their long-term efficacy is not supported by robust evidence. Antidepressants provide an interesting alternative to hypnotics, since they can improve pain perception as well as sleep disorders in selected patients. Sedative antipsychotics can be considered for sleep disturbances in those patients exhibiting psychotic features, or for those with

  7. Pain Management in the Elderly Population: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Alan D.; Baluch, Amir; Scott, Jared T.

    2010-01-01

    The elderly population comprises the fastest growing segment of the world's population. As patients age, the incidence and prevalence of certain pain syndromes increase. Pain may be underreported as some elderly patients incorrectly believe that pain is a normal process of aging. A comprehensive pain assessment includes a thorough medical history and physical examination, review of systems and pertinent laboratory results, imaging studies, and diagnostic tests. Pain physicians should have a broad range of understanding of the pharmacologic and physiological changes that occur in the geriatric population. The present review on pain management in the elderly focuses on relevant information for the pain clinician. Included are appropriate pain assessment, physical examination, pathophysiologic changes in the elderly, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes, and present pain management modalities. Elderly patients present with increased fat mass, decreased muscle mass, and decreased body water, all of which have important ramifications on drug distribution. Hepatic phase I reactions involving oxidation, hydrolysis, and reduction appear to be more altered by age than phase II conjugation such as acetylation, glucuronidation, sulfation, and glycine conjugation. There is a predictable age-related decline in cytochrome P-450 function and, combined with the polypharmacy that much of the elderly population experiences, this may lead to a toxic reaction of medications. One of the newer opiates, oxymorphone, has recently been studied as it is metabolized in a non-cytochrome P-450 pathway and therefore bypasses many of the drug-drug interactions common to the elderly. A multidisciplinary approach is recommended to investigate all possible options for optimal management, including pharmacotherapy, interventional procedures, physical rehabilitation, and psychological support. PMID:21603375

  8. Helicopter winchmens' experiences with pain management in challenging environments.

    PubMed

    van der Velde, J; Linehan, L; Cusack, S

    2013-02-01

    We conducted a survey of Irish Coast Guard Search and Rescue Helicopter winchmen to establish if their pain management scope of practice was adequate for their working environment. We surveyed 17 SAR personnel. 88% of winchmen have experienced scenarios where they were unable to reduce pain scores below 6/10. In seeking solutions within current Irish Prehospital Clinical Practice Guidelines, repeated descriptions of operations in extreme weather and sea conditions were given which were entirely incompatible with the dexterity required to break a glass ampoule and draw up solution, let alone site an intravenous (IV) line or administer a drug via intramuscular (IM) injection. Irish Coast Guard Search and Rescue Helicopter winchmen encounter polytrauma patients in extreme pain in uniquely challenging environments. Novel solutions to pain management within this tightly governed system are urgently required. PMID:23472383

  9. Hypnosis and its place in modern pain management - review article.

    PubMed

    Amadasun, F E

    2007-09-01

    This is an evidence-based review of the efficacy of hypnosis in pain management. Hypnosis is as old as mankind. It is reported in the Ebers Papyrus in ancient Egyptian cures. It went into decline in the Middle Ages with the rise of Christianity, being erroneously associated with witchcraft. There was resurgence of interest in the 19th century. In the early 1950s, the British Medical Association endorsed the teaching of hypnosis in all medical schools. The literature is replete with anecdotal and controlled studies of the efficacy of hypnotherapy in pain management. Not much is found of the effectiveness in acute pain conditions. Nevertheless, in spite of some methodological flaws in many reports, there seems to be sufficient clinical evidence of sufficient quality, to conclude that hypnosis has demonstrable efficacy in the treatment of chronic pain. PMID:17767210

  10. A neuroscience approach to managing athletes with low back pain.

    PubMed

    Puentedura, Emilio J; Louw, Adriaan

    2012-08-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common complaint within the athletic population and is commonly managed through a biomedical approach. The injured or damaged structure causing the LBP is identified and treated, and complete recovery from the episode is expected. Clinical experience shows us that often, athletes with LBP will not recover from their episode and may continue their sports participation despite persistent pain, or they may limit participation. Recent neuroscience research into the biology of pain suggests that clinicians involved in the management of athletes with LBP should embrace a biopsychosocial approach by engaging the brain and nervous system. This manuscript provides an overview of such a biopsychosocial approach, and presents information on the neurobiology of the athlete's pain experience. PMID:22814445

  11. Cervical zygapophysial (facet) joint pain: effectiveness of interventional management strategies.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A; Kaye, Alan D; Boswell, Mark V

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic facet joint nerve blocks have been utilized in the diagnosis of cervical facet joint pain in patients without disk herniation or radicular pain due to a lack of reliable noninvasive diagnostic measures. Therapeutic interventions include intra-articular injections, facet joint nerve blocks and radiofrequency neurotomy. The diagnostic accuracy and effectiveness of facet joint interventions have been assessed in multiple diagnostic accuracy studies, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), and systematic reviews in managing chronic neck pain. This assessment shows there is Level II evidence based on a total of 11 controlled diagnostic accuracy studies for diagnosing cervical facet joint pain in patients without disk herniation or radicular pain utilizing controlled diagnostic blocks. Due to significant variability and internal inconsistency regarding prevalence in a heterogenous population; despite 11 studies, evidence is determined as Level II. Prevalence ranged from 36% to 67% with at least 80% pain relief as the criterion standard with a false-positive rate ranging from 27% to 63%. The evidence is Level II for the long-term effectiveness of radiofrequency neurotomy and facet joint nerve blocks in managing cervical facet joint pain. There is Level III evidence for cervical intra-articular injections. PMID:26653406

  12. Persistent pain as a disease entity: implications for clinical management.

    PubMed

    Siddall, Philip J; Cousins, Michael J

    2004-08-01

    Pain has often been regarded merely as a symptom that serves as a passive warning signal of an underlying disease process. Using this model, the goal of treatment has been to identify and address the pathology causing pain in the expectation that this would lead to its resolution. However, there is accumulating evidence to indicate that persistent pain cannot be regarded as a passive symptom. Continuing nociceptive inputs result in a multitude of consequences that impact on the individual, ranging from changes in receptor function to mood dysfunction, inappropriate cognitions, and social disruption. These changes that occur as a consequence of continuing nociceptive inputs argue for the consideration of persistent pain as a disease entity in its own right. As with any disease, the extent of these changes is largely determined by the internal and external environments in which they occur. Thus genetic, psychological and social factors may all contribute to the perception and expression of persistent pain. Optimal outcomes in the management of persistent pain may be achieved not simply by attempting to remove the cause of the pain, but by addressing both the consequences and contributors that together comprise the disease of persistent pain. PMID:15271732

  13. Pain Management in Four-Limb Amputation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Warner, Nafisseh S; Warner, Matthew A; Moeschler, Susan M; Hoelzer, Bryan C

    2015-09-01

    Acute pain following amputation can be challenging to treat due to multiple underlying mechanisms and variable clinical responses to treatment. Furthermore, poorly controlled preoperative pain is a risk factor for developing chronic pain. Evidence suggests that epidural analgesia and peripheral nerve blockade may decrease the severity of residual limb pain and the prevalence of phantom pain after lower extremity amputation. We present the perioperative analgesic management of a patient with gangrene of the bilateral upper and lower extremities as a result of septic shock and prolonged vasopressor administration who underwent four-limb amputation in a single procedure. A multimodal analgesic regimen was utilized, including titration of preoperative opioid and neuropathic pain agents, perioperative intravenous, epidural and peripheral nerve catheter infusions, and postoperative oral medication titration. More than 8 months postoperatively, the patient has satisfactory pain control with no evidence for phantom limb pain. To our knowledge, there have been no publications to date concerning analgesic regimens in four-limb amputation. PMID:26011696

  14. The management of pain following laminectomy for lumbar disc lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, G.

    1981-01-01

    Assessment of the results of laminectomy for lumbar disc lesions is unsatisfactory, but it seems that some degree of recurrent pain is virtually inevitable. The clinical features and incidence of the various painful syndromes seen in these patients, including one, the sacro-spinalis insertion syndrome, which has not previously been described, are outlined and the management of each is discussed with reference to two personal series, one of 98 patients consecutively undergoing laminectomy and the other of 35 patients referred because of recurrent pain following laminectomy. Finally, problems of prophylaxis are considered. PMID:6454375

  15. CE: Appropriate Use of Opioids in Managing Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Denenberg, Risa; Curtiss, Carol P

    2016-07-01

    : Over the past two decades, the use of opioids to manage chronic pain has increased substantially, primarily in response to the recognized functional, emotional, and financial burden associated with chronic pain. Within this same period, unintentional death related to prescription opioids has been identified as a public health crisis, owing in part to such factors as insufficient professional training and medication overprescription, misuse, and diversion. The authors discuss current best practices for prescribing opioids for chronic pain, emphasizing patient assessment and essential patient teaching points regarding safe medication use, storage, and disposal. PMID:27294667

  16. Educational approaches to management of low back pain.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L

    1989-01-01

    With the high incidence of low back pain in adults, especially in the work place, industrial and health care professionals must work together to reduce the physical, emotional, and monetary cost of back pain. Conservative management can be effective when it includes therapy and patient education. This article discusses back schools and work hardening programs, two methods used to return employees to productive levels. PMID:2523529

  17. American Society for Pain Management Nursing Position Statement: Prescribing and Administering Opioid Doses Based Solely on Pain Intensity.

    PubMed

    Pasero, Chris; Quinlan-Colwell, Ann; Rae, Diana; Broglio, Kathleen; Drew, Debra

    2016-06-01

    The foundation of safe and effective pain management is an individualized, comprehensive pain assessment, which includes, but is not limited to, determining the intensity of pain if the patient is able to report it. An unforeseen consequence of the widespread use of pain intensity rating scales is the practice of prescribing specific doses of opioid analgesics based solely on specific pain intensity. Many factors in addition to pain intensity influence opioid requirements, and there is no research showing that a specific opioid dose will relieve pain of a specific intensity in all patients. The American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) holds the position that the practice of prescribing doses of opioid analgesics based solely on a patient's pain intensity should be prohibited because it disregards the relevance of other essential elements of assessment and may contribute to untoward patient outcomes. PMID:27108082

  18. Mindfulness, functioning and catastrophizing after multidisciplinary pain management for chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Emma Louise; Atherton, Rachel Jane; Robertson, Noelle; Walsh, David Andrew; Gillett, Raphael

    2012-03-01

    We examined mindfulness in people with chronic low back pain who were attending a multidisciplinary pain management programme. Participants completed questionnaires at baseline (n=116) and after a 3-month cognitive-behaviourally informed multidisciplinary intervention (n=87). Self-reported mindfulness was measured before and after the intervention, and relationships were explored between mindfulness, disability, affect and pain catastrophizing. Mindfulness increased following participation in the intervention, and greater mindfulness was predictive of lower levels of disability, anxiety, depression and catastrophizing, even when pain severity was controlled. Mediator analyses suggested that the relationship between mindfulness and disability was mediated by catastrophizing. It is possible that cognitive-behavioural interventions and processes can affect both catastrophizing and mindfulness. PMID:22240149

  19. Perioperative pain management in hip arthroscopy; what options are there?

    PubMed

    Bech, N H; Hulst, A H; Spuijbroek, J A; van Leuken, L L A; Haverkamp, D

    2016-08-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a fast growing orthopedic field of expertise. As in any field of surgery adequate postoperative pain management regimes are of utmost importance. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of current knowledge on anesthetic options for perioperative pain management for hip arthroscopy. We searched the Pubmed/Medline and Embase database for literature and included 10 studies for our analysis. Because of the variety of pain scales and different ways of measured pain no meta-analysis could be performed and a descriptive review is performed. There are several types of pain regimens that can mostly be divided in two groups: local anesthetics and nerve blocks. Included studies show a rather large variation in reported visual analogue scale scores, post anesthesia care unit admission time and opioid usage. There are several anesthetic options available for hip arthroscopy. Different studies use different dosages, anesthetic regimens and different protocols; this partly explains the differences between studies with similar techniques. Peripheral nerve blocks seems promising but regarding current literature no clear recommendation can be made about what the best perioperative pain management option is, an overview of all reported techniques is given. PMID:27583156

  20. Pediatric nurses' beliefs and pain management practices: an intervention pilot.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle Vincent, Catherine; Wilkie, Diana J; Wang, Edward

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated feasibility of the Internet-based Relieve Children's Pain (RCP) protocol to improve nurses' management of children's pain. RCP is an interactive, content-focused, and Kolb's experiential learning theory-based intervention. Using a one-group, pretest-posttest design, we evaluated feasibility of RCP and pretest-posttest difference in scores for nurses' beliefs, and simulated and actual pain management practices. Twenty-four RNs completed an Internet-based Pain Beliefs and Practices Questionnaire (PBPQ, alpha=.83) before and after they completed the RCP and an Acceptability Scale afterward. Mean total PBPQ scores significantly improved from pretest to posttest as did simulated practice scores. After RCP in actual hospital practice, nurses administered significantly more ibuprofen and ketorolac and children's pain intensity significantly decreased. Findings showed strong evidence for the feasibility of RCP and study procedures and significant improvement in nurses' beliefs and pain management practices. The 2-hr RCP program is promising and warrants replication with an attention control group and a larger sample. PMID:21172923

  1. Perioperative pain management in hip arthroscopy; what options are there?

    PubMed Central

    Bech, N. H.; Hulst, A. H.; Spuijbroek, J. A.; van Leuken, L. L. A.; Haverkamp, D.

    2016-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a fast growing orthopedic field of expertise. As in any field of surgery adequate postoperative pain management regimes are of utmost importance. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of current knowledge on anesthetic options for perioperative pain management for hip arthroscopy. We searched the Pubmed/Medline and Embase database for literature and included 10 studies for our analysis. Because of the variety of pain scales and different ways of measured pain no meta-analysis could be performed and a descriptive review is performed. There are several types of pain regimens that can mostly be divided in two groups: local anesthetics and nerve blocks. Included studies show a rather large variation in reported visual analogue scale scores, post anesthesia care unit admission time and opioid usage. There are several anesthetic options available for hip arthroscopy. Different studies use different dosages, anesthetic regimens and different protocols; this partly explains the differences between studies with similar techniques. Peripheral nerve blocks seems promising but regarding current literature no clear recommendation can be made about what the best perioperative pain management option is, an overview of all reported techniques is given. PMID:27583156

  2. Chronic pain management: legal and licensure issues.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ku-Lang; Fillingim, Roger; Hurley, Robert W; Schmidt, Siegfried

    2015-05-01

    Legal and licensure issues are an inevitable aspect of treating patients with chronic pain. Clinicians need to ensure compliance with state medical board and federal guidelines. Prescription drug abuse continues to be a significant problem. Despite the legalization of medical marijuana in some states, there is currently no medical indication for prescribing marijuana; the exceptions are dronabinol and nabilone. These are approved by the Food and Drug Administration for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, and dronabinol also is approved for anorexia in patients with AIDS or cancer. Other legal issues concern establishment of chronic pain as a basis for disability status. Clinicians often are asked to provide a letter or assessment, such as a functional capacity evaluation, for documenting disability. Referral to a physical medicine and rehabilitation subspecialist or physical therapist for this evaluation should be considered. Balancing legal and licensure issues with the best interests of the patient can be challenging for clinicians. PMID:25970871

  3. Parity not perfect: making sense of substance addiction equity for case managers.

    PubMed

    Swanke, Jayme R; Zeman, Laura Dreuth

    2011-01-01

    In October of 2008, the Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act became a law. It represents a groundbreaking change in substance abuse treatment policy because it redistributes the bulk of costs for substance abuse treatment from the federal government to group health plans. The law required that employee and public insurances that cover health or surgical care also provide comparable terms of coverage and treatment limitations for substance abuse. This article considers shift within the context of a popular substance abuse motto that "reform is progress but not perfect." Specifically, it examines policy implications and their impact on consumers, insurers, providers, and case managers. PMID:22026240

  4. Pain management strategies and lessons from the military: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Vallerand, April Hazard; Cosler, Patricia; Henningfield, Jack E; Galassini, Pam

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Wounded soldiers often experience substantial pain, which must be addressed before returning to active duty or civilian life. The United States (US) military has instituted several guidelines and initiatives aimed at improving pain management by providing rapid access to medical care, and developing interdisciplinary multimodal pain management strategies based on outcomes observed both in combat and hospital settings. OBJECTIVE: To provide a narrative review regarding US military pain management guidelines and initiatives, which may guide improvements in pain management, particularly chronic pain management and prevention, for the general population. METHODS: A literature review of US military pain management guidelines and initiatives was conducted, with a particular focus on the potential of these guidelines to address shortcomings in chronic pain management in the general population. DISCUSSION: The application of US military pain management guidelines has been shown to improve pain monitoring, education and relief. In addition, the US military has instituted the development of programs and guidelines to ensure proper use and discourage aberrant behaviours with regard to opioid use, because opioids are regarded as a critical part of acute and chronic pain management schemes. Inadequate pain management, particularly inadequate chronic pain management, remains a major problem for the general population in the US. Application of military strategies for pain management to the general US population may lead to more effective pain management and improved long-term patient outcomes. PMID:26448972

  5. The SMART Way to Manage Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulding, Kerstin

    1998-01-01

    The Self-Management Programme for People with Arthritis aims to teach patients to manage their condition, improve their understanding, and communicate effectively with health professionals. The focus is on developing self-efficacy and peer teaching. (SK)

  6. Managing Pain from a Broken Hip: A Guide for Adults and Their Caregivers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the pain is managed. Understanding Your Choices Usual care for pain from a broken hip Your doctor may give you medicines to treat the pain before or after an operation to repair the broken hip. Some ...

  7. Informal hospice caregiver pain management concerns: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Marjorie; Demiris, George; Nguyen, Huong; Oliver, Debra P; Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Background Informal, unpaid, family caregivers provide much hospice care in the United States. These caregivers suffer physically, psychologically, emotionally, and socially from the burden of caring. The most often identified area of caregiver burden is the management of end-of-life pain. However, little empirical evidence exists of effective interventions to help caregivers manage end-of-life pain, and issues surrounding caregiver pain management remain vague and undefined. Understanding these concerns will inform the design of effective caregiver interventions. Aim The purpose of this study was to describe and organize caregiver pain management challenges faced by home hospice caregivers of cancer patients. Design A content analysis of secondary data, namely, recordings of caregiver interviews, was conducted to describe pain management issues. These interviews were part of a larger clinical trial. Setting/participants Multiple sessions with 29 informal caregivers, of patients dying of cancer, were audio-recorded. Subjects were purposively selected from two hospice programs in the Northwestern United States. Caregivers of noncancer patients were excluded from the study sample. Results A framework of six major themes with subordinate subthemes was developed through a literature review and peer review. The framework was used to organize the content of 87 caregiver interviews. The six major themes identified in the analysis included Caregiver-Centric Issues, Caregiver Medication Skills and Knowledge Issues, End-of-Life Symptom Knowledge Issues, Communication and Teamwork Issues, Organizational Skill Issues, and Patient-Centric Issues. Conclusion This analysis clearly articulated and classified caregiver issues surrounding pain management. Future hospice research may benefit from the use of this analysis and framework in the development of tools to alleviate this major cause of caregiver burden. PMID:23612959

  8. Normalizing suffering: A meta-synthesis of experiences of and perspectives on pain and pain management in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Skär, Lisa; Söderberg, Siv; Bondas, Terese E

    2016-01-01

    Older people who live in nursing homes commonly suffer from pain. Therefore, relieving suffering among older people that stems from pain demands knowledge improvement through an integration of international knowledge. This study aimed to integrate current international findings and strengthen the understanding of older people's experiences of and perspectives on pain and pain management in nursing homes. A meta-synthesis study using Noblit and Hare's interpretative meta-ethnography approach was conducted. Empirical research papers from journals were collected from various databases. The search process and appraisal determined six articles for inclusion. Two studies were conducted in the US and one each in Iceland, Norway, the UK, and Australia. The older people's experiences of pain as well as perspectives on pain management from all involved (older people, their family members, and healthcare staff) were integrated into a theoretical model using three themes of "identity of pain," "recognition of pain," and "response to pain." The metaphor of "normalizing suffering" was devised to illustrate the meaning of pain experiences and pain management in nursing homes. Society's common attitude that pain is unavoidable and therefore acceptable in old age in society-among older people themselves as well as those who are responsible for reporting, acknowledging, and relieving pain-must change. The article emphasizes that pain as a primary source of suffering can be relieved, provided that older people are encouraged to report their pain. In addition, healthcare staff require sufficient training to take a person-centered approach towards assessment and management of pain that considers all elements of pain. PMID:27173102

  9. Interventional management of neuropathic pain: NeuPSIG recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, Robert H.; O’Connor, Alec B.; Kent, Joel; Mackey, Sean C.; Raja, Srinivasa N.; Stacey, Brett R.; Levy, Robert M.; Backonja, Miroslav; Baron, Ralf; Harke, Henning; Loeser, John D.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Turk, Dennis C.; Wells, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is often refractory to pharmacologic and non-interventional treatment. On behalf of the International Association for the Study of Pain Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group (NeuPSIG), the authors evaluated systematic reviews, clinical trials, and existing guidelines for the interventional management of NP. Evidence is summarized and presented for neural blockade, spinal cord stimulation (SCS), intrathecal medication, and neurosurgical interventions in patients with the following peripheral and central NP conditions: herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN); painful diabetic and other peripheral neuropathies; spinal cord injury NP; central post-stroke pain; radiculopathy and failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS); complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS); and trigeminal neuralgia and neuropathy. Due to the paucity of high-quality clinical trials, no strong recommendations can be made. Four weak recommendations based on the amount and consistency of evidence, including degree of efficacy and safety, are: (1) epidural injections for herpes zoster; (2) steroid injections for radiculopathy; (3) SCS for FBSS; and (4) SCS for CRPS type 1. Based on the available data, we recommend not to use sympathetic blocks for PHN nor RF lesions for radiculopathy. No other conclusive recommendations can be made due to the poor quality of available of data. Whenever possible, these interventions should either be part of randomized clinical trials or documented in pain registries. Priorities for future research include randomized clinical trials; long-term studies; and head-to-head comparisons among different interventional and non-interventional treatments. PMID:23748119

  10. Effect of Massage on Pain Management for Thoracic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza; Rodgers, Nancy; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Cordes, Mary Ellen; Bauer, Brent; Cassivi, Stephen D.; Cha, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Integrative therapies such as massage have gained support as interventions that improve the overall patient experience during hospitalization. Thoracic surgery patients undergo long procedures and commonly have postoperative back, neck, and shoulder pain. Purpose: Given the promising effects of massage therapy for alleviation of pain, we studied the effectiveness and feasibility of massage therapy delivered in the postoperative thoracic surgery setting. Methods: Patients who received massage in the postoperative setting had pain scores evaluated pre and post massage on a rating scale of 0 to 10 (0 = no pain, 10 = worst possible pain). Results: In total, 160 patients completed the pilot study and received massage therapy that was individualized. Patients receiving massage therapy had significantly decreased pain scores after massage (p ≤ .001), and patients’ comments were very favorable. Patients and staff were highly satisfied with having massage therapy available, and no major barriers to implementing massage therapy were identified. Conclusions: Massage therapy may be an important additional pain management component of the healing experience for patients after thoracic surgery. PMID:21847428

  11. Management of breakthrough pain in children with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Friedrichsdorf, Stefan J; Postier, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Breakthrough pain in children with cancer is an exacerbation of severe pain that occurs over a background of otherwise controlled pain. There are no randomized controlled trials in the management of breakthrough pain in children with cancer, and limited data and considerable experience indicate that breakthrough pain in this pediatric patient group is common, underassessed, and undertreated. An ideal therapeutic agent would be rapid in onset, have a relatively short duration, and would be easy to administer. A less effective pharmacologic strategy would be increasing a patient’s dose of scheduled opioids, because this may increase the risk of oversedation. The most common and effective strategy seems to be multimodal analgesia that includes an immediate-release opioid (eg, morphine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, or diamorphine) administered intravenously by a patient-controlled analgesia pump, ensuring an onset of analgesic action within minutes. Intranasal fentanyl (or hydromorphone) may be an alternative, but no pediatric data have been published yet for commercially available fentanyl transmucosal application systems (ie, sublingual tablets/spray, buccal lozenge/tablet/film, and nasal spray), and these products cannot yet be recommended for use with children with cancer and breakthrough pain. The aim of this paper was to emphasize the dearth of available information on treatment of breakthrough pain in pediatric cancer patients, to describe the treatment protocols we currently recommend based on clinical experience, and to suggest future research on this very important and under-researched topic. PMID:24639603

  12. Gonyautoxins: First evidence in pain management in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hinzpeter, Jaime; Barrientos, Cristián; Zamorano, Álvaro; Martinez, Álvaro; Palet, Miguel; Wulf, Rodrigo; Barahona, Maximiliano; Sepúlveda, Joaquín M; Guerra, Matias; Bustamante, Tamara; Del Campo, Miguel; Tapia, Eric; Lagos, Nestor

    2016-09-01

    Improvements in pain management techniques in the last decade have had a major impact on the practice of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Gonyautoxin are phycotoxins, whose molecular mechanism of action is a reversible block of the voltage-gated sodium channels at the axonal level, impeding nerve impulse propagation. This study was designed to evaluate the clinical efficacy of Gonyautoxin infiltration, as a long acting pain blocker in TKA. Fifteen patients received a total dose of 40 μg of Gonyautoxin during the TKA operation. Postoperatively, all patients were given a standard painkiller protocol: 100 mg of intravenous ketoprofen and 1000 mg of oral acetaminophen every 8 hours for 3 days. The Visual Analog Scale (VAS) pain score and range of motion were recorded 12, 36, and 60 hours post-surgery. All patients reported pain of 2 or less on the VAS 12 and 36 hours post-surgery. Moreover, all scored were less than 4 at 60 hours post-surgery. All patients achieved full knee extension at all times. No side effects or adverse reactions to Gonyautoxin were detected in the follow-up period. The median hospital stay was 3 days. For the first time, this study has shown the effect of blocking the neuronal transmission of pain by locally infiltrating Gonyautoxin during TKA. All patients successfully responded to the pain control. The Gonyautoxin infiltration was safe and effective, and patients experienced pain relief without the use of opioids. PMID:27317871

  13. Present-day challenges and future solutions in postoperative pain management: results from PainForum 2014

    PubMed Central

    Kuusniemi, Kristiina; Pöyhiä, Reino

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a summary of presentations on postoperative pain control by the authors at the 2014 PainForum meeting in People’s Republic of China. Postoperative pain is often untreated or undertreated and may lead to subsequent chronic pain syndromes. As more procedures migrate to the outpatient setting, postoperative pain control will become increasingly more challenging. Evidence-based guidelines for postoperative pain control recommend pain assessment using validated tools on a consistent basis. In this regard, consistency may be more important than the specific tool selected. Many hospitals have introduced a multidisciplinary acute pain service (APS), which has been associated with improved patient satisfaction and fewer adverse events. Patient education is an important component of postoperative pain control, which may be most effective when clinicians chose a multimodal approach, such as paracetamol (acetaminophen) and opioids. Opioids are a mainstay of postoperative pain control but require careful monitoring and management of side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and somnolence. Opioids may be administered using patient-controlled analgesia systems. Protocols for postoperative pain control can be very helpful to establish benchmarks for pain management and assure that clinicians adhere to evidence-based standards. The future of postoperative pain control around the world will likely involve more and better established APSs and greater communication between patients and clinicians about postoperative pain. The changes necessary to implement and move forward with APSs is not a single step but rather one of continuous improvement and ongoing change. PMID:26893579

  14. Psychological characteristics of people with spinal cord injury-related persisting pain referred to a tertiary pain management center.

    PubMed

    Nicholson Perry, Kathryn; Nicholas, Michael K; Middleton, James; Siddall, Philip

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the psychological characteristics of a cohort of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) and persisting pain referred to a tertiary pain management center. Forty-five individuals completed measures of pain, mood, disability, and both pain- and SCI-related psychological variables such as self-efficacy and catastrophizing. Compared with a general pain clinic population attending the same tertiary pain management center (n = 5,941), the sample was found to have lower pain intensity, comparable pain catastrophizing levels, and less activity interference due to pain. In contrast, those with SCI pain reported poorer mood. Pain catastrophizing was associated with anxiety, depression, and activity interference due to pain; pain self-efficacy was close to being significantly associated with these variables also. SCI acceptance and self-efficacy were also associated with some of these variables. These findings suggest that the biopsychosocial model of pain is applicable in this sample and that further treatment benefits could be obtained through use of interventions targeting psychological and social variables within this model. PMID:19533520

  15. Present-day challenges and future solutions in postoperative pain management: results from PainForum 2014.

    PubMed

    Kuusniemi, Kristiina; Pöyhiä, Reino

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a summary of presentations on postoperative pain control by the authors at the 2014 PainForum meeting in People's Republic of China. Postoperative pain is often untreated or undertreated and may lead to subsequent chronic pain syndromes. As more procedures migrate to the outpatient setting, postoperative pain control will become increasingly more challenging. Evidence-based guidelines for postoperative pain control recommend pain assessment using validated tools on a consistent basis. In this regard, consistency may be more important than the specific tool selected. Many hospitals have introduced a multidisciplinary acute pain service (APS), which has been associated with improved patient satisfaction and fewer adverse events. Patient education is an important component of postoperative pain control, which may be most effective when clinicians chose a multimodal approach, such as paracetamol (acetaminophen) and opioids. Opioids are a mainstay of postoperative pain control but require careful monitoring and management of side effects, such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and somnolence. Opioids may be administered using patient-controlled analgesia systems. Protocols for postoperative pain control can be very helpful to establish benchmarks for pain management and assure that clinicians adhere to evidence-based standards. The future of postoperative pain control around the world will likely involve more and better established APSs and greater communication between patients and clinicians about postoperative pain. The changes necessary to implement and move forward with APSs is not a single step but rather one of continuous improvement and ongoing change. PMID:26893579

  16. Interventional pain management skills competency in pain medicine fellows: a method for development and assessment.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Kevin; Cuccurullo, Sara J; Perret-Karimi, Danielle; Hata, Justin; Ferrer, Steven M; Demesmin, Didier; Petagna, Ann Marie

    2014-08-01

    The purposes of this project were to propose an educational module to instruct pain medicine fellows in the appropriate performance of interventional pain management techniques and to verify procedural competency through objective evaluation methodology. Eight board-certified pain medicine physicians spanning two fellowship programs trained seven fellows using a standardized competency-based module. Assessment tools address the basic competencies outlined by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (American Board of Anesthesiology Pain Medicine Content Outline). The seven fellows demonstrated proficiency in every segment of the evaluation module. Objective measures compared the fellows' performance on standardized procedure checklists administered 9 mos into training; fellows in the 2012-2013 academic year also received testing at the 3-mo mark. Support for the assessment module is demonstrated by appropriate performance of interventional procedures, with improvement noted from 3-mo to 9-mo testing, successful completion of chart-stimulated oral examinations, proper performance of relevant physical examination maneuvers, and completion of program-specific medical knowledge written tests. The fellows were evaluated via patient surveys and 360-degree global rating scales, maintained procedure logs, and completed two patient-care reports; these were reviewed by program directors to ensure adequate completion. The standardized educational module and evaluation methodology presented provide a potential framework for the definition of baseline competency in the clinical skill area of interventional pain management. PMID:25033098

  17. [Pain management with herbal antirheumatic drugs].

    PubMed

    Chrubasik, Sigrun; Pollak, S

    2002-01-01

    Herbal antirheumatics are indicated in painful inflammatory and degenerative rheumatic diseases. Their mechanism of action is broader than that of synthetic antirheumatics. Particular preparations from Devils's Claw with 50 to 100 mg of harpagoside in the daily dosage as well as a particular willow bark extract with 120 to 240 mg salicin in the daily dosage proved efficacy in a number of clinical studies including confirmatory ones. Exploratory studies indicate that these herbal antirheumatics were not inferior to the selective COX-2 inhibitor rofecoxib when treating acute exacerbations of chronic low back pain. For the proprietary nettle root extract IDS23 promising in vitro/in vivo results indicate an anti-inflammatory effect, however there are only 2 open uncontrolled clinical studies available and the proof of efficacy is still missing. Safety data in order to recommend use during pregnancy and lactation are only available for the herbal combination product Phytodolor prepared from aspen, ash and goldenrod. In principle, blackcurrent leaf with not less than 1.5% flavonoids may be an appropriate antirheumatic. Likewise, the seed oils of blackcurrent, evening primrose and borage offering at least 1 to 3 g gammalinolenic acid/day are recommendable. In case superiority versus placebo has been established, proprietary herbal antirheumatics should be administered before the conventional analgesics due to the lower incidence of adverse events. PMID:12017748

  18. A Simple and Effective Daily Pain Management Method for Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy for Painful Bone Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, Regiane S.; Proctor, Julian W.; Slack, Robert; Marlowe, Ursula; Ashby, Karlotta R.; Schenken, Larry L.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: The incidence of painful bone metastases increases with longer survival times. Although external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is an effective palliative treatment, it often requires several days from the start of treatment to produce a measurable reduction in pain scores and a qualitative amelioration of patient pain levels. Meanwhile, the use of analgesics remains the best approach early on in the treatment course. We investigated the role of radiation therapists as key personnel for collecting daily pain scores to supplement assessments by physician and oncology nursing staff and manage pain more effectively during radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Daily pain scores were obtained by the radiation therapists for 89 patients undertaking a total of 124 courses of EBRT for bone metastases and compared with pretreatment pain scores. The majority of patients (71%) were treated to 30 Gy (range, 20-37.5) in 10 fractions (range, 8-15 fractions). Results: One hundred nineteen treatment courses (96%) were completed. Pain scores declined rapidly to 37.5%, 50%, and 75% of the pretreatment levels by Days 2, 4, and 10, respectively. Pain was improved in 91% of patients with only 4% of worse pain at the end of treatment. Improved pain scores were maintained in 83% of patients at 1-month follow-up, but in 35% of them, the pain was worse than at the end of treatment. Conclusions: Collection of daily pain scores by radiation therapists was associated with an effective reduction in pain scores early on during EBRT of painful osseous metastases.

  19. Determinants of critical care nurses' pain management behaviour.

    PubMed

    Glynn, G; Ahern, M

    2000-11-01

    Research findings over the last 20 years show that critical care nurses (CCNs) continue to underestimate and under medicate their patients' pain, despite an allegedly strong commitment to pain relief. This literature review investigates the determinants of CCNs' pain assessment and management behaviours. Fishbein and Ajzen's theory of reasoned action' and Ajzen's theory of planned behaviour have been used as models to facilitate understanding of this phenomenon. Fishbein and Ajzen highlight attitudes, beliefs, subjective norms and the motivation to comply to the anticipated expectations of significant others as the determinants of intention to perform behaviour. Attitudinal barriers, knowledge deficits and the influence of peers affect CCNs' pain management behaviours, resulting in inadequate pain assessment and management practices. CCNs' attitudes about narcotic analgesia and how this interacts with gender, age and culture are also explored. Through an analysis of the behavioural determinants following the models described by Fishbein and Ajzen, strategies can be formulated to address CCN deficiencies, improve patient outcomes and satisfaction with nursing care and CCN fulfilment. Cervantes was quoted as saying "It's a long way from saying to doing". This report aims to improve on this idea. PMID:16948205

  20. New formulations of fentanyl for acute pain management.

    PubMed

    Paech, M J; Bloor, M; Schug, S A

    2012-02-01

    Intravenous fentanyl citrate has stood the test of time as a valuable formulation for pain management. The desirable physicochemical properties of fentanyl have allowed the development of several alternative formulations for delivery using less invasive routes, for example, transmucosal (intranasal, oral buccal and oral sublingual) and transdermal. These new formulations have been applied to clinical settings in which rapid onset of analgesia is desired, using convenient but noninvasive methods. Recent commercialization of various formulations has been driven largely by the needs of cancer patients, for whom severe but self-limiting "breakthrough" pain is less suitably treated by parenteral or oral routes of opioid administration. However, these formulations are also used for acute analgesia in prehospital and in-hospital emergency department care, and for pediatric acute pain management. Finally, they are increasingly used by patients with chronic pain of nonmalignant origin, although there is considerable debate about their merit in this group. We searched the databases MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL and Cochrane up to October 2011, using search terms "fentanyl AND nasal; intranasal; transmucosal; buccal; sublingual; oral; inhaled; inhalation; transdermal". The characteristics of several formulations of fentanyl are reviewed, detailing their pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and clinical experience with their use for acute pain management. PMID:22384452

  1. Topical analgesics in the management of acute and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Argoff, Charles E

    2013-02-01

    Oral analgesics are commonly prescribed for the treatment of acute and chronic pain, but these agents often produce adverse systemic effects, which sometimes are severe. Topical analgesics offer the potential to provide the same analgesic relief provided by oral analgesics but with minimal adverse systemic effects. This article describes the results of a systematic review of the efficacy of topical analgesics in the management of acute and chronic pain conditions. A literature search of MEDLINE/PubMed was conducted using the keywords topical analgesic AND chronic pain OR acute pain OR neuropathic pain and focused only on individual clinical trials published in English-language journals. The search identified 92 articles, of which 65 were eligible for inclusion in the review. The most commonly studied topical analgesics were nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (n=27), followed by lidocaine (n=9), capsaicin (n=6), amitriptyline (n=5), glyceryl trinitrate (n=3), opioids (n=2), menthol (n=2), pimecrolimus (n=2), and phenytoin (n=2). The most common indications were acute soft tissue injuries (n=18), followed by neuropathic pain (n=17), experimental pain (n=6), osteoarthritis and other chronic joint-related conditions (n=5), skin or leg ulcers (n=5), and chronic knee pain (n=2). Strong evidence was identified for the use of topical diclofenac and topical ibuprofen in the treatment of acute soft tissue injuries or chronic joint-related conditions, such as osteoarthritis. Evidence also supports the use of topical lidocaine in the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia and diabetic neuropathy. Currently, limited evidence is available to support the use of other topical analgesics in acute and chronic pain. PMID:23374622

  2. Canadian recommendations for the management of breakthrough cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Daeninck, P; Gagnon, B; Gallagher, R; Henderson, J D; Shir, Y; Zimmermann, C; Lapointe, B

    2016-04-01

    Breakthrough cancer pain (btcp) represents an important element in the spectrum of cancer pain management. Because most btcp episodes peak in intensity within a few minutes, speed of medication onset is crucial for proper control. In Canada, several current provincial guidelines for the management of cancer pain include a brief discussion about the treatment of btcp; however, there are no uniform national recommendations for the management of btcp. That lack, accompanied by unequal access to pain medication across the country, contributes to both regional and provincial variability in the management of btcp. Currently, immediate-release oral opioids are the treatment of choice for btcp. This approach might not always offer optimal speed for onset of action and duration to match the rapid nature of an episode of btcp. Novel transmucosal fentanyl formulations might be more appropriate for some types of btcp, but limited access to such drugs hinders their use. In addition, the recognition of btcp and its proper assessment, which are crucial steps toward appropriate treatment selection, remain challenging for many health care professionals. To facilitate appropriate management of btcp, a group of prominent Canadian specialists in palliative care, oncology, and anesthesiology convened to develop a set of recommendations and suggestions to assist Canadian health care providers in the treatment of btcp and the alleviation of the suffering and discomfort experienced by adult cancer patients. PMID:27122974

  3. Canadian recommendations for the management of breakthrough cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Daeninck, P.; Gagnon, B.; Gallagher, R.; Henderson, J.D.; Shir, Y.; Zimmermann, C.; Lapointe, B.

    2016-01-01

    Breakthrough cancer pain (btcp) represents an important element in the spectrum of cancer pain management. Because most btcp episodes peak in intensity within a few minutes, speed of medication onset is crucial for proper control. In Canada, several current provincial guidelines for the management of cancer pain include a brief discussion about the treatment of btcp; however, there are no uniform national recommendations for the management of btcp. That lack, accompanied by unequal access to pain medication across the country, contributes to both regional and provincial variability in the management of btcp. Currently, immediate-release oral opioids are the treatment of choice for btcp. This approach might not always offer optimal speed for onset of action and duration to match the rapid nature of an episode of btcp. Novel transmucosal fentanyl formulations might be more appropriate for some types of btcp, but limited access to such drugs hinders their use. In addition, the recognition of btcp and its proper assessment, which are crucial steps toward appropriate treatment selection, remain challenging for many health care professionals. To facilitate appropriate management of btcp, a group of prominent Canadian specialists in palliative care, oncology, and anesthesiology convened to develop a set of recommendations and suggestions to assist Canadian health care providers in the treatment of btcp and the alleviation of the suffering and discomfort experienced by adult cancer patients. PMID:27122974

  4. Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... realize you have a medical problem that needs treatment. Once you take care of the problem, pain ... Fortunately, there are many ways to treat pain. Treatment varies depending on the cause of pain. Pain ...

  5. Normalizing suffering: A meta-synthesis of experiences of and perspectives on pain and pain management in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Skär, Lisa; Söderberg, Siv; Bondas, Terese E.

    2016-01-01

    Older people who live in nursing homes commonly suffer from pain. Therefore, relieving suffering among older people that stems from pain demands knowledge improvement through an integration of international knowledge. This study aimed to integrate current international findings and strengthen the understanding of older people's experiences of and perspectives on pain and pain management in nursing homes. A meta-synthesis study using Noblit and Hare's interpretative meta-ethnography approach was conducted. Empirical research papers from journals were collected from various databases. The search process and appraisal determined six articles for inclusion. Two studies were conducted in the US and one each in Iceland, Norway, the UK, and Australia. The older people's experiences of pain as well as perspectives on pain management from all involved (older people, their family members, and healthcare staff) were integrated into a theoretical model using three themes of “identity of pain,” “recognition of pain,” and “response to pain.” The metaphor of “normalizing suffering” was devised to illustrate the meaning of pain experiences and pain management in nursing homes. Society's common attitude that pain is unavoidable and therefore acceptable in old age in society—among older people themselves as well as those who are responsible for reporting, acknowledging, and relieving pain—must change. The article emphasizes that pain as a primary source of suffering can be relieved, provided that older people are encouraged to report their pain. In addition, healthcare staff require sufficient training to take a person-centered approach towards assessment and management of pain that considers all elements of pain. PMID:27173102

  6. Guidance on the management of pain in older people.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Aza; Adams, Nicola; Bone, Margaret; Elliott, Alison M; Gaffin, Jean; Jones, Derek; Knaggs, Roger; Martin, Denis; Sampson, Liz; Schofield, Pat

    2013-03-01

    This guidance document reviews the epidemiology and management of pain in older people via a literature review of published research. The aim of this document is to inform health professionals in any care setting who work with older adults on best practice for the management of pain and to identify where there are gaps in the evidence that require further research. The assessment of pain in older people has not been covered within this guidance and can be found in a separate document (http://www.britishpainsociety.org/pub_professional.htm#assessmentpop). Substantial differences in the population, methods and definitions used in published research makes it difficult to compare across studies and impossible to determine the definitive prevalence of pain in older people. There are inconsistencies within the literature as to whether or not pain increases or decreases in this age group, and whether this is influenced by gender. There is, however, some evidence that the prevalence of pain is higher within residential care settings. The three most common sites of pain in older people are the back; leg/knee or hip and 'other' joints. In common with the working-age population, the attitudes and beliefs of older people influence all aspects of their pain experience. Stoicism is particularly evident within this cohort of people. Evidence from the literature search suggests that paracetamol should be considered as first-line treatment for the management of both acute and persistent pain, particularly that which is of musculoskeletal origin, due to its demonstrated efficacy and good safety profile. There are few absolute contraindications and relative cautions to prescribing paracetamol. It is, however, important that the maximum daily dose (4 g/24 h) is not exceeded. Non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should be used with caution in older people after other safer treatments have not provided sufficient pain relief. The lowest dose should be provided

  7. Pain from sickle-cell crisis.

    PubMed

    Waters, J; Thomas, V

    A qualitative questionnaire survey was carried out to identify the perceptions and expectations of pain management of patients with sickle-cell disease, and of nurses. The study illustrates that the present sample of nurses contributed to the poor pain control of sickle-cell patients because of their misconceptions about narcotic addiction, inadequate formal pain assessment and their neglect of attention to the psychosocial implications of this chronic disease. PMID:7731853

  8. Pain Management: A Practical Approach to Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wacker, Margaret S.; Pawasauskas, Joyce

    2002-01-01

    Nine brief onsite educational sessions of 10-20 minutes each trained nurses in pain management techniques. Participants recognized the value of brief presentations, but wanted more time to learn the material. The content was made available on disk for further study. (SK)

  9. Use of analgesic drugs for pain management in sheep.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, I; Chambers, J P

    2012-03-01

    Awareness of pain and its effects is increasing within the veterinary profession, but pain management in food animals has been neglected. Sheep seldom receive analgesics despite various conditions, husbandry practice and experimental procedures being known to be painful, e.g. footrot, mastitis, vaginal prolapse, castration, vasectomy, penis deviation, and laparoscopy. The evidence supporting use of analgesic drugs in this species is reviewed here. Opioid agonists are of dubious efficacy and are short acting. α₂-agonists such as xylazine are good, short-lived analgesics, but induce hypoxaemia. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) such as ketoprofen provide long-lasting analgesia, but not as marked as that from α₂-agonists; they should be more widely used for inflammatory pain. Local anaesthetics reliably block pain signals, but may also induce motor blockade. Balanced analgesia using more than one class of drug, such as an α₂ agonist (e.g. medetomidine) and N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist (e.g. ketamine), with the combination selected for the circumstances, probably provides the best analgesia for severe pain. It should be noted that there are no approved analgesic drugs for use in sheep and therefore the use of such drugs in this species has to be off-label. This information may be useful to veterinary practitioners, biomedical researchers, and regulators in animal welfare to develop rational analgesic regimens which ultimately may improve the health and welfare of sheep in both farming and experimental conditions. PMID:22352925

  10. Assessment and management of children's pain in community hospitals.

    PubMed

    Caty, S; Tourigny, J; Koren, I

    1995-10-01

    Registered nurses (n = 72) working in 10 paediatric units in community hospitals in north-eastern Ontario, Canada, participated in a descriptive study investigating how nurses assess and manage pain in children. A four-part questionnaire was used to collect the self-reported data. Twenty-five (36%) of the respondents defined pain as an individual and personal experience and another 25 (36%) respondents defined pain as a more or less localized sensation or discomfort resulting from the stimulation of specialized nerve endings. In response to three different clinical situations, the subjects' mean pain ratings were: 5.72 for an infant; 7.34 for a 3-year-old; and 7.29 for a 12-year-old child. The criterion 'nurses' judgment' was cited as being used frequently in both the assessment and decision making process; however, there was indication that some of the current knowledge in the assessment and management of pain in children was not known or being used. PMID:8708181

  11. Hypnosis for pain management in the older adult.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Norma G

    2005-09-01

    Pain is a physical, emotional and psychologic phenomenon that is often ignored in older adults causing depression and poor quality of life. Older adults report the use of complementary and alternative medicine in some form with 80% of these users reporting improvement in their health conditions. Although physical pain in the older adult is usually managed with pharmacologic interventions, methods that may reduce the use of prescription drugs may decrease adverse effects that can compromise the physiologic state of the older adult. Hypnosis has continued to gain acceptance within mainstream medicine as an appropriate treatment and can be integrated safely with conventional medicine as an effective treatment for a variety of conditions in the older adult. It is an intervention that can be used for relaxation and pain control, especially when conventional pharmacologic regimens have failed. The purpose of this article is to review the concepts related to pain in older adults; the use of complementary and alternative medicine in the older adult; hypnosis and the older adult (i.e., background, definition, benefits, research, mechanism of action, hypnotizability, and the process); and the implications of using hypnosis for pain management in the older adult. PMID:16129381

  12. Addicts with chronic hepatitis C: Difficult to reach, manage or treat?

    PubMed Central

    Zanini, Barbara; Benini, Federica; Pigozzi, Marie Graciella; Furba, Patrizia; Giacò, Ernesto; Cinquegrana, Antonia; Fasoli, Mariagrazia; Lanzini, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    %, respectively). In a univariate analysis, alcohol intake was associated with a non-response (P = 0.0018, 95%CI: 0.0058-0.4565). CONCLUSION: Drug addicts with CHC can be successfully treated in a multidisciplinary setting using standard antiviral combination therapy, despite several “difficult to reach, manage and treat” characteristics. PMID:24307794

  13. Postoperative pain management after supratentorial craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Verchère, Eric; Grenier, Bruno; Mesli, Abdelghani; Siao, Daniel; Sesay, Mussa; Maurette, Pierre

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of three different postoperative treatments after supratentorial craniotomy. Sixty-four patients were allocated prospectively and randomly into three groups: paracetamol (the P group, n = 8), paracetamol and tramadol (the PT group, n = 29), and paracetamol and nalbuphine (the PN group, n = 27). General anesthesia was standardized with propofol and remifentanil using atracurium as the muscle relaxant. One hour before the end of surgery, all patients received 30 mg/kg propacetamol intravenously then 30 mg/kg every 6 hours. Patients in the PT group received 1.5 mg/kg tramadol 1 hour before the end of surgery. For patients in the PN group, 0.15 mg/kg nalbuphine was injected after discontinuation of remifentanil, because of its mu-antagonist effect. Postoperative pain was assessed in the fully awake patient after extubation (hour 0) and at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours using a visual analog scale (VAS). Additional tramadol (1.5 mg/kg) or 0.15 mg/kg nalbuphine was administered when the VAS score was > or = 30 mm. Analgesia was compared using the Mantha and Kaplan-Meier methods. Adverse effects of the drugs were also measured. The three groups were similar with respect to the total dose of remifentanil received (0.27 +/- 0.1 mircog/kg/min). In all patients, extubation was obtained within 6 +/- 3 minutes after remifentanil administration. Postoperative analgesia was ineffective in the P group; therefore, inclusions in this group were stopped after the eighth patient. Postoperative analgesia was effective in the two remaining groups because VAS scores were similar, except at hour 1, when nalbuphine was more effective (P = .001). Nevertheless, acquiring such a result demanded significantly more tramadol than nalbuphine (P < .05). More cases of nausea and vomiting were observed in the PT group but the difference was not significant (P < .06). In conclusion, pain after supratentorial neurosurgery must be taken into account

  14. Optimising postoperative pain management in the ambulatory patient.

    PubMed

    Shang, Allan B; Gan, Tong J

    2003-01-01

    Over 60% of surgery is now performed in an ambulatory setting. Despite improved analgesics and sophisticated drug delivery systems, surveys indicate that over 80% of patients experience moderate to severe pain postoperatively. Inadequate postoperative pain relief can prolong recovery, precipitate or increase the duration of hospital stay, increase healthcare costs, and reduce patient satisfaction. Effective postoperative pain management involves a multimodal approach and the use of various drugs with different mechanisms of action. Local anaesthetics are widely administered in the ambulatory setting using techniques such as local injection, field block, regional nerve block or neuraxial block. Continuous wound infusion pumps may have great potential in an ambulatory setting. Regional anaesthesia (involving anaesthetising regional areas of the body, including single extremities, multiple extremities, the torso, and the face or jaw) allows surgery to be performed in a specific location, usually an extremity, without the use of general anaesthesia, and potentially with little or no sedation. Opioids remain an important component of any analgesic regimen in treating moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. However, the incorporation of non-opioids, local anaesthetics and regional techniques will enhance current postoperative analgesic regimens. The development of new modalities of treatment, such as patient controlled analgesia, and newer drugs, such as cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, provide additional choices for the practitioner. While there are different routes of administration for analgesics (e.g. oral, parenteral, intramuscular, transmucosal, transdermal and sublingual), oral delivery of medications has remained the mainstay for postoperative pain control. The oral route is effective, the simplest to use and typically the least expensive. The intravenous route has the advantages of a rapid onset of action and easier titratibility, and so is recommended for the

  15. The effect of postoperative pain management program on improving nurses' knowledge and attitudes toward pain.

    PubMed

    Abdalrahim, Maysoon S; Majali, Sawsan A; Stomberg, Margareta Warrén; Bergbom, Ingegerd

    2011-07-01

    Effective postoperative pain treatment is an essential component to good quality of care. The purpose of this study was to explore nurses' knowledge of and attitudes toward pain in surgical wards before and after implementation of a postoperative management program at a university hospital in Jordan. The program consisted of an education program for nurses, and its effect was evaluated by using a pre- and post-intervention design. Sixty five registered nurses were asked to respond to a 21 items questionnaire, and a total of 240 patients' records were audited. After implementation of the program, the mean scores for all the questionnaire items were found to increase to 75%, with an average of 16/21 for the correct answers. There was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) between the number of correct answers between nurses' responses in the pre-intervention phase and their responses in the post-intervention phase for most of the questionnaire items. Also, there was a statistically significant improvement in the documentation of patients' care in 85% of the audited patients' records. It was recommended to introduce an acute pain services (APS) using a well established and safe pain management routines to increase the quality of care. PMID:21186139

  16. Current concepts in management of pain in children in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Baruch S; Calligaris, Lorenzo; Green, Steven M; Barbi, Egidio

    2016-01-01

    Pain is common in children presenting to emergency departments with episodic illnesses, acute injuries, and exacerbation of chronic disorders. We review recognition and assessment of pain in infants and children and discuss the manifestations of pain in children with chronic illness, recurrent pain syndromes, and cognitive impairment, including the difficulties of pain management in these patients. Non-pharmacological interventions, as adjuncts to pharmacological management for acute anxiety and pain, are described by age and development. We discuss the pharmacological management of acute pain and anxiety, reviewing invasive and non-invasive routes of administration, pharmacology, and adverse effects. PMID:26095580

  17. Hand burn management: minimising pain and trauma at dressing change.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Jacky; Mason, Sally

    The aim of wound management in hand burn injuries is to restore function and prevent problem scars, so a key consideration in wound healing is the removal of dressings without causing pain and further trauma as well as preserving function. Conventionally, wound dressings such as paraffin gauze were used for burn injuries, but this led to pain and trauma on removal, as well as drying out. This study looks at the use of Mepitel® One on hand burns; this dressing incorporates all the benefits of Mepitel, however, it only has Safetac technology on the wound contact side, allowing easy handling and application. PMID:24225512

  18. Management of severe pain due to lumbar disk protrusion.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Liam

    2015-03-01

    Lumbar intervertebral disk protrusion can cause excruciating pain in severe cases, which can be exacerbated by activity such as sitting down and straining at stool. Acute sciatica due to disk rupture will improve within 1 to 3 months. The efficacy of drugs used for the management of sciatica in primary care is unclear. Severe cases can require opioid analgesia, however people taking opioids for pain relief frequently present with opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. The use of transforaminal steroid injections is a controversial issue and repeat steroid injections should be considered in light of the risk-benefit profile of the individual patient. PMID:25643230

  19. Preparing Addiction Specialists to Include Case Management and Vocational Rehabilitation Services in the Treatment Model for Problem Gamblers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Margaret K.; Diaz, Sebastian R.; Hawley, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    Professionals in the field of addictions view problems associated with recovery management across multiple domains. This exploratory study utilized concept mapping and pattern matching methodology to conceptualize the resulting 7 domains of concern for treatment and aftercare of problem and pathological gamblers. The information can be used by…

  20. A Personalized Approach to Assessing and Managing Pain in Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Pain is one of the most common and distressing symptoms in patients with cancer. In this review, we discuss an evidence-based approach to personalized pain assessment and management. Recent insights into the pain expression pathway have led to a paradigm shift in pain management, allowing clinicians to deliver personalized treatments tailored to the individual's needs. Personalized pain management begins with systematic screening, followed by comprehensive pain assessment. Impeccable characterization of pain informs its etiology and the mechanism to guide treatment choices. Identification of modulators of pain expression such as psychological distress, alcoholism, substance use, and delirium allow clinicians to further tailor treatment recommendations. Documentation of a personalized pain goal provides an individualized response criterion. A multidimensional treatment plan is then formulated targeting the pain mechanism, etiologic factors, and modulators. Finally, longitudinal monitoring customized to the individual's needs allows clinicians to improve adherence and, ultimately, to optimize pain control over time. PMID:24799495

  1. Painful os Acromiale: Conservative Management in a Young Swimmer Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Frizziero, Antonio; Benedetti, Maria G.; Creta, Domenico; Moio, Antonio; Galletti, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    An os acromiale (OA) arises from a fusion failure of the anterior acromial apophysis. This case report presents the successful management of a painful OA associated to rotator cuff impingement in a competitive swimmer, based on ultrasonographic diagnosis and conservative management. Rest from sport activity, oral anti-inflammatory drugs and previous attempt of treatment of shoulder pain were ineffective. After two months of conservative treatment consisting of avoidance of swimming, local anti-inflammatory, physical therapy with ice, strengthening exercises with elastic bands to strengthen the scapular stabilizing muscles, rotator cuff and lowering humeral head muscles, the patient was pain free and all specific clinical tests for impingement syndrome (Neer, Hawkins, Whipple and Yocum tests) were negative. Digital compression of the OA site was not painful, and the Jobe and Palm-up tests were negative. The athlete returned to swim continuing the rehabilitation exercises, and the successful results were maintained at one year follow up. An unstable and symptomatic OA can be easily diagnosed with ultrasound exam. Rehabilitation for rotator cuff tendinopathies or/and bursitis can be a valid alternative to surgery. Key pointsAn os acromiale (OA) arises from a fusion failure of the anterior acromial apophysis.A correct diagnosis of OA associated to rotator cuff impingement can be performed by ultrasonographic exam.A conservative management of rotator cuff impingement syndrome, associated to OA, can be planned in athletic patients as a valid alternative to surgery. PMID:24149210

  2. Is oxycodone/naloxone effective and safe in managing chronic pain of a fragile elderly patient with multiple skin ulcers of the lower limbs? A case report

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Fabio; Maurizi, Niccolo; Francis, Matthew; Sgarlata, Carmelo; Ricevuti, Giovanni; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Perna, Simone; Rollone, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Skin ulcers are a common issue in the elderly, as physiological loss of skin elasticity, alterations in microcirculation, and concomitant chronic diseases typically occur in advanced age, thereby predisposing to these painful lesions. Wound-related pain is often associated with skin ulcers and negatively impacts both the patient’s quality of life and, indirectly, wound healing. Pain management is an ongoing issue in the elderly, and remains underestimated and under-treated in this fragile population. Recent guidelines suggest the use of opioids as the frontline treatment of moderate and severe pain in nononcological pain in the elderly. However, due to the concerns of adverse reactions, drug interactions, and addiction, clinicians frequently hesitate to prescribe opioids. This case report describes an elderly diabetic patient with multiple ulcers of the lower limbs suffering wound-related pain. In our report, oxycodone/naloxone has proved to be an effective and safe drug, providing pain relief as well as increased compliance when redressing wounds and faster healing compared to that in similar patients. Our case provides anecdotal evidence, supported by other studies, to justify future, larger studies on chronic pain using this therapy. PMID:26300632

  3. Chronic pain management in the active-duty military

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, David; Cohen, Steven P.

    2012-06-01

    As in the general population, chronic pain is a prevalent and burdensome affliction in active-duty military personnel. Painful conditions in military members can be categorized broadly in terms of whether they arise directly from combat injuries (gunshot, fragmentation wound, blast impact) or whether they result from non-combat injuries (sprains, herniated discs, motor vehicle accidents). Both combat-related and non-combat-related causes of pain can further be classified as either acute or chronic. Here we discuss the state of pain management as it relates to the military population in both deployed and non-deployed settings. The term non-battle injury (NBI) is commonly used to refer to those conditions not directly associated with the combat actions of war. In the history of warfare, NBI have far outstripped battle-related injuries in terms not only of morbidity, but also mortality. It was not until improvements in health care and field medicine were applied in World War I that battle-related deaths finally outnumbered those attributed to disease and pestilence. However, NBI have been the leading cause of morbidity and hospital admission in every major conflict since the Korean War. Pain remains a leading cause of presentation to military medical facilities, both in and out of theater. The absence of pain services is associated with a low return-to-duty rate among the deployed population. The most common pain complaints involve the low-back and neck, and studies have suggested that earlier treatment is associated with more significant improvement and a higher return to duty rate. It is recognized that military medicine is often at the forefront of medical innovation, and that many fields of medicine have reaped benefit from the conduct of war.

  4. Is adherence to pain self-management strategies associated with improved pain, depression and disability in those with disabling chronic pain?

    PubMed

    Nicholas, M K; Asghari, A; Corbett, M; Smeets, R J E M; Wood, B M; Overton, S; Perry, C; Tonkin, L E; Beeston, L

    2012-01-01

    There is generally good evidence that pain management interventions that include self-management strategies can substantially reduce disability and improve psychological well-being in patients with chronic pain. Reductions in unhelpful responses, especially catastrophising and fear-avoidance beliefs, have been established as key contributors to these gains. In contrast, there is surprisingly little evidence that adherence to self-management strategies contributes to achieving these outcomes. Difficulties in defining and measuring the use of pain self-management strategies have been obstacles for this research. Using a pragmatic way of assessing the practice of specific strategies this study investigated their ability to account for changes in pain, disability and depressive symptoms after a 3-week cognitive-behavioural pain management program. The post-treatment outcomes on these dimensions were found to be statistically and, for many, clinically significant. Consistent with previous research, reductions in catastrophising and fear-avoidance beliefs, and increased pain self-efficacy beliefs, were also associated with these gains. But the key new finding was that there was a clear gradient between adherence to specific self-management strategies and reductions in pain, disability and depressive symptoms. Furthermore, adherence to the self-management strategies was predictive of better outcomes even after controlling for the moderating effects of initial catastrophising, fear-avoidance and pain self-efficacy beliefs. PMID:21705246

  5. Increasing nurses' knowledge and behavior changes in nonpharmacological pain management for children in China.

    PubMed

    He, Hong-Gu; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Pietilä, Anna-Maija; Pölkki, Tarja

    2008-01-01

    This study implemented pain education for Chinese nurses using a pre-post test design and compared their use of nonpharmacological methods in children's postoperative pain management. Results show that nurses' use of most of these methods for pain relief increased significantly, which helped to improve the quality of care for children. This study enriches nurses' knowledge in children's pain management and develops evidence for practice by demonstrating the need for hospitals to provide continuous pain education to nurses. PMID:18344784

  6. Use and abuse of opioid analgesics in chronic pain.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, B.

    1993-01-01

    Primary care physicians are frequently required to treat patients with chronic debilitating pain. Opioid analgesics can successfully manage chronic pain. To prescribe opioid analgesics effectively, physicians must identify appropriate patients. Several methods can be used to identify and distinguish appropriate patients, addicted patients, and for-profit drug seekers. PMID:8097128

  7. Pain assessment and management in critically ill older adults.

    PubMed

    Kirksey, Kenn M; McGlory, Gayle; Sefcik, Elizabeth F

    2015-01-01

    Older adults comprise approximately 50% of patients admitted to critical care units in the United States. This population is particularly susceptible to multiple morbidities that can be exacerbated by confounding factors like age-related safety risks, polypharmacy, poor nutrition, and social isolation. The elderly are particularly vulnerable to health conditions (heart disease, stroke, and diabetes) that put them at greater risk of morbidity and mortality. When an older adult presents to the emergency department with 1 or more of these life-altering diagnoses, an admission to the intensive care unit is often inevitable. Pain is one of the most pervasive manifestations exhibited by intensive care unit patients. There are myriad challenges for critical care nurses in caring for patients experiencing pain-inadequate communication (cognitively impaired or intubated patients), addressing the concerns of family members, or gaps in patients' knowledge. The purpose of this article was to discuss the multidimensional nature of pain and identify concepts innate to pain homeostenosis for elderly patients in the critical care setting. Evidence-based strategies, including an interprofessional team approach and best practice recommendations regarding pharmacological and nonpharmacological pain management, are presented. PMID:26039645

  8. Effect of Pain Management on Immunization Efficacy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kolstad, April M; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Kim, Caroline J; Hale, Laura P

    2012-01-01

    Immunization with complete Freund adjuvant (CFA) or incomplete Freund adjuvant (IFA) is commonly viewed as painful, yet rodents may not receive analgesics due to concerns that these drugs affect the desired immune responses. Here we tested the hypothesis that pain associated with immunization with CFA or IFA in mice can be relieved without compromising the effectiveness of the immune response. After subcutaneous immunization in the leg with antigen in CFA or IFA, mice were assessed for signs of pain by using behavioral tests, including unrestricted locomotion in an open field, forced running on an automated treadmill, and voluntary wheel running. Effects of the analgesics acetaminophen, meloxicam, and buprenorphine on behavioral and antibody responses were assessed after primary and secondary immunization with the model antigen ovalbumin and after repeated immunization with a limiting dose of recombinant protective antigen from Bacillus anthracis. Open field activity and the distance traveled during forced gait analysis and voluntary wheel running both decreased after immunization. Treatment with each of the analgesics normalized some but not all of these behaviors but did not decrease the mean or maximal antibody titer after primary or repeated immunization with a moderate dose of ovalbumin or after repeated immunization with a limiting dose of protective antigen. In summary, after immunization with CFA or IFA, mice showed behavioral responses suggestive of pain. Acetaminophen, meloxicam, and buprenorphine attenuated these effects without decreasing antibody responses. Therefore, the use of these analgesics for managing rodent pain associated with CFA- or IFA-containing vaccines can be encouraged. PMID:23043810

  9. A Multi-Level Approach to Predicting Community Addiction Treatment Attitudes About Contingency Management

    PubMed Central

    Hartzler, Bryan; Donovan, Dennis; Tillotson, Carrie; Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange; Doyle, Suzanne; McCarty, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Adoption of contingency management (CM) by the addiction treatment community is limited to date despite much evidence for its efficacy. This study examined systemic and idiographic staff predictors of CM adoption attitudes via archival data collected from treatment organizations affiliated with the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network. Multilevel modeling analyses evaluated potential predictors from organizational, treatment unit, and workforce surveys. Among these were individual and shared perceptions of staff concerning aspects of their clinic culture and climate. Modeling analyses identified three systemic predictors (clinic provision of opiate agonist services, national accreditation, lesser shared perception of workplace stress) and five idiographic predictors (staff with a graduate degree, longer service tenure, managerial position, e-communication facility, and openness to change in clinical procedures). Findings are discussed as they relate to extant literature on CM attitudes and established implementation science constructs, and their practical implications are discussed. PMID:22138199

  10. Toward the development of a motivational model of pain self-management.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mark P; Nielson, Warren R; Kerns, Robert D

    2003-11-01

    Adaptive management of chronic pain depends to a large degree on how patients choose to cope with pain and its impact. Consequently, patient motivation is an important factor in determining how well patients learn to manage pain. However, the role of patient motivation in altering coping behavior and maintaining those changes is seldom discussed, and theoretically based research on motivation for pain treatment is lacking. This article reviews theories that have a direct application to understanding motivational issues in pain coping and presents a preliminary motivational model of pain self-management. The implications of this model for enhancing engagement in and adherence to chronic pain treatment programs are then discussed. The article ends with a call for research to better understand motivation as it applies to chronic pain self-management. In particular, there is a need to determine whether (and which) motivation enhancement interventions increase active participation in self-management treatment programs for chronic pain. PMID:14636816

  11. [Postoperative pain management. Aims and organization of a strategy for postoperative acute pain therapy].

    PubMed

    Nolli, M; Nicosia, F

    2000-09-01

    The Health Services, not only the Italian one, is under pressure because of request for improving treatment quality and the financial need for reorganization and cost-saving. It's required a rationalization of intervention, together with a careful choice of the best and cheapest techniques and the demonstration of their efficacy. The anaesthesia service activity, in a period of cost rationalization and funds restriction should be aimed to appropriate outcome measures corrected by both patient's risk factors and surgical-anaesthesiological case-mix. The development of a complete strategy for surgical pain management might run into two phases. The first phase, internal and mono-specialistic, should develop like the creation of an Acute Pain Team. The main processes are: focusing the problem (charge of the care), training, information, teaching methodology (timing, methods, drugs, techniques, etc.) and the audit (before and after changes). The main aims are the evaluation of the level of analgesia and pain relief or patient's satisfaction which are partial endpoints useful to demonstrate the improvement and the efficacy of the new pain management strategies. The second phase, multidisciplinary, is directed toward the creation of a Postoperative Evaluation Team. The main objective is to set up a collaborative clinical group able to identify the criteria for quality, efficacy and safety. The major purpose is the evaluation of major outcome measures: surgical outcome, morbidity, mortality and length of hospitalization. The improvement in the quality of postoperative pain treatment goes through a better organization and a progressive increase of the already available therapy. The achievement of the result and the quality projects depend on the interaction among staff members with different behaviours and settings. Internal teaching and training, continuous education for doctors and nurses, and external information, marketing and improvement of attractive capability of

  12. Tramadol extended-release in the management of chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    McCarberg, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Chronic, noncancer pain such as that associated with osteoarthritis of the hip and knee is typically managed according to American College of Rheumatology guidelines. Patients unresponsive to first-line treatment with acetaminophen receive nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors. However, many patients may have chronic pain that is refractory to these agents, or they may be at risk for the gastrointestinal, renal, and cardiovascular complications associated with their use. Tramadol, a mild opioid agonist and norepinephrine and serotonin reuptake inhibitor, is recommended by current guidelines for the treatment of moderate to moderately severe pain in patients who have not responded to previous oral therapy, or in patients who have contraindications to COX-2 inhibitors and nonselective NSAIDs. An extended-release (ER) formulation of tramadol was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in September 2005. In contrast with immediate-release (IR) tramadol, this ER formulation allows once-daily dosing, providing around-the-clock analgesia. In clinical studies, tramadol ER has demonstrated a lower incidence of adverse events than that reported for IR tramadol. Unlike nonselective NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors, tramadol ER is not associated with gastrointestinal, renal, or cardiovascular complications. Although tramadol is an opioid agonist, significant abuse has not been demonstrated after long-term therapy. It is concluded that tramadol ER has an efficacy and safety profile that warrants its early use for the management of chronic pain, either alone or in conjunction with nonselective NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors. PMID:18488071

  13. [Management of adult abdominal pain in the Emergency Room].

    PubMed

    Chiche, L; Roupie, E; Delassus, P

    2006-01-01

    Abdominal pain is a commonplace reason for surgical consultation in the emergency department and is the the most common symptom which the digestive surgeon on-call must evaluate. He must understand the pathophysiologic basis of visceral pain and referred pain in order to appreciate its diverse manifestations. Abdominal pain can stem from many causes intestinal and non-intestinal, medical and surgical. Evaluation and management in the emergency department must be rapid and pragmatic; clinical history and physical examination should define the gravity of the case, direct the first diagnostic procedures and complementary examinations, and guide the therapeutic direction. Ultrasonography is a quick and effective diagnostic procedure in the diagnosis of biliary, urologic, and gynecologic pathologies; it can be useful for other digestive problems as well. The new generation spiral CT scanner gives excellent definition of digestive and vascular pathologies. The initial evaluation and management of the acute abdomen may determine the prognosis of the patient; it should lead to prompt symptomatic relief and to a well-directed treatment appropriate to the diagnosis. PMID:16609646

  14. Quality indicators in postoperative pain management: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Idvall, E; Hamrin, E; Sjöström, B; Unosson, M

    2001-01-01

    Quality indicators in postoperative pain management: a validation study. In a previous study, strategic and clinical quality indicators were developed from a tentative model to assess high quality in postoperative pain management. The aim of the present study was to investigate the content validity of these 15 indicators. The indicators were compiled in a questionnaire, and two groups of nurses (n=210, n=321) scored each indicator on a 5-point scale (strongly disagree to strongly agree) from three different standpoints: whether it was essential for achieving high quality, whether it was realistic to carry out, and whether it was possible for nurses to influence management. The respondents were also asked to choose the most crucial indicators for the quality of care. The results showed that both groups of nurses judged the 15 indicators to have content validity from all three standpoints. Both groups also found the same six indicators to be the most crucial. These indicators concerned detecting and acting on signs and symptoms, performing prescriptions, informing and educating, acting on behalf of patients, competence/knowledge, and attitudes. The validated indicators should be useful to consider when implementing a strategy for postoperative pain management and when planning to evaluate the quality of care. PMID:12453175

  15. Pain Management Practices by Nurses: An Application of the Knowledge, Attitude and Practices (KAP) Model

    PubMed Central

    Alzghoul, Bashar I.; Abdullah, Nor Azimah Chew

    2016-01-01

    Pain is one of the most common reasons that drive people to go to hospitals. It has been found that several factors affect the practices of pain management. In this regard, this study aimed at investigating the underlying determinants in terms of pain management practices. Based on reviewing the previous studies and the suggestions of the KAP model, it was hypothesized that the main elements of the KAP model (attitudes and knowledge) significantly predict the variation in the practices of nurses regarding pain management. A questionnaire comprising the KAP model’ s constructs, i.e. knowledge and attitude towards pain management, as well as pain management practices, was used to collect data from 266 registered nurses (n=266) who are deemed competent in the management of patients’ pain in the Jordanian public hospitals. The two constructs, attitude and knowledge, which are the main determinants of the KAP model were found to independently predict nurses’ practices of managing patients’ pain. Knowledge of pain management was found to be the strongest predictor. Additionally, it was found that about 69% of the variance in pain management could be explained by the constructs of the KAP model. Therefore, it is recommended that the Jordanian hospitals and universities focus on nurses’ knowledge and attitude towards pain management in order to enhance their practices in the field of pain management. PMID:26755474

  16. Assessment and management of pain, with particular emphasis on central neuropathic pain, in moderate to severe dementia.

    PubMed

    Scherder, Erik J A; Plooij, Bart

    2012-09-01

    In patients with dementia, undertreatment of pain, irrespective of its aetiology, is widely recognized; the risk for undertreatment increases with the severity of dementia. We argue, however, that central neuropathic pain is by far the most undertreated type of pain in patients with dementia. Central pain is a type of neuropathic pain that is known to occur in stroke patients and is caused by white matter lesions. Although white matter lesions are also a neuropathological hallmark of dementia, central neuropathic pain has hardly been described in dementia. Therefore, the goal of this review was to address assessment and management of pain, with particular emphasis on central neuropathic pain, in moderate to severe dementia. Concerning pain assessment, the findings of this review suggest that self-report pain rating scales, in particular the Verbal Rating Scale, the Horizontal Visual Analogue Scale and the Faces Pain Scale can be administered to patients in a more advanced stage of dementia. For those who are no longer able to communicate pain, pain observation scales are most appropriate. Self-report and pain observation should be combined, if possible. For an overview of assessment tools to measure pain with older people unable to verbally communicate, we refer readers to the City of Hope Pain and Palliative Care Resource Center ( http://prc.coh.org/PAIN-NOA.htm ). The review further highlights that behavioural disturbances, e.g. agitation and physical inactivity, as well as autonomic responses, e.g. an increase in blood pressure and heart rate, may contribute to a more reliable assessment of pain. With respect to central neuropathic pain in particular, assessment of sensory abilities (touch, pinprick, temperature and vibration), mood (e.g. anxiety) and determination of the presence of a Babinsky reflex, accelerated tendon reflexes, and spasticity may contribute to reliable assessment. Management of pain, not of a central origin, starts with paracetamol

  17. The role of pain management in recovery following trauma and orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Buckenmaier, Chester C

    2012-01-01

    War often serves as a catalyst for medical innovation and progressive change. The current conflicts are no exception, particularly in the area of pain management of wounded warriors. Morphine administration has served as the primary method of battlefield pain management since the American Civil War. Although traditional opioid-based pain management is effective, it has significant side effects that can complicate recovery and rehabilitation following injury. These side effects (eg, sedation, nausea and vomiting, ileus, respiratory depression) can be fatal to persons wounded in combat. This fact, along with recent research findings indicating that pain itself may constitute a disease process, points to the need for significant improvements in pain management in order to adequately address current battlefield realities. The US Army Pain Management Task Force evaluated pain medicine practices at 28 military and civilian institutions and provided several recommendations to enhance pain management in wounded warriors. PMID:22865134

  18. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for pain management in labour

    PubMed Central

    Dowswell, Therese; Bedwell, Carol; Lavender, Tina; Neilson, James P

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TENS) has been proposed as a means of reducing pain in labour. The TENS unit emits low-voltage electrical impulses which vary in frequency and intensity. During labour, TENS electrodes are generally placed on the lower back, although TENS may be used to stimulate acupuncture points or other parts of the body. The physiological mechanisms whereby TENS relieves pain are uncertain. TENS machines are frequently operated by women, which may increase a sense of control in labour. Objectives To assess the effects of TENS on pain in labour. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (30 April 2011) and reference lists of retrieved papers. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials comparing women receiving TENS for pain management in labour versus routine care, alternative non-pharmacological methods of pain relief, or placebo devices. We included all types of TENS machines. Data collection and analysis Two review authors assessed for inclusion all trials identified by the search strategy, carried out data extraction and assessed risk of bias. We have recorded reasons for excluding studies. Main results Seventeen trials with 1466 women contribute data to the review. Thirteen examined TENS applied to the back, two to acupuncture points, and two to the cranium. Overall, there was little difference in pain ratings between TENS and control groups, although women receiving TENS to acupuncture points were less likely to report severe pain (average risk ratio 0.41, 95% confidence interval 0.31 to 0.54; measured in two studies). The majority of women using TENS said they would be willing to use it again in a future labour. Where TENS was used as an adjunct to epidural analgesia there was no evidence that it reduced pain. There was no consistent evidence that TENS had any impact on interventions and outcomes in labour. There was little information on outcomes for mothers and babies. No

  19. Pain Management: Knowledge and Attitudes of Senior Nursing Students and Practicing Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    Despite scientific advances in pain management, inadequate pain relief in hospitalized patients continues to be an on-going phenomenon. Although nurses do not prescribe medication for pain, the decision to administer pharmacological or other interventions for pain relief is part of nursing practice. Nurses play a critical role in the relief of…

  20. Manipulative management of back pain in patients with spondyloisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, J. D.; Potter, G. E.; Kirkaldy-Willis, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    The authors see a large number of back problems, many with complicating features, and are involved in an ongoing assessment of the effectiveness of various treatment modalities, particularly spinal manipulation. This paper deals with spondylolisthesis. Included is a discussion of the definition, classification, etiology and epidemiology of spondylolisthesis. Pain mechanisms are discussed along with the role of conservative and surgical management. Results are presented in a series of cases managed by manipulative methods. The authors conclude that spinal manipulation is of great value in selected cases of back pain in which there is radiographic evidence of spondylolisthesis. No claim is made that such treatment is influencing the spondylolisthesis itself, but that in most cases the spondylolisthesis is an incidental finding, and no contraindication to manipulative therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10

  1. Managing childhood fever and pain--the comfort loop.

    PubMed

    Clinch, Jacqui; Dale, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Parents can transmit their anxiety to their child, and just as children can pick up on parental anxiety, they can also respond to a parent's ability to stay calm in stressful situations. Therefore, when treating children, it is important to address parental anxiety and to improve their understanding of their child's ailment. Parental understanding and management of both pain and fever - common occurrences in childhood - is of utmost importance, not just in terms of children's health and welfare, but also in terms of reducing the economic burden of unnecessary visits to paediatric emergency departments. Allaying parental anxiety reduces the child's anxiety and creates a positive feedback loop, which ultimately affects both the child and parentIn this review, the integral role of parental perception of the child's condition and the efficacy of treatment in the management of childhood fever and pain will be discussed. PMID:17678550

  2. Pain management in the acute care setting: Update and debates.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Greta M

    2016-02-01

    Pain management in the paediatric acute care setting is underutilised and can be improved. An awareness of the analgesic options available and their limitations is an important starting point. This article describes the evolving understanding of relevant pharmacogenomics and safety data of the various analgesic agents with a focus on agents available in Australia and New Zealand. It highlights the concerns with the use of codeine in children and discusses alternative oral opioids. Key features of oral, parenteral, inhaled and intranasal analgesic agents are discussed, as well as evidence supported use of sweet tasting solutions and non-pharmacological interventions. One of the biggest changes in acute care pain management has been the advent of intranasal fentanyl providing reliable potent analgesia without the need for intravenous access. The article will also address the issue of multimodal analgesia where a single agent is insufficient. PMID:27062626

  3. Dietary Supplements and Alternative Therapies for Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Philip J

    2015-11-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) continues to grow in North America. The most recent National Health Interview Survey found that in 2012, 33.2 percent of respondents reported usage of some form of CAM in the previous 12 months. A survey of adult patients in a U.S. dental school clinic found that 24 percent reported the use of herbal supplements. Dietary supplements and alternative therapies are often used for pain management. PMID:26798883

  4. Cancer patient supportive care and pain management. Special listing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    This Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Infectious disease in cancer patients; Immunological aspects of supportive care of cancer patients; Nutritional evaluation and support of cancer patients; Pain management of cancer patients.

  5. Obamacare 2012: prognosis unclear for interventional pain management.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2012-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), informally referred to as ObamaCare, is a United States federal statute signed into law by President Barack Obama on March 23, 2010. ACA has substantially changed the landscape of medical practice in the United States and continues to influence all sectors, in particular evolving specialties such as interventional pain management. ObamaCare has been signed into law amidst major political fallouts, has sustained a Supreme Court challenge and emerged bruised, but still very much alive. While proponents argue that ObamaCare will provide insurance for almost everyone, with an improvement in the quality of and reduction in the cost of health care,, opponents criticize it as being a massive bureaucracy laden with penalties and taxes, that will ultimately eliminate personal medicine and individual practices. Based on the 2 years since the passage of ACA in 2010, the prognosis for interventional pain management is unclear. The damage sustained to interventional pain management and the majority of medicine practices is irreparable. ObamaCare may provide insurance for all, but with cuts in Medicare to fund Obamacare, a limited expansion of Medicaid, the inadequate funding of exchanges, declining employer health insurance coverage and skyrocketing disability claims, the coverage will be practically nonexistent. ObamaCare is composed of numerous organizations and bureaucracies charged with controlling the practice of medicine through the extension of regulations. Apart from cutting reimbursements and reducing access to interventional pain management, administration officials are determined to increase the role of midlevel practitioners and reduce the role of individual physicians by liberalizing the scope of practice regulations and introducing proposals to reduce medical education and training. PMID:22996858

  6. The role of physical therapy in craniofacial pain disorders: an adjunct to dental pain management.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, S

    1991-01-01

    Treatment of craniofacial pain disorders is often complicated by diverse factors such as acute or chronic trauma and persistent postural changes. In addition, emotional issues and life stress often cloud the recovery process. Physical therapists, with their diverse knowledge base and highly competent treatment skills, can be quite effective in assisting dentists and physicians with management of the many difficult upper quarter and craniofacial pain syndromes. This article reviews the role of myofascial and craniosacral dysfunction, as well as the function of posture, tension, and stress in the development of these syndromes. Additionally, it provides a comprehensive overview of the many evaluative techniques and treatment options that can be provided by today's physical therapists. PMID:1843484

  7. Pharmacological management of chronic neuropathic pain: Revised consensus statement from the Canadian Pain Society

    PubMed Central

    Moulin, DE; Boulanger, A; Clark, AJ; Clarke, H; Dao, T; Finley, GA; Furlan, A; Gilron, I; Gordon, A; Morley-Forster, PK; Sessle, BJ; Squire, P; Stinson, J; Taenzer, P; Velly, A; Ware, MA; Weinberg, EL; Williamson, OD

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuropathic pain (NeP), redefined as pain caused by a lesion or a disease of the somatosensory system, is a disabling condition that affects approximately two million Canadians. OBJECTIVE: To review the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews related to the pharmacological management of NeP to develop a revised evidence-based consensus statement on its management. METHODS: RCTs, systematic reviews and existing guidelines on the pharmacological management of NeP were evaluated at a consensus meeting in May 2012 and updated until September 2013. Medications were recommended in the consensus statement if their analgesic efficacy was supported by at least one methodologically sound RCT (class I or class II) showing significant benefit relative to placebo or another relevant control group. Recommendations for treatment were based on the degree of evidence of analgesic efficacy, safety and ease of use. RESULTS: Analgesic agents recommended for first-line treatments are gabapentinoids (gabapentin and pregabalin), tricyclic antidepressants and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors. Tramadol and controlled-release opioid analgesics are recommended as second-line treatments for moderate to severe pain. Cannabinoids are now recommended as third-line treatments. Recommended fourth-line treatments include methadone, anticonvulsants with lesser evidence of efficacy (eg, lamotrigine, lacos-amide), tapentadol and botulinum toxin. There is support for some analgesic combinations in selected NeP conditions. CONCLUSIONS: These guidelines provide an updated, stepwise approach to the pharmacological management of NeP. Treatment should be individualized for each patient based on efficacy, side-effect profile and drug accessibility, including cost. Additional studies are required to examine head-to-head comparisons among analgesics, combinations of analgesics, long-term outcomes and treatment of pediatric, geriatric and central NeP. PMID:25479151

  8. The endodontist's role in the management of chronic orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Marais, J T

    2008-10-01

    The management of patients with chronic orofacial pain is a challenge which faces the dental profession daily. These cases can easily be misdiagnosed, overtreated or undertreated. There is a very real danger also of classifying patients as suffering from a psychological condition when in fact they are suffering from organic disease. A series of cases illustrating these problems are presented in order to highlight the pitfalls and to suggest ways to overcome them. Diagnosis is central to all of these cases. Guidelines for the management of these patients are presented. PMID:19213256

  9. Scrambler Therapy for the management of chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Majithia, Neil; Smith, Thomas J.; Coyne, Patrick J.; Abdi, Salahadin; Pachman, Deirdre R.; Lachance, Daniel; Shelerud, Randy; Cheville, Andrea; Basford, Jeffrey R.; Farley, David; O’Neill, Carrie; Ruddy, Kathryn J.; Sparadeo, Frank; Beutler, Andreas; Loprinzi, Charles L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Chronic pain is a widespread and debilitating condition, encountered by physicians in a variety of practice settings. Although many pharmacologic and behavioral strategies exist for the management of this condition, treatment is often unsatisfactory. Scrambler Therapy is a novel, non-invasive pain modifying technique that utilizes transcutaneous electrical stimulation of pain fibers with the intent of re-organizing maladaptive signaling pathways. This review was conducted to further evaluate what is known regarding the mechanisms and mechanics of Scrambler Therapy and to investigate the preliminary data pertaining to the efficacy of this treatment modality. Methods The PubMed/Medline, SCOPUS, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched for all articles published on Scrambler Therapy prior to November 2015. All case studies and clinical trials were evaluated and reported in a descriptive manner. Results To date, 20 reports, of varying scientific quality, have been published regarding this device; all but one small study, published only as an abstract, provided results that appear positive. Conclusion The positive findings from preliminary studies with Scrambler Therapy support that this device provides benefit for patients with refractory pain syndromes. Larger, randomized studies are required to further evaluate the efficacy of this approach. PMID:27041741

  10. Anticonvulsant drugs for management of pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed Central

    McQuay, H.; Carroll, D.; Jadad, A. R.; Wiffen, P.; Moore, A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine effectiveness and adverse effects of anticonvulsant drugs in management of pain. DESIGN--Systematic review of randomised controlled trials of anticonvulsants for acute, chronic, or cancer pain identified by using Medline, by hand searching, by searching reference lists, and by contacting investigators. SUBJECTS--Between 1966 and February 1994, 37 reports were found; 20 reports, of four anticonvulsants, were eligible. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Numbers needed to treat were calculated for effectiveness, adverse effects, and drug related withdrawal from study. RESULTS--The only placebo controlled study in acute pain found no analgesic effect of sodium valproate. For treating trigeminal neuralgia, carbamazepine had a combined number needed to treat of 2.6 for effectiveness, 3.4 for adverse effects, and 24 for severe effects (withdrawal from study). For treating diabetic neuropathy, anticonvulsants had a combined number needed to treat of 2.5 for effectiveness, 3.1 for adverse effects, and 20 for severe effects. For migraine prophylaxis, anticonvulsants had a combined number needed to treat of 1.6 for effectiveness, 2.4 for adverse effects, and 39 for severe effects. Phenytoin had no effect on the irritable bowel syndrome, and carbamazepine had little effect on pain after stroke. Clonazepam was effective in one study for temporomandibular joint dysfunction. No study compared one anticonvulsant with another. CONCLUSIONS--Anticonvulsants were effective for trigeminal neuralgia and diabetic neuropathy and for migraine prophylaxis. Minor adverse effects occurred as often as benefit. PMID:7580659

  11. Laser Acupuncture for Postoperative Pain Management in Cats

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Virgínia I.; Cassu, Renata N.; Nascimento, Felipe F.; Tavares, Rafaela C. P.; Crociolli, Giulliane C.; Guilhen, Rafael C.; Nicácio, Gabriel M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate laser acupuncture as an adjuvant for postoperative pain management in cats. Twenty cats, undergoing ovariohysterectomy, were sedated with intramuscular (IM) ketamine (5 mg kg−1), midazolam (0.5 mg kg−1), and tramadol (2 mg kg−1). Prior to induction of anaesthesia, the subjects were randomly distributed into two groups of 10 cats: Laser: bilateral stomach 36 and spleen 6 acupoints were stimulated with infrared laser; Control: no acupuncture was applied. Anaesthesia was induced using intravenous propofol (4 mg kg−1) and maintained with isoflurane. Postoperative analgesia was evaluated by a blinded assessor for 24 h following extubation using the Dynamic Interactive Visual Analogue Scale and Multidimensional Composite Pain Scale. Rescue analgesia was provided with IM tramadol (2 mg kg−1), and the pain scores were reassessed 30 min after the rescue intervention. If the analgesia remained insufficient, meloxicam (0.2 mg kg−1 IM, single dose) was administered. Data were analyzed using t-tests, the Mann-Whitney test, and the Friedman test (P < 0.05). The pain scores did not differ between groups. However, postoperative supplemental analgesia was required by significantly more cats in the Control (5/10) compared with the Laser group (1/10) (P = 0.038). Laser acupuncture reduced postoperative analgesic requirements in cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy. PMID:26170879

  12. How Can We Make the Pain Go Away? Public Policies to Manage Pain at the End of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imhof, Sara; Kaskie, Brian

    2008-01-01

    The continued undertreatment of pain at the end of life is a substantive public health problem that has not been resolved through increased public awareness, the issuance of clinical guidance for providers, or expanded organizational commitments. In this forum, we illuminate the role of public policies in promoting pain management. We review…

  13. Duloxetine in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Ormseth, Michelle J; Scholz, Beth A; Boomershine, Chad S

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy affects up to 70% of diabetics, and diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP) is the most common and debilitating of the diabetic neuropathies. DPNP significantly reduces quality of life and increases management costs in affected patients. Despite the impact of DPNP, management is poor with one-quarter of patients receiving no treatment and many treated with medications having little or no efficacy in managing DPNP. Duloxetine is one of two drugs approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for DPNP management. Duloxetine is a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) proven safe, effective, and cost-saving in reducing DPNP symptoms at a dose of 60 mg/day. Duloxetine doses greater than 60 mg/day for DPNP management are not recommended since they are no more efficacious and associated with more side effects; addition of pregabalin or gabapentin for these patients may be beneficial. Side effects of duloxetine are generally mild and typical for the SNRI class including nausea, dizziness, somnolence, fatigue, sweating, dry mouth, constipation, and diarrhea. Given its other indications, duloxetine is a particularly good choice for DPNP treatment in patients with coexisting depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, or chronic musculoskeletal pain. Duloxetine treatment had no clinically significant effect on glycemic control and did not increase the risk of cardiovascular events in diabetes patients. However, duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with hepatic disease or severe renal impairment. Given its safety, efficacy, and tolerability, duloxetine is an excellent choice for DPNP treatment in many patients. PMID:21845034

  14. Duloxetine in the management of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ormseth, Michelle J; Scholz, Beth A; Boomershine, Chad S

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy affects up to 70% of diabetics, and diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP) is the most common and debilitating of the diabetic neuropathies. DPNP significantly reduces quality of life and increases management costs in affected patients. Despite the impact of DPNP, management is poor with one-quarter of patients receiving no treatment and many treated with medications having little or no efficacy in managing DPNP. Duloxetine is one of two drugs approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for DPNP management. Duloxetine is a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) proven safe, effective, and cost-saving in reducing DPNP symptoms at a dose of 60 mg/day. Duloxetine doses greater than 60 mg/day for DPNP management are not recommended since they are no more efficacious and associated with more side effects; addition of pregabalin or gabapentin for these patients may be beneficial. Side effects of duloxetine are generally mild and typical for the SNRI class including nausea, dizziness, somnolence, fatigue, sweating, dry mouth, constipation, and diarrhea. Given its other indications, duloxetine is a particularly good choice for DPNP treatment in patients with coexisting depression, anxiety, fibromyalgia, or chronic musculoskeletal pain. Duloxetine treatment had no clinically significant effect on glycemic control and did not increase the risk of cardiovascular events in diabetes patients. However, duloxetine use should be avoided in patients with hepatic disease or severe renal impairment. Given its safety, efficacy, and tolerability, duloxetine is an excellent choice for DPNP treatment in many patients. PMID:21845034

  15. Chronic Widespread Pain Drawn on a Body Diagram is a Screening Tool for Increased Pain Sensitization, Psycho-Social Load, and Utilization of Pain Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Visser, Eric J; Ramachenderan, Jonathan; Davies, Stephanie J; Parsons, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that chronic widespread pain, (CWP) drawn by patients on a body diagram, could be used as a screening tool for increased pain sensitization, psycho-social load, and utilization of pain management strategies. The triage questionnaires of 144 adults attending a chronic pain outpatients' clinic were audited and the percentage pain surface area (PPSA) drawn on their body diagrams was calculated using the "rule of nines" (RON) method for burns area assessment. Outcomes were measured using the painDETECT Questionnaire (PD-Q) and other indices and compared using a nonrandomized, case-control method. It was found that significantly more subjects with CWP (defined as a PPSA ≥ 20%) reported high (≥ 19) PD-Q scores (suggesting pain "sensitization" or neuropathic pain) (P = 0.0002), "severe" or "extremely severe" anxiety scores on the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 Items Questionnaire (P = 0.0270), ≥ 5 psycho-social stressors (P = 0.0022), ≥ 5 significant life events (P = 0.0098), and used ≥ 7 pain management strategies (PMS) (P < 00001), compared to control subjects with a lower PPSA. A Widespread Pain Index score ≥ 7 (OR = 11.36), PD-Q score ≥ 19 (OR = 4.46) and use of ≥ 7 PMS (OR = 5.49) were independently associated with CWP. This study demonstrates that calculating PPSA on a body diagram (using the RON method) is a valid and convenient "snapshot" screening tool to identify patients with an increased likelihood of pain sensitization, psycho-social load, and utilizing pain management resources. PMID:25469881

  16. Pain Management for Children during Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vasquenza, Kelly; Ruble, Kathy; Chen, Allen; Billett, Carol; Kozlowski, Lori; Atwater, Sara; Kost-Byerly, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Pain management for children during bone marrow and stem cell transplantation is a significant clinical challenge for the health care team. Pain management strategies vary by institution. This paper reports on the use of a pediatric pain management service and patient-and caregiver-controlled analgesia for children undergoing transplant. This 2-year retrospective chart review examined the pain management practices and outcomes of children undergoing bone marrow and stem cell transplants in a large urban teaching hospital during 2008 and 2009. We concluded that patient- and caregiver-controlled analgesia is a well-tolerated modality for pain control during hospitalization for transplantation at this institution. PMID:25267531

  17. Clinical and Periprocedural Pain Management for Uterine Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Elizabeth Brooke; Stratil, Peter; Mizones, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Uterine artery embolization has Level A data supporting excellent safety and efficacy in treating symptomatic uterine leiomyomata. However, there is a perception that either postprocedural pain is severe or poorly managed by the physician performing these procedures. This has led some primary care physicians to omit this procedure from the patients' options or to steer patients away from this procedure. A few simple techniques (pruning of the vascular tree and embolizing to 5–10 beat stasis) and fastidious pre-, intra-, and post-procedural management can nearly eliminate significant pain associated with embolization. Specifically, early implementation of long-acting low-dose narcotics, antiemetics and anti-inflammatory medications is critical. Finally, the use of a superior hypogastric nerve block, which takes minutes to perform and carries a very low risk, significantly reduces pain and diminishes the need for narcotics; when this technique was used in a prospective study, all patients were able to be discharged the day of the procedure. In the authors' experience, patients treated in this manner largely recover completely within 5 days and have a far less traumatic experience than patients traditionally treated with only midazolam (Versed) and fentanyl citrate (fentanyl) intraprocedurally, and narcotics and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs postprocedurally. PMID:24436562

  18. A community pain service solution-focused pain management programme: delivery and preliminary outcome data

    PubMed Central

    Iddon, Joanne; Barker, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Summary points 1. This article introduces a rationale for a solution-focused approach to a community-based pain management programme (PMP), describing delivery and preliminary outcome data. 2. It suggests PMPs can be feasibly run in the community without necessity for hospital care setting. 3. A community setting is also advantageous in that it allows maintenance of social networks and close third-sector links to support long-term, sustained mental well-being. 4. Solution-focused psychological approaches help the clinician tap into patient expertise and develop rich descriptions of the patient’s preferred future, enhancing self-efficacy and empowerment. 5. Evaluation found significant statistical and clinical improvements in pre–post pain self-efficacy, mental well-being and function (but findings were limited by internal and external validity and no significant effect was found on pain levels). 6. Statistically significant change was maintained at 10 weeks for self-efficacy and function (and for the latter, clinically significant change was also maintained); improvements in mental well-being showed maintenance at all measured time points (up to 12 months) in terms of both statistical and clinical significant changes. PMID:26516534

  19. Internet Addiction: A Logotherapeutic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Didelot, Mary J.; Hollingsworth, Lisa; Buckenmeyer, Janet A.

    2012-01-01

    Internet addiction (IA) is both the most rapidly growing addiction and the least understood addiction (Watson, 2005). For counselors, treatment issues surrounding the disease are also growing. At the forefront is the lack of understanding concerning treatment protocol to manage the challenging recovery and maintenance stages after IA behavior has…

  20. Population, professional, and client support for different models of managing addictive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Koski-Jännes, Anja; Hirschovits-Gerz, Tanja; Pennonen, Marjo

    2012-02-01

    This study, funded by the Academy of Finland, explores how different stakeholder groups in Finland attribute responsibility for various addictions. A random general population survey and surveys with addiction treatment professionals and clients (n = 1,338) were conducted in 2007-2008. The data were analyzed with analyses of variance and logistic regression analysis. Individual responsibility was emphasized by all groups. The Moral model dominated in behavioral and the Enlightenment model in hard drug addictions, views on other substance addictions varied more. Some signs of the actor-observer asymmetry were observed. Personal addiction experiences and sex were the major predictors of the average response tendencies. The heavy emphasis on individual responsibility may prevent help-seeking. PMID:22217128

  1. Case Presentations from the Addiction Academy.

    PubMed

    Laes, JoAn R; Wiegand, Timothy

    2016-03-01

    In this article, a case-based format is used to address complex clinical issues in addiction medicine. The cases were developed from the authors' practice experience, and were presented at the American College of Medical Toxicology Addiction Academy in 2015. Section I: Drug and Alcohol Dependence and Pain explores cases of patients with co-occurring pain and substance use disorders. Section II: Legal and Policy Issues in Substance Use Disorders highlights difficult legal and policy questions in addiction medicine. Section III: Special Populations and Addictive Disorders delves into the complexity of addiction in special populations (pregnant, pediatric, and geriatric patients). PMID:26586253

  2. Pain Management for Older African Americans in the Perianesthesia Setting: The "Eight I's".

    PubMed

    Booker, Staja S; Herr, Keela A

    2015-06-01

    National legislation (Affordable Care Act) emphasizes quality and equitable pain care for all patient populations, but frequently, pain management is not effective and equitable in African American (AA) elders, placing them at higher risk for severe pain and persistent pain. Research shows that AAs are less likely to receive guideline-based pain care. This underscores the need for perianesthesia nurses to be knowledgeable and capable of integrating cultural practices and evidence-based recommendations into their care of older AAs to ensure adequate pain management in this vulnerable population. This article describes differences and disparities in pain management in AA older adults and provides a cultural framework to guide perianesthesia pain management. PMID:26003763

  3. A combined nurse-pharmacist managed pain clinic: joint venture of public and private sectors.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Muhammad Abdul; Alldred, David Phillip; Briggs, Michelle; Closs, S José

    2012-02-01

    Chronic pain has become one of the most prevalent problems in primary care. The management of chronic pain is complex and often requires a multidisciplinary approach. The limited capacity of general practitioners to manage chronic pain and long waiting time for secondary care referrals further add to the complexity of chronic pain management. Restricted financial and skilled human capital make it hard for healthcare systems across the world to establish and maintain multidisciplinary pain clinics, in spite of their documented effectiveness. Affordability and accessibility to such multidisciplinary pain clinics is often problematic for patients. The purpose of this paper is to share our experience and relevant research evidence of a community based combined nurse-pharmacist managed pain clinic. The pain clinic serves as an example of public-private partnership in healthcare. PMID:22120700

  4. Parenteral opioids for maternal pain management in labour

    PubMed Central

    Ullman, Roz; Smith, Lesley A; Burns, Ethel; Mori, Rintaro; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    did not have sufficient evidence to assess which opioid drug provided the best pain relief with the least adverse effects. Authors’ conclusions Parenteral opioids provide some relief from pain in labour but are associated with adverse effects. Maternal satisfaction with opioid analgesia was largely unreported but appeared moderate at best. This review needs to be examined alongside related Cochrane reviews examining pain management in labour. More research is needed to determine which analgesic intervention is most effective, and provides greatest satisfaction to women with acceptable adverse effects for mothers and their newborn. PMID:20824859

  5. Improving access to adequate pain management in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Willem

    2015-06-01

    There is a global crisis in access to pain management in the world. WHO estimates that 4.65 billion people live in countries where medical opioid consumption is near to zero. For 2010, WHO considered a per capita consumption of 216.7 mg morphine equivalents adequate, while Taiwan had a per capita consumption of 0.05 mg morphine equivalents in 2007. In Asia, the use of opioids is sensitive because of the Opium Wars in the 19th century and for this reason, the focus of controlled substances policies has been on the prevention of diversion and dependence. However, an optimal public health outcome requires that also the beneficial aspects of these substances are acknowledged. Therefore, WHO recommends a policy based on the Principle of Balance: ensuring access for medical and scientific purposes while preventing diversion, harmful use and dependence. Furthermore, international law requires that countries ensure access to opioid analgesics for medical and scientific purposes. There is evidence that opioid analgesics for chronic pain are not associated with a major risk for developing dependence. Barriers for access can be classified in the categories of overly restrictive laws and regulations; insufficient medical training on pain management and problems related to assessment of medical needs; attitudes like an excessive fear for dependence or diversion; and economic and logistical problems. The GOPI project found many examples of such barriers in Asia. Access to opioid medicines in Taiwan can be improved by analysing the national situation and drafting a plan. The WHO policy guidelines Ensuring Balance in National Policies on Controlled Substances can be helpful for achieving this purpose, as well as international guidelines for pain treatment. PMID:26068436

  6. Management of Postoperative Pain in Medical Institutions in Shandong Province in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Donghua; Ma, Jianzhong; Zhang, Zongwang; Yu, Ailan; Chen, Xueli; Feng, Cuicui; Lei, Weifu

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate current situation of postoperative pain management in medical institutions in Shandong Province.A questionnaire was developed on the basis of guidelines of acute pain and pain quality assessment scale. The questionnaire was used to obtain information regarding the nature and scale of the medical institution, structure of pain management organization, implementation of pain assessment, and analgesic techniques and processes used in clinical practice. A multistage stratified and cluster sampling method was employed to investigate the current situation of postoperative pain management in 168 medical institutions in Shandong Province.For acute pain service (APS), 32% of the hospitals established postoperative pain management organizations similar to APS. For pain evaluation, 57.1% of the hospitals evaluated pain as the fifth vital sign, and 47.0% of the hospitals evaluated pain at rest and during activity. Furthermore, 43.0% of the surveyed hospitals employed patient-controlled analgesia mode, of which hospitals employing brachial plexus block, lumbar plexus block, and femoral nerve block analgesia accounted for 5.0%, 1.0%, and 4.0%, respectively. The survey revealed that 51.0% of the hospitals educated patients about pain and pain management, of which patients were postoperatively educated by ward nurses in 5.0% and patients were educated by APS during ward rounds in 2.0%.There is a lack of standardized postoperative pain management, the involvement of nurses in pain management is scarce, and the pain assessment and education and application of advanced analgesic management techniques were found to be inadequate in medical institutions in Shandong Province. PMID:26871800

  7. Management of Postoperative Pain in Medical Institutions in Shandong Province in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Donghua; Ma, Jianzhong; Zhang, Zongwang; Yu, Ailan; Chen, Xueli; Feng, Cuicui; Lei, Weifu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to investigate current situation of postoperative pain management in medical institutions in Shandong Province.A questionnaire was developed on the basis of guidelines of acute pain and pain quality assessment scale. The questionnaire was used to obtain information regarding the nature and scale of the medical institution, structure of pain management organization, implementation of pain assessment, and analgesic techniques and processes used in clinical practice. A multistage stratified and cluster sampling method was employed to investigate the current situation of postoperative pain management in 168 medical institutions in Shandong Province. For acute pain service (APS), 32% of the hospitals established postoperative pain management organizations similar to APS. For pain evaluation, 57.1% of the hospitals evaluated pain as the fifth vital sign, and 47.0% of the hospitals evaluated pain at rest and during activity. Furthermore, 43.0% of the surveyed hospitals employed patient-controlled analgesia mode, of which hospitals employing brachial plexus block, lumbar plexus block, and femoral nerve block analgesia accounted for 5.0%, 1.0%, and 4.0%, respectively. The survey revealed that 51.0% of the hospitals educated patients about pain and pain management, of which patients were postoperatively educated by ward nurses in 5.0% and patients were educated by APS during ward rounds in 2.0%. There is a lack of standardized postoperative pain management, the involvement of nurses in pain management is scarce, and the pain assessment and education and application of advanced analgesic management techniques were found to be inadequate in medical institutions in Shandong Province. PMID:26871800

  8. Improving undergraduate medical education about pain assessment and management: A qualitative descriptive study of stakeholders’ perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Tellier, Pierre-Paul; Bélanger, Emmanuelle; Rodríguez, Charo; Ware, Mark A; Posel, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pain is one of the most common reasons for individuals to seek medical advice, yet it remains poorly managed. One of the main reasons that poor pain management persists is the lack of adequate knowledge and skills of practicing clinicians, which stems from a perceived lack of pain education during the training of undergraduate medical students. OBJECTIVE: To identify gaps in knowledge with respect to pain management as perceived by students, patients and educators. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted. Data were generated through six focus groups with second- and fourth-year medical students, four focus groups with patients and individual semistructured interviews with nine educators. All interviews were audiotaped and an inductive thematic analysis was performed. RESULTS: A total of 70 individuals participated in the present study. Five main themes were identified: assessment of physical and psychosocial aspects of pain; clinical management of pain with pharmacology and alternative therapies; communication and the development of a good therapeutic relationship; ethical considerations surrounding pain; and institutional context of medical education about pain. CONCLUSION: Participating patients, students and pain experts recognized a need for additional medical education about pain assessment and management. Educational approaches need to teach students to gather appropriate information about pain, to acquire knowledge of a broad spectrum of therapeutic options, to develop a mutual, trusting relationship with patients and to become aware of their own biases and prejudice toward patients with pain. The results of the present study should be used to develop and enhance existing pain curricula content. PMID:23985579

  9. A preliminary evaluation of the motivational model of pain self-management in persons with spinal cord injury related pain

    PubMed Central

    Molton, Ivan R.; Jensen, Mark P.; Nielson, Warren; Cardenas, Diana; Ehde, Dawn M.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pain commonly accompanies long-term disabilities such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Research suggests that patient motivation to engage in adaptive pain coping strategies, such as exercise/stretching and task persistence, is an important factor in determining the impact that this pain will have on quality of life. One recently proposed model (the “Motivational Model of Pain Self-Management”) suggests that motivation to manage pain is influenced by two primary variables: beliefs about the importance of engaging in pain self-management (i.e., “perceived importance”) and beliefs about one's own ability to engage in these behaviors (i.e., “self-efficacy”). The purpose of this study was to provide a preliminary test of this model in a sample of 130 adults with SCI who completed a return by mail survey. Measures included a numerical rating scale of pain intensity and the revised version of the Multidimensional Pain Readiness to Change Questionnaire. Mediation analyses were performed using multiple regression. Results suggested that the effects of perceived importance and self-efficacy on exercise behavior were mediated by readiness to engage in exercise, consistent with the proposed model. However, the model could not be established for the outcome of task persistence. Perspective: This study tests a model describing motivation to engage in pain management behaviors (i.e., “readiness to change”) in adults with spinal cord injury. This model could potentially aid clinicians in their conceptualization of the factors that affect patient motivation to manage pain. PMID:18359668

  10. Case studies illustrating the management of trigeminal neuropathic pain using topical 5% lidocaine plasters

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Zehra; Renton, Tara

    2013-01-01

    Chronic trigeminal pain, with its severe related functional problems, is difficult to treat. Treatment is often empirically based on medications used for other chronic pain conditions. Systemic sodium channel and calcium channel blocking agents may cause a multitude of complications that are often poorly tolerated by the patient. Aim: The aim of this case report was to assess the efficacy of topical 5% lidocaine plasters in reducing pain and reducing adjuvant medication in patients with orofacial neuropathic pain. Method: Fourteen patients with chronic orofacial pain conditions referred to the oral surgery department were instructed to wear 5% lidocaine plasters for 12 hours each day over the painful area. The conditions included post-surgical neuropathy (n = 10), multiple sclerosis-related pain (n = 1), persistent idiopathic facial pain (n = 1), Ramsay Hunt syndrome (post-herpetic neuralgia, n = 1) and trigeminal neuralgia (n = 1). Data were collected on patient demographics, pain levels and medication. Results: Pain levels improved in 12 out of 14 patients. Nine patients had a reduction in adjuvant medication, two of whom completely stopped adjuvant treatment. Conclusion: This case series demonstrates that of the use of 5% lidocaine plasters may play a useful role in the management of chronic trigeminal pain. A suggested novel approach for the management of orofacial pain, for clinicians, is presented. Summary points Management of chronic orofacial pain continues to be a major challenge to the clinician. Patients are often placed on a multitude of medications in an attempt to alleviate pain without success. Topical 5% lidocaine plasters, currently used for the management of post-herpetic neuralgia, offer the option of locally targeting trigeminal pain without the multiple side-effects of systemic medication. This case series demonstrates that lidocaine plasters decrease verbal pain scores in extraoral, trigeminal and neuropathic pain, and reduce the use of other

  11. Evaluation of American Indian Health Service Training in Pain Management and Opioid Substance Use Disorder.

    PubMed

    Katzman, Joanna G; Fore, Chris; Bhatt, Snehal; Greenberg, Nina; Griffin Salvador, Julie; Comerci, George C; Camarata, Christopher; Marr, Lisa; Monette, Rebecca; Arora, Sanjeev; Bradford, Andrea; Taylor, Denise; Dillow, Jenny; Karol, Susan

    2016-08-01

    We examined the benefits of a collaboration between the Indian Health Service and an academic medical center to address the high rates of unintentional drug overdose in American Indians/Alaska Natives. In January 2015, the Indian Health Service became the first federal agency to mandate training in pain and opioid substance use disorder for all prescribing clinicians. More than 1300 Indian Health Service clinicians were trained in 7 possible 5-hour courses specific to pain and addiction. We noted positive changes in pre- and postcourse knowledge, self-efficacy, and attitudes as well as thematic responses showing the trainings to be comprehensive, interactive, and convenient. PMID:27196642

  12. Nurses' willingness to manage the pain of specific groups of patients.

    PubMed

    Brockopp, Dorothy Y; Ryan, Patty; Warden, Sherry

    Effective pain management remains a challenge for the nursing profession. While nurses' knowledge of appropriate pain strategies has improved considerably, additional research needs to be conducted into the influence of factors other than knowledge on the management of pain. This study examined the willingness of nurses (n = 157) and nursing students (n = 265) to spend time and energy managing the pain of different groups of patients, when told that all patients had the same degree of pain. The willingness of nurses to spend time and energy in managing patients' pain was used as a proxy for preconceived notions relative to particular groups of patients. A pattern emerged that suggested that nurses' and nursing students' willingness to spend time and energy managing patients' pain in influenced by their perceptions of different groups of patients. PMID:12743487

  13. Concepts of rehabilitation for the management of low back pain.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Gordon; Burton, A Kim

    2005-08-01

    This chapter develops rehabilitation principles for the clinical and occupational management of non-specific low back pain (LBP). Rehabilitation has traditionally been a secondary intervention, which focused on permanent impairment, but this is inappropriate for LBP. Most patients with LBP do not have any irremediable impairment and long-term incapacity is not inevitable: given the right care, support and opportunity, most should be able to return to work. Rehabilitation should then address obstacles to recovery and barriers to (return to) work. Rehabilitation should not be a separate, second stage after 'treatment' is complete: rehabilitation principles should be integral to clinical and occupational management. It should be possible to reduce sickness absence and long-term incapacity due to LBP by at least 30-50%, but this will require a fundamental shift in management culture. PMID:15949782

  14. A survey of current perianesthesia nursing practice for pain and comfort management.

    PubMed

    Krenzischek, Dina A; Windle, Pamela; Mamaril, Myrna

    2004-06-01

    Widespread dissemination of information and high-profile press coverage about pain and comfort management has resulted in heightened awareness among health care professionals and the public of the need for improvements in the way pain and comfort are managed. Despite significant advances in treatment options for pain relief and comfort, studies show that both phenomena continue to be poorly managed and undertreated. Providing pain relief and comfort to patients are important fundamental components of good nursing care; however, no studies have been performed to evaluate these responsibilities in perianesthesia nursing practice. Therefore, a descriptive survey was undertaken to assess the current practices for pain and comfort management among perianesthesia nurses. A convenience sample of 220 perianesthesia nurses working in preoperative and postoperative settings in rural and urban hospitals, outpatient centers, and freestanding facilities completed a questionnaire survey. The survey asked 10 questions that addressed various aspects of pain and comfort care, including assessment in different settings, discharge criteria, and obstacles in the management of pain and comfort. Findings showed that perianesthesia nurses assessed pain at a frequency of 58% and comfort at a frequency of 56% on admission. Preoperative assessment of patients' desired level of pain relief and comfort occurred at frequencies of 21% and 20%, respectively. Pain was assessed most often with self-report pain ratings and ordinal descriptions such as "no pain" to "severe pain." A moderate pain level was used most often as a discharge criterion. Inappropriate and inadequate physicians' orders were cited as two of the most common obstacles to managing pain and comfort. Findings of this study can be used to increase awareness of the need to evaluate and improve pain and comfort management education and practices in the perianesthesia settings. ASPAN will also use the results as baseline data as it

  15. Addiction and will

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Brian

    2013-01-01

    A hypothesis about the neurobiological bases of drive, drive reduction and will in addictive illness is presented. Drive reduction seems to require both SEEKING and gratification. Will is the everyday term for our experience of drives functioning within us. Addictive drugs take over the will by altering neurotransmission in the SEEKING system. As a result of this biological change, psychological defenses are arrayed that allow partial gratification and reduce anxiety about the consequences of drug use. Repeated partial gratification of the addictive drive creates a cathexis to the drug and the drug seller. It also keeps the addicted person in a permanent state of SEEKING. The cathexis to the drug and drug seller creates a difficult situation for psychoanalytic therapists. The actively addicted patient will have one set of feelings for the analyst, and a split off set of feelings for the drug dealer. Addictive neuroses, which feature a split transference, are contrasted with Freud’s concept of transference and narcissistic neuroses. For treatment of an actively addicted patient, the treater must negotiate the split transference. By analyzing the denial system the relationship with the drug dealer ends and the hostility involved in addictive behavior enters the transference where it can be interpreted. Selling drugs that take over the will is a lucrative enterprise. The addictive drug industry, about the size of the oil and gas industry worldwide, produces many patients in need of treatment. The marketers of addictive drugs understand the psychology of inducing initial ingestion of the drugs, and of managing their addicted populations. The neuropsychoanalytic understanding of addiction might be used to create more effective public health interventions to combat this morbid and mortal illness. PMID:24062657

  16. Addiction and will.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brian

    2013-01-01

    A hypothesis about the neurobiological bases of drive, drive reduction and will in addictive illness is presented. Drive reduction seems to require both SEEKING and gratification. Will is the everyday term for our experience of drives functioning within us. Addictive drugs take over the will by altering neurotransmission in the SEEKING system. As a result of this biological change, psychological defenses are arrayed that allow partial gratification and reduce anxiety about the consequences of drug use. Repeated partial gratification of the addictive drive creates a cathexis to the drug and the drug seller. It also keeps the addicted person in a permanent state of SEEKING. The cathexis to the drug and drug seller creates a difficult situation for psychoanalytic therapists. The actively addicted patient will have one set of feelings for the analyst, and a split off set of feelings for the drug dealer. Addictive neuroses, which feature a split transference, are contrasted with Freud's concept of transference and narcissistic neuroses. For treatment of an actively addicted patient, the treater must negotiate the split transference. By analyzing the denial system the relationship with the drug dealer ends and the hostility involved in addictive behavior enters the transference where it can be interpreted. Selling drugs that take over the will is a lucrative enterprise. The addictive drug industry, about the size of the oil and gas industry worldwide, produces many patients in need of treatment. The marketers of addictive drugs understand the psychology of inducing initial ingestion of the drugs, and of managing their addicted populations. The neuropsychoanalytic understanding of addiction might be used to create more effective public health interventions to combat this morbid and mortal illness. PMID:24062657

  17. Internet Addiction and Other Behavioral Addictions.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, Alicia Grattan; Hsiao, Ray Chih-Jui; Yen, Cheng-Fang

    2016-07-01

    The Internet is increasingly influential in the lives of adolescents. Although there are many positives, there are also risks related to excessive use and addiction. It is important to recognize clinical signs and symptoms of Internet addiction (compulsive use, withdrawal, tolerance, and adverse consequences), treat comorbid conditions (other substance use disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety, depression, and hostility), and initiate psychosocial interventions. More research on this topic will help to provide consensus on diagnostic criteria and further clarify optimal management. PMID:27338971

  18. Pain Assessment and Management in Critically ill Intubated Patients in Jordan: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ayasrah, Shahnaz Mohammad; O’Neill, Teresa Mary; Abdalrahim, Maysoon Saleem; Sutary, Manal Mohammed; Kharabsheh, Muna Suliman

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to describe: (1) pain indicators used by nurses and physicians to assess pain, (2) pain management interventions (pharmacological and non-pharmacological) used by nurses, and (3) indicators used by nurses to verify pain intervention effectiveness. Methodology A total of 301 medical records of currently admitted patients from six different ICUs in Jordan were reviewed using a data collection instrument developed by Gélinas et al. (2004) Pain-related indicators were classified into non-observable (patient’s self-reports of pain) and observable (physiological and behavioral) categories. Results Only 105 (35%) of a total 301 reviewed medical records contained pain assessment data. From these medical records, 15 pain episodes were collected altogether. Observable indicators documented 98% of the 115 pain episodes. Patients’ self-reports of pain were documented only 1.7% of the time. In 78% and 46% of the 115 pain episodes, pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for pain management were documented, respectively. Only 37% of the pain episodes were reassessed with self- report (1%) and observable indicators (36%) to determine the effectiveness of the interventions. Conclusion Pain documentation for assessment, management, and reassessment was lacking and needs improvement. PMID:25505864

  19. Pain Management in Ambulatory Surgery—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, Jan G.

    2014-01-01

    Day surgery, coming to and leaving the hospital on the same day as surgery as well as ambulatory surgery, leaving hospital within twenty-three hours is increasingly being adopted. There are several potential benefits associated with the avoidance of in-hospital care. Early discharge demands a rapid recovery and low incidence and intensity of surgery and anaesthesia related side-effects; such as pain, nausea and fatigue. Patients must be fit enough and symptom intensity so low that self-care is feasible in order to secure quality of care. Preventive multi-modal analgesia has become the gold standard. Administering paracetamol, NSIADs prior to start of surgery and decreasing the noxious influx by the use of local anaesthetics by peripheral block or infiltration in surgical field prior to incision and at wound closure in combination with intra-operative fast acting opioid analgesics, e.g., remifentanil, have become standard of care. Single preoperative 0.1 mg/kg dose dexamethasone has a combined action, anti-emetic and provides enhanced analgesia. Additional α-2-agonists and/or gabapentin or pregabalin may be used in addition to facilitate the pain management if patients are at risk for more pronounced pain. Paracetamol, NSAIDs and rescue oral opioid is the basic concept for self-care during the first 3–5 days after common day/ambulatory surgical procedures. PMID:25061796

  20. Person-centered pain management - science and art.

    PubMed

    Braš, Marijana; Đorđević, Veljko; Janjanin, Mladen

    2013-06-01

    We are witnessing an unprecedented development of the medical science, which promises to revolutionize health care and improve patients' health outcomes. However, the core of the medical profession has always been and will be the relationship between the doctor and the patient, and communication is the most widely used clinical skill in medical practice. When we talk about different forms of communication in medicine, we must never forget the importance of communication through art. Although one of the simplest, art is the most effective way to approach the patient and produce the effect that no other means of communication can achieve. Person-centered pain management takes into account psychological, physical, social, and spiritual aspects of health and disease. Art should be used as a therapeutic technique for people who suffer from pain, as well as a means of raising public awareness of this problem. Art can also be one of the best forms of educating medical professionals and others involved in treatment and decision-making on pain. PMID:23771762

  1. Arthroscopic management of the painful total elbow arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Gregory I

    2015-01-01

    Background Failure of total elbow arthroplasty is more common than after other major joint arthroplasties and is often a result of aseptic loosening, peri-prosthetic infection, fracture and instability. Infection can be a devastating complication, yet there are no established guidelines for the pre-operative diagnosis of total elbow peri-prosthetic infection. This is because pre-operative clinical, radiographic and biochemical tests are often unreliable. Methods Using three case examples, a standardized protocol for the clinical and arthroscopic assessment of the painful total elbow arthroplasty is described. This is used to provide a mechanical and microbiological diagnosis of the patient’s pain. Results There have been no complications resulting from the use of this technique in the three patients described, nor in any other patient to date. Conclusions The staged protocol described in the present study, utilizing arthroscopic assessment, has refined the approach to the painful total elbow arthroplasty because it directly influences the definitive surgical management of the patient. It is recommended that other surgeons follow the principles outlined in the present study when faced with this challenging problem. PMID:27583000

  2. 2015 AAHA/AAFP Pain Management Guidelines for Dogs and Cats.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Mark; Rodan, Ilona; Griffenhagen, Gregg; Kadrlik, Jamie; Petty, Michael; Robertson, Sheilah; Simpson, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    The robust advances in pain management for companion animals underlie the decision of AAHA and AAFP to expand on the information provided in the 2007 AAHA/AAFP Pain Management Guidelines for Dogs and Cats . The 2015 guidelines summarize and offer a discriminating review of much of this new knowledge. Pain management is central to veterinary practice, alleviating pain, improving patient outcomes, and enhancing both quality of life and the veterinarian-client-patient relationship. The management of pain requires a continuum of care that includes anticipation, early intervention, and evaluation of response on an individual-patient basis. The guidelines include both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic modalities to manage pain; they are evidence-based insofar as possible and otherwise represent a consensus of expert opinion. Behavioral changes are currently the principal indicator of pain and its course of improvement or progression, and the basis for recently validated pain scores. A team-oriented approach, including the owner, is essential for maximizing the recognition, prevention, and treatment of pain in animals. Postsurgical pain is eminently predictable but a strong body of evidence exists supporting strategies to mitigate adaptive as well as maladaptive forms. Degenerative joint disease is one of the most significant and under-diagnosed diseases of cats and dogs. Degenerative joint disease is ubiquitous, found in pets of all ages, and inevitably progresses over time; evidence-based strategies for management are established in dogs, and emerging in cats. These guidelines support veterinarians in incorporating pain management into practice, improving patient care. PMID:25764070

  3. The assessment and management of pain in an orthopaedic out-patient setting: A case study.

    PubMed

    Hall, Gillian; Gregory, Julie

    2016-08-01

    The management of pain is an important aspect of an orthopaedic nurse's role. The aim of this paper is to use an individual case study to demonstrate the role of an out-patient orthopaedic nurse in the identification, assessment and management of pain. This paper describes how pain was identified and managed for a patient in the orthopaedic outpatient department, highlighting that pain and its management are not isolated to the in-patient setting. The case study illustrates the importance of recognising pain and taking into account the numerous factors that can influence pain perception. The assessment of an individual patient's pain led to obtaining help from the Acute Pain Team which led to improvement in the patient's pain management and quality of life. The nursing team reflected and discussed the issues identified by this case study which led to changes in practice being introduced. This has resulted in an increased knowledge of and confidence in pain management within the nursing team and development and improvement of pain management practice within the orthopaedic out-patient department. PMID:26711709

  4. Pain assessment and management in the critically ill: wizardry or science?

    PubMed

    Puntillo, Kathleen

    2003-07-01

    Assessment and management of patients' pain across practice settings have recently received the increased attention of providers, patients, patients' families, and regulatory agencies. Scientific advances in understanding pain mechanisms, multidimensional methods of pain assessment, and analgesic pharmacology have aided in the improvement of pain management practices. However, pain assessment and management for critical care patients, especially those with communication barriers, continue to present challenges to clinicians and researchers. The state of nursing science of pain in critically ill patients, including development and testing of pain assessment methods and clinical trials of pharmacological interventions, is described. Special emphasis is placed on results from the Thunder Project II, a major multisite investigation of procedural pain. PMID:12882060

  5. Clinical outcomes of educating nurses about pediatric pain management.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, S C; Wilson, C J

    1999-01-01

    This pilot study examined the influence of a mandatory hospital in-service pediatric pain management program on nurses' administration of analgesics. Chart audits were conducted using a convenience sample of all children who had undergone tonsillectomies during a 2-week period before and after the in-service. In contrast to what was expected, after the educational program, there was an increased length of time before the first dose of analgesic was given and between doses of analgesics given to patients. PMID:10427245

  6. Effects of Pain and Pain Management on Motor Recovery of Spinal Cord-Injured Patients: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Cragg, Jacquelyn J; Haefeli, Jenny; Jutzeler, Catherine R; Röhrich, Frank; Weidner, Norbert; Saur, Marion; Maier, Doris D; Kalke, Yorck B; Schuld, Christian; Curt, Armin; Kramer, John K

    2016-09-01

    Background Approximately 60% of patients suffering from acute spinal cord injury (SCI) develop pain within days to weeks after injury, which ultimately persists into chronic stages. To date, the consequences of pain after SCI have been largely examined in terms of interfering with quality of life. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the effects of pain and pain management on neurological recovery after SCI. Methods We analyzed clinical data in a prospective multicenter observational cohort study in patients with SCI. Using mixed effects regression techniques, total motor and sensory scores were modelled at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury. Results A total of 225 individuals were included in the study (mean age: 45.8 ± 18 years, 80% male). At 1 month postinjury, 28% of individuals with SCI reported at- or below-level neuropathic pain. While pain classification showed no effect on neurological outcomes, individuals administered anticonvulsant medications at 1 month postinjury showed significant reductions in pain intensity (2 points over 1 year; P < .05) and greater recovery in total motor scores (7.3 points over 1 year; P < .05). This drug effect on motor recovery remained significant after adjustment for injury level and injury severity, pain classification, and pain intensity. Conclusion While initial pain classification and intensity did not reveal an effect on motor recovery following acute SCI, anticonvulsants conferred a significant beneficial effect on motor outcomes. Early intervention with anticonvulsants may have effects beyond pain management and warrant further studies to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness in human SCI. PMID:26747127

  7. Best evidence in multimodal pain management in spine surgery and means of assessing postoperative pain and functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Devin, Clinton J; McGirt, Matthew J

    2015-06-01

    Multimodal approaches to pain management have arisen with the goal of improving postoperative pain and reducing opioid analgesic use. We performed a comprehensive literature review to determine grades of recommendation for commonly used agents in multimodal pain management and provide a best practice guideline. To evaluate common drugs used in multimodal treatment of pain, a search was performed on English language publications on Medline (PubMed; National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD, USA). Manuscripts were rated as Level I-V according to the North American Spine Society's (NASS) standardized levels of evidence tables. Grades of recommendation were assigned for each drug based on the NASS Clinical Guidelines for Multidisciplinary Spine Care. There is good (Grade A) evidence gabapentinoids, acetaminophen, neuraxial blockade and extended-release local anesthetics reduce postoperative pain and narcotic requirements. There is fair (Grade B) evidence that preemptive analgesia and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) result in reduced postoperative pain. There is insufficient and/or conflicting (Grade I) evidence that muscle relaxants and ketamine provide a significant reduction in postoperative pain or narcotic usage. There is fair (Grade B) evidence that short-term use of NSAID result in no long-term reduction in bone healing or fusion rates. Comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness of perioperative pain control can be accomplished through the use of validated measures. Multimodal pain management protocols have consistently been demonstrated to allow for improved pain control with less reliance on opioids. There is good quality evidence that supports many of the common agents utilized in multimodal therapy, however, there is a lack of evidence regarding optimal postoperative protocols or pathways. PMID:25766366

  8. Pain management in a patient with intractable spinal cord injury pain: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Que, Jocelyn C; Siddall, Philip J; Cousins, Michael J

    2007-11-01

    Chronic pain is one of the more disturbing sequelae of spinal cord injury, often interfering with the basic activities, effective rehabilitation, and quality of life of the patient. Pain in the cord-injured patient is often recalcitrant to treatment. This dilemma is amplified by the limited availability of effective pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment options. We identified relevant articles regarding pain after spinal cord injury from the Medline database from 1975 to 2005 using the search terms "spinal cord injury" or "spinal cord injuries" and "pain" or "spasticity or "muscle spasms." We also searched by hand the review articles in a recently published book from the International Association for the Study of Pain Press on spinal cord injury pain, and identified relevant articles through reference lists. We present a patient with intractable spinal cord injury pain who was successfully treated with a pain management plan that addressed the various aspects of spinal cord injury pain. The evidence for treatment options is reviewed. PMID:17959984

  9. Multi-centre European study of breakthrough cancer pain: pain characteristics and patient perceptions of current and potential management strategies.

    PubMed

    Davies, Andrew; Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Andersen, Steen; Damkier, Anette; Vejlgaard, Tove; Nauck, Friedemann; Radbruch, Lukas; Sjolund, Karl-Frederik; Stenberg, Mariann; Buchanan, Alison

    2011-08-01

    This study involved 320 cancer patients from four Northern European countries. Patients with breakthrough pain were questioned about the characteristics of their pain, the current management of their pain, and the acceptability/utility of alternative routes of administration. The median number of episodes was 3/day. Forty-four percent patients reported incident-type pain, 39% spontaneous-type pain, and 17% a combination of these pains. The median duration was 60 min, and the median time to peak intensity was 15 min. Three percent patients reported "mild" pain, 37% "moderate" pain, and 60% "severe" pain. Ninety percent patients stated that the pain interfered with their daily activities. All patients were using opioids as rescue medication (mainly oral morphine/oxycodone), whilst 28% patients were using non-opioids, and 50% patients were using non-pharmacological interventions. Only 55% patients took rescue medication every time they experienced breakthrough pain. Sixty-five percent patients would definitely consider using an oral transmucosal product; patients from Denmark were less likely to answer positively, and a positive response was associated with previous use of the route for breakthrough pain. Seventy-three percent patients reported regular oral problems. Forty-two percent patients would definitely consider using an intranasal product, with 26% patients stating they would definitely not use such a preparation; patients from Denmark and Sweden were less likely to answer positively, and a positive response was associated with male gender, and previous use of the route. Forty-four percent patients reported regular nasal problems. Sixty percent patients would definitely consider using a subcutaneous product, and 44% patients would definitely consider using an intrapulmonary product. PMID:21251860

  10. From addiction to infection: managing drug abuse in the context of HIV/AIDS in Africa.

    PubMed

    Akindipe, Taiwo; Abiodun, Lolade; Adebajo, Sylvia; Lawal, Rahman; Rataemane, Solomon

    2014-09-01

    People who use drugs are at higher risk of HIV: directly through the sharing of injecting equipment, indirectly through associated risk behavior, and physiologically through the substances' impact on the immune system. Drug users, especially people who inject drugs (PWID) are a bridge to the general population. The treatment of drug addiction and provision of harm reduction interventions have impact on HIV transmission and incidence. Addiction treatment reduces the frequency of drug-related risky behaviors and enhances access and adherence to HIV treatment, resulting in fewer new infections. However, the drug policies of many African countries are punitive and hostile to harm reduction programs. These fuel criminalization of drug use and discrimination against the drug user thereby preventing individuals with drug addiction from accessing treatment programs. There is need to formulate policies aimed at protecting the rights of people with drug addiction and address the ethical aspects of treatment. PMID:26050376

  11. Characteristics and prognostic factors for pain management in 152 patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Liu, Yumei; He, Hua; Wang, Cong; Li, Hongwei; Wang, Nanya

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to analyze the pain characteristics and factors influencing the outcome of pain control in patients with lung cancer having pain. Methods Pain characteristics, the effectiveness, and prognostic factors for pain control were analyzed in 152 patients with lung cancer having moderate or severe chronic pain admitted to Cancer Center of The First Hospital of Jilin University, People’s Republic of China, between January 2012 and May 2013. Information about sex, age, pathological type, TNM stage, presence/absence of bone metastases, characteristics of pain, methods, and effectiveness of pain management was recorded. Results Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and small-cell carcinoma accounted for 132/152 (86.8%) and 20/152 (13.2%) cases, respectively. Among them, moderate (72.4%) or severe pain (27.6%) was reported in 73.7% of the cases at stage IV, chest or back pain was reported in 76.3% of the cases, and pain in other locations in the rest of the cases. Bone metastases were apparent in 44.1% of the patients. Neuropathic pain was noted in 46.7% of the patients, and frequent breakthrough pain was noted in 25.7% of the patients. High pain intensity was associated with frequent breakthrough pain. Pain was adequately controlled in 81.6% of the patients prescribed 3 days of analgesics. More patients reported a KPS higher than or equal to 80 after 3 days of analgesic treatment (P<0.001). Severe pain, frequent breakthrough pain, and presence of bone metastases were independent risk factors for poor pain control. Severe pain, frequent breakthrough pain, or neuropathic pain in the patients using opioids required higher doses of analgesic for pain control. Opioids plus nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs offered better pain control than opioids alone. Conclusion High pain intensity is associated with frequent breakthrough pain in patients with lung cancer, which can be largely controlled with analgesics. Severe pain, frequent

  12. An Interprofessional Consensus of Core Competencies for Prelicensure Education in Pain Management: Curriculum Application for Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Keela; St. Marie, Barbara; Gordon, Debra B.; Paice, Judith A.; Watt-Watson, Judy; Stevens, Bonnie J.; Bakerjian, Debra; Young, Heather M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ineffective assessment and management of pain is a significant problem. A gap in prelicensure health science program pain content has been identified for the improvement of pain care in the United States. Method Through consensus processes, an expert panel of nurses, who participated in the interdisciplinary development of core competencies in pain management for prelicensure health professional education, developed recommendations to address the gap in nursing curricula. Results Challenges and incentives for implementation of pain competencies in nursing education are discussed, and specific recommendations for how to incorporate the competencies into entry-level nursing curricula are provided. Conclusion Embedding pain management core competencies into prelicensure nursing education is crucial to ensure that nurses have the essential knowledge and skills to effectively manage pain and to serve as a foundation on which clinical practice skills can be later honed. PMID:26057425

  13. Continuity of care in addictions treatment: the role of advocacy and coordination in case management.

    PubMed

    Graham, K; Timney, C B; Bois, C; Wedgerfield, K

    1995-11-01

    Although advocacy and coordination are recognized as important aspects of the addictions treatment process, little research has been done in these areas. The present study examined advocacy and coordination at two programs where the mandate was assessment, referral, and case management. Both programs spent a similar proportion of client-related effort on advocacy and/or coordination (about 25% of contact time, accounting for about half of contacts made regarding clients). The majority of advocacy and coordination contacts were with other agencies about clients (the remainder with family and friends of clients). A framework for advocacy and coordination was developed that allowed contacts to be categorized into mutually exclusive advocacy or coordination activities. Advocacy was defined as any activity undertaken to obtain something for clients; coordination involved the giving or receiving of information regarding specific clients. Sources of variability in the provision of advocacy and coordination were found between the programs that could be attributed to differences between the systems within which the programs operated, as well as differences in program clientele. In terms of client characteristics, it was found that females were more likely than males to receive advocacy; those over 65 years were most likely to receive both advocacy and coordination; those who were referred by school or employer or by corrections were most likely to receive coordination; those with no prior treatment were most likely to receive advocacy; and self-referrals and those who had had prior treatment were most likely to receive neither advocacy nor coordination. Receiving advocacy or coordination was not found to reduce the need by clients for other case management services, such as supportive counseling. The findings are discussed in terms of the need for knowledge regarding highly variable aspects of treatment such as advocacy and coordination. New research approaches (as taken in

  14. Congenital Insensitivity to Pain without Anhidrosis: Orodental Problems and Management

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, N.; Fakhruddin, Kausar Sadia; Samsudin, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the case of a 4-year-old male patient who was brought by parents requesting for replacement of multiple missing anterior teeth. The patient suffered from congenital insensitivity to pain without anhidrosis and presented with full blown sequelae of the condition in the form of oral self-mutilation leading to loss of teeth, tongue tip amputation, finger tips destruction, and lower limb wound infections. Dental and orthopaedic treatment consists of local management of oral wound and prevention from further oral and finger injuries that takes the form of dental splints and finger sleeve splints, constant feet coverage with shoes, and behavioural medical therapy. The age of the patient and parents' education present challenges in managing this condition to avoid morbidity and premature mortality. PMID:26457210

  15. Phantom limb pain and its psychologic management: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Niraj, Shruti; Niraj, G

    2014-03-01

    Phantom limb pain is a puzzling phenomenon, from the viewpoints of both the patient experiencing it and the clinician trying to treat it. This review focuses on psychologic aspects in the origin of the PLP and critically evaluates the various psychologic interventions in the management of PLP. Whereas pharmacologic and surgical treatments often fail, psychologic interventions may hold promise in managing PLP. Studies using cognitive-behavioral therapies and hypnotherapy are reviewed. The outcome reports for psychologic therapies have been mainly positive. The results of the majority of these studies show a reduction in PLP. However, the lack of well controlled and randomized trials makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions regarding the effectiveness of these psychologic therapies in the treatment of PLP. PMID:24602439

  16. Understanding pain and improving management of sickle cell disease: the PiSCES study.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Wally R.; Bovbjerg, Viktor E.; Penberthy, Lynne T.; McClish, Donna K.; Levenson, James L.; Roberts, John D.; Gil, Karen; Roseff, Susan D.; Aisiku, Imoigele P.

    2005-01-01

    Until recent decades, sickle cell disease (SCD) was associated with recurrent, disabling pain, organ failure and death in childhood or early adulthood. SCD treatment advances have now decreased pain and prolonged survival, but episodic or chronic pain may still require substantial analgesic use and frequent hospitalization for pain episodes. This pain is poorly characterized and often poorly treated. Adult patients may face barriers to comprehensive SCD care, stigmatization of their care-seeking behavior by providers and lack of family support, forcing them into maladaptive coping strategies. The Pain in Sickle Cell Epidemiology Study (PiSCES) attempts to develop and validate a biopsychosocial model of SCD pain, pain response and healthcare utilization in a large, multisite adult cohort. PiSCES participants complete a baseline survey and six months of daily pain diaries in which they record levels of SCD-related pain and related disability and distress as well as responses to pain (e.g., medication use, hospital visits). PiSCES will advance methods of measuring pain and pain response in SCD by better describing home-managed as well as provider-managed pain. PiSCES will assess the relative contributions of biological (disease-related), psychosocial and environmental (readiness to utilize) factors to overall pain and pain response in SCD, suggesting targets for biobehavioral interventions over time. Importantly, PiSCES will also identify "triggers" of SCD pain episodes and healthcare utilization in the moment of pain, suggesting targets for timely care that mutes pain episodes. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:15712781

  17. Acceptance- versus Change-Based Pain Management: The Role of Psychological Acceptance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blacker, Kara J.; Herbert, James D.; Forman, Evan M.; Kounios, John

    2012-01-01

    This study compared two theoretically opposed strategies for acute pain management: an acceptance-based and a change-based approach. These two strategies were compared in a within-subjects design using the cold pressor test as an acute pain induction method. Participants completed a baseline pain tolerance assessment followed by one of the two…

  18. Evaluation and Management of Pain in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Marie C.; Norby, Suzanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Transient episodes of pain are common in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). A small fraction of patients have disabling chronic pain. In this review, we discuss the etiologies of pain in ADPKD; review how ADPKD patients should be assessed; and discuss medical, surgical, and other management options. PMID:20439087

  19. Relieving pain in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Carolyn Louise

    2007-01-01

    In 2000, people aged 65 and older made up 12.4 percent of the U.S. population. Between now and 2011, when the earliest-born of the baby-boom generation reaches that age, the nation will see a rapid growth in its senior citizen population. It has been estimated that pain occurs in from 45 percent to 85 percent of the geriatric population. Much of it is undertreated. Undertreated pain leads to other problems, including reduced quality of life, decreased socialization, depression, sleep disturbances, cognitive impairment, and malnutrition. For a population already vulnerable because of aging, the costs incurred by more frequent physician visits and hospitalizations can be financially devastating. Health professionals have a moral imperative to help elderly people in pain. The management of pain in geriatric patients can be complicated by the changing physiology that occurs with aging. Older people are also more likely to be living with multiple chronic diseases, necessitating many daily medications, thereby increasing the risk of negative drug-disease and drug-drug interactions. Older patients often show atypical presentations of pain. Depression can also play a role in the assessment and treatment of pain. For a number of reasons, many older people choose not to report their pain. Often they are afraid that they will be involuntarily hospitalized or subjected to invasive procedures if they report pain. Another important barrier to successful pain management is the fact that older people are often misinformed about the aging process, analgesics, pain management, and opioid addiction. Recognition of the problem of undertreatment of pain in older persons prompts the following question: What can be done to solve the problem? Educational in-service sessions improve the quality of patient care, because they improve providers' pain-management skills and attitudes. Patient education is also extremely important. When combined with teaching about self-management and coping

  20. CLINICAL ASPECTS OF ACUTE POST-OPERATIVE PAIN MANAGEMENT & ITS ASSESSMENT

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anuj; Kaur, Kirtipal; Sharma, Sheeshpal; Goyal, Shubham; Arora, Saahil; Murthy, R.S.R

    2010-01-01

    Management of postoperative pain relieve suffering and leads to earlier mobilization, shortened hospital stay, reduced hospital costs, and increased patient satisfaction. An effective postoperative management is not a standardized regime rather is tailored to the needs of the individual patient, taking into account medical, psychological, and physical condition; age; level of fear or anxiety; surgical procedure; personal preference; and response to therapeutic agents given. The major goal in the management of postoperative pain is to minimize the dose of medications to lessen side effects & provide adequate analgesia. Postoperative pain is still under managed due to obstacles in implementation of Acute Pain Services due to insufficient education, fear of complications associated with available analgesic drugs, poor pain assessment and inadequate staff. This review reflects the clinical aspects of postoperative pain & its assessment & management with an emphasis on research for new analgesic molecules & delivery system. PMID:22247838

  1. Pharmacological management of chronic neuropathic pain – Consensus statement and guidelines from the Canadian Pain Society

    PubMed Central

    Moulin, DE; Clark, AJ; Gilron, I; Ware, MA; Watson, CPN; Sessle, BJ; Coderre, T; Morley-Forster, PK; Stinson, J; Boulanger, A; Peng, P; Finley, GA; Taenzer, P; Squire, P; Dion, D; Cholkan, A; Gilani, A; Gordon, A; Henry, J; Jovey, R; Lynch, M; Mailis-Gagnon, A; Panju, A; Rollman, GB; Velly, A

    2007-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NeP), generated by disorders of the peripheral and central nervous system, can be particularly severe and disabling. Prevalence estimates indicate that 2% to 3% of the population in the developed world suffer from NeP, which suggests that up to one million Canadians have this disabling condition. Evidence-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of NeP are therefore urgently needed. Randomized, controlled trials, systematic reviews and existing guidelines focusing on the pharmacological management of NeP were evaluated at a consensus meeting. Medications are recommended in the guidelines if their analgesic efficacy was supported by at least one methodologically sound, randomized, controlled trial showing significant benefit relative to placebo or another relevant control group. Recommendations for treatment are based on degree of evidence of analgesic efficacy, safety, ease of use and cost-effectiveness. Analgesic agents recommended for first-line treatments are certain antidepressants (tricyclics) and anticonvulsants (gabapentin and pregabalin). Second-line treatments recommended are serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors and topical lidocaine. Tramadol and controlled-release opioid analgesics are recommended as third-line treatments for moderate to severe pain. Recommended fourth-line treatments include cannabinoids, methadone and anticonvulsants with lesser evidence of efficacy, such as lamotrigine, topiramate and valproic acid. Treatment must be individualized for each patient based on efficacy, side-effect profile and drug accessibility, including cost. Further studies are required to examine head-to-head comparisons among analgesics, combinations of analgesics, long-term outcomes, and treatment of pediatric and central NeP. PMID:17372630

  2. Improving the quality of cancer pain management in an academic medical center emergency department.

    PubMed

    Won, Young Hwa; Choi, Yun Jung; Ahn, Shin; Lee, Jae-Lyun; Park, Jeong Yun; Kim, Sulhwa; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Yeon Hee

    2014-12-01

    The impact and outcomes of the implementation of a pain management guideline and pain assessment standard operating procedure (SOP) in a cancer-specific emergency department are evaluated in this article. After implementation of the SOP, the number of pain assessments conducted per patient during hospitalization increased, as did the percentage of patients who underwent a pain assessment at admission, within one hour after analgesic medication was administered, and at regular intervals. PMID:25427696

  3. Auriculotherapy for Pain Management: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Daniel E.; Coeytaux, Remy R.; Reilly, Aimee C.; Loh, Yen L.; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A.; Winham, Stacey J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Side-effects of standard pain medications can limit their use. Therefore, nonpharmacologic pain relief techniques such as auriculotherapy may play an important role in pain management. Our aim was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies evaluating auriculotherapy for pain management. Design MEDLINE,® ISI Web of Science, CINAHL, AMED, and Cochrane Library were searched through December 2008. Randomized trials comparing auriculotherapy to sham, placebo, or standard-of-care control were included that measured outcomes of pain or medication use and were published in English. Two (2) reviewers independently assessed trial eligibility, quality, and abstracted data to a standardized form. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were calculated for studies using a pain score or analgesic requirement as a primary outcome. Results Seventeen (17) studies met inclusion criteria (8 perioperative, 4 acute, and 5 chronic pain). Auriculotherapy was superior to controls for studies evaluating pain intensity (SMD, 1.56 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.85, 2.26]; 8 studies). For perioperative pain, auriculotherapy reduced analgesic use (SMD, 0.54 [95% CI: 0.30, 0.77]; 5 studies). For acute pain and chronic pain, auriculotherapy reduced pain intensity (SMD for acute pain, 1.35 [95% CI: 0.08, 2.64], 2 studies; SMD for chronic pain, 1.84 [95% CI: 0.60, 3.07], 5 studies). Removal of poor quality studies did not alter the conclusions. Significant heterogeneity existed among studies of acute and chronic pain, but not perioperative pain. Conclusions Auriculotherapy may be effective for the treatment of a variety of types of pain, especially postoperative pain. However, a more accurate estimate of the effect will require further large, well-designed trials. PMID:20954963

  4. Fluoroscopic lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in managing chronic lumbar axial or discogenic pain

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A; McManus, Carla D; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Benyamin, Ramsin

    2012-01-01

    Among the multiple causes of chronic low back pain, axial and discogenic pain are common. Various modalities of treatments are utilized in managing discogenic and axial low back pain including epidural injections. However, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity of any treatment modality utilized for managing axial or discogenic pain, including epidural injections. In an interventional pain management practice in the US, a randomized, double-blind, active control trial was conducted. The objective was to assess the effectiveness of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for managing chronic low back pain of discogenic origin. However, disc herniation, radiculitis, facet joint pain, or sacroiliac joint pain were excluded. Two groups of patients were studied, with 60 patients in each group receiving either local anesthetic only or local anesthetic mixed with non-particulate betamethasone. Primary outcome measures included the pain relief-assessed by numeric rating scale of pain and functional status assessed by the, Oswestry Disability Index, Secondary outcome measurements included employment status, and opioid intake. Significant improvement or success was defined as at least a 50% decrease in pain and disability. Significant improvement was seen in 77% of the patients in Group I and 67% of the patients in Group II. In the successful groups (those with at least 3 weeks of relief with the first two procedures), the improvement was 84% in Group I and 71% in Group II. For those with chronic function-limiting low back pain refractory to conservative management, it is concluded that lumbar interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids may be an effective modality for managing chronic axial or discogenic pain. This treatment appears to be effective for those who have had facet joints as well as sacroiliac joints eliminated as the pain source

  5. The impact of managed care on substance abuse treatment: a report of the American Society of Addiction Medicine.

    PubMed

    Galanter, M; Keller, D S; Dermatis, H; Egelko, S

    2000-01-01

    This report examines the impact of managed care (MC) and related developments on substance abuse treatment, and evaluates how it has been associated with a decline in the availability of proper treatment for many addicted patients. A trend toward carve-out and for-profit MC organizations is associated with lower financial incentives for intensive treatment than in earlier staff-model and not-for-profit MC organizations. The value of substance abuse insurance coverage has declined by 75% between 1988 and 1998 for employees of mid-to large-size companies, compared with only an 11.5% decline for general health insurance. The shift towards MC has also been associated with a drastic reduction in frequency and duration of inpatient hospitalization, and there is no clear evidence that this reduction has been offset by a corresponding increase in outpatient support. In a survey of physicians treating addiction, the majority felt that MC had a negative impact on detoxification and rehabilitation, and on their ethical practice of addiction medicine. PMID:11076117

  6. Virtual Reality for Pain Management in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mosso-Vázquez, José Luis; Gao, Kenneth; Wiederhold, Brenda K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Surgical anxiety creates psychological and physiological stress, causes complications in surgical procedures, and prolongs recovery. Relaxation of patients in postoperative intensive care units can moderate patient vital signs and reduce discomfort. This experiment explores the use of virtual reality (VR) cybertherapy to reduce postoperative distress in patients that have recently undergone cardiac surgery. Sixty-seven patients were monitored at IMSS La Raza National Medical Center within 24 hours of cardiac surgery. Patients navigated through a 30 minute VR simulation designed for pain management. Results were analyzed through comparison of pre- and postoperative vital signs and Likert scale survey data. A connection was found in several physiological factors with subjective responses from the Likert scale survey. Heavy positive correlation existed between breathing rate and Likert ratings, and a moderate correlation was found between mean arterial pressure and Likert ratings and heart rate and Likert ratings, all of which indicated lower pain and stress within patients. Further study of these factors resulted in the categorization of patients based upon their vital signs and subjective response, providing a context for the effectiveness of the therapy to specific groups of patients. PMID:24892200

  7. Cancer-Related Pain Management and the Optimal Use of Opioids.

    PubMed

    Reis-Pina, Paulo; Lawlor, Peter G; Barbosa, António

    2015-01-01

    Pain relief is vital to the treatment of cancer. Despite the widespread use and recognition of clinical recommendations for the management of cancer-related pain, avoidable suffering is still prevalent in patients with malignant disease. A gap exists between what is known about pain medical management and actual practices of patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals and institutions. Opioids are the pillar of the medical management of moderate to severe pain. The prescription of opioid analgesics - by a registered medical practitioner for absolute pain control - is a legitimate practice. In this article we look at patients' fears and physicians' general hesitations towards morphine and alike. We examine misconceptions that yield fallacies on the therapeutically use of opioids and, therefore, sustain inadequate pain management. PMID:26421791

  8. [Structure of pain management facilities in Germany : Classification of medical and psychological pain treatment services-Consensus of the Joint Commission of the Professional Societies and Organizations for Quality in Pain Medicine].

    PubMed

    Müller-Schwefe, G H H; Nadstawek, J; Tölle, T; Nilges, P; Überall, M A; Laubenthal, H J; Bock, F; Arnold, B; Casser, H R; Cegla, T H; Emrich, O M D; Graf-Baumann, T; Henning, J; Horlemann, J; Kayser, H; Kletzko, H; Koppert, W; Längler, K H; Locher, H; Ludwig, J; Maurer, S; Pfingsten, M; Schäfer, M; Schenk, M; Willweber-Strumpf, A

    2016-06-01

    On behalf of the Medical/Psychological Pain Associations, Pain Patients Alliance and the Professional Association of Pain Physicians and Psychologists, the Joint Commission of Professional Societies and Organizations for Quality in Pain Medicine, working in close collaboration with the respective presidents, has developed verifiable structural and process-related criteria for the classification of medical and psychological pain treatment facilities in Germany. Based on the established system of graded care in Germany and on existing qualifications, these criteria also argue for the introduction of a basic qualification in pain medicine. In addition to the first-ever comprehensive description of psychological pain facilities, the criteria presented can be used to classify five different levels of pain facilities, from basic pain management facilities, to specialized institutions, to the Centre for Interdisciplinary Pain Medicine. The recommendations offer binding and verifiable criteria for quality assurance in pain medicine and improved pain treatment. PMID:27221745

  9. Observation of pain assessment and management--the complexities of clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Manias, Elizabeth; Botti, Mari; Bucknall, Tracey

    2002-11-01

    Pain assessment and management are complex issues that embrace physiological, emotional, cognitive, and social dimensions. This observational study sought to investigate nurse-patient interactions associated with pain assessment and management in hospitalized postsurgical patients in clinical practice settings. Twelve field observations were carried out on Registered Nurses' activities relating to pain with their assigned patients. All nurses were involved in direct patient care in one surgical unit of a metropolitan teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Six observation times were identified as key periods for activities relating to pain, which included change of shift and high activity periods. Each observation period lasted 2 hours and was examined on two occasions. Four major themes were identified as barriers to effective pain management: nurses' responses to interruptions of activities relating to pain, nurses' attentiveness to patient cues of pain, nurses' varying interpretations of pain, and nurses' attempts to address competing demands of nurses, doctors and patients. These findings provide some understanding of the complexities impacting on nurses' assessment and management of postoperative pain. Further research using this observational methodology is indicated to examine these influences in more depth. This knowledge may form the basis for developing and evaluating strategic intervention programmes that analyse nurses' management of postoperative pain and, in particular, their administration of opioid analgesics. PMID:12427177

  10. Physicians' Attitudes to Clinical Pain Management and Education: Survey from a Middle Eastern Country.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Soumana C; Nassif, Jeanette G; Saad, Aline Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Despite promising initiatives to advance the practice of pain management in Middle Eastern countries, their pain care lags behind developed countries. The objectives of this study are to evaluate physicians' assessment of their own competency in pain management, to assess physicians' practice related to pain management, and to identify physician-related barriers to effective pain control. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 3 teaching medical centers in Lebanon targeting the above-mentioned outcomes and assessing the impact of physicians' years in practice on the studied end-points. A total of 69 physicians were surveyed. Fifty-seven percent reported "very good to excellent" pain management skills; only 25% of them described the need for continuing professional development. When treating patients with pain, 52% of physicians refer to updated international guidelines, whereas 43% rely on their own judgment. Physicians were more likely to consult with another physician (65%) rather than a pharmacist (12%) when treating patients with pain. Fear of adverse effects of analgesics was the most commonly reported barrier (45%) to pain control among physicians from different career stages. Based on these survey findings, national pain management and practice policies are needed to optimize this area of deficiency in patient care. PMID:27445596

  11. Physicians' Attitudes to Clinical Pain Management and Education: Survey from a Middle Eastern Country

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Aline Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Despite promising initiatives to advance the practice of pain management in Middle Eastern countries, their pain care lags behind developed countries. The objectives of this study are to evaluate physicians' assessment of their own competency in pain management, to assess physicians' practice related to pain management, and to identify physician-related barriers to effective pain control. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 3 teaching medical centers in Lebanon targeting the above-mentioned outcomes and assessing the impact of physicians' years in practice on the studied end-points. A total of 69 physicians were surveyed. Fifty-seven percent reported “very good to excellent” pain management skills; only 25% of them described the need for continuing professional development. When treating patients with pain, 52% of physicians refer to updated international guidelines, whereas 43% rely on their own judgment. Physicians were more likely to consult with another physician (65%) rather than a pharmacist (12%) when treating patients with pain. Fear of adverse effects of analgesics was the most commonly reported barrier (45%) to pain control among physicians from different career stages. Based on these survey findings, national pain management and practice policies are needed to optimize this area of deficiency in patient care.

  12. Gambling Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Gambling Addiction KidsHealth > For Teens > Gambling Addiction Print A ... So what's the story with gambling? What Is Gambling? Gambling means taking part in any activity or ...

  13. Quality Improvement Project to Improve Patient Satisfaction With Pain Management: Using Human-Centered Design.

    PubMed

    Trail-Mahan, Tracy; Heisler, Scott; Katica, Mary

    2016-01-01

    In this quality improvement project, our health system developed a comprehensive, patient-centered approach to improving inpatient pain management and assessed its impact on patient satisfaction across 21 medical centers. Using human-centered design principles, a bundle of 6 individual and team nursing practices was developed. Patient satisfaction with pain management, as measured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems pain composite score, increased from the 25th to just under the 75th national percentile. PMID:26447343

  14. [Work addiction].

    PubMed

    Mentzel, G

    1979-01-01

    The symptomatology of workaholism (work addiction) was presented in the form of a questionnaire and compared with other forms of addiction, especially alcoholism. Then a case was used as example to illustrate the development of the illness and its psychodynamics. The therapy procedure was also briefly explained. Moreover the psychodynamics of workaholism (work addiction) are described, once again in comparison to other addictions. Finally the author gives general guidelines for therapy. PMID:452731

  15. Effects of an Individually Tailored Web-Based Chronic Pain Management Program on Pain Severity, Psychological Health, and Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun; Oberleitner, Lindsay; Schwartz, Steven; Williams, Amy M

    2013-01-01

    Background It is estimated that 30% of adults in the United States experience daily chronic pain. This results in a significant burden on the health care system, in particular primary care, and on the workplace. Chronic pain management with cognitive-behavioral psychological treatment is effective in reducing pain intensity and interference, health-related quality of life, mood, and return to work. However, the population of individuals with chronic pain far exceeds the population of therapists that can provide this care face-to-face. The use of tailored, Web-based interventions for the management of chronic pain could address limitations to access by virtue of its unlimited scalability. Objective To examine the effects of a tailored Web-based chronic pain management program on subjective pain, activity and work interference, quality of life and health, and stress. Methods Eligible participants accessed the online pain management program and informed consent via participating employer or health care benefit systems; program participants who completed baseline, 1-, and 6-month assessments were included in the study. Of the 645 participants, the mean age was 56.16 years (SD 12.83), most were female (447/645, 69.3%), and white (505/641, 78.8%). Frequent pain complaints were joint (249/645, 38.6%), back (218/645, 33.8%), and osteoarthritis (174/654, 27.0%). The online pain management program used evidence-based theories of cognitive behavioral intervention, motivational enhancement, and health behavior change to address self-management, coping, medical adherence, social support, comorbidities, and productivity. The program content was individually tailored on several relevant participant variables. Results Both pain intensity (mean 5.30, SD 2.46), and unpleasantness (mean 5.43, SD 2.52) decreased significantly from baseline to 1-month (mean 4.16, SD 2.69 and mean 4.24, 2.81, respectively) and 6-month (mean 3.78, SD 2.79 and mean 3.78, SD 2.79, respectively) assessments

  16. Musculoskeletal Pain Management Among Dentists: An Alternative Approach.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Devanand; M, Devaki; Dommaraju, Neelima; Srinivas, Kavuri Teja; Patil, Atul A; Momin, Rizwan K; Jain, Ankita; Gupta, Rajendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the most important occupational health issues in health care workers. Musculoskeletal pain is an occupational health problem for dental professionals, particularly dentists. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) can be helpful in managing and preventing these MSDs. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of MSDs among dentists residing in east India and the use of CAM therapies for the management of MSDs among dentists. Dentists (N = 1082) residing in east India, registered under the Dental Council of India, were surveyed. A questionnaire comprising demographic profile, questions related to MSD among dentists, use of CAM therapies for MSD management, source of CAM information. Data analysis was done using SPSS (version 17), and data were presented in tabular and graphic forms. Univariate and bivariate analyses were done, with P < .05 considered as significant. A response rate of 81% (n = 877) was obtained, revealing that 71% (n = 623) of dentists suffered from MSD. The use of CAM was reported among 83% (n = 517) and conventional therapy among 15% (n = 94) of dentists, and 2% (n = 12) of dentists with MSD do not use any type of treatment modality. Complementary and alternative medicine represents a group of diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not considered to be part of conventional medicine. CAM therapies have improved quality of life and have given a new meaning to it, especially to dentists who suffer from MSD. PMID:26067590

  17. Evaluation and Effectiveness of Pain Recognition and Management Training for Staff Working in Learning Disability Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Ellen; Dodd, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Following Beacroft & Dodd's (2009) audit of pain recognition and management within learning disability services in Surrey, it was recommended that learning disability services should receive training in pain recognition and management. Two hundred and seventy-five services were invited to participate, of which 197 services in Surrey accepted and…

  18. A New Taxonomy of Cognitive Strategies for the Management of Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Ephrem P.

    This paper presents cognitive strategies as one major approach to pain management. They are discussed as part of a trimodal system of pain management that also includes behavioral manipulations and physical intervention. The need for a standardized classification to deal with terminological inconsistency in the literature on cognitive management…

  19. Primary Care Management of Chronic Nonmalignant Pain in Veterans: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Jorge G.; Qadri, S. Sobiya; Nader, Samir; Wang, Jia; Lawler, Timothy; Hagenlocker, Brian; Roos, Bernard A.

    2010-01-01

    Clinicians managing older patients with chronic pain play an important role. This paper explores the attitudes of primary care clinicians (PCPs) toward chronic nonmalignant pain management and their experiences using a clinical decision support system. Our investigation followed a qualitative approach based on grounded theory. Twenty-one PCPs…

  20. An Action Research Study Exploring How Education May Enhance Pain Management in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Joan M.

    2002-01-01

    Focus groups (n=14) and a study day (n=10) on pain management for child patients were held for pediatric nurses. Participants felt they increased their knowledge of pharmacology and their confidence and assertiveness in the practice of pain management. (Contains 37 references.) (SK)

  1. Effectiveness of an interprofessional workshop on pain management for medical and nursing students.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Jeanne M; Brashers, Valentina; Owen, John; Marks, Jennifer R; Thomas, Shannon M

    2016-07-01

    Interprofessional (IP) care is critical for effective pain management, but evidence is lacking about the best way to teach pain management skills to medical and nursing students using IP strategies. In 2013 and 2014, 307 medical and 169 nursing students participated in an IP case-based pain management workshop. The aims of this study were to determine (1) if students who participate in IP case-based learning groups will have improved pain management skills compared to students who participate in uniprofessional case-based learning groups, and (2) if students mentored by faculty with IP training will have improved pain management skills compared to students who are not mentored by IP-trained faculty. Student learning was assessed and compared using scored checklists for each group's pain management plans. Findings show that IP mentorship and IP group participation improved medical students' pain management skills but did not have the same effect on nursing student performance. Continued work is needed to develop, refine, and integrate innovative and tailored IP strategies into the curricula of medical and nursing schools to advance the pain management competencies of students before they enter clinical practice. PMID:27268513

  2. Evidence-Based Evaluation of Complementary Health Approaches for Pain Management in the United States.

    PubMed

    Nahin, Richard L; Boineau, Robin; Khalsa, Partap S; Stussman, Barbara J; Weber, Wendy J

    2016-09-01

    Although most pain is acute and resolves within a few days or weeks, millions of Americans have persistent or recurring pain that may become chronic and debilitating. Medications may provide only partial relief from this chronic pain and can be associated with unwanted effects. As a result, many individuals turn to complementary health approaches as part of their pain management strategy. This article examines the clinical trial evidence for the efficacy and safety of several specific approaches-acupuncture, manipulation, massage therapy, relaxation techniques including meditation, selected natural product supplements (chondroitin, glucosamine, methylsulfonylmethane, S-adenosylmethionine), tai chi, and yoga-as used to manage chronic pain and related disability associated with back pain, fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, neck pain, and severe headaches or migraines. PMID:27594189

  3. Empowering Patients with Persistent Pain Using an Internet-based Self-Management Program.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Marian; Roll, John M; Corbett, Cynthia; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina

    2015-08-01

    New strategies are needed to improve access to cognitive and behavioral therapies for patients with persistent pain. The purpose of this randomized, controlled trial was to determine the effectiveness of the Chronic Pain Management Program, an 8-week online intervention targeting cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and social pain determinants. Program efficacy and engagement was evaluated for 92 individuals with a diagnosis of chronic noncancer pain who had a current opioid prescription. Participants were recruited from primary care practices and Internet sites, then randomly assigned to receive access to the intervention either immediately (treatment group) or after an 8-week delay (wait-list comparison). Biweekly self-report measurements were collected using online surveys on pain, depressive symptoms, pain self-management behaviors, and health care utilization during the 8-week trial. Additional measurements of opioid misuse behaviors, pain self-efficacy, and medicine regimens were completed at baseline and week 8. Engagement was evaluated by examining completion of program learning modules. The results from analysis of variance showed that at week 8, the treatment group had significantly greater improvements on pain self-efficacy and opioid misuse measures than the wait-list comparison group. Engagement level was positively associated with improvements in pain intensity, pain interference, and pain self-efficacy. In conclusion, patients on opioids were able to engage and demonstrate positive outcomes using an Internet-based self-management program. Future efforts toward heightening engagement could further maximize impacts. PMID:26088940

  4. Pain management in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: insights for the clinician

    PubMed Central

    Srinath, Arvind Iyengar; Walter, Chelsea; Newara, Melissa C.

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal pain is a common symptom in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and has a profound negative impact on patients’ lives. There are growing data suggesting that pain is variably related to the degree of active inflammation. Given the multifactorial etiologies underlying the pain, the treatment of abdominal pain in the IBD population is best accomplished by individualized plans. This review covers four clinically relevant categories of abdominal pain in patients with IBD, namely, inflammation, surgical complications, bacterial overgrowth, and neurobiological processes and how pain management can be addressed in each of these cases. The role of genetic factors, psychological factors, and psychosocial stress in pain perception and treatment will also be addressed. Lastly, psychosocial, pharmacological, and procedural pain management techniques will be discussed. An extensive review of the existing literature reveals a paucity of data regarding pain management specific to IBD. In addition, there is growing consensus suggesting a spectrum between IBD and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms. Thus, this review for adult and pediatric clinicians also incorporates the literature for the treatment of functional abdominal pain and the clinical consensus from IBD and IBS experts on pharmacological, behavioral, and procedural methods to treat abdominal pain in this population. PMID:22973418

  5. Neuropathic Pain Management: A Reference for the Clinical Nurse.

    PubMed

    Blumstein, Bree; Barkley, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    The International Association for the Study of Pain neuropathic pain guidelines are presented. Nursing considerations, including neuropathic pain assessment and medication efficacy, are reported to explain medications' primary mechanisms of action and provide a nursing reference for patient education. PMID:26863700

  6. Pain: Its Diagnosis and Management in the Rehabilitation of Horses.

    PubMed

    Daglish, Jodie; Mama, Khursheed R

    2016-04-01

    This article provides a brief overview of pain physiology and its relevance to equine patients. Objective and subjective techniques for assessing pain in the horse are described in depth. Pharmacologic and interventional pain modulation treatments are discussed with a focus on the rehabilitating horse. PMID:27012506

  7. UNEXPLAINED VISCERAL PAIN IN CHILDREN: PATHOPHYSIOLOGY, CLINICAL FEATURES AND MANAGEMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many children experience recurrent episodes of abdominal pain, but it is unclear why this occurs. This article reviews our present understanding of this common condition and how it sometimes can relate to diet, inherent pain sensing ability, and the influence of how the parents perceive pain....

  8. Pain Assessment and Management in Nursing Education Using Computer-based Simulations.

    PubMed

    Romero-Hall, Enilda

    2015-08-01

    It is very important for nurses to have a clear understanding of the patient's pain experience and of management strategies. However, a review of the nursing literature shows that one of the main barriers to proper pain management practice is lack of knowledge. Nursing schools are in a unique position to address the gap in pain management knowledge by facilitating the acquisition and use of knowledge by the next generation of nurses. The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of computer-based simulations as a reliable educational technology strategy that can enhance the learning experience of nursing students acquiring pain management knowledge and practice. Computer-based simulations provide a significant number of learning affordances that can help change nursing students' attitudes and behaviors toward and practice of pain assessment and management. PMID:26256223

  9. Provision of training in chronic pain management for specialist registrars in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Huggins, L J; Ward, S P; Stannard, C F

    1999-08-01

    A study published in 1992 highlighted wide variations in the provision of training in pain management. In this survey, data were collected from both pain clinicians and Programme Directors of the Schools of Anaesthesia to see if there had been any changes in training patterns since the introduction of the Calman training scheme. There did not seem to be a uniform improvement in the provision of training in pain management for Specialist Registrars and many may reach their Certificate of Completion of Specialist Training without a basic knowledge of chronic pain. It is thought that at the present time there will be few Specialist Registrars with sufficient training to take up consultant posts in pain management unless they compete for the much sought after, and often not fully funded, pain fellowships outside their rotations. PMID:10460528

  10. Chronic pain management in dermatology: pharmacotherapy and therapeutic monitoring with opioid analgesia.

    PubMed

    Enamandram, Monica; Rathmell, James P; Kimball, Alexandra B

    2015-10-01

    A number of chronic dermatologic conditions may necessitate long-term adjunctive pain management in addition to treatment of the primary skin disease, such as hidradenitis suppurativa, lichen planus, and other systemic diseases associated with significant pain. Adequate management of chronic pain can represent a unique challenge, but remains an integral component of clinical treatment in relevant contexts. For nociceptive pain of moderate to severe intensity, opioid analgesics can be beneficial when other pain management strategies have failed to produce adequate relief. The decision to initiate long-term opioid therapy must be carefully weighed, and individualized treatment plans are often necessary to effectively treat pain while minimizing adverse effects. Part II of this 2-part continuing medical education article will describe the appropriate settings for initiation of opioid analgesia for dermatology patients and detail therapeutic strategies and patient monitoring guidelines. PMID:26369841

  11. Postoperative Pain Management among Surgically Treated Patients in an Ethiopian Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Woldehaimanot, Tewodros Eyob; Eshetie, Tesfahun Chanie; Kerie, Mirkuzie Woldie

    2014-01-01

    Background Incidence of postoperative pain has been reported to be between 47–100%. Ineffective postoperative pain management results in tangible and intangible costs. The purpose of this study was to assess the processes and outcomes of pain management in the surgical wards of Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Ethiopia. Methods and Findings A prospective cross sectional study was conducted among 252 postoperative patients during February 13 to April 30, 2012. A contextually modified and validated (Cronbach’s α coefficient of 0.78) American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire was used to assess pain experience of patients. Patients’ charts were reviewed to assess the pattern of analgesic use. Incidence of postoperative pain was 91.4%, and remained high over 3 measurements (McNemar’s; p<0.05), and 80.1% of the patients were undertreated. The mean pain intensity, and pain interference on functional status were 6.72±1.44 and 5.61±1.13 on a 10 point Numerical rating scale respectively; both being strongly correlated(r = 0.86: p<0.001). Pain intensity was varied by ethnicity, education and preoperative information (ANOVA; P<0.05). Only 50% of the patients were adequately satisfied with their pain management. As needed (prn), solo analgesic, null analgesic, and intramuscular orders were noted for 31.3%, 89.29%, 9.7% and 20.1% of the prescription orders respectively. Though under dose, diclofenac and tramadol were the top prescribed medications, and only 57% of their dose was administered. Linear regression model showed that the predictors of satisfaction were sex of an individual and pain interference with functional status. Conclusion Despite patients’ paradoxical high satisfaction with pain management, the majority of patients were inadequately and inappropriately treated. Thus, further research is needed to determine how best to break down current barriers to effective pain management. PMID:25033399

  12. Fluoroscopic caudal epidural injections in managing chronic axial low back pain without disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A; McManus, Carla D; Pampati, Vidyasagar

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic low back pain without disc herniation is common. Various modalities of treatments are utilized in managing this condition, including epidural injections. However, there is continued debate on the effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity of any treatment modality utilized for managing axial or discogenic pain, including epidural injections. Methods A randomized, double-blind, actively controlled trial was conducted. The objective was to evaluate the ability to assess the effectiveness of caudal epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for managing chronic low back pain not caused by disc herniation, radiculitis, facet joints, or sacroiliac joints. A total of 120 patients were randomized to two groups; one group did not receive steroids (group 1) and the other group did (group 2). There were 60 patients in each group. The primary outcome measure was at least 50% improvement in Numeric Rating Scale and Oswestry Disability Index. Secondary outcome measures were employment status and opioid intake. These measures were assessed at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after treatment. Results Significant pain relief and functional status improvement (primary outcome) defined as a 50% or more reduction in scores from baseline, were observed in 54% of patients in group 1 and 60% of patients in group 2 at 24 months. In contrast, 84% of patients in group 1 and 73% in group 2 saw significant pain relief and functional status improvement in the successful groups at 24 months. Conclusion Caudal epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids are effective in patients with chronic axial low back pain of discogenic origin without facet joint pain, disc herniation, and/or radiculitis. PMID:23091395

  13. The role of nurses in comprehensive care management of pregnant women with drug addiction.

    PubMed

    McKeever, Amy E; Spaeth-Brayton, Sylvia; Sheerin, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Drug addiction during pregnancy is a complex health and social issue that requires an interdisciplinary health care team providing nonjudgmental, comprehensive care. Critical challenges include onset of and attendance at prenatal care, potential obstetric complications, transition to extrauterine life and potential neonatal abstinence syndrome for the neonate, newborn feeding issues, postpartum depression and risk of relapse for women. PMID:25145717

  14. Loin Pain Haematuria Syndrome - A Narrative Review of Pain Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Loin pain haematuria syndrome (LPHS) is an uncommon clinical entity that has divided renal physicians, pain practitioners, and even psychiatrists since its initial description. A relative paucity of data exists regarding the condition, with best practice guidelines lacking amid the existing threads of anecdotal experiences and variable follow-up observations. The aim of this article was to review the cumulative published experience of pain relief strategies for LPHS. PMID:27103962

  15. Chronic Stress, Cortisol Dysfunction, and Pain: A Psychoneuroendocrine Rationale for Stress Management in Pain Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a primary symptom driving patients to seek physical therapy, and its attenuation commonly defines a successful outcome. A large body of evidence is dedicated to elucidating the relationship between chronic stress and pain; however, stress is rarely addressed in pain rehabilitation. A physiologic stress response may be evoked by fear or perceived threat to safety, status, or well-being and elicits the secretion of sympathetic catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinepherine) and neuroendocrine hormones (cortisol) to promote survival and motivate success. Cortisol is a potent anti-inflammatory that functions to mobilize glucose reserves for energy and modulate inflammation. Cortisol also may facilitate the consolidation of fear-based memories for future survival and avoidance of danger. Although short-term stress may be adaptive, maladaptive responses (eg, magnification, rumination, helplessness) to pain or non–pain-related stressors may intensify cortisol secretion and condition a sensitized physiologic stress response that is readily recruited. Ultimately, a prolonged or exaggerated stress response may perpetuate cortisol dysfunction, widespread inflammation, and pain. Stress may be unavoidable in life, and challenges are inherent to success; however, humans have the capability to modify what they perceive as stressful and how they respond to it. Exaggerated psychological responses (eg, catastrophizing) following maladaptive cognitive appraisals of potential stressors as threatening may exacerbate cortisol secretion and facilitate the consolidation of fear-based memories of pain or non–pain-related stressors; however, coping, cognitive reappraisal, or confrontation of stressors may minimize cortisol secretion and prevent chronic, recurrent pain. Given the parallel mechanisms underlying the physiologic effects of a maladaptive response to pain and non–pain-related stressors, physical therapists should consider screening for non–pain-related stress to

  16. Managing Chronic Pain in Special Populations with Emphasis on Pediatric, Geriatric, and Drug Abuser Populations.

    PubMed

    Baumbauer, Kyle M; Young, Erin E; Starkweather, Angela R; Guite, Jessica W; Russell, Beth S; Manworren, Renee C B

    2016-01-01

    In the adult population chronic pain can lead to loss of productivity and earning potential, and decreased quality of life. There are distinct groups with increased vulnerability for the emergence of chronic pain. These groups may be defined by developmental status and/or life circumstances. Within the pediatric, geriatric, and drug abuser populations, chronic pain represents a significant health issue. This article focuses on known anatomic, physiologic, and genetic mechanisms underlying chronic pain in these populations, and highlights the need for a multimodal approach from multiple health care professionals for management of chronic pain in those with the most risk. PMID:26614727

  17. Advanced Concepts and Controversies in Emergency Department Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Motov, Sergey M; Nelson, Lewis S

    2016-06-01

    Pain is the most common complaint for which patients come to the emergency department (ED). Emergency physicians are responsible for pain relief in a timely, efficient, and safe manner in the ED. The improvement in our understanding of the neurobiology of pain has balanced the utilization of nonopioid and opioid analgesia, and simultaneously has led to more rational and safer opioid prescribing practices. This article reviews advances in pain management in the ED for patients with acute and chronic pain as well as describes several newer strategies and controversies. PMID:27208710

  18. Canadian Orofacial Pain Team workshop report on the global year against orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Lavigne, Gilles J; Sessle, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    The year 2013-2014 has been designated the Global Year Against Orofacial Pain by the International Association for the Study of Pain. Accordingly, a multidisciplinary Canadian and international group of clinical, research and knowledge-transfer experts attended a workshop in Montreal, Quebec. The workshop had two aims: to identify new pathways for innovative diagnosis and management of chronic orofacial pain states; and to identify opportunities for further collaborative orofacial pain research and education in Canada. Three topics related to chronic orofacial pain were explored: biomarkers and pain signatures for chronic orofacial pain; misuse of analgesic and opioid pain medications for managing chronic orofacial pain; and complementary alternative medicine, topical agents and the role of stress in chronic orofacial pain. It was determined that further research is needed to: identify biomarkers of chronic orofacial post-traumatic neuropathic pain, with a focus on psychosocial, physiological and chemical-genetic factors; validate the short- and long-term safety (i.e., no harm to health, and avoidance of misuse and addiction) of opioid use for two distinct conditions (acute and chronic orofacial pain, respectively); and promote the use of topical medications as an alternative treatment in dentistry, and further document the benefits and safety of complementary and alternative medicine, including stress management, in dentistry. It was proposed that burning mouth syndrome, a painful condition that is not uncommon and affects mainly postmenopausal women, should receive particular attention. PMID:25522352

  19. Canadian Orofacial Pain Team workshop report on the Global Year Against Orofacial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lavigne, Gilles J; Sessle, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    The year 2013–2014 has been designated the Global Year Against Orofacial Pain by the International Association for the Study of Pain. Accordingly, a multidisciplinary Canadian and international group of clinical, research and knowledge-transfer experts attended a workshop in Montreal, Quebec. The workshop had two aims: to identify new pathways for innovative diagnosis and management of chronic orofacial pain states; and to identify opportunities for further collaborative orofacial pain research and education in Canada. Three topics related to chronic orofacial pain were explored: biomarkers and pain signatures for chronic orofacial pain; misuse of analgesic and opioid pain medications for managing chronic orofacial pain; and complementary alternative medicine, topical agents and the role of stress in chronic orofacial pain. It was determined that further research is needed to: identify biomarkers of chronic orofacial post-traumatic neuropathic pain, with a focus on psychosocial, physiological and chemical-genetic factors; validate the short-and long-term safety (ie, no harm to health, and avoidance of misuse and addiction) of opioid use for two distinct conditions (acute and chronic orofacial pain, respectively); and promote the use of topical medications as an alternative treatment in dentistry, and further document the benefits and safety of complementary and alternative medicine, including stress management, in dentistry. It was proposed that burning mouth syndrome, a painful condition that is not uncommon and affects mainly postmenopausal women, should receive particular attention. PMID:25522352

  20. Pharmacological management of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Baastrup, Cathrine; Finnerup, Nanna B

    2008-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) has a number of severe and disabling consequences, including chronic pain, and around 40% of patients develop persistent neuropathic pain. Pain following SCI has a detrimental impact on the patient's quality of life and is a major specific healthcare problem in its own right. Thus far, there is no cure for the pain and oral pharmaceutical intervention is often inadequate, commonly resulting in a reduction of only 20-30% in pain intensity. Neuropathic pain sensations are characterized by spontaneous persistent pain and a range of abnormally evoked responses, e.g. allodynia (pain evoked by normally non-noxious stimuli) and hyperalgesia (an increased response to noxious stimuli). Neuropathic pain following SCI may be present at or below the level of injury. Oral pharmacological agents used in the treatment of neuropathic pain act either by depressing neuronal activity, by blocking sodium channels or inhibiting calcium channels, by increasing inhibition via GABA agonists, by serotonergic and noradrenergic reuptake inhibition, or by decreasing activation via glutamate receptor inhibition, especially by blocking the NMDA receptor. At present, only ten randomized, double-blind, controlled trials have been performed on oral drug treatment of pain after SCI, the results of most of which were negative. The studies included antidepressants (amitriptyline and trazodone), antiepileptics (gabapentin, pregabalin, lamotrigine and valproate) and mexiletine. Gabapentin, pregabalin and amitriptyline showed a significant reduction in neuropathic pain following SCI. Cannabinoids have been found to relieve other types of central pain, and serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors as well as opioids relieve peripheral neuropathic pain and may be used to treat patients with SCI pain. PMID:18484790

  1. Post-Operative Pain Management Practices in Patients with Dementia - The Current Situation in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, Maija; Kankkunen, Päivi; Kvist, Tarja; Hartikainen, Sirpa

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe current post-operative pain management practices for patients with dementia and hip fracture in Finland. Older adults with hip fracture are at high risk of under treatment for pain, especially if they also have a cognitive disorder at the stage of dementia. Previous studies have provided limited information about the quality of acute pain treatment for persons with dementia. In this study data concerning current pain management practices was collected by questionnaire from 333 nursing staff. They worked in surgical wards of seven universities and ten city-centre hospitals. The response rate to the questionnaire was 53%. The data was analysed using factor analysis and parametric methods. Half the respondents (53%) considered that post-operative pain management was sufficient for patients with dementia. Less than one third of respondent nurses reported that pain scales were in use on their unit: the most commonly used scale was VAS. The use of pain scales was significantly related to the respondents’ opinion of the sufficiency of post-operative pain management in this patient group (p<0.001). The findings can be utilised in nursing practice and research when planning suitable complementary educational interventions for nursing staff of surgical wards. Further research is needed to explain the current situation of pain management practices from the viewpoint of patients with dementia. PMID:22723810

  2. Cancer-related pain management in clinical oncology.

    PubMed

    Cipta, Andre M; Pietras, Christopher J; Weiss, Timothy E; Strouse, Thomas B

    2015-10-01

    Uncontrolled pain is one of the most feared and debilitating symptoms among cancer patients, and many suffer unnecessarily from suboptimal pain control. Cancer-related pain is often multidimensional and can affect all aspects of a patient's life. Hence, achieving adequate pain relief among cancer patients involves a proper assessment of psychosocial, spiritual, and physical pain issues, matched with an individualized treatment plan involving pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic, and procedural therapies when appropriate. Providing effective pain relief can help ease the overall burden of disease among oncology patients while helping them tolerate cancer-directed therapies and achieve the most optimal quality of life throughout all phases of the disease continuum. In this review, the authors will discuss the syndromes, assessment of, and treatment for cancer-related pain in the outpatient setting. PMID:26862909

  3. Back pain: Prevention and management in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Schaafsma, Frederieke G; Anema, Johannes R; van der Beek, Allard J

    2015-06-01

    Despite all the efforts in studying work-related risk factors for low back pain (LBP), interventions targeting these risk factors to prevent LBP have no proven cost-effectiveness. Even with adequate implementation strategies for these interventions on group level, these did not result in the reduction of incident LBP. Physical exercise, however, does have a primary preventive effect on LBP. For secondary prevention, it seems that there are more opportunities to cost-effectively intervene in reducing the risk of long-term sickness absence due to LBP. Starting at the earliest moment possible with proper assessment of risk factors for long-term sickness absence related to the individual, the underlying mechanisms of the LBP, and also factors related to the workplace by a well-trained clinician, may increase the potential of effective return to work (RTW) management. More research on how to overcome barriers in the uptake of these effective interventions in relation to policy-specific environments, and with regard to proper financing of RTW management is necessary. PMID:26612243

  4. Implications of fraud and abuse in interventional pain management.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2002-07-01

    The federal government has enacted a comprehensive strategy to fight healthcare waste, fraud and abuse. As a result of the federal government's comprehensive strategy, in 2002, the Office of Inspector General announced that improper Medicare payments to doctors, hospitals and other healthcare providers declined 54% from the fiscal year 1996 to the fiscal year 2001. The Office of Inspector General in its 2002 work plan focuses on procedure coding for outpatient services billed by hospital and doctor, coding for evaluation and management services in physician offices and conditions under which a doctor's bill is "incident to" services or supplies among other things. The distinction between fraud and abuse can be very important in determining the potential fines and penalties that might apply, even though it is not clear. Fraud is much more serious than abuse. The degree of intent by the individual or entity under investigation is often the determining factor. The most commonly used statutes for prosecuting or facilitating such a prosecution of healthcare fraud or abuse include HIPAA of 1996, the False Claims Act, healthcare fraud, theft or embezzlement, obstruction of criminal investigations of healthcare offenders, the False Statement Statute, mail and wire fraud statutes, the Social Security Act Civil Monetary Penalties, criminal penalties, and/or Stark laws. This review focuses on various aspects of implications of fraud and abuse in interventional pain management practices including various activities of potential fraud and abuse. PMID:16902658

  5. Medicare in interventional pain management: A critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2006-07-01

    Recent years have been quite eventful for interventional pain physicians with numerous changes in the Medicare payment system with a view for the future and what it holds for interventional pain management for 2006 and beyond. On February 8, 2006, President Bush signed the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005, which cuts the federal budget by 39 billion dollars and Medicare and Medicaid by almost 11 billion dollars over five years. The Act contains a number of important provisions that effect physicians in general and interventional pain physicians in particular. This Act provides one year, 0% conversion factor update in payments for physicians services in 2006. Medicare has four programs or parts, namely Medicare Parts A, B, C, and D, and two funds to pay providers for serving beneficiaries in each of these program. Part B helps pay for physician, outpatient hospital, home health, and other services for the aged and disabled who have voluntarily enrolled. Before 1922, the fees that Medicare paid for those services were largely based on physician's historical charges. Despite Congress's actions of freezing or limiting the fee increases, spending continued to rise because of increases in the volume and intensity of physician services. Medicare spending per beneficiary for physician services grew at an average annual rate of 11.6% from 1980 through 1991. Consequently Congress was forced to reform the way that Medicare sets physician fees, due to ineffectiveness of the fee controls and reductions. The sustained growth rate (SGR) system was established because of the concern that the fee schedule itself would not adequately constrain increases in spending for physicians' services. The law specifies a formula for calculating the SGR, based on changes in four factors: (1) estimated changes in fees; (2) estimated change in the average number of Part B enrollees (excluding Medicare Advantage beneficiaries); (3) estimated projected growth in real gross domestic product (GDP

  6. Opioids, adjuvants, and interventional options for pain management of symptomatic metastases.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amrita; Berger, Ann

    2014-07-01

    Cancer pain is a complex issue that unfortunately affects a majority of cancer patients, the assessment and treatment of which are equally essential in alleviating many facets of this pain. The objective of this section is to address the many facets of cancer pain: its assessment, management, and its varied treatment modalities. We will discuss characteristics of pain, essential aspects of the patient interview, and management using opioids, adjuvants, and interventional and invasive strategies as well as side effects of these techniques. Many of these modalities are used for palliation but may and should be used in cancer patients who experience side effects from both their cancer and their chemotherapeutics. PMID:25841694

  7. Cancer Pain: A Critical Review of Mechanism-based Classification and Physical Therapy Management in Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Senthil P

    2011-01-01

    Mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management of pain is essential to effectively manage painful symptoms in patients attending palliative care. The objective of this review is to provide a detailed review of mechanism-based classification and physical therapy management of patients with cancer pain. Cancer pain can be classified based upon pain symptoms, pain mechanisms and pain syndromes. Classification based upon mechanisms not only addresses the underlying pathophysiology but also provides us with an understanding behind patient's symptoms and treatment responses. Existing evidence suggests that the five mechanisms – central sensitization, peripheral sensitization, sympathetically maintained pain, nociceptive and cognitive-affective – operate in patients with cancer pain. Summary of studies showing evidence for physical therapy treatment methods for cancer pain follows with suggested therapeutic implications. Effective palliative physical therapy care using a mechanism-based classification model should be tailored to suit each patient's findings, using a biopsychosocial model of pain. PMID:21976851

  8. The Rationale for Exercise in the Management of Pain in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Natalie E.; Moloney, Niamh; van Vliet, Vanessa; Canning, Colleen G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pain is a distressing non-motor symptom experienced by up to 85% of people with Parkinson’s disease (PD), yet it is often untreated. This pain is likely to be influenced by many factors, including the disease process, PD impairments as well as co-existing musculoskeletal and/or neuropathic pain conditions. Expert opinion recommends that exercise is included as one component of pain management programs; however, the effect of exercise on pain in this population is unclear. This review presents evidence describing the potential influence of exercise on the pain-related pathophysiological processes present in PD. Emerging evidence from both animal and human studies suggests that exercise might contribute to neuroplasticity and neuro-restoration by increasing brain neurotrophic factors, synaptic strength and angiogenesis, as well as stimulating neurogenesis and improving metabolism and the immune response. These changes may be beneficial in improving the central processing of pain. There is also evidence that exercise can activate both the dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic pain inhibitory pathways, suggesting that exercise may help to modulate the experience of pain in PD. Whilst clinical data on the effects of exercise for pain relief in people with PD are scarce, and are urgently needed, preliminary guidelines are presented for exercise prescription for the management of central neuropathic, peripheral neuropathic and musculoskeletal pain in PD. PMID:25649828

  9. Stepped care model of pain management and quality of pain care in long-term opioid therapy.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brent A; Anderson, Daren; Dorflinger, Lindsey; Zlateva, Ianita; Lee, Allison; Gilliam, Wesley; Tian, Terrence; Khatri, Khushbu; Ruser, Christopher B; Kerns, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    Successful organizational improvement processes depend on application of reliable metrics to establish targets and to monitor progress. This study examined the utility of the Pain Care Quality (PCQ) extraction tool in evaluating implementation of the Stepped Care Model for Pain Management at one Veterans Health Administration (VHA) healthcare system over 4 yr and in a non-VHA Federally qualified health center (FQHC) over 2 yr. Two hundred progress notes per year from VHA and 150 notes per year from FQHC primary care prescribers of long-term opioid therapy (>90 consecutive days) were randomly sampled. Each note was coded for the presence or absence of key dimensions of PCQ (i.e., pain assessment, treatment plans, pain reassessment/outcomes, patient education). General estimating equations controlling for provider and facility were used to examine changes in PCQ items over time. Improvements in the VHA were noted in pain reassessment and patient education, with trends in positive directions for all dimensions. Results suggest that the PCQ extraction tool is feasible and may be responsive to efforts to promote organizational improvements in pain care. Future research is indicated to improve the reliability of the PCQ extraction tool and enhance its usability. PMID:27006068

  10. Carpal tunnel syndrome, diabetic neuropathy, fibromyalgia, glucosamine and chondroitin, hypnosis in pain management, marijuana for pain.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Scott M

    2007-01-01

    This feature presents information for patients in a question and answer format. It is written to simulate actual questions that many pain patients ask and to provide answers in a context and language that most pain patients will comprehend. Issues addressed in this issue are carpel tunnel syndrome, fibromyalgia, glucosamine and chondroitin, hypnosis, marijuana. PMID:17844729

  11. Perioperative Pain Management in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Korean Hip Society Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeesuk; Cho, Hong-Man; Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Pil Whan; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Moon, Kyong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Effective perioperative pain management techniques and accelerated rehabilitation programs can improve health-related quality of life and functional status of patients after total hip arthroplasty. Traditionally, postoperative analgesia following arthroplasty was provided by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia or epidural analgesia. Recently, peripheral nerve blockade has emerged alternative analgesic approach. Multimodal analgesia strategy combines analgesics with different mechanisms of action to improve pain management. Intraoperative periarticular injection of multimodal drugs is one of the most important procedures in perioperative pain control for total hip arthroplasty. The goal of this review article is to provide a concise overview of the principles of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the perioperative pain management for total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27536639

  12. Perioperative Pain Management in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Korean Hip Society Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Min, Byung-Woo; Kim, Yeesuk; Cho, Hong-Man; Park, Kyung-Soon; Yoon, Pil Whan; Nho, Jae-Hwi; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Moon, Kyong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Effective perioperative pain management techniques and accelerated rehabilitation programs can improve health-related quality of life and functional status of patients after total hip arthroplasty. Traditionally, postoperative analgesia following arthroplasty was provided by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia or epidural analgesia. Recently, peripheral nerve blockade has emerged alternative analgesic approach. Multimodal analgesia strategy combines analgesics with different mechanisms of action to improve pain management. Intraoperative periarticular injection of multimodal drugs is one of the most important procedures in perioperative pain control for total hip arthroplasty. The goal of this review article is to provide a concise overview of the principles of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the perioperative pain management for total hip arthroplasty. PMID:27536639

  13. Pain Management in Long-Term Care Communities: A Quality Improvement Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Cary; O’Neil, Kevin W.; Dancy, JaNeen; Berry, Carolyn A.; Stowell, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Pain is underrecognized and undertreated in the long-term care (LTC) setting. To improve the management of pain for LTC residents, the authors implemented a quality improvement (QI) initiative at one LTC facility. They conducted a needs assessment to identify areas for improvement and designed a 2-hour educational workshop for facility staff and local clinicians. Participants were asked to complete a survey before and after the workshop, which showed significant improvement in their knowledge of pain management and confidence in their ability to recognize and manage residents’ pain. To measure the effectiveness of the QI initiative, the authors performed a chart review at baseline and at 3 and 8 months after the workshop and evaluated relevant indicators of adequate pain assessment and management. The post-workshop chart reviews showed significant improvement in how consistently employees documented pain characteristics (ie, location, intensity, duration) in resident charts and in their use of targeted pain assessments for residents with cognitive dysfunction. The proportion of charts that included a documented plan for pain assessment was high at baseline and remained stable throughout the study. Overall, the findings suggest a QI initiative is an effective way to improve pain care practices in the LTC setting. PMID:25949232

  14. The ON-Q pain management system in elective gynecology oncologic surgery: Management of postoperative surgical site pain compared to intravenous patient-controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Dawn; Lee, Yoo Jin; Jo, Mi Hyun; Park, Hyun Jong; Lim, Ga Won; Cho, Hanbyoul; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Young Tae

    2013-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to compare postoperative surgical site pain in gynecologic cancer patients who underwent elective extended lower midline laparotomy and managed their pain with either the ON-Q pain management system (surgical incision site pain relief system, ON-Q pump) or an intravenous patient-controlled analgesia pump (IV PCA). Methods Twenty gynecologic cancer patients who underwent elective extended lower midline laparotomy were divided into two groups. One group received a 72-hour continuous wound perfusion of the local anesthetic ropivacaine (0.5%, study group) into the supraperitoneal layer of the abdominal incision through the ON-Q pump. The other group received intravenous infusion pump of patient-controlled analgesia (fentanyl citrate 20 mg/mL · kg+ondansetron hydrochloride 16 mg/8 mL+normal saline). Postoperative pain was assessed immediately and at 6, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours after surgery using the visual analogue scale. Results Postoperative surgical site pain scores at 24, 48, and 72 hours after surgery were lower in the ON-Q group than the IV PCA group. Pain scores at 24 hours and 48 hours after surgery were significantly different between the two groups (P=0.023, P<0.001). Overall painkiller administration was higher in the ON-Q group but this difference was not statistically significant (5.1 vs. 4.3, P=0.481). Conclusion This study revealed that the ON-Q pain management system is a more effective approach than IV PCA for acute postoperative surgical site pain relief after extended lower midline laparotomy in gynecologic cancer patients. PMID:24327987

  15. Focused suggestion with somatic anchoring technique: rapid self-hypnosis for pain management.

    PubMed

    Donatone, Brooke

    2013-04-01

    This article details a self-hypnosis technique designed to teach patients how to manage acute or chronic pain through directed focus. The focused suggestion with somatic anchoring technique has been used with various types of pain, including somatic pain (arthritis, post-injury pain from bone breaks, or muscle tears), visceral pain (related to irritable bowel disease), and neuropathic pain (related to multiple sclerosis). This technique combines cognitive restructuring and mindfulness meditation with indirect and direct suggestions during hypnosis. The case examples demonstrate how the focused suggestion with somatic anchoring technique is used with both acute and chronic pain conditions when use of long-term medication has been relatively ineffective. PMID:23724568

  16. Hypnosis for the management of chronic and cancer procedure-related pain in children.

    PubMed

    Tomé-Pires, Catarina; Miró, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review published controlled trials of hypnotic treatments for chronic and cancer procedure-related pain in children. Trials were included if participants were 18 years of age or below, were randomized and had populations with chronic pain or cancer procedure-related pain. After the studies were assessed, 12 were selected for review. Although the evidence is limited, the findings indicate that hypnosis is an effective pain-control technique when used with children suffering from cancer procedure-related pain or chronic pain. Further research into the use of hypnosis to manage chronic pain in children should be a priority so that empirically based conclusions can be drawn about the effects of hypnosis on children. PMID:22917107

  17. Pain management following spinal surgeries: An appraisal of the available options

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Haldar, Rudrashish

    2015-01-01

    Spinal procedures are generally associated with intense pain in the postoperative period, especially for the initial few days. Adequate pain management in this period has been seen to correlate well with improved functional outcome, early ambulation, early discharge, and preventing the development of chronic pain. A diverse array of pharmacological options exists for the effective amelioration of post spinal surgery pain. Each of these drugs possesses inherent advantages and disadvantages which restricts their universal applicability. Therefore, combination therapy or multimodal analgesia for proper control of pain appears as the best approach in this regard. The current manuscript discussed the pathophysiology of postsurgical pain including its nature, the various tools for assessment, and the various pharmacological agents (both conventional and upcoming) available at our disposal to respond to post spinal surgery pain. PMID:26288544

  18. State of the science review: Advances in pain management in wounded service members over a decade at war.

    PubMed

    Clifford, John L; Fowler, Marcie; Hansen, Jacob J; Cheppudira, Bopiah; Nyland, Jennifer E; Salas, Margaux M; McGhee, Laura L; Petz, Lawrence N; Loyd, Dayna R

    2014-09-01

    The pain conditions and comorbidities experienced by injured service members and the challenge of pain management by the military medical system offer a unique opportunity to inform pain management and medical research. In this article, acute and chronic pain issues, current treatment options and limitations, as well as novel approaches to pain management are discussed within the context of combat casualty care, from the battlefield to hospitalization and rehabilitation. This review will also highlight the current pain management limitations that need to be addressed in future clinical and basic science research to improve care for our nation's injured service members. PMID:25159359

  19. Self-management and self-management support on functional ablement in chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Kawi, Jennifer

    2014-03-01

    This study examined self-management (SM), self-management support (SMS), and functional ablement in chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients and the role of SM in explaining the relationship of SMS to functional ablement. The pervasiveness of CLBP is alarming in today's health care. Although the literature is beginning to explicate the impact of SM and SMS in other chronic illnesses, these are yet to be clarified in CLBP. The adapted chronic care model guided this study. A nonexperimental, cross-sectional, descriptive design with mediation analysis was used. Through convenience sampling, 110 participants were recruited from two pain centers that used similar multimodal pain management practices. Although the findings showed lack of mediation, it was found that SM and SMS were strongly correlated. Furthermore, overall health was found to be a significant covariate to the functional ablement of CLBP patients. This study assists in advancing knowledge and contributing toward understanding SM, SMS, and functional ablement in CLBP. It is important to engage patients and health care providers in SM and SMS. More exploration is necessary to assess the influences of SM and SMS in CLBP outcomes toward improving the complex care of these patients. PMID:24602423

  20. Future directions for the management of pain in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sofat, Nidhi; Kuttapitiya, Anasuya

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the predominant form of arthritis worldwide, resulting in a high degree of functional impairment and reduced quality of life owing to chronic pain. To date, there are no treatments that are known to modify disease progression of OA in the long term. Current treatments are largely based on the modulation of pain, including NSAIDs, opiates and, more recently, centrally acting pharmacotherapies to avert pain. This review will focus on the rationale for new avenues in pain modulation, including inhibition with anti-NGF antibodies and centrally acting analgesics. The authors also consider the potential for structure modification in cartilage/bone using growth factors and stem cell therapies. The possible mismatch between structural change and pain perception will also be discussed, introducing recent techniques that may assist in improved patient phenotyping of pain subsets in OA. Such developments could help further stratify subgroups and treatments for people with OA in future. PMID:25018771

  1. Pain and Agitation Management in Critically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Julie; Wright, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Pain and agitation may be difficult to assess in a critically ill patient. Pain is best assessed by self-reporting pain scales; but in patients who are unable to communicate, behavioral pain scales seem to have benefit. Patients' sedation level should be assessed each shift and preferably by a validated ICU tool, such as the RASS or SAS scale. Pain is most appropriately treated with the use of opiates, and careful consideration should be given to the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of various analgesics to determine the optimal agent for each individual patient. Sedation levels should preferably remain light or with the use of a daily awakening trial. Preferred treatment of agitation is analgosedation with the addition of nonbenzodiazepine sedatives if necessary. There are risks associated with each agent used in the treatment of pain and agitation, and it is important to monitor patients for effectiveness, signs of toxicity, and adverse drug reactions. PMID:26897427

  2. Therapeutic Education in Improving Cancer Pain Management: A Synthesis of Available Studies.

    PubMed

    Prevost, Virginie; Delorme, Claire; Grach, Marie-Christine; Chvetzoff, Gisèle; Hureau, Magalie

    2016-07-01

    This literature review aims to synthesize available studies and to update findings in order to obtain a current, comprehensive estimate of the benefits of pain education. Forty-four original articles obtained from the PubMed database were analyzed to investigate which protocols could be most effective in improving pain management. Recent studies indicate a growing interest in evaluating patients' skills and attitudes; these include satisfaction with cancer pain treatment, patient-reported improvement, and patient participation-all of which could be dependable benchmarks for evaluating the effectiveness of educational programs. Besides pain measurement, recent studies advance support for the importance of assessing newly developed outcome criteria. In this sense, patients' active participation and decision making in their pain management are probably the most relevant goals of pain education. PMID:25991567

  3. Guidelines in the management of diabetic nerve pain: clinical utility of pregabalin

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, Aaron I; Casellini, Carolina M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes. It presents as a variety of syndromes for which there is no universally accepted unique classification. Sensorimotor polyneuropathy is the most common type, affecting about 30% of diabetic patients in hospital care and 25% of those in the community. Pain is the reason for 40% of patient visits in a primary care setting, and about 20% of these have had pain for greater than 6 months. Chronic pain may be nociceptive, which occurs as a result of disease or damage to tissue with no abnormality in the nervous system. In contrast, neuropathic pain is defined as “pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system.” Persistent neuropathic pain interferes significantly with quality of life, impairing sleep and recreation; it also significantly impacts emotional well-being, and is associated with depression, anxiety, and noncompliance with treatment. Painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a difficult-to-manage clinical problem, and patients with this condition are more apt to seek medical attention than those with other types of diabetic neuropathy. Early recognition of psychological problems is critical to the management of pain, and physicians need to go beyond the management of pain per se if they are to achieve success. This evidence-based review of the assessment of the patient with pain in diabetes addresses the state-of-the-art management of pain, recognizing all the conditions that produce pain in diabetes and the evidence in support of a variety of treatments currently available. A search of the full Medline database for the last 10 years was conducted in August 2012 using the terms painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, painful diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy, painful diabetic neuropathy and pain in diabetes. In addition, recent reviews addressing this issue were adopted as necessary. In particular, reports from the American Academy of

  4. Postoperative Pain Management in Children, Parental English Proficiency, and Access to Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Nathalia; Jackson, Douglass L.; Zhou, Chuan; Ayala, Nelly C.; Ebel, Beth E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Patients with limited English proficiency (LEP) are at risk for undertreated pain. The goal of this study was to examine the association between parental language proficiency, interpreted care, and postsurgical pediatric pain management. METHODS This was a retrospective matched cohort study among children <18 years of age. Children of LEP and English-proficient (EP) parents were matched according to age group, surgical procedure, and admission date. Mean number of daily pain assessments and mean daily pain scores were compared between language groups. We also compared the association between pain scores and type of medication given (opioid versus nonopioid). Within the LEP group, similar analyses compared pain assessment and treatment of children whose families received ≥2 professional interpretations per day versus those who received lower rates of interpretation. RESULTS A total of 474 children (237 LEP and 237 EP) were included in the study. Children of LEP parents had fewer pain assessments (mean: 7 [95% confidence interval: 2–13] vs 9 [95% confidence interval: 4–15]; P = .012), and higher levels of pain recorded before receiving opioid analgesics, compared with children of EP parents (P = .003). Within the LEP group, children with ≥2 interpretations per day had lower pain scores after medication administration (P < .05) and were more likely to receive opioids at pain levels similar to those of EP families. CONCLUSIONS Children of LEP parents received fewer pain assessments and were less likely to receive opioid analgesics for similar levels of pain compared with children of EP parents. More frequent use of professional interpreters when assessing pain may aid in reducing the gap in pain management between LEP and EP pediatric patients. PMID:24435597

  5. Limitations associated with managing chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Beland, Paul

    2016-04-20

    Non-specific chronic low back pain is an occupational hazard for nurses. It may result in persistent and disabling pain for some people. There are many techniques for investigating, assessing and treating chronic low back pain. However, research to support some of these interventions and the assumptions that underlie them is limited. Interventions that may be beneficial are not always available to those who need them. Changes to service provision are required to rectify this situation and provide effective treatment for patients with non-specific chronic low back pain. PMID:27097211

  6. Nonpharmacologic Pain Management Interventions in German Nursing Homes: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Sonja; Budnick, Andrea; Kuhnert, Ronny; Könner, Franziska; Kissel-Kröll, Angela; Kreutz, Reinhold; Dräger, Dagmar

    2015-08-01

    The reported prevalence of pain among nursing home residents (NHRs) is high. Insufficient use of analgesics, the conventional pain management strategy, is often reported. Whether and to what extent nonpharmacologic therapies (NPTs) are used to manage the pain of NHRs in Germany is largely unknown. The aim of this cluster-randomized trial was to assess the NPTs provided and to enhance the application and prescription of NPTs in NHRs on an individual level. There were six nursing homes in the intervention group and six in the control group. There were 239 NHRs, aged ≥65 years, with an average Mini-Mental State Examination score of at least 18 at baseline. Pain management interventions (cluster level) included an online course for physicians and 1-day seminar for nurses. Data on NPT applied by nurses and therapeutic NPT prescribed by physicians were obtained from residents' nursing documentation. Face-to-face interviews with NHRs assessed the NPT received. At baseline, 82.6% of NHR (mean age 83 years) were affected by pain, but less than 1 in 10 received NPT. The intervention did not result in a significant increase in the NPT applied by nurses, but did significantly increase the therapeutic NPT prescribed by physicians. Residents were active in using NPT to self-manage their pain. Given the prevalence of pain in NHRs, there is a clear need to improve pain management in this population. Extended use of NPT offers a promising approach. We recommend that nurses provide residents with education on pain-management techniques to support them in taking a proactive role in managing their pain. PMID:26256216

  7. Reiki as a pain management adjunct in screening colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Alda L; Sullivan, Mary E; Winter, Michael R

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of Reiki decreases the amount of meperidine administered to patients undergoing screening colonoscopy. The literature review reveals limited studies to show whether Reiki has been able to decrease the amount of opioid the patient receives during screening colonoscopy. A chart review of 300 patients was conducted to obtain baseline average doses of meperidine patients received as the control. Following the chart review, 30 patients were recruited to the Reiki study. Twenty-five of the study arm patients received Reiki in conjunction with meperidine. Five randomly chosen study arm patients received placebo Reiki in conjunction with meperidine in an attempt to blind the clinicians to the treatment received by the patients. Results showed that there were no significant differences in meperidine administration between the patients in the chart review group (control) and the Reiki group. The study revealed that 16% who received Reiki, together with intravenous administration of conscious sedation, received less than 50 mg of meperidine. All the patients in the chart review group received more than 50 mg of meperidine. Results from this pilot study suggest that there may be a decrease in meperidine needed during screening colonoscopy when patients receive Reiki treatments before the procedure. A larger study powered to detect smaller medication differences is the next step in more accurately determining the effect of Reiki on pain management. PMID:23018166

  8. Core Competencies for Pain Management: Results of an Interprofessional Consensus Summit

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Scott M; Young, Heather M; Lucas Arwood, Ellyn; Chou, Roger; Herr, Keela; Murinson, Beth B; Watt-Watson, Judy; Carr, Daniel B; Gordon, Debra B; Stevens, Bonnie J; Bakerjian, Debra; Ballantyne, Jane C; Courtenay, Molly; Djukic, Maja; Koebner, Ian J; Mongoven, Jennifer M; Paice, Judith A; Prasad, Ravi; Singh, Naileshni; Sluka, Kathleen A; St Marie, Barbara; Strassels, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this project was to develop core competencies in pain assessment and management for prelicensure health professional education. Such core pain competencies common to all prelicensure health professionals have not been previously reported. Methods An interprofessional executive committee led a consensus-building process to develop the core competencies. An in-depth literature review was conducted followed by engagement of an interprofessional Competency Advisory Committee to critique competencies through an iterative process. A 2-day summit was held so that consensus could be reached. Results The consensus-derived competencies were categorized within four domains: multidimensional nature of pain, pain assessment and measurement, management of pain, and context of pain management. These domains address the fundamental concepts and complexity of pain; how pain is observed and assessed; collaborative approaches to treatment options; and application of competencies across the life span in the context of various settings, populations, and care team models. A set of values and guiding principles are embedded within each domain. Conclusions These competencies can serve as a foundation for developing, defining, and revising curricula and as a resource for the creation of learning activities across health professions designed to advance care that effectively responds to pain. PMID:23577878

  9. Joining forces: Collaborating internationally to deliver high-quality, online postgraduate education in pain management

    PubMed Central

    Devonshire, Elizabeth; Siddall, Philip J

    2011-01-01

    The effective management of pain is a complex and costly global issue, requiring a range of innovative educational strategies to enable culturally appropriate and high-quality health care provision. In response to this issue, the Pain Management Research Institute at the University of Sydney (Sydney, Australia) has established several strategic alliances with other overseas universities to deliver online postgraduate education in pain management. The present article discusses the rationale for joining forces, and the approach adopted in creating and maintaining these alliances. It also provides insights into the benefits, challenges and opportunities associated with collaborative educational initiatives of this nature, from institutional, academic and student perspectives. PMID:22184549

  10. Joining forces: collaborating internationally to deliver high-quality, online postgraduate education in pain management.

    PubMed

    Devonshire, Elizabeth; Siddall, Philip

    2011-01-01

    The effective management of pain is a complex and costly global issue, requiring a range of innovative educational strategies to enable culturally appropriate and high-quality health care provision. In response to this issue, the Pain Management Research Institute at the University of Sydney (Sydney, Australia) has established several strategic alliances with other overseas universities to deliver online postgraduate education in pain management. The present article discusses the rationale for joining forces, and the approach adopted in creating and maintaining these alliances. It also provides insights into the benefits, challenges and opportunities associated with collaborative educational initiatives of this nature, from institutional, academic and student perspectives. PMID:22184549

  11. Non-pharmacologic management of pain in the person with cancer.

    PubMed

    Mayer, D K

    1985-07-01

    Management of pain in the person with cancer is a high priority in nursing. Although the actual incidence and severity is not well documented, pain may be experienced at some point by the majority of persons with cancer. Pharmacologic management, by itself, is often not adequate. Nurses must become familiar with non-pharmacologic interventions, to be used alone or in combination with analgesics, for the successful management of cancer pain. This paper discusses various non-pharmacologic options and includes a nursing protocol. More research is warranted to better define those most likely to benefit from these interventions. PMID:3900169

  12. Jordanian nurses' roles in the management of postoperative pain in the postanesthesia care unit.

    PubMed

    al-Hassan, M; Alkhalil, M S; al Ma'aitah, R

    1999-12-01

    One of the most important patient care issues for nurses is pain because of its significant impact on patients' well-being. Therefore, the main purpose of this exploratory study was to describe the role of Jordanian nurses in the management of postoperative pain in the PACU. A convenience sample of 42 postoperative patients was included in this study. Forty-two nurse-patient encounters involving 20 different nurses were observed during data collection. Findings from this study indicated that nurses in Jordan pay little attention to the area of assessment and management of postoperative pain. Cultural issues were discussed in light of the perception of pain and management of postoperative pain among Jordanian patients. Recommendations related to nursing practice, education, and research were developed to improve the quality of nursing care provided to postoperative patients in Jordan. PMID:10839078

  13. Pain Management for Elective Foot and Ankle Surgery: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Liu, George T; Mayo, Helen G; Joshi, Girish P

    2015-01-01

    Pain after foot and ankle surgery can significantly affect the postoperative outcomes. We performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials assessing postoperative pain after foot and ankle surgery, because the surgery will lead to moderate-to-severe postoperative pain, but the optimal pain therapy has been controversial. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials in English reporting on pain after foot and ankle surgery in adults published from January 1946 to February 2013 was performed. The primary outcome measure was the postoperative pain scores. The secondary outcome measures included supplemental analgesic requirements and other recovery outcomes. With 953 studies identified, 45 met the inclusion criteria. The approaches improving pain relief (reduced pain scores or opioid requirements) included peripheral nerve blocks, wound infiltration, intravenous dexamethasone, acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors, and opioids. Wound instillation, intra-articular injection, and intravenous regional analgesia had variable analgesia. The lack of homogeneous study design precluded quantitative analyses. Optimal pain management strategies included locoregional analgesic techniques plus acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors, with opioids used for "rescue," and 1 intraoperative dose of parenteral dexamethasone. Popliteal sciatic nerve blocks would be appropriate when expecting severe postoperative pain (extensive surgical procedure), and ankle blocks and surgical incision infiltration would be appropriate when expecting moderate postoperative pain (less extensive and minimally invasive surgical procedures). Additional studies are needed to assess multimodal analgesia techniques. PMID:24954920

  14. Prevention and Management of Procedural Pain in the Neonate: An Update.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    The prevention of pain in neonates should be the goal of all pediatricians and health care professionals who work with neonates, not only because it is ethical but also because repeated painful exposures have the potential for deleterious consequences. Neonates at greatest risk of neurodevelopmental impairment as a result of preterm birth (ie, the smallest and sickest) are also those most likely to be exposed to the greatest number of painful stimuli in the NICU. Although there are major gaps in knowledge regarding the most effective way to prevent and relieve pain in neonates, proven and safe therapies are currently underused for routine minor, yet painful procedures. Therefore, every health care facility caring for neonates should implement (1) a pain-prevention program that includes strategies for minimizing the number of painful procedures performed and (2) a pain assessment and management plan that includes routine assessment of pain, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies for the prevention of pain associated with routine minor procedures, and measures for minimizing pain associated with surgery and other major procedures. PMID:26810788

  15. Effect of Music Therapy on Postoperative Pain Management in Gynecological Patients: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Sin, Wai Man; Chow, Ka Ming

    2015-12-01

    Unrelieved postoperative pain may have a negative impact on the physiological and psychological well-being of patients. Pharmacological methods are currently used to relieve such pain in gynecological patients; however, inadequate pain control is still reported, and the use of nonpharmacological pain-relieving methods is increasingly being advocated, one of which is music therapy. The purpose of this literature review was to identify, summarize, and critically appraise current evidence on music therapy and postoperative pain management among gynecological patients. A systematic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index, and Allied and Complementary Medicine was conducted using the search terms music, gynecological, pain, surgery, operative, and post-operative to identify relevant articles in English from 1995 to the present. All identified articles were assessed independently for inclusion into review. A total of 7 articles were included after removal of duplicates and exclusion of irrelevant studies. All the included studies assessed the effects of music therapy on postoperative pain intensity, and three of them measured pain-related physiological symptoms. The findings indicated that music therapy, in general, was effective in reducing pain intensity, fatigue, anxiety, and analgesic consumption in gynecological patients during the postoperative period. It is recommended as an adjunct to pharmacological pain-relieving methods in reducing postoperative pain. Future researches on music therapy to identify the most effective application and evaluate its effect by qualitative study are recommended. PMID:26697822

  16. A Smartphone-Based Pain Management App for Adolescents With Cancer: Establishing System Requirements and a Pain Care Algorithm Based on Literature Review, Interviews, and Consensus

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Bonnie J; Nathan, Paul C; Seto, Emily; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Stinson, Jennifer N

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain that occurs both within and outside of the hospital setting is a common and distressing problem for adolescents with cancer. The use of smartphone technology may facilitate rapid, in-the-moment pain support for this population. To ensure the best possible pain management advice is given, evidence-based and expert-vetted care algorithms and system design features, which are designed using user-centered methods, are required. Objective To develop the decision algorithm and system requirements that will inform the pain management advice provided by a real-time smartphone-based pain management app for adolescents with cancer. Methods A systematic approach to algorithm development and system design was utilized. Initially, a comprehensive literature review was undertaken to understand the current body of knowledge pertaining to pediatric cancer pain management. A user-centered approach to development was used as the results of the review were disseminated to 15 international experts (clinicians, scientists, and a consumer) in pediatric pain, pediatric oncology and mHealth design, who participated in a 2-day consensus conference. This conference used nominal group technique to develop consensus on important pain inputs, pain management advice, and system design requirements. Using data generated at the conference, a prototype algorithm was developed. Iterative qualitative testing was conducted with adolescents with cancer, as well as pediatric oncology and pain health care providers to vet and refine the developed algorithm and system requirements for the real-time smartphone app. Results The systematic literature review established the current state of research related to nonpharmacological pediatric cancer pain management. The 2-day consensus conference established which clinically important pain inputs by adolescents would require action (pain management advice) from the app, the appropriate advice the app should provide to adolescents in pain, and the

  17. Improving Pain Management at the Nursing Education Level: Evaluating Knowledge and Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Latchman, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Unmanaged pain is a prevalent problem faced by many cancer patients. One part of this problem centers on a lack of emphasis on pain management in the undergraduate nursing curriculum. This study examined the knowledge and attitudes of 41 undergraduate nursing students regarding pain management. Students voluntarily completed a demographic data form, the Nurses’ Attitude Survey, and the Pain Management Principles Assessment Tool. A mean score of 19.4 out of a possible 31 was achieved on the knowledge test, whereas a mean score of 17.0 was achieved on the Nurses’ Attitude Survey. A weak-to-moderate relationship between knowledge and attitudes was found. Although students had positive attitudes regarding pain management, many still lacked the fundamental knowledge essential for adequately managing pain. The sample size was relatively small and not demographically diverse, but the response from the sample was sufficient to provide statistically meaningful data. In the quest to improve patient outcomes, these findings suggest the need to develop specific strategies to effectively teach undergraduate nursing students about pain management. PMID:25032029

  18. Managing a Female Patient with Left Low Back Pain and Sacroiliac Joint Pain with Therapeutic Exercise: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this case study is to describe the management of a female patient with chronic left low back pain and sacroiliac joint pain (LBP/SIJP) using unique unilateral exercises developed by the Postural Restoration Institute (PRI) to address pelvic asymmetry and left hip capsule restriction, which is consistent with a Right Handed and Left Anterior Interior Chain pattern of postural asymmetry. Client Description: The client was 65-year-old woman with a 10-month history of constant left LBP/SIJP and leg pain. Intervention: The patient was seen six times to correct pelvic position/posture and left hip posterior capsule restriction via (1) muscle activation (left hamstrings, adductor magnus, and anterior gluteus medius) and (2) left hip adduction to lengthen the left posterior capsule/ischiofemoral ligament. Stabilization exercises included bilateral hamstrings, gluteus maximus, adductors, and abdominals to maintain pelvic position/posture. Measures and Outcome: Left Ober's test (initially positive) was negative at discharge. Pain as measured on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (initially 1/10 at best and 8/10 at worst) was 0/10–0/10 at discharge. Oswestry Disability Index score (initially 20%) was 0% at discharge. The patient no longer had numbness in her left leg, and sexual intercourse had become pain free. Implications: Interventions to restore and maintain the optimal position of pelvis and hip (femoral head in the acetabulum) may be beneficial for treating patients with chronic LBP/SIJP. The patient's pain was eliminated 13 days after she first performed three exercises to reposition the pelvis and restore left posterior hip capsule extensibility and internal rotation. PMID:22379254

  19. Management of radicular pain in rheumatic disease: insight for the physician

    PubMed Central

    Fabule, John

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatologists are still relatively unaware of the causes, presentation, diagnosis and management of radicular pain. This is against a background of increasing evidence of the presence and importance of radicular problems in patients with rheumatological disorders. When they coexist in patients, differentiating between nociceptive and neuropathic pain is clinically important because these components require different pain management strategies. Consequently, it is essential that rheumatologists become skilled in identifying as well as managing both forms of pain. This review will serve to further increase awareness among rheumatologists of this important issue as well as discuss the practical aspects of managing these conditions. The evaluation of patients requires very careful history taking and full thorough neurological examination. Diagnostic testing is suggested mainly to confirm the diagnosis and aetiology in patients with persistent symptoms despite conservative treatment. Neuroimaging is recommended for patients with acute radicular pain with progressive neurological deficits or those with high suspicion of neoplasm or epidural abscess. If neuroimaging does not confirm diagnosis, electrophysiology studies may be helpful. The management of this condition is multifaceted and involves physicians and allied healthcare professionals as well as the patients who should be encouraged to participate in self-management programmes. Nociceptive and neuropathic pain often coexists in patients with rheumatic disease. There are challenges to making the diagnosis of radicular pain in these patients. The diagnosis is primarily clinical but pathophysiological issues, diversity in symptoms, the multiple mechanisms of action and difficulties in communication between patients and their doctors as well as variable response to therapy pose challenges to the effective management of these patients. Despite these difficulties and challenges, it is essential that rheumatologists

  20. Cannabinoids in the management of difficult to treat pain.

    PubMed

    Russo, Ethan B

    2008-02-01

    This article reviews recent research on cannabinoid analgesia via the endocannabinoid system and non-receptor mechanisms, as well as randomized clinical trials employing cannabinoids in pain treatment. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, Marinol((R))) and nabilone (Cesamet((R))) are currently approved in the United States and other countries, but not for pain indications. Other synthetic cannabinoids, such as ajulemic acid, are in development. Crude herbal cannabis remains illegal in most jurisdictions but is also under investigation. Sativex((R)), a cannabis derived oromucosal spray containing equal proportions of THC (partial CB(1) receptor agonist ) and cannabidiol (CBD, a non-euphoriant, anti-inflammatory analgesic with CB(1) receptor antagonist and endocannabinoid modulating effects) was approved in Canada in 2005 for treatment of central neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis, and in 2007 for intractable cancer pain. Numerous randomized clinical trials have demonstrated safety and efficacy for Sativex in central and peripheral neuropathic pain, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer pain. An Investigational New Drug application to conduct advanced clinical trials for cancer pain was approved by the US FDA in January 2006. Cannabinoid analgesics have generally been well tolerated in clinical trials with acceptable adverse event profiles. Their adjunctive addition to the pharmacological armamentarium for treatment of pain shows great promise. PMID:18728714