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Sample records for adding phase change

  1. Phases of global AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Pallab; Krishnan, Chethan; Subramanian, P. N. Bala

    2016-06-01

    We study the phases of gravity coupled to a charged scalar and gauge field in an asymptotically Anti-de Sitter spacetime ( AdS 4) in the grand canonical ensemble. For the conformally coupled scalar, an intricate phase diagram is charted out between the four relevant solutions: global AdS, boson star, Reissner-Nordstrom black hole and the hairy black hole. The nature of the phase diagram undergoes qualitative changes as the charge of the scalar is changed, which we discuss. We also discuss the new features that arise in the extremal limit.

  2. Predicting impact of multi-paths on phase change in map-based vehicular ad hoc networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmes, Mark; Lemieux, George; Sonnenberg, Jerome; Chester, David B.

    2014-05-01

    Dynamic Spectrum Access, which through its ability to adapt the operating frequency of a radio, is widely believed to be a solution to the limited spectrum problem. Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANETs) can extend high capacity mobile communications over large areas where fixed and tethered-mobile systems are not available. In one use case with high potential impact cognitive radio employs spectrum sensing to facilitate identification of allocated frequencies not currently accessed by their primary users. Primary users own the rights to radiate at a specific frequency and geographic location, secondary users opportunistically attempt to radiate at a specific frequency when the primary user is not using it. We quantify optimal signal detection in map based cognitive radio networks with multiple rapidly varying phase changes and multiple orthogonal signals. Doppler shift occurs due to reflection, scattering, and rapid vehicle movement. Path propagation as well as vehicle movement produces either constructive or destructive interference with the incident wave. Our signal detection algorithms can assist the Doppler spread compensation algorithm by deciding how many phase changes in signals are present in a selected band of interest. Additionally we can populate a spatial radio environment map (REM) database with known information that can be leveraged in an ad hoc network to facilitate Dynamic Spectrum Access. We show how topography can help predict the impact of multi-paths on phase change, as well as about the prediction from dense traffic areas. Utilization of high resolution geospatial data layers in RF propagation analysis is directly applicable.

  3. Leading Change, Adding Value.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nick

    2016-09-12

    Essential facts Leading Change, Adding Value is NHS England's new nursing and midwifery framework. It is designed to build on Compassion in Practice (CiP), which was published 3 years ago and set out the 6Cs: compassion, care, commitment, courage, competence and communication. CiP established the values at the heart of nursing and midwifery, while the new framework sets out how staff can help transform the health and care sectors to meet the aims of the NHS England's Five Year Forward View. PMID:27615573

  4. Climatic change and contemporaneous land-use phases north and south of the Alps 2300 BC to 800 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinner, Willy; Lotter, André F.; Ammann, Brigitta; Conedera, Marco; Hubschmid, Priska; van Leeuwen, Jacqueline F. N.; Wehrli, Michael

    2003-06-01

    Fluctuations in the Δ 14C curve and subsequent gaps of archaeological findings at 800-650 and 400-100 BC in western and central Europe may indicate major climate-driven land-abandonment phases. To address this hypothesis radiocarbon-dated sediments from four lakes in Switzerland were studied palynologically. Pollen analysis indicates contemporaneous phases of forest clearances and of intensified land-use at 1450-1250 BC, 650-450 BC, 50 BC-100 AD and around 700 AD. These land-use expansions coincided with periods of warm climate as recorded by the Alpine dendroclimatic and Greenland oxygen isotope records. Our results suggest that harvest yields would have increased synchronously over wide areas of central and southern Europe during periods of warm and dry climate. Combined interpretation of palaeoecological and archaeological findings suggests that higher food production led to increased human populations. Positive long-term trends in pollen values of Cerealia and Plantago lanceolata indicate that technical innovations during the Bronze and Iron Age (e.g. metal ploughs, scythes, hay production, fertilising methods) gradually increased agricultural productivity. The successful adoption of yield-increasing advances cannot be explained by climatic determinism alone. Combined with archaeological evidence, our results suggest that despite considerable cycles of spatial and demographic reorganisation (repeated land abandonments and expansions, as well as large-scale migrations and population decreases), human societies were able to shift to lower subsistence levels without dramatic ruptures in material culture. However, our data imply that human societies were not able to compensate rapidly for harvest failures when climate deteriorated. Agriculture in marginal areas was abandoned, and spontaneous reforestations took place on abandoned land south and north of the Alps. Only when the climate changed again to drier and warmer conditions did a new wide-spread phase of

  5. Dressing phases of AdS3/CFT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsato, Riccardo; Ohlsson Sax, Olof; Sfondrini, Alessandro; Stefański, Bogdan, Jr.; Torrielli, Alessandro

    2013-09-01

    We determine the all-loop dressing phases of the AdS3/CFT2 integrable system related to type IIB string theory on AdS3×S3×T4 by solving the recently found crossing relations and studying their singularity structure. The two resulting phases present a novel structure with respect to the ones appearing in AdS5/CFT4 and AdS4/CFT3. In the strongly coupled regime, their leading order reduces to the universal Arutyunov-Frolov-Staudacher phase as expected. We also compute their subleading order and compare it with recent one-loop perturbative results and comment on their weak-coupling expansion.

  6. An improved AFS phase for AdS3 string integrability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Michael C.; Aniceto, Inês

    2015-04-01

    We propose a number of modifications to the classical term in the dressing phase for integrable strings in AdS3 ×S3 ×S3 ×S1, and check these against existing perturbative calculations, crossing symmetry, and the semiclassical limit of the Bethe equations. The principal change is that the phase for different masses should start with a term Q1Q2, like the one-loop AdS3 dressing phase, rather than Q2Q3 as for the original AdS5 AFS phase.

  7. Phase Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2004-01-01

    Recent workshops to define strategic research on critical issues in microgravity fluids and transport phenomena in support of mission orientated needs of NASA and many technical conferences over the years in support of fundamental research targeting NASA's long range missions goal have identified several phase change processes needed to design advanced space and planetary based systems for long duration operations Recommendation noted that phase change processes are profoundly affected by gravitational environment.

  8. Are You Ready Phase Two? Pricing Changes and Commercial Products Added to DOE High-Performance Windows Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mapes, Terry S.

    2011-05-01

    This article, for publication in Door and Window Manufacturer magazine, describes DOE's High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program, WVPP, and how PNNL, which manages the program for DOE, is assisting DOE in the transition to the next phase (Phase II), which begins in May. While the foundation of the program will remain relatively unchanged, PNNL is employing several new strategies to continue the momentum built during the program's first full year of implementation. The program helps buyers and manufacturers to develop a market for highly insulating windows and low-E storm windows at affordable prices and thereby overcome the principal barrier of cost.

  9. Adding Value in the Postanalytical Phase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Apart from maintaining the highest quality of analytical test results, laboratories are now getting more focused on how to achieve the greatest impact of laboratory results on their patient's outcome. Laboratory professionals are now in the learning phase of implementing new practices at different steps of the extra-analytical phases of the testing process where laboratories used to contribute seldom, only sporadically. Recently, the achievable levels of harmonization and responsible contributors at various steps of the testing process have also been proposed. Based on this proposal some tasks of the extra-analytical phase should become primarily the responsibility of laboratories with the involvement of clinicians, like additive testing, individualized interpretative commenting and reporting results with clinical urgency in postanalytical (PA) phase. These tasks can be good targets to start with or to increase patient outcome-oriented extra-analytical activities of laboratories. The status of the present practice of the PA activities for which laboratories proposed to be primarily responsible in the testing process - laboratory-driven PA tasks - will be reviewed below. In addition, approaches of quality assessment (QA) with quality specifications of these laboratory-driven PA tasks and the available best practice recommendations in the light of the achievable level of harmonization will be discussed. Laboratory professionals are encouraged to improve their methodological, theoretical and communicational skills and take the lead and participate in the discussed PA activities that can assist in translating laboratory test results into clinical meaning and thereby lead to better clinical utilization of laboratory test results.

  10. Adding Value in the Postanalytical Phase.

    PubMed

    Ajzner, Éva

    2016-04-01

    Apart from maintaining the highest quality of analytical test results, laboratories are now getting more focused on how to achieve the greatest impact of laboratory results on their patient's outcome. Laboratory professionals are now in the learning phase of implementing new practices at different steps of the extra-analytical phases of the testing process where laboratories used to contribute seldom, only sporadically. Recently, the achievable levels of harmonization and responsible contributors at various steps of the testing process have also been proposed. Based on this proposal some tasks of the extra-analytical phase should become primarily the responsibility of laboratories with the involvement of clinicians, like additive testing, individualized interpretative commenting and reporting results with clinical urgency in postanalytical (PA) phase. These tasks can be good targets to start with or to increase patient outcome-oriented extra-analytical activities of laboratories. The status of the present practice of the PA activities for which laboratories proposed to be primarily responsible in the testing process - laboratory-driven PA tasks - will be reviewed below. In addition, approaches of quality assessment (QA) with quality specifications of these laboratory-driven PA tasks and the available best practice recommendations in the light of the achievable level of harmonization will be discussed. Laboratory professionals are encouraged to improve their methodological, theoretical and communicational skills and take the lead and participate in the discussed PA activities that can assist in translating laboratory test results into clinical meaning and thereby lead to better clinical utilization of laboratory test results. PMID:27683529

  11. Demonstrating Phase Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohr, Walter

    1995-01-01

    Presents two experiments that demonstrate phase changes. The first experiment explores phase changes of carbon dioxide using powdered dry ice sealed in a piece of clear plastic tubing. The second experiment demonstrates an equilibrium process in which a crystal grows in equilibrium with its saturated solution. (PVD)

  12. [Enantioseparation behavior of chiral stationary phases AD, AS and OD].

    PubMed

    Li, Liqun; Fan, Jun; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Xiaodong; Wang, Tai; He, Jianfeng; Zhang, Weiguang

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, HPLC enantioseparation with chiral stationary phases (CSPs) has been widely applied in chiral analysis and preparation of new pharmaceuticals, pesticides, food, etc. Herein, enantioseparation of 20 chiral compounds have been carried out on three polysaccharide-based CSPs (EnantioPak AD, AS and OD) with normal phases by HPLC, separately. The influences of skeletal structure and the kinds of derivative groups on separation behaviors of these CSPs have been studied in detail. As results indicated, except for compound 13, the other compounds were baseline separated on EnantioPak AD, with most of resolution over 2. 0; in addition, better separation for acidic or basic compounds was achieved through adding acidic/basic additives into the mobile phase of hexane-alcohol. For four aromatic alcohols (compounds 13-16), their retention in the EnantioPak AD column showed a weakening tendency with increase of carbon number in side chain group, and the reverse trend of their resolution was observed. Furthermore, EnantioPak AD showed much better separation performance for eight compounds (13-20) than the others. In short, these results have provided some references for further investigation of separation behavior and applications of polysaccharide-based CSPs. PMID:27319174

  13. Phase change compositions

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1989-01-01

    Compositions containing crystalline, straight chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  14. Phase change compositions

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.; Griffen, Charles W.

    1986-01-01

    Compositions containing crystalline, long chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  15. Fun with Phase Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purvis, David

    2006-01-01

    A lot of good elementary science involves studying solids, liquids, and gases, and some inquiry-based activities that are easy to set up and do. In this article, the author presents activities pertaining to simple phase change. Using water as the example, these activities introduce upper-grade students to the idea of the arrangement of molecules…

  16. Holographic phase transition from dyons in an AdS black hole background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo, A. R.; Moreno, E. F.; Schaposnik, F. A.

    2010-03-01

    We construct a dyon solution for a Yang-Mills-Higgs theory in a 4 dimensional Schwarzschild-anti-de Sitter black hole background with temperature T. We then apply the AdS/CFT correspondence to describe the strong coupling regime of a 2 + 1 quantum field theory which undergoes a phase transition exhibiting the condensation of a composite charge operator below a critical temperature T c .

  17. Phase change materials handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, D. V.; Hoover, M. J.; Oneill, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    This handbook is intended to provide theory and data needed by the thermal design engineer to bridge the gap between research achievements and actual flight systems, within the limits of the current state of the art of phase change materials (PCM) technology. The relationship between PCM and more conventional thermal control techniques is described and numerous space and terrestrial applications of PCM are discussed. Material properties of the most promising PCMs are provided; the purposes and use of metallic filler materials in PCM composites are presented; and material compatibility considerations relevant to PCM design are included. The engineering considerations of PCM design are described, especially those pertaining to the thermodynamic and heat transfer phenomena peculiar to PCM design. Methods of obtaining data not currently available are presented. The special problems encountered in the space environment are described. Computational tools useful to the designer are discussed. In summary, each aspect of the PCM problem important to the design engineer is covered to the extent allowed by the scope of this effort and the state of the art.

  18. PHASE CHANGE LIQUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron

    2006-03-01

    Work is being performed to develop a new shipping system for frozen environmental samples (or other materials) that uses an optimal phase change liquid (PCL) formulation and an insulated shipping container with an on-board digital temperature data logger to provide a history of the temperature profile within the container during shipment. In previous work, several PCL formulations with temperatures of fusion ranging from approximately -14 to -20 C were prepared and evaluated. Both temperature of fusion and heat of fusion of the formulations were measured, and an optimal PCL formulation was selected. The PCL was frozen in plastic bags and tested for its temperature profile in a cooler using a digital temperature data logger. This testing showed that the PCL formulation can maintain freezer temperatures (< -7 to -20 C) for an extended period, such as the time for shipping samples by overnight courier. The results of the experiments described in this report provide significant information for use in developing an integrated freezer system that uses a PCL formulation to maintain freezer temperatures in coolers for shipping environmental samples to the laboratory. Experimental results show the importance of the type of cooler used in the system and that use of an insulating material within the cooler improves the performance of the freezer system. A new optimal PCL formulation for use in the system has been determined. The new formulation has been shown to maintain temperatures at < -7 to -20 C for 47 hours in an insulated cooler system containing soil samples. These results are very promising for developing the new technology.

  19. Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA’s Game Changing Development is taking on a technologydevelopment and demonstration effort to design, build, and test the next generation of Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers (PCM HXs) on ...

  20. On thermodynamics of charged AdS black holes in extended phases space via M2-branes background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabab, M.; El Moumni, H.; Masmar, K.

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by a recent work on asymptotically AdS_4 black holes in M-theory, we investigate both thermodynamics and the thermodynamical geometry of Reissner-Nordstrom-AdS black holes from M2-branes. More precisely, we study AdS black holes in AdS4× S7, with the number of M2-branes interpreted as a thermodynamical variable. In this context, we calculate various thermodynamical quantities including the chemical potential, and examine their phase transitions along with the corresponding stability behaviors. In addition, we also evaluate the thermodynamical curvatures of the Weinhold, Ruppeiner, and Quevedo metrics for M2-branes geometry to study the stability of such a black object. We show that the singularities of these scalar curvature's metrics reproduce similar stability results to those obtained by the phase transition diagram via the heat capacities in different ensembles either when the number of the M2 branes or the charge is held fixed. Also, we note that all results derived in Belhaj et al. (Eur Phys J C 76(2):73, 2016) are recovered in the limit of the vanishing charge.

  1. Stochastic phase-change neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuma, Tomas; Pantazi, Angeliki; Le Gallo, Manuel; Sebastian, Abu; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2016-08-01

    Artificial neuromorphic systems based on populations of spiking neurons are an indispensable tool in understanding the human brain and in constructing neuromimetic computational systems. To reach areal and power efficiencies comparable to those seen in biological systems, electroionics-based and phase-change-based memristive devices have been explored as nanoscale counterparts of synapses. However, progress on scalable realizations of neurons has so far been limited. Here, we show that chalcogenide-based phase-change materials can be used to create an artificial neuron in which the membrane potential is represented by the phase configuration of the nanoscale phase-change device. By exploiting the physics of reversible amorphous-to-crystal phase transitions, we show that the temporal integration of postsynaptic potentials can be achieved on a nanosecond timescale. Moreover, we show that this is inherently stochastic because of the melt-quench-induced reconfiguration of the atomic structure occurring when the neuron is reset. We demonstrate the use of these phase-change neurons, and their populations, in the detection of temporal correlations in parallel data streams and in sub-Nyquist representation of high-bandwidth signals.

  2. Children's Views Concerning Phase Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar, Varda; Travis, Anthony S.

    1991-01-01

    This article reports on answers by children (grades 1-9, n=83) to oral and written questions concerning the phase change from liquid to gas. The development of concepts was followed, proceeding from concrete to abstract ideas. Many students were found to experience difficulties in problem solving even though they may have had the necessary level…

  3. Phase transition and thermodynamic geometry of f (R ) AdS black holes in the grand canonical ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gu-Qiang; Mo, Jie-Xiong

    2016-06-01

    The phase transition of a four-dimensional charged AdS black hole solution in the R +f (R ) gravity with constant curvature is investigated in the grand canonical ensemble, where we find novel characteristics quite different from that in the canonical ensemble. There exists no critical point for T -S curve while in former research critical point was found for both the T -S curve and T -r+ curve when the electric charge of f (R ) black holes is kept fixed. Moreover, we derive the explicit expression for the specific heat, the analog of volume expansion coefficient and isothermal compressibility coefficient when the electric potential of f (R ) AdS black hole is fixed. The specific heat CΦ encounters a divergence when 0 <Φ b . This finding also differs from the result in the canonical ensemble, where there may be two, one or no divergence points for the specific heat CQ . To examine the phase structure newly found in the grand canonical ensemble, we appeal to the well-known thermodynamic geometry tools and derive the analytic expressions for both the Weinhold scalar curvature and Ruppeiner scalar curvature. It is shown that they diverge exactly where the specific heat CΦ diverges.

  4. Thermo-mechanical phase-shift determination in Coriolis mass-flowmeters with added masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghayesh, Mergen H.; Amabili, Marco; Païdoussis, Michael P.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop an approximate analytical solution for phase-shift (and thus mass flow) prediction along the length of the measuring tube of a Coriolis mass-flowmeter. A single, straight measuring tube is considered; added masses at the sensor and excitation locations are included in the model, and thus in the equation of motion. The measuring tube is excited harmonically by an electromagnetic driver. Taking into account thermal effects, the equation of motion is derived through use of the extended Hamilton's principle and constitutive relations. The equation of motion is discretized into a set of ordinary differential equations via Galerkin's technique. The method of multiple timescales is applied to the set of resultant equations, and the equations of order one and epsilon are obtained analytically for the system at primary resonance. The solution of the equation of motion is obtained by satisfying the solvability condition (making the solution of order epsilon free of secular terms). The flow-related phase-shift in the driver-induced tube vibration is measured at two symmetrically located points on either side of the mid-length of the tube. The analytical results for the phase-shift are compared to those obtained numerically. The effect of system parameters on the measured phase-shift is discussed. It is shown that the measured phase-shift depends on the mass flow rate, of course, but it is also affected by the magnitude of the added sensor mass and location, and the temperature change; nevertheless, the factors investigated do not induce a zero phase-shift.

  5. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1995-12-26

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft. 3 figs.

  6. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1994-01-01

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft.

  7. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1995-01-01

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft.

  8. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1994-12-06

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and particularly in applications for heat protection for heat sensitive items, such as aircraft flight recorders, and for preventing brake fade in automobiles, buses, trucks and aircraft. 3 figures.

  9. Soda consumption during ad libitum food intake predicts weight change.

    PubMed

    Bundrick, Sarah C; Thearle, Marie S; Venti, Colleen A; Krakoff, Jonathan; Votruba, Susanne B

    2014-03-01

    Soda consumption may contribute to weight gain over time. Objective data were used to determine whether soda consumption predicts weight gain or changes in glucose regulation over time. Subjects without diabetes (128 men, 75 women; mean age 34.3±8.9 years; mean body mass index 32.5±7.4; mean percentage body fat 31.6%±8.6%) self-selected their food from an ad libitum vending machine system for 3 days. Mean daily energy intake was calculated from food weight. Energy consumed from soda was recorded as were food choices that were low in fat (<20% of calories from fat) or high in simple sugars (>30%). Food choices were expressed as percentage of daily energy intake. A subset of 85 subjects had measurement of follow-up weights and oral glucose tolerance (57 men, 28 women; mean follow-up time=2.5±2.1 years, range 6 months to 9.9 years). Energy consumed from soda was negatively related to age (r=-0.27, P=0.0001) and choosing low-fat foods (r=-0.35, P<0.0001), but positively associated with choosing solid foods high in simple sugars (r=0.45, P<0.0001) and overall average daily energy intake (r=0.46, P<0.0001). Energy intake from food alone did not differ between individuals who did and did not consume beverage calories (P=0.11). Total daily energy intake had no relationship with change in weight (P=0.29) or change in glucose regulation (P=0.38) over time. However, energy consumed from soda correlated with change in weight (r=0.21, P=0.04). This relationship was unchanged after adjusting for follow-up time and initial weight. Soda consumption is a marker for excess energy consumption and is associated with weight gain.

  10. Phase change material storage heater

    DOEpatents

    Goswami, D. Yogi; Hsieh, Chung K.; Jotshi, Chand K.; Klausner, James F.

    1997-01-01

    A storage heater for storing heat and for heating a fluid, such as water, has an enclosure defining a chamber therein. The chamber has a lower portion and an upper portion with a heating element being disposed within the enclosure. A tube through which the fluid flows has an inlet and an outlet, both being disposed outside of the enclosure, and has a portion interconnecting the inlet and the outlet that passes through the enclosure. A densely packed bed of phase change material pellets is disposed within the enclosure and is surrounded by a viscous liquid, such as propylene glycol. The viscous liquid is in thermal communication with the heating element, the phase change material pellets, and the tube and transfers heat from the heating element to the pellets and from the pellets to the tube. The viscous fluid has a viscosity so that the frictional pressure drop of the fluid in contact with the phase change material pellets substantially reduces vertical thermal convection in the fluid. As the fluid flows through the tube heat is transferred from the viscous liquid to the fluid flowing through the tube, thereby heating the fluid.

  11. Phase Change Fabrics Control Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Originally featured in Spinoff in 1997, Outlast Technologies Inc. (formerly Gateway Technologies Inc.) has built its entire product line on microencapsulated phase change materials, developed in Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Johnson Space Center after initial development for the U.S. Air Force. The Boulder, Colorado-based company acquired the exclusive patent rights and now integrates these materials into textiles or onto finished apparel, providing temperature regulation in bedding materials and a full line of apparel for both ordinary and extreme conditions.

  12. Microstructural and phase evolution in metakaolin geopolymers with different activators and added aluminosilicate fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Madhuchhanda; Dana, Kausik; Das, Sukhen

    2015-10-01

    This work aims to investigate the microstructural and phase evolution of alkali activated metakaolin products with different activators and added aluminosilicate filler phases. The added filler phases have different reactivity to the alkali activated metakaolin system. Microstructural evolution in the alkali activated products has been investigated by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). Variation in strength development in alkali activated metakaolin products was followed by compressive strength measurement test. Microstructural study shows that in case of metakaolin with NaOH activator crystalline sodalite formed in all the product samples irrespective of the added filler phases. The microstructure of these NaOH activated products investigated by FESEM showed crystalline and inhomogeneous morphology. Mixed activator containing both NaOH and sodium silicate in a fixed mass ratio formed predominantly amorphous phase. Microstructure of these samples showed more homogeneity than that of NaOH activated metakaolin products. The study further shows that addition of α-Al2O3 powder, non reactive phase to the alkali activated metakaolin system when used in larger amount increased crystalline phase in the matrix. α-Al2O3 powder addition increased the compressive strength of the product samples for both the activator compositions. Added phase of colloidal silica, reactive to the alkali activated metakaolin system when used in larger amount was found to increase amorphous nature of the matrix. Addition of colloidal silica influenced the compressive strength property differently with different activator compositions.

  13. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1992-04-21

    A free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] to about 7 [times] 10[sup [minus]2] microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 9 figs.

  14. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1993-10-19

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (pcm) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7[times]10[sup [minus]3] to about 7[times]10[sup [minus]2] microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 10 figures.

  15. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1993-05-18

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7[times]10[sup [minus]3] to about 7[times]10[sup [minus]2] microns and the p.c.m. must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less p.c.m. per combined weight of silica and p.c.m. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a p.c.m. material. The silica-p.c.m. mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  16. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, I.O.

    1994-02-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a PCM material. The silica-PCM mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 2 figures.

  17. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1993-01-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  18. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1994-01-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a PCM material. The silica-PCM mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  19. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1992-01-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  20. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1993-01-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garmets, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  1. Will Teacher Value-Added Scores Change When Accountability Tests Change? What We Know Series: Value-Added Methods and Applications. Knowledge Brief 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaffrey, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Value-added evaluations use student test scores to assess teacher effectiveness. How student achievement is judged can depend on which test is used to measure it. Thus it is reasonable to ask whether a teacher's value-added score depends on which test is used to calculate it. Would it change if a different test was used? Specifically, might a…

  2. Effects of added polyacrylamide on changes in water states during the composting of kitchen waste.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Qiang; Chen, Zhuo-Xian; Zhang, Xue-Qing; Hu, Li-Fang; Shen, Dong-Sheng; Long, Yu-Yang

    2015-02-01

    The effects of adding polyacrylamide (PAM), to attempt to delay the loss of capillary water and achieve a better level of organic matter humification, in the composting of kitchen waste were evaluated. Four treatments, with initial moisture content of 60 % were used: 0.1 % PAM added before the start of composting (R1), 0.1 % PAM added when the thermophilic phase of composting became stable (at >50 °C) (R2), 0.1 % PAM added when the moisture content significantly decreased (R3), and no PAM added (R4). The introduction of PAM in R1 and R2 significantly increased the capillary force and delayed the loss of moisture content and capillary water. The introduction of PAM in R2 and R3 improved the composting process, in terms of the degradation of biochemical fractions and the humification degree. These results show that the optimal time for adding PAM was the initial stage of the thermophilic phase.

  3. Insight into the microscopic structure of an AdS black hole from a thermodynamical phase transition.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shao-Wen; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2015-09-11

    Comparing with an ordinary thermodynamic system, we investigate the possible microscopic structure of a charged anti-de Sitter black hole completely from the thermodynamic viewpoint. The number density of the black hole molecules is introduced to measure the microscopic degrees of freedom of the black hole. We found that the number density suffers a sudden change accompanied by a latent heat when the black hole system crosses the small-large black hole coexistence curve, while when the system passes the critical point, it encounters a second-order phase transition with a vanishing latent heat due to the continuous change of the number density. Moreover, the thermodynamic scalar curvature suggests that there is a weak attractive interaction between two black hole molecules. These phenomena might cast new insight into the underlying microscopic structure of a charged anti-de Sitter black hole. PMID:26406818

  4. Insight into the microscopic structure of an AdS black hole from a thermodynamical phase transition.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shao-Wen; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2015-09-11

    Comparing with an ordinary thermodynamic system, we investigate the possible microscopic structure of a charged anti-de Sitter black hole completely from the thermodynamic viewpoint. The number density of the black hole molecules is introduced to measure the microscopic degrees of freedom of the black hole. We found that the number density suffers a sudden change accompanied by a latent heat when the black hole system crosses the small-large black hole coexistence curve, while when the system passes the critical point, it encounters a second-order phase transition with a vanishing latent heat due to the continuous change of the number density. Moreover, the thermodynamic scalar curvature suggests that there is a weak attractive interaction between two black hole molecules. These phenomena might cast new insight into the underlying microscopic structure of a charged anti-de Sitter black hole.

  5. Knowledgeable Learning and Conceptual Change: Value Adding to Teacher Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeigh, Tony

    2013-01-01

    This report concerns the use of pre and post responses to an online questionnaire as evidence of knowledgeable learning by education students at a regional Australian university. Factor analysis was used to reveal conceptual changes in the students' thinking about classroom management across a unit of learning they had undertaken. These changes…

  6. Optical birefringence studies of a binary mixture with the nematic-smectic Ad-re-entrant nematic phase sequence.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Akhileshwar; Das, Malay Kumar

    2010-05-19

    We report the measurements of birefringence as a function of temperature of a binary system 4-cyanophenyl [4'(4''-n-heptylphenyl)]benzoate (7CPB) + 4-cyanophenyl 4-nonylbenzoate (9.CN) showing a nematic-smectic A(d)-re-entrant nematic phase sequence by means of the optical transmission method. The temperature dependence of the birefringence has been determined from the transmitted intensity data and the orientational order parameters have been calculated. These observations indicate that re-entrant nematic to induced smectic A(d) and induced smectic A(d) to nematic phase transitions for all the mixtures are of second order. There is a continuous change in the Δn values at the nematic-smectic A(d) and smectic A(d)-re-entrant nematic phase transitions. However, for some mixtures a slight increase in birefringence on cooling in the vicinity of the smectic A(d)-re-entrant nematic transition has been observed. We have also fitted our experimental results with those calculated from the modified McMillan theory as proposed by Luckhurst and Timimi.

  7. Phase change material for temperature control and material storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Jr., Francis C. (Inventor); Blackwood, James M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A phase change material comprising a mixture of water and deuterium oxide is described, wherein the mole fraction of deuterium oxide is selected so that the mixture has a selected phase change temperature within a range between 0.degree. C. and 4.degree. C. The mixture is placed in a container and used for passive storage and transport of biomaterials and other temperature sensitive materials. Gels, nucleating agents, freezing point depression materials and colorants may be added to enhance the characteristics of the mixture.

  8. Thermal analysis of metal foam matrix composite phase change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiange

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, CPCM (Composite Phase Change Material) was manufactured with metal foam matrix used as filling material. The temperature curves were obtained by experiment. The performance of heat transfer was analyzed. The experimental results show that metal foam matrix can improve temperature uniformity in phase change thermal storage material and enhance heat conduction ability. The thermal performance of CPCM is significantly improved. The efficiency of temperature control can be obviously improved by adding metal foam in phase change material. CPCM is in solid-liquid two-phase region when temperature is close to phase change point of paraffin. An approximate plateau appears. The plateau can be considered as the temperature control zone of CPCM. Heat can be transferred from hot source and be uniformly spread in thermal storage material by using metal foam matrix since thermal storage material has the advantage of strong heat storage capacity and disadvantage of poor heat conduction ability. Natural convection promotes the melting of solid-liquid phase change material. Good thermal conductivity of foam metal accelerates heat conduction of solid-liquid phase change material. The interior temperature difference decreases and the whole temperature becomes more uniform. For the same porosity with a metal foam, melting time of solid-liquid phase change material decreases. Heat conduction is enhanced and natural convection is suppressed when pore size of metal foam is smaller. The thermal storage time decreases and heat absorption rate increases when the pore size of metal foam reduces. The research results can be used to guide fabricating the CPCM.

  9. Bipolar switching in chalcogenide phase change memory

    PubMed Central

    Ciocchini, N.; Laudato, M.; Boniardi, M.; Varesi, E.; Fantini, P.; Lacaita, A. L.; Ielmini, D.

    2016-01-01

    Phase change materials based on chalcogenides are key enabling technologies for optical storage, such as rewritable CD and DVD, and recently also electrical nonvolatile memory, named phase change memory (PCM). In a PCM, the amorphous or crystalline phase affects the material band structure, hence the device resistance. Although phase transformation is extremely fast and repeatable, the amorphous phase suffers structural relaxation and crystallization at relatively low temperatures, which may affect the temperature stability of PCM state. To improve the time/temperature stability of the PCM, novel operation modes of the device should be identified. Here, we present bipolar switching operation of PCM, which is interpreted by ion migration in the solid state induced by elevated temperature and electric field similar to the bipolar switching in metal oxides. The temperature stability of the high resistance state is demonstrated and explained based on the local depletion of chemical species from the electrode region. PMID:27377822

  10. Bipolar switching in chalcogenide phase change memory.

    PubMed

    Ciocchini, N; Laudato, M; Boniardi, M; Varesi, E; Fantini, P; Lacaita, A L; Ielmini, D

    2016-01-01

    Phase change materials based on chalcogenides are key enabling technologies for optical storage, such as rewritable CD and DVD, and recently also electrical nonvolatile memory, named phase change memory (PCM). In a PCM, the amorphous or crystalline phase affects the material band structure, hence the device resistance. Although phase transformation is extremely fast and repeatable, the amorphous phase suffers structural relaxation and crystallization at relatively low temperatures, which may affect the temperature stability of PCM state. To improve the time/temperature stability of the PCM, novel operation modes of the device should be identified. Here, we present bipolar switching operation of PCM, which is interpreted by ion migration in the solid state induced by elevated temperature and electric field similar to the bipolar switching in metal oxides. The temperature stability of the high resistance state is demonstrated and explained based on the local depletion of chemical species from the electrode region. PMID:27377822

  11. Bipolar switching in chalcogenide phase change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocchini, N.; Laudato, M.; Boniardi, M.; Varesi, E.; Fantini, P.; Lacaita, A. L.; Ielmini, D.

    2016-07-01

    Phase change materials based on chalcogenides are key enabling technologies for optical storage, such as rewritable CD and DVD, and recently also electrical nonvolatile memory, named phase change memory (PCM). In a PCM, the amorphous or crystalline phase affects the material band structure, hence the device resistance. Although phase transformation is extremely fast and repeatable, the amorphous phase suffers structural relaxation and crystallization at relatively low temperatures, which may affect the temperature stability of PCM state. To improve the time/temperature stability of the PCM, novel operation modes of the device should be identified. Here, we present bipolar switching operation of PCM, which is interpreted by ion migration in the solid state induced by elevated temperature and electric field similar to the bipolar switching in metal oxides. The temperature stability of the high resistance state is demonstrated and explained based on the local depletion of chemical species from the electrode region.

  12. Fast phase-added stereogram algorithm for generation of photorealistic 3D content.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoonjong; Stoykova, Elena; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-20

    A new phase-added stereogram algorithm for accelerated computation of holograms from a point cloud model is proposed. The algorithm relies on the hologram segmentation, sampling of directional information, and usage of the fast Fourier transform with a finer grid in the spatial frequency domain than is provided by the segment size. The algorithm gives improved quality of reconstruction due to new phase compensation introduced in the segment fringe patterns. The result is finer beam steering leading to high peak intensity and a large peak signal-to-noise ratio in reconstruction. The feasibility of the algorithm is checked by the generation of 3D contents for a color wavefront printer. PMID:26835945

  13. The MYRRHA ADS Project in Belgium Enters the Front End Engineering Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bruyn, Didier; Abderrahim, Hamid Aït; Baeten, Peter; Leysen, Paul

    The MYRRHA project started in 1998 by SCK•CEN. MYRRHA is a MTR, based on the ADS concept, for material and fuel research, for studying the feasibility of transmutation of Minor Actinides and Long-Lived Fission Products arising from radioactive waste reprocessing and finally for demonstrating at a reasonable power scale the principle of the ADS. The MYRRHA design has progressed through various framework programmes of the European Commission in the context of Partitioning and Transmutation. The design has now entered into the Front End Engineering Phase (FEED) covering the period 2012-2015. The engineering company, which will handle this phase, has been selected and the works have begun in the late 2013. In the mean time we have made some refinements in both primary systems and plant layout, including reactor building design. In this paper, we present the most recent developments of the MYRRHA design in terms of reactor building and plant layout as existing today as well as a preliminary study concerning the spent fuel building of the facility. During the oral presentation we add some preliminary results of the interaction with the FEED contractor and the most recent version of the primary systems.

  14. Polar switching in the smectic- AdPA phase composed of asymmetric bent-core molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lingfeng; Dhara, Surajit; Sadashiva, B. K.; Radhika, S.; Pratibha, R.; Shimbo, Yoshio; Araoka, Fumito; Ishikawa, Ken; Takezoe, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    We have studied mesogenic properties in the smectic- AdPA phase of an asymmetric bent-core liquid crystal by means of polarizing optical microscopy, second-harmonic generation (SHG), electro-optical (EO), and dielectric measurements. In homeotropically aligned cells, EO switching is clearly observed from a schlieren texture with both four- and two-brush defects to a uniform bright domain under the application of very low in-plane electric field below 1V/μm . The phase is SHG active under an electric field, i.e., SHG gradually increases without a threshold and saturates with the increasing field. In homogeneous cells, by applying triangular wave field at saturated voltage, the splitting of the polarization switching current peak is observed, indicating that the mesophase is antiferroelectric. The dielectric studies indicate a Debye-type relaxation of the transverse dipoles associated with the rotation of the molecules about their long axis. The dc bias-dependent dielectric relaxation time and the dielectric strength suggest that a field-induced antiferroelectric-ferroelectric phase transition occurs continuously beyond 1.2V/μm and is reversible. The field-dependent texture observation is consistent with the dielectric measurements. Two possible models are proposed to interpret the continuous phase transition.

  15. Projected asymmetric response of Adélie penguins to Antarctic climate change.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Megan A; Lynch, Heather J; Saba, Vincent S; Oliver, Matthew J

    2016-06-29

    The contribution of climate change to shifts in a species' geographic distribution is a critical and often unresolved ecological question. Climate change in Antarctica is asymmetric, with cooling in parts of the continent and warming along the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP). The Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) is a circumpolar meso-predator exposed to the full range of Antarctic climate and is undergoing dramatic population shifts coincident with climate change. We used true presence-absence data on Adélie penguin breeding colonies to estimate past and future changes in habitat suitability during the chick-rearing period based on historic satellite observations and future climate model projections. During the contemporary period, declining Adélie penguin populations experienced more years with warm sea surface temperature compared to populations that are increasing. Based on this relationship, we project that one-third of current Adélie penguin colonies, representing ~20% of their current population, may be in decline by 2060. However, climate model projections suggest refugia may exist in continental Antarctica beyond 2099, buffering species-wide declines. Climate change impacts on penguins in the Antarctic will likely be highly site specific based on regional climate trends, and a southward contraction in the range of Adélie penguins is likely over the next century.

  16. Projected asymmetric response of Adélie penguins to Antarctic climate change

    PubMed Central

    Cimino, Megan A.; Lynch, Heather J.; Saba, Vincent S.; Oliver, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of climate change to shifts in a species’ geographic distribution is a critical and often unresolved ecological question. Climate change in Antarctica is asymmetric, with cooling in parts of the continent and warming along the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP). The Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) is a circumpolar meso-predator exposed to the full range of Antarctic climate and is undergoing dramatic population shifts coincident with climate change. We used true presence-absence data on Adélie penguin breeding colonies to estimate past and future changes in habitat suitability during the chick-rearing period based on historic satellite observations and future climate model projections. During the contemporary period, declining Adélie penguin populations experienced more years with warm sea surface temperature compared to populations that are increasing. Based on this relationship, we project that one-third of current Adélie penguin colonies, representing ~20% of their current population, may be in decline by 2060. However, climate model projections suggest refugia may exist in continental Antarctica beyond 2099, buffering species-wide declines. Climate change impacts on penguins in the Antarctic will likely be highly site specific based on regional climate trends, and a southward contraction in the range of Adélie penguins is likely over the next century. PMID:27352849

  17. Projected asymmetric response of Adélie penguins to Antarctic climate change.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Megan A; Lynch, Heather J; Saba, Vincent S; Oliver, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of climate change to shifts in a species' geographic distribution is a critical and often unresolved ecological question. Climate change in Antarctica is asymmetric, with cooling in parts of the continent and warming along the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP). The Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) is a circumpolar meso-predator exposed to the full range of Antarctic climate and is undergoing dramatic population shifts coincident with climate change. We used true presence-absence data on Adélie penguin breeding colonies to estimate past and future changes in habitat suitability during the chick-rearing period based on historic satellite observations and future climate model projections. During the contemporary period, declining Adélie penguin populations experienced more years with warm sea surface temperature compared to populations that are increasing. Based on this relationship, we project that one-third of current Adélie penguin colonies, representing ~20% of their current population, may be in decline by 2060. However, climate model projections suggest refugia may exist in continental Antarctica beyond 2099, buffering species-wide declines. Climate change impacts on penguins in the Antarctic will likely be highly site specific based on regional climate trends, and a southward contraction in the range of Adélie penguins is likely over the next century. PMID:27352849

  18. Projected asymmetric response of Adélie penguins to Antarctic climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimino, Megan A.; Lynch, Heather J.; Saba, Vincent S.; Oliver, Matthew J.

    2016-06-01

    The contribution of climate change to shifts in a species’ geographic distribution is a critical and often unresolved ecological question. Climate change in Antarctica is asymmetric, with cooling in parts of the continent and warming along the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP). The Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) is a circumpolar meso-predator exposed to the full range of Antarctic climate and is undergoing dramatic population shifts coincident with climate change. We used true presence-absence data on Adélie penguin breeding colonies to estimate past and future changes in habitat suitability during the chick-rearing period based on historic satellite observations and future climate model projections. During the contemporary period, declining Adélie penguin populations experienced more years with warm sea surface temperature compared to populations that are increasing. Based on this relationship, we project that one-third of current Adélie penguin colonies, representing ~20% of their current population, may be in decline by 2060. However, climate model projections suggest refugia may exist in continental Antarctica beyond 2099, buffering species-wide declines. Climate change impacts on penguins in the Antarctic will likely be highly site specific based on regional climate trends, and a southward contraction in the range of Adélie penguins is likely over the next century.

  19. Phase change fluids for solar thermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sama, D.A.; Sladek, K.J.

    1981-01-01

    This study explores the use, for storage of solar energy, of phase change materials which are suspended or emulsified in an immiscible carrier fluid. Emulsions of up to 50 weight % paraffin wax in water were found to be very fluid, highly stable, and quite flame resistant. Such easily pumped emulsions allow for an increase in stored energy density while avoiding the severe heat transfer rate problems normally encountered with phase change storage. Since the suspended phase change materials can be used both to collect and store solar energy, a heat transfer step is eliminated and the energy may be stored at a higher average temperature. This in turn results in a higher thermodynamic availability which is shown to be particularly advantageous in the storage of solar energy for refrigeration or heat pump systems. 6 refs.

  20. Solar heat storage in phase change material

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, H.J.

    1984-02-28

    The objective of this project was to develop a chemical heat storage system that had a phase change with release of latent heat at about 105/sup 0/F. The primary reason this kind on system was sought was that heat storage capacity of commonly used storage systems do not match the heat collection capacity of open air collectors. In addition to the phase change three other factors were considered: the cost of the material, the amount of heat the system would hold per unit volume, and the rate at which the system released sensible and latent heat. One hundred nineteen tests were made on 32 systems. Only data on six of the more promising are presented. In the six systems, borax was used as the major component with other materials used as nucleating agents toraise the temperature of phase change.

  1. String theory in Ad{{S}_{3}}\\times {{S}^{3}}\\times {{T}^{4}} with mixed flux: semiclassical and 1-loop phase in the S-matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanchuk, A.

    2015-05-01

    We present a semiclassical derivation of the tree-level and 1-loop dressing phases in the massive sector of string theory on Ad{{S}3}× {{S}3}× {{T}4} supplemented by Ramond-Ramond and Neveu-Schwarz-Neveu-Schwarz 3-form fluxes. In analogy with the Ad{{S}5}× {{S}5} case, we use the dressing method to obtain scattering solutions for dyonic giant magnons which allows us to determine the semiclassical bound-state S-matrix and its 1-loop correction. We also find that the 1-loop correction to the dyonic giant magnon energy vanishes. Looking at the relation between the bound-state picture and elementary magnons in terms of the fusion procedure we deduce the elementary dressing phases. In both the semiclassical and 1-loop cases we find agreement with recent proposals from finite-gap equations and unitarity cut methods. Further, we find consistency with the finite-gap picture by determining the resolvent for the dyonic giant magnon from the semiclassical bosonic scattering data.

  2. Adding static printing capabilities to the EUV phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Anderson, Erik H.; Batson, Phillip; Denham, Paul; Jackson, Keith; Rekawa, Seno; Bokor, Jeffery

    2001-03-01

    While interferometry is routinely used for the characterization and alignment of lithographic optics, the ultimate performance metric for these optics is printing in photoresist. Direct comparison of imaging and wavefront performance is also useful for verifying and improving the predictive power of wavefront metrology under actual printing conditions. To address these issues, static, small-field printing capabilities are being added to the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) phase-shifting point diffraction interferometer (PS/PDI) implemented at the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This Sub-field Exposure Station (SES) will enable the earliest possible imaging characterization of the upcoming Engineering Test Stand (ETS) Set-2 projection optics. Relevant printing studies with the ETS projection optics require illumination partial coherence with {sigma} of approximately 0.7. This {sigma} value is very different from the coherent illumination requirements of the EUV PS/PDI and the coherence properties naturally provided by synchrotron undulator beamline illumination. Adding printing capabilities to the PS/PDI experimental system thus necessitates the development of an alternative illumination system capable of destroying the inherent coherence of the beamline. The SES is being implemented with two independent illuminators: the first is based on a novel EUV diffuser currently under development and the second is based on a scanning mirror design. Here we describe the design and implementation of the new SES, including a discussion of the illuminators and the fabrication of the EUV diffuser.

  3. Polyolefin composites containing a phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1991-01-01

    A composite useful in thermal energy storage, said composite being formed of a polyolefin matrix having a phase change material such as a crystalline alkyl hydrocarbon incorporated therein, said polyolefin being thermally form stable; the composite is useful in forming pellets, sheets or fibers having thermal energy storage characteristics; methods for forming the composite are also disclosed.

  4. Phase change thermal energy storage material

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Burrows, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    A thermal energy storge composition is disclosed. The composition comprises a non-chloride hydrate having a phase change transition temperature in the range of 70.degree.-95.degree. F. and a latent heat of transformation of at least about 35 calories/gram.

  5. Covert thermal barcodes based on phase change nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Binh; Liu, Helin; Ma, Liyuan; Su, Ming

    2014-01-01

    An unmet need is to develop covert barcodes that can be used to track-trace objects, and authenticate documents. This paper describes a new nanoparticle-based covert barcode system, in which a selected panel of solid-to-liquid phase change nanoparticles with discrete and sharp melting peaks is added in a variety of objects such as explosive derivative, drug, polymer, and ink. This method has high labeling capacity owing to the small sizes of nanoparticles, sharp melting peaks, and large scan range of thermal analysis. The thermal barcode can enhance forensic investigation by its technical readiness, structural covertness, and robustness. PMID:24901064

  6. Locust Dynamics: Behavioral Phase Change and Swarming

    PubMed Central

    Topaz, Chad M.; D'Orsogna, Maria R.; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah; Bernoff, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Locusts exhibit two interconvertible behavioral phases, solitarious and gregarious. While solitarious individuals are repelled from other locusts, gregarious insects are attracted to conspecifics and can form large aggregations such as marching hopper bands. Numerous biological experiments at the individual level have shown how crowding biases conversion towards the gregarious form. To understand the formation of marching locust hopper bands, we study phase change at the collective level, and in a quantitative framework. Specifically, we construct a partial integrodifferential equation model incorporating the interplay between phase change and spatial movement at the individual level in order to predict the dynamics of hopper band formation at the population level. Stability analysis of our model reveals conditions for an outbreak, characterized by a large scale transition to the gregarious phase. A model reduction enables quantification of the temporal dynamics of each phase, of the proportion of the population that will eventually gregarize, and of the time scale for this to occur. Numerical simulations provide descriptions of the aggregation's structure and reveal transiently traveling clumps of gregarious insects. Our predictions of aggregation and mass gregarization suggest several possible future biological experiments. PMID:22916003

  7. Locust dynamics: behavioral phase change and swarming.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Chad M; D'Orsogna, Maria R; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah; Bernoff, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    Locusts exhibit two interconvertible behavioral phases, solitarious and gregarious. While solitarious individuals are repelled from other locusts, gregarious insects are attracted to conspecifics and can form large aggregations such as marching hopper bands. Numerous biological experiments at the individual level have shown how crowding biases conversion towards the gregarious form. To understand the formation of marching locust hopper bands, we study phase change at the collective level, and in a quantitative framework. Specifically, we construct a partial integrodifferential equation model incorporating the interplay between phase change and spatial movement at the individual level in order to predict the dynamics of hopper band formation at the population level. Stability analysis of our model reveals conditions for an outbreak, characterized by a large scale transition to the gregarious phase. A model reduction enables quantification of the temporal dynamics of each phase, of the proportion of the population that will eventually gregarize, and of the time scale for this to occur. Numerical simulations provide descriptions of the aggregation's structure and reveal transiently traveling clumps of gregarious insects. Our predictions of aggregation and mass gregarization suggest several possible future biological experiments.

  8. 40 CFR 1054.650 - What special provisions apply for adding or changing governors?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-testing requirements of 40 CFR 1065.10(c)(1) related to in-use duty cycles do not apply to engines you... conclusion. (b) It is a violation of the tampering provisions in 40 CFR 1068.101(b)(1) to remove a governor... adding or changing governors? 1054.650 Section 1054.650 Protection of Environment...

  9. 40 CFR 1054.650 - What special provisions apply for adding or changing governors?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-testing requirements of 40 CFR 1065.10(c)(1) related to in-use duty cycles do not apply to engines you... conclusion. (b) It is a violation of the tampering provisions in 40 CFR 1068.101(b)(1) to remove a governor... adding or changing governors? 1054.650 Section 1054.650 Protection of Environment...

  10. A numerical simulation of the Plinian Fall Phase of 79 A.D. eruption of Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedonio, G.; Pareschi, M. T.; Santacroce, R.

    1988-12-01

    The tephra transport and fallout during the Plinian phase of the 79 A.D. eruption of Vesuvius has been numerically simulated by using an advection-diffusion model based on a continuity equation for the mass concentration in which wind field, atmospheric diffusion, and gravity settling are considered. The solution of the equation has been obtained on a nonuniform three-dimensional grid to optimize the computation time and to reduce the errors. The input data are (1) the total erupted mass, (2) the variation with time of the column height, (3) the particle population in terms of the settling velocity, and (4) the wind field. The vertical mass distribution of the particles which leave the column is given by an empirical formula (Suzuki, 1983), whose parameters are obtained from data of Carey and Sigurdsson (1987) and best fitting with field data. Two distinct phases have been distinguished in the eruption: (1) related to white phonolitic pumice fallout and (2) dominated by the emission of gray tephritic-phonolite pumice. According to the literature the total duration of the pumice fallout was about 19 hours with column height ranging between about 14 and 32 km. The "white phase" has been estimated to have had 9 hours duration, while the "gray phase" lasted 10 hours. Magma discharge rate has been calculated assuming a fourth power relationship with column height. Total erupted volumes of 1.0 and 2.6 km3 of dense rock equivalent products have been assumed for the white and the gray phases, respectively (Sigurdsson et al., 1985). The particle population of the cloud has been assumed to correspond to that of a pyroclastic flow deposit related to a nearly total column collapse. The wind field results from a 60° clockwise rotation of the presently most frequent wind distribution field during the summer reduced in speed module of about 40%. The simulated ground thicknesses generally agree with the actual ones. The computed granulometric spectra at specific localities are in

  11. Endurance characteristics of phase change memory cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruru, Huo; Daolin, Cai; Chen, Bomy; Yifeng, Chen; Yuchan, Wang; Yueqing, Wang; Hongyang, Wei; Qing, Wang; Yangyang, Xia; Dan, Gao; Zhitang, Song

    2016-05-01

    The endurance characteristics of phase change memory are studied. With operational cycles, the resistances of reset and set states gradually change to the opposite direction. What is more, the operational conditions that are needed are also discussed. The failure and the changes are concerned with the compositional change of the phase change material. An abnormal phenomenon that the threshold voltage decreases slightly at first and then increases is observed, which is due to the coaction of interface contact and growing active volume size changing. Project supported by the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. XDA09020402), the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Nos. 2013CBA01900, 2010CB934300, 2011CBA00607, 2011CB932804), the National Integrate Circuit Research Program of China (No. 2009ZX02023-003), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61176122, 61106001, 61261160500, 61376006), and the Science and Technology Council of Shanghai (Nos. 12nm0503701, 13DZ2295700, 12QA1403900, 13ZR1447200, 14ZR1447500).

  12. Study of the physical properties of a mesogenic mixture showing induced smectic A(d) phase by refractive index, density and x-ray diffraction measurements.

    PubMed

    Roy, P D; Prasad, A; Das, M K

    2009-02-18

    The binary mixture of 4-n-pentyl phenyl 4-n'-hexyloxy benzoate (ME6O.5) and p-cyanophenyl trans-4-pentyl cyclohexane carboxylate (CPPCC) shows the presence of an induced smectic A(d) phase in a certain concentration range 0.03change in birefringence is continuous at the smectic A(d) to nematic phase transition for mixtures with x>0.33, whereas there is a discontinuity in these values for mixtures with x<0.33, consistent with the density and transition entropy measurements done on this system. The orientational order parameter, measured from x-ray diffraction studies, are somewhat smaller than those obtained from refractive index measurement in the induced smectic phase for all the mixtures. In the smectic phase, the OOP values initially increases with molar concentration up to x = 0.24 and then decreases showing a broad minima around x = 0.4. The variation of layer thickness in the induced smectic phase with composition has been explained by assuming the formation of homo- and heterodimers. We conclude that the possible packing of molecules in the induced smectic A(d) phase stabilizes the layers but increases the orientational free volume, consistent with the lower orientational order parameter.

  13. Characterization of vapor phase mercury released from concrete processing with baghouse filter dust added cement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Hayes, Josh; Wu, Chang-Yu; Townsend, Timothy; Schert, John; Vinson, Tim; Deliz, Katherine; Bonzongo, Jean-Claude

    2014-02-18

    The fate of mercury (Hg) in cement processing and products has drawn intense attention due to its contribution to the ambient emission inventory. Feeding Hg-loaded coal fly ash to the cement kiln introduces additional Hg into the kiln's baghouse filter dust (BFD), and the practice of replacing 5% of cement with the Hg-loaded BFD by cement plants has recently raised environmental and occupational health concerns. The objective of this study was to determine Hg concentration and speciation in BFD as well as to investigate the release of vapor phase Hg from storing and processing BFD-added cement. The results showed that Hg content in the BFD from different seasons ranged from 0.91-1.44 mg/kg (ppm), with 62-73% as soluble inorganic Hg, while Hg in the other concrete constituents were 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than the BFD. Up to 21% of Hg loss was observed in the time-series study while storing the BFD in the open environment by the end of the seventh day. Real-time monitoring in the bench system indicated that high temperature and moisture can facilitate Hg release at the early stage. Ontario Hydro (OH) traps showed that total Hg emission from BFD is dictated by the air exchange surface area. In the bench simulation of concrete processing, only 0.4-0.5% of Hg escaped from mixing and curing BFD-added cement. A follow-up headspace study did not detect Hg release in the following 7 days. In summary, replacing 5% of cement with the BFD investigated in this study has minimal occupational health concerns for concrete workers, and proper storing and mixing of BFD with cement can minimize Hg emission burden for the cement plant. PMID:24444016

  14. Characterization of vapor phase mercury released from concrete processing with baghouse filter dust added cement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Hayes, Josh; Wu, Chang-Yu; Townsend, Timothy; Schert, John; Vinson, Tim; Deliz, Katherine; Bonzongo, Jean-Claude

    2014-02-18

    The fate of mercury (Hg) in cement processing and products has drawn intense attention due to its contribution to the ambient emission inventory. Feeding Hg-loaded coal fly ash to the cement kiln introduces additional Hg into the kiln's baghouse filter dust (BFD), and the practice of replacing 5% of cement with the Hg-loaded BFD by cement plants has recently raised environmental and occupational health concerns. The objective of this study was to determine Hg concentration and speciation in BFD as well as to investigate the release of vapor phase Hg from storing and processing BFD-added cement. The results showed that Hg content in the BFD from different seasons ranged from 0.91-1.44 mg/kg (ppm), with 62-73% as soluble inorganic Hg, while Hg in the other concrete constituents were 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than the BFD. Up to 21% of Hg loss was observed in the time-series study while storing the BFD in the open environment by the end of the seventh day. Real-time monitoring in the bench system indicated that high temperature and moisture can facilitate Hg release at the early stage. Ontario Hydro (OH) traps showed that total Hg emission from BFD is dictated by the air exchange surface area. In the bench simulation of concrete processing, only 0.4-0.5% of Hg escaped from mixing and curing BFD-added cement. A follow-up headspace study did not detect Hg release in the following 7 days. In summary, replacing 5% of cement with the BFD investigated in this study has minimal occupational health concerns for concrete workers, and proper storing and mixing of BFD with cement can minimize Hg emission burden for the cement plant.

  15. Lower mantle tomography and phase change mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Daoyuan; Helmberger, Don

    2008-10-01

    A lower mantle S wave triplication (Scd) has been recognized for many years and appears to be explained by the recently discovered perovskite (PV) to postperovskite (PPV) phase change. Seismic observations of Scd display (1) rapid changes in strength and timing relative to S and ScS and (2) early arrivals beneath fast lower mantle regions. While the latter feature can be explained by a Clapeyron slope (γ) of 6 MPa/K and a velocity jump of 1.5% when corrected by tomographic predictions, it does not explain the first feature. Here, we expand on this mapping approach by attempting a new parameterization that requires a sample of D" near the ScS bounce point (δVS) where the phase height (hph) and velocity jump (β) are functions of (δVS). These parameters are determined by modeling dense record sections collected from USArray and PASSCAL data where Grand's tomographic model is the most detailed in D" structure beneath Central America. We also address the range of γ to generate new global models of the phase boundary and associated temperature variation. We conclude that a γ near 9 MPa/K is most satisfactory but requires β to be nonuniform with a range from about 1.0 to 4.0% with some slow region samples requiring the largest values. Moreover, the edges of the supposed buckled slabs delimitated by both P and S waves display very rapid changes in phase boundary heights producing Scd multipathing. These features can explain the unstable nature of the Scd phase with easy detection to no detection commonly observed. The fine structure at the base of the mantle beneath these edges contains particularly strong reflections indicative of local ultralow velocity zones, which are predicted in some dynamic models.

  16. Phase change in liquid face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, W. F.; Winowich, N. S.; Birchak, M. J.; Kennedy, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of boiling (or phase change) in liquid face seals. An appropriate model is set up and approximate solutions obtained. Some practical illustrative examples are given. Major conclusions are that (1) boiling may occur more often than has been suspected particularly when the sealed liquid is near saturation conditions, (2) the temperature variation in a seal clearance region may not be very great and the main reason for boiling is the flashing which occurs as the pressure decreases through the seal clearance, and (3) there are two separate values of the parameter film-thickness/angular-velocity-squared (and associated radii where phase change takes place) which provide the same separating force under a given set of operating conditions. For a given speed seal face excursions about the larger spacing are stable, but excursions about the smaller spacing are unstable, leading to a growth to the larger spacing or a catastrophic collapse.

  17. Phase-change materials in masonry construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, M.

    1982-01-01

    A demonstration project leading to commercialization of a passive thermal wall using phase change storage materials (PCM) in masonry construction is reported. Techniques of vacuum forming have been identified and characterized making it possible to produce high-volume low-cost packages for insertion into the core of cement blocks. PCM filled packages with aluminum laminated film produces a long life product capable of operating to store and release solar heat over long periods of time. Accelerated tests indicate operability over the life of the building. Five hundred accelerated test cycles have shown insignificant deterioration of capacity of the phase change material. The testing program shows that the wall is capable of both storing and transmitting heat in a similar manner to conventional trombe walls, but with increased thermal capability. Product cost data on return on investment estimates are low enough to be economically attractive.

  18. Dependence of phase transitions on small changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, R.

    1993-06-01

    In this contribution, the generalized thermodynamic formalism is applied to a nonhyperbolic dynamical system in two comparable situations. The change from one situation to the other is small in the sense that the grammar and the singularities of the system are preserved. For the discussion of the effects generated by this change, the generalized entropy functions are calculated and the sets of the specific scaling functions which reflect the phase transition of the system are investigated. It is found that even under mild variations, this set is not invariant.

  19. Solar activity and climate change during the 1750 A.D. solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, Edouard; Baroni, Mélanie; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    The number of sunspots and other characteristics have been widely used to reconstruct the solar activity beyond the last three decades of accurate satellite measurements. It has also been possible to reconstruct the long-term solar behavior by measuring the abundance on Earth of cosmogenic nuclides such as carbon 14 and beryllium 10. These isotopes are formed by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with atmospheric molecules. Accelerator mass spectrometry is used to measure the abundance of these isotopes in natural archives such as polar ice (for 10Be), tree rings and corals (for 14C). Over the last millennium, the solar activity has been dominated by alternating active and quiet periods, such as the Maunder Minimum, which occurred between 1645 and 1715 A.D. The climate forcing of this solar variability is the subject of intense research, both because the exact scaling in terms of irradiance is still a matter of debate and because other solar variations may have played a role in amplifying the climatic response. Indeed, the past few decades of accurate solar measurements do not include conditions equivalent to an extended solar minimum. A further difficulty of the analysis lies in the presence of other climate forcings during the last millennium, which are superimposed on the solar variations. Finally, the inherent precision of paleotemperature proxies are close to the signal amplitude retrieved from various paleoclimate archives covering the last millennium. Recent model-data comparisons for the last millennium have led to the conclusion that the solar forcing during this period was minor in comparison to volcanic eruptions and greenhouse gas concentrations (e.g. Schurer et al. 2013 J. Clim., 2014 Nat. Geo.). In order to separate the different forcings, it is useful to focus on a temperature change in phase with a well-documented solar minimum so as to maximize the response to this astronomical forcing. This is the approach followed by Wagner et al. (2005 Clim

  20. Sprayable Phase Change Coating Thermal Protection Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Rod W.; Hayes, Paul W.; Kaul, Raj

    2005-01-01

    NASA has expressed a need for reusable, environmentally friendly, phase change coating that is capable of withstanding the heat loads that have historically required an ablative thermal insulation. The Space Shuttle Program currently relies on ablative materials for thermal protection. The problem with an ablative insulation is that, by design, the material ablates away, in fulfilling its function of cooling the underlying substrate, thus preventing the insulation from being reused from flight to flight. The present generation of environmentally friendly, sprayable, ablative thermal insulation (MCC-l); currently use on the Space Shuttle SRBs, is very close to being a reusable insulation system. In actual flight conditions, as confirmed by the post-flight inspections of the SRBs, very little of the material ablates. Multi-flight thermal insulation use has not been qualified for the Space Shuttle. The gap that would have to be overcome in order to implement a reusable Phase Change Coating (PCC) is not unmanageable. PCC could be applied robotically with a spray process utilizing phase change material as filler to yield material of even higher strength and reliability as compared to MCC-1. The PCC filled coatings have also demonstrated potential as cryogenic thermal coatings. In experimental thermal tests, a thin application of PCC has provided the same thermal protection as a much thicker and heavier application of a traditional ablative thermal insulation. In addition, tests have shown that the structural integrity of the coating has been maintained and phase change performance after several aero-thermal cycles was not affected. Experimental tests have also shown that, unlike traditional ablative thermal insulations, PCC would not require an environmental seal coat, which has historically been required to prevent moisture absorption by the thermal insulation, prevent environmental degradation, and to improve the optical and aerodynamic properties. In order to reduce

  1. Bubble oscillation regimes including phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergamasco, Luca; Fuster, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    In this work we study thermal and mass diffusion effects on spherical bubble dynamics. The transfer function, which relates the bubble radius oscillation with pressure changes, is obtained by solving analytically the linearized form of the conservation equations inside, outside the bubble and at the interface with the surrounding fluid. Phase diagrams are then built using this transfer function, which is shown to depend on: the bubble and liquid Peclet number, the water-vapor/gas content, the Sherwood number, a dimensionless enthalpy of vaporization and the ratio of thermal conductivities between the bubble and the liquid. We construct the phase diagrams by comparing the predictions of simplified models with the full analytical solution. Heat and vapor mass diffusion inside the bubble significantly restricts the maximum evaporation flux that one obtains when assuming uniform vapor pressure inside the bubble. This mechanism influences the bubble oscillation for bubbles containing a significant amount of vapor (mass fraction larger than 0.5) in a range of frequencies that is influenced by the enthalpy of vaporization and the ratio of thermal conductivities. The proposed analysis is meant to be useful for the validation of full 3D numerical codes dealing with phase change processes.

  2. The Ad Hoc process to strengthen the framework convention on climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishna, K.; Deutz, A.M.; Jacobsen, L.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Woods Hole Research Center convened an International Conference on The Ad Hoc Process to Strengthen the Framework Convention on Climate Change in Woods Hole, MA, on October 7-9, 1995. The conference was conducted to examine the prospects for successful adoption of a protocol to the Framework Convention on Climate Change by 1997. In preparation for the Second session of the Ad Hoc Group on the Berlin Mandate, several governmental and nongovernmental representatives met in Woods Hole to discuss the process and possible outcome of the Berlin Mandate negotiations for a protocol or other legal instrument to strengthen the Convention. The conference was by invitation and all participants attended in their personal capacities.

  3. Tunable hyperbolic metamaterials utilizing phase change heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamoorthy, Harish N. S.; Menon, Vinod M.; Zhou, You; Ramanathan, Shriram; Narimanov, Evgenii

    2014-03-24

    We present a metal-free tunable anisotropic metamaterial where the iso-frequency surface is tuned from elliptical to hyperbolic dispersion by exploiting the metal-insulator phase transition in the correlated material vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}). Using VO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} heterostructures, we demonstrate the transition in the effective dielectric constant parallel to the layers to undergo a sign change from positive to negative as the VO{sub 2} undergoes the phase transition. The possibility to tune the iso-frequency surface in real time using external perturbations such as temperature, voltage, or optical pulses creates new avenues for controlling light-matter interaction.

  4. Effects of adding MIN-AD to steam-flaked corn-based diets with or without wet corn distiller's grain plus solubles on performance by beef cattle during receiving and finishing phases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of wet corn distillers grain (WCDG) and MIN-AD (MIN-AD Inc., Amarillo, TX), a commercial source of calcium-magnesium carbonate, on cattle performance and carcass measurements were evaluated in a 42-d receiving phase (220 steers; initial BW = 279.3 kg) and a subsequent finishing phase (192 s...

  5. Phase change based cooling for high burst mode heat loads with temperature regulation above the phase change temperature

    DOEpatents

    The United States of America as represented by the United States Department of Energy

    2009-12-15

    An apparatus and method for transferring thermal energy from a heat load is disclosed. In particular, use of a phase change material and specific flow designs enables cooling with temperature regulation well above the fusion temperature of the phase change material for medium and high heat loads from devices operated intermittently (in burst mode). Exemplary heat loads include burst mode lasers and laser diodes, flight avionics, and high power space instruments. Thermal energy is transferred from the heat load to liquid phase change material from a phase change material reservoir. The liquid phase change material is split into two flows. Thermal energy is transferred from the first flow via a phase change material heat sink. The second flow bypasses the phase change material heat sink and joins with liquid phase change material exiting from the phase change material heat sink. The combined liquid phase change material is returned to the liquid phase change material reservoir. The ratio of bypass flow to flow into the phase change material heat sink can be varied to adjust the temperature of the liquid phase change material returned to the liquid phase change material reservoir. Varying the flowrate and temperature of the liquid phase change material presented to the heat load determines the magnitude of thermal energy transferred from the heat load.

  6. Phase Change Material Thermal Power Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    2013-01-01

    An innovative modification has been made to a previously patented design for the Phase Change Material (PCM) Thermal Generator, which works in water where ocean temperature alternatively melts wax in canisters, or allows the wax to re-solidify, causing high-pressure oil to flow through a hydraulic generator, thus creating electricity to charge a battery that powers the vehicle. In this modification, a similar thermal PCM device has been created that is heated and cooled by the air and solar radiation instead of using ocean temperature differences to change the PCM from solid to liquid. This innovation allows the device to use thermal energy to generate electricity on land, instead of just in the ocean.

  7. Hairy AdS solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabalón, Andrés; Astefanesei, Dumitru; Choque, David

    2016-11-01

    We construct exact hairy AdS soliton solutions in Einstein-dilaton gravity theory. We examine their thermodynamic properties and discuss the role of these solutions for the existence of first order phase transitions for hairy black holes. The negative energy density associated to hairy AdS solitons can be interpreted as the Casimir energy that is generated in the dual filed theory when the fermions are antiperiodic on the compact coordinate.

  8. Estimation of the effective phase function of bulk diffusing materials with the inverse adding-doubling method.

    PubMed

    Leyre, Sven; Meuret, Youri; Durinck, Guy; Hofkens, Johan; Deconinck, Geert; Hanselaer, Peter

    2014-04-01

    The accuracy of optical simulations including bulk diffusors is heavily dependent on the accuracy of the bulk scattering properties. If no knowledge on the physical scattering effects is available, an iterative procedure is usually used to obtain the scattering properties, such as the inverse Monte Carlo method or the inverse adding-doubling (AD) method. In these methods, a predefined phase function with one free parameter is usually used to limit the number of free parameters. In this work, three predefined phase functions (Henyey-Greenstein, two-term Henyey-Greenstein, and Gegenbauer kernel (GK) phase function) are implemented in the inverse AD method to determine the optical properties of two strongly diffusing materials: low-density polyethylene and TiO₂ particles. Using the presented approach, an estimation of the effective phase function was made. It was found that the use of the GK phase function resulted in the best agreement between calculated and experimental transmittance, reflectance, and scattered radiant intensity distribution for the LDPE sample. For the TiO₂ sample, a good agreement was obtained with both the two-term Henyey-Greenstein and the GK phase function. PMID:24787170

  9. Metallic resist for phase-change lithography

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Bi Jian; Huang, Jun Zhu; Ni, Ri Wen; Yu, Nian Nian; Wei, Wei; Hu, Yang Zhi; Li, Zhen; Miao, Xiang Shui

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the most widely used photoresists in optical lithography are organic-based resists. The major limitations of such resists include the photon accumulation severely affects the quality of photolithography patterns and the size of the pattern is constrained by the diffraction limit. Phase-change lithography, which uses semiconductor-based resists such as chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 films, was developed to overcome these limitations. Here, instead of chalcogenide, we propose a metallic resist composed of Mg58Cu29Y13 alloy films, which exhibits a considerable difference in etching rate between amorphous and crystalline states. Furthermore, the heat distribution in Mg58Cu29Y13 thin film is better and can be more easily controlled than that in Ge2Sb2Te5 during exposure. We succeeded in fabricating both continuous and discrete patterns on Mg58Cu29Y13 thin films via laser irradiation and wet etching. Our results demonstrate that a metallic resist of Mg58Cu29Y13 is suitable for phase change lithography, and this type of resist has potential due to its outstanding characteristics. PMID:24931505

  10. Material Engineering for Phase Change Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, David M.

    As semiconductor devices continue to scale downward, and portable consumer electronics become more prevalent there is a need to develop memory technology that will scale with devices and use less energy, while maintaining performance. One of the leading prototypical memories that is being investigated is phase change memory. Phase change memory (PCM) is a non-volatile memory composed of 1 transistor and 1 resistor. The resistive structure includes a memory material alloy which can change between amorphous and crystalline states repeatedly using current/voltage pulses of different lengths and magnitudes. The most widely studied PCM materials are chalcogenides - Germanium-Antimony-Tellerium (GST) with Ge2Sb2Te3 and Germanium-Tellerium (GeTe) being some of the most popular stochiometries. As these cells are scaled downward, the current/voltage needed to switch these materials becomes comparable to the voltage needed to sense the cell's state. The International Roadmap for Semiconductors aims to raise the threshold field of these devices from 66.6 V/mum to be at least 375 V/mum for the year 2024. These cells are also prone to resistance drift between states, leading to bit corruption and memory loss. Phase change material properties are known to influence PCM device performance such as crystallization temperature having an effect on data retention and litetime, while resistivity values in the amorphous and crystalline phases have an effect on the current/voltage needed to write/erase the cell. Addition of dopants is also known to modify the phase change material parameters. The materials G2S2T5, GeTe, with dopants - nitrogen, silicon, titanium, and aluminum oxide and undoped Gallium-Antimonide (GaSb) are studied for these desired characteristics. Thin films of these compositions are deposited via physical vapor deposition at IBM Watson Research Center. Crystallization temperatures are investigated using time resolved x-ray diffraction at Brookhaven National Laboratory

  11. Cooling and societal change during the Late Antique Little Ice Age from 536 to around 660 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büntgen, Ulf; Myglan, Vladimir S.; Ljungqvist, Fredrik Charpentier; McCormick, Michael; di Cosmo, Nicola; Sigl, Michael; Jungclaus, Johann; Wagner, Sebastian; Krusic, Paul J.; Esper, Jan; Kaplan, Jed O.; de Vaan, Michiel A. C.; Luterbacher, Jürg; Wacker, Lukas; Tegel, Willy; Kirdyanov, Alexander V.

    2016-03-01

    Climatic changes during the first half of the Common Era have been suggested to play a role in societal reorganizations in Europe and Asia. In particular, the sixth century coincides with rising and falling civilizations, pandemics, human migration and political turmoil. Our understanding of the magnitude and spatial extent as well as the possible causes and concurrences of climate change during this period is, however, still limited. Here we use tree-ring chronologies from the Russian Altai and European Alps to reconstruct summer temperatures over the past two millennia. We find an unprecedented, long-lasting and spatially synchronized cooling following a cluster of large volcanic eruptions in 536, 540 and 547 AD (ref. ), which was probably sustained by ocean and sea-ice feedbacks, as well as a solar minimum. We thus identify the interval from 536 to about 660 AD as the Late Antique Little Ice Age. Spanning most of the Northern Hemisphere, we suggest that this cold phase be considered as an additional environmental factor contributing to the establishment of the Justinian plague, transformation of the eastern Roman Empire and collapse of the Sasanian Empire, movements out of the Asian steppe and Arabian Peninsula, spread of Slavic-speaking peoples and political upheavals in China.

  12. The MYRRHA ADS Project in Belgium Enters the Front End Engineering Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schyns, M.; Aït Abderrahim, H.; Baeten, P.; Fernandez, R.; De Bruyn, D.

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a multipurpose research facility currently being developed at SCK•CEN. MYRRHA is based on the ADS (Accelerator Driven System) concept where a proton accelerator, a spallation target and a subcritical reactor are coupled. MYRRHA will demonstrate the ADS full concept by coupling these three components at a reasonable power level.

  13. Projected phase-change memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelmans, Wabe W.; Sebastian, Abu; Jonnalagadda, Vara Prasad; Krebs, Daniel; Dellmann, Laurent; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2015-09-01

    Nanoscale memory devices, whose resistance depends on the history of the electric signals applied, could become critical building blocks in new computing paradigms, such as brain-inspired computing and memcomputing. However, there are key challenges to overcome, such as the high programming power required, noise and resistance drift. Here, to address these, we present the concept of a projected memory device, whose distinguishing feature is that the physical mechanism of resistance storage is decoupled from the information-retrieval process. We designed and fabricated projected memory devices based on the phase-change storage mechanism and convincingly demonstrate the concept through detailed experimentation, supported by extensive modelling and finite-element simulations. The projected memory devices exhibit remarkably low drift and excellent noise performance. We also demonstrate active control and customization of the programming characteristics of the device that reliably realize a multitude of resistance states.

  14. Projected phase-change memory devices.

    PubMed

    Koelmans, Wabe W; Sebastian, Abu; Jonnalagadda, Vara Prasad; Krebs, Daniel; Dellmann, Laurent; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale memory devices, whose resistance depends on the history of the electric signals applied, could become critical building blocks in new computing paradigms, such as brain-inspired computing and memcomputing. However, there are key challenges to overcome, such as the high programming power required, noise and resistance drift. Here, to address these, we present the concept of a projected memory device, whose distinguishing feature is that the physical mechanism of resistance storage is decoupled from the information-retrieval process. We designed and fabricated projected memory devices based on the phase-change storage mechanism and convincingly demonstrate the concept through detailed experimentation, supported by extensive modelling and finite-element simulations. The projected memory devices exhibit remarkably low drift and excellent noise performance. We also demonstrate active control and customization of the programming characteristics of the device that reliably realize a multitude of resistance states. PMID:26333363

  15. Responding to climate change: Adélie Penguins confront astronomical and ocean boundaries.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Grant; Toniolo, Viola; Ainley, David G; Parkinson, Claire L; Arrigo, Kevin R; Trathan, Phil N

    2010-07-01

    Long-distance migration enables many organisms to take advantage of lucrative breeding and feeding opportunities during summer at high latitudes and then to move to lower, more temperate latitudes for the remainder of the year. The latitudinal range of the Adélie Penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) spans approximately 22 degrees. Penguins from northern colonies may not migrate, but due to the high latitude of Ross Island colonies, these penguins almost certainly undertake the longest migrations for the species. Previous work has suggested that Adélies require both pack ice and some ambient light at all times of year. Over a three-year period, which included winters of both extensive and reduced sea ice, we investigated characteristics of migratory routes and wintering locations of Adélie Penguins from two colonies of very different size on Ross Island, Ross Sea, the southernmost colonies for any penguin. We acquired data from 3-16 geolocation sensor tags (GLS) affixed to penguins each year at both Cape Royds and Cape Crozier in 2003-2005. Migrations averaged 12760 km, with the longest being 17 600 km, and were in part facilitated by pack ice movement. Trip distances varied annually, but not by colony. Penguins rarely traveled north of the main sea-ice pack, and used areas with high sea-ice concentration, ranging from 75% to 85%, about 500 km inward from the ice edge. They also used locations where there was some twilight (2-7 h with sun < 6 degrees below the horizon). We report the present Adélie Penguin migration pattern and conjecture on how it probably has changed over the past approximately 12000 years, as the West Antarctic Ice Sheet withdrew southward across the Ross Sea, a situation that no other Adélie Penguin population has had to confront. As sea ice extent in the Ross Sea sector decreases in the near future, as predicted by climate models, we can expect further changes in the migration patterns of the Ross Sea penguins.

  16. Metallic phase change material thermal storage for Dish Stirling

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, C. E.; Kruizenga, A. M.; Hernandez-Sanchez, B. A.; Coker, E. N.

    2015-06-05

    Dish-Stirling systems provide high-efficiency solar-only electrical generation and currently hold the world record at 31.25%. This high efficiency results in a system with a high possibility of meeting the DOE SunShot goal of $0.06/kWh. However, current dish-Stirling systems do not incorporate thermal storage. For the next generation of non-intermittent and cost-competitive solar power plants, we propose adding a thermal energy storage system that combines latent (phase-change) energy transport and latent energy storage in order to match the isothermal input requirements of Stirling engines while also maximizing the exergetic efficiency of the entire system. This paper reports current findings in the area of selection, synthesis and evaluation of a suitable high performance metallic phase change material (PCM) as well as potential interactions with containment alloy materials. The metallic PCM's, while more expensive than salts, have been identified as having substantial performance advantages primarily due to high thermal conductivity, leading to high exergetic efficiency. Systems modeling has indicated, based on high dish Stirling system performance, an allowable cost of the PCM storage system that is substantially higher than SunShot goals for storage cost on tower systems. Several PCM's are identified with suitable melting temperature, cost, and performance.

  17. Metallic phase change material thermal storage for Dish Stirling

    DOE PAGES

    Andraka, C. E.; Kruizenga, A. M.; Hernandez-Sanchez, B. A.; Coker, E. N.

    2015-06-05

    Dish-Stirling systems provide high-efficiency solar-only electrical generation and currently hold the world record at 31.25%. This high efficiency results in a system with a high possibility of meeting the DOE SunShot goal of $0.06/kWh. However, current dish-Stirling systems do not incorporate thermal storage. For the next generation of non-intermittent and cost-competitive solar power plants, we propose adding a thermal energy storage system that combines latent (phase-change) energy transport and latent energy storage in order to match the isothermal input requirements of Stirling engines while also maximizing the exergetic efficiency of the entire system. This paper reports current findings in themore » area of selection, synthesis and evaluation of a suitable high performance metallic phase change material (PCM) as well as potential interactions with containment alloy materials. The metallic PCM's, while more expensive than salts, have been identified as having substantial performance advantages primarily due to high thermal conductivity, leading to high exergetic efficiency. Systems modeling has indicated, based on high dish Stirling system performance, an allowable cost of the PCM storage system that is substantially higher than SunShot goals for storage cost on tower systems. Several PCM's are identified with suitable melting temperature, cost, and performance.« less

  18. Phase change material thermal capacitor clothing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus and method for metabolic cooling and insulation of a user in a cold environment. In its preferred embodiment the apparatus is a highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The apparatus can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The apparatus may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the apparatus also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  19. Antarctic climate change: extreme events disrupt plastic phenotypic response in Adélie penguins.

    PubMed

    Lescroël, Amélie; Ballard, Grant; Grémillet, David; Authier, Matthieu; Ainley, David G

    2014-01-01

    In the context of predicted alteration of sea ice cover and increased frequency of extreme events, it is especially timely to investigate plasticity within Antarctic species responding to a key environmental aspect of their ecology: sea ice variability. Using 13 years of longitudinal data, we investigated the effect of sea ice concentration (SIC) on the foraging efficiency of Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) breeding in the Ross Sea. A 'natural experiment' brought by the exceptional presence of giant icebergs during 5 consecutive years provided unprecedented habitat variation for testing the effects of extreme events on the relationship between SIC and foraging efficiency in this sea-ice dependent species. Significant levels of phenotypic plasticity were evident in response to changes in SIC in normal environmental conditions. Maximum foraging efficiency occurred at relatively low SIC, peaking at 6.1% and decreasing with higher SIC. The 'natural experiment' uncoupled efficiency levels from SIC variations. Our study suggests that lower summer SIC than currently observed would benefit the foraging performance of Adélie penguins in their southernmost breeding area. Importantly, it also provides evidence that extreme climatic events can disrupt response plasticity in a wild seabird population. This questions the predictive power of relationships built on past observations, when not only the average climatic conditions are changing but the frequency of extreme climatic anomalies is also on the rise.

  20. Antarctic climate change: extreme events disrupt plastic phenotypic response in Adélie penguins.

    PubMed

    Lescroël, Amélie; Ballard, Grant; Grémillet, David; Authier, Matthieu; Ainley, David G

    2014-01-01

    In the context of predicted alteration of sea ice cover and increased frequency of extreme events, it is especially timely to investigate plasticity within Antarctic species responding to a key environmental aspect of their ecology: sea ice variability. Using 13 years of longitudinal data, we investigated the effect of sea ice concentration (SIC) on the foraging efficiency of Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) breeding in the Ross Sea. A 'natural experiment' brought by the exceptional presence of giant icebergs during 5 consecutive years provided unprecedented habitat variation for testing the effects of extreme events on the relationship between SIC and foraging efficiency in this sea-ice dependent species. Significant levels of phenotypic plasticity were evident in response to changes in SIC in normal environmental conditions. Maximum foraging efficiency occurred at relatively low SIC, peaking at 6.1% and decreasing with higher SIC. The 'natural experiment' uncoupled efficiency levels from SIC variations. Our study suggests that lower summer SIC than currently observed would benefit the foraging performance of Adélie penguins in their southernmost breeding area. Importantly, it also provides evidence that extreme climatic events can disrupt response plasticity in a wild seabird population. This questions the predictive power of relationships built on past observations, when not only the average climatic conditions are changing but the frequency of extreme climatic anomalies is also on the rise. PMID:24489657

  1. Antarctic Climate Change: Extreme Events Disrupt Plastic Phenotypic Response in Adélie Penguins

    PubMed Central

    Lescroël, Amélie; Ballard, Grant; Grémillet, David; Authier, Matthieu; Ainley, David G.

    2014-01-01

    In the context of predicted alteration of sea ice cover and increased frequency of extreme events, it is especially timely to investigate plasticity within Antarctic species responding to a key environmental aspect of their ecology: sea ice variability. Using 13 years of longitudinal data, we investigated the effect of sea ice concentration (SIC) on the foraging efficiency of Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) breeding in the Ross Sea. A ‘natural experiment’ brought by the exceptional presence of giant icebergs during 5 consecutive years provided unprecedented habitat variation for testing the effects of extreme events on the relationship between SIC and foraging efficiency in this sea-ice dependent species. Significant levels of phenotypic plasticity were evident in response to changes in SIC in normal environmental conditions. Maximum foraging efficiency occurred at relatively low SIC, peaking at 6.1% and decreasing with higher SIC. The ‘natural experiment’ uncoupled efficiency levels from SIC variations. Our study suggests that lower summer SIC than currently observed would benefit the foraging performance of Adélie penguins in their southernmost breeding area. Importantly, it also provides evidence that extreme climatic events can disrupt response plasticity in a wild seabird population. This questions the predictive power of relationships built on past observations, when not only the average climatic conditions are changing but the frequency of extreme climatic anomalies is also on the rise. PMID:24489657

  2. Newly Enacted Intent Changes to ADS-B MASPS: Emphasis on Operations, Compatibility, and Integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhydt, Richard; Warren, Anthony W.

    2002-01-01

    Significant changes to the intent reporting structure in the Minimum Aviation System Performance Standards (MASPS) for Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) have recently been approved by RTCA Special Committee 186. The re-structured intent formats incorporate two major changes to the current MASPS (DO-242): addition of a Target State (TS) report that provides information on the horizontal and vertical targets for the current flight segment and replacement of the current Trajectory Change Point (TCP) and TCP+1 reports with Trajectory Change (TC) reports. TC reports include expanded information about TCPs and their connecting flight segments, in addition to making provisions for trajectory conformance elements. New intent elements are designed to accommodate a greater range of intent information, better reflect operational use and capabilities of existing and future aircraft avionics, and aid trajectory synthesis and conformance monitoring systems. These elements are expected to benefit near-term and future Air Traffic Management (ATM) applications, including separation assurance, local traffic flow management, and conformance monitoring. The current MASPS revision (DO-242A) implements those intent elements that are supported by current avionics standards and data buses. Additional elements are provisioned for inclusion in future MASPS revisions (beyond DO-242A) as avionics systems are evolved.

  3. Mechanics of Metals with Phase Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Lashley, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    New experimental data is presented on some exotic metals that exhibit phase changes at cryogenic temperatures. The types of phase changes that were detected in the specific heat data range from martensitic (diffusion less) transitions to superconducting transitions. In addition, the charge density wave (CDW) state in uranium metal was detected in the specific heat. Specific-heat measurements were made in zero-magnetic field using an apparatus capable of obtaining temperatures as low as 0.4 K. Calibration performed on this apparatus, using a single-crystal copper sample, show its accuracy to be 0.50%, while the resolution was better than 0.1%. Our measurements demonstrate that similar high precision and accurate specific-heat measurements can be obtained on milligram-scale samples. In Chapters 2 and 3, specific-heat measurements are presented for the B2 (CsCl structure) alloy AuZn and for {alpha}-uranium (orthorhombic symmetry). The AuZn alloy exhibits a continuous transition at 64.75 K and an entropy of transition of ({Delta}S{sub tr}) 2.02 J K{sup {minus}1} mol{sup {minus}1}. Calculation of the Debye temperature, by extrapolating of the high temperature phase elastic constants to T = 0 K yields a value of 207 K ({+-}2 K), in favorable agreement with the calorimetric value of 219 K ({+-}0.50 K), despite the intervening martensitic transition. Reported results for single-crystal {alpha}-U show a low-temperature limiting {Theta}{sub D} of 256 K ({+-}0.50 K) and four low-temperature anomalies: a superconducting transition below 1 K, an electronic transition at 22 K, and two anomalies at 38 K and at 42 K indicative of the CDW state. In order to continue the study of the actinide series of elements, a program was initiated to first purify and then grow single crystals of plutonium. Accordingly, the focus of Chapters 4 through 6 will be a description of plutonium sample preparation. In this program plutonium metal was purified via zone refining, using a levitated molten

  4. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The IR environment of the space craft varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. The result is a situation where a radiator sized for the maximal heat load in the most adverse situation is subject to freezing on the dark side of the orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when there is too much being produced by the space craft to reject to space, and then feeding that energy back into the thermal loop when conditions are more favorable. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration LLO missions. In order to validate the performance of PCM Heat Exchangers, a life test is being conducted on four n-Pentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed.

  5. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan; Lee, Steve; He, Hung

    2008-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The emitted infrared (IR) heat flux from the lunar surface varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. Due to the extremely high incident IR flux, especially at low beta angles, a radiator is oftentimes unable to reject the vehicle heat load throughout the entire lunar orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when the radiator is unable to reject the required heat load. The stored energy is then removed from the PCM heat exchanger when the environment is more benign. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration Low Lunar Orbit missions. The Advanced Thermal Control project at JSC is completing a PCM heat exchanger life test to determine whether further technology development is warranted. The life test is being conducted on four nPentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed and reported in the current document.

  6. Reconfigurable Braille display with phase change locking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soule, Cody W.; Lazarus, Nathan

    2016-07-01

    Automatically updated signs and displays for sighted people are common in today’s world. However, there is no cheap, low power equivalent available for the blind. This work demonstrates a reconfigurable Braille cell using the solid-to-liquid phase change of a low melting point alloy as a zero holding power locking mechanism. The device is actuated with the alloy in the liquid state, and is then allowed to solidify to lock the Braille dot in the actuated position. A low-cost manufacturing process is developed that includes molding of a rigid silicone to create pneumatic channels, and bonding of a thin membrane of a softer silicone on the surface for actuation. A plug of Field’s metal (melting point 62 °C) is placed in the pneumatic channels below each Braille dot to create the final device. The device is well suited for low duty cycle operation in applications such as signs, and is able to maintain its state indefinitely without additional power input. The display requires a pneumatic pressure of only 24 kPa for actuation, and reconfiguration has been demonstrated in less than a minute and a half.

  7. Signaling added response-independent reinforcement to assess Pavlovian processes in resistance to change and relapse.

    PubMed

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Fleet, James D

    2014-09-01

    Behavioral momentum theory asserts Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relations govern the persistence of operant behavior. Specifically, resistance to conditions of disruption (e.g., extinction, satiation) reflects the relation between discriminative stimuli and the prevailing reinforcement conditions. The present study assessed whether Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relations govern resistance to disruption in pigeons by arranging both response-dependent and -independent food reinforcers in two components of a multiple schedule. In one component, discrete-stimulus changes preceded response-independent reinforcers, paralleling methods that reduce Pavlovian conditioned responding to contextual stimuli. Compared to the control component with no added stimuli preceding response-independent reinforcement, response rates increased as discrete-stimulus duration increased (0, 5, 10, and 15 s) across conditions. Although resistance to extinction decreased as stimulus duration increased in the component with the added discrete stimulus, further tests revealed no effect of discrete stimuli, including other disrupters (presession food, intercomponent food, modified extinction) and reinstatement designed to control for generalization decrement. These findings call into question a straightforward conception that the stimulus-reinforcer relations governing resistance to disruption reflect the same processes as Pavlovian conditioning, as asserted by behavioral momentum theory. PMID:25044232

  8. Signaling added response-independent reinforcement to assess Pavlovian processes in resistance to change and relapse.

    PubMed

    Podlesnik, Christopher A; Fleet, James D

    2014-09-01

    Behavioral momentum theory asserts Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relations govern the persistence of operant behavior. Specifically, resistance to conditions of disruption (e.g., extinction, satiation) reflects the relation between discriminative stimuli and the prevailing reinforcement conditions. The present study assessed whether Pavlovian stimulus-reinforcer relations govern resistance to disruption in pigeons by arranging both response-dependent and -independent food reinforcers in two components of a multiple schedule. In one component, discrete-stimulus changes preceded response-independent reinforcers, paralleling methods that reduce Pavlovian conditioned responding to contextual stimuli. Compared to the control component with no added stimuli preceding response-independent reinforcement, response rates increased as discrete-stimulus duration increased (0, 5, 10, and 15 s) across conditions. Although resistance to extinction decreased as stimulus duration increased in the component with the added discrete stimulus, further tests revealed no effect of discrete stimuli, including other disrupters (presession food, intercomponent food, modified extinction) and reinstatement designed to control for generalization decrement. These findings call into question a straightforward conception that the stimulus-reinforcer relations governing resistance to disruption reflect the same processes as Pavlovian conditioning, as asserted by behavioral momentum theory.

  9. Microencapsulated Phase Change Composite Materials for Energy Efficient Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, Alexander

    This study aims to elucidate how phase change material (PCM)-composite materials can be leveraged to reduce the energy consumption of buildings and to provide cost savings to ratepayers. Phase change materials (PCMs) can store thermal energy in the form of latent heat when subjected to temperatures exceeding their melting point by undergoing a phase transition from solid to liquid state. Reversibly, PCMs can release this thermal energy when the system temperature falls below their solidification point. The goal in implementing composite PCM walls is to significantly reduce and time-shift the maximum thermal load on the building in order to reduce and smooth out the electricity demand for heating and cooling. This Ph.D. thesis aims to develop a set of thermal design methods and tools for exploring the use of PCM-composite building envelopes and for providing design rules for their practical implementation. First, detailed numerical simulations were used to show that the effective thermal conductivity of core-shell-matrix composites depended only on the volume fraction and thermal conductivity of the constituent materials. The effective medium approximation reported by Felske (2004) was in very good agreement with numerical predictions of the effective thermal conductivity. Second, a carefully validated transient thermal model was used to simulate microencapsulated PCM-composite walls subjected to diurnal or annual outdoor temperature and solar radiation flux. It was established that adding microencapsulated PCM to concrete walls both substantially reduced and delayed the thermal load on the building. Several design rules were established, most notably, (i) increasing the volume fraction of microencapsulated PCM within the wall increases the energy savings but at the potential expense of mechanical properties [1], (ii) the phase change temperature leading to the maximum energy and cost savings should equal the desired indoor temperature regardless of the climate

  10. Changing correlation structures of the Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation from 1000 to 2100 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raible, C. C.; Lehner, F.; Gonzalez Rouco, J. F.; Fernandez Donado, L.

    2013-08-01

    Atmospheric circulation modes are important concepts to understand the variability of atmospheric dynamics. Assuming their spatial patterns to be fixed, such modes are often described by simple indices derived from rather short observational data sets. The increasing length of reanalysis products allows scrutinizing these concepts and assumptions. Here we investigate the stability of spatial patterns of Northern Hemisphere teleconnections by using the Twentieth Century Reanalysis as well as several control and transient millennium-scale simulations with coupled models. The observed and simulated centers of action of the two major teleconnection patterns, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and to some extent the Pacific North American (PNA), are not stable in time. The currently observed dipole pattern of the NAO with its center of action over Iceland and the Azores split into a North-South dipole pattern in the western Atlantic and a wave train pattern in the eastern part connecting the British Isles with West Greenland and the Eastern Mediterranean in the period 1940-1969 AD. The PNA centers of action over Canada are shifted southwards and over Florida into the Gulf of Mexico in the period 1915-1944 AD. The analysis further shows that shifts in the centers of action of either telconnection pattern are not related to changes in the external forcing applied in transient simulations of the last millennium. Such shifts in their centers of action are associated with changes in the relation of local precipitation and temperature to the overlying atmospheric mode. These findings further undermine the assumption of stationarity between local climate/proxy variability and large-scale dynamics inherent in proxy-based reconstructions of atmospheric modes and call for a more robust understanding of atmospheric variability on decadal time scales.

  11. Changing correlation structures of the Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation from 1000 to 2100 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raible, C. C.; Lehner, F.; González-Rouco, J. F.; Fernández-Donado, L.

    2014-03-01

    Atmospheric circulation modes are important concepts in understanding the variability of atmospheric dynamics. Assuming their spatial patterns to be fixed, such modes are often described by simple indices from rather short observational data sets. The increasing length of reanalysis products allows these concepts and assumptions to be scrutinised. Here we investigate the stability of spatial patterns of Northern Hemisphere teleconnections by using the Twentieth Century Reanalysis as well as several control and transient millennium-scale simulations with coupled models. The observed and simulated centre of action of the two major teleconnection patterns, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and to some extent the Pacific North American (PNA), are not stable in time. The currently observed dipole pattern of the NAO, its centre of action over Iceland and the Azores, split into a north-south dipole pattern in the western Atlantic with a wave train pattern in the eastern part, connecting the British Isles with West Greenland and the eastern Mediterranean during the period 1940-1969 AD. The PNA centres of action over Canada are shifted southwards and over Florida into the Gulf of Mexico during the period 1915-1944 AD. The analysis further shows that shifts in the centres of action of either teleconnection pattern are not related to changes in the external forcing applied in transient simulations of the last millennium. Such shifts in their centres of action are accompanied by changes in the relation of local precipitation and temperature with the overlying atmospheric mode. These findings further undermine the assumption of stationarity between local climate/proxy variability and large-scale dynamics inherent when using proxy-based reconstructions of atmospheric modes, and call for a more robust understanding of atmospheric variability on decadal timescales.

  12. Enhancing heat capacity of colloidal suspension using nanoscale encapsulated phase-change materials for heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yan; Ding, Shujiang; Wu, Wei; Hu, Jianjun; Voevodin, Andrey A; Gschwender, Lois; Snyder, Ed; Chow, Louis; Su, Ming

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes a new method to enhance the heat-transfer property of a single-phase liquid by adding encapsulated phase-change nanoparticles (nano-PCMs), which absorb thermal energy during solid-liquid phase changes. Silica-encapsulated indium nanoparticles and polymer-encapsulated paraffin (wax) nanoparticles have been made using colloid method, and suspended into poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) and water for potential high- and low-temperature applications, respectively. The shells prevent leakage and agglomeration of molten phase-change materials, and enhance the dielectric properties of indium nanoparticles. The heat-transfer coefficients of PAO containing indium nanoparticles (30% by mass) and water containing paraffin nanoparticles (10% by mass) are 1.6 and 1.75 times higher than those of corresponding single-phase fluids. The structural integrity of encapsulation allows repeated use of such nanoparticles for many cycles in high heat generating devices. PMID:20527779

  13. Enhancing heat capacity of colloidal suspension using nanoscale encapsulated phase-change materials for heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yan; Ding, Shujiang; Wu, Wei; Hu, Jianjun; Voevodin, Andrey A; Gschwender, Lois; Snyder, Ed; Chow, Louis; Su, Ming

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes a new method to enhance the heat-transfer property of a single-phase liquid by adding encapsulated phase-change nanoparticles (nano-PCMs), which absorb thermal energy during solid-liquid phase changes. Silica-encapsulated indium nanoparticles and polymer-encapsulated paraffin (wax) nanoparticles have been made using colloid method, and suspended into poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) and water for potential high- and low-temperature applications, respectively. The shells prevent leakage and agglomeration of molten phase-change materials, and enhance the dielectric properties of indium nanoparticles. The heat-transfer coefficients of PAO containing indium nanoparticles (30% by mass) and water containing paraffin nanoparticles (10% by mass) are 1.6 and 1.75 times higher than those of corresponding single-phase fluids. The structural integrity of encapsulation allows repeated use of such nanoparticles for many cycles in high heat generating devices.

  14. Photoinduced Bilayer-to-Nonbilayer Phase Transition of POPE by Photoisomerization of Added Stilbene Molecules.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Koyomi; Hishida, Mafumi; Nagatomo, Shigenori; Yamamura, Yasuhisa; Saito, Kazuya

    2016-08-01

    The photocontrol of a bilayer-to-nonbilayer phase transition (the liquid-crystalline Lα phase to the inverted hexagonal HII phase) of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) by the photoisomerization of incorporated stilbene molecules was examined by utilizing differential scanning calorimetry, small-angle X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet (UV)/visible absorption, and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies. cis-Stilbene lowered the transition temperature, Th, to a greater extent than did trans-stilbene, and the difference was at most ca. 10 °C. At temperatures higher than the Th of POPE/cis-stilbene but lower than that of POPE/trans-stilbene, the photoisomerization from the trans to the cis form of the stilbene molecules by irradiation with UV light caused a Lα-HII phase transition. The UV irradiation partially induced the HII phase at a constant temperature because of the incomplete photoisomerization of stilbene (ca. 60%). The reduction in Th by the incorporation of stilbenes was caused mainly by the reduction in the spontaneous radius of curvature of the lipid monolayer, R0. The greater bulkiness of cis-stilbene as compared to the trans form resulted in a more effective reduction in R0 and stabilization of the HII phase. PMID:27351293

  15. Phase behavior of shape-changing spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, P. I. C.; Masters, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a simple model for a biaxial nematic liquid crystal. This consists of hard spheroids that can switch shape between prolate (rodlike) and oblate (platelike) subject to an energy penalty Δ ɛ . The spheroids are approximated as hard Gaussian overlap particles and are treated at the level of Onsager's second-virial description. We use both bifurcation analysis and a numerical minimization of the free energy to show that, for additive particle shapes, (i) there is no stable biaxial phase even for Δ ɛ =0 (although there is a metastable biaxial phase in the same density range as the stable uniaxial phase) and (ii) the isotropic-to-nematic transition is into either one of two degenerate uniaxial phases, rod rich or plate rich. We confirm that even a small amount of shape nonadditivity may stabilize the biaxial nematic phase.

  16. Determination of optical property changes by laser treatments using inverse adding-doubling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Norihiro; Ishii, Katsunori; Kimura, Akinori; Sakai, Makoto; Awazu, Kunio

    2009-02-01

    It is widely recognized for the realization of the pre-estimated treatment effects that the knowledge about the optical properties of the target tissues used to understanding the prediction of propagation and distribution of light within tissues would suffer from the technical problem such as the kinetic changes of the optical properties in laser irradiation. In this study, the optical properties of normal and laser coagulated chicken breast tissues and porcine intervertebral disks, normal and laser ablation have been determined in vitro in the spectral range between 350 and 1000 nm. In addition, the optical properties of the normal and photodynamic therapy (PDT) treated tumor, Lewis lung carcinoma, tissues have been determined. Diffuse reflectance and total transmittance of the samples are measured using an integrating-sphere technique. From these experimental data, the absorption coefficients and the reduced scattering coefficients of the samples are determined employing an inverse adding-doubling method. Laser coagulations and ablations have clearly increased the reduced scattering coefficient and slightly reduced the absorption coefficient. PDT treatment has increased absorption and reduced scattering coefficient. It is our expectation that these data will provide fundamental understandings on laser irradiation interactions behavior with tissues. The changes of the optical properties should be accounted for while planning the therapeutic procedure for the realization of safe laser treatments.

  17. Kerr-AdS analogue of triple point and solid/liquid/gas phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamirano, Natacha; Kubizňák, David; Mann, Robert B.; Sherkatghanad, Zeinab

    2014-02-01

    We study the thermodynamic behavior of multi-spinning d = 6 Kerr-anti de Sitter black holes in the canonical ensemble of fixed angular momenta J1 and J2. We find, dependent on the ratio q = J2/J1, qualitatively different interesting phenomena known from the ‘every day thermodynamics’ of simple substances. For q = 0 the system exhibits recently observed reentrant large/small/large black hole phase transitions, but for 0 < q ≪ 1 we find an analogue of a ‘solid/liquid’ phase transition. Furthermore, for q ∈ (0.00905, 0.0985) the system displays the presence of a large/intermediate/small black hole phase transition with two critical and one triple (or tricritical) points. This behavior is reminiscent of the solid/liquid/gas phase transition except that the coexistence line of small and intermediate black holes does not continue for an arbitrary value of pressure (similar to the solid/liquid coexistence line) but rather terminates at one of the critical points. Finally, for q > 0.0985 we observe the ‘standard liquid/gas behavior’ of the Van der Waals fluid.

  18. Nano composite phase change materials microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qingwen

    MicroPCMs with nano composite structures (NC-MicroPCMs) have been systematically studied. NC-MicroPCMs were fabricated by the in situ polymerization and addition of silver NPs into core-shell structures. A full factorial experiment was designed, including three factors of core/shell, molar ratio of formaldehyde/melamine and NPs addition. 12 MicroPCMs samples were prepared. The encapsulated efficiency is approximately 80% to 90%. The structural/morphological features of the NC-MicroPCMs were evaluated. The size was in a range of 3.4 mu m to 4.0 mu m. The coarse appearance is attributed to NPs and NPs are distributed on the surface, within the shell and core. The NC-MicroPCMs contain new chemical components and molecular groups, due to the formation of chemical bonds after the pretreatment of NPs. Extra X-ray diffraction peaks of silver were found indicating silver nano-particles were formed into an integral structure with the core/shell structure by means of chemical bonds and physical linkages. Extra functionalities were found, including: (1) enhancement of IR radiation properties; (2) depression of super-cooling, and (3) increase of thermal stabilities. The effects of SERS (Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy) arising from the silver nano-particles were observed. The Raman scattering intensity was magnified more than 100 times. These effects were also exhibited in macroscopic level in the fabric coatings as enhanced IR radiation properties were detected by the "Fabric Infrared Radiation Management Tester" (FRMT). "Degree of Crystallinity" (DOC) was measured and found the three factors have a strong influence on it. DOC is closely related to thermal stability and MicroPCMs with a higher DOC show better temperature resistance. The thermal regulating effects of the MicroPCMs coatings were studied. A "plateau regions" was detected around the temperature of phase change, showing the function of PCMs. Addition of silver nano-particles to the MicroPCMs has a positive

  19. Chiral phase transition and meson spectrum in improved soft-wall AdS/QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhen; Wu, Yue-Liang; Zhang, Lin

    2016-11-01

    We investigate in detail the chiral thermal transition of QCD in an improved soft-wall AdS/QCD model with a simply modified 5D conformal mass of the bulk scalar field. We also present a calculation in this model for the light meson spectra and other low-energy characteristic quantities including the pion form factor, the π- ρ coupling constant and the decay constants of π, ρ, a1, which are shown to result in a good agreement with experimental data except for the pion decay constant. The thermal behavior of chiral condensate is studied. It is found that such a simply improved soft-wall model incorporates the crossover behavior of chiral thermal transition indicated by lattice simulations. The expected chiral transition temperature can be obtained.

  20. Value Added?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UCLA IDEA, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Value added measures (VAM) uses changes in student test scores to determine how much "value" an individual teacher has "added" to student growth during the school year. Some policymakers, school districts, and educational advocates have applauded VAM as a straightforward measure of teacher effectiveness: the better a teacher, the better students…

  1. Final report for the ASC gas-powder two-phase flow modeling project AD2006-09.

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Gregory Herbert; Winters, William S.

    2007-01-01

    This report documents activities performed in FY2006 under the ''Gas-Powder Two-Phase Flow Modeling Project'', ASC project AD2006-09. Sandia has a need to understand phenomena related to the transport of powders in systems. This report documents a modeling strategy inspired by powder transport experiments conducted at Sandia in 2002. A baseline gas-powder two-phase flow model, developed under a companion PEM project and implemented into the Sierra code FUEGO, is presented and discussed here. This report also documents a number of computational tests that were conducted to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of the new model. Although considerable progress was made in implementing the complex two-phase flow model, this project has identified two important areas that need further attention. These include the need to compute robust compressible flow solutions for Mach numbers exceeding 0.35 and the need to improve conservation of mass for the powder phase. Recommendations for future work in the area of gas-powder two-phase flow are provided.

  2. Autosomal Dominant Alzheimer Disease: A Unique Resource to Study CSF Biomarker Changes in Preclinical AD

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Suzanne Elizabeth; Fagan, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) has been greatly influenced by investigation of rare families with autosomal dominant mutations that cause early onset AD. Mutations in the genes coding for amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin 1 (PSEN-1), and presenilin 2 (PSEN-2) cause over-production of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) leading to early deposition of Aβ in the brain, which in turn is hypothesized to initiate a cascade of processes, resulting in neuronal death, cognitive decline, and eventual dementia. Studies of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from individuals with the common form of AD, late-onset AD (LOAD), have revealed that low CSF Aβ42 and high CSF tau are associated with AD brain pathology. Herein, we review the literature on CSF biomarkers in autosomal dominant AD (ADAD), which has contributed to a detailed road map of AD pathogenesis, especially during the preclinical period, prior to the appearance of any cognitive symptoms. Current drug trials are also taking advantage of the unique characteristics of ADAD and utilizing CSF biomarkers to accelerate development of effective therapies for AD. PMID:26175713

  3. Ethylene-associated phase change from juvenile to mature phenotype of daylily (Hemerocallis) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Smith, D L; Kelly, K; Krikorian, A D

    1989-01-01

    Hemerocallis plantlets maintained in vitro for extended periods of time in tightly closed culture vessels frequently show a phenotype, albeit on a miniaturized scale, typical of more mature, field-grown plants. The positive relationship of elevated ethylene in the headspace of such vessels to the phase shift from juvenile to mature form is established. Rigorous restriction in air exchange with the external environment by means of silicone grease seals hastens the phase change and improves uniformity of response. Although some plantlets may take longer to accumulate enough ethylene in sealed jars to undergo change, added ethylene and ethylene-releasing agents promote it. Ethylene adsorbants (e.g. mercuric perchlorate) block the shift of juvenile to mature form. Critical ambient ethylene level for the shift is ca 1 microliter l-1. Levels up to 1000 microliters l-1 do not hasten the response but are not toxic. The phase change is fully reversible when air exchange permits ethylene to drop below 1 microliter l-1. At least 1 microliter l-1 ethylene is required to sustain the mature phenotype. The ethylene synthesis inhibitor aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG) prevents the phase change, while the ethylene biosynthesis intermediate 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid (ACC) improves it. KOH, as a CO2 absorbent, does not prevent the phase change. Histology sections demonstrate subtle changes in the form of shoot tips of plantlets undergoing phase change. PMID:11538860

  4. Ethylene-associated phase change from juvenile to mature phenotype of daylily (Hemerocallis) in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. L.; Kelly, K.; Krikorian, A. D.

    1989-01-01

    Hemerocallis plantlets maintained in vitro for extended periods of time in tightly closed culture vessels frequently show a phenotype, albeit on a miniaturized scale, typical of more mature, field-grown plants. The positive relationship of elevated ethylene in the headspace of such vessels to the phase shift from juvenile to mature form is established. Rigorous restriction in air exchange with the external environment by means of silicone grease seals hastens the phase change and improves uniformity of response. Although some plantlets may take longer to accumulate enough ethylene in sealed jars to undergo change, added ethylene and ethylene-releasing agents promote it. Ethylene adsorbants (e.g. mercuric perchlorate) block the shift of juvenile to mature form. Critical ambient ethylene level for the shift is ca 1 microliter l-1. Levels up to 1000 microliters l-1 do not hasten the response but are not toxic. The phase change is fully reversible when air exchange permits ethylene to drop below 1 microliter l-1. At least 1 microliter l-1 ethylene is required to sustain the mature phenotype. The ethylene synthesis inhibitor aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG) prevents the phase change, while the ethylene biosynthesis intermediate 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid (ACC) improves it. KOH, as a CO2 absorbent, does not prevent the phase change. Histology sections demonstrate subtle changes in the form of shoot tips of plantlets undergoing phase change.

  5. Potential for small scale added value of RCM's downscaled climate change signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Luca, Alejandro; de Elía, Ramón; Laprise, René

    2013-02-01

    In recent decades, the need of future climate information at local scales have pushed the climate modelling community to perform increasingly higher resolution simulations and to develop alternative approaches to obtain fine-scale climatic information. In this article, various nested regional climate model (RCM) simulations have been used to try to identify regions across North America where high-resolution downscaling generates fine-scale details in the climate projection derived using the "delta method". Two necessary conditions were identified for an RCM to produce added value (AV) over lower resolution atmosphere-ocean general circulation models in the fine-scale component of the climate change (CC) signal. First, the RCM-derived CC signal must contain some non-negligible fine-scale information—independently of the RCM ability to produce AV in the present climate. Second, the uncertainty related with the estimation of this fine-scale information should be relatively small compared with the information itself in order to suggest that RCMs are able to simulate robust fine-scale features in the CC signal. Clearly, considering necessary (but not sufficient) conditions means that we are studying the "potential" of RCMs to add value instead of the AV, which preempts and avoids any discussion of the actual skill and hence the need for hindcast comparisons. The analysis concentrates on the CC signal obtained from the seasonal-averaged temperature and precipitation fields and shows that the fine-scale variability of the CC signal is generally small compared to its large-scale component, suggesting that little AV can be expected for the time-averaged fields. For the temperature variable, the largest potential for fine-scale added value appears in coastal regions mainly related with differential warming in land and oceanic surfaces. Fine-scale features can account for nearly 60 % of the total CC signal in some coastal regions although for most regions the fine scale

  6. Phase-change composites TES for nickel-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knowles, Timothy R.; Meyer, Richard A.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs of a discussion on phase-change composites thermal energy storage (TES) for nickel-hydrogen batteries are presented. Topics covered include Ni-H2 thermal control problems; passive thermal control with TES; phase-change composites (PCC); candidate materials; design options; fabrication and freeze-melt cycling; thermal modeling; system benefits; and applications.

  7. Heat storage system utilizing phase change materials government rights

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    2000-09-12

    A thermal energy transport and storage system is provided which includes an evaporator containing a mixture of a first phase change material and a silica powder, and a condenser containing a second phase change material. The silica powder/PCM mixture absorbs heat energy from a source such as a solar collector such that the phase change material forms a vapor which is transported from the evaporator to the condenser, where the second phase change material melts and stores the heat energy, then releases the energy to an environmental space via a heat exchanger. The vapor is condensed to a liquid which is transported back to the evaporator. The system allows the repeated transfer of thermal energy using the heat of vaporization and condensation of the phase change material.

  8. Phase-change radiative thermal diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Biehs, Svend-Age

    2013-11-01

    A thermal diode transports heat mainly in one preferential direction rather than in the opposite direction. This behavior is generally due to the non-linear dependence of certain physical properties with respect to the temperature. Here we introduce a radiative thermal diode which rectifies heat transport thanks to the phase transitions of materials. Rectification coefficients greater than 70% and up to 90% are shown, even for small temperature differences. This result could have important applications in the development of future contactless thermal circuits or in the conception of radiative coatings for thermal management.

  9. Phase-change radiative thermal diode

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe; Biehs, Svend-Age

    2013-11-04

    A thermal diode transports heat mainly in one preferential direction rather than in the opposite direction. This behavior is generally due to the non-linear dependence of certain physical properties with respect to the temperature. Here we introduce a radiative thermal diode which rectifies heat transport thanks to the phase transitions of materials. Rectification coefficients greater than 70% and up to 90% are shown, even for small temperature differences. This result could have important applications in the development of future contactless thermal circuits or in the conception of radiative coatings for thermal management.

  10. Ultra-high-density phase-change storage and memory.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Hendrik F; O'Boyle, Martin; Martin, Yves C; Rooks, Michael; Wickramasinghe, H Kumar

    2006-05-01

    Phase-change storage is widely used in optical information technologies (DVD, CD-ROM and so on), and recently it has also been considered for non-volatile memory applications. This work reports advances in thermal data recording of phase-change materials. Specifically, we show erasable thermal phase-change recording at a storage density of 3.3 Tb inch(-2), which is three orders of magnitude denser than that currently achievable with commercial optical storage technologies. We demonstrate the concept of a thin-film nanoheater to realize ultra-small heat spots with dimensions of less than 50 nm. Finally, we show in a proof-of-concept demonstration that an individual thin-film heater can write, erase and read the phase of these storage materials at competitive speeds. This work provides important stepping stones for a very-high-density storage or memory technology based on phase-change materials. PMID:16604077

  11. Ultra-high-density phase-change storage and memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Hendrik F.; O'Boyle, Martin; Martin, Yves C.; Rooks, Michael; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    2006-05-01

    Phase-change storage is widely used in optical information technologies (DVD, CD-ROM and so on), and recently it has also been considered for non-volatile memory applications. This work reports advances in thermal data recording of phase-change materials. Specifically, we show erasable thermal phase-change recording at a storage density of 3.3 Tb inch-2, which is three orders of magnitude denser than that currently achievable with commercial optical storage technologies. We demonstrate the concept of a thin-film nanoheater to realize ultra-small heat spots with dimensions of less than 50 nm. Finally, we show in a proof-of-concept demonstration that an individual thin-film heater can write, erase and read the phase of these storage materials at competitive speeds. This work provides important stepping stones for a very-high-density storage or memory technology based on phase-change materials.

  12. Ultra-high-density phase-change storage and memory.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Hendrik F; O'Boyle, Martin; Martin, Yves C; Rooks, Michael; Wickramasinghe, H Kumar

    2006-05-01

    Phase-change storage is widely used in optical information technologies (DVD, CD-ROM and so on), and recently it has also been considered for non-volatile memory applications. This work reports advances in thermal data recording of phase-change materials. Specifically, we show erasable thermal phase-change recording at a storage density of 3.3 Tb inch(-2), which is three orders of magnitude denser than that currently achievable with commercial optical storage technologies. We demonstrate the concept of a thin-film nanoheater to realize ultra-small heat spots with dimensions of less than 50 nm. Finally, we show in a proof-of-concept demonstration that an individual thin-film heater can write, erase and read the phase of these storage materials at competitive speeds. This work provides important stepping stones for a very-high-density storage or memory technology based on phase-change materials.

  13. Confined crystals of the smallest phase-change material.

    PubMed

    Giusca, Cristina E; Stolojan, Vlad; Sloan, Jeremy; Börrnert, Felix; Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Sader, Kasim; Rümmeli, Mark H; Büchner, Bernd; Silva, S Ravi P

    2013-09-11

    The demand for high-density memory in tandem with limitations imposed by the minimum feature size of current storage devices has created a need for new materials that can store information in smaller volumes than currently possible. Successfully employed in commercial optical data storage products, phase-change materials, that can reversibly and rapidly change from an amorphous phase to a crystalline phase when subject to heating or cooling have been identified for the development of the next generation electronic memories. There are limitations to the miniaturization of these devices due to current synthesis and theoretical considerations that place a lower limit of 2 nm on the minimum bit size, below which the material does not transform in the structural phase. We show here that by using carbon nanotubes of less than 2 nm diameter as templates phase-change nanowires confined to their smallest conceivable scale are obtained. Contrary to previous experimental evidence and theoretical expectations, the nanowires are found to crystallize at this scale and display amorphous-to-crystalline phase changes, fulfilling an important prerequisite of a memory element. We show evidence for the smallest phase-change material, extending thus the size limit to explore phase-change memory devices at extreme scales.

  14. Confined Crystals of the Smallest Phase-Change Material

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The demand for high-density memory in tandem with limitations imposed by the minimum feature size of current storage devices has created a need for new materials that can store information in smaller volumes than currently possible. Successfully employed in commercial optical data storage products, phase-change materials, that can reversibly and rapidly change from an amorphous phase to a crystalline phase when subject to heating or cooling have been identified for the development of the next generation electronic memories. There are limitations to the miniaturization of these devices due to current synthesis and theoretical considerations that place a lower limit of 2 nm on the minimum bit size, below which the material does not transform in the structural phase. We show here that by using carbon nanotubes of less than 2 nm diameter as templates phase-change nanowires confined to their smallest conceivable scale are obtained. Contrary to previous experimental evidence and theoretical expectations, the nanowires are found to crystallize at this scale and display amorphous-to-crystalline phase changes, fulfilling an important prerequisite of a memory element. We show evidence for the smallest phase-change material, extending thus the size limit to explore phase-change memory devices at extreme scales. PMID:23984706

  15. PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS IN FLOOR TILES FOR THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas C. Hittle

    2002-10-01

    Passive solar systems integrated into residential structures significantly reduce heating energy consumption. Taking advantage of latent heat storage has further increased energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change materials into building materials used in passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. Increasing the thermal storage of floor tile by the addition of encapsulated paraffin wax is the proposed topic of research. Latent heat storage of a phase change material (PCM) is obtained during a change in phase. Typical materials use the latent heat released when the material changes from a liquid to a solid. Paraffin wax and salt hydrates are examples of such materials. Other PCMs that have been recently investigated undergo a phase transition from one solid form to another. During this process they will release heat. These are known as solid-state phase change materials. All have large latent heats, which makes them ideal for passive solar applications. Easy incorporation into various building materials is must for these materials. This proposal will address the advantages and disadvantages of using these materials in floor tile. Prototype tile will be made from a mixture of quartz, binder and phase change material. The thermal and structural properties of the prototype tiles will be tested fully. It is expected that with the addition of the phase change material the structural properties will be compromised to some extent. The ratio of phase change material in the tile will have to be varied to determine the best mixture to provide significant thermal storage, while maintaining structural properties that meet the industry standards for floor tile.

  16. Anomalous dimension, chiral phase transition and inverse magnetic catalysis in soft-wall AdS/QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhen

    2016-07-01

    A modified soft-wall AdS/QCD model with a z-dependent bulk scalar mass is proposed. We argue for the necessity of a modified bulk scalar mass from the quark mass anomalous dimension and carefully constrain the form of bulk mass by the corresponding UV and IR asymptotics. After fixing the form of bulk scalar mass, we calculate the mass spectra of (axial-)vector and pseudoscalar mesons, which have a good agreement with the experimental data. The behavior of chiral phase transition is also investigated, and the results are consistent with the standard scenario and lattice simulations. Finally, the issue of chiral magnetic effects is addressed. We find that the inverse magnetic catalysis emerges naturally from the modified soft-wall model, which is consistent with the recent lattice simulations.

  17. Polarization selective phase-change nanomodulator

    PubMed Central

    Appavoo, Kannatassen; Haglund Jr., Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Manipulating optical signals below the diffraction limit is crucial for next-generation data-storage and telecommunication technologies. Although controlling the flow of light around nanoscale waveguides was achieved over a decade ago, modulating optical signals at terahertz frequencies within nanoscale volumes remains a challenge. Since the physics underlying any modulator relies on changes in dielectric properties, the incorporation of strongly electron-correlated materials (SECMs) has been proposed because they can exhibit orders of magnitude changes in electrical and optical properties with modest thermal, electrical or optical trigger signals. Here we demonstrate a hybrid nanomodulator of deep sub-wavelength dimensions with an active volume of only 0.002 µm3 by spatially confining light on the nanometre length scale using a plasmonic nanostructure while simultaneously controlling the reactive near-field environment at its optical focus with a single, precisely positioned SECM nanostructure. Since the nanomodulator functionality hinges on this near-field electromagnetic interaction, the modulation is also selectively responsive to polarization. This architecture suggests one path for designing reconfigurable optoelectronic building blocks with responses that can be tailored with exquisite precision by varying size, geometry, and the intrinsic materials properties of the hybrid elements. PMID:25346427

  18. Polarization selective phase-change nanomodulator

    SciTech Connect

    Appavoo, Kannatassen; Haglund Jr., Richard F.

    2014-10-27

    Manipulating optical signals below the diffraction limit is crucial for next-generation data-storage and telecommunication technologies. Although controlling the flow of light around nanoscale waveguides was achieved over a decade ago, modulating optical signals at terahertz frequencies within nanoscale volumes remains a challenge. Since the physics underlying any modulator relies on changes in dielectric properties, the incorporation of strongly electron-correlated materials (SECMs) has been proposed because they can exhibit orders of magnitude changes in electrical and optical properties with modest thermal, electrical or optical trigger signals. Here we demonstrate a hybrid nanomodulator of deep sub-wavelength dimensions with an active volume of only 0.002 µm3 by spatially confining light on the nanometre length scale using a plasmonic nanostructure while simultaneously controlling the reactive near-field environment at its optical focus with a single, precisely positioned SECM nanostructure. Since the nanomodulator functionality hinges on this near-field electromagnetic interaction, the modulation is also selectively responsive to polarization. Lastly, this architecture suggests one path for designing reconfigurable optoelectronic building blocks with responses that can be tailored with exquisite precision by varying size, geometry, and the intrinsic materials properties of the hybrid elements.

  19. Polarization selective phase-change nanomodulator

    DOE PAGES

    Appavoo, Kannatassen; Haglund Jr., Richard F.

    2014-10-27

    Manipulating optical signals below the diffraction limit is crucial for next-generation data-storage and telecommunication technologies. Although controlling the flow of light around nanoscale waveguides was achieved over a decade ago, modulating optical signals at terahertz frequencies within nanoscale volumes remains a challenge. Since the physics underlying any modulator relies on changes in dielectric properties, the incorporation of strongly electron-correlated materials (SECMs) has been proposed because they can exhibit orders of magnitude changes in electrical and optical properties with modest thermal, electrical or optical trigger signals. Here we demonstrate a hybrid nanomodulator of deep sub-wavelength dimensions with an active volume ofmore » only 0.002 µm3 by spatially confining light on the nanometre length scale using a plasmonic nanostructure while simultaneously controlling the reactive near-field environment at its optical focus with a single, precisely positioned SECM nanostructure. Since the nanomodulator functionality hinges on this near-field electromagnetic interaction, the modulation is also selectively responsive to polarization. Lastly, this architecture suggests one path for designing reconfigurable optoelectronic building blocks with responses that can be tailored with exquisite precision by varying size, geometry, and the intrinsic materials properties of the hybrid elements.« less

  20. Polarization selective phase-change nanomodulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appavoo, Kannatassen; Haglund, Richard F., Jr.

    2014-10-01

    Manipulating optical signals below the diffraction limit is crucial for next-generation data-storage and telecommunication technologies. Although controlling the flow of light around nanoscale waveguides was achieved over a decade ago, modulating optical signals at terahertz frequencies within nanoscale volumes remains a challenge. Since the physics underlying any modulator relies on changes in dielectric properties, the incorporation of strongly electron-correlated materials (SECMs) has been proposed because they can exhibit orders of magnitude changes in electrical and optical properties with modest thermal, electrical or optical trigger signals. Here we demonstrate a hybrid nanomodulator of deep sub-wavelength dimensions with an active volume of only 0.002 µm3 by spatially confining light on the nanometre length scale using a plasmonic nanostructure while simultaneously controlling the reactive near-field environment at its optical focus with a single, precisely positioned SECM nanostructure. Since the nanomodulator functionality hinges on this near-field electromagnetic interaction, the modulation is also selectively responsive to polarization. This architecture suggests one path for designing reconfigurable optoelectronic building blocks with responses that can be tailored with exquisite precision by varying size, geometry, and the intrinsic materials properties of the hybrid elements.

  1. Protection from radiation injury by elemental diet: does added glutamine change the effect?

    PubMed

    McArdle, A H

    1994-01-01

    The feeding of a protein hydrolysate based 'elemental' diet supplemented with added glutamine did not provide superior protection to the small intestine of dogs subjected to therapeutic pelvic irradiation. Comparison of diets with and without the added glutamine showed significant protection of the intestine from radiation injury. Both histological examination and electron microscopy showed lack of tissue injury with both diets. The activity of the free radical generating enzymes, scavengers, and antioxidants were similar in the intestinal mucosa of dogs fed either diet. After radiation, however, the activity of xanthine oxidase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase were significantly (p < 0.002) higher in the intestine of dogs fed elemental diet without the added glutamine. If the activities of these enzymes are important in the protection of the intestine from radiation injury, then the addition of extra glutamine may provide no benefit.

  2. Solution-Phase Deposition and Nanopattering of GeSbSe Phase-Change Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Milliron,D.; Raoux, S.; Shelby, R.; Jordan-Sweet, J.

    2007-01-01

    Chalcogenide films with reversible amorphous-crystalline phase transitions have been commercialized as optically rewritable data-storage media, and intensive effort is now focused on integrating them into electrically addressed non-volatile memory devices (phase-change random-access memory or PCRAM). Although optical data storage is accomplished by laser-induced heating of continuous films, electronic memory requires integration of discrete nanoscale phase-change material features with read/write electronics. Currently, phase-change films are most commonly deposited by sputter deposition, and patterned by conventional lithography. Metal chalcogenide films for transistor applications have recently been deposited by a low-temperature, solution-phase route. Here, we extend this methodology to prepare thin films and nanostructures of GeSbSe phase-change materials. We report the ready tuneability of phase-change properties in GeSbSe films through composition variation achieved by combining novel precursors in solution. Rapid, submicrosecond phase switching is observed by laser-pulse annealing. We also demonstrate that prepatterned holes can be filled to fabricate phase-change nanostructures from hundreds down to tens of nanometres in size, offering enhanced flexibility in fabricating PCRAM devices with reduced current requirements.

  3. Polarised black holes in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Miguel S.; Greenspan, Lauren; Oliveira, Miguel; Penedones, João; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-06-01

    We consider solutions in Einstein-Maxwell theory with a negative cosmological constant that asymptote to global AdS 4 with conformal boundary {S}2× {{{R}}}t. At the sphere at infinity we turn on a space-dependent electrostatic potential, which does not destroy the asymptotic AdS behaviour. For simplicity we focus on the case of a dipolar electrostatic potential. We find two new geometries: (i) an AdS soliton that includes the full backreaction of the electric field on the AdS geometry; (ii) a polarised neutral black hole that is deformed by the electric field, accumulating opposite charges in each hemisphere. For both geometries we study boundary data such as the charge density and the stress tensor. For the black hole we also study the horizon charge density and area, and further verify a Smarr formula. Then we consider this system at finite temperature and compute the Gibbs free energy for both AdS soliton and black hole phases. The corresponding phase diagram generalizes the Hawking-Page phase transition. The AdS soliton dominates the low temperature phase and the black hole the high temperature phase, with a critical temperature that decreases as the external electric field increases. Finally, we consider the simple case of a free charged scalar field on {S}2× {{{R}}}t with conformal coupling. For a field in the SU(N ) adjoint representation we compare the phase diagram with the above gravitational system.

  4. Phase Change Material Thermal Power Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Chao, Yi (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An energy producing device, for example a submersible vehicle for descending or ascending to different depths within water or ocean, is disclosed. The vehicle comprises a temperature-responsive material to which a hydraulic fluid is associated. A pressurized storage compartment stores the fluid as soon as the temperature-responsive material changes density. The storage compartment is connected with a hydraulic motor, and a valve allows fluid passage from the storage compartment to the hydraulic motor. An energy storage component, e.g. a battery, is connected with the hydraulic motor and is charged by the hydraulic motor when the hydraulic fluid passes through the hydraulic motor. Upon passage in the hydraulic motor, the fluid is stored in a further storage compartment and is then sent back to the area of the temperature-responsive material.

  5. Phase change material thermal power generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Chao, Yi (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An energy producing device, for example a submersible vehicle for descending or ascending to different depths within water or ocean, is disclosed. The vehicle comprises a temperature-responsive material to which a hydraulic fluid is associated. A pressurized storage compartment stores the fluid as soon as the temperature-responsive material changes density. The storage compartment is connected with a hydraulic motor, and a valve allows fluid passage from the storage compartment to the hydraulic motor. An energy storage component, e.g. a battery, is connected with the hydraulic motor and is charged by the hydraulic motor when the hydraulic fluid passes through the hydraulic motor. Upon passage in the hydraulic motor, the fluid is stored in a further storage compartment and is then sent back to the area of the temperature-responsive material.

  6. Anomalous phase change characteristics in Fe-Te materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, X. T.; Song, W. D.; Ji, R.; Ho, H. W.; Wang, L.; Hong, M. H.

    2012-05-14

    Phase change materials have become significantly attractive due to its unique characteristics for its extensive applications. In this paper, a kind of phase change material, which consists of Fe and Te components, is developed. The crystallization temperature of the Fe-Te materials is 180 deg. C for Fe{sub 1.19}Te and can be adjusted by the Fe/Te ratio. High-speed phase change in the Fe-Te materials has been demonstrated by nanosecond laser irradiation. Comparing to conventional phase change materials, the Fe-Te materials exhibit an anomalous optical property that has higher reflectivity at amorphous than crystalline state, which is useful for data storage design.

  7. A Gibbs Formulation for Reactive Materials with Phase Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Scott

    2015-06-01

    A large class of applications have pure, condensed phase constituents that come into contact, chemically react and simultaneously undergo phase change. Phase change in a given molecular material has often been considered to be separate from chemical reaction. Continuum modelers of phase change often use a phase field model whereby an indicator function is allowed to change from one value to another in regions of phase change, governed by evolutionary (Ginzburg-Landau) equations, whereas classic chemical kinetics literally count species concentrations and derive kinetics evolution equations based on species mass transport. We argue the latter is fundamental and is the same as the former, if all species, phase or chemical are treated as distinct chemical species. We pose a self-consistent continuum, thermo-mechanical model to account for significant energetic quantities with correct molecular and continuum limits in the mixture. A single stress tensor, and a single temperature is assumed for the mixture with specified Gibbs potentials for all relevant species, and interaction energies. We discuss recent examples of complex reactive material modeling, drawn from thermitic and propellant combustion that use this new model. Supported by HDTRA1-10-1-0020 (DTRA), N000014-12-1-0555 (ONR) and FA8651-10-1-0004 (AFRL/RW).

  8. A Gibbs Formulation for Reactive Materials with Phase Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Scott

    2015-11-01

    A large class of applications have pure, condensed phase constituents that come into contact, chemically react and simultaneously undergo phase change. Phase change in a given molecular material has often been considered to be separate from chemical reaction. Continuum modelers of phase change often use a phase field model whereby an indicator function is allowed to change from one value to another in regions of phase change, governed by evolutionary (Ginzburg-Landau) equations, whereas classic chemical kinetics literally count species concentrations and derive kinetics evolution equations based on species mass transport. We argue the latter is fundamental and is the same as the former, if all species, phase or chemical are treated as distinct chemical species. We pose a self-consistent continuum, thermo-mechanical model to account for significant energetic quantities with correct molecular and continuum limits in the mixture. A single stress tensor, and a single temperature is assumed for the mixture with specified Gibbs potentials for all relevant species, and interaction energies. We discuss recent examples of complex reactive material modeling, drawn from thermitic and propellant combustion that use this new model. DSS supported by DTRA, ONR and AFOSR.

  9. Phase Change Super Resolution near Field Structure ROM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunki; Hwang, Inoh; Kim, Jooho; Park, Changmin; Ro, Myongdo; Lee, Jinkyung; Jung, Moonil; Park, Insik

    2005-05-01

    We confirmed a super resolution phenomenon and a typical super resolution near field structure threshold phenomenon in a read only memory (ROM)-type sample disk. We found that this super resolution phenomenon originates from a phase-change layer and is closely related to the thermal properties of the super resolution layer. We also improved the readout stability using a co-sputtered layer with phase change (GST) and dielectric materials (ZnS-SiO2).

  10. Solid–Liquid Phase Change Driven by Internal Heat Generation

    SciTech Connect

    John Crepeau; Ali s. Siahpush

    2012-07-01

    This article presents results of solid-liquid phase change, the Stefan Problem, where melting is driven internal heat generation, in a cylindrical geometry. The comparison between a quasi-static analytical solution for Stefan numbers less than one and numerical solutions shows good agreement. The computational results of phase change with internal heat generation show how convection cells form in the liquid region. A scale analysis of the same problem shows four distinct regions of the melting process.

  11. Transformations of biomass-derived platform molecules: from high added-value chemicals to fuels via aqueous-phase processing.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Ruiz, Juan Carlos; Luque, Rafael; Sepúlveda-Escribano, Antonio

    2011-11-01

    Global warming issues and the medium-term depletion of fossil fuel reserves are stimulating researchers around the world to find alternative sources of energy and organic carbon. Biomass is considered by experts the only sustainable source of energy and organic carbon for our industrial society, and it has the potential to displace petroleum in the production of chemicals and liquid transportation fuels. However, the transition from a petroleum-based economy to one based on biomass requires new strategies since the petrochemical technologies, well-developed over the last century, are not valid to process the biomass-derived compounds. Unlike petroleum feedstocks, biomass derived platform molecules possess a high oxygen content that gives them low volatility, high solubility in water, high reactivity and low thermal stability, properties that favour the processing of these resources by catalytic aqueous-phase technologies at moderate temperatures. This tutorial review is aimed at providing a general overview of processes, technologies and challenges that lie ahead for a range of different aqueous-phase transformations of some of the key biomass-derived platform molecules into liquid fuels for the transportation sector and related high added value chemicals. PMID:21713268

  12. A latchable thermally activated phase change actuator for microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Christiane; Sachsenheimer, Kai; Rapp, Bastian E.

    2016-03-01

    Complex microfluidic systems often require a high number of individually controllable active components like valves and pumps. In this paper we present the development and optimization of a latchable thermally controlled phase change actuator which uses a solid/liquid phase transition of a phase change medium and the displacement of the liquid phase change medium to change and stabilize the two states of the actuator. Because the phase change is triggered by heat produced with ohmic resistors the used control signal is an electrical signal. In contrast to pneumatically activated membrane valves this concept allows the individual control of several dozen actuators with only two external pressure lines. Within this paper we show the general working principle of the actuator and demonstrate its general function and the scalability of the concept at an example of four actuators. Additionally we present the complete results of our studies to optimize the response behavior of the actuator - the influence of the heating power as well as the used phase change medium on melting and solidifying times.

  13. Mantle plume interaction with an endothermic phase change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Gerald; Anderson, Charles; Goldman, Peggy

    1995-01-01

    High spatial resolution numerical simulations of mantle plumes impinging from below on the endothermic phase change at 660-km depth are used to investigate the effects of latent heat release on the plume-phase change interaction. Both axisymmetric and planar upflows are considered, and the strong temperature dependence of mantle viscosity is taken into account. For plume strengths considered, a Clapeyron slope of -4 MPa/K prevents plume penetration of the phase change. Plumes readily penetrate the phase change for a Clapeyron slope of -2 MPa/K and arrive in the upper mantle considerably hotter than if they had not traversed the phase change. For the same amount of thermal drive, i.e., the same excess basal temperature, axisymmetric plumes are hotter upon reaching the upper mantle than are planar upwellings. Heating of plumes by their passage through the spinel-perovskite endothermic phase change can have important consequences for the ability of the plume to thermally thin the lithosphere and cause melting and volcanism.

  14. Phase Change Material Systems for High Temperature Heat Storage.

    PubMed

    Perraudin, David Y S; Binder, Selmar R; Rezaei, Ehsan; Ortonaa, Alberto; Haussener, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Efficient, cost effective, and stable high-temperature heat storage material systems are important in applications such as high-temperature industrial processes (metal processing, cement and glass manufacturing, etc.), or electricity storage using advanced adiabatic compressed air energy storage. Incorporating phase change media into heat storage systems provides an advantage of storing and releasing heat at nearly constant temperature, allowing steady and optimized operation of the downstream processes. The choice of, and compatibility of materials and encapsulation for the phase change section is crucial, as these must guarantee good and stable performance and long lifetime at low cost. Detailed knowledge of the material properties and stability, and the coupled heat transfer, phase change, and fluid flow are required to allow for performance and lifetime predictions. We present coupled experimental-numerical techniques allowing prediction of the long-term performance of a phase change material-based high-temperature heat storage system. The experimental investigations focus on determination of material properties (melting temperature, heat of fusion, etc.) and phase change material and encapsulation interaction (stability, interface reactions, etc.). The computational investigations focus on an understanding of the multi-mode heat transfer, fluid flow, and phase change processes in order to design the material system for enhanced performance. The importance of both the experimental and numerical approaches is highlighted and we give an example of how both approaches can be complementarily used for the investigation of long-term performance. PMID:26842330

  15. Reactivation of the Pleistocene trans-Arabian Wadi ad Dawasir fluvial system (Saudi Arabia) during the Holocene humid phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matter, Albert; Mahjoub, Ayman; Neubert, Eike; Preusser, Frank; Schwalb, Antje; Szidat, Sönke; Wulf, Gerwin

    2016-10-01

    The Wadi ad Dawasir fluvial system in central Saudi Arabia is investigated using remote sensing and sedimentology, in combination with bio-proxy analyses (molluscs and ostracods). Age control is provided by radiocarbon as well as luminescence dating, using both quartz and feldspar grains. It is shown that the fluvial system was active from the Asir Mountains across the partially sand-covered interior of the Arabian Peninsula to the Arabian Gulf during the Holocene humid period. Sedimentology and faunal analysis reveal the presence of perennial streams and a permanent freshwater lake in the distal reach of the Dawasir system that are synchronous with fluvial accumulation in the headwaters of its major tributary, Wadi Tathlith. The increased runoff during the Holocene led to a re-activation of streams that largely followed pre-existing Late Pleistocene courses and eroded into older sediments. The absence of Holocene lakes in most of the Rub' al-Khali implies that trans-Arabian rivers were mainly fed by precipitation in the Asir Mountains. Monsoonal rainfall was apparently stronger there as well as in the northern, south-eastern and southern part of the Arabian Peninsula (southern Yemen and Oman), but it apparently did not directly affect the interior during the Holocene. The palaeoenvironmental reconstruction shows a narrow trans-Arabian green freshwater corridor as the result of phases of sustained flow lasting up to several centuries. The permanent availability of water and subsistence for wildlife provided a favourable environment for human occupation as documented by Neolithic stone tools that are found all along Wadi ad Dawasir.

  16. 40 shades of black: regional differences in vegetation response to a changing human influence in the Low Countries during the Dark Ages (AD 300-1000).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouw-Bouman, Marjolein T. I. J.; Donders, Timme H.; Hoek, Wim Z.

    2016-04-01

    During the Dark Ages, which includes the Late Roman Period (LRP, AD 300-500) and the Early Middle Ages (EMA, AD 500-1000), large scale vegetation development in Northwestern Europe is generally characterized by a forest regeneration. This forest redevelopment phase was not uniformous across the Netherlands. A comparison between existing pollen records shows that forest redevelopment started earlier and was more severe in the southern part of the Netherlands than in the northeastern Netherlands. The prevailing view advocates that the forest redevelopment is the result of a diminishing human influence on the landscape due to the collapse of the Roman Empire. Following this view, regional changes in forest regeneration are explained by varying population densities. However, existing climate-records indicate a colder and wetter climate during the Dark Ages and the geomorphological record points to a changing landscape. How and to what extent these climatic and environmental changes contributed to the changes in vegetation development or even to the decline of the Roman Empire is largely unknown. To understand the relative importance of the factors (climate, environment, economy and demography) influencing vegetation development it is important to accurately map regional differences in vegetation both on a regional and extra-regional scale. For an extra-regional overview all available pollen records in the Netherlands from this period are compiled to show differences in amplitude of the vegetation development during the Dark Ages. On a regional scale, vegetation reconstruction maps have been produced reflecting the influence of geological/geomorphological factors.

  17. Changes in Intakes of Total and Added Sugar and their Contribution to Energy Intake in the U.S.

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Ock K.; Chung, Chin E.; Wang, Ying; Padgitt, Andrea; Song, Won O.

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to document changes in total sugar intake and intake of added sugars, in the context of total energy intake and intake of nutrient categories, between the 1970s and the 1990s, and to identify major food sources contributing to those changes in intake. Data from the NHANES I and III were analyzed to obtain nationally representative information on food consumption for the civilian, non-institutionalized population of the U.S. from 1971 to 1994. In the past three decades, in addition to the increase in mean intakes of total energy, total sugar, added sugars, significant increases in the total intake of carbohydrates and the proportion of carbohydrates to the total energy intake were observed. The contribution of sugars to total carbohydrate intake decreased in both 1–18 y and 19+ y age subgroups, and the contribution of added sugars to the total energy intake did not change. Soft drinks/fluid milk/sugars and cakes, pastries, and pies remained the major food sources for intake of total sugar, total carbohydrates, and total energy during the past three decades. Carbonated soft drinks were the most significant sugar source across the entire three decades. Changes in sugar consumption over the past three decades may be a useful specific area of investigation in examining the effect of dietary patterns on chronic diseases. PMID:22254059

  18. Adversary phase change detection using SOMs and text data.

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, Ann Elizabeth; Doser, Adele Beatrice; Warrender, Christina E.

    2010-05-01

    In this work, we developed a self-organizing map (SOM) technique for using web-based text analysis to forecast when a group is undergoing a phase change. By 'phase change', we mean that an organization has fundamentally shifted attitudes or behaviors. For instance, when ice melts into water, the characteristics of the substance change. A formerly peaceful group may suddenly adopt violence, or a violent organization may unexpectedly agree to a ceasefire. SOM techniques were used to analyze text obtained from organization postings on the world-wide web. Results suggest it may be possible to forecast phase changes, and determine if an example of writing can be attributed to a group of interest.

  19. Preservice Elementary Teachers' Knowledge of Observable Moon Phases and Pattern of Change in Phases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Atwood, Ronald K.; Christopher, John E.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe selected content knowledge held by 52 preservice elementary teachers about the observable phases of the moon and the monthly pattern of change in observable phases. Data were obtained from participants in a physics course before and after they received inquiry-based instruction designed to promote…

  20. Transition from effusive to explosive phases in andesite eruptions — A case-study from the AD1655 eruption of Mt. Taranaki, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platz, Thomas; Cronin, Shane J.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Stewart, Robert B.; Smith, Ian E. M.

    2007-03-01

    The extrusion of viscous andesite lava forming domes can terminate in explosive activity. To understand the driving forces behind this behaviour, a study of an AD1655 eruption episode at Mt. Taranaki was carried out. We propose that simple changes in magmatic conditions of a single hydrous melt during ascent caused sudden changes in explosivity and gave rise to pumice with highly variable vesicularities and colour. Fractionation of hornblende + plagioclase + clinopyroxene + Fe-Ti oxide at the onset of magma ascent, and step-wise crystallisation of plagioclase ± clinopyroxene in different parts of a single melt within the conduit was controlled by rates of initial rise, capping by an impermeable lava dome, and differential rates of vesiculation and volatile exsolution. This resulted in a vertical stratification in the conduit, comprising a viscous, hypocrystalline lava cap, that overlay alternating zones of grey, brown and grey magma-foams. Horizontal gradients in geochemistry in the conduit are also indicated by different clast textures. The eruption consisted of an initial extrusive phase followed by three pulses of sub-plinian activity. Each phase or pulse, corresponded to individual layers within the conduit. Ejecta included block-and-ash flow deposits, three pyroclastic pumice-flow deposits of alternating grey, brown and grey pumice, as well as fallout deposits dominated by grey pumice. The brown magma foam contained more microlites, had a more-evolved matrix glass, and a higher temperature than the grey magma foams above and below. Its eruption destabilised the sub-plinian eruption column because it was more degassed. It fragmented less efficiently than the grey magma foams due to its lower viscosity, preventing pressure build-up in bubbles. Incomplete mixing at interfaces between brown and grey magma phases gave rise to banded pumices.

  1. Understanding Phase-Change Memory Alloys from a Chemical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, A. V.; Fons, P.; Tominaga, J.

    2015-09-01

    Phase-change memories (PCM) are associated with reversible ultra-fast low-energy crystal-to-amorphous switching in GeTe-based alloys co-existing with the high stability of the two phases at ambient temperature, a unique property that has been recently explained by the high fragility of the glass-forming liquid phase, where the activation barrier for crystallisation drastically increases as the temperature decreases from the glass-transition to room temperature. At the same time the atomistic dynamics of the phase-change process and the associated changes in the nature of bonding have remained unknown. In this work we demonstrate that key to this behavior is the formation of transient three-center bonds in the excited state that is enabled due to the presence of lone-pair electrons. Our findings additionally reveal previously ignored fundamental similarities between the mechanisms of reversible photoinduced structural changes in chalcogenide glasses and phase-change alloys and offer new insights into the development of efficient PCM materials.

  2. Rayleigh-Taylor instability of viscous fluids with phase change.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byoung Jae; Kim, Kyung Doo

    2016-04-01

    Film boiling on a horizontal surface is a typical example of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. During the film boiling, phase changes take place at the interface, and thus heat and mass transfer must be taken into consideration in the stability analysis. Moreover, since the vapor layer is not quite thick, a viscous flow must be analyzed. Existing studies assumed equal kinematic viscosities of two fluids, and/or considered thin viscous fluids. The purpose of this study is to derive the analytical dispersion relation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for more general conditions. The two fluids have different properties. The thickness of the vapor layer is finite, but the liquid layer is thick enough to be nearly semi-infinite in view of perturbation. Initially, the vapor is in equilibrium with the liquid at the interface, and the direction of heat transfer is from the vapor side to the liquid side. In this case, the phase change has a stabilizing effect on the growth rate of the interface. When the vapor layer is thin, there is a coupled effect of the vapor viscosity, phase change, and vapor thickness on the critical wave number. For the other limit of a thick vapor, both the liquid and vapor viscosities influence the critical wave number. Finally, the most unstable wavelength is investigated. When the vapor layer is thin, the most unstable wavelength is not affected by phase change. When the vapor layer is thick, however, it increases with the increasing rate of phase change. PMID:27176406

  3. Understanding Phase-Change Memory Alloys from a Chemical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kolobov, A.V.; Fons, P.; Tominaga, J.

    2015-01-01

    Phase-change memories (PCM) are associated with reversible ultra-fast low-energy crystal-to-amorphous switching in GeTe-based alloys co-existing with the high stability of the two phases at ambient temperature, a unique property that has been recently explained by the high fragility of the glass-forming liquid phase, where the activation barrier for crystallisation drastically increases as the temperature decreases from the glass-transition to room temperature. At the same time the atomistic dynamics of the phase-change process and the associated changes in the nature of bonding have remained unknown. In this work we demonstrate that key to this behavior is the formation of transient three-center bonds in the excited state that is enabled due to the presence of lone-pair electrons. Our findings additionally reveal previously ignored fundamental similarities between the mechanisms of reversible photoinduced structural changes in chalcogenide glasses and phase-change alloys and offer new insights into the development of efficient PCM materials. PMID:26323962

  4. Rayleigh-Taylor instability of viscous fluids with phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung Jae; Kim, Kyung Doo

    2016-04-01

    Film boiling on a horizontal surface is a typical example of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. During the film boiling, phase changes take place at the interface, and thus heat and mass transfer must be taken into consideration in the stability analysis. Moreover, since the vapor layer is not quite thick, a viscous flow must be analyzed. Existing studies assumed equal kinematic viscosities of two fluids, and/or considered thin viscous fluids. The purpose of this study is to derive the analytical dispersion relation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for more general conditions. The two fluids have different properties. The thickness of the vapor layer is finite, but the liquid layer is thick enough to be nearly semi-infinite in view of perturbation. Initially, the vapor is in equilibrium with the liquid at the interface, and the direction of heat transfer is from the vapor side to the liquid side. In this case, the phase change has a stabilizing effect on the growth rate of the interface. When the vapor layer is thin, there is a coupled effect of the vapor viscosity, phase change, and vapor thickness on the critical wave number. For the other limit of a thick vapor, both the liquid and vapor viscosities influence the critical wave number. Finally, the most unstable wavelength is investigated. When the vapor layer is thin, the most unstable wavelength is not affected by phase change. When the vapor layer is thick, however, it increases with the increasing rate of phase change.

  5. Understanding Phase-Change Memory Alloys from a Chemical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Kolobov, A V; Fons, P; Tominaga, J

    2015-01-01

    Phase-change memories (PCM) are associated with reversible ultra-fast low-energy crystal-to-amorphous switching in GeTe-based alloys co-existing with the high stability of the two phases at ambient temperature, a unique property that has been recently explained by the high fragility of the glass-forming liquid phase, where the activation barrier for crystallisation drastically increases as the temperature decreases from the glass-transition to room temperature. At the same time the atomistic dynamics of the phase-change process and the associated changes in the nature of bonding have remained unknown. In this work we demonstrate that key to this behavior is the formation of transient three-center bonds in the excited state that is enabled due to the presence of lone-pair electrons. Our findings additionally reveal previously ignored fundamental similarities between the mechanisms of reversible photoinduced structural changes in chalcogenide glasses and phase-change alloys and offer new insights into the development of efficient PCM materials. PMID:26323962

  6. New developments in optical phase-change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovshinsky, Stanford R.; Czubatyj, Wolodymyr

    2001-02-01

    Phase change technology has progressed from the original invention of Ovshinsky to become the leading choice for rewritable optical disks. ECD's early work in phase change materials and methods for operating in a direct overwrite fashion were crucial to the successes that have been achieved. Since the introduction of the first rewritable phase change products in 1991, the market has expanded from CD-RW into rewritable DVD with creative work going on worldwide. Phase change technology is ideally suited to address the continuous demand for increased storage capacity. First, laser beams can be focused to ever-smaller spot sizes using shorter wavelength lasers and higher performance optics. Blue lasers are now commercially viable and high numerical aperture and near field lenses have been demonstrated. Second, multilevel approaches can be used to increase capacity by a factor of three or more with concomitant increases in data transfer rate. In addition, ECD has decreased manufacturing costs through the use of innovative production technology. These factors combine to accelerate the widespread use of phase change technology. As in all our technologies, such as thin film photovoltaics, nickel metal hydride batteries, hydrogen storage systems, fuel cells, electrical memory, etc., we have invented the materials, the products, the production machines and the production processes for high rate, low-cost manufacture.

  7. Urban health inequities and the added pressure of climate change: an action-oriented research agenda.

    PubMed

    Friel, Sharon; Hancock, Trevor; Kjellstrom, Tord; McGranahan, Gordon; Monge, Patricia; Roy, Joyashree

    2011-10-01

    Climate change will likely exacerbate already existing urban social inequities and health risks, thereby exacerbating existing urban health inequities. Cities in low- and middle-income countries are particularly vulnerable. Urbanization is both a cause of and potential solution to global climate change. Most population growth in the foreseeable future will occur in urban areas primarily in developing countries. How this growth is managed has enormous implications for climate change given the increasing concentration and magnitude of economic production in urban localities, as well as the higher consumption practices of urbanites, especially the middle classes, compared to rural populations. There is still much to learn about the extent to which climate change affects urban health equity and what can be done effectively in different socio-political and socio-economic contexts to improve the health of urban dwelling humans and the environment. But it is clear that equity-oriented climate change adaptation means attention to the social conditions in which urban populations live-this is not just a climate change policy issue, it requires inter-sectoral action. Policies and programs in urban planning and design, workplace health and safety, and urban agriculture can help mitigate further climate change and adapt to existing climate change. If done well, these will also be good for urban health equity.

  8. The added complications of climate change: understanding and managing biodiversity and ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amanda Staudt,; Allison K. Leidner,; Jennifer Howard,; Kate A. Brauman,; Jeffrey S. Dukes,; Hansen, Lara J.; Paukert, Craig; Sabo, John L.; Solorzano, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Ecosystems around the world are already threatened by land-use and land-cover change, extraction of natural resources, biological disturbances, and pollution. These environmental stressors have been the primary source of ecosystem degradation to date, and climate change is now exacerbating some of their effects. Ecosystems already under stress are likely to have more rapid and acute reactions to climate change; it is therefore useful to understand how multiple stresses will interact, especially as the magnitude of climate change increases. Understanding these interactions could be critically important in the design of climate adaptation strategies, especially because actions taken by other sectors (eg energy, agriculture, transportation) to address climate change may create new ecosystem stresses.

  9. A Study on Phase Changes of Heterogeneous Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirasawa, Yoshio; Saito, Akio; Takegoshi, Eisyun

    In this study, a phase change process in heterogeneous composite materials which consist of water and coiled copper wires as conductive solid is investigated by four kinds of typical calculation models : 1) model-1 in which the effective thermal conductivity of the composite material is used, 2) model-2 in which a fin metal acts for many conductive solids, 3) model-3 in which the effective thermal conductivities between nodes are estimated and three-dimensional calculation is performed, 4) model-4 proposed by authors in the previous paper in which effective thermal conductivity is not needed. Consequently, model-1 showed the phase change rate considerably lower than the experimental results. Model-2 gave the larger amount of the phase change rate. Model-3 agreed well with the experiment in the case of small coil diameter and relatively large Vd. Model-4 showed a very well agreement with the experiment in the range of this study.

  10. Phase change dispersion of plasmonic nano-objects

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xie; Hu, Haifeng; Gao, Yongkang; Ji, Dengxin; Zhang, Nan; Song, Haomin; Liu, Kai; Jiang, Suhua; Gan, Qiaoqiang

    2015-01-01

    Phase is an inherent and important feature for coherent processes, which, unfortunately, has not been completely understood for surface plasmon polariton (SPP) and matter interactions. Here we propose a practical approach to extract the phase change dispersion during the interaction between free-space light, SPPs and nanogroove/slit based on far-field information only. Numerical simulation and experimental validation were both presented using nanoslit-groove plasmonic interferometers, agreeing well with theoretical near-field analysis. This approach is generally feasible to extract the intrinsic phase dispersion of other plasmonic nanostructures and can reveal more fundamental features of SPP-matter interactions. PMID:26219831

  11. Phase-change Random Access Memory: A Scalable Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Raoux, S.; Burr, G; Breitwisch, M; Rettner, C; Chen, Y; Shelby, R; Salinga, M; Krebs, D; Chen, S; Lung, H

    2008-01-01

    Nonvolatile RAM using resistance contrast in phase-change materials [or phase-change RAM (PCRAM)] is a promising technology for future storage-class memory. However, such a technology can succeed only if it can scale smaller in size, given the increasingly tiny memory cells that are projected for future technology nodes (i.e., generations). We first discuss the critical aspects that may affect the scaling of PCRAM, including materials properties, power consumption during programming and read operations, thermal cross-talk between memory cells, and failure mechanisms. We then discuss experiments that directly address the scaling properties of the phase-change materials themselves, including studies of phase transitions in both nanoparticles and ultrathin films as a function of particle size and film thickness. This work in materials directly motivated the successful creation of a series of prototype PCRAM devices, which have been fabricated and tested at phase-change material cross-sections with extremely small dimensions as low as 3 nm x 20 nm. These device measurements provide a clear demonstration of the excellent scaling potential offered by this technology, and they are also consistent with the scaling behavior predicted by extensive device simulations. Finally, we discuss issues of device integration and cell design, manufacturability, and reliability.

  12. An SPICE model for phase-change memory simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Li; Zhitang, Song; Daolin, Cai; Xiaogang, Chen; Houpeng, Chen

    2011-09-01

    Along with a series of research works on the physical prototype and properties of the memory cell, an SPICE model for phase-change memory (PCM) simulations based on Verilog-A language is presented. By handling it with the heat distribution algorithm, threshold switching theory and the crystallization kinetic model, the proposed SPICE model can effectively reproduce the physical behaviors of the phase-change memory cell. In particular, it can emulate the cell's temperature curve and crystallinity profile during the programming process, which can enable us to clearly understand the PCM's working principle and program process.

  13. Using adversary text to detect adversary phase changes.

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, Ann Elizabeth; Doser, Adele Beatrice; Warrender, Christina E.

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to help develop a research roadmap and small proof ofconcept for addressing key problems and gaps from the perspective of using text analysis methods as a primary tool for detecting when a group is undergoing a phase change. Self- rganizing map (SOM) techniques were used to analyze text data obtained from the tworld-wide web. Statistical studies indicate that it may be possible to predict phase changes, as well as detect whether or not an example of writing can be attributed to a group of interest.

  14. Conduction phase change beneath insulated heated or cooled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunardini, V. J.

    1982-08-01

    The problem of thawing beneath heated structures on permafrost (or cooled structures in non-permafrost zones) must be addressed if safe engineering designs are to be conceived. In general, there are no exact solutions to the problem of conduction heat transfer with phase change for practical geometries. The quasi-steady approximation is used here to solve the conductive heat transfer problem with phase change for insulated geometries including infinite strips, rectangular buildings, circular storage tanks, and buried pipes. Analytical solutions are presented and graphed for a range of parameters of practical importance.

  15. Extracting changes in air temperature using acoustic coda phase delays.

    PubMed

    Marcillo, Omar; Arrowsmith, Stephen; Whitaker, Rod; Morton, Emily; Scott Phillips, W

    2014-10-01

    Blast waves produced by 60 high-explosive detonations were recorded at short distances (few hundreds of meters); the corresponding waveforms show charge-configuration independent coda-like features (i.e., similar shapes, amplitudes, and phases) lasting several seconds. These features are modeled as reflected and/or scattered waves by acoustic reflectors/scatters surrounding the explosions. Using explosion pairs, relative coda phase delays are extracted and modeled as changes in sound speed due to changes in air temperature. Measurements from nearby weather towers are used for validation. PMID:25324115

  16. Vibration damping and heat transfer using material phase changes

    DOEpatents

    Kloucek, Petr; Reynolds, Daniel R.

    2009-03-24

    A method and apparatus wherein phase changes in a material can dampen vibrational energy, dampen noise and facilitate heat transfer. One embodiment includes a method for damping vibrational energy in a body. The method comprises attaching a material to the body, wherein the material comprises a substrate, a shape memory alloy layer, and a plurality of temperature change elements. The method further comprises sensing vibrations in the body. In addition, the method comprises indicating to at least a portion of the temperature change elements to provide a temperature change in the shape memory alloy layer, wherein the temperature change is sufficient to provide a phase change in at least a portion of the shape memory alloy layer, and further wherein the phase change consumes a sufficient amount of kinetic energy to dampen at least a portion of the vibrational energy in the body. In other embodiments, the shape memory alloy layer is a thin film. Additional embodiments include a sensor connected to the material.

  17. Vibration damping and heat transfer using material phase changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloucek, Petr (Inventor); Reynolds, Daniel R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and apparatus wherein phase changes in a material can dampen vibrational energy, dampen noise and facilitate heat transfer. One embodiment includes a method for damping vibrational energy in a body. The method comprises attaching a material to the body, wherein the material comprises a substrate, a shape memory alloy layer, and a plurality of temperature change elements. The method further comprises sensing vibrations in the body. In addition, the method comprises indicating to at least a portion of the temperature change elements to provide a temperature change in the shape memory alloy layer, wherein the temperature change is sufficient to provide a phase change in at least a portion of the shape memory alloy layer, and further wherein the phase change consumes a sufficient amount of kinetic energy to dampen at least a portion of the vibrational energy in the body. In other embodiments, the shape memory alloy layer is a thin film. Additional embodiments include a sensor connected to the material.

  18. Changes in QTc Interval in the Citalopram for Agitation in Alzheimer's Disease (CitAD) Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Drye, Lea T.; Spragg, David; Devanand, D. P.; Frangakis, Constantine; Marano, Christopher; Meinert, Curtis L.; Mintzer, Jacobo E.; Munro, Cynthia A.; Pelton, Gregory; Pollock, Bruce G.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Rabins, Peter V.; Rosenberg, Paul B.; Schneider, Lon S.; Shade, David M.; Weintraub, Daniel; Yesavage, Jerome; Lyketsos, Constantine G.

    2014-01-01

    Background A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) safety communication in August 2011 warned that citalopram was associated with a dose dependent risk of QT prolongation and recommended dose restriction in patients over the age of 60 but did not provide data for this age group. Methods CitAD was a randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled, multicenter clinical trial for agitation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Participants were assigned to citalopram (target dose of 30 mg/day) or placebo in a 1∶1 ratio. 186 people, 181 of whom were over the age of 60, having probable AD with clinically significant agitation were recruited from September 2009 to January 2013. After the FDA safety communication about citalopram, ECG was added to the required study procedures before enrollment and repeated at week 3 to monitor change in QTc interval. Forty-eight participants were enrolled after enhanced monitoring began. Results Citalopram treatment was associated with a larger increase in QTc interval than placebo (difference in week 3 QTc adjusting for baseline QTc: 18.1 ms [95% CI: 6.1, 30.1]; p = 0.004). More participants in the citalopram group had an increase ≥30 ms from baseline to week 3 (7 in citalopram versus 1 in placebo; Fisher's exact p = 0.046), but only slightly more in the citalopram group met a gender-specific threshold for prolonged QTc (450 ms for males; 470 ms for females) at any point during follow-up (3 in citalopram versus 1 in placebo, Fisher's exact p = 0.611). One of the citalopram participants who developed prolonged QTc also displayed ventricular bigeminy. No participants in either group had a cardiovascular-related death. Conclusion Citalopram at 30 mg/day was associated with improvement in agitation in patients with AD but was also associated with QT prolongation. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00898807 PMID:24914549

  19. Determination of the orientational order parameter of a binary mixture showing an induced smectic A(d) phase from magnetic susceptibility measurements.

    PubMed

    Roy, Prithwi Dev; Das, Banani; Das, Malay Kumar

    2009-08-19

    The diamagnetic susceptibility anisotropy (Δχ) measurement of a binary mixture comprising of a strongly polar mesogen (CPPCC) and a weakly polar mesogen (ME6O.5) showing an induced smectic A(d) phase is reported here. Assuming an axially symmetric molecule, the temperature dependence of the orientational order parameter ⟨P(2)⟩ has been investigated from the anisotropy of the susceptibility at different temperatures throughout the entire composition range. The results are compared with x-ray and optical birefringence measurements along with the mean-field theory of the smectic A phase. The maximum in the stability of the smectic A(d) phase (at x(CPPCC) = 0.33) corresponds to the minimum in the order parameter values. The order of the smectic to nematic phase transition has also been discussed.

  20. Engineering of chalcogenide materials for embedded applications of Phase Change Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuliani, Paola; Palumbo, Elisabetta; Borghi, Massimo; Dalla Libera, Giovanna; Annunziata, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    Phase Change Memory technology can be a real breakthrough for process cost saving and performances for embedded applications. The feasibility at 90 nm technology node has been solidly proven in an industrial environment and the added value of this solution demonstrated. Nevertheless, for specific applications some improvement in High Temperature Data Retention (HTDR) characteristics is needed. In this work we present the engineering of chalcogenide materials in order to increase the stability of RESET state as a function of temperature. This goal has been achieved by exploring Ge-rich compounds in the Ge-Sb-Te ternary diagram. In particular, an optimized GexSbyTez Phase Change material, able to guarantee code integrity of the memory content after soldering thermal profile and data retention in extended temperature range has been obtained. Extrapolation of data retention at 10 years for temperatures higher than 150 °C cell-level has been demonstrated, thus enabling automotive applications.

  1. Compensating temperature-induced ultrasonic phase and amplitude changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Peng; Hay, Thomas R.; Greve, David W.; Junker, Warren R.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2016-04-01

    In ultrasonic structural health monitoring (SHM), environmental and operational conditions, especially temperature, can significantly affect the propagation of ultrasonic waves and thus degrade damage detection. Typically, temperature effects are compensated using optimal baseline selection (OBS) or optimal signal stretch (OSS). The OSS method achieves compensation by adjusting phase shifts caused by temperature, but it does not fully compensate phase shifts and it does not compensate for accompanying signal amplitude changes. In this paper, we develop a new temperature compensation strategy to address both phase shifts and amplitude changes. In this strategy, OSS is first used to compensate some of the phase shifts and to quantify the temperature effects by stretching factors. Based on stretching factors, empirical adjusting factors for a damage indicator are then applied to compensate for the temperature induced remaining phase shifts and amplitude changes. The empirical adjusting factors can be trained from baseline data with temperature variations in the absence of incremental damage. We applied this temperature compensation approach to detect volume loss in a thick wall aluminum tube with multiple damage levels and temperature variations. Our specimen is a thick-walled short tube, with dimensions closely comparable to the outlet region of a frac iron elbow where flow-induced erosion produces the volume loss that governs the service life of that component, and our experimental sequence simulates the erosion process by removing material in small damage steps. Our results show that damage detection is greatly improved when this new temperature compensation strategy, termed modified-OSS, is implemented.

  2. Unusual crystallization behavior in Ga-Sb phase change alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Putero, Magali Coulet, Marie-Vanessa; Ouled-Khachroum, Toufik; Muller, Christophe; Baehtz, Carsten; Raoux, Simone

    2013-12-01

    Combined in situ X-ray scattering techniques using synchrotron radiation were applied to investigate the crystallization behavior of Sb-rich Ga-Sb alloys. Measurements of the sheet resistance during heating indicated a reduced crystallization temperature with increased Sb content, which was confirmed by in situ X-ray diffraction. The electrical contrast increased with increasing Sb content and the resistivities in both the amorphous and crystalline phases decreased. It was found that by tuning the composition between Ga:Sb = 9:91 (in at.%) and Ga:Sb = 45:55, the change in mass density upon crystallization changes from an increase in mass density which is typical for most phase change materials to a decrease in mass density. At the composition of Ga:Sb = 30:70, no mass density change is observed which should be very beneficial for phase change random access memory (PCRAM) applications where a change in mass density during cycling is assumed to cause void formation and PCRAM device failure.

  3. Synthesis and nanoscale thermal encoding of phase-change nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xuhui; Yu Bin; Meyyappan, M.

    2007-04-30

    Low-dimensional phase-change nanostructures provide a valuable research platform for understanding the phase-transition behavior and thermal properties at nanoscale and their potential in achieving superdense data storage. Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} nanowires have been grown using a vapor-liquid-solid technique and shown to exhibit distinctive properties that may overcome the present data storage scaling barrier. Local heating of an individual nanowire with a focused electron beam was used to shape a nano-bar-code on a Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} nanowire. The data encoding on Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} nanowire may promote novel device concepts to implement ultrahigh density, low energy, high speed data storage using phase-change nanomaterials with diverse thermal-programing strategies.

  4. Method for preparing polyolefin composites containing a phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1990-01-01

    A composite useful in thermal energy storage, said composite being formed of a polyolefin matrix having a phase change material such as a crystalline alkyl hydrocarbon incorporated therein. The composite is useful in forming pellets, sheets or fibers having thermal energy storage characteristics; methods for forming the composite are also disclosed.

  5. Phase Change Permeation Technology For Environmental Control Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Use of a phase change permeation membrane (Dutyion [Trademark]) to passively and selectively mobilize water in microgravity to enable improved water recovery from urine/brine for Environment Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) and water delivery to plans for potential use in microgravity.

  6. Kodak phase-change media for optical tape applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyan, Yuan-Sheng; Preuss, Donald R.; Olin, George R.; Vazan, Fridrich; Pan, Kee-Chuan; Raychaudhuri, Pranab. K.

    1993-01-01

    The SbInSn phase-change write-once optical medium developed by Eastman Kodak Company is particularly suitable for development into the next generation optical tape media. Its performance for optical recording has already been demonstrated in some of the highest performance optical disk systems. Some of the key performance features are presented.

  7. Thermally-actuated, phase change flow control for microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zongyuan; Wang, Jing; Qian, Shizhi; Bau, Haim H

    2005-11-01

    An easy to implement, thermally-actuated, noninvasive method for flow control in microfluidic devices is described. This technique takes advantage of the phase change of the working liquid itself-the freezing and melting of a portion of a liquid slug-to noninvasively close and open flow passages (referred to as a phase change valve). The valve was designed for use in a miniature diagnostic system for detecting pathogens in oral fluids at the point of care. The paper describes the modeling, construction, and characteristics of the valve. The experimental results favorably agree with theoretical predictions. In addition, the paper demonstrates the use of the phase change valves for flow control, sample metering and distribution into multiple analysis paths, sealing of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber, and sample introduction into and withdrawal from a closed loop. The phase change valve is electronically addressable, does not require any moving parts, introduces only minimal dead volume, is leakage and contamination free, and is biocompatible.

  8. Performance enhancement of hermetic compressor using phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, I. M.; Rady, M. A.; Huzayyin, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    The present study is motivated by the need for the research of simple measures for increasing energy efficiency of hermetic compressor. The measure is the application of phase change materials for performance enhancement. The first experimental study should be guide for choice of PCM. It has been performed to investigate the effects of thermostat setting temperature on the performance of hermetic compressor. The effects of thermostat setting temperature with and without load on power consumption have been analyzed. Performance enhancement using phase change materials (PCMs) has been studied by employing a phase change material Rubitherm-42 (RT-42) on the top surface of compressor. Choice of PCM material is based on basic compressor performance measured in the first part of the present study. Experiments have been carried out for different load values and different quantities of PCM. The quantity and phase change characteristic of PCM are essential parameters that determine the percentage of performance enhancement in term of energy consumption. Reduction of energy consumption of about 10% has been achieved in the present study by using PCM. The present study shows that how to reduce the electrical power consumption to enhance compressor heat dissipation method to improve efficiency.

  9. High-pressure Raman spectroscopy of phase change materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin Mao, Wendy L.; Zalden, Peter; Wuttig, Matthias; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2013-11-04

    We used high-pressure Raman spectroscopy to study the evolution of vibrational frequencies of the phase change materials (PCMs) Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, GeSb{sub 2}Te{sub 4}, and SnSb{sub 2}Te{sub 4}. We found that the critical pressure for triggering amorphization in the PCMs decreases with increasing vacancy concentration, demonstrating that the presence of vacancies, rather than differences in the atomic covalent radii, is crucial for pressure-induced amorphization in PCMs. Compared to the as-deposited amorphous phase, the pressure-induced amorphous phase has a similar vibrational spectrum but requires much lower laser power to transform into the crystalline phase, suggesting different kinetics of crystallization, which may have implications for applications of PCMs in non-volatile data storage.

  10. Ultrafast characterization of phase-change material crystallization properties in the melt-quenched amorphous phase.

    PubMed

    Jeyasingh, Rakesh; Fong, Scott W; Lee, Jaeho; Li, Zijian; Chang, Kuo-Wei; Mantegazza, Davide; Asheghi, Mehdi; Goodson, Kenneth E; Wong, H-S Philip

    2014-06-11

    Phase change materials are widely considered for application in nonvolatile memories because of their ability to achieve phase transformation in the nanosecond time scale. However, the knowledge of fast crystallization dynamics in these materials is limited because of the lack of fast and accurate temperature control methods. In this work, we have developed an experimental methodology that enables ultrafast characterization of phase-change dynamics on a more technologically relevant melt-quenched amorphous phase using practical device structures. We have extracted the crystallization growth velocity (U) in a functional capped phase change memory (PCM) device over 8 orders of magnitude (10(-10) < U < 10(-1) m/s) spanning a wide temperature range (415 < T < 580 K). We also observed direct evidence of non-Arrhenius crystallization behavior in programmed PCM devices at very high heating rates (>10(8) K/s), which reveals the extreme fragility of Ge2Sb2Te5 in its supercooled liquid phase. Furthermore, these crystallization properties were studied as a function of device programming cycles, and the results show degradation in the cell retention properties due to elemental segregation. The above experiments are enabled by the use of an on-chip fast heater and thermometer called as microthermal stage (MTS) integrated with a vertical phase change memory (PCM) cell. The temperature at the PCM layer can be controlled up to 600 K using MTS and with a thermal time constant of 800 ns, leading to heating rates ∼10(8) K/s that are close to the typical device operating conditions during PCM programming. The MTS allows us to independently control the electrical and thermal aspects of phase transformation (inseparable in a conventional PCM cell) and extract the temperature dependence of key material properties in real PCM devices. PMID:24798660

  11. Dynamic observation of phase transformation behaviors in indium(III) selenide nanowire based phase change memory.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Chun-Wei; Chen, Jui-Yuan; Ting, Yi-Hsin; Lu, Kuo-Chang; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Wu, Wen-Wei

    2014-09-23

    Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) has been extensively investigated for its potential applications in next-generation nonvolatile memory. In this study, indium(III) selenide (In2Se3) was selected due to its high resistivity ratio and lower programming current. Au/In2Se3-nanowire/Au phase change memory devices were fabricated and measured systematically in an in situ transmission electron microscope to perform a RESET/SET process under pulsed and dc voltage swept mode, respectively. During the switching, we observed the dynamic evolution of the phase transformation process. The switching behavior resulted from crystalline/amorphous change and revealed that a long pulse width would induce the amorphous or polycrystalline state by different pulse amplitudes, supporting the improvement of the writing speed, retention, and endurance of PCRAM. PMID:25133955

  12. Irreversible altering of crystalline phase of phase-change Ge-Sb thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Krusin-Elbaum, L.; Shakhvorostov, D.; Cabral, C. Jr.; Raoux, S.; Jordan-Sweet, J. L.

    2010-03-22

    The stability of the crystalline phase of binary phase-change Ge{sub x}Sb{sub 1-x} films is investigated over a wide range of Ge content. From Raman spectroscopy we find the Ge-Sb crystalline structure irreversibly altered after exposure to a laser beam. We show that with increasing beam intensity/temperature Ge agglomerates and precipitates out in the amount growing with x. A simple empirical relation links Ge precipitation temperature T{sub Ge}{sup p} to the rate of change dT{sub cryst}/dx of crystallization, with the precipitation easiest on the mid-range x plateau, where T{sub cryst} is nearly constant. Our findings point to a preferable 15% < or approx. x < 50% window, that may achieve the desired cycling/archival properties of a phase-change cell.

  13. Climate Change Winners: Receding Ice Fields Facilitate Colony Expansion and Altered Dynamics in an Adélie Penguin Metapopulation

    PubMed Central

    LaRue, Michelle A.; Ainley, David G.; Swanson, Matt; Dugger, Katie M.; Lyver, Phil O′B.; Barton, Kerry; Ballard, Grant

    2013-01-01

    There will be winners and losers as climate change alters the habitats of polar organisms. For an Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) colony on Beaufort Island (Beaufort), part of a cluster of colonies in the southern Ross Sea, we report a recent population increase in response to increased nesting habitat as glaciers have receded. Emigration rates of birds banded as chicks on Beaufort to colonies on nearby Ross Island decreased after 2005 as available habitat on Beaufort increased, leading to altered dynamics of the metapopulation. Using aerial photography beginning in 1958 and modern satellite imagery, we measured change in area of available nesting habitat and population size of the Beaufort colony. Population size varied with available habitat, and both increased rapidly since the 1990s. In accord with glacial retreat, summer temperatures at nearby McMurdo Station increased by ∼0.50°C per decade since the mid-1980s. Although the Ross Sea is likely to be the last ocean with an intact ecosystem, the recent retreat of ice fields at Beaufort that resulted in increased breeding habitat exemplifies a process that has been underway in the Ross Sea during the entire Holocene. Furthermore, our results are in line with predictions that major ice shelves and glaciers will retreat rapidly elsewhere in the Antarctic, potentially leading to increased breeding habitat for Adélie penguins. Results further indicated that satellite imagery may be used to estimate large changes in Adélie penguin populations, facilitating our understanding of metapopulation dynamics and environmental factors that influence regional populations. PMID:23573267

  14. Climate change winners: receding ice fields facilitate colony expansion and altered dynamics in an Adélie penguin metapopulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaRue, Michelle A.; Ainley, David G.; Swanson, Matt; Dugger, Katie M.; Lyber, Phil O'B.; Barton, Kerry; Ballard, Grant

    2013-01-01

    There will be winners and losers as climate change alters the habitats of polar organisms. For an Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) colony on Beaufort Island (Beaufort), part of a cluster of colonies in the southern Ross Sea, we report a recent population increase in response to increased nesting habitat as glaciers have receded. Emigration rates of birds banded as chicks on Beaufort to colonies on nearby Ross Island decreased after 2005 as available habitat on Beaufort increased, leading to altered dynamics of the metapopulation. Using aerial photography beginning in 1958 and modern satellite imagery, we measured change in area of available nesting habitat and population size of the Beaufort colony. Population size varied with available habitat, and both increased rapidly since the 1990s. In accord with glacial retreat, summer temperatures at nearby McMurdo Station increased by ~0.50°C per decade since the mid-1980s. Although the Ross Sea is likely to be the last ocean with an intact ecosystem, the recent retreat of ice fields at Beaufort that resulted in increased breeding habitat exemplifies a process that has been underway in the Ross Sea during the entire Holocene. Furthermore, our results are in line with predictions that major ice shelves and glaciers will retreat rapidly elsewhere in the Antarctic, potentially leading to increased breeding habitat for Adélie penguins. Results further indicated that satellite imagery may be used to estimate large changes in Adélie penguin populations, facilitating our understanding of metapopulation dynamics and environmental factors that influence regional populations.

  15. Climate change winners: receding ice fields facilitate colony expansion and altered dynamics in an Adélie penguin metapopulation.

    PubMed

    LaRue, Michelle A; Ainley, David G; Swanson, Matt; Dugger, Katie M; Lyver, Phil O'B; Barton, Kerry; Ballard, Grant

    2013-01-01

    There will be winners and losers as climate change alters the habitats of polar organisms. For an Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) colony on Beaufort Island (Beaufort), part of a cluster of colonies in the southern Ross Sea, we report a recent population increase in response to increased nesting habitat as glaciers have receded. Emigration rates of birds banded as chicks on Beaufort to colonies on nearby Ross Island decreased after 2005 as available habitat on Beaufort increased, leading to altered dynamics of the metapopulation. Using aerial photography beginning in 1958 and modern satellite imagery, we measured change in area of available nesting habitat and population size of the Beaufort colony. Population size varied with available habitat, and both increased rapidly since the 1990s. In accord with glacial retreat, summer temperatures at nearby McMurdo Station increased by ~0.50 °C per decade since the mid-1980s. Although the Ross Sea is likely to be the last ocean with an intact ecosystem, the recent retreat of ice fields at Beaufort that resulted in increased breeding habitat exemplifies a process that has been underway in the Ross Sea during the entire Holocene. Furthermore, our results are in line with predictions that major ice shelves and glaciers will retreat rapidly elsewhere in the Antarctic, potentially leading to increased breeding habitat for Adélie penguins. Results further indicated that satellite imagery may be used to estimate large changes in Adélie penguin populations, facilitating our understanding of metapopulation dynamics and environmental factors that influence regional populations.

  16. Climate change winners: receding ice fields facilitate colony expansion and altered dynamics in an Adélie penguin metapopulation.

    PubMed

    LaRue, Michelle A; Ainley, David G; Swanson, Matt; Dugger, Katie M; Lyver, Phil O'B; Barton, Kerry; Ballard, Grant

    2013-01-01

    There will be winners and losers as climate change alters the habitats of polar organisms. For an Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) colony on Beaufort Island (Beaufort), part of a cluster of colonies in the southern Ross Sea, we report a recent population increase in response to increased nesting habitat as glaciers have receded. Emigration rates of birds banded as chicks on Beaufort to colonies on nearby Ross Island decreased after 2005 as available habitat on Beaufort increased, leading to altered dynamics of the metapopulation. Using aerial photography beginning in 1958 and modern satellite imagery, we measured change in area of available nesting habitat and population size of the Beaufort colony. Population size varied with available habitat, and both increased rapidly since the 1990s. In accord with glacial retreat, summer temperatures at nearby McMurdo Station increased by ~0.50 °C per decade since the mid-1980s. Although the Ross Sea is likely to be the last ocean with an intact ecosystem, the recent retreat of ice fields at Beaufort that resulted in increased breeding habitat exemplifies a process that has been underway in the Ross Sea during the entire Holocene. Furthermore, our results are in line with predictions that major ice shelves and glaciers will retreat rapidly elsewhere in the Antarctic, potentially leading to increased breeding habitat for Adélie penguins. Results further indicated that satellite imagery may be used to estimate large changes in Adélie penguin populations, facilitating our understanding of metapopulation dynamics and environmental factors that influence regional populations. PMID:23573267

  17. Irradiation induced structural change in Mo2Zr intermetallic phase

    DOE PAGES

    Gan, J.; Keiser, Jr., D. D.; Miller, B. D.; Eriksson, N.; Sohn, Y. H.; Kirk, M.

    2016-05-14

    The Mo2Zr phase has been identified as a major interaction product at the interface of U-10Mo and Zr. Transmission electron microscopy in-situ irradiation with Kr ions at 200 °C with doses up to 2.0E+16 ions/cm2 was carried out to investigate the radiation stability of the Mo2Zr. The Mo2Zr undergoes a radiation-induced structural change, from a large cubic (cF24) to a small cubic (cI2), along with an estimated 11.2% volume contraction without changing its composition. The structural change begins at irradiation dose below 1.0E+14 ions/cm2. Furthermore, the transformed Mo2Zr phase demonstrates exceptional radiation tolerance with the development of dislocations without bubblemore » formation.« less

  18. Changes in annual temperature and precipitation extremes in the Carpathians since AD 1961

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Birsan, Marius-Victor; Magdalena Micu, Dana; Cheval, Sorin

    2014-05-01

    The Carpathians are the largest, longest, most twisted and fragmented segment of the Alpine system, stretching between latitudes 44°N and 50°N, and longitudes 17°E and 27°E. This European mountain range is a climatically transitional region between major atmospheric circulation source areas of the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea and continental Europe. The region is a European biodiversity hotspot, containing over one third of all European plant species. It is acknowledged that the mountain regions are particularly sensitive and vulnerable to climate change than any other regions located at the same latitudes. Observational studies on the variability and trends of extreme events suggest an overall consensus towards a significant increase in the frequency, duration and intensity of warm extremes in most of these regions, including the Carpathians. 15 core indices, defined by the Expert Team on Climate Change Detection and Indices (ETCCDI), were computed in order to investigate the changes in annual temperature and precipitation extremes, based on their known relevance for the infrastructure, human health and tourism activities in these mountains. The indices were computed from gridded daily datasets of minimum and maximum temperature and precipitation at 0.1° resolution (~10 km), available online within the framework of the project CarpatClim (www.carpatclim-eu.org) for the period 1961-2010. Changes in the annual temperature and precipitation extremes in the last five decades have been identified with the Mann-Kendall non-parametric trend test, at the 90% significance level (two-tail test). The results show decreasing trends in cold-related thermal indices, especially in the number of frost days, and increasing trends in warm-related ones. No consistent trend in precipitation extremes has been found. There is a generally uniform signal of significant increasing trends in the frequency of summer days across the Carpathians, with no obvious differences between

  19. Energy and time modelling of kerbside waste collection: Changes incurred when adding source separated food waste.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Joel; Othman, Maazuza; Burn, Stewart; Crossin, Enda

    2016-10-01

    The collection of source separated kerbside municipal FW (SSFW) is being incentivised in Australia, however such a collection is likely to increase the fuel and time a collection truck fleet requires. Therefore, waste managers need to determine whether the incentives outweigh the cost. With literature scarcely describing the magnitude of increase, and local parameters playing a crucial role in accurately modelling kerbside collection; this paper develops a new general mathematical model that predicts the energy and time requirements of a collection regime whilst incorporating the unique variables of different jurisdictions. The model, Municipal solid waste collect (MSW-Collect), is validated and shown to be more accurate at predicting fuel consumption and trucks required than other common collection models. When predicting changes incurred for five different SSFW collection scenarios, results show that SSFW scenarios require an increase in fuel ranging from 1.38% to 57.59%. There is also a need for additional trucks across most SSFW scenarios tested. All SSFW scenarios are ranked and analysed in regards to fuel consumption; sensitivity analysis is conducted to test key assumptions. PMID:27396681

  20. Energy and time modelling of kerbside waste collection: Changes incurred when adding source separated food waste.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Joel; Othman, Maazuza; Burn, Stewart; Crossin, Enda

    2016-10-01

    The collection of source separated kerbside municipal FW (SSFW) is being incentivised in Australia, however such a collection is likely to increase the fuel and time a collection truck fleet requires. Therefore, waste managers need to determine whether the incentives outweigh the cost. With literature scarcely describing the magnitude of increase, and local parameters playing a crucial role in accurately modelling kerbside collection; this paper develops a new general mathematical model that predicts the energy and time requirements of a collection regime whilst incorporating the unique variables of different jurisdictions. The model, Municipal solid waste collect (MSW-Collect), is validated and shown to be more accurate at predicting fuel consumption and trucks required than other common collection models. When predicting changes incurred for five different SSFW collection scenarios, results show that SSFW scenarios require an increase in fuel ranging from 1.38% to 57.59%. There is also a need for additional trucks across most SSFW scenarios tested. All SSFW scenarios are ranked and analysed in regards to fuel consumption; sensitivity analysis is conducted to test key assumptions.

  1. Effect of adding mFOLFOX6 after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally advanced rectal cancer: a multicentre, phase 2 trial

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Chow, Oliver S; Smith, David D; Marcet, Jorge E; Cataldo, Peter A; Varma, Madhulika G; Kumar, Anjali S; Oommen, Samuel; Coutsoftides, Theodore; Hunt, Steven R; Stamos, Michael J; Ternent, Charles A; Herzig, Daniel O; Fichera, Alessandro; Polite, Blase N; Dietz, David W; Patil, Sujata; Avila, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Patients with locally advanced rectal cancer who achieve a pathological complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation have an improved prognosis. The need for surgery in these patients has been questioned, but the proportion of patients achieving a pathological complete response is small. We aimed to assess whether adding cycles of mFOLFOX6 between chemoradiation and surgery increased the proportion of patients achieving a pathological complete response. Methods We did a phase 2, non-randomised trial consisting of four sequential study groups of patients with stage II–III locally advanced rectal cancer at 17 institutions in the USA and Canada. All patients received chemoradiation (fluorouracil 225 mg/m2 per day by continuous infusion throughout radiotherapy, and 45.0 Gy in 25 fractions, 5 days per week for 5 weeks, followed by a minimum boost of 5.4 Gy). Patients in group 1 had total mesorectal excision 6–8 weeks after chemoradiation. Patients in groups 2–4 received two, four, or six cycles of mFOLFOX6, respectively, between chemoradiation and total mesorectal excision. Each cycle of mFOLFOX6 consisted of racemic leucovorin 200 mg/m2 or 400 mg/m2, according to the discretion of the treating investigator, oxaliplatin 85 mg/m2 in a 2-h infusion, bolus fluorouracil 400 mg/m2 on day 1, and a 46-h infusion of fluorouracil 2400 mg/m2. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients who achieved a pathological complete response, analysed by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00335816. Findings Between March 24, 2004, and Nov 16, 2012, 292 patients were registered, 259 of whom (60 in group 1, 67 in group 2, 67 in group 3, and 65 in group 4) met criteria for analysis. 11 (18%, 95% CI 10–30) of 60 patients in group 1, 17 (25%, 16–37) of 67 in group 2, 20 (30%, 19–42) of 67 in group 3, and 25 (38%, 27–51) of 65 in group 4 achieved a pathological complete response (p=0.0036). Study group was

  2. Reconstructing the role of landuse change on water yield at the Maya urban center Tikal, Guatemala [700-800 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, L.; Duffy, C.; French, K. D.; Murtha, T., Jr.; Garcia-Gonzalez, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years scientists have been debating the role of climate on the trajectory of Maya culture in the Late Classic period, 600-900 AD. Paleo-climatologists have reconstructed realizations of climate [Haug 2003; Medina-Elizalde 2012; Hodell 1995] that offer evidence for reduced precipitation in the Late Classic period. Recently French et al [2014] proposed that landuse change may also play an important role in the available water supply at Tikal, with the removal of tropical forest and conversion to maize-agriculture and urban landuse leading to extensive development of sophisticated water storage systems and rainfall harvesting for water supply and irrigation. Rapid population growth is a concurrent and compounding factor [Scarborough 2012; Shaw 2003] where landuse impacts the distribution and availability of water storage in the surrounding watershed. Although proposed climate scenarios for the Late Classic offer a quantitative scenario for possible atmospheric conditions at Tikal, the impact of land use change on the distribution and availability of water supply has not been evaluated. In this research we reconstruct the plausible vulnerability of the water supply at Tikal under the combined forces of climatic and land use change. The Penn State Integrated Hydrologic Model (PIHM) [Qu and Duffy 2007] is used to simulate the daily-to-seasonal space and time distribution of soil moisture, groundwater and surface water storage for the period 700-800 AD, the peak of Tikal's population history. The analysis includes a quantitative assessment of the likely changes in available water storage as tropical forest is converted to maize agriculture and urban land. In particular we examine the important control that reduced canopy interception plays in the seasonal availability of water. Preliminary simulations suggest that removing tropical forest increases runoff and available water storage, which may serve to moderate seasonal and long-term drought conditions.

  3. Non-equilibrium model of two-phase porous media flow with phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Fu, X.; Juanes, R.

    2014-12-01

    The efficient simulation of multi-phase multi-component flow through geologic porous media is challenging and computationally intensive, yet quantitative modeling of these processes is essential in engineering and the geosciences. Multiphase flow with phase change and complex phase behavior arises in numerous applications, including enhanced oil recovery, steam injection in groundwater remediation, geologic CO2 storage and enhanced geothermal energy systems. A challenge of multiphase compositional simulation is that the number of existing phases varies with position and time, and thus the number of state variables in the saturation-based conservation laws is a function of space and time. The tasks of phase-state identification and determination of the composition of the different phases are performed assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium. Here we investigate a thermodynamically consistent formulation for non-isothermal two-phase flow, in systems where the hypothesis of instantaneous local equilibrium does not hold. Non-equilibrium effects are important in coarse-scale simulations where the assumption of complete mixing in each gridblock is not realistic. We apply our model to steam injection in water-saturated porous media.

  4. Multiplexed detection of molecular biomarkers with phase-change nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ming

    2014-01-01

    This review describes a new biosensing method based on nanoparticles of solid-to-liquid phase-change materials, in which a panel of metallic nanoparticles (metals and eutectic alloys) that have different compositions and melting temperatures are used as thermal reporters. Each type of nanoparticle will be conjugated to a ligand that can specifically bind to one type of molecular biomarker (protein or DNA) and then immobilized onto a substrate that is comodified with multiple ligands by forming sandwiched antibody–antigen complexes or DNA double helices. After removing unbound nanoparticles by washing, the nature and concentration of the biomarkers are determined by detecting the melting temperature and fusion enthalpy of the nanoparticles using differential scanning calorimetry. Furthermore, an even larger panel of thermal barcodes can be formed by encapsulating selected phase-change nanoparticles inside non-melting shells, such as silica, where each microparticle will have a characteristic signature that can be determined from its thermal signatures. PMID:23394155

  5. Nanoscale phase change memory with graphene ribbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnam, Ashkan; Xiong, Feng; Cappelli, Andrea; Wang, Ning C.; Carrion, Enrique A.; Hong, Sungduk; Dai, Yuan; Lyons, Austin S.; Chow, Edmond K.; Piccinini, Enrico; Jacoboni, Carlo; Pop, Eric

    2015-09-01

    Phase change memory (PCM) devices are known to reduce in power consumption as the bit volume and contact area of their electrodes are scaled down. Here, we demonstrate two types of low-power PCM devices with lateral graphene ribbon electrodes: one in which the graphene is patterned into narrow nanoribbons and the other where the phase change material is patterned into nanoribbons. The sharp graphene "edge" contacts enable switching with threshold voltages as low as ˜3 V, low programming currents (<1 μA SET and <10 μA RESET) and OFF/ON resistance ratios >100. Large-scale fabrication with graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition also enables the study of heterogeneous integration and that of variability for such nanomaterials and devices.

  6. Round-Robin Test of Paraffin Phase-Change Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidi, S.; Mehling, H.; Hemberger, F.; Haussmann, Th.; Laube, A.

    2015-11-01

    A round-robin test between three institutes was performed on a paraffin phase-change material (PCM) in the context of the German quality association for phase-change materials. The aim of the quality association is to define quality and test specifications for PCMs and to award certificates for successfully tested materials. To ensure the reproducibility and comparability of the measurements performed at different institutes using different measuring methods, a round-robin test was performed. The sample was unknown. The four methods used by the three participating institutes in the round-robin test were differential scanning calorimetry, Calvet calorimetry and three-layer calorimetry. Additionally, T-history measurements were made. The aim of the measurements was the determination of the enthalpy as a function of temperature. The results achieved following defined test specifications are in excellent agreement.

  7. Phase-Changing Ionic Liquids: CO2 Capture with Ionic Liquids Involving Phase Change

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    IMPACCT Project: Notre Dame is developing a new CO2 capture process that uses special ionic liquids (ILs) to remove CO2 from the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. ILs are salts that are normally liquid at room temperature, but Notre Dame has discovered a new class of ILs that are solid at room temperature and change to liquid when they bind to CO2. Upon heating, the CO2 is released for storage, and the ILs re-solidify and donate some of the heat generated in the process to facilitate further CO2 release. These new ILs can reduce the energy required to capture CO2 from the exhaust stream of a coal-fired power plant when compared to state-ofthe- art technology.

  8. All-dielectric phase-change reconfigurable metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karvounis, Artemios; Gholipour, Behrad; MacDonald, Kevin F.; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2016-08-01

    We harness non-volatile, amorphous-crystalline transitions in the chalcogenide phase-change medium germanium antimony telluride (GST) to realize optically-switchable, all-dielectric metamaterials. Nanostructured, subwavelength-thickness films of GST present high-quality resonances that are spectrally shifted by laser-induced structural transitions, providing reflectivity and transmission switching contrast ratios of up to 5:1 (7 dB) at visible/near-infrared wavelengths selected by design.

  9. Study of large nonlinear change phase in Hibiscus Sabdariffa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejo-Durán, M.; Alvarado-Méndez, E.; Andrade-Lucio, J. A.; Rojas-Laguna, R.; Vázquez-Guevara, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    High intensities electromagnetic energy interacting with organic media gives rise to nonlinear optical effects. Hibiscus Sabdariffa is a flower whose concentrated solution presents interesting nonlinear optical properties. This organic material shows an important self-phase modulation with changes bigger than 2π. We present a diffraction ring patterns study of the Hibiscus Sabdariffa solution. Numerical results of transmittance, with refraction and simultaneous absorption, are shown.

  10. Amyloid-β 11C-PiB-PET imaging results from 2 randomized bapineuzumab phase 3 AD trials

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Mark E.; Margolin, Richard; Sperling, Reisa; Koeppe, Robert; Mason, Neale S.; Klunk, William E.; Mathis, Chester A.; Salloway, Stephen; Fox, Nick C.; Hill, Derek L.; Les, Andrea S.; Collins, Peter; Gregg, Keith M.; Di, Jianing; Lu, Yuan; Tudor, I. Cristina; Wyman, Bradley T.; Booth, Kevin; Broome, Stephanie; Yuen, Eric; Grundman, Michael; Brashear, H. Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of bapineuzumab on brain β-amyloid (Aβ) burden using 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (11C-PiB)-PET. Methods: Two phase 3 clinical trials, 1 each in apolipoprotein APOE ε4 carriers and noncarriers, were conducted in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease dementia. Bapineuzumab, an anti-Aβ monoclonal antibody, or placebo, was administered by IV infusion every 13 weeks for 78 weeks. PET substudies assessed change in brain fibrillar Aβ over 71 weeks using an 11C-PiB-PET standardized uptake value ratio (SUVr) global cortical average (GCA) comprising the average SUVr from 5 cortical regions of interest with cerebellar gray matter as the reference region. Results: A total of 115 carriers and 39 noncarriers were analyzed. The difference (δ) in mean baseline to 71 week change in 11C-PiB-PET GCA between bapineuzumab and placebo was significant in carriers (0.5 mg/kg vs placebo δ = −0.101; p = 0.004) and in pooled analyses of both carriers and noncarriers (0.5 mg/kg vs placebo δ = −0.068; p = 0.027; 1.0 mg/kg vs placebo δ = −0.133; p = 0.028) but not in the noncarrier trial separately. Analyses by individual region of interest and in mild disease yielded findings similar to the main trial results. Conclusions: The 11C-PiB-PET imaging results demonstrated reduction of fibrillar Aβ accumulation in patients with Alzheimer disease treated with bapineuzumab; however, as no clinical benefit was observed, the findings are consistent with the hypotheses that bapineuzumab may not have been initiated early enough in the disease course, the doses were insufficient, or the most critical Aβ species were inadequately targeted. PMID:26208959

  11. Experimental measurements within a phase change metallurgical reactor.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, C; Désilets, M; Soucy, G

    2011-12-01

    The measurement of solidification front evolution is essential for the optimization and control of many important metallurgical processes. However, this measurement is tedious, imprecise, and time consuming. More generally, industry needs reliable instruments for the thermal characterization of phase change reactors. This paper enables researchers with means and instruments to study the thermal behavior of processes involving the transformation of phase change materials up to 1000 °C. In this work, an original experimental setup is described to analyze the behavior of two high temperature phase change materials: zinc and molten salts. In particular, it is possible to evaluate the 2D solid solidification front evolution with time. The measurements done with zinc show the presence of two thermal regimes. A solidification rate of 20 mm h(-1) is measured with two different approaches: thermocouples and a mechanical probe. Finally, an infrared camera is also used to make the link between the external thermal behavior and the solidification front evolution inside the reactor. When implemented within an inverse numerical method, the use of this instrument as a new external sensor looks promising.

  12. Forced ion migration for chalcogenide phase change memory device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Kristy A. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Non-volatile memory devices with two stacked layers of chalcogenide materials comprising the active memory device have been investigated for their potential as phase change memories. The devices tested included GeTe/SnTe, Ge.sub.2Se.sub.3/SnTe, and Ge.sub.2Se.sub.3/SnSe stacks. All devices exhibited resistance switching behavior. The polarity of the applied voltage with respect to the SnTe or SnSe layer was critical to the memory switching properties, due to the electric field induced movement of either Sn or Te into the Ge-chalcogenide layer. One embodiment of the invention is a device comprising a stack of chalcogenide-containing layers which exhibit phase change switching only after a reverse polarity voltage potential is applied across the stack causing ion movement into an adjacent layer and thus "activating" the device to act as a phase change random access memory device or a reconfigurable electronics device when the applied voltage potential is returned to the normal polarity. Another embodiment of the invention is a device that is capable of exhibiting more that two data states.

  13. Forced ion migration for chalcogenide phase change memory device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Kristy A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Non-volatile memory devices with two stacked layers of chalcogenide materials comprising the active memory device have been investigated for their potential as phase-change memories. The devices tested included GeTe/SnTe, Ge.sub.2Se.sub.3/SnTe, and Ge.sub.2Se.sub.3/SnSe stacks. All devices exhibited resistance switching behavior. The polarity of the applied voltage with respect to the SnTe or SnSe layer was critical to the memory switching properties, due to the electric field induced movement of either Sn or Te into the Ge-chalcogenide layer. One embodiment of the invention is a device comprising a stack of chalcogenide-containing layers which exhibit phase-change switching only after a reverse polarity voltage potential is applied across the stack causing ion movement into an adjacent layer and thus "activating" the device to act as a phase-change random access memory device or a reconfigurable electronics device when the applied voltage potential is returned to the normal polarity. Another embodiment of the invention is a device that is capable of exhibiting more than two data states.

  14. Forced Ion Migration for Chalcogenide Phase Change Memory Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Kristy A (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Non-volatile memory devices with two stacked layers of chalcogenide materials comprising the active memory device have been investigated for their potential as phase-change memories. The devices tested included GeTe/SnTe, Ge2Se3/SnTe, and Ge2Se3/SnSe stacks. All devices exhibited resistance switching behavior. The polarity of the applied voltage with respect to the SnTe or SnSe layer was critical to the memory switching properties, due to the electric field induced movement of either Sn or Te into the Ge-chalcogenide layer. One embodiment of the invention is a device comprising a stack of chalcogenide-containing layers which exhibit phase-change switching only after a reverse polarity voltage potential is applied across the stack causing ion movement into an adjacent layer and thus "activating" the device to act as a phase-change random access memory device or a reconfigurable electronics device when the applied voltage potential is returned to the normal polarity. Another embodiment of the invention is a device that is capable of exhibiting more than two data states.

  15. Experimental measurements within a phase change metallurgical reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, C.; Désilets, M.; Soucy, G.

    2011-12-01

    The measurement of solidification front evolution is essential for the optimization and control of many important metallurgical processes. However, this measurement is tedious, imprecise, and time consuming. More generally, industry needs reliable instruments for the thermal characterization of phase change reactors. This paper enables researchers with means and instruments to study the thermal behavior of processes involving the transformation of phase change materials up to 1000 °C. In this work, an original experimental setup is described to analyze the behavior of two high temperature phase change materials: zinc and molten salts. In particular, it is possible to evaluate the 2D solid solidification front evolution with time. The measurements done with zinc show the presence of two thermal regimes. A solidification rate of 20 mm h-1 is measured with two different approaches: thermocouples and a mechanical probe. Finally, an infrared camera is also used to make the link between the external thermal behavior and the solidification front evolution inside the reactor. When implemented within an inverse numerical method, the use of this instrument as a new external sensor looks promising.

  16. Thermal Properties of Phase Change Composites Containing Ferric Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jifen; Xie, Huaqing; Li, Yang

    2015-04-01

    We prepared a series of homogeneous nanocomposites by suspending Fe2O3 nanoparticles into paraffin wax (PW) matrix. Fe2O3/PW nanocomposites have reduced both solid-solid phase change latent heat capacity (Ls-s) and solid-liquid phase change latent heat capacity (Ls-l) with an increase in the mass fraction of Fe2O3 nanoparticles. There is almost equable solid-solid phase change temperature (Ts-s) between PW and Fe2O3/PW composites, as well as melting temperature (Ts-l). Fe2O3 nanoparticle addition leads to substantial enhancement in the thermal conductivity of Fe2O3/PW and the enhancement ratio increases with the nanoparticle loading. Thermal conductivity of Fe2O3/PW composite with 3.0 wt% nanoparticles is about 0.27 W/(m · K) at 15 °C, which close to that of γ-Al2O3/PW with 5.0 wt% nanoparticles but higher than that of ZnO/PW containing 5.0 wt% nanoparticles. At 60 °C, Fe2O3/PW has higher thermal conductivity than γ-A12O3/PW and ZnO/PW contained with same fraction of nanoparticles. PMID:26353577

  17. Density analysis of magmatic and phreatomagmatic phases of the 934 AD Eldgjá Eruption, southern Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreland, William; Thordarson, Thorvaldur

    2014-05-01

    the samples have weakly negatively skewed distributions - the bomb layer has a plateau-like vesicularity distribution and a span of 51% - indicating that outgassed magma was also involved in the explosive activity. This outgassed portion of the tephra deposits is best explained by the pulsating explosions on the same fissure segment. The section at Stóragil contains both phreatomagmatic and magmatic products. The phreatomagmatic samples exhibit characteristic plateau-like distributions with modal vesicularity between 70-80% and a span of 40-50%. In one of the fall units a gradual change from plateau-like to normal distribution is observed indicating a change from phreatomagmatic to magmatic activity during the course of a single explosive phase. This implies that either gradual change in access of external water to the erupting vents or that the external water source was being exhausted. Thin-sections will be made of clasts in each sample which show extreme vesicularities. SEM photographs will be taken of these and vesicle-size distributions measured by image analysis. These results will also be presented.

  18. Characteristics of phase-change materials containing oxide nano-additives for thermal storage

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the authors report the production of nanocomposite-enhanced phase-change materials (NEPCMs) using the direct-synthesis method by mixing paraffin with alumina (Al2O3), titania (TiO2), silica (SiO2), and zinc oxide (ZnO) as the experimental samples. Al2O3, TiO2, SiO2, and ZnO were dispersed into three concentrations of 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 wt.%. Through heat conduction and differential scanning calorimeter experiments to evaluate the effects of varying concentrations of the nano-additives on the heat conduction performance and thermal storage characteristics of NEPCMs, their feasibility for use in thermal storage was determined. The experimental results demonstrate that TiO2 is more effective than the other additives in enhancing both the heat conduction and thermal storage performance of paraffin for most of the experimental parameters. Furthermore, TiO2 reduces the melting onset temperature and increases the solidification onset temperature of paraffin. This allows the phase-change heat to be applicable to a wider temperature range, and the highest decreased ratio of phase-change heat is only 0.46%, compared to that of paraffin. Therefore, this study demonstrates that TiO2, added to paraffin to form NEPCMs, has significant potential for enhancing the thermal storage characteristics of paraffin. PMID:23127224

  19. Adding Some Gas Can Completely Change How an Object in a Liquid-Filled Housing Responds to Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torczynski, J. R.; O'Hern, T. J.; Clausen, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    Adding a little gas can completely change the motion of an object in a liquid-filled housing during vibration. A common system exhibiting this behavior is a spring-supported piston in a liquid-filled cylinder, where the gaps between them are narrow and depend on the piston position. When gas is absent, the piston's vibrational response is highly overdamped due to forcing viscous liquid through narrow gaps. When a small amount of gas is added, Bjerknes forces cause some of the gas to migrate below the piston. The resulting two gas regions form a pneumatic spring that enables the liquid to move with the piston, with the result that very little liquid is forced through the narrow gaps. This ``Couette mode'' has low damping and thus has a strong resonance near the frequency given by the pneumatic spring constant and the piston mass. At this frequency, the piston response is large, and the nonlinearity from the gap geometry produces a net force on the piston. This ``rectified'' force can be many times the piston's weight and can cause the piston to compress its supporting spring. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Cryogenic two-phase flow and phase-change heat transfer in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Cheng-Feng

    The applications of cryogenic flow and heat transfer are found in many different types of industries, whether it be the liquid fuel for propulsion or the cryogenic cooling in medical applications. It is very common to find the transportation of cryogenic flow under microgravity in space missions. For example, the liquid oxygen and hydrogen are used to power launch vehicles and helium is used for pressurizing the fuel tank. During the transportation process in pipes, because of high temperature and heat flux from the pipe wall, the cryogenic flow is always in a two-phase condition. As a result, the physics of cryogenic two-phase flow and heat transfer is an important topic for research. In this research, numerical simulation is employed to study fluid flow and heat transfer. The Sharp Interface Method (SIM) with a Cut-cell approach (SIMCC) is adopted to handle the two-phase flow and heat transfer computation. In SIMCC, the background grid is Cartesian and explicit true interfaces are immersed into the computational domain to divide the entire domain into different sub-domains/phases. In SIMCC, each phase comes with its own governing equations and the interfacial conditions act as the bridge to connect the information between the two phases. The Cut-cell approach is applied to handle nonrectangular cells cut by the interfaces and boundaries in SIMCC. With the Cut-cell approach, the conservative properties can be maintained better near the interface. This research will focus on developing the numerical techniques to simulate the two-phase flow and phase change phenomena for one of the major flow patterns in film boiling, the inverted annular flow.

  1. Speed Measurement and Motion Analysis of Chang'E-3 Rover Based on Differential Phase Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Pan; Qing-hui, Liu; Xin, Zheng; Qing-bao, He; Ya-jun, Wu

    2016-04-01

    On 14th December 2013, the Chang'E-3 made a successful soft landing on the lunar surface, and then carried out the tasks of separating the lander and the rover, and taking pictures of each other. With the same beam VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) technique to observe the signals transmitted by the lander and the rover simultaneously, the differential phase delay between them is calculated, which can reflect the minor changes of the rover's position on a scale of a few centimeters. Based on the high sensitivity of differential phase delay, the rover's speeds during 5 movements are obtained with an average of 0.056 m/s. The relationship between the rover's shake in the moving process and the lunar terrain is analyzed by using the spectrum of the residual of the differential phase delay after the first-order polynomial fitting.

  2. Engineering the Phase Front of Light with Phase-Change Material Based Planar lenses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiguo; Li, Xiong; Sonnefraud, Yannick; Fernández-Domínguez, Antonio I.; Luo, Xiangang; Hong, Minghui; Maier, Stefan A.

    2015-01-01

    A novel hybrid planar lens is proposed to engineer the far-field focusing patterns. It consists of an array of slits which are filled with phase-change material Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST). By varying the crystallization level of GST from 0% to 90%, the Fabry-Pérot resonance supported inside each slit can be spectrally shifted across the working wavelength at 1.55 µm, which results in a transmitted electromagnetic phase modulation as large as 0.56π. Based on this geometrically fixed platform, different phase fronts can be constructed spatially on the lens plane by assigning the designed GST crystallization levels to the corresponding slits, achieving various far-field focusing patterns. The present work offers a promising route to realize tunable nanophotonic components, which can be used in optical circuits and imaging applications. PMID:25726864

  3. Modeling thermal insulation of firefighting protective clothing embedded with phase change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yin; Huang, Dongmei; Qi, Zhengkun; He, Song; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Heping

    2013-04-01

    Experiments and research on heat transport through firefighting protective clothing when exposed to high temperature or intensive radiation are significant. Phase change material (PCM) takes energy when changes from solid to liquid thus reducing heat transmission. A numerical simulation of heat protection of the firefighting protective clothing embedded with PCM was studied. We focused on the temperature variation by comparing different thicknesses and position conditions of PCM combined in the clothing, as well as the melting state of PCM and human irreversible burns through a simplified one-dimensional model. The results showed it was superior to place PCM between water and proof layer and inner layer, in addition, greater thickness increased protection time while might adding extra burden to the firefighter.

  4. Aluminum Foam-Phase Change Material Composites as Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Sung-tae; Herling, Darrell R.

    2007-04-07

    The effects of geometric parameters of open-cell aluminum foams on the performance of aluminum foam-phase change material (PCM) composites as heat sinks are investigated by experiments. Three types of open-cell aluminum 6061 foams with similar relative densities and different cell sizes are used. Paraffin is selected as the PCM due to its excellent thermal stability and ease of handling. The experimental results show that the performance of the heat sink is significantly affected by the surface area density of the aluminum foam. In general, as the surface area density of the foam increases, the performance of the heat sink is improved regardless of the current phase of the PCM.

  5. Phase-Change Contrast Agents for Imaging and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sheeran, Paul S.; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) for ultrasound-based applications have resulted in novel ways of approaching diagnostic and therapeutic techniques beyond what is possible with microbubble contrast agents and liquid emulsions. When subjected to sufficient pressures delivered by an ultrasound transducer, stabilized droplets undergo a phase-transition to the gaseous state and a volumetric expansion occurs. This phenomenon, termed acoustic droplet vaporization, has been proposed as a means to address a number of in vivo applications at the microscale and nanoscale. In this review, the history of PCCAs, physical mechanisms involved, and proposed applications are discussed with a summary of studies demonstrated in vivo. Factors that influence the design of PCCAs are discussed, as well as the need for future studies to characterize potential bioeffects for administration in humans and optimization of ultrasound parameters. PMID:22352770

  6. Characterization of Sodium Nitrate as Phase Change Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Thomas; Laing, Doerte; Tamme, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    In this article the results of material investigations of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) with a melting temperature of 306 °C as a phase change material (PCM) are presented. The thermal stability was examined by kinetic experiments and longduration oven tests. In these experiments the nitrite formation was monitored. Although some nitrite formation in the melt was detected, results show that the thermal stability of NaNO3 is sufficient for PCM applications. Various measurements of thermophysical properties of NaNO3 are reported. These properties include the thermal diffusivity by the laser-flash, the thermal conductivity by the transient hot wire, and the heat capacity by the differential scanning calorimeter method. The current measurements and literature values are compared. In this article comprehensive temperature-dependent thermophysical values of the density, heat capacity, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity in the liquid and solid phases are reported.

  7. Low-energy phase change memory with graphene confined layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chengqiu; Ma, Jun; Ge, Xiaoming; Rao, Feng; Ding, Keyuan; Lv, Shilong; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang

    2016-06-01

    How to reduce the Reset operation energy is the key scientific and technological problem in the field of phase change memory (PCM). Here, we show in the Ge2Sb2Te5 based PCM cell, inserting an additional graphene monolayer in the Ge2Sb2Te5 layer can remarkably decrease both the Reset current and energy. Because of the small out-of-plane electrical and thermal conductivities of such monolayer graphene, the Set resistance and the heat dissipation towards top TiN electrode of the modified PCM cell are significantly increased and decreased, respectively. The mushroom-typed larger active phase transition volume thus can be confined inside the underlying thinner GST layer, resulting in the lower power consumption.

  8. Simulation of recrystallization in phase-change recording materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, Yoshiko; Kando, Hidehiko; Terao, Motoyasu

    2002-01-01

    Phase-change optical discs are common media for audio-visual equipment and computer peripherals. In such recording media as the DVD-RAM, amorphous marks are written on the crystalline matrix by controlling the power of laser beam pulses. Due to the need for higher capacity optical disc drives, track pitches are becoming narrower, so that the thermal effects of adjacent tracks are no longer negligible. This is also a problem in the track direction. Achieving higher density in drives requires smaller marks on the media, leading to shorter intervals between pulses. The thermal effects of the following pulses change the shape of the amorphous mark made by previous pulse. That is, the trailing boundary of an amorphous mark is re-crystallized by the heat of the following pulses. Close attention to the re-crystallization of the recording material is necessary to control the mark shapes on phase-change optical discs. We have simulated the movement of the crystalline/amorphous boundary during the writing process. We have also developed the concept of a 're-crystallization-ring' to explain the mark-forming process. The movement of the boundary was traced by drawing arrows to represent the crystallization direction and speed. The trace lines of these arrows matched the streamlines for crystal growth as observed by TEM. Simulation was done for both GeSbTe and Ag-InSbTe recording materials.

  9. Initial Droplet Size Impacts pH-Induced Structural Changes in Phase-Separated Polymer Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Thongkaew, Chutima; Zeeb, Benjamin; Gibis, Monika; Hinrichs, Jörg; Weiss, Jochen

    2016-05-01

    The effect of pH change on the morphology of whey protein isolate (WPI)-pectin dispersions obtained from phase-separated systems after mild shear was studied. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of mixing speed on the initial particle size of biopolymer complexes and their structure morphology after sequentially changing the pH. Therefore, solutions of WPI and pectin were combined at pH 6.1, allowed to phase separate and were then mildly homogenized at 50, 100, and 150 rpm, respectively, to form a dispersion containing differently sized WPI droplets in a surrounding pectin-rich phase. Each dispersion was then subjected to a pH change, such as 6.1 to 5.2 and 3.2, by slowly adding hydrochloric acid. The systems morphology, size, appearance, rheology, and storage stability was then characterized by optical microscopy, static light scattering, visual inspections, and steady shear rheometry to gain insights into the structural rearrangements. Results indicated substantial changes in the structure of the dispersion when the pH was changed. Formation of core-shell structures from the WPI droplets was observed at an intermediate pH. There, initial droplet size was found to affect structures formed, that is, core-shell type particles would only form if droplets were large (>1.5 μm) prior to pH change. Insights gained may be of importance to food manufacturers intending to create new structures from mixtures of proteins and carbohydrates. PMID:27061600

  10. Lattice-Boltzmann-based two-phase thermal model for simulating phase change.

    PubMed

    Kamali, M R; Gillissen, J J J; van den Akker, H E A; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2013-09-01

    A lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is presented for solving the energy conservation equation in two phases when the phase change effects are included in the model. This approach employs multiple distribution functions, one for a pseudotemperature scalar variable and the rest for the various species. A nonideal equation of state (EOS) is introduced by using a pseudopotential LB model. The evolution equation for the pseudotemperature variable is constructed in such a manner that in the continuum limit one recovers the well known macroscopic energy conservation equation for the mixtures. Heats of reaction, the enthalpy change associated with the phase change, and the diffusive transport of enthalpy are all taken into account; but the dependence of enthalpy on pressure, which is usually a small effect in most nonisothermal flows encountered in chemical reaction systems, is ignored. The energy equation is coupled to the LB equations for species transport and pseudopotential interaction forces through the EOS by using the filtered local pseudotemperature field. The proposed scheme is validated against simple test problems for which analytical solutions can readily be obtained.

  11. Polymerase chain reaction with phase change as intrinsic thermal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yi-Fan; Yonezawa, Eri; Kuo, Long-Sheng; Yeh, Shiou-Hwei; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Ping-Hei

    2013-04-01

    This research demonstrated that without any external temperature controller, the capillary convective polymerase chain reaction (ccPCR) powered by a candle can operate with the help of phase change. The candle ccPCR system productively amplified hepatitis B virus 122 base-pairs DNA fragment. The detection sensitivity can achieve at an initial DNA concentration to 5 copies per reaction. The results also show that the candle ccPCR system can operate functionally even the ambient temperature varies from 7 °C to 45 °C. These features imply that the candle ccPCR system can provide robust medical detection services.

  12. Polymeric compositions incorporating polyethylene glycol as a phase change material

    DOEpatents

    Salyer, Ival O.; Griffen, Charles W.

    1989-01-01

    A polymeric composition comprising a polymeric material and polyethylene glycol or end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material, said polyethylene glycol and said end-capped polyethylene glycol having a molecular weight greater than about 400 and a heat of fusion greater than about 30 cal/g; the composition is useful in making molded and/or coated materials such as flooring, tiles, wall panels and the like; paints containing polyethylene glycols or end-capped polyethylene glycols are also disclosed.

  13. Rewriting magnetic phase change memory by laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerwilke, John; Liou, Sy-Hwang; Cheng, Shu Fan; Edelstein, Alan S.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic phase change memory (MAG PCM) consists of bits with different magnetic permeability values. The bits are read by measuring their effect on a magnetic probe field. Previously low permeability crystalline bits had been written in high permeability amorphous films of Metglas via laser heating. Here data is presented showing that by applying short laser pulses with the appropriate power to previously crystallized regions they can first be vitrified and then again crystallized. Thus, MAG PCM is rewriteable. Technical issues in processing the bits are discussed and results on thermal modeling are presented.

  14. Automated baseline change detection phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD) project is supported by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) as part of its ER&WM cross-cutting technology program in robotics. Phase 1 of the Automated Baseline Change Detection project is summarized in this topical report. The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. In support of this primary objective, there are secondary objectives to determine DOE operational inspection requirements and DOE system fielding requirements.

  15. Tuning Eu3+ emission in europium sesquioxide films by changing the crystalline phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariscal, A.; Quesada, A.; Camps, I.; Palomares, F. J.; Fernández, J. F.; Serna, R.

    2016-06-01

    We report the growth of europium sesquioxide (Eu2O3) thin films by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in vacuum at room temperature from a pure Eu2O3 ceramic bulk target. The films were deposited in different configurations formed by adding capping and/or buffer layers of amorphous aluminum oxide (a-Al2O3). The optical properties, refractive index and extinction coefficient of the as deposited Eu2O3 layers were obtained. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements were done to assess its chemical composition. Post-deposition annealing was performed at 500 °C and 850 °C in air in order to achieve the formation of crystalline films and to accomplish photoluminescence emission. According to the analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra, cubic and monoclinic phases were formed. It is found that the relative amount of the phases is related to the different film configurations, showing that the control over the crystallization phase can be realized by adequately designing the structures. All the films showed photoluminescence emission peaks (under excitation at 355 nm) that are attributed to the intra 4f-transitions of Eu3+ ions. The emission spectral shape depends on the crystalline phase of the Eu2O3 layer. Specifically, changes in the hypersensitive 5D0 → 7F2 emission confirm the strong influence of the crystal field effect on the Eu3+ energy levels.

  16. Controllable thermal rectification realized in binary phase change composites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Renjie; Cui, Yalong; Tian, He; Yao, Ruimin; Liu, Zhenpu; Shu, Yi; Li, Cheng; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tianling; Zhang, Gang; Zou, Ruqiang

    2015-03-09

    Phase transition is a natural phenomenon happened around our daily life, represented by the process from ice to water. While melting and solidifying at a certain temperature, a high heat of fusion is accompanied, classified as the latent heat. Phase change material (PCM) has been widely applied to store and release large amount of energy attributed to the distinctive thermal behavior. Here, with the help of nanoporous materials, we introduce a general strategy to achieve the binary eicosane/PEG4000 stuffed reduced graphene oxide aerogels, which has two ends with different melting points. It's successfully demonstrated this binary PCM composites exhibits thermal rectification characteristic. Partial phase transitions within porous networks instantaneously result in one end of the thermal conductivity saltation at a critical temperature, and therefore switch on or off the thermal rectification with the coefficient up to 1.23. This value can be further raised by adjusting the loading content of PCM. The uniqueness of this device lies in its performance as a normal thermal conductor at low temperature, only exhibiting rectification phenomenon when temperature is higher than a critical value. The stated technology has broad applications for thermal energy control in macroscopic scale such as energy-efficiency building or nanodevice thermal management.

  17. Controllable Thermal Rectification Realized in Binary Phase Change Composites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Renjie; Cui, Yalong; Tian, He; Yao, Ruimin; Liu, Zhenpu; Shu, Yi; Li, Cheng; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tianling; Zhang, Gang; Zou, Ruqiang

    2015-01-01

    Phase transition is a natural phenomenon happened around our daily life, represented by the process from ice to water. While melting and solidifying at a certain temperature, a high heat of fusion is accompanied, classified as the latent heat. Phase change material (PCM) has been widely applied to store and release large amount of energy attributed to the distinctive thermal behavior. Here, with the help of nanoporous materials, we introduce a general strategy to achieve the binary eicosane/PEG4000 stuffed reduced graphene oxide aerogels, which has two ends with different melting points. It's successfully demonstrated this binary PCM composites exhibits thermal rectification characteristic. Partial phase transitions within porous networks instantaneously result in one end of the thermal conductivity saltation at a critical temperature, and therefore switch on or off the thermal rectification with the coefficient up to 1.23. This value can be further raised by adjusting the loading content of PCM. The uniqueness of this device lies in its performance as a normal thermal conductor at low temperature, only exhibiting rectification phenomenon when temperature is higher than a critical value. The stated technology has broad applications for thermal energy control in macroscopic scale such as energy-efficiency building or nanodevice thermal management. PMID:25748640

  18. Analysis of Lipoplex Structure and Lipid Phase Changes

    SciTech Connect

    Koynova, Rumiana

    2012-07-18

    Efficient delivery of genetic material to cells is needed for tasks of utmost importance in the laboratory and clinic, such as gene transfection and gene silencing. Synthetic cationic lipids can be used as delivery vehicles for nucleic acids and are now considered the most promising nonviral gene carriers. They form complexes (lipoplexes) with the polyanionic nucleic acids. A critical obstacle for clinical application of the lipid-mediated DNA delivery (lipofection) is its unsatisfactory efficiency for many cell types. Understanding the mechanism of lipid-mediated DNA delivery is essential for their successful application, as well as for a rational design and synthesis of novel cationic lipoid compounds for enhanced gene delivery. A viewpoint now emerging is that the critical factor in lipid-mediated transfection is the structural evolution of lipoplexes within the cell, upon interacting and mixing with cellular lipids. In particular, recent studies showed that the phase evolution of lipoplex lipids upon interaction and mixing with membrane lipids appears to be decisive for transfection success: specifically, lamellar lipoplex formulations, which were readily susceptible to undergoing lamellar-nonlamellar phase transition upon mixing with cellular lipids and were found rather consistently associated with superior transfection potency, presumably as a result of facilitated DNA release. Thus, understanding the lipoplex structure and the phase changes upon interacting with membrane lipids is important for the successful application of the cationic lipids as gene carriers.

  19. Controllable Thermal Rectification Realized in Binary Phase Change Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Renjie; Cui, Yalong; Tian, He; Yao, Ruimin; Liu, Zhenpu; Shu, Yi; Li, Cheng; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tianling; Zhang, Gang; Zou, Ruqiang

    2015-03-01

    Phase transition is a natural phenomenon happened around our daily life, represented by the process from ice to water. While melting and solidifying at a certain temperature, a high heat of fusion is accompanied, classified as the latent heat. Phase change material (PCM) has been widely applied to store and release large amount of energy attributed to the distinctive thermal behavior. Here, with the help of nanoporous materials, we introduce a general strategy to achieve the binary eicosane/PEG4000 stuffed reduced graphene oxide aerogels, which has two ends with different melting points. It's successfully demonstrated this binary PCM composites exhibits thermal rectification characteristic. Partial phase transitions within porous networks instantaneously result in one end of the thermal conductivity saltation at a critical temperature, and therefore switch on or off the thermal rectification with the coefficient up to 1.23. This value can be further raised by adjusting the loading content of PCM. The uniqueness of this device lies in its performance as a normal thermal conductor at low temperature, only exhibiting rectification phenomenon when temperature is higher than a critical value. The stated technology has broad applications for thermal energy control in macroscopic scale such as energy-efficiency building or nanodevice thermal management.

  20. Subscale Water Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Rubik; Hansen, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Supplemental heat rejection devices are required in many spacecraft as the radiators are not sized to meet the full heat rejection demand. One means of obtaining additional heat rejection is through the use of phase change material heat exchangers (PCM HX's). PCM HX's utilize phase change to store energy in unfavorable thermal environments (melting) and reject the energy in favorable environments (freezing). Traditionally, wax has been used as a PCM on spacecraft. However, water is an attractive alternative because it is capable of storing about 40% more energy per unit mass due to its higher latent heat of fusion. The significant problem in using water as a PCM is its expansion while freezing, leading to structural integrity concerns when housed in an enclosed heat exchanger volume. Significant investigation and development has taken place over the past five years to understand and overcome the problems associated with water PCM HX's. This paper reports on the final efforts by Johnson Space Center's Thermal Systems Branch to develop a water based PCM HX. The test article developed and reported on is a subscale version of the full-scale water-based PCM HX's constructed by Mezzo Technologies. The subscale unit was designed by applying prior research on freeze front propagation and previous full-scale water PCM HX development. Design modifications to the subscale unit included use of urethane bladder, decreased aspect ratio, perforated protection sheet, and use of additional mid-plates. Testing of the subscale unit was successful and 150 cycles were completed without fail.

  1. Preliminary Trade Study of Phase Change Heat Sinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Molly; Leimkeuhler, Thomas; Quinn, Gregory; Golliher, Eric

    2006-01-01

    For short durations, phase change based heat rejection systems are a very effective way of removing heat from spacecraft. Future NASA vehicles, such as the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), will require non-radiative heat rejection systems during at least a portion of the planned mission, just as their predecessors have. While existing technologies are available to modify, such as Apollo era sublimators, or the Space Shuttle Flash Evaporator System (FES), several new technologies are under development or investigation to progress beyond these existing heat rejection systems. Examples include the Multi-Fluid Evaporator developed by Hamilton Sundstrand, improvements upon the Contaminant Insensitive Sublimator originally developed for the X-38 program, and a Compact Flash Evaporator System (CFES). Other possibilities evaluate new ways of operating existing designs. The new developments are targeted at increasing operating life, expanding the environments in which the system can operate, improving the mass and volume characteristics, or some combination of these or other improvements. This paper captures the process and results of a preliminary trade study performed at Johnson Space Center to compare the various existing and proposed phase change based heat rejection systems for the CEV. Because the new systems are still in development, and the information on existing systems is extrapolation, this trade study is not meant to suggest a final decision for future vehicles. The results of this early trade study are targeted to aid the development efforts for the new technologies by identifying issues that could reduce the chances of selection for the CEV.

  2. The Study of the Thermoelectric Properties of Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ming; Abdi, Mohammed; Noimande, Zibusisu; Mbamalu, Godwin; Alameeri, Dheyaa; Datta, Timir

    We study thermoelectric property that is electrical phenomena occurring in conjunction with the flow of heat of phase-change materials (PCM) in particular GeSbTe (GST225). From given sets of material parameters, COMSOL Multiphysics heat-transfer module is used to compute maps of temperature and voltage distribution in the PCM samples. These results are used to design an apparatus including the variable temperature sample holder set up. An Arbitrary/ Function generator and a circuit setup is also designed to control the alternation of heaters embedded on the sample holder in order to ensure sequential back and forward flow of heat current from both sides of the sample. Accurate values of potential differences and temperature distribution profiles are obtained in order to compute the Seebeck coefficient of the sample. The results of elemental analysis and imaging studies such as XRD, UV-VIS, EDEX and SEM of the sample are obtained. Factors affecting the thermoelectric properties of phase change memory are also discussed. NNSA/ DOD Consortium for Materials and Energy Studies.

  3. Integrating Phase-Change Materials into Automotive Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein Altstedde, Mirko; Rinderknecht, Frank; Friedrich, Horst

    2014-06-01

    Because the heat emitted by conventional combustion-engine vehicles during operation has highly transient properties, automotive thermoelectric generators (TEG) are intended for a particular operating state (design point). This, however, leads to two problems. First, whenever the combustion engine runs at low load, the maximum operating temperature cannot be properly utilised; second, a combustion engine at high load requires partial diversion of exhaust gas away from the TEG to protect the thermoelectric modules. An attractive means of stabilising dynamic exhaust behaviour (thereby keeping the TEG operating status at the design point for as long as possible) is use of latent heat storage, also known as phase-change materials (PCM). By positioning PCM between module and exhaust heat conduit, and choosing a material with a phase-change temperature matching the module's optimum operating temperature, it can be used as heat storage. This paper presents results obtained during examination of the effect of integration of latent heat storage on the potential of automotive TEG to convert exhaust heat. The research resulted in the development of a concept based on the initial integration idea, followed by proof of concept by use of a specially created prototype. In addition, the potential amount of energy obtained by use of a PCM-equipped TEG was calculated. The simulations indicated a significant increase in electrical energy was obtained in the selected test cycle.

  4. Phase change energy storage for solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, F. P.; Taylor, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a transient computer simulation that was developed to study phase change energy storage techniques for Space Station Freedom (SSF) solar dynamic (SD) power systems. Such SD systems may be used in future growth SSF configurations. Two solar dynamic options are considered in this paper: Brayton and Rankine. Model elements consist of a single node receiver and concentrator, and takes into account overall heat engine efficiency and power distribution characteristics. The simulation not only computes the energy stored in the receiver phase change material (PCM), but also the amount of the PCM required for various combinations of load demands and power system mission constraints. For a solar dynamic power system in low earth orbit, the amount of stored PCM energy is calculated by balancing the solar energy input and the energy consumed by the loads corrected by an overall system efficiency. The model assumes an average 75 kW SD power system load profile which is connected to user loads via dedicated power distribution channels. The model then calculates the stored energy in the receiver and subsequently estimates the quantity of PCM necessary to meet peaking and contingency requirements. The model can also be used to conduct trade studies on the performance of SD power systems using different storage materials.

  5. Analysis of wallboard containing a phase change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlinson, J. J.; Heberle, D. P.

    Phase change materials (PCMs) used on the interior of buildings hold the promise for improved thermal performance by reducing the energy requirements for space conditioning and by improving thermal comfort by reducing temperature swings inside the building. Efforts are underway to develop a gypsum wallboard containing a hydrocarbon PCM. With a phase change temperature in the room temperature range, the PCM wallboard adds substantially to the thermal mass of the building while serving the same architectural function as conventional wallboard. To determine the thermal and economic performance of this PCM wallboard, the Transient Systems Simulation Program (TRNSYS) was modified to accommodate walls that are covered with PCM plasterboard, and to apportion the direct beam solar radiation to interior surfaces of a building. The modified code was used to simulate the performance of conventional and direct-gain passive solar residential-sized buildings with and without PCM wallboard. Space heating energy savings were determined as a function of PCM wallboard characteristics. Thermal comfort improvements in buildings containing the PCM were qualified in terms of energy savings. The report concludes with a present worth economic analysis of these energy savings and arrives at system costs and economic payback based on current costs of PCMs under study for the wallboard application.

  6. Phase Change Effects on Immiscible Flow Displacements in Radial Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadlouydarab, Majid; Azaiez, Jalel; Chen, Zhangxin

    2014-11-01

    We report a systematic simulation of immiscible fluid-fluid displacements in radial injection in the presence of phase change. Due to the presence of two fluid-fluid interfaces in the system, a special treatment has been adopted. To track the leading interface position, two highly accurate methods including Level Set and Immersed Interface Method were used, while for locating the trailing interface an energy equation was adopted assuming the existence of a constant thin condensate layer. Dimensional analysis led to three important dimensionless groups including capillary number (Ca), Jacob number (Ja) and viscosity ratios (M) of the three fluids. Simulation results indicate significant influences of these parameters on the development of the instability and the interfacial morphology of fingers. Increasing Ca or M tends to amplify the interfacial instability, fingertip splitting, and results in longer fingers. In contrast, increasing Ja has stabilizing effects due to an increase of the thickness of the condensate layer. On the other hand at lower viscosity ratios as well as lower Ca, because of compensation effects of the phase change, both leading and trailing interfaces are found to be less unstable. Moreover accumulated condensate and oil saturation depletion curves show increasing and decreasing trends, respectively, when the Ca increases. Although viscosity ratio and Ja have similar effects on the accumulated condensate, they do not show any effect on the oil depletion saturation.

  7. Studies on a Heat Storage Container with Phase Change Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Naoki; Watanabe, Koji; Watanabe, Mituo; Yanadori, Michio

    This paper deals with the heat transfer characteristics when a phase change medium discharges the storing energy to a finned tube in a heat storage container. In this experiments, the phase change medium is Calcium Chloride Hexahydrate (CaCl26H2O)with fusion temperature 28°C. The following results are obtained. 1. In solidification process of the medium, the heat discharge quantity to a finned tube is greater than that to a single tube, However, the heat dischage quantity of the finned tube does not increase inproportion to the surface area of the fin. 2. The fin effect of the finned tube decreases as the increase of the accumulative heat discharge quantity rate. 3. This reason lies in the fact that the thermal resistance of the finned tube is greater than that of the single tube. Especially, in the range of the large values of the accumulative heat discharge quantity rate, it is consiberable that the themal resistanse increases so that the ratio of the dead space of the heat transfer area increases at the contact parts of the fins and the tube.

  8. Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Phase 1 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Songgang

    2013-05-15

    The primary purpose of this project is to develop and validate an innovative, scalable phase change salt thermal energy storage (TES) system that can interface with Infinia’s family of free-piston Stirling engines (FPSE). This TES technology is also appropriate for Rankine and Brayton power converters. Solar TES systems based on latent heat of fusion rather than molten salt temperature differences, have many advantages that include up to an order of magnitude higher energy storage density, much higher temperature operation, and elimination of pumped loops for most of Infinia’s design options. DOE has funded four different concepts for solar phase change TES, including one other Infinia awarded project using heat pipes to transfer heat to and from the salt. The unique innovation in this project is an integrated TES/pool boiler heat transfer system that is the simplest approach identified to date and arguably has the best potential for minimizing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE). The Phase 1 objectives are to design, build and test a 1-hour TES proof-of-concept lab demonstrator integrated with an Infinia 3 kW Stirling engine, and to conduct a preliminary design of a 12-hour TES on-sun prototype.

  9. A zero density change phase change memory material: GeTe-O structural characteristics upon crystallisation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xilin; Dong, Weiling; Zhang, Hao; Simpson, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen-doped germanium telluride phase change materials are proposed for high temperature applications. Up to 8 at.% oxygen is readily incorporated into GeTe, causing an increased crystallisation temperature and activation energy. The rhombohedral structure of the GeTe crystal is preserved in the oxygen doped films. For higher oxygen concentrations the material is found to phase separate into GeO2 and TeO2, which inhibits the technologically useful abrupt change in properties. Increasing the oxygen content in GeTe-O reduces the difference in film thickness and mass density between the amorphous and crystalline states. For oxygen concentrations between 5 and 6 at.%, the amorphous material and the crystalline material have the same density. Above 6 at.% O doping, crystallisation exhibits an anomalous density change, where the volume of the crystalline state is larger than that of the amorphous. The high thermal stability and zero-density change characteristic of Oxygen-incorporated GeTe, is recommended for efficient and low stress phase change memory devices that may operate at elevated temperatures. PMID:26068587

  10. Solid phase bio-electrofermentation of food waste to harvest value-added products associated with waste remediation.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, K; Amulya, K; Mohan, S Venkata

    2015-11-01

    A novel solid state bio-electrofermentation system (SBES), which can function on the self-driven bioelectrogenic activity was designed and fabricated in the laboratory. SBES was operated with food waste as substrate and evaluated for simultaneous production of electrofuels viz., bioelectricity, biohydrogen (H2) and bioethanol. The system illustrated maximum open circuit voltage and power density of 443 mV and 162.4 mW/m(2), respectively on 9 th day of operation while higher H2 production rate (21.9 ml/h) was observed on 19th day of operation. SBES system also documented 4.85% w/v bioethanol production on 20th day of operation. The analysis of end products confirmed that H2 production could be generally attributed to a mixed acetate/butyrate-type of fermentation. Nevertheless, the presence of additional metabolites in SBES, including formate, lactate, propionate and ethanol, also suggested that other metabolic pathways were active during the process, lowering the conversion of substrate into H2. SBES also documented 72% substrate (COD) removal efficiency along with value added product generation. Continuous evolution of volatile fatty acids as intermediary metabolites resulted in pH drop and depicted its negative influence on SBES performance. Bio-electrocatalytic analysis was carried out to evaluate the redox catalytic capabilities of the biocatalyst. Experimental data illustrated that solid-state fermentation can be effectively integrated in SBES for the production of value added products with the possibility of simultaneous solid waste remediation.

  11. Consideration of a Phase Change Model Based on Apparent Phase Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwada, S.; Iga, Y.

    2015-12-01

    It has been known that cavity volume is underestimated and there is a discrepancy between predicted and measured breakdown characteristics for the numerical simulation of unsteady cavitation around a hydrofoil at high angle of attack. Therefore, in this study, in order to predict the cavity volume with high accuracy, the phenomena that gas phase increases even at a pressure higher than saturated vapour pressure which is known as aeration is modelled, and applied to phase change term. It was assumed that the precipitation of dissolved air is promoted by mechanical stimulation such as Reynolds stress in unsteady flow. The effectivity of the proposed model is discussed through the comparison among some kinds of components of the pressure variation.

  12. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; H. Yasuhara; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn

    2002-10-28

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (1) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology using high-resolution x-ray microtomography, (2) modeling of fracture permeability in the presence of asperities and confining stress, and (3) simulation of two-phase fluid flow in a fracture and a layered matrix. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. The distribution of fracture aperture is a difficult issue that we are studying and developing methods of quantification. The difficulties are both numerical and conceptual. Numerically, the three-dimensional data sets include millions, and sometimes, billions of points, and pose a computational challenge. The conceptual difficulties derive from the rough nature of the fracture surfaces, and the heterogeneous nature of the rock matrix. However, the high-resolution obtained by the imaging system provides us a much needed measuring environment on rock samples that are subjected to simultaneous fluid flow and confining stress. Pilot multi-phase experiments have been performed, proving the ability to detect two phases in certain large fractures. The absolute permeability of a fracture depends on the behavior of the asperities that keep it open. A model is being developed that predicts the permeability and average aperture of a fracture as a function of time under steady flow of water including the pressure solution at the asperity contact points. Several two-phase flow experiments in the presence of a fracture tip were performed in the past. At the

  13. Value-Added Estimates for Phase 1 of the Pennsylvania Teacher and Principal Evaluation Pilot. Full Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipscomb, Stephen; Chiang, Hanley; Gill, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania plans to develop a new statewide evaluation system for teachers and principals in its public schools by school year 2013-2014. To inform the development of this evaluation system, the Team Pennsylvania Foundation (Team PA) undertook the first phase of the Pennsylvania Teacher and Principal Evaluation…

  14. Value-Added Estimates for Phase 1 of the Pennsylvania Teacher and Principal Evaluation Pilot. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipscomb, Stephen; Chiang, Hanley; Gill, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania plans to develop a new statewide evaluation system for teachers and principals in its public schools by school year 2013-2014. To inform the development of this evaluation system, the Team Pennsylvania Foundation (Team PA) undertook the first phase of the Pennsylvania Teacher and Principal Evaluation…

  15. NGNP Process Heat Utilization: Liquid Metal Phase Change Heat Exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

    2008-09-01

    One key long-standing issue that must be overcome to fully realize the successful growth of nuclear power is to determine other benefits of nuclear energy apart from meeting the electricity demands. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will most likely be producing electricity and heat for the production of hydrogen and/or oil retrieval from oil sands and oil shale to help in our national pursuit of energy independence. For nuclear process heat to be utilized, intermediate heat exchange is required to transfer heat from the NGNP to the hydrogen plant or oil recovery field in the most efficient way possible. Development of nuclear reactor - process heat technology has intensified the interest in liquid metals as heat transfer media because of their ideal transport properties. Liquid metal heat exchangers are not new in practical applications. An important rational for considering liquid metals is the potential convective heat transfer is among the highest known. Thus explains the interest in liquid metals as coolant for intermediate heat exchange from NGNP. For process heat it is desired that, intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) transfer heat from the NGNP in the most efficient way possible. The production of electric power at higher efficiency via the Brayton Cycle, and hydrogen production, requires both heat at higher temperatures and high effectiveness compact heat exchangers to transfer heat to either the power or process cycle. Compact heat exchangers maximize the heat transfer surface area per volume of heat exchanger; this has the benefit of reducing heat exchanger size and heat losses. High temperature IHX design requirements are governed in part by the allowable temperature drop between the outlet and inlet of the NGNP. In order to improve the characteristics of heat transfer, liquid metal phase change heat exchangers may be more effective and efficient. This paper explores the overall heat transfer characteristics and pressure drop of the phase change

  16. Optimized Structures for Low-Profile Phase Change Thermal Spreaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharratt, Stephen Andrew

    Thin, low-profile phase change thermal spreaders can provide cooling solutions for some of today's most pressing heat flux dissipation issues. These thermal issues are only expected to increase as future electronic circuitry requirements lead to denser and potentially 3D chip packaging. Phase change based heat spreaders, such as heat pipes or vapor chambers, can provide a practical solution for effectively dissipating large heat fluxes. This thesis reports a comprehensive study of state-of-the-art capillary pumped wick structures using computational modeling, micro wick fabrication, and experimental analysis. Modeling efforts focus on predicting the shape of the liquid meniscus inside a complicated 3D wick structure. It is shown that this liquid shape can drastically affect the wick's thermal resistance. In addition, knowledge of the liquid meniscus shape allows for the computation of key parameters such as permeability and capillary pressure which are necessary for predicting the maximum heat flux. After the model is validated by comparison to experimental results, the wick structure is optimized so as to decrease overall wick thermal resistance and increase the maximum capillary limited heat flux before dryout. The optimized structures are then fabricated out of both silicon and copper using both traditional and novel micro-fabrication techniques. The wicks are made super-hydrophilic using chemical and thermal oxidation schemes. A sintered monolayer of Cu particles is fabricated and analyzed as well. The fabricated wick structures are experimentally tested for their heat transfer performance inside a well controlled copper vacuum chamber. Heat fluxes as high as 170 W/cm2 are realized for Cu wicks with structure heights of 100 μm. The structures optimized for both minimized thermal resistance and high liquid supply ability perform much better than their non-optimized counterparts. The super-hydrophilic oxidation scheme is found to drastically increase the maximum

  17. Surface topographical changes measured by phase-locked interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Fung, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    An electronic optical laser interferometer capable of resolving depth differences of as low as 30 A and planar displacements of 6000 A was constructed to examine surface profiles of bearing surfaces without physical contact. Topological chemical reactivity was determined by applying a drop of dilute alcoholic hydrochloric acid and measuring the profile of the solid surface before and after application of this probe. Scuffed bearing surfaces reacted much faster than virgin ones but that bearing surfaces exposed to lubricants containing an organic chloride reacted much more slowly. The reactivity of stainless steel plates, heated in a nitrogen atmosphere to different temperatures, were examined later at ambient temperature. The change of surface contour as a result of the probe reaction followed Arrhenius-type relation with respect to heat treatment temperature. The contact area of the plate of a ball/plate sliding elastohydrodynamic contact run on trimethylopropane triheptanoate with or without additives was optically profiled periodically. As scuffing was approached, the change of profile within the contact region changed much more rapidly by the acid probe and assumed a constant high value after scuffing. A nonetching metallurgical phase was found in the scuff mark, which was apparently responsible for the high reactivity.

  18. Changes of firing rate induced by changes of phase response curve in bifurcation transitions.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasuomi D; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-11-01

    We study dynamical mechanisms responsible for changes of the firing rate during four different bifurcation transitions in the two-dimensional Hindmarsh-Rose (2DHR) neuron model: the saddle node on an invariant circle (SNIC) bifurcation to the supercritical Andronov-Hopf (AH) one, the SNIC bifurcation to the saddle-separatrix loop (SSL) one, the AH bifurcation to the subcritical AH (SAH) one, and the SSL bifurcation to the AH one. For this purpose, we study slopes of the firing rate curve with respect to not only an external input current but also temperature that can be interpreted as a timescale in the 2DHR neuron model. These slopes are mathematically formulated with phase response curves (PRCs), expanding the firing rate with perturbations of the temperature and external input current on the one-dimensional space of the phase [Formula: see text] in the 2DHR oscillator. By analyzing the two different slopes of the firing rate curve with respect to the temperature and external input current, we find that during changes of the firing rate in all of the bifurcation transitions, the calculated slope with respect to the temperature also changes. This is largely dependent on changes in the PRC size that is also related to the slope with respect to the external input current. Furthermore, we find phase transition-like switches of the firing rate with a possible increase of the temperature during the SSL-to-AH bifurcation transition.

  19. Solid phase bio-electrofermentation of food waste to harvest value-added products associated with waste remediation.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, K; Amulya, K; Mohan, S Venkata

    2015-11-01

    A novel solid state bio-electrofermentation system (SBES), which can function on the self-driven bioelectrogenic activity was designed and fabricated in the laboratory. SBES was operated with food waste as substrate and evaluated for simultaneous production of electrofuels viz., bioelectricity, biohydrogen (H2) and bioethanol. The system illustrated maximum open circuit voltage and power density of 443 mV and 162.4 mW/m(2), respectively on 9 th day of operation while higher H2 production rate (21.9 ml/h) was observed on 19th day of operation. SBES system also documented 4.85% w/v bioethanol production on 20th day of operation. The analysis of end products confirmed that H2 production could be generally attributed to a mixed acetate/butyrate-type of fermentation. Nevertheless, the presence of additional metabolites in SBES, including formate, lactate, propionate and ethanol, also suggested that other metabolic pathways were active during the process, lowering the conversion of substrate into H2. SBES also documented 72% substrate (COD) removal efficiency along with value added product generation. Continuous evolution of volatile fatty acids as intermediary metabolites resulted in pH drop and depicted its negative influence on SBES performance. Bio-electrocatalytic analysis was carried out to evaluate the redox catalytic capabilities of the biocatalyst. Experimental data illustrated that solid-state fermentation can be effectively integrated in SBES for the production of value added products with the possibility of simultaneous solid waste remediation. PMID:26117418

  20. Investigation into the chemical, thermal and radiological changes of organic chemicals added to the underground storage tanks at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Samuels, W.D.; Camaioni, D.M.; Clauss, S.A.; Linehan, J.C.

    1996-10-01

    Uranium and plutonium production at the Hanford site produced large quantities of radioactive by-products and contaminated process chemicals that are presently stored in underground tanks awaiting treatment and disposal. Having been made strongly alkaline and then subjected to successive water evaporation campaigns to increase storage capacity, the wastes now exist in the physical forms of salt cakes, metal oxide sludges, and saturated aqueous brine solutions. Those waste storage tanks containing organic process chemicals mixed with nitrate/nitrite salt wastes are thought to be at risk for fuel-nitrate combustion accidents. To support resolution of this potential hazard, we are studying how organic chemicals added to the tanks may have {open_quotes}aged{close_quotes} or changed under storage conditions. Simulated wastes have been irradiated with gamma rays at temperatures between ambient and 90{degrees}C and subsequently analyzed quantitatively. The presentation will report findings on the rates and products of organic degradation. Reaction mechanisms and implications of the findings will be discussed.

  1. Storminess variation at Skagen, northern Denmark since AD 1860: Relations to climate change and implications for coastal dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemmensen, Lars B.; Hansen, Kristian W. T.; Kroon, Aart

    2014-12-01

    Systematic observations of wind speed and direction have been collected at Skagen Fyr (Skagen Lighthouse), northern Denmark from December 1860 to August 2012. Wind speed and wind direction are analyzed based on two data sets given in Beaufort and m/s respectively and based on these data storminess variation is analyzed. Changes in wind climate during this time interval cover the final phase of the relatively cold Little Ice Age and the following warming since the late 19th century. Since the end of the Little Ice Age the wind pattern has clearly changed in terms of both strength and direction. Between 1860 and 1875 storminess (wind events exceeding Beaufort 8) is extremely high, but since then storminess decreases. Around 1870 the annual drift potential (DP) is also extremely high and reaches up to 9600 vector units (VU); since 1980 DP levels are below 3000 VU and decreasing. Resultant drift direction (RDD) is towards the east or east-north-east until about 1960 when it steadily becomes more and more northerly. Most storms occur during autumn and early winter. Summers are less stormy but characterized by unidirectional winds. Since the end of the Little Ice Age most inland parabolic dunes on Skagen Odde have undergone a general stabilization. This shift in dune dynamics is primarily related to continued dune management, but the change in wind climate including an overall decrease in storminess (including a marked decrease in summer storminess) and an increase in southerly and south-westerly winds probably contribute to dune stabilization.

  2. Direct solar thermal energy storage using a semitransparent phase change material

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, M.; Bando, Y.; Kuraishi, M. ); Hahne, E.W.P. )

    1989-03-01

    For a passive solar thermal energy storage system, in which a plane layer of a semitransparent PCM (phase change material) is directly heated and melted by the sun, the effect of the optical thickness of the PCM on the temperature distribution and the efficiency of thermal energy storage was investigated. Paraffin wax was used as the PCM and a black dye was added to vary its absorption coefficient. Samples composed of the PCM layer and an insulating layer with an adiabatic rear side were tested using a solar simulator with constant incident radiation. A theoretical analysis was carried out by applying the concept of overall specific heat. This paper reports that the numerical results agreed fairly well with the experimental results within the range of the present experimental conditions thus validating the theoretical analysis.

  3. Natural removal of added N-nutrients, reactive phosphorus, crude oil, and heavy metals from the water phase in a simulated water/sediment system

    SciTech Connect

    Lam-Leung, S.Y.; Cheung, M.T.; He, Y.Q.

    1996-08-01

    Water/sediment simulation systems were constructed by using an aquarium (0.45 x 0.29 x 0.35 m{sup 3}), filled with suitable amounts of water and sediment collected from three selected locations: Lan Hau Shan (LHS), Tai Hu (TH), and Loong Yu Tao (LYT) of the Zhujiang (Pearl River) Estuary of China in November 1992 at low-tide period. The salinities of the water samples collected form LHS, TH, LYT were found to be 0.2, 4.6, 16.2 g L{sup -1}, respectively. Known amounts of ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, reactive phosphorous, crude oil, arsenate(III), cadmium (II), copper(II), and zinc(II) were added as pollutants into each of the water/sediment simulation systems. The rates of the natural removal of each added pollutant in all water/sediment simulation systems were studied by monitoring their concentrations at various intrevals in the investigation period. Except for Cr(III) and reactive phosphorous in the water/sediment systems of the LHS, TH, and LYT sites, and nitrate in the TH and LYT sites, the concentrations of the added pollutants in the water phase of the studied systems under a flow-condition simulation were reduced to 8% or less of the corresponding added amount on or before the 12th day by natural processes. The rate of self-purification and the estimated assimulative capacity of each added pollutant in all water/sediment simulation systems is discussed. 30 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Enhancing the performance of BICPV systems using phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shivangi; Sellami, Nazmi; Tahir, Asif; Reddy, K. S.; Mallick, Tapas K.

    2015-09-01

    Building Integrated Concentrated Photovoltaic (BICPV) systems have three main benefits for integration into built environments, namely, (i) generating electricity at the point of use (ii) allowing light efficacy within the building envelope and (iii) providing thermal management. In this work, to maintain solar cell operating temperature and improve its performance, a phase change material (PCM) container has been designed, developed and integrated with the BICPV system. Using highly collimated continuous light source, an indoor experiment was performed. The absolute electrical power conversion efficiency for the module without PCM cooling resulted in 7.82% while using PCM increased it to 9.07%, thus showing a relative increase by 15.9% as compared to a non- PCM system. A maximum temperature reduction of 5.2°C was also observed when the BICPV module was integrated with PCM containment as compared to the BICPV system without any PCM containment.

  5. Thermophysical Properties and Phase Changes in the Upper Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafin, Sayyadul

    2015-11-01

    The correlation between phase changes within the upper mantle and the thermophysical properties of the minerals therein has been investigated by using the thermoelastic and thermodynamic equations. The depth dependence data of seismic velocities of Jeffreys-Bullen and density within the upper mantle are used as inputs in the analysis. The material characteristic properties like Debye temperature,Θ _D, adiabatic compressibility, κ S, Grüneisen parameter, ξ and the specific heat capacity, C_{{P}} computed as a function of depth show clearly two discontinuities at average depths of 414 km and 645 km which are in fair agreement with the presently accepted depths 410 km and 670 km from the preliminary reference earth model data.

  6. Plastic phase change material and articles made therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Abhari, Ramin

    2016-04-19

    The present invention generally relates to a method for manufacturing phase change material (PCM) pellets. The method includes providing a melt composition, including paraffin and a polymer. The paraffin has a melt point of between about 10.degree. C. and about 50.degree. C., and more preferably between about 18.degree. C. and about 28.degree. C. In one embodiment, the melt composition includes various additives, such as a flame retardant. The method further includes forming the melt composition into PCM pellets. The method further may include the step of cooling the melt to increase the melt viscosity before pelletizing. Further, PCM compounds are provided having an organic PCM and a polymer. Methods are provided to convert the PCM compounds into various form-stable PCMs. A method of coating the PCMs is included to provide PCMs with substantially no paraffin seepage and with ignition resistance properties.

  7. Thermal analysis of n-alkane phase change material mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Chio, Y.I.; Choi, E.; Lorsch, H.G.

    1991-03-31

    Tests were performed to characterize the thermal behavior of it number of n-alkanes to be used as phase change materials (PCMs) in district cooling applications. Hexadecane and tetradecane were mixed in different fractions, and their thermal behavior was experimentally evaluated. Test results for melting temperature and fusion energy for laboratory grade hexadecane and tetradecane showed good agreement with datain the literature. However, values for commercial grade hexadecane were found to be considerably lower. In the range of temperatures of interest for district cooling, mixtures of tetradecane and hexadecane can be treated as homogeneous substances. However, their heats of fusion are slightly lower than those of the pure substances. Their melting temperatures are also lower by an amount that can be predicted.

  8. Pickering Emulsification to Mass Produce Nanoencapsulated Phase-change-material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuezhen; Zhang, Lecheng; Yu, Yi-Hsien; Mannan, S. Sam; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong; Cheng's Group Team, Dr.

    2015-03-01

    Phase changing materials (PCM) have useful applications in thermal management. However, mass production of micro and nano encapsulated PCM has been a challenge. Here, we present a simple and scalable method via a two-step Pickering emulsification method. We have developed interface active nanoplates by asymmetric modification of nanoplates of layered crystal materials. Nanoencapsulated PCM is realized with exfoliated monolayer nanoplates surfactants using very little energy input for emulsification. Further chemical reactions are performed to convert the emulsions into core-shell structures. The resulted capsules are submicron in size with remarkable uniformity in size distribution. DSC characterization showed that the capsulation efficiency of NEPCM was 58.58% and were thermal stable which was characterized by the DSC data for the sample after 200 thermal cycling.

  9. Thermal energy storage in phase change materials for heating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jotshi, C.K.; Goswami, D.Y.; Huddle, R.B.; Srinivasan, N.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the results of an investigation of thermal energy storage in phase change materials (PCMs) for water heating and space heating applications. Several PCMs were selected from the literature that have transition temperatures in the range of 60 to 100 C. These PCMs included salt hydrates, organic materials, and eutectics. Based on the information on energy density, toxicity and cost, the list of PCMs was narrowed down to three for experimental investigation. These PCMs were trisodium phosphate dodecahydrate, ammonium alum, and eutectic of ammonium alum and ammonium nitrate. Supercooling of PCMs was prevented by using nucleating agents and phase segregation was prevented by using extra water and thickening agents. Enthalpy was measured in a drop calorimeter over a large number of heating and cooling cycles. Encapsulation of PCMs in laminated aluminum foil pouches and in hollow high density polyethylene (HDPE) balls was investigated. Different types of laminated aluminum foils were tested, with varying degree of success. A scale model of storage unit was tested for space heating using eutectic of ammonium alum and ammonium nitrate encapsulated in hollow HDPE balls.

  10. Diffusion and phase change characterization by mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koslin, M. E.; White, F. A.

    1979-01-01

    The high temperature diffusion of trace elements in metals and alloys was investigated. Measurements were made by high sensitivity mass spectrometry in which individual atoms were detected, and quantitative data was obtained for zircaloy-2, 304 stainless steel, and tantalum. Additionally, a mass spectrometer was also an analytical tool for determining an allotropic phase change for stainless steel at 955 C, and a phase transition region between 772 C and 1072 C existing for zircaloy-2. Diffusion rates were measured in thin (0.001" (0.0025 cm) and 0.0005" (0.0013 cm)) ribbons which were designed as high temperature thermal ion sources, with the alkali metals as naturally occurring impurities. In the temperature and pressure regime where diffusion measurements were made, the solute atoms evaporated from the ribbon filaments when the impurities diffused to the surface, with a fraction of these impurity atoms ionized according to the Langmuir-Saha relation. The techniques developed can be applied to many other alloys important to space vehicles and supersonic transports; and, with appropriate modifications, to the diffusion of impurities in composites.

  11. Phase Change Material Heat Sink for an ISS Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Gregory; Stieber, Jesse; Sheth, Rubik; Ahlstrom, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A flight experiment is being constructed to utilize the persistent microgravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS) to prove out operation of a microgravity compatible phase change material (PCM) heat sink. A PCM heat sink can help to reduce the overall mass and volume of future exploration spacecraft thermal control systems (TCS). The program is characterizing a new PCM heat sink that incorporates a novel phase management approach to prevent high pressures and structural deformation that often occur with PCM heat sinks undergoing cyclic operation in microgravity. The PCM unit was made using brazed aluminum construction with paraffin wax as the fusible material. It is designed to be installed into a propylene glycol and water cooling loop, with scaling consistent with the conceptual designs for the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. This paper reports on the construction of the PCM heat sink and on initial ground test results conducted at UTC Aerospace Systems prior to delivery to NASA. The prototype will be tested later on the ground and in orbit via a self-contained experiment package developed by NASA Johnson Space Center to operate in an ISS EXPRESS rack.

  12. Heat transfer in vertically aligned phase change energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect

    El-Dessouky, H.T.; Bouhamra, W.S.; Ettouney, H.M.; Akbar, M.

    1999-05-01

    Convection effects on heat transfer are analyzed in low temperature and vertically aligned phase change energy storage systems. This is performed by detailed temperature measurements in the phase change material (PCM) in eighteen locations forming a grid of six radial and three axial positions. The system constitutes a double pipe configuration, where commercial grade paraffin wax is stored in the annular space between the two pipes and water flows inside the inner pipe. Vertical alignment of the system allowed for reverse of the flow direction of the heat transfer fluid (HTF), which is water. Therefore, the PCM is heated from the bottom for HTF flow from bottom to top and from the top as the HTF flow direction is reversed. For the former case, natural convection affects the melting process. Collected data are used to study variations in the transient temperature distribution at axial and radial positions as well as for the two-dimensional temperature field. The data are used to calculate the PCM heat transfer coefficient and to develop correlations for the melting Fourier number. Results indicate that the PCM heat transfer coefficient is higher for the case of PCM heating from bottom to top. Nusselt number correlations are developed as a function of Rayleigh, Stefan, and Fourier numbers for the HTF flow from bottom to top and as a function of Stefan and Fourier numbers for HTF flow from top to bottom. The enhancement ratio for heat transfer caused by natural convection increases and then levels off as the inlet temperature of the HTF is increased.

  13. Self-tracking phase change concentrator device demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagolla, V.; Tremblay, E.; Moser, C.

    2014-10-01

    Concentration photovoltaic systems uses free-space optics to concentrate sunlight onto photovoltaic cells, using mechanical trackers to accurately track the sun's position and keep the focal spot on the PV cell. We recently proposed and demonstrated a proof-of concept of a self-tracking mechanism using a phase-change material to greatly extend the acceptance angle of the concentration device. The light responsive mechanism allows for efficient waveguide coupling and light concentration independent of the angle of incidence inside its angular range of acceptance. The system uses a lens pair to achieve a flat Petzval field curvature over the acceptance angle range. A waveguide slab acts as the concentrating device. The use of a dichroic prism membrane separates the solar spectrum into two parts, lower wavelengths (<750nm) are coupled into the waveguide, while the energy of higher wavelengths (>750nm) is used to power the self-tracking mechanism. The energy in this part of the spectrum is absorbed by a carbon black paraffin wax mixture that undergoes a phase change and subsequently creates a coupling feature due to thermal expansion which allows the lower wavelength part to be coupled into the waveguide. We show the extension of our proof-of concept to a device-like demonstrator, featuring the extension to a lens array and much larger dimensions. All parts of the proof-of-concept device have been upscaled to meet the requirements of a larger scale demonstrator. The demonstrator has an acceptance angle of +/- 16 degrees and can achieve an effective concentration factor of 20x. We present experimental and simulation results of the demonstration device.

  14. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarad; H. Yasuhara; A. Alajmi

    2002-04-20

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multi-phase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (1) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (2) modeling of fracture permeability in the presence of asperities and confining stress, and (3) simulation of two-phase fluid flow in a fracture and a layered matrix. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. The distribution of fracture aperture is a difficult issue that we are studying and developing methods of quantification. The difficulties are both numerical and conceptual. Numerically, the three-dimensional data sets include millions, and sometimes, billions of points, and pose a computational challenge. The conceptual difficulties derive from the rough nature of the fracture surfaces, and the heterogeneous nature of the rock matrix. However, the high-resolution obtained by the imaging system provides us a much needed measuring environment on rock samples that are subjected to simultaneous fluid flow and confining stress. The absolute permeability of a fracture depends on the behavior of the asperities that keep it open. A model is being developed that predicts the permeability and average aperture of a fracture as a function of time under steady flow of water including the pressure solution at the asperity contact points. Several two-phase flow experiments in the presence of a fracture tip were performed in the past. At the present time, we are developing an inverse process using a simulation model to understand the fluid flow patterns in

  15. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-06-15

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) quantifying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture, and (c) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress on the nature of the rock and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual descriptions of the process are shown in the report while detailed analysis of the behavior of the distribution of fracture aperture is in progress. Both extensional and shear fractures are being considered. The initial multi-phase flow tests were done in extensional fractures. Several rock samples with induced shear fracture are being studied, and some of the new results are presented in this report. These samples are being scanned in order to

  16. MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-06-15

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) quantifying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture, and (c) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress on the nature of the rock and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual descriptions of the process are shown in the report while detailed analysis of the behavior of the distribution of fracture aperture is in progress. Both extensional and shear fractures are being considered. The initial multi-phase flow tests were done in extensional fractures. Several rock samples with induced shear fracture are being studies, and some of the new results are presented in this report. These samples are being scanned in order to

  17. Evidence of human-induced morphodynamic changes along the Campania coastal areas (southern Italy) since the 3rd-4th cent. AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo Ermolli, Elda; Romano, Paola; Liuzza, Viviana; Amato, Vincenzo; Ruello, Maria Rosaria; Di Donato, Valentino

    2014-05-01

    Campania has always offered suitable climatic and physiographic conditions for human settlements since prehistoric times. In particular, many Graeco-Roman towns developed along its coasts starting from the 7th-6th cent. BC. In the last decade, geoarchaelogical surveys have been carried out in the archaeological excavations of Neapolis, Paestum and Elea-Velia allowing the main steps of the landscape evolution around these towns to be defined in detail. The greek town of Neapolis rose in the late 6th cent. BC [1] on a terrace overlooking a low-relief rocky coast surrounded by volcanic hills. Port activities developed in a protected bay facing the town from the 4th-2nd cent. BC up to the 4th cent. AD, as testified by the discovery of structures and shipwrecks [2, 3, 4]. Starting from the 3rd cent. AD a spit bar formed at the bay entrance causing the progressive establishment of a lagoon which was gradually filled up by alluvial inputs and completely closed in the 5th cent. AD. During the same period, episodes of increased alluvial inputs were also recorded further west along the coast, where a narrow sandy beach formed at the cliff toe. The greek town of Poseidonia, renamed Paestum by the Romans, was founded in the 540 BC on a travertine terrace facing the sandy littoral of a prograding coastal plain [5]. In front of the main town door, a coastal lagoon developed thanks to the growth of a dune ridge and was probably used for harbor activities [5]. After this period the shoreline shifted seawards, another dune ridge formed and the back-ridge depression was filled with fluvial-marshy deposits, slowly drying up. Phases of travertine deposition, which characterized the SE sector of the plain all along the Holocene, were recorded in the northern and southern quarters of the town in historical times and were connected to the abandonment of the town in the early Medieval times. The greek colony of Elea-Velia was located on top of a siliciclastic promontory where the ruins of

  18. Phase Change Characteristics of a Nanoemulsion as a Latent Heat Storage Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumoto, Koji; Sato, Noriaki; Kawaji, Masahiro; Kawanami, Tsuyoshi; Inamura, Takao

    2014-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the fundamental phase change characteristics of a nanoemulsion using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Tetradecane, which has a slightly higher melting point than water, was utilized as the phase change material for the nanoemulsion. The melting point of the nanoemulsion, the melting peak temperature, and latent heat were examined in detail. Regarding the fundamental phase change characteristics of the nanoemulsion, it was found that its phase change characteristics were strongly affected by the temperature-scanning rate of the DSC. Moreover, it was confirmed that the phase change behavior does not change with repeated solidification and melting.

  19. Reducing Pumping Power in Hydronic Heating and Cooling Systems with Microencapsulated Phase Change Material Slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karas, Kristoffer Jason

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are being used increasingly in a variety of thermal transfer and thermal storage applications. This thesis presents the results of a laboratory study into the feasibility of improving the performance of hydronic heating and cooling systems by adding microcapsules filled with a PCM to the water used as heat transport media in these systems. Microencapsulated PCMs (MPCMs) increase the heat carrying capacity of heat transport liquids by absorbing or releasing heat at a constant temperature through a change of phase. Three sequences of tests and their results are presented: 1) Thermal cycling tests conducted to determine the melting temperatures and extent of supercooling associated with the MPCMs tested. 2) Hydronic performance tests in which MPCM slurries were pumped through a fin-and-tube, air-to-liquid heat exchanger and their thermal transfer performance compared against that of ordinary water. 3) Mechanical stability tests in which MPCM slurries were pumped in a continuous loop in order to gauge the extent of rupture due to pumping. It is shown that slurries consisting of water and MPCMs ˜ 14-24 mum in diameter improve thermal performance and offer the potential for power savings in the form of reduced pumping requirements. In addition, it is shown that while slurries of MPCMs 2-5 mum in diameter appear to exhibit better mechanical stability than slurries of larger diameter MPCMs, the smaller MPCMs appear to reduce the thermal performance of air-to-liquid heat exchangers.

  20. Thermal Characterization of Lauric-Stearic Acid/Expanded Graphite Eutectic Mixture as Phase Change Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Peng; Meng, Zhaonan; Li, Ming

    2015-04-01

    The eutectic mixture of lauric acid (LA) and stearic acid (SA) is a desirable phase change material (PCM) due to the constant melting temperature and large latent heat. However, its poor thermal conductivity has hampered its broad utilization. In the present study, pure LA, SA and the mixtures with various mass fractions of LA-SA were used as the basic PCMs, and 10 wt% expanded graphite (EG) was added to enhance the thermal conductivities. The phase change behaviors, microstructural analysis, thermal conductivities and thermal stabilities of the mixtures of PCMs were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electronic microscope (SEM), transient plane source (TPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The results show that the LA-SA binary mixture of mixture ratio of 76.3 wt%: 23.7 wt% forms an eutectic mixture, which melts at 38.99 °C and has a latent heat of 159.94 J/g. The melted fatty acids are well absorbed by the porous network of EG and they have a good thermal stability. Furthermore, poor thermal conductivities can be well enhanced by the addition of EG.

  1. Thermal Characterization of Lauric-Stearic Acid/Expanded Graphite Eutectic Mixture as Phase Change Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Peng; Meng, Zhaonan; Li, Ming

    2015-04-01

    The eutectic mixture of lauric acid (LA) and stearic acid (SA) is a desirable phase change material (PCM) due to the constant melting temperature and large latent heat. However, its poor thermal conductivity has hampered its broad utilization. In the present study, pure LA, SA and the mixtures with various mass fractions of LA-SA were used as the basic PCMs, and 10 wt% expanded graphite (EG) was added to enhance the thermal conductivities. The phase change behaviors, microstructural analysis, thermal conductivities and thermal stabilities of the mixtures of PCMs were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electronic microscope (SEM), transient plane source (TPS) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The results show that the LA-SA binary mixture of mixture ratio of 76.3 wt%: 23.7 wt% forms an eutectic mixture, which melts at 38.99 °C and has a latent heat of 159.94 J/g. The melted fatty acids are well absorbed by the porous network of EG and they have a good thermal stability. Furthermore, poor thermal conductivities can be well enhanced by the addition of EG. PMID:26353580

  2. Flexible composite material with phase change thermal storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The composite material can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The composite may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the PCM composite also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, ,gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  3. Phase change thermal control materials, method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for metabolic cooling and insulation of a user in a cold environment. In its preferred embodiment the apparatus is a highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The apparatus can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The apparatus may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the apparatus also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  4. Flexible composite material with phase change thermal storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The composite material can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The composite may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the PCM composite also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  5. Design and rationale for RE-VERSE AD: A phase 3 study of idarucizumab, a specific reversal agent for dabigatran.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Charles V; Reilly, Paul A; Bernstein, Richard; Dubiel, Robert; Eikelboom, John; Glund, Stephan; Huisman, Menno V; Hylek, Elaine; Kam, Chak-Wah; Kamphuisen, Pieter W; Kreuzer, Joerg; Levy, Jerrold H; Sellke, Frank; Stangier, Joachim; Steiner, Thorsten; Wang, Bushi; Weitz, Jeffrey I

    2015-07-01

    Idarucizumab, a Fab fragment directed against dabigatran, produced rapid and complete reversal of the anticoagulation effect of dabigatran in animals and in healthy volunteers. The Study of the REVERSal Effects of Idarucizumab in Patients on Active Dabigatran (RE-VERSE AD™) is a global phase 3 prospective cohort study aimed at investigating idarucizumab in dabigatran-treated patients who present with uncontrollable or life-threatening bleeding, and in those requiring urgent surgery or intervention. We describe the rationale for, and design of the trial (clinicaltrials.gov NCT02104947).

  6. An in situ heater for a phase-change-material-based actuation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sant, Himanshu J.; Ho, Tammy; Gale, Bruce K.

    2010-08-01

    This paper reports efforts to develop paraffin actuators that rely on a phase change to achieve actuation. While paraffin phase-change actuators have existed for some time, this work relies on heating the paraffin in situ, rather than using external heaters. Graphite is used to create an in situ heater that utilizes resistive heating as a voltage is applied across the graphite-paraffin wax mixture. The main motivation behind this work is to reduce the actuation time and power required. An added advantage of the developed in situ heater is the use of printed circuit board technology to fabricate the prototypes rapidly and in a cost-effective manner. A video microscope and IR camera are used to characterize the performance of the actuators built in this work. Different compositions of graphite in paraffin wax are used to measure the actuator performance characteristics such as actuation time, actuation height and power required. Both dc and a pulsed power input are used to test the prototypes. Comparison with a similar actuator that utilizes a thin film heater shows a 90% reduction in actuation time for similar power usage. The actuator developed as part of this work resulted in 0.577 mm dot height at 0.69 W power input in 6 s translating to ~4 J/actuation for an actuator chamber of 2.82 µL. A new performance metric, 'effective actuation time (W s-1 mm-4)', is used to compare the performance of this technology with other phase-change-material-based actuators, and the actuator developed in this work is found to be 10 to 200 times better.

  7. Early molecular changes in Alzheimer disease: can we catch the disease in its presymptomatic phase?

    PubMed

    Wirz, Kerstin T S; Keitel, Stella; Swaab, Dick F; Verhaagen, Joost; Bossers, Koen

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and characterized by deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques, neurofibrillary tangles consisting of hyperphosphorylated tau, atrophy, and progressive neurodegeneration. While the familial, early onset form of AD is known to be caused by specific mutations in genes encoding presenilin 1, presenilin 2, or amyloid-β protein precursor, the underlying mechanisms leading to the development of sporadic AD are still not known. The major risk factors are, however, aging and APOE ε4. Here we review the latest evidence for the involvement of malfunctioning insulin signaling, dysfunction of mitochondria-associated membranes, cerebrovascular changes, increased oxidative stress and free radical formation, DNA damage, disturbed energy metabolism, and synaptic dysfunction in early stages of AD. We focus on whether the changes in these processes precede or succeed the earliest symptoms in AD patients, i.e., minimal cognitive impairment. Since changes in Aβ processing are probably a key event in AD we also highlight the relationship of the above mentioned processes with the formation, secretion, aggregation, and toxicity of Aβ. Based on our literature findings we propose a model in which insulin dysfunction, pathological cerebrovascular changes, dysfunction of mitochondria-associated membranes, and/or synaptic changes are likely to interact with each other, thereby initiating and facilitating the development of AD pathology by accelerating the production and deposition of Aβ. Increased oxidative stress and free radical formation, DNA damage, disturbed energy metabolism, and synaptic loss follow these events, but still occur very early in AD.

  8. Multi-Phase Fracture-Matrix Interactions Under Stress Changes

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarao; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

    2005-12-07

    The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multi-phase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) counter-current fluid transport between the matrix and the fracture, (c) studying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture and two-phase flow, and (d) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress, on the nature of the rock, and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual and detailed descriptions of the process are shown in the report. Both extensional and shear fractures have been considered. A series of water imbibition tests were conducted in which water was injected into a fracture and its migration into the matrix was monitored with CT and DR x-ray techniques. The objective was to understand the impact of the

  9. Changes of physical properties in multiferroic phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Litvin, Daniel B

    2014-07-01

    The physical property coefficients that arise in a phase transition which are zero in the high-symmetry phase and nonzero in the low-symmetry phase are called spontaneous coefficients. For all 1601 Aizu species of phase transitions, matrices have been constructed which show the nonzero coefficients of a wide variety of magnetic and nonmagnetic physical properties including toroidal property coefficients in the high-symmetry phase and their corresponding spontaneous coefficients in the low-symmetry phase. It is also shown that these spontaneous coefficients provide for the distinction of and switching between nonferroelastic domain pairs. PMID:25970196

  10. Cytarabine added to interferon improves the cost-effectiveness of initial therapy for patients with early chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Beck, J R; Guilhot, J; Giles, F J; Aoki, N; Wirt, D P; Guilhot, F

    2001-03-01

    The French Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Study Group prospective randomized study results indicate that the addition of cytarabine to alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) increases the rate of major cytogenetic response and prolongs survival in patients with early chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The French group study design permitted a single crossover to include or discontinue cytarabine or interferon. Endpoints were overall survival, complete hematologic remission (CHR) at six months, and major cytogenetic response at 12 months. We modified a published Markov model that compared IFN-alpha alone to IFN-alpha plus cytarabine and included the possibility of crossover as in the French study. The model permits allogeneic and autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT), and follows cytogenetic response and acceleration of CML through death. Treatment response, toxicity, and survival are drawn from the French Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Study Group population of 810 patients on an intention-to-treat model. Survivals are extended to 62 months based on currently available follow-up. Costs from a United States oncology specialty institution, and state utilities from previous research and a quality-adjusted Time Without Symptoms or Toxicity analysis of the subject study were discounted at 3% per annum. At the median cohort age of 50, cytarabine offers 21 months of added median survival to IFN-alpha, which itself is superior to conventional chemotherapy by 21 months. Cost-effectiveness estimates for cytarabine added to IFN-alpha range from $7,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) to $35,000 per QALY, under all plausible assumptions superior to IFN-alpha alone. The model is sensitive to the quality of life on therapy, as well as to remission rate with additive cytarabine, although the cost-effectiveness calculations are robust over the entire range of clinical assumptions. Based on data from the French study, cytarabine added to IFN-alpha substantially improves the cost

  11. Continued Water-Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Scott W.; Sheth, Rubik B.; Poynot, Joe; Giglio, Tony; Ungar, Gene K.

    2015-01-01

    In a cyclical heat load environment such as low Lunar orbit, a spacecraft's radiators are not sized to meet the full heat rejection demands. Traditionally, a supplemental heat rejection device (SHReD) such as an evaporator or sublimator is used to act as a "topper" to meet the additional heat rejection demands. Utilizing a Phase Change Material (PCM) heat exchanger (HX) as a SHReD provides an attractive alternative to evaporators and sublimators as PCM HX's do not use a consumable, thereby leading to reduced launch mass and volume requirements. In continued pursuit of water PCM HX development two full-scale, Orion sized water-based PCM HX's were constructed by Mezzo Technologies. These HX's were designed by applying prior research on freeze front propagation to a full-scale design. Design options considered included bladder restraint and clamping mechanisms, bladder manufacturing, tube patterns, fill/drain methods, manifold dimensions, weight optimization, and midplate designs. Two units, Units A and B, were constructed and differed only in their midplate design. Both units failed multiple times during testing. This report highlights learning outcomes from these tests and are applied to a final sub-scale PCM HX which is slated to be tested on the ISS in early 2017.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  13. Water Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Scott W.; Sheth, Ribik B.; Atwell, Matt; Cheek, Ann; Agarwal, Muskan; Hong, Steven; Patel, Aashini,; Nguyen, Lisa; Posada, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    In a cyclical heat load environment such as low Lunar orbit, a spacecraft’s radiators are not sized to reject the full heat load requirement. Traditionally, a supplemental heat rejection device (SHReD) such as an evaporator or sublimator is used to act as a “topper” to meet the additional heat rejection demands. Utilizing a Phase Change Material (PCM) heat exchanger (HX) as a SHReD provides an attractive alternative to evaporators and sublimators as PCM HXs do not use a consumable, thereby leading to reduced launch mass and volume requirements. Studies conducted in this paper investigate utilizing water’s high latent heat of formation as a PCM, as opposed to traditional waxes, and corresponding complications surrounding freezing water in an enclosed volume. Work highlighted in this study is primarily visual and includes understanding ice formation, freeze front propagation, and the solidification process of water/ice. Various test coupons were constructed of copper to emulate the interstitial pin configuration (to aid in conduction) of the proposed water PCM HX design. Construction of a prototypic HX was also completed in which a flexible bladder material and interstitial pin configurations were tested. Additionally, a microgravity flight was conducted where three copper test articles were frozen continuously during microgravity and 2-g periods and individual water droplets were frozen during microgravity.

  14. University of South Florida- Phase Change Materials (PCM)

    ScienceCinema

    Goswami, Yogi; Stefanakos, Lee

    2016-07-12

    USF is developing low-cost, high-temperature phase-change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage systems. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night--when the sun is not out--to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Most PCMs do not conduct heat very well. Using an innovative, electroless encapsulation technique, USF is enhancing the heat transfer capability of its PCMs. The inner walls of the capsules will be lined with a corrosion-resistant, high-infrared emissivity coating, and the absorptivity of the PCM will be controlled with the addition of nano-sized particles. USF's PCMs remain stable at temperatures from 600 to 1,000°C and can be used for solar thermal power storage, nuclear thermal power storage, and other applications.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2011-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  16. Continued Water-Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Scott; Poynot, Joe

    2014-01-01

    In a cyclical heat load environment such as low Lunar orbit, a spacecraft's radiators are not sized to reject the full heat load requirement. Traditionally, a supplemental heat rejection device (SHReD) such as an evaporator or sublimator is used to act as a "topper" to meet the additional heat rejection demands. Utilizing a Phase Change Material (PCM) heat exchanger (HX) as a SHReD provides an attractive alternative to evaporators and sublimators as PCM HXs do not use a consumable, thereby leading to reduced launch mass and volume requirements. In continued pursuit of water PCM HX development two full-scale, Orion sized water-based PCM HX's were constructed by Mezzo Technologies. These HX's were designed by applying prior research and experimentation to the full scale design. Design options considered included bladder restraint and clamping mechanisms, bladder manufacturing, tube patterns, fill/drain methods, manifold dimensions, weight optimization, and midplate designs. Design and construction of these HX's led to successful testing of both PCM HX's.

  17. Numerical Modeling of Liquid-Vapor Phase Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esmaeeli, Asghar; Arpaci, Vedat S.

    2001-01-01

    We implemented a two- and three-dimensional finite difference/front tracking technique to solve liquid-vapor phase change problems. The mathematical and the numerical features of the method were explained in great detail in our previous reports, Briefly, we used a single formula representation which incorporated jump conditions into the governing equations. The interfacial terms were distributed as singular terms using delta functions so that the governing equations would be the same as conventional conservation equations away from the interface and in the vicinity of the interface they would provide correct jump conditions. We used a fixed staggered grid to discretize these equations and an unstructured grid to explicitly track the front. While in two dimensions the front was simply a connection of small line segments, in three dimensions it was represented by a connection of small triangular elements. The equations were written in conservative forms and during the course of computations we used regriding to control the size of the elements of the unstructured grid. Moreover, we implemented a coalescence in two dimensions which allowed the merging of different fronts or two segments of the same front when they were sufficiently close. We used our code to study thermocapillary migration of bubbles, burst of bubbles at a free surface, buoyancy-driven interactions of bubbles, evaporation of drops, rapid evaporation of an interface, planar solidification of an undercooled melt, dendritic solidification, and a host of other problems cited in the reference.

  18. Radiation and phase change of lithium fluoride in an annulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Kurt O.

    1993-01-01

    A one-dimensional thermal model is developed to evaluate the effect of radiation on the phase change of lithium-fluoride (LiF) in an annular canister under gravitational and microgravitational conditions. Specified heat flux at the outer wall of the canister models focused solar flux; adiabatic and convective conditions are considered for the inner wall. A two-band radiation model is used for the combined-mode heat transfer within the canister, and LiF optical properties relate metal surface properties in vacuum to those in LiF. For axial gravitational conditions, the liquid LiF remains in contact with the two bounding walls, whereas a void gap is used at the outer wall to model possible microgravitational conditions. For the adiabatic cases, exact integrals are obtained for the time required for complete melting of the LiF. Melting was found to occur primarily from the outer wall in the 1-g model, whereas it occurred primarily from the inner wall in the mu-g model. For the convective cases, partially melted steady-state conditions and fully melted conditions are determined to depend on the source flux level, with radiation extending the melting times.

  19. Applications of fibrous substrates containing insolubilized phase change polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigo, Tyrone L.; Bruno, Joseph S.

    1993-01-01

    Incorporation of polyethylene glycols into fibrous substrates produces several improved functional properties when they are insolubilized by crosslinking with a methylolamide resin or by polyacetal formation by their reaction with glyoxal. The range of molecular weights of polyols that may be insolubilized is broad as are the curing conditions (0.25-10 min at 80-200C). Most representative fiber types and blends (natural and synthetic) and all types of fabric constructions (woven, nonwoven and knit) have been modified by incorporation of the bound polyols. The most novel property is the thermal adaptability of the modified substrates to many climatic conditions. This adaptability is due to the high latent heat of the crosslinked polyols that function as phase change materials, the hydrophilic nature of the crosslinked polymer and its enhanced thermal conductivity. Other enhanced properties imparted to fabrics include flex and flat abrasion, antimicrobial activity, reduced static charge, resistance to oily soils, resiliency, wind resistance and reduced lint loss. Applications commercialized in the U.S. and Japan include sportswear and skiwear. Several examples of electric sets of properties useful for specific end uses are given. In addition, other uses are biomedical horticultural, aerospace, indoor insulation, automotive interiors and components and packaging material.

  20. A modular phase change heat exchanger for a solar oven

    SciTech Connect

    Bushnell, D.L.; Sohi, M. )

    1992-10-01

    A modular energy storing heat exchanger designed to use pentaerythritol for thermal storage (solid-solid phase change at 182 C) is tested in an oven by circulating heat transfer oil which is electrically heated in a manner to simulate a concentrating solar collector. Three efficiencies for heating the system under controlled and measured power input are determined - the heat exchanger efficiency, the efficiency of the heater with distribution lines, and the total system efficiency. Thermal energy retention times and cooking extraction times are determined, and along with the efficiencies, are compared with the results previously reported for a nonmodular heat exchanger. The modular configuration provides a highly improved extraction rate for cooking due to its wrap-around character and its increased surface-to-volume ratio. A full scale glass model of the copper tubing of the system is described and flow observations reported demonstrating how uniformly the parallel pumping branches perform and how trapped air pockets affect pumping power. A technique for measuring pumping power is described and its application to the system is quantified to show that less than 1 watt is required to circulate the heat transfer oil even when the system includes the solar collector and its longer connecting tubes.

  1. University of South Florida- Phase Change Materials (PCM)

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Yogi; Stefanakos, Lee

    2014-03-07

    USF is developing low-cost, high-temperature phase-change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage systems. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night--when the sun is not out--to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Most PCMs do not conduct heat very well. Using an innovative, electroless encapsulation technique, USF is enhancing the heat transfer capability of its PCMs. The inner walls of the capsules will be lined with a corrosion-resistant, high-infrared emissivity coating, and the absorptivity of the PCM will be controlled with the addition of nano-sized particles. USF's PCMs remain stable at temperatures from 600 to 1,000°C and can be used for solar thermal power storage, nuclear thermal power storage, and other applications.

  2. Phase Change Insulation for Energy Efficiency Based on Wax-Halloysite Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yafei; Thapa, Suvhashis; Weiss, Leland; Lvov, Yuri

    2014-08-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) have gained extensive attention in thermal energy storage. Wax can be used as a PCM in solar storage but it has low thermal conductivity. Introducing 10% halloysite admixed into wax yields a novel composite (wax-halloysite) which has a thermal conductivity of 0.5 W/mK. To increase the base conductivity, graphite and carbon nanotubes were added into the PCM composite improving its thermal energy storage. Thermal conductivity of wax-halloysite-graphite (45/45/10%) composite showed increased conductivity of 1.4 W/mK (3 times higher than the base wax-halloysite composite). Wax- halloysite-graphite-carbon nanotubes (45/45/5/5%) composite showed conductivity of 0.85 W/mK while maintaining the original shape perfectly until 91 °C (above the original wax melting point). Thermal conductivity can be further increased with higher doping of carbon nanotubes. This new composites are promising heat storage material due to good thermal stability, high thermal/electricity conductivity and ability to preserve its shape during phase transitions.

  3. The use of lipids as phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are substances capable of absorbing and releasing large 2 amounts of thermal energy (heat or cold) as latent heat over constant temperature as they 3 undergo a change in state of matter (phase transition), commonly, between solid and 4 liquid phases. Since the late 194...

  4. Sedimentary Evidence for Land Use Change in the Narragansett Bay Watershed: Late Woodland period (~500 AD) to the present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salacup, J. M.; Altabet, M. A.; Herbert, T.; Prell, W. L.

    2012-12-01

    In the U.S., the last ~300 years have been a period of progressive and widespread resource exploitation, ecosystem degradation, and habitat destruction. In southern New England, the European Colonists thrived on the spread of slave-based plantation farming, which peaked ~1750 in RI. They produced commodities such as livestock, apples, onions, flax, and dairy. Trees felled to produce the necessary pasture- and farm-land were quickly used as lumber for boards, planks, timber, and barrels. In 1793, Slater Mill, located on the Blackstone River at the head of Narragansett Bay, was the first mill in the U.S to spin yarn using water power, making it the birthplace of the U.S Industrial Revolution. The ensuing urbanization drove the human population of the watershed up from ~50,000 in 1790 to more than 2 million by the year 2000. More recently, the Bay has experienced episodic hypoxic events [1]. These events correlate well with spatial and temporal patterns of nutrients and productivity [2] suggesting that human-induced increases in nutrient nitrogen and phosphorus are responsible for eutrophication-induced oxygen depletion [3]. However, these post-Colonial land use changes have yet to be characterized within the longer context of Native American land use practices, mainly due to the lack of historical records for the period. Additionally, the impact of this ecosystem disturbance on the Bay has not been fully described. Here we present results based on sedimentary profiles of biomarkers diagnostic for soil delivery to marine systems, branched glycerol dialykl glycerol tetraethers, and pollen for disturbance taxa, that suggest land use change began in the Bay's watershed 300 years before European contact. This contradicts long standing ideas regarding the land use practices of local tribes but agrees with new archaeological findings suggesting large semi-permanent settlements and widespread horticulture of maize may have been the norm at this time. We also show results of

  5. The effect of glucose when added to a fat load on the response of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and apolipoprotein B-48 in the postprandial phase.

    PubMed

    Zemánková, K; Mrázková, J; Piťha, J; Kovář, J

    2015-01-01

    Increased and prolonged postprandial lipemia has been identified as a risk factor of cardiovascular disease. However, there is no consensus on how to test postprandial lipemia, especially with respect to the composition of an experimental meal. To address this question of how glucose, when added to a fat load, affects the selected parameters of postprandial lipemia, we carried out a study in 30 healthy male volunteers. Men consumed an experimental meal containing either 75 g of fat + 25 g of glucose (F+G meal) or 75 g of fat (F meal) in a control experiment. Blood was taken before the meal and at selected time points within the following 8 h. Glucose, when added to a fat load, induced an increase of glycemia and insulinemia and, surprisingly, a 20 % reduction in the response of both total and active glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) concentration. The addition of glucose did not affect the magnitude of postprandial triglyceridemia and TRL-C and TRL-TG concentrations but stimulated a faster response of chylomicrons to the test meal, evaluated by changes in apolipoprotein B-48 concentrations. The addition of glucose induced the physiological response of insulin and the lower response of GLP-1 to the test meal during the early postprandial phase, but had no effect on changes of TRL-cholesterol and TRL-TG within 8 h after the meal. PMID:26680669

  6. Early post parturient changes in milk acute phase proteins.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Funmilola C; Waterston, Mary; Hastie, Peter; Haining, Hayley; Eckersall, P David

    2016-08-01

    The periparturient period is one of the most critical periods in the productive life of a dairy cow, and is the period when dairy cows are most susceptible to developing new intramammary infections (IMI) leading to mastitis. Acute phase proteins (APP) such as haptoglobin (Hp), mammary associated serum amyloid A3 (M-SAA3) and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been detected in milk during mastitis but their presence in colostrum and milk in the immediate postpartum period has had limited investigation. The hypothesis was tested that APP are a constituent of colostrum and milk during this period. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were used to determine each APP's concentration in colostrum and milk collected daily from the first to tenth day following calving in 22 Holstein-Friesian dairy cows. Haptoglobin was assessed in individual quarters and composite milk samples while M-SAA3 and CRP concentration were determined in composite milk samples. Change in Hp in relation to the high abundance proteins during the transition from colostrum to milk were evaluated by 1 and 2 dimension electrophoresis and western blot. In 80% of the cows all APPs were detected in colostrum on the first day following parturition at moderately high levels but gradually decreased to minimal values in the milk by the 6th day after calving. The remaining cows (20%) showed different patterns in the daily milk APP concentrations and when an elevated level is detected could reflect the presence of IMI. Demonstration that APP are present in colostrum and milk following parturition but fall to low levels within 4 days means that elevated APP after this time could be biomarkers of post parturient mastitis allowing early intervention to reduce disease on dairy farms. PMID:27600971

  7. Performance of Thermal Insulation Containing Microencapsulated Phase Change Material

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, Jan; Yarbrough, David; Syed, Azam M

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study is dynamic thermal performance microencapsulated phase change material (PCM) blended with loose-fill cellulose insulation. Dynamic hot-box testing and heat-flux measurements have been made for loose-fill cellulose insulation with and without uniformly distributed microencapsulated PCM. The heat flux measurements were made with a heat-flow-meter (HFM) apparatus built in accordance with ASTM C 518. Data were obtained for 1.6 lb{sub m}/ft{sup 3} cellulose insulation containing 0 to 40 wt% PCM. Heat-flux data resulting from a rapid increase in the temperature on one side of a test specimen initially at uniform temperature were analyzed to access the effect of PCM on total heat flow. The heat flux was affected by the PCM for about 100 minutes after the temperature increase. The total heat flow during this initial period decreased linearly with PCM content from 6.5 Btu/ft{sup 2} at 0% PCM to 0.89 Btu/ft{sup 2} for 40 wt% PCM. The cellulose insulation with PCM discharged heat faster than the untreated cellulose when the hot-side temperature of the test specimen was reduced. In addition, hot-box apparatus built in accordance with ASTM C 1363 was utilized for dynamic hot-box testing of a wood stud wall assembly containing PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation. Experimental data obtained for wood-frame wall cavities containing cellulose insulation with PCM was compared with results obtained from cavities containing only cellulose insulation.

  8. A design handbook for phase change thermal control and energy storage devices. [selected paraffins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, W. R.; Griggs, E. I.

    1977-01-01

    Comprehensive survey is given of the thermal aspects of phase change material devices. Fundamental mechanisms of heat transfer within the phase change device are discussed. Performance in zero-g and one-g fields are examined as it relates to such a device. Computer models for phase change materials, with metal fillers, undergoing conductive and convective processes are detailed. Using these models, extensive parametric data are presented for a hypothetical configuration with a rectangular phase change housing, using straight fins as the filler, and paraffin as the phase change material. These data are generated over a range of realistic sizes, material properties, and thermal boundary conditions. A number of illustrative examples are given to demonstrate use of the parametric data. Also, a complete listing of phase change material property data are reproduced herein as an aid to the reader.

  9. Finite element simulations involving simultaneous multiple interface fronts in phase change problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouyang, Tianhong; Tamma, Kumar K.

    1992-01-01

    The present paper describes the simulation of phase change problems involving simultaneous multiple interface fronts employing the finite element method. Much of the past investigations employing finite elements have been restricted to primarily a single phase change situation. The existence of more than one phase, that is, the presence of multiple phase fronts poses certain challenges and further complications. However, the results provide a very interesting thermal behavior for this class of problems. In this paper, attention is focused on fixed grid methods and the trapezoidal family of one-step methods using the enthalpy formulations. Illustrative examples which handle simultaneous multiple fronts in phase change problems are presented.

  10. Phase interface effects in the total enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann model for solid-liquid phase change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rongzong; Wu, Huiying

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, phase interface effects, including the differences in thermophysical properties between solid and liquid phases and the numerical diffusion across phase interface, are investigated for the recently developed total enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann model for solid-liquid phase change, which has high computational efficiency by avoiding iteration procedure and linear equation system solving. For the differences in thermophysical properties (thermal conductivity and specific heat) between solid and liquid phases, a novel reference specific heat is introduced to improve the total enthalpy-based lattice Boltzmann model, which makes the thermal conductivity and specific heat decoupled. Therefore, the differences in thermal conductivity and specific heat can be handled by the dimensionless relaxation time and equilibrium distribution function, respectively. As for the numerical diffusion across phase interface, it is revealed for the first time and found to be induced by solid-liquid phase change. To reduce such numerical diffusion, multiple-relaxation-time collision scheme is exploited, and a special value (one fourth) for the so-called "magic" parameter, a combination of two relaxation parameters, is found. Numerical tests show that the differences in thermophysical properties can be correctly handled and the numerical diffusion across phase interface can be dramatically reduced. Finally, theoretical analyses are carried out to offer insights into the roles of the reference specific heat and "magic" parameter in the treatments of phase interface effects.

  11. Phases and Phase Changes of Mixed Organic/Inorganic Model Systems of Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolli, C.; Krieger, U. K.; Zardini, A. A.; Zobrist, B.; Zuend, A.; Luo, B. P.; Peter, T.

    2006-12-01

    Knowledge of the physical state of tropospheric aerosols is important for an adequate description of cloud formation, heterogeneous and multiphase chemistry, and the aerosol's radiative properties. We will present and discuss laboratory experiments on bulk aerosol model mixtures and micron-sized particles consisting of polyols, polyethylene glycol or dicarboxylic acids mixed with ammonium sulfate. Depending on the exact composition and relative humidity, these mixtures form liquid-one-phase or two-phase systems plus additional solid phases. Whilst the organic matter in ambient aerosols is expected to be predominantly present in the form of liquid or amorphous phases, the inorganic salts may still undergo deliquescence and efflorescence as a function of relative humidity. Moreover, they may induce phase separations into a predominantly organic and an inorganic aqueous phase. In the absence of solid phases, the water uptake and release of the investigated micron-sized particles was usually well described by the Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) approach. However, this model became inaccurate when solid phases were present. Moreover, it is not able to account for liquid-liquid phase separations due to the salting-out effects of the investigated inorganic salts. While most organics participate in liquid phases some organic substances are abundant enough in the particles to form crystalline solids that might act as ice nuclei. We show that this is the case for oxalic acid.

  12. Two Virasoro symmetries in stringy warped AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Guica, Monica; Rodriguez, Maria J.

    2014-12-01

    We study three-dimensional consistent truncations of type IIB supergravity which admit warped AdS3 solutions. These theories contain subsectors that have no bulk dynamics. We show that the symplectic form for these theories, when restricted to the non-dynamical subsectors, equals the symplectic form for pure Einstein gravity in AdS3. Consequently, for each consistent choice of boundary conditions in AdS3, we can define a consistent phase space in warped AdS3 with identical conserved charges. This way, we easily obtain a Virasoro × Virasoro asymptotic symmetry algebra in warped AdS3; two different types of Virasoro × Kač-Moody symmetries are also consistent alternatives.

  13. Stable isotopes reveal Holocene changes in the diet of Adélie penguins in Northern Victoria Land (Ross Sea, Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Lorenzini, Sandra; Baroni, Carlo; Fallick, Anthony E; Baneschi, Ilaria; Salvatore, Maria Cristina; Zanchetta, Giovanni; Dallai, Luigi

    2010-12-01

    Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) modern and fossil eggshells and guano samples collected from ornithogenic soils in Terra Nova Bay (Victoria Land, Ross Sea) were processed for carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios with the aim of detecting past penguin dietary changes. A detailed and greatly expanded Adélie penguin dietary record dated back to 7,200 years BP has been reconstructed for the investigated area. Our data indicate a significant dietary shift between fish and krill, with a gradual decrease from past to present time in the proportion of fish compared to krill in Adélie penguin diet. From 7,200 to 2,000 years BP, δ(13)C and δ(15)N values indicate fish as the most eaten prey. The dietary contribution of lower-trophic prey in penguin diet started becoming evident not earlier than 2,000 years BP, when the δ(13)C values reveal a change in the penguin feeding behavior. Modern eggshell and guano samples reveal a major dietary contribution of krill but not a krill-dominated diet, since δ(13)C values remain much too high if krill prevail in the diet. According to the Holocene environmental background attested for Victoria Land, Adélie penguin dietary shifts between fish and krill seem to reflect penguin paleoecological responses to different paleoenvironmental settings with different conditions of sea-ice extension and persistence. Furthermore, Adélie penguin diet appears to be particularly affected by environmental changes in a very specific period within the breeding season, namely the egg-laying period when penguin dietary and feeding habit shifts are clearly documented by the δ(13)C of eggshell carbonate.

  14. Onset of Convection in Two Liquid Layers with Phase Change

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, G B; Coriell, S R; Gurski, K F; Cotrell, D L

    2006-09-14

    We perform linear stability calculations for horizontal fluid bilayers that can undergo a phase transformation, taking into account both buoyancy effects and thermocapillary effects in the presence of a vertical temperature gradient. We compare the familiar case of the stability of two immiscible fluids in a bilayer geometry with the less-studied case that the two fluids represent different phases of a single-component material, e.g., the water-steam system. The two cases differ in their interfacial boundary conditions: the condition that the interface is a material surface is replaced by the continuity of mass flux across the interface, together with an assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium that in the linearized equations represents the Clausius-Clapeyron relation relating the interfacial temperature and pressures. For the two-phase case, we find that the entropy difference between the phases plays a crucial role in determining the stability of the system. For small values of the entropy difference between the phases, the two-phase system can be linearly unstable to either heating from above or below. The instability is due to the Marangoni effect in combination with the effects of buoyancy (for heating from below). For larger values of the entropy difference the two-phase system is unstable only for heating from below, and the Marangoni effect is masked by effects of the entropy difference. To help understand the mechanisms driving the instability on heating from below we have performed both long-wavelength and short-wavelength analyses of the two-phase system. The short-wavelength analysis shows that the instability is driven by a coupling between the flow normal to the interface and the latent heat generation at the interface. The mechanism for the large wavelength instability is more complicated, and the detailed form of the expansion is found to depend on the Crispation and Bond numbers as well as the entropy difference. The two-phase system allows a

  15. Phase Change Heat Transfer Device for Process Heat Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Vivek Utgikar; Fred Gunnerson

    2010-10-01

    The next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) will most likely produce electricity and process heat, with both being considered for hydrogen production. To capture nuclear process heat, and transport it to a distant industrial facility requires a high temperature system of heat exchangers, pumps and/or compressors. The heat transfer system is particularly challenging not only due to the elevated temperatures (up to approx.1300 K) and industrial scale power transport (=50MW), but also due to a potentially large separation distance between the nuclear and industrial plants (100+m) dictated by safety and licensing mandates. The work reported here is the preliminary analysis of two-phase thermosyphon heat transfer performance with alkali metals. A thermosyphon is a thermal device for transporting heat from one point to another with quite extraordinary properties. In contrast to single-phased forced convective heat transfer via ‘pumping a fluid’, a thermosyphon (also called a wickless heat pipe) transfers heat through the vaporization/condensing process. The condensate is further returned to the hot source by gravity, i.e., without any requirement of pumps or compressors. With this mode of heat transfer, the thermosyphon has the capability to transport heat at high rates over appreciable distances, virtually isothermally and without any requirement for external pumping devices. Two-phase heat transfer by a thermosyphon has the advantage of high enthalpy transport that includes the sensible heat of the liquid, the latent heat of vaporization, and vapor superheat. In contrast, single-phase forced convection transports only the sensible heat of the fluid. Additionally, vapor-phase velocities within a thermosyphon are much greater than single-phase liquid velocities within a forced convective loop. Thermosyphon performance can be limited by the sonic limit (choking) of vapor flow and/or by condensate entrainment. Proper thermosyphon requires analysis of both.

  16. Changes in the microstructure and characteristics of carbon/carbon composites with mesophase mesocarbon microbeads added during graphitization

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, H.L.; Ko, T.H.; Ku, W.S.

    2005-12-05

    Carbon/carbon (C/C) composites were prepared from oxidative PAN fiber felts, a resol-type phenolic resin, and mesophase pitch derived from coal tar. In this study, the effects on mesocarbon microbeads (MCMBs), flexural strength, flexural moduli, electric conductivity, and thermal conductivity of C/C composites with a mesophase content ranging from 0 to 30 wt % were examined during pyrolysis. The results show that the C/C composite with the addition of 10-30 wt % mesophase had a higher density, greater stacking size, and higher preferred orientation than the C/C composites without any mesophase during heat treatment. These composites also exhibited an improvement in flexural strength from 19.7 to 30.3%. The flexural moduli of these composites with mesophase added increased by 15.1 to 31.3% compared to that with no mesophase added. These composites also showed improved electric conductivity, from 15.1 to 43.7%, and thermal conductivity, from 12 to 31.3%.

  17. Phase Change of Gallium Enables Highly Reversible and Switchable Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhou; Lum, Guo Zhan; Song, Sukho; Rich, Steven; Sitti, Metin

    2016-07-01

    Gallium exhibits highly reversible and switchable adhesion when it undergoes a solid-liquid phase transition. The robustness of gallium is notable as it exhibits strong performance on a wide range of smooth and rough surfaces, under both dry and wet conditions. Gallium may therefore find numerous applications in transfer printing, robotics, electronic packaging, and biomedicine. PMID:27146217

  18. Ultrafast phase-change logic device driven by melting processes

    PubMed Central

    Loke, Desmond; Skelton, Jonathan M.; Wang, Wei-Jie; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Zhao, Rong; Chong, Tow-Chong; Elliott, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    The ultrahigh demand for faster computers is currently tackled by traditional methods such as size scaling (for increasing the number of devices), but this is rapidly becoming almost impossible, due to physical and lithographic limitations. To boost the speed of computers without increasing the number of logic devices, one of the most feasible solutions is to increase the number of operations performed by a device, which is largely impossible to achieve using current silicon-based logic devices. Multiple operations in phase-change–based logic devices have been achieved using crystallization; however, they can achieve mostly speeds of several hundreds of nanoseconds. A difficulty also arises from the trade-off between the speed of crystallization and long-term stability of the amorphous phase. We here instead control the process of melting through premelting disordering effects, while maintaining the superior advantage of phase-change–based logic devices over silicon-based logic devices. A melting speed of just 900 ps was achieved to perform multiple Boolean algebraic operations (e.g., NOR and NOT). Ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations and in situ electrical characterization revealed the origin (i.e., bond buckling of atoms) and kinetics (e.g., discontinuouslike behavior) of melting through premelting disordering, which were key to increasing the melting speeds. By a subtle investigation of the well-characterized phase-transition behavior, this simple method provides an elegant solution to boost significantly the speed of phase-change–based in-memory logic devices, thus paving the way for achieving computers that can perform computations approaching terahertz processing rates. PMID:25197044

  19. Thermal Conductivity of Eutectic Nitrates and Nitrates/Expanded Graphite Composite as Phase Change Materials.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xin; Zhang, Peng; Meng, Zhao-Nan; Li, Ming

    2015-04-01

    Nitrates and eutectic nitrate mixtures are considered as potential phase change materials (PCMs) for the middle-temperature-range solar energy storage applications. But the extensive utilization is restricted by the poor thermal conductivity and thermal stability. In the present study, sodium nitrate-potassium nitrate eutectic mixture was used as the base PCM, and expanded graphite (EG) was added to the mixture so as to improve the thermal conductivities. The elaboration method consists of a physically mixing of salt powders with or without EG, and the composite PCMs were cold-compressed to form shape-stabilized PCMs at room temperature. The thermal conductivities of the composite PCMs fabricated by cold-compression were investigated at different temperatures by the steady state method. The results showed that the addition of EG significantly enhanced the thermal conductivities. The thermal conductivities of pure nitrates and nitrates/EG composite PCMs in solid state showed the behavior of temperature dependant, and they slightly decreased with the increase of the temperature.

  20. Phase change materials. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the use of phase change materials in thermal energy storage systems and energy utilization. Phase change compositions used in solar energy building heating and cooling systems are discussed, as well as methods used in the preparation of thermal storage materials. (Contains a minimum of 194 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. Evidence for electronic gap-driven metal-semiconductor transition in phase-change materials

    PubMed Central

    Shakhvorostov, Dmitry; Nistor, Razvan A.; Krusin-Elbaum, Lia; Martyna, Glenn J.; Newns, Dennis M.; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Liu, Xiao-hu; Hughes, Zak E.; Paul, Sujata; Cabral, Cyril; Raoux, Simone; Shrekenhamer, David B.; Basov, Dimitri N.; Song, Young; Müser, Martin H.

    2009-01-01

    Phase-change materials are functionally important materials that can be thermally interconverted between metallic (crystalline) and semiconducting (amorphous) phases on a very short time scale. Although the interconversion appears to involve a change in local atomic coordination numbers, the electronic basis for this process is still unclear. Here, we demonstrate that in a nearly vacancy-free binary GeSb system where we can drive the phase change both thermally and, as we discover, by pressure, the transformation into the amorphous phase is electronic in origin. Correlations between conductivity, total system energy, and local atomic coordination revealed by experiments and long time ab initio simulations show that the structural reorganization into the amorphous state is driven by opening of an energy gap in the electronic density of states. The electronic driving force behind the phase change has the potential to change the interconversion paradigm in this material class. PMID:19549858

  2. 75 FR 28830 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing of a Proposed Rule Change Adding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ... triggered, the ] Exchange will immediately notify the single plan processor responsible for consolidation of... the public interest. The proposed rule change also is designed to support the principles of...

  3. Electrodeposition of SbTe Phase-Change Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Huang,Q.; Kellock, A.; Raoux, S.

    2007-01-01

    Electrodeposition of SbTe thin films was investigated at room temperature, where amorphous deposits were obtained. The electrodeposition of Sb was found to be induced by Te, while the latter was not affected by the Sb. Detailed studies on this induced deposition were carried out by varying the Sb(III) and Te(IV) concentrations, pH, and agitation. The Sb deposition rate was found to be independent of the concentrations of both species but dependent on the pH and agitation. A phase transition from amorphous films into crystalline Sb2Te3 at 120 C was observed for the plated SbTe.

  4. Association Between Media Dose, Ad Tagging, and Changes in Web Traffic for a National Tobacco Education Campaign: A Market-Level Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Kevin C; Patel, Deesha; Rodes, Robert; Beistle, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2012, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched Tips From Former Smokers (Tips), the first federally funded national tobacco education campaign. In 2013, a follow-up Tips campaign aired on national cable television networks, radio, and other channels, with supporting digital advertising to drive traffic to the Tips campaign website. Objective The objective of this study was to use geographic and temporal variability in 2013 Tips campaign television media doses and ad tagging to evaluate changes in traffic to the campaign website in response to specific doses of campaign media. Methods Linear regression models were used to estimate the dose-response relationship between weekly market-level television gross rating points (GRPs) and weekly Web traffic to the Tips campaign website. This relationship was measured using unique visitors, total visits, and page views as outcomes. Ad GRP effects were estimated separately for ads tagged with the Tips campaign website URL and 1-800-QUIT-NOW. Results In the average media market, an increase of 100 television GRPs per week for ads tagged with the Tips campaign website URL was associated with an increase of 650 unique visitors (P<.001), 769 total visits (P<.001), and 1255 total page views (P<.001) per week. The associations between GRPs for ads tagged with 1-800-QUIT-NOW and each Web traffic measure were also statistically significant (P<.001), but smaller in magnitude. Conclusions Based on these findings, we estimate that the 16-week 2013 Tips television campaign generated approximately 660,000 unique visitors, 900,000 total visits, and 1,390,000 page views for the Tips campaign website. These findings can help campaign planners forecast the likely impact of targeted advertising efforts on consumers’ use of campaign-specific websites. PMID:26887959

  5. Adding serum estradiol measurements to ultrasound monitoring does not change the yield of mature oocytes in IVF/ICSI.

    PubMed

    Vandekerckhove, Frank; Gerris, Jan; Vansteelandt, Stijn; De Sutter, Petra

    2014-09-01

    In a non-randomized, comparative prospective study (416 patients) we compared the outcome of IVF/ICSI in two parallel control groups: one in which patients were followed up using combined monitoring (ultrasound plus serum estradiol monitoring, the UHM group) and one in which only ultrasound monitoring was used (the UM group). This study has taken the number of mature oocytes at the moment of egg retrieval as its primary end variable. After adjustment for age, gravidity, antagonist protocol, AMH and infertility diagnosis, the average difference in number of mature oocytes between the UHM group and the UM group was -0.4 (95% CI: -1.7 to 1.0), which met our definition of clinical equivalence (95% CI for the adjusted mean difference between -2 and 2). Larger studies are still needed to evaluate the differences in the live birth rates per cycle and to further confirm that blood sampling definitively has no added value in monitoring ovarian stimulation for IVF/ICSI.

  6. Adding to the HIV Prevention Portfolio – the Achievement of Structural Changes by 13 Connect to Protect® Coalitions

    PubMed Central

    Chutuape, Kate S.; Muyeed, Adaline Z.; Willard, Nancy; Greenberg, Lauren; Ellen, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Opportunities to control risk factors that contribute to HIV transmission and acquisition extend far beyond individuals and include addressing social and structural determinants of HIV risk, such as inadequate housing, poor access to healthcare and economic insecurity. The infrastructure within communities, including the policies and practices that guide institutions and organizations, should be considered crucial targets for change. This paper examines the extent to which 13 community coalitions across the U.S. and Puerto Rico were able to achieve “structural change” objectives (i.e., new or modified practices or policies) as an intermediate step toward the long-term goal of reducing HIV risk among adolescents and young adults (12-24 years old). The study resulted in the completion of 245 objectives with 70% categorized as structural in nature. Coalitions targeted social services, education and government as primary community sectors to adopt structural changes. A median of 12 key actors and six new key actors contributed to accomplishing structural changes. Structural change objectives required a median of seven months to complete. The structural changes achieved offer new ideas for community health educators and practitioners seeking to bolster their HIV prevention agenda. PMID:25632407

  7. Impact of Compound Hydrate Dynamics on Phase Boundary Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osegovic, J. P.; Max, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    Compound hydrate reactions are affected by the local concentration of hydrate forming materials (HFM). The relationship between HFM composition and the phase boundary is as significant as temperature and pressure. Selective uptake and sequestration of preferred hydrate formers (PF) has wide ranging implications for the state and potential use of natural hydrate formation, including impact on climate. Rising mineralizing fluids of hydrate formers (such as those that occur on Earth and are postulated to exist elsewhere in the solar system) will sequester PF before methane, resulting in a positive relationship between depth and BTU content as ethane and propane are removed before methane. In industrial settings the role of preferred formers can separate gases. When depressurizing gas hydrate to release the stored gas, the hydrate initial composition will set the decomposition phase boundary because the supporting solution takes on the composition of the hydrate phase. In other settings where hydrate is formed, transported, and then dissociated, similar effects can control the process. The behavior of compound hydrate systems can primarily fit into three categories: 1) In classically closed systems, all the material that can form hydrate is isolated, such as in a sealed laboratory vessel. In such systems, formation and decomposition are reversible processes with observed hysteresis related to mass or heat transfer limitations, or the order and magnitude in which individual hydrate forming gases are taken up from the mixture and subsequently released. 2) Kinetically closed systems are exposed to a solution mass flow across a hydrate mass. These systems can have multiple P-T phase boundaries based on the local conditions at each face of the hydrate mass. A portion of hydrate that is exposed to fresh mineralizing solution will contain more preferred hydrate formers than another portion that is exposed to a partially depleted solution. Examples of kinetically closed

  8. Highly stable phase change material emulsions fabricated by interfacial assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers during phase inversion.

    PubMed

    Park, Hanhee; Han, Dong Wan; Kim, Jin Woong

    2015-03-10

    This study introduced a robust and promising approach to fabricate highly stable phase change material (PCM) emulsions consisting of n-tetradecane as a dispersed phase and a mixture of meso-2,3-butanediol (m-BDO) and water as a continuous phase. We showed that amphiphilic poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) block copolymers assembled to form a flexible but tough polymer membrane at the interface during phase inversion from water-in-oil emulsion to oil-in-water emulsion, thus remarkably improving the emulsion stability. Although the incorporation of m-BDO into the emulsion lowered the phase changing enthalpy, it provided a useful means to elevate the melting temperature of the emulsions near to 15 °C. Interestingly, supercooling was commonly observed in our PCM emulsions. We attributed this to the fact that the PCM molecules confined in submicron-scale droplets could not effectively nucleate to grow molecular crystals. Moreover, the presence of m-BDO in the continuous phase rather dominated the heat emission of the emulsion system during freezing, which made the supercooling more favorable. PMID:25674921

  9. First principles study of the optical contrast in phase change materials.

    PubMed

    Caravati, S; Bernasconi, M; Parrinello, M

    2010-08-11

    We study from first principles the optical properties of the phase change materials Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) (GST), GeTe and Sb(2)Te(3) in the crystalline phase and in realistic models of the amorphous phase generated by quenching from the melt in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The calculations reproduce the strong optical contrast between the crystalline and amorphous phases measured experimentally and exploited in optical data storage. It is demonstrated that the optical contrast is due to a change in the optical matrix elements across the phase change in all the compounds. It is concluded that the reduction of the optical matrix elements in the amorphous phases is due to angular disorder in p-bonding which dominates the amorphous network in agreement with previous proposals (Huang and Robertson 2010 Phys. Rev. B 81 081204) based on calculations on crystalline models.

  10. A SPICE model for a phase-change memory cell based on the analytical conductivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiqun, Wei; Xinnan, Lin; Yuchao, Jia; Xiaole, Cui; Jin, He; Xing, Zhang

    2012-11-01

    By way of periphery circuit design of the phase-change memory, it is necessary to present an accurate compact model of a phase-change memory cell for the circuit simulation. Compared with the present model, the model presented in this work includes an analytical conductivity model, which is deduced by means of the carrier transport theory instead of the fitting model based on the measurement. In addition, this model includes an analytical temperature model based on the 1D heat-transfer equation and the phase-transition dynamic model based on the JMA equation to simulate the phase-change process. The above models for phase-change memory are integrated by using Verilog-A language, and results show that this model is able to simulate the I-V characteristics and the programming characteristics accurately.

  11. Space observations of cold-cloud phase change.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong-Sang; Lindzen, Richard S; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Kim, Jinwon

    2010-06-22

    This study examines the vertically resolved cloud measurements from the cloud-aerosol lidar with orthogonal polarization instrument on Aqua satellite from June 2006 through May 2007 to estimate the extent to which the mixed cloud-phase composition can vary according to the ambient temperature, an important concern for the uncertainty in calculating cloud radiative effects. At -20 degrees C, the global average fraction of supercooled clouds in the total cloud population is found to be about 50% in the data period. Between -10 and -40 degrees C, the fraction is smaller at lower temperatures. However, there are appreciable regional and temporal deviations from the global mean (> +/- 20%) at the isotherm. In the analysis with coincident dust aerosol data from the same instrument, it appears that the variation in the supercooled cloud fraction is negatively correlated with the frequencies of dust aerosols at the -20 degrees C isotherm. This result suggests a possibility that dust particles lifted to the cold cloud layer effectively glaciate supercooled clouds. Observations of radiative flux from the clouds and earth's radiant energy system instrument aboard Terra satellite, as well as radiative transfer model simulations, show that the 20% variation in the supercooled cloud fraction is quantitatively important in cloud radiative effects, especially in shortwave, which are 10-20 W m(-2) for regions of mixed-phase clouds affected by dust. In particular, our results demonstrate that dust, by glaciating supercooled water, can decrease albedo, thus compensating for the increase in albedo due to the dust aerosols themselves. This has important implications for the determination of climate sensitivity.

  12. Space observations of cold-cloud phase change

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong-Sang; Lindzen, Richard S.; Ho, Chang-Hoi; Kim, Jinwon

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the vertically resolved cloud measurements from the cloud-aerosol lidar with orthogonal polarization instrument on Aqua satellite from June 2006 through May 2007 to estimate the extent to which the mixed cloud-phase composition can vary according to the ambient temperature, an important concern for the uncertainty in calculating cloud radiative effects. At -20 °C, the global average fraction of supercooled clouds in the total cloud population is found to be about 50% in the data period. Between -10 and -40 °C, the fraction is smaller at lower temperatures. However, there are appreciable regional and temporal deviations from the global mean (>  ± 20%) at the isotherm. In the analysis with coincident dust aerosol data from the same instrument, it appears that the variation in the supercooled cloud fraction is negatively correlated with the frequencies of dust aerosols at the -20 °C isotherm. This result suggests a possibility that dust particles lifted to the cold cloud layer effectively glaciate supercooled clouds. Observations of radiative flux from the clouds and earth’s radiant energy system instrument aboard Terra satellite, as well as radiative transfer model simulations, show that the 20% variation in the supercooled cloud fraction is quantitatively important in cloud radiative effects, especially in shortwave, which are 10 - 20 W m-2 for regions of mixed-phase clouds affected by dust. In particular, our results demonstrate that dust, by glaciating supercooled water, can decrease albedo, thus compensating for the increase in albedo due to the dust aerosols themselves. This has important implications for the determination of climate sensitivity. PMID:20534562

  13. Late Holocene (ca. AD 370-1210) ecosystem changes inferred from a stalagmite from northwestern Madagascar: the role of the ITCZ and human activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voarintsoa, N. R. G.; Railsback, L. B.; Brook, G. A.; Wang, L.; Liang, F.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution stable isotope records combined with petrographic examination of stalagmite MA3 from Anjohibe Cave provide a better understanding of the climatically- and anthropogenically- induced ecosystem change in NW Madagascar between ca. AD 370 and 1210. The record suggests strong climatic control prior to ca. 700 and strong influence of human activities after ca. 920. Prior to 700, monsoonal rainfall and ecosystem change seem to respond to the change in the relative position of the ITCZ. This is inferred from the positive correlation between δ13C and δ18O and T anomalies in the Northern Hemisphere. A cooler NH pushed the ITCZ southward, thus favoring longer visits in northwestern Madagascar and strengthening the Malagasy monsoon. This offered favorable conditions to vegetation cover growth (the opposite was possible during warmer NH). The period between ca. 675 and 700 is the driest and might represent a period of abrupt change in vegetation cover as suggested by the stalagmite's petrography, smaller layer specific width, and greater values of both δ13C and δ18O. This drier period is followed by slight change in hydrology and a gradual recovery in vegetation in NW Madagascar, which lasted until ca. 920. This change is reflected in the decrease of stable isotope values and an increase in the layer specific width. Since ca. 920, the records suggest that the ecosystem change around the cave was controlled by something other than climate. The coincidence in time with human settlement and the gradual shift from lower to higher δ13C would suggest a strong involvement of human activities, particularly the practice of "tavy" or slash-and burn activities. This finding is important because Madagascar has experienced major ecological changes since the late Holocene, the cause of which has raised two hypotheses as to whether caused by severe climate change or by human activities. Deciphering the difference between human-induced and abrupt climatic changes has been

  14. Oxygen Tuned Local Structure and Phase-Change Performance of Germanium Telluride.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xilin; Du, Yonghua; Behera, Jitendra K; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang; Simpson, Robert E

    2016-08-10

    The effect of oxygen on the local structure of Ge atoms in GeTe-O materials has been investigated. Oxygen leads to a significant modification to the vibrational modes of Ge octahedra, which results from a decrease in its coordination. We find that a defective octahedral Ge network is the crucial fingerprint for rapid and reversible structural transitions in GeTe-based phase change materials. The appearance of oxide Raman modes confirms phase separation into GeO and TeO at high level O doping. Counterintuitively, despite the increase in crystallization temperature of oxygen doped GeTe-O phase change materials, when GeTe-O materials are used in electrical phase change memory cells, the electrical switching energy is lower than the pure GeTe material. This switching energy reduction is ascribed to the smaller change in volume, and therefore smaller enthalpy change, for the oxygen doped GeTe materials. PMID:27430363

  15. Numerical Simulation of Two-Phase Critical Flow with the Phase Change in the Nozzle Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigaki, Masahiro; Watanabe, Tadashi; Nakamura, Hideo

    Two-phase critical flow in the nozzle tube is analyzed numerically by the best estimate code TRACE and the CFD code FLUENT, and the performance of the mass flow rate estimation by the numerical codes is discussed. For the best estimate analysis by the TRACE code, the critical flow option is turned on. The mixture model is used with the cavitation model and the evaporation-condensation model for the numerical simulation by the FLUENT code. Two test cases of the two-phase critical flow are analyzed. One case is the critical flashing flow in a convergent-divergent nozzle (Super Moby Dick experiment), and the other case is the break nozzle flow for a steam generator tube rupture experiment of pressurized water reactors at Large Scale Test Facility of Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The calculation results of the mass flow rates by the numerical simulations show good agreements with the experimental results.

  16. Isolating the roles of different forcing agents in global stratospheric temperature changes using model integrations with incrementally added single forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquila, V.; Swartz, W. H.; Waugh, D. W.; Colarco, P. R.; Pawson, S.; Polvani, L. M.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2016-07-01

    Satellite instruments show a cooling of global stratospheric temperatures over the whole data record (1979-2014). This cooling is not linear and includes two descending steps in the early 1980s and mid-1990s. The 1979-1995 period is characterized by increasing concentrations of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) and by the two major volcanic eruptions of El Chichón (1982) and Mount Pinatubo (1991). The 1995-present period is characterized by decreasing ODS concentrations and by the absence of major volcanic eruptions. Greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations increase over the whole time period. In order to isolate the roles of different forcing agents in the global stratospheric temperature changes, we performed a set of simulations using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model with prescribed sea surface temperatures. We find that in our model simulations the cooling of the stratosphere from 1979 to present is mostly driven by changes in GHG concentrations in the middle and upper stratosphere and by GHG and ODS changes in the lower stratosphere. While the cooling trend caused by increasing GHGs is roughly constant over the satellite era, changing ODS concentrations cause a significant stratospheric cooling only up to the mid-1990s, when they start to decrease because of the implementation of the Montreal Protocol. Sporadic volcanic events and the solar cycle have a distinct signature in the time series of stratospheric temperature anomalies but do not play a statistically significant role in the long-term trends from 1979 to 2014. Several factors combine to produce the step-like behavior in the stratospheric temperatures: in the lower stratosphere, the flattening starting in the mid-1990s is due to the decrease in ozone-depleting substances; Mount Pinatubo and the solar cycle cause the abrupt steps through the aerosol-associated warming and the volcanically induced ozone depletion. In the middle and upper stratosphere, changes in solar

  17. Thermal modeling with solid/liquid phase change of the thermal energy storage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarda, J. Raymond Lee

    1991-01-01

    A thermal model which simulates combined conduction and phase change characteristics of thermal energy storage (TES) materials is presented. Both the model and results are presented for the purpose of benchmarking the conduction and phase change capabilities of recently developed and unvalidated microgravity TES computer programs. Specifically, operation of TES-1 is simulated. A two-dimensional SINDA85 model of the TES experiment in cylindrical coordinates was constructed. The phase change model accounts for latent heat stored in, or released from, a node undergoing melting and freezing.

  18. Automated baseline change detection -- Phases 1 and 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Byler, E.

    1997-10-31

    The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. The ABCD image processing software was installed on a robotic vehicle developed under a related DOE/FETC contract DE-AC21-92MC29112 Intelligent Mobile Sensor System (IMSS) and integrated with the electronics and software. This vehicle was designed especially to navigate in DOE Waste Storage Facilities. Initial system testing was performed at Fernald in June 1996. After some further development and more extensive integration the prototype integrated system was installed and tested at the Radioactive Waste Management Facility (RWMC) at INEEL beginning in April 1997 through the present (November 1997). The integrated system, composed of ABCD imaging software and IMSS mobility base, is called MISS EVE (Mobile Intelligent Sensor System--Environmental Validation Expert). Evaluation of the integrated system in RWMC Building 628, containing approximately 10,000 drums, demonstrated an easy to use system with the ability to properly navigate through the facility, image all the defined drums, and process the results into a report delivered to the operator on a GUI interface and on hard copy. Further work is needed to make the brassboard system more operationally robust.

  19. Microgravity experiments on phase change of self-rewetting fluids.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yoshiyuki; Iwasaki, Akira; Tanaka, Kotaro

    2004-11-01

    A series of microgravity experiments on self-rewetting fluids has been conducted at the 10-second drop shaft of the Japan Microgravity Center (JAMIC). In all the experiments, 1.5 wt% of 1-butanol aqueous solution were employed as a self-rewetting fluid. The objective of the first experiment was to observe the boiling behavior of two-dimensional adjacent dual vapor bubbles with the aid of a two-wavelength interferometer and tracer particles. A significant difference was observed between a self-rewetting fluid and a normal fluid (CFC-113 in this experiment) in bubble interaction and flow developed along vapor/bubble interface. The second experiment focused on the flow at the bubble/heater contact area and around the three-phase interline, visualized with tracer particles. Differing behavior among three fluids, 1-butanol aqueous solution, CFC-113, and ethanol aqueous solution, was observed. The last microgravity experiment was a demonstration of wickless heat pipes containing three different fluids as a working fluid, 1-butanol aqueous solution, water, and ethanol aqueous solution. The temperature variation of working fluid in the heat pipe was monitored, and the liquid flow returning from the condensation region to the evaporation region was visualized by tracer particles. In addition to microgravity experiments, the performance of conventional heat pipes with 1-butanol aqueous solution was evaluated on the ground, and compared with water heat pipes. Our preliminary results are presented.

  20. Repeated consumption of a large volume of liquid and semi-solid foods increases ad libitum intake, but does not change expected satiety.

    PubMed

    Hogenkamp, P S; Mars, M; Stafleu, A; de Graaf, C

    2012-10-01

    Food intake and a food's expected satiating effect initially rely on sensory attributes. People will learn about the food's satiating capacity by exposure. We investigated whether repeated consumption changed the expected satiety effects and intake of iso-energetic liquid and semi-solid foods. In a randomised cross-over study, participants (n=53; age: 21±2.9 y; BMI: 21.8±2.0 kg/m²) consumed one of two iso-energetic dairy foods (liquid or semi-solid) for breakfast in each 5-day test condition. Expectations regarding satiety were measured on days 1, 2, and 5. Foods were offered ad libitum on days 1 and 5 and in a fixed volume on days 2-4. Appetite sensations were rated up to 180 min after the start of the session on fixed time points. Expected satiety effects of the semi-solid food were higher than of the liquid food on all days (p<0.0001). Ad libitum intake of the liquid food was higher than of the semi-solid food on day 1 (liquid: 391±177 g, semi-solid: 277±98 g; p<0.0001) and day 5 (liquid: 477±161 g, semi-solid: 375±148 g; p<0.0001). On day 2, hunger was rated lower and fullness rated higher after the semi-solid compared with the liquid food; on day 4, no differences were observed (significant product∗ exposure interaction AUC). Changes in hunger and fullness indicated that the fixed volumes of liquid and solid food were perceived to be equally satiating after repeated consumption, but this did not result in the anticipated changes: expected satiety effects remained lower, and ad libitum intake higher for the liquid compared with the semi-solid food. The effect of texture on a food's expected satiety effects and its ad libitum intake appears to be large, also after repeated consumption. Expectations based on sensory cues are not easily changed.

  1. FRAGMATIC: A randomised phase III clinical trial investigating the effect of fragmin® added to standard therapy in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs when blood clots in the leg, pelvic or other deep vein (deep vein thrombosis) with or without transport of the thrombus into the pulmonary arterial circulation (pulmonary embolus). VTE is common in patients with cancer and is increased by surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and disease progression. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is routinely used to treat VTE and some evidence suggests that LMWH may also have an anticancer effect, by reduction in the incidence of metastases. The FRAGMATIC trial will assess the effect of adding dalteparin (FRAGMIN), a type of LMWH, to standard treatment for patients with lung cancer. Methods/Design The study design is a randomised multicentre phase III trial comparing standard treatment and standard treatment plus daily LMWH for 24 weeks in patients with lung cancer. Patients eligible for this study must have histopathological or cytological diagnosis of primary bronchial carcinoma (small cell or non-small cell) within 6 weeks of randomisation, be 18 or older, and must be willing and able to self-administer 5000 IU dalteparin by daily subcutaneous injection or have it administered to themselves or by a carer for 24 weeks. A total of 2200 patients will be recruited from all over the UK over a 3 year period and followed up for a minimum of 1 year after randomisation. Patients will be randomised to one of the two treatment groups in a 1:1 ratio, standard treatment or standard treatment plus dalteparin. The primary outcome measure of the trial is overall survival. The secondary outcome measures include venous thrombotic event (VTE) free survival, serious adverse events (SAEs), metastasis-free survival, toxicity, quality of life (QoL), levels of breathlessness, anxiety and depression, cost effectiveness and cost utility. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN80812769 PMID:19807917

  2. Aridity changes in the Temperate-Mediterranean transition of the Andes since ad 1346 reconstructed from tree-rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, Duncan A.; Boninsegna, José A.; Cleaveland, Malcolm K.; Lara, Antonio; Le Quesne, Carlos; Morales, Mariano S.; Mudelsee, Manfred; Stahle, David W.; Villalba, Ricardo

    2011-04-01

    The Andes Cordillera acts as regional "Water Towers" for several countries and encompasses a wide range of ecosystems and climates. Several hydroclimatic changes have been described for portions of the Andes during recent years, including glacier retreat, negative precipitation trends, an elevation rise in the 0° isotherm, and changes in regional streamflow regimes. The Temperate-Mediterranean transition (TMT) zone of the Andes (35.5°-39.5°S) is particularly at risk to climate change because it is a biodiversity hotspot with heavy human population pressure on water resources. In this paper we utilize a new tree-ring network of Austrocedrus chilensis to reconstruct past variations in regional moisture in the TMT of the Andes by means of the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI). The reconstruction covers the past 657 years and captures interannual to decadal scales of variability in late spring-early summer PDSI. These changes are related to the north-south oscillations in moisture conditions between the Mediterranean and Temperate climates of the Andes as a consequence of the latitudinal position of the storm tracks forced by large-scale circulation modes. Kernel estimation of occurrence rates reveals an unprecedented increment of severe and extreme drought events during the last century in the context of the previous six centuries. Moisture conditions in our study region are linked to tropical and high-latitude ocean-atmospheric forcing, with PDSI positively related to Niño-3.4 SST during spring and strongly negatively correlated with the Antarctic Oscillation (AAO) during summer. Geopotential anomaly maps at 500-hPa show that extreme dry years are tightly associated with negative height anomalies in the Ross-Amundsen Seas, in concordance with the strong negative relationship between PDSI and AAO. The twentieth century increase in extreme drought events in the TMT may not be related to ENSO but to the positive AAO trend during late-spring and summer resulting

  3. Flow of suspensions of carbon nanotubes carrying phase change materials through microchannels and heat transfer enhancement.

    PubMed

    Sinha-Ray, Sumit; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Sriram, Hari; Yarin, Alexander L

    2014-02-01

    This work explores the potential of nano-encapsulated phase change materials (PCMs) in applications related to microelectronics cooling. PCMs (wax or meso-erythritol) were encapsulated in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by a method of self-sustained diffusion at room temperature and pressure. These nano-encapsulated wax nanoparticles alone allowed heat removal over a relatively wide range of temperatures (different waxes have melting temperatures in the range 40-80 °C). On the other hand, nano-encapsulated meso-erythritol nanoparticles allowed heat removal in the range 118-120 °C. The combination of these two PCMs (wax and meso-erythritol) could extend the temperature range to 40-120 °C, when both types of nanoparticles (wax and meso-erythritol intercalated) would be suspended in the same carrier fluid (an oil). The nanoparticles possess a short response time of the order of 10(-7) s. Such nano-encapsulation can also prevent the PCM from sticking to the wall. In this work, experiments with wax-intercalated CNTs, stable aqueous suspensions of CNTs with concentrations up to 3 wt% with and without nano-encapsulated wax were prepared using a surfactant sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (NaDDBS). These suspensions were pumped through two channels of 603 μm or 1803 μm in diameter subjected to a constant heat flux at the wall. It was found that the presence of the surfactant in CNT suspensions results in a pseudo-slip at the channel wall which enhances the flow rate at a fixed pressure drop. When aqueous solutions of the surfactant were employed (with no CNTs added), the enhanced convection alone was responsible for a ~2 °C reduction in temperature in comparison with pure water flows. When CNTs with nano-encapsulated wax were added, an additional ~1.90 °C reduction in temperature due to the PCM fusion was observed when using 3 wt% CNT suspensions. In addition, suspensions of meso-erythritol-intercalated CNTs in alpha-olefin oil were used as coolants in flows through the

  4. Phase change references for in-flight recalibration of orbital thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topham, T. S.; Latvakoski, H.; Watson, M.

    2013-09-01

    Several critical questions need to be answered to determine the potential utility of phase change materials as long-term orbital references: How accurate and repeatable will phase change reference implementations be after incorporating necessary design trade-offs to accommodate launch and the space environment? How can the temperature of phase transitions be transferred to something useful for calibration such as a black body. How, if at all, will the microgravity environment affect the phase transitions? To help answer some of these questions, three experiments will be conducted on the International Space Station (ISS). The experiments will test melts and freezes of three different phase change materials in various containment apparatus. This paper addresses the current status of the ISS experiments, as well as results from ground testing of several concepts for space application of PCM recalibration systems in the CORSAIR (Calibration Observations of Radiance Spectra in the far Infrared) black body.

  5. An optoelectronic framework enabled by low-dimensional phase-change films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Peiman; Wright, C. David; Bhaskaran, Harish

    2014-07-01

    The development of materials whose refractive index can be optically transformed as desired, such as chalcogenide-based phase-change materials, has revolutionized the media and data storage industries by providing inexpensive, high-speed, portable and reliable platforms able to store vast quantities of data. Phase-change materials switch between two solid states--amorphous and crystalline--in response to a stimulus, such as heat, with an associated change in the physical properties of the material, including optical absorption, electrical conductance and Young's modulus. The initial applications of these materials (particularly the germanium antimony tellurium alloy Ge2Sb2Te5) exploited the reversible change in their optical properties in rewritable optical data storage technologies. More recently, the change in their electrical conductivity has also been extensively studied in the development of non-volatile phase-change memories. Here we show that by combining the optical and electronic property modulation of such materials, display and data visualization applications that go beyond data storage can be created. Using extremely thin phase-change materials and transparent conductors, we demonstrate electrically induced stable colour changes in both reflective and semi-transparent modes. Further, we show how a pixelated approach can be used in displays on both rigid and flexible films. This optoelectronic framework using low-dimensional phase-change materials has many likely applications, such as ultrafast, entirely solid-state displays with nanometre-scale pixels, semi-transparent `smart' glasses, `smart' contact lenses and artificial retina devices.

  6. DIS in AdS

    SciTech Connect

    Albacete, Javier L.; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Taliotis, Anastasios

    2009-03-23

    We calculate the total cross section for the scattering of a quark-anti-quark dipole on a large nucleus at high energy for a strongly coupled N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory using AdS/CFT correspondence. We model the nucleus by a metric of a shock wave in AdS{sub 5}. We then calculate the expectation value of the Wilson loop (the dipole) by finding the extrema of the Nambu-Goto action for an open string attached to the quark and antiquark lines of the loop in the background of an AdS{sub 5} shock wave. We find two physically meaningful extremal string configurations. For both solutions we obtain the forward scattering amplitude N for the quark dipole-nucleus scattering. We study the onset of unitarity with increasing center-of-mass energy and transverse size of the dipole: we observe that for both solutions the saturation scale Q{sub s} is independent of energy/Bjorken-x and depends on the atomic number of the nucleus as Q{sub s}{approx}A{sup 1/3}. Finally we observe that while one of the solutions we found corresponds to the pomeron intercept of {alpha}{sub P} = 2 found earlier in the literature, when extended to higher energy or larger dipole sizes it violates the black disk limit. The other solution we found respects the black disk limit and yields the pomeron intercept of {alpha}{sub P} = 1.5. We thus conjecture that the right pomeron intercept in gauge theories at strong coupling may be {alpha}{sub P} = 1.5.

  7. Chalcogenide phase-change thin films used as grayscale photolithography materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Wei, Jingsong; Fan, Yongtao

    2014-03-10

    Chalcogenide phase-change thin films are used in many fields, such as optical information storage and solid-state memory. In this work, we present another application of chalcogenide phase-change thin films, i.e., as grayscale photolithgraphy materials. The grayscale patterns can be directly inscribed on the chalcogenide phase-change thin films by a single process through direct laser writing method. In grayscale photolithography, the laser pulse can induce the formation of bump structure, and the bump height and size can be precisely controlled by changing laser energy. Bumps with different height and size present different optical reflection and transmission spectra, leading to the different gray levels. For example, the continuous-tone grayscale images of lifelike bird and cat are successfully inscribed onto Sb(2)Te(3) chalcogenide phase-change thin films using a home-built laser direct writer, where the expression and appearance of the lifelike bird and cat are fully presented. This work provides a way to fabricate complicated grayscale patterns using laser-induced bump structures onto chalcogenide phase-change thin films, different from current techniques such as photolithography, electron beam lithography, and focused ion beam lithography. The ability to form grayscale patterns of chalcogenide phase-change thin films reveals many potential applications in high-resolution optical images for micro/nano image storage, microartworks, and grayscale photomasks.

  8. Chalcogenide phase-change thin films used as grayscale photolithography materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Wei, Jingsong; Fan, Yongtao

    2014-03-10

    Chalcogenide phase-change thin films are used in many fields, such as optical information storage and solid-state memory. In this work, we present another application of chalcogenide phase-change thin films, i.e., as grayscale photolithgraphy materials. The grayscale patterns can be directly inscribed on the chalcogenide phase-change thin films by a single process through direct laser writing method. In grayscale photolithography, the laser pulse can induce the formation of bump structure, and the bump height and size can be precisely controlled by changing laser energy. Bumps with different height and size present different optical reflection and transmission spectra, leading to the different gray levels. For example, the continuous-tone grayscale images of lifelike bird and cat are successfully inscribed onto Sb(2)Te(3) chalcogenide phase-change thin films using a home-built laser direct writer, where the expression and appearance of the lifelike bird and cat are fully presented. This work provides a way to fabricate complicated grayscale patterns using laser-induced bump structures onto chalcogenide phase-change thin films, different from current techniques such as photolithography, electron beam lithography, and focused ion beam lithography. The ability to form grayscale patterns of chalcogenide phase-change thin films reveals many potential applications in high-resolution optical images for micro/nano image storage, microartworks, and grayscale photomasks. PMID:24663836

  9. Finite element developments for two dimensional multiple-interface phase change problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouyang, Tianhong; Tamma, Kumar K.

    1992-01-01

    Finite element developments for multiple phase change problems in two-dimensional models are presented for the first time. The enthalpy method is used to simulate latent heat release in conjunction with fixed grid techniques. An unconditionally stable implicit method is used for the time integration. The effects of boundary conditions and the different phase regions on the multiple phase front developments are examined for numerous examples. Discussions and conclusions are appropriately addressed.

  10. Ice core reconstruction of sea ice change in the Amundsen-Ross Seas since 1702 A.D.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Elizabeth R.; Abram, Nerilie J.

    2016-05-01

    Antarctic sea ice has been increasing in recent decades, but with strong regional differences in the expression of sea ice change. Declining sea ice in the Bellingshausen Sea since 1979 (the satellite era) has been linked to the observed warming on the Antarctic Peninsula, while the Ross Sea sector has seen a marked increase in sea ice during this period. Here we present a 308 year record of methansulphonic acid from coastal West Antarctica, representing sea ice conditions in the Amundsen-Ross Sea. We demonstrate that the recent increase in sea ice in this region is part of a longer trend, with an estimated ~1° northward expansion in winter sea ice extent (SIE) during the twentieth century and a total expansion of ~1.3° since 1702. The greatest reconstructed SIE occurred during the mid-1990s, with five of the past 30 years considered exceptional in the context of the past three centuries.

  11. Phase change nanocomposites with tunable melting temperature and thermal energy storage density.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minglu; Wang, Robert Y

    2013-08-21

    Size-dependent melting decouples melting temperature from chemical composition and provides a new design variable for phase change material applications. To demonstrate this potential, we create nanocomposites that exhibit stable and tunable melting temperatures through numerous melt-freeze cycles. These composites consist of a monodisperse ensemble of Bi nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a polyimide (PI) resin matrix. The Bi NPs operate as the phase change component whereas the PI resin matrix prevents nanoparticle coalescence during melt-freeze cycles. We tune melting temperature and enthalpy of fusion in these composites by varying the NP diameter. Adjusting the NP volume fraction also controls the composite's thermal energy storage density. Hence it is possible to leverage size effects to tune phase change temperature and energy density in phase change materials.

  12. Radiation Heat Transfer Modeling Improved for Phase-Change, Thermal Energy Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Jacqmin, David A.

    1998-01-01

    Spacecraft solar dynamic power systems typically use high-temperature phase-change materials to efficiently store thermal energy for heat engine operation in orbital eclipse periods. Lithium fluoride salts are particularly well suited for this application because of their high heat of fusion, long-term stability, and appropriate melting point. Considerable attention has been focused on the development of thermal energy storage (TES) canisters that employ either pure lithium fluoride (LiF), with a melting point of 1121 K, or eutectic composition lithium-fluoride/calcium-difluoride (LiF-20CaF2), with a 1040 K melting point, as the phase-change material. Primary goals of TES canister development include maximizing the phase-change material melt fraction, minimizing the canister mass per unit of energy storage, and maximizing the phase-change material thermal charge/discharge rates within the limits posed by the container structure.

  13. Preparation of CMC-modified melamine resin spherical nano-phase change energy storage materials.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaofeng; Huang, Zhanhua; Zhang, Yanhua

    2014-01-30

    A novel carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-modified melamine-formaldehyde (MF) phase change capsule with excellent encapsulation was prepared by in situ polymerization. Effects of CMC on the properties of the capsules were studied by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that the CMC-modified capsules had an average diameter of about 50nm and good uniformity. The phase change enthalpy of the capsules was increased and the cracking ratio decreased by incorporating a suitable amount of CMC. The optimum phase change enthalpy of the nanocapsules was 83.46J/g, and their paraffin content was 63.1%. The heat resistance of the capsule shells decreased after CMC modification. In addition, the nanocapsule cracking ratio of the nanocapsules was 11.0%, which is highly attractive for their application as nano phase change materials.

  14. Thermal modeling of phase change solidification in thermal control devices including natural convection effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukanwa, A. O.; Stermole, F. J.; Golden, J. O.

    1972-01-01

    Natural convection effects in phase change thermal control devices were studied. A mathematical model was developed to evaluate natural convection effects in a phase change test cell undergoing solidification. Although natural convection effects are minimized in flight spacecraft, all phase change devices are ground tested. The mathematical approach to the problem was to first develop a transient two-dimensional conduction heat transfer model for the solidification of a normal paraffin of finite geometry. Next, a transient two-dimensional model was developed for the solidification of the same paraffin by a combined conduction-natural-convection heat transfer model. Throughout the study, n-hexadecane (n-C16H34) was used as the phase-change material in both the theoretical and the experimental work. The models were based on the transient two-dimensional finite difference solutions of the energy, continuity, and momentum equations.

  15. Some aspects of the computer simulation of conduction heat transfer and phase change processes

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A. D.

    1982-04-01

    Various aspects of phase change processes in materials are discussd including computer modeling, validation of results and sensitivity. In addition, the possible incorporation of cognitive activities in computational heat transfer is examined.

  16. Preparation of CMC-modified melamine resin spherical nano-phase change energy storage materials.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaofeng; Huang, Zhanhua; Zhang, Yanhua

    2014-01-30

    A novel carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-modified melamine-formaldehyde (MF) phase change capsule with excellent encapsulation was prepared by in situ polymerization. Effects of CMC on the properties of the capsules were studied by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that the CMC-modified capsules had an average diameter of about 50nm and good uniformity. The phase change enthalpy of the capsules was increased and the cracking ratio decreased by incorporating a suitable amount of CMC. The optimum phase change enthalpy of the nanocapsules was 83.46J/g, and their paraffin content was 63.1%. The heat resistance of the capsule shells decreased after CMC modification. In addition, the nanocapsule cracking ratio of the nanocapsules was 11.0%, which is highly attractive for their application as nano phase change materials. PMID:24299752

  17. Aluminum-centered tetrahedron-octahedron transition in advancing Al-Sb-Te phase change properties.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mengjiao; Ding, Keyuan; Rao, Feng; Li, Xianbin; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang

    2015-02-24

    Group IIIA elements, Al, Ga, or In, etc., doped Sb-Te materials have proven good phase change properties, especially the superior data retention ability over popular Ge2Sb2Te5, while their phase transition mechanisms are rarely investigated. In this paper, aiming at the phase transition of Al-Sb-Te materials, we reveal a dominant rule of local structure changes around the Al atoms based on ab initio simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance evidences. By comparing the local chemical environments around Al atoms in respective amorphous and crystalline Al-Sb-Te phases, we believe that Al-centered motifs undergo reversible tetrahedron-octahedron reconfigurations in phase transition process. Such Al-centered local structure rearrangements significantly enhance thermal stability of amorphous phase compared to that of undoped Sb-Te materials, and facilitate a low-energy amorphization due to the weak links among Al-centered and Sb-centered octahedrons. Our studies may provide a useful reference to further understand the underlying physics and optimize performances of all IIIA metal doped Sb-Te phase change materials, prompting the development of NOR/NAND Flash-like phase change memory technology.

  18. Aluminum-Centered Tetrahedron-Octahedron Transition in Advancing Al-Sb-Te Phase Change Properties

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Mengjiao; Ding, Keyuan; Rao, Feng; Li, Xianbin; Wu, Liangcai; Song, Zhitang

    2015-01-01

    Group IIIA elements, Al, Ga, or In, etc., doped Sb-Te materials have proven good phase change properties, especially the superior data retention ability over popular Ge2Sb2Te5, while their phase transition mechanisms are rarely investigated. In this paper, aiming at the phase transition of Al-Sb-Te materials, we reveal a dominant rule of local structure changes around the Al atoms based on ab initio simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance evidences. By comparing the local chemical environments around Al atoms in respective amorphous and crystalline Al-Sb-Te phases, we believe that Al-centered motifs undergo reversible tetrahedron-octahedron reconfigurations in phase transition process. Such Al-centered local structure rearrangements significantly enhance thermal stability of amorphous phase compared to that of undoped Sb-Te materials, and facilitate a low-energy amorphization due to the weak links among Al-centered and Sb-centered octahedrons. Our studies may provide a useful reference to further understand the underlying physics and optimize performances of all IIIA metal doped Sb-Te phase change materials, prompting the development of NOR/NAND Flash-like phase change memory technology. PMID:25709082

  19. Simplified computer program for the analysis of phase change in liquid face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birchak, M.; Hughes, W. F.

    1977-01-01

    A simplified computer program is presented which allows for the prediction of boiling (phase change) in liquid face seals. The program determines if and when boiling occurs and then calculates the location of the boiling interface, pressure and temperature profiles, and load. The main assumption which allows for a simplified analysis is the assumption of an isothermal gas phase.

  20. Oral health changes during early phase of orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Sudarević, Karlo; Jurela, Antonija; Repić, Dario; Jokić, Dražen; Mikić, Ivana Medvedec; Pejda, Slavica

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the influence of fixed orthodontic appliance on Streptococcus (S.) mutans and S. sobrinus counts in orthodontic patients with regard to their previous caries experience (Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth (DMFT) index) during the first 12 weeks of orthodontic treatment. Twenty-two patients that satisfied inclusion criteria (healthy systemic and periodontal condition, avoidance of antibiotic therapy and antiseptic mouthwashes in the past three months) were included. All clinical measurements took place prior to and 12 weeks after fixed orthodontic appliance placement, in the following order: 1) stimulated saliva flow (SS); 2) Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S); and 3) DMFT. The method of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect the presence of S. mutans and S. sobrinus at T1 and T2. T-test showed significant increase in DMFT index and SS between T1 and T2. Results also indicated significant improvement in OHI-S index. By use of the PCR method, S. mutans was detected in two patients at T1. At T2, two more patients had S. mutans, but the increase was not statistically significant. Using the same method, S. sobrinus was detected only in two patients at T2. In conclusion, fixed orthodontic appliances did not induce statistically significant changes in caries microflora even in the presence of enhanced oral hygiene habits.

  1. Spectral changes induced by a phase modulator acting as a time lens

    SciTech Connect

    Plansinis, B. W.; Donaldson, W. R.; Agrawal, G. P.

    2015-07-06

    We show both numerically and experimentally that a phase modulator, acting as a time lens in the Fourier-lens configuration, can induce spectral broadening, narrowing, or shifts, depending on the phase of the modulator cycle. These spectral effects depend on the maximum phase shift that can be imposed by the modulator. In our numerical simulations, pulse spectrum could be compressed by a factor of 8 for a 30 rad phase shift. Experimentally, spectral shifts over a 1.35 nm range and spectral narrowing and broadening by a factor of 2 were demonstrated using a lithium niobate phase modulator with a maximum phase shift of 16 rad at a 10 GHz modulation frequency. All spectral changes were accomplished without employing optical nonlinear effects such as self- or cross-phase modulation.

  2. MRI phase changes in multiple sclerosis vs neuromyelitis optica lesions at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Sinnecker, Tim; Schumacher, Sophie; Mueller, Katharina; Pache, Florence; Dusek, Petr; Harms, Lutz; Ruprecht, Klemens; Nytrova, Petra; Chawla, Sanjeev; Niendorf, Thoralf; Kister, Ilya; Ge, Yulin; Wuerfel, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize paramagnetic MRI phase signal abnormalities in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) vs multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions in a cross-sectional study. Methods: Ten patients with NMOSD and 10 patients with relapsing-remitting MS underwent 7-tesla brain MRI including supratentorial T2*-weighted imaging and supratentorial susceptibility weighted imaging. Next, we analyzed intra- and perilesional paramagnetic phase changes on susceptibility weighted imaging filtered magnetic resonance phase images. Results: We frequently observed paramagnetic rim-like (75 of 232 lesions, 32%) or nodular (32 of 232 lesions, 14%) phase changes in MS lesions, but only rarely in NMOSD lesions (rim-like phase changes: 2 of 112 lesions, 2%, p < 0.001; nodular phase changes: 2 of 112 lesions, 2%, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Rim-like or nodular paramagnetic MRI phase changes are characteristic for MS lesions and not frequently detectable in NMOSD. Future prospective studies should ask whether these imaging findings can be used as a biomarker to distinguish between NMOSD- and MS-related brain lesions. PMID:27489865

  3. Phase change materials. (Latest citations from the US patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the use of phase change materials in thermal energy storage systems and energy utilization. Phase change compositions used in solar energy building heating and cooling systems are discussed, as well as methods used in the preparation of thermal storage materials. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  4. Phase change nanocomposites with tunable melting temperature and thermal energy storage density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minglu; Wang, Robert Y.

    2013-07-01

    Size-dependent melting decouples melting temperature from chemical composition and provides a new design variable for phase change material applications. To demonstrate this potential, we create nanocomposites that exhibit stable and tunable melting temperatures through numerous melt-freeze cycles. These composites consist of a monodisperse ensemble of Bi nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a polyimide (PI) resin matrix. The Bi NPs operate as the phase change component whereas the PI resin matrix prevents nanoparticle coalescence during melt-freeze cycles. We tune melting temperature and enthalpy of fusion in these composites by varying the NP diameter. Adjusting the NP volume fraction also controls the composite's thermal energy storage density. Hence it is possible to leverage size effects to tune phase change temperature and energy density in phase change materials.Size-dependent melting decouples melting temperature from chemical composition and provides a new design variable for phase change material applications. To demonstrate this potential, we create nanocomposites that exhibit stable and tunable melting temperatures through numerous melt-freeze cycles. These composites consist of a monodisperse ensemble of Bi nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in a polyimide (PI) resin matrix. The Bi NPs operate as the phase change component whereas the PI resin matrix prevents nanoparticle coalescence during melt-freeze cycles. We tune melting temperature and enthalpy of fusion in these composites by varying the NP diameter. Adjusting the NP volume fraction also controls the composite's thermal energy storage density. Hence it is possible to leverage size effects to tune phase change temperature and energy density in phase change materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and additional DSC data on nanocomposites and pure PI resin. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr02842a

  5. Quasi-stationary phase change heat transfer on a fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzechowski, Tadeusz; Stokowiec, Katarzyna

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents heat transfer research basing on a long fin with a circular cross-section. Its basis is welded to the pipe where the hot liquid paraffin, having a temperature of 70°C at the inflow, is pumped. The analyzed element is a recurrent part of a refrigeration's condenser, which is immersed in a paraffin. The temperature of the inflowing liquid is higher than the temperature of the melting process for paraffin, which allows the paraffin to liquify. The temperature at the basis of the rib changes and it is assumed that the heat transfer is quasi-stationary. On this basis the estimation of the mean value of heat transfer coefficient was conducted. The unsteady thermal field of the investigated system was registered with an infrared camera V50 produced by a Polish company Vigo System. This device is equipped with a microbolometric detector with 384 × 288 elements and the single pixel size 25 × 25 μm. Their thermal resolution is lower than 70 mK at a temperature of 30 °C. The camera operates at 7,5 ÷ 14 μm long-wave infrared radiation range. For a typical lens 35 mm the special resolution is 0.7 mrad. The result of the calculations is mean heat transfer coefficient for the considered time series. It is equal to 50 W m -2 K-1 and 47 W m -2 K-1 on the left and right side of the fin, respectively. The distance between the experimental data and the curve approximating the temperature distribution was assessed with the standard deviation, Sd = 0.04 K.

  6. Physico-chemical changes during storage and sensory acceptance of low sodium probiotic Minas cheese added with arginine.

    PubMed

    Felicio, T L; Esmerino, E A; Vidal, V A S; Cappato, L P; Garcia, R K A; Cavalcanti, R N; Freitas, M Q; Conte Junior, C A; Padilha, M C; Silva, M C; Raices, R S L; Arellano, D B; Bollini, H M A; Pollonio, M A R; Cruz, A G

    2016-04-01

    The partial substitution of sodium chloride by potassium chloride (0%, 25%, and 50%) and addition of arginine (1% w/w) in probiotic Minas cheese was investigated. Microbiological (Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus acidophilus counts, and functionality of the prebiotics L. acidophilus), physicochemical (pH, proteolysis, organic acids, fatty acids, and volatile profiles), rheological (uniaxial compression) and sensory (hedonic test with 100 consumers) characterizations were carried out. The sodium reduction and addition of arginine did not constitute a hurdle to lactic and probiotic bacteria survival, with presented values of about 9 log CFU/g, ranging from 7.11 to 9.21 log CFU/g, respectively. In addition, lower pH values, higher proteolysis, and a decrease in toughness, elasticity and firmness were observed, as well as an increase in lactic, citric, and acetic acid contents. In contrast, no change was observed in the fatty acid profile. With respect to the sensory acceptance, the probiotic low-sodium Minas cheese presented scores above 6.00 (liked slightly) for the attributes flavor and overall acceptance. The addition of arginine can be a potential alternative for the development of probiotic dairy products with reduced sodium content.

  7. Understanding rapid changes in phase partitioning between cloud liquid and ice in an Arctic stratiform mixed-phase cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalesse, Heike; de Boer, Gijs; Solomon, Amy; Oue, Mariko; Ahlgrimm, Maike; Zhang, Damao; Shupe, Matthew; Luke, Edward; Protat, Alain

    2016-04-01

    In the Arctic, a region particularly sensitive to climate change, mixed-phase clouds occur as persistent single or multiple stratiform layers. For many climate models, the correct partitioning of hydrometeor phase (liquid vs. ice) remains a challenge. However, this phase partitioning plays an important role for precipitation processes and the radiation budget. To better understand the partitioning of phase in Arctic clouds, observations using a combination of surface-based remote sensors are useful. In this study, the focus is on a persistent low-level single-layer stratiform Arctic mixed-phase cloud observed during March 11-12, 2013 at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) permanent site in Barrow, Alaska. This case is of particular interest due to two significant shifts in observed precipitation intensity over a 36 hour period. For the first 12 hours of this case, the observed liquid portion of the cloud cover featured a stable cloud top height with a gradually descending liquid cloud base and continuous ice precipitation. Then the ice precipitation intensity significantly decreased. A second decrease in ice precipitation intensity was observed a few hours later coinciding with the advection of a cirrus over the site. Through analysis of the data collected by extensive ground-based remote-sensing and in-situ observing systems as well as Nested Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) simulations and ECMWF radiation scheme simulations, we try to shed light on the processes responsible for these rapid changes in precipitation rates. A variety of parameters such as the evolution of the internal dynamics and microphysics of the low-level mixed-phase cloud and the influence of the cirrus cloud are evaluated.

  8. Behavioural change phases of different stakeholders involved in the implementation process of ergonomics measures in bricklaying.

    PubMed

    van der Molen, Henk F; Sluiter, Judith K; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this qualitative study was to assess whether a hypothesised sequential order of behavioural change phases would be fulfilled in different groups of stakeholders involved at the start of a process to implement ergonomic [corrected] measures in bricklaying teams. The measures include trestles, bricklaying scaffolds, mast climbing work platforms [corrected] and cranes. The behavioural change phases were: (1) being aware of measures, (2) understanding measures, (3) wanting measures, (4) intention to buy or hire measures, (5) ability to use measures, (6) using measures (experience), and (7) continuing to use measures. Structured interviews were conducted to examine the change phases in two groups of stakeholders (employers/work planners (n=11) [corrected] and foremen/bricklayers (n=9) [corrected] from nine companies) thought to be relevant in the decision to adopt and use the ergonomic [corrected] measures. The results show that the fulfilled behavioural change phases differ between individual stakeholders, groups of stakeholders, companies and also between ergonomic measures. The hypothesised order of fulfilled consecutive behavioural change phases for individual stakeholders has not been confirmed by this study. The relationship between [corrected] fulfilled and unfulfilled change phases by each stakeholder (group) and actual use of each ergonomic measure requires further study, so as to improve the selection of suitable implementation strategies [corrected

  9. Extended lattice Boltzmann method for numerical simulation of thermal phase change in two-phase fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Safari, Hesameddin; Rahimian, Mohammad Hassan; Krafczyk, Manfred

    2013-07-01

    In this article, a method based on the multiphase lattice Boltzmann framework is presented which is applicable to liquid-vapor phase-change phenomena. Both liquid and vapor phases are assumed to be incompressible. For phase changes occurring at the phase interface, the divergence-free condition of the velocity field is no longer satisfied due to the gas volume generated by vaporization or fluid volume generated by condensation. Thus, we extend a previous model by a suitable equation to account for the finite divergence of the velocity field within the interface region. Furthermore, the convective Cahn-Hilliard equation is extended to take into account vaporization effects. In a first step, a D1Q3 LB model is constructed and validated against the analytical solution of a one-dimensional Stefan problem for different density ratios. Finally the model is extended to two dimensions (D2Q9) to simulate droplet evaporation. We demonstrate that the results obtained by this approach are in good agreement with theory. PMID:23944580

  10. Extended lattice Boltzmann method for numerical simulation of thermal phase change in two-phase fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safari, Hesameddin; Rahimian, Mohammad Hassan; Krafczyk, Manfred

    2013-07-01

    In this article, a method based on the multiphase lattice Boltzmann framework is presented which is applicable to liquid-vapor phase-change phenomena. Both liquid and vapor phases are assumed to be incompressible. For phase changes occurring at the phase interface, the divergence-free condition of the velocity field is no longer satisfied due to the gas volume generated by vaporization or fluid volume generated by condensation. Thus, we extend a previous model by a suitable equation to account for the finite divergence of the velocity field within the interface region. Furthermore, the convective Cahn-Hilliard equation is extended to take into account vaporization effects. In a first step, a D1Q3 LB model is constructed and validated against the analytical solution of a one-dimensional Stefan problem for different density ratios. Finally the model is extended to two dimensions (D2Q9) to simulate droplet evaporation. We demonstrate that the results obtained by this approach are in good agreement with theory.

  11. Initial Atomic Motion Immediately Following Femtosecond-Laser Excitation in Phase-Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubara, E.; Okada, S.; Ichitsubo, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Hirata, A.; Guan, P. F.; Tokuda, K.; Tanimura, K.; Matsunaga, T.; Chen, M. W.; Yamada, N.

    2016-09-01

    Despite the fact that phase-change materials are widely used for data storage, no consensus exists on the unique mechanism of their ultrafast phase change and its accompanied large and rapid optical change. By using the pump-probe observation method combining a femtosecond optical laser and an x-ray free-electron laser, we substantiate experimentally that, in both GeTe and Ge2 Sb2 Te5 crystals, rattling motion of mainly Ge atoms takes place with keeping the off-center position just after femtosecond-optical-laser irradiation, which eventually leads to a higher symmetry or disordered state. This very initial rattling motion in the undistorted lattice can be related to instantaneous optical change due to the loss of resonant bonding that characterizes GeTe-based phase change materials. Based on the amorphous structure derived by first-principles molecular dynamics simulation, we infer a plausible ultrafast amorphization mechanism via nonmelting.

  12. Using Pre-Melted Phase Change Material to Keep Payloads in Space Warm for Hours without Power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Adding phase change material (PCM) to a mission payload can maintain its temperature above the cold survival limit, without power, for several hours in space. For the International Space Station, PCM is melted by heaters just prior to the payload translation to the worksite when power is available. When power is cut off during the six-hour translation, the PCM releases its latent heat to make up the heat loss from the radiator(s) to space. For the interplanetary Probe, PCM is melted by heaters just prior to separation from the orbiter when power is available from the orbiter power system. After the Probe separates from the orbiter, the PCM releases its latent heat to make up the heat loss from the Probe exterior to space. Paraffin wax is a good PCM candidate.

  13. Refraction-Assisted Solar Thermoelectric Generator based on Phase-Change Lens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung-Soo; Kim, Min-Ki; Jo, Sung-Eun; Joo, Chulmin; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs), which are used for various applications, (particularly small size electronic devices), have optical concentration systems for high energy conversion efficiency. In this study, a refraction-assisted STEG (R-STEG) is designed based on phase-change materials. As the phase-change material (PCM) changes phase from solid to liquid, its refractive index and transmittance also change, resulting in changes in the refraction of the sunlight transmitted through it, and concentration of solar energy in the phase-change lens. This innovative design facilitates double focusing the solar energy through the optical lens and a phase-change lens. This mechanism resulted in the peak energy conversion efficiencies of the R-STEG being 60% and 86% higher than those of the typical STEG at solar intensities of 1 kW m(-2) and 1.5 kW m(-2), respectively. In addition, the energy stored in PCM can help to generate steady electrical energy when the solar energy was removed. This work presents significant progress regarding the optical characteristic of PCM and optical concentration systems of STEGs. PMID:27283350

  14. Refraction-Assisted Solar Thermoelectric Generator based on Phase-Change Lens

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung-Soo; Kim, Min-Ki; Jo, Sung-Eun; Joo, Chulmin; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs), which are used for various applications, (particularly small size electronic devices), have optical concentration systems for high energy conversion efficiency. In this study, a refraction-assisted STEG (R-STEG) is designed based on phase-change materials. As the phase-change material (PCM) changes phase from solid to liquid, its refractive index and transmittance also change, resulting in changes in the refraction of the sunlight transmitted through it, and concentration of solar energy in the phase-change lens. This innovative design facilitates double focusing the solar energy through the optical lens and a phase-change lens. This mechanism resulted in the peak energy conversion efficiencies of the R-STEG being 60% and 86% higher than those of the typical STEG at solar intensities of 1 kW m−2 and 1.5 kW m−2, respectively. In addition, the energy stored in PCM can help to generate steady electrical energy when the solar energy was removed. This work presents significant progress regarding the optical characteristic of PCM and optical concentration systems of STEGs. PMID:27283350

  15. Refraction-Assisted Solar Thermoelectric Generator based on Phase-Change Lens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung-Soo; Kim, Min-Ki; Jo, Sung-Eun; Joo, Chulmin; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2016-06-10

    Solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs), which are used for various applications, (particularly small size electronic devices), have optical concentration systems for high energy conversion efficiency. In this study, a refraction-assisted STEG (R-STEG) is designed based on phase-change materials. As the phase-change material (PCM) changes phase from solid to liquid, its refractive index and transmittance also change, resulting in changes in the refraction of the sunlight transmitted through it, and concentration of solar energy in the phase-change lens. This innovative design facilitates double focusing the solar energy through the optical lens and a phase-change lens. This mechanism resulted in the peak energy conversion efficiencies of the R-STEG being 60% and 86% higher than those of the typical STEG at solar intensities of 1 kW m(-2) and 1.5 kW m(-2), respectively. In addition, the energy stored in PCM can help to generate steady electrical energy when the solar energy was removed. This work presents significant progress regarding the optical characteristic of PCM and optical concentration systems of STEGs.

  16. Refraction-Assisted Solar Thermoelectric Generator based on Phase-Change Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myoung-Soo; Kim, Min-Ki; Jo, Sung-Eun; Joo, Chulmin; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs), which are used for various applications, (particularly small size electronic devices), have optical concentration systems for high energy conversion efficiency. In this study, a refraction-assisted STEG (R-STEG) is designed based on phase-change materials. As the phase-change material (PCM) changes phase from solid to liquid, its refractive index and transmittance also change, resulting in changes in the refraction of the sunlight transmitted through it, and concentration of solar energy in the phase-change lens. This innovative design facilitates double focusing the solar energy through the optical lens and a phase-change lens. This mechanism resulted in the peak energy conversion efficiencies of the R-STEG being 60% and 86% higher than those of the typical STEG at solar intensities of 1 kW m‑2 and 1.5 kW m‑2, respectively. In addition, the energy stored in PCM can help to generate steady electrical energy when the solar energy was removed. This work presents significant progress regarding the optical characteristic of PCM and optical concentration systems of STEGs.

  17. An experimental and theoretical evaluation of increased thermal diffusivity phase change devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. P.; Golden, J. O.; Stermole, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    This study was to experimentally evaluate and mathematically model the performance of phase change thermal control devices containing high thermal conductivity metal matrices. Three aluminum honeycomb filters were evaluated at five different heat flux levels using n-oct-adecane as the test material. The system was mathematically modeled by approximating the partial differential equations with a three-dimensional implicit alternating direction technique. The mathematical model predicts the system quite well. All of the phase change times are predicted. The heating of solid phase is predicted exactly while there is some variation between theoretical and experimental results in the liquid phase. This variation in the liquid phase could be accounted for by the fact that there are some heat losses in the cell and there could be some convection in the experimental system.

  18. Nucleation of a new phase on a surface that is changing irreversibly with time.

    PubMed

    Sear, Richard P

    2014-02-01

    Nucleation of a new phase almost always starts at a surface. This surface is almost always assumed not to change with time. However, surfaces can roughen, partially dissolve, and change chemically with time. Each of these irreversible changes will change the nucleation rate at the surface, resulting in a time-dependent nucleation rate. Here we use a simple model to show that partial surface dissolution can qualitatively change the nucleation process in a way that is testable in experiment. The changing surface means that the nucleation rate is increasing with time. There is an initial period during which no nucleation occurs, followed by relatively rapid nucleation. PMID:25353480

  19. Phase Change Nanodots Patterning using a Self-Assembled Polymer Lithography and Crystallization Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Raoux, S; Krebs, D; Krupp, L; Topuria, T; Caldwell, M; Milliron, D; Kellock, A; Rice, P; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    Crystallization behavior of scalable phase change materials can be studied on nanoscale structures. In this paper, high density ordered phase change nanodot arrays were fabricated using the lift-off technique on a self-assembled diblock copolymer template, polystyrene-poly(methyl-methacrylate). The size of the nanodots was less than 15 nm in diameter with 40 nm spacing. This method is quite flexible regarding the patterned materials and can be used on different substrates. The crystallization behavior of small scale phase change nanodot arrays was studied using time-resolved x-ray diffraction, which showed the phase transition for different materials such as Ge15Sb85, Ge2Sb2Te5, and Ag and In doped Sb2Te. The transition temperatures of these nanodot samples were also compared with their corresponding blanket thin films, and it was found that the nanodots had higher crystallization temperatures and crystallized over a broader temperature range.

  20. Materials research for passive solar systems: solid-state phase-change materials

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.K.; Webb, J.D.; Burrows, R.W.; McFadden, J.D.O.; Christensen, C.

    1985-03-01

    A set of solid-state phase-change materials is being evaluated for possible use in passive solar thermal energy storage systems. The most promising materials are organic solid solutions of pentaerythritol (C/sub 5/H/sub 12/O/sub 4/), pentaglycerinve (C/sub 5/H/sub 12/O/sub 3/), and neopentyl glycol (C/sub 5/H/sub 12/O/sub 2/). Solid solution mixtures of these compounds can be tailored so that they exhibit solid-to-solid phase transformations at any desired temperature betweeen 25/sup 0/C and 188/sup 0/C, and have latent heats of transformation between 20 and 70 cal/g. Transformation temperatures, specific heats, and latent heats of transformation have been measured for a number of these materials. Limited cyclic experiments suggest that the solid solutions are stable. These phase-change materials exhibit large amounts of undercooling; however, the addition of certain nucleating agents as particulate dispersions in the solid phase-change material greatly reduces this effect. Computer simulations suggest that the use of an optimized solid-state phase-change material in a Trombe wall could provide better performance than a concrete Trombe wall four times thicker and nine times heavier. Nevertheless, a higher cost of the phase-change materials (approx. =$0.70 per pound) is likely to limit their applicability in passive solar systems unless their performance can be significantly improved through further research.

  1. Adélie penguins coping with environmental change: Results from a natural experiment at the edge of their breeding range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dugger, Catherine; Ballard, Grant; Ainley, David G.; Lyber, Phil O'B.; Schine, Casey

    2014-01-01

    We investigated life history responses to extreme variation in physical environmental conditions during a long-term demographic study of Adélie penguins at 3 colonies representing 9% of the world population and the full range of breeding colony sizes. Five years into the 14-year study (1997–2010) two very large icebergs (spanning 1.5 latitude degrees in length) grounded in waters adjacent to breeding colonies, dramatically altering environmental conditions during 2001–2005. This natural experiment allowed us to evaluate the relative impacts of expected long-term, but also extreme, short-term climate perturbations on important natural history parameters that can regulate populations. The icebergs presented physical barriers, not just to the penguins but to polynya formation, which profoundly increased foraging effort and movement rates, while reducing breeding propensity and productivity, especially at the smallest colony. We evaluated the effect of a variety of environmental parameters during breeding, molt, migration and wintering periods during years with and without icebergs on penguin breeding productivity, chick mass, and nesting chronology. The icebergs had far more influence on the natural history parameters of penguins than any of the other environmental variables measured, resulting in population level changes to metrics of reproductive performance, including delays in nesting chronology, depressed breeding productivity, and lower chick mass. These effects were strongest at the smallest, southern-most colony, which was most affected by alteration of the Ross Sea Polynya during years the iceberg was present. Additionally, chick mass was negatively correlated with colony size, supporting previous findings indicating density-dependent energetic constraints at the largest colony. Understanding the negative effects of the icebergs on the short-term natural history of Adélie penguins, as well as their response to long-term environmental variation, are

  2. An Automatic Phase-Change Detection Technique for Colloidal Hard Sphere Suspensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark; Gray, Elizabeth; Rogers, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions of monodisperse spheres are used as physical models of thermodynamic phase transitions and as precursors to photonic band gap materials. However, current image analysis techniques are not able to distinguish between densely packed phases within conventional microscope images, which are mainly characterized by degrees of randomness or order with similar grayscale value properties. Current techniques for identifying the phase boundaries involve manually identifying the phase transitions, which is very tedious and time consuming. We have developed an intelligent machine vision technique that automatically identifies colloidal phase boundaries. The algorithm utilizes intelligent image processing techniques that accurately identify and track phase changes vertically or horizontally for a sequence of colloidal hard sphere suspension images. This technique is readily adaptable to any imaging application where regions of interest are distinguished from the background by differing patterns of motion over time.

  3. Homologous Boosting with Adenoviral Serotype 5 HIV Vaccine (rAd5) Vector Can Boost Antibody Responses despite Preexisting Vector-Specific Immunity in a Randomized Phase I Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Uzma N.; Novik, Laura; Enama, Mary E.; Plummer, Sarah A.; Koup, Richard A.; Nason, Martha C.; Bailer, Robert T.; McDermott, Adrian B.; Roederer, Mario; Mascola, John R.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Graham, Barney S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Needle-free delivery improves the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines but is also associated with more local reactogenicity. Here we report the first comparison of Biojector and needle administration of a candidate rAd5 HIV vaccine. Methods Thirty-one adults, 18–55 years, 20 naive and 11 prior rAd5 vaccine recipients were randomized to receive single rAd5 vaccine via needle or Biojector IM injection at 1010 PU in a Phase I open label clinical trial. Solicited reactogenicity was collected for 5 days; clinical safety and immunogenicity follow-up was continued for 24 weeks. Results Overall, injections by either method were well tolerated. There were no serious adverse events. Frequency of any local reactogenicity was 16/16 (100%) for Biojector compared to 11/15 (73%) for needle injections. There was no difference in HIV Env-specific antibody response between Biojector and needle delivery. Env-specific antibody responses were more than 10-fold higher in subjects receiving a booster dose of rAd5 vaccine than after a single dose delivered by either method regardless of interval between prime and boost. Conclusions Biojector delivery did not improve antibody responses to the rAd5 vaccine compared to needle administration. Homologous boosting with rAd5 gene-based vectors can boost insert-specific antibody responses despite pre-existing vector-specific immunity. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00709605 NCT00709605 PMID:25264782

  4. Experimental investigation of thermal characteristics of lithium ion battery using phase change materials combined with metallic foams and fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Y. C.; Zhang, H. Y.; Xia, X.

    2016-08-01

    Phase change materials are of great interest in energy storage and energy management applications due to their high latent heat and excellent cycling stability. In this paper, the thermal characteristics of phase change materials (PCM) for thermal management of cylindrical 18650 lithium-ion battery (LIB) were experimentally investigated. A commercial paraffin wax with a melting temperaturerange between 47 - 53.8oC was used in this study. A metal cylinder with a heater was used to emulate the heat generation from a battery, which was surrounded with the paraffin PCM and containted in a metal housing. The experiment was conducted in an environmental test chamber with controlled ambient temperatures and power inputs. Both the battery temperature and the housing wall temperature were measured during steady-state heating and cyclic heating conditions. Since PCM has low thermal conductivity, thermal enhancement techniques were investigated by adding metal foams (MFs) or combining metallic foam and fins into the PCM to enhance the thermal conductivity. The battery temperatures were measured for all the cases and the results were analyzed and discussed.

  5. Modeling of a Two-Phase Jet Pump with Phase Change, Shocks and Temperature-Dependent Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherif, S. A.

    1998-01-01

    One of the primary motivations behind this work is the attempt to understand the physics of a two-phase jet pump which constitutes part of a flow boiling test facility at NASA-Marshall. The flow boiling apparatus is intended to provide data necessary to design highly efficient two-phase thermal control systems for aerospace applications. The facility will also be capable of testing alternative refrigerants and evaluate their performance using various heat exchangers with enhanced surfaces. The test facility is also intended for use in evaluating single-phase performance of systems currently using CFC refrigerants. Literature dealing with jet pumps is abundant and covers a very wide array of application areas. Example application areas include vacuum pumps which are used in the food industry, power station work, and the chemical industry; ejector systems which have applications in the aircraft industry as cabin ventilators and for purposes of jet thrust augmentation; jet pumps which are used in the oil industry for oil well pumping; and steam-jet ejector refrigeration, to just name a few. Examples of work relevant to this investigation includes those of Fairuzov and Bredikhin (1995). While past researchers have been able to model the two-phase flow jet pump using the one-dimensional assumption with no shock waves and no phase change, there is no research known to the author apart from that of Anand (1992) who was able to account for condensation shocks. Thus, one of the objectives of this work is to model the dynamics of fluid interaction between a two-phase primary fluid and a subcooled liquid secondary fluid which is being injected employing atomizing spray injectors. The model developed accounts for phase transformations due to expansion, compression, and mixing. It also accounts for shock waves developing in the different parts of the jet pump as well as temperature and pressure dependencies of the fluid properties for both the primary two-phase mixture and the

  6. Adversary phase change detection using S.O.M. and text data.

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, Ann Elizabeth; Doser, Adele Beatrice; Warrender, Christina E.

    2010-09-01

    In this work, we developed a self-organizing map (SOM) technique for using web-based text analysis to forecast when a group is undergoing a phase change. By 'phase change', we mean that an organization has fundamentally shifted attitudes or behaviors. For instance, when ice melts into water, the characteristics of the substance change. A formerly peaceful group may suddenly adopt violence, or a violent organization may unexpectedly agree to a ceasefire. SOM techniques were used to analyze text obtained from organization postings on the world-wide web. Results suggest it may be possible to forecast phase changes, and determine if an example of writing can be attributed to a group of interest.

  7. Presence of acute phase changes in zinc, iron, and copper metabolism in turkey embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Klasing, K.C.; Richards, M.P.; Darcey, S.E.; Laurin, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Acute phase changes in trace mineral metabolism were examined in turkey embryos. An endotoxin injection resulted in increased concentrations of serum copper and liver zinc and decreased concentrations of serum zinc in embryos incubated either in ovo or ex ovo. Changes in zinc and copper metabolism occurred when endotoxin either was injected intramuscularly, into the amnionic fluid, or administered onto the chorioallantoic membrane. Unlike poults, embryos did not respond to an inflammatory challenge with decreased serum iron concentrations. Acute phase changes in embryo serum zinc and copper as well as liver zinc concentrations were similar to those in poults. Increased liver zinc concentrations were associated with increased zinc in metallothionein (MT). An injection of a crude interleukin 1 preparation into embryos resulted in similar increases in hepatic zinc and MT concentrations as an endotoxin injection, suggesting a role for this cytokine in mediating the acute phase changes in embryonic zinc metabolism.

  8. Adversary phase change detection using S.O.M. and text data.

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, Ann Elizabeth; Doser, Adele Beatrice; Warrender, Christina E.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we developed a self-organizing map (SOM) technique for using web-based text analysis to forecast when a group is undergoing a phase change. By 'phase change', we mean that an organization has fundamentally shifted attitudes or behaviors. For instance, when ice melts into water, the characteristics of the substance change. A formerly peaceful group may suddenly adopt violence, or a violent organization may unexpectedly agree to a ceasefire. SOM techniques were used to analyze text obtained from organization postings on the world-wide web. Results suggest it may be possible to forecast phase changes, and determine if an example of writing can be attributed to a group of interest.

  9. Panigarh cave stalagmite evidence of climate change in the Indian Central Himalaya since AD 1256: Monsoon breaks and winter southern jet depressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Fuyuan; Brook, George A.; Kotlia, Bahadur S.; Railsback, L. Bruce; Hardt, Benjamin; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence; Kandasamy, Selvaraj

    2015-09-01

    Variations in petrography, stable isotopes, reflectance, and luminescence along the central growth axis of a 14.5 cm stalagmite from Panigarh cave indicate cooler and slightly wetter conditions in the Himalayan foothills of northern India during the Little Ice Age (LIA), which lasted from ˜AD 1489-1889 based on deposition of calcite, and AD 1450-1820 based on rapid changes in δ18O values. Conditions were warmer and drier during the preceding Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and also in the post-LIA periods, as evidenced by deposition of aragonite. A review of currently existing stalagmite and other proxy data from south and east Asia reveals a broad spatial pattern in precipitation over south and east Asia during the LIA, with northern areas showing generally increased precipitation and southern areas reduced precipitation. During the MCA and after the LIA, the records suggest this pattern was reversed. Weaker ISM during the LIA brought drought conditions to the core ISM area but triggered more monsoon 'breaks' that brought higher precipitation to the Himalayas. At the same time, the weaker ISM may also have pushed more depressions along the path of the southern winter jet which brought more winter precipitation to the Himalayas and therefore a LIA wetter in our study area.

  10. Holography and AdS4 self-gravitating dyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo, A. R.; Moreno, E. F.; Schaposnik, F. A.

    2010-11-01

    We present a self-gravitating dyon solution of the Einstein-Yang-Mills-Higgs equations of motion in asymptotically AdS space. The back reaction of gauge and Higgs fields on the space-time geometry leads to the metric of an asymptotically AdS black hole. Using the gauge/gravity correspondence we analyze relevant properties of the finite temperature quantum field theory defined on the boundary. In particular we identify an order operator, characterize a phase transition of the dual theory on the border and also compute the expectation value of the finite temperature Wilson loop.

  11. Competing covalent and ionic bonding in Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials

    DOE PAGES

    Subedi, Alaska; Siegrist, Theo; Singh, David J.; Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Sun, Jifeng

    2016-05-19

    Ge2Sb2Te5 and related phase change materials are highly unusual in that they can be readily transformed between amorphous and crystalline states using very fast melt, quench, anneal cycles, although the resulting states are extremely long lived at ambient temperature. These states have remarkably different physical properties including very different optical constants in the visible in strong contrast to common glass formers such as silicates or phosphates. This behavior has been described in terms of resonant bonding, but puzzles remain, particularly regarding different physical properties of crystalline and amorphous phases. Here we show that there is a strong competition between ionicmore » and covalent bonding in cubic phase providing a link between the chemical basis of phase change memory property and origins of giant responses of piezoelectric materials (PbTiO3, BiFeO3). This has important consequences for dynamical behavior in particular leading to a simultaneous hardening of acoustic modes and softening of high frequency optic modes in crystalline phase relative to amorphous. As a result, this different bonding in amorphous and crystalline phases provides a direct explanation for different physical properties and understanding of the combination of long time stability and rapid switching and may be useful in finding new phase change compositions with superior properties.« less

  12. Competing covalent and ionic bonding in Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Sun, Jifeng; Subedi, Alaska; Siegrist, Theo; Singh, David J.

    2016-05-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 and related phase change materials are highly unusual in that they can be readily transformed between amorphous and crystalline states using very fast melt, quench, anneal cycles, although the resulting states are extremely long lived at ambient temperature. These states have remarkably different physical properties including very different optical constants in the visible in strong contrast to common glass formers such as silicates or phosphates. This behavior has been described in terms of resonant bonding, but puzzles remain, particularly regarding different physical properties of crystalline and amorphous phases. Here we show that there is a strong competition between ionic and covalent bonding in cubic phase providing a link between the chemical basis of phase change memory property and origins of giant responses of piezoelectric materials (PbTiO3, BiFeO3). This has important consequences for dynamical behavior in particular leading to a simultaneous hardening of acoustic modes and softening of high frequency optic modes in crystalline phase relative to amorphous. This different bonding in amorphous and crystalline phases provides a direct explanation for different physical properties and understanding of the combination of long time stability and rapid switching and may be useful in finding new phase change compositions with superior properties.

  13. Competing covalent and ionic bonding in Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Sun, Jifeng; Subedi, Alaska; Siegrist, Theo; Singh, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 and related phase change materials are highly unusual in that they can be readily transformed between amorphous and crystalline states using very fast melt, quench, anneal cycles, although the resulting states are extremely long lived at ambient temperature. These states have remarkably different physical properties including very different optical constants in the visible in strong contrast to common glass formers such as silicates or phosphates. This behavior has been described in terms of resonant bonding, but puzzles remain, particularly regarding different physical properties of crystalline and amorphous phases. Here we show that there is a strong competition between ionic and covalent bonding in cubic phase providing a link between the chemical basis of phase change memory property and origins of giant responses of piezoelectric materials (PbTiO3, BiFeO3). This has important consequences for dynamical behavior in particular leading to a simultaneous hardening of acoustic modes and softening of high frequency optic modes in crystalline phase relative to amorphous. This different bonding in amorphous and crystalline phases provides a direct explanation for different physical properties and understanding of the combination of long time stability and rapid switching and may be useful in finding new phase change compositions with superior properties. PMID:27193531

  14. Competing covalent and ionic bonding in Ge-Sb-Te phase change materials.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Sun, Jifeng; Subedi, Alaska; Siegrist, Theo; Singh, David J

    2016-01-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 and related phase change materials are highly unusual in that they can be readily transformed between amorphous and crystalline states using very fast melt, quench, anneal cycles, although the resulting states are extremely long lived at ambient temperature. These states have remarkably different physical properties including very different optical constants in the visible in strong contrast to common glass formers such as silicates or phosphates. This behavior has been described in terms of resonant bonding, but puzzles remain, particularly regarding different physical properties of crystalline and amorphous phases. Here we show that there is a strong competition between ionic and covalent bonding in cubic phase providing a link between the chemical basis of phase change memory property and origins of giant responses of piezoelectric materials (PbTiO3, BiFeO3). This has important consequences for dynamical behavior in particular leading to a simultaneous hardening of acoustic modes and softening of high frequency optic modes in crystalline phase relative to amorphous. This different bonding in amorphous and crystalline phases provides a direct explanation for different physical properties and understanding of the combination of long time stability and rapid switching and may be useful in finding new phase change compositions with superior properties. PMID:27193531

  15. Visualising phase change in a brushite-based calcium phosphate ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Bannerman, A.; Williams, R. L.; Cox, S. C.; Grover, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    The resorption of brushite-based bone cements has been shown to be highly unpredictable, with strong dependence on a number of conditions. One of the major factors is phase transformation, with change to more stable phases such as hydroxyapatite affecting the rate of resorption. Despite its importance, the analysis of phase transformation has been largely undertaken using methods that only detect crystalline composition and give no information on the spatial distribution of the phases. In this study confocal Raman microscopy was used to map cross-sections of brushite cylinders aged in Phosphate Buffered Saline, Foetal Bovine Serum, Dulbecco’s – Minimum Essential Medium (with and without serum). Image maps showed the importance of ageing medium on the phase composition throughout the ceramic structure. When aged without serum, there was dissolution of the brushite phase concomitant to the deposition of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) around the periphery of the sample. The deposition of OCP was detectable within five days and reduced the rate of brushite dissolution from the material. The use of serum, even at a concentration of 10vol% prevented phase transformation. This paper demonstrates the value of confocal Raman microscopy in monitoring phase change in biocements; it also demonstrates the problems with assessing material degradation in non-serum containing media. PMID:27604149

  16. Visualising phase change in a brushite-based calcium phosphate ceramic.

    PubMed

    Bannerman, A; Williams, R L; Cox, S C; Grover, L M

    2016-01-01

    The resorption of brushite-based bone cements has been shown to be highly unpredictable, with strong dependence on a number of conditions. One of the major factors is phase transformation, with change to more stable phases such as hydroxyapatite affecting the rate of resorption. Despite its importance, the analysis of phase transformation has been largely undertaken using methods that only detect crystalline composition and give no information on the spatial distribution of the phases. In this study confocal Raman microscopy was used to map cross-sections of brushite cylinders aged in Phosphate Buffered Saline, Foetal Bovine Serum, Dulbecco's - Minimum Essential Medium (with and without serum). Image maps showed the importance of ageing medium on the phase composition throughout the ceramic structure. When aged without serum, there was dissolution of the brushite phase concomitant to the deposition of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) around the periphery of the sample. The deposition of OCP was detectable within five days and reduced the rate of brushite dissolution from the material. The use of serum, even at a concentration of 10vol% prevented phase transformation. This paper demonstrates the value of confocal Raman microscopy in monitoring phase change in biocements; it also demonstrates the problems with assessing material degradation in non-serum containing media. PMID:27604149

  17. Visualising phase change in a brushite-based calcium phosphate ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannerman, A.; Williams, R. L.; Cox, S. C.; Grover, L. M.

    2016-09-01

    The resorption of brushite-based bone cements has been shown to be highly unpredictable, with strong dependence on a number of conditions. One of the major factors is phase transformation, with change to more stable phases such as hydroxyapatite affecting the rate of resorption. Despite its importance, the analysis of phase transformation has been largely undertaken using methods that only detect crystalline composition and give no information on the spatial distribution of the phases. In this study confocal Raman microscopy was used to map cross-sections of brushite cylinders aged in Phosphate Buffered Saline, Foetal Bovine Serum, Dulbecco’s – Minimum Essential Medium (with and without serum). Image maps showed the importance of ageing medium on the phase composition throughout the ceramic structure. When aged without serum, there was dissolution of the brushite phase concomitant to the deposition of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) around the periphery of the sample. The deposition of OCP was detectable within five days and reduced the rate of brushite dissolution from the material. The use of serum, even at a concentration of 10vol% prevented phase transformation. This paper demonstrates the value of confocal Raman microscopy in monitoring phase change in biocements; it also demonstrates the problems with assessing material degradation in non-serum containing media.

  18. Effect of water-ice phase change on thermal performance of building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kočí, Václav; Černý, Robert

    2016-07-01

    The effect of water ice-phase change on thermal performance of integrated building material is investigated in this paper. As a characteristic construction, simple external wall made of aerated autoclaved concrete was assumed which was exposed to dynamic climatic condition of Šerák, Czech Republic. The computational modelling of hygrothermal performance was carried out using computer codes HEMOT and SIFEL that work on the basis of finite element method. The effect of phase change was taken into account by fixed-domain method, when experimentally determined effective specific heat capacity was used as a material parameter. It comprises also the effect of heat consumption and heat release that accompany the water-ice phase change. Comparing to the results with specific heat capacity, the effect of phase change on thermal performance could be quantified. The results showed that temperature fields can differ more than 6 °C. Additionally, the amount energy transported through the wall may be higher up to 4 %. This confirmed, that the effect water-ice phase change should be included in all the relevant energy calculations.

  19. Electro- and photodriven phase change composites based on wax-infiltrated carbon nanotube sponges.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liangjie; Zou, Ruqiang; Xia, Wei; Liu, Zhenpu; Shang, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Yingxia; Lin, Jianhua; Xia, Dingguo; Cao, Anyuan

    2012-12-21

    Organic phase change materials are usually insulating in nature, and they are unlikely to directly trigger latent heat storage through an electrical way. Here we report a multifunctional phase change composite in which the energy storage can be driven by small voltages (e.g., 1.5 V) or light illumination with high electro-to-heat or photo-to-thermal storage efficiencies (40% to 60%). The composite is composed of paraffin wax infiltrated into a porous, deformable carbon nanotube sponge; the latter not only acts as a flexible encapsulation scaffold for wax but also maintains a highly conductive network during the phase change process (for both solid and liquid states). Uniform interpenetration between the nanotube network and paraffin wax with high affinity results in enhanced phase change enthalpy and thermal conductivity compared to pure paraffin wax. Our phase change composite can store energy in practical ways such as by sunlight absorption or under voltages applied by conventional lithium-ion batteries.

  20. Is the use of ergonomic measures associated with behavioural change phases?

    PubMed

    van der Molen, Henk F; Sluiter, Judith K; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2006-01-15

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the absolute number of completed behavioural change phases (ABP) and the sequentially ordered number of completed behavioural change phases (SBP) are positively associated with the use of ergonomic measures by two groups of stakeholders in bricklaying companies (employers/planners, foremen/bricklayers). The measures, consisting of trestles, bricklaying scaffolds, mast-climbing work platforms and cranes, reduce the physical work demands made upon bricklayers and bricklayers' assistants. Structured interviews were conducted with stakeholders of 27 companies. Ordinal regression of behavioural change phases on the use of ergonomic measures showed a significant increase in both ABP and SBP in relation to increased use of three of the four ergonomic measures (i.e. trestles, bricklaying scaffolds, mast-climbing work platforms) by employers/planners and increased use of one ergonomic measure (i.e. trestles) by foremen/bricklayers. In conclusion, the positive and significant associations between the completed behavioural change phases (ABP and SBP) and use of ergonomic measures differ for the stakeholder groups and between the ergonomic measures. The data suggest that there is a higher chance of increasing the use of ergonomic measures by means of a higher ABP than a higher SBP. It is recommended for activities to be carried out-primarily by employers/planners-to facilitate as many behavioural change phases as possible in order to stimulate actual use of ergonomic measures at worksites.

  1. A tree-ring perspective on temporal changes in the frequency and intensity of hydroclimatic extremes in the territory of the Czech Republic since 761 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolný, P.; Rybníček, M.; Kolář, T.; Brázdil, R.; Trnka, M.; Büntgen, U.

    2015-07-01

    It is generally accepted that anthropogenic-induced climate change may affect the frequency and intensity of hydrological extremes, together with a variety of subsequent impacts on ecosystems and human society. Proxy records that are absolutely dated and annually resolved are indispensable to a better understanding of temporal changes in the occurrence of floods and droughts. This contribution presents a new dataset of 3194 oak (Quercus spp.) ring width samples from living trees and historical timbers, collected across the Czech Republic. A composite tree-ring width (TRW) chronology is developed that best captures the high-frequency extremes over the past 1250 years. The temporal distribution of negative and positive extremes is regular with no indication of clustering. The highest number of negative extremes was found in the 19th century, while positive extremes were most frequent in the 12th century. The lowest number of negative and positive extremes occurred in the 18th and 13th centuries respectively. Negative and positive TRW extremes were compared with the instrumental measurements back to 1805 AD, with documentary-based temperature and precipitation reconstructions from 1804 to 1500, and with documentary evidence before 1500 AD. Negative TRW extremes coincided with above-average March-May and June-August temperature means and below-average precipitation totals. Positive extremes coincided with higher summer precipitation, while temperatures were mostly normal. Mean sea level pressure (SLP) over the European/North Atlantic sector suggested drought for the negative oak TRW extremes, whereas the positive extremes corresponded to wetter conditions overall. More consistent patterns of synoptic SLP were found for negative rather than for positive extremes. Reasons for the possible offset between the oak-based hydroclimatic extremes and their counterparts from meteorological observations and documentary evidence may be manifold and emphasize the need for multi

  2. A tree-ring perspective on temporal changes in the frequency and intensity of hydroclimatic extremes in the territory of the Czech Republic since 761 AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrovolný, P.; Rybníček, M.; Kolář, T.; Brázdil, R.; Trnka, M.; Büntgen, U.

    2015-10-01

    It is generally accepted that anthropogenic-induced climate change may affect the frequency and intensity of hydrological extremes, together with a variety of subsequent impacts on ecosystems and human society. Proxy records that are absolutely dated and annually resolved are indispensable to a better understanding of temporal changes in the occurrence of floods and droughts. This contribution presents a new data set of 3194 oak (Quercus spp.) ring width samples from living trees and historical timbers, collected across the Czech Republic. A composite tree-ring width (TRW) chronology is developed that best captures the high-frequency extremes over the past 1250 years. The temporal distribution of negative and positive extremes is regular with no indication of clustering. The highest number of negative extremes was found in the 19th century, while positive extremes were most frequent in the 12th century. The lowest number of negative and positive extremes occurred in the 18th and 13th centuries respectively. Negative and positive TRW extremes were compared with the instrumental measurements back to 1805 AD, with documentary-based temperature and precipitation reconstructions from 1804 to 1500, and with documentary evidence before 1500 AD. Negative TRW extremes coincided with above-average March-May and June-August temperature means and below-average precipitation totals. Positive extremes coincided with higher summer precipitation, while temperatures were mostly normal. Mean sea level pressure (SLP) over the European/North Atlantic sector suggested drought for the negative oak TRW extremes, whereas the positive extremes corresponded to wetter conditions overall. More consistent patterns of synoptic SLP were found for negative rather than for positive extremes. Reasons for the possible offset between the oak-based hydroclimatic extremes and their counterparts from meteorological observations and documentary evidence may be manifold and emphasize the need for multi

  3. Ultrafast Ge-Te bond dynamics in a phase-change superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvestuto, Marco; Caretta, Antonio; Casarin, Barbara; Cilento, Federico; Dell'Angela, Martina; Fausti, Daniele; Calarco, Raffaella; Kooi, Bart J.; Varesi, Enrico; Robertson, John; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2016-09-01

    A long-standing question for avant-garde data storage technology concerns the nature of the ultrafast photoinduced phase transformations in the wide class of chalcogenide phase-change materials (PCMs). Overall, a comprehensive understanding of the microstructural evolution and the relevant kinetics mechanisms accompanying the out-of-equilibrium phases is still missing. Here, after overheating a phase-change chalcogenide superlattice by an ultrafast laser pulse, we indirectly track the lattice relaxation by time resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy (tr-XAS) with a sub-ns time resolution. The approach to the tr-XAS experimental results reported in this work provides an atomistic insight of the mechanism that takes place during the cooling process; meanwhile a first-principles model mimicking the microscopic distortions accounts for a straightforward representation of the observed dynamics. Finally, we envisage that our approach can be applied in future studies addressing the role of dynamical structural strain in PCMs.

  4. Lipid Liquid-Crystal Phase Change Induced through near-Infrared Irradiation of Entrained Graphene Particles.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Matthew D J; Du, Joanne; Boyd, Ben J; Hawley, Adrian; Notley, Shannon M

    2015-06-23

    Lipid packing is intimately related to the geometry of the lipids and the forces that drive self-assembly. Here, the photothermal response of a cubic liquid-crystalline phase formed using phytantriol in the presence of low concentrations of pristine graphene was evaluated. Small-angle X-ray scattering showed the reversible phase changes from cubic to hexagonal to micellar due to localized heating through irradiation with near-infrared (NIR) light and back to cubic after cooling.

  5. Study on Solidification of Phase Change Material in Fractal Porous Metal Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chengbin; Wu, Liangyu; Chen, Yongping

    2015-02-01

    The Sierpinski fractal is introduced to construct the porous metal foam. Based on this fractal description, an unsteady heat transfer model accompanied with solidification phase change in fractal porous metal foam embedded with phase change material (PCM) is developed and numerically analyzed. The heat transfer processes associated with solidification of PCM embedded in fractal structure is investigated and compared with that in single-pore structure. The results indicate that, for the solidification of phase change material in fractal porous metal foam, the PCM is dispersedly distributed in metal foam and the existence of porous metal matrix provides a fast heat flow channel both horizontally and vertically, which induces the enhancement of interstitial heat transfer between the solid matrix and PCM. The solidification performance of the PCM, which is represented by liquid fraction and solidification time, in fractal structure is superior to that in single-pore structure.

  6. Hybrid transfinite element modeling/analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems involving phase change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1988-01-01

    The present paper describes the applicability of hybrid transfinite element modeling/analysis formulations for nonlinear heat conduction problems involving phase change. The methodology is based on application of transform approaches and classical Galerkin schemes with finite element formulations to maintain the modeling versatility and numerical features for computational analysis. In addition, in conjunction with the above, the effects due to latent heat are modeled using enthalpy formulations to enable a physically realistic approximation to be dealt computationally for materials exhibiting phase change within a narrow band of temperatures. Pertinent details of the approach and computational scheme adapted are described in technical detail. Numerical test cases of comparative nature are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed formulations for numerical modeling/analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems involving phase change.

  7. Morphological analysis of GeTe in inline phase change switches

    SciTech Connect

    King, Matthew R.; El-Hinnawy, Nabil; Salmon, Mike; Gu, Jitty; Wagner, Brian P.; Jones, Evan B.; Howell, Robert S.; Nichols, Doyle T.; Young, Robert M.; Borodulin, Pavel

    2015-09-07

    Crystallization and amorphization phenomena in indirectly heated phase change material-based devices were investigated. Scanning transmission electron microscopy was utilized to explore GeTe phase transition processes in the context of the unique inline phase change switch (IPCS) architecture. A monolithically integrated thin film heating element successfully converted GeTe to ON and OFF states. Device cycling prompted the formation of an active area which sustains the majority of structural changes during pulsing. A transition region on both sides of the active area consisting of polycrystalline GeTe and small nuclei (<15 nm) in an amorphous matrix was also observed. The switching mechanism, determined by variations in pulsing parameters, was shown to be predominantly growth-driven. A preliminary model for crystallization and amorphization in IPCS devices is presented.

  8. Temperature dependence of SET switching characteristics in phase-change memory cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiang; Li, Zhen; Liu, Chang; Meng, Xiang-ru; Peng, Ju-hong; Lai, Zhi-bo; Miao, Xiang-shui

    2016-09-01

    The temperature dependence of crystallization kinetics of phase-change materials raises a series of reliability issues, while phase-change memory cells work at high temperature or thermal-disturbance condition. These issues hinder the development of ultrahigh-density storage devices. We investigate the evolution of SET switching characteristics of phase-change memory cells at high operating temperature. We show that the high temperature strongly impacts the SET state resistance. As a result, SET failure has been observed with elevated ambient temperature. Our SPICE simulations indicate that transient amorphization behavior during a complete SET pulse period is considered as the potential mechanism of SET failure. By modifying the SET pulse intensity and width linearly, we successfully reduce the SET failure in the experiments. The results illustrate that the demonstrated linear properties may optimize SET pulse performance.

  9. The Oxidation Behaviour of Diamond Like Carbon for Phase-Change Probe Memory Application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Cihui; Wen, Jing; Yang, Guowei

    2015-06-01

    Phase-change probe memory, as a promising candidate for next-generation storage device, usually requires a capping layer to protect phase-change media from wear and corrosion. Diamond-like carbon film has been commonly used for capping layer due to its high mechanical hardness and easiness for tailoring physical properties. However, the possibility for such carbon thin film to react to surrounding oxygen when subjected to Joule heating during the recording process of phase-change probe memory is rarely investigated before from both experimental and simulation point of view. Therefore, a novel carbon oxidation model was developed to mimic the chemical reaction of carbon film to the surrounding oxygen in terms of the degradation of layer thickness. Results obtained from this model are in a good agreement with the experimental counterpart, indicating the physical reality of this proposed model.

  10. Transient analysis of a thermal storage unit involving a phase change material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griggs, E. I.; Pitts, D. R.; Humphries, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    The transient response of a single cell of a typical phase change material type thermal capacitor has been modeled using numerical conductive heat transfer techniques. The cell consists of a base plate, an insulated top, and two vertical walls (fins) forming a two-dimensional cavity filled with a phase change material. Both explicit and implicit numerical formulations are outlined. A mixed explicit-implicit scheme which treats the fin implicity while treating the phase change material explicitly is discussed. A band algorithmic scheme is used to reduce computer storage requirements for the implicit approach while retaining a relatively fine grid. All formulations are presented in dimensionless form thereby enabling application to geometrically similar problems. Typical parametric results are graphically presented for the case of melting with constant heat input to the base of the cell.

  11. Electrical wind force-driven and dislocation-templated amorphization in phase-change nanowires.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sung-Wook; Chung, Hee-Suk; Lo, Yu Chieh; Qi, Liang; Li, Ju; Lu, Ye; Johnson, A T Charlie; Jung, Yeonwoong; Nukala, Pavan; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2012-06-22

    Phase-change materials undergo rapid and reversible crystalline-to-amorphous structural transformation and are being used for nonvolatile memory devices. However, the transformation mechanism remains poorly understood. We have studied the effect of electrical pulses on the crystalline-to-amorphous phase change in a single-crystalline Ge(2)Sb(2)Te(5) (GST) nanowire memory device by in situ transmission electron microscopy. We show that electrical pulses produce dislocations in crystalline GST, which become mobile and glide in the direction of hole-carrier motion. The continuous increase in the density of dislocations moving unidirectionally in the material leads to dislocation jamming, which eventually induces the crystalline-to-amorphous phase change with a sharp interface spanning the entire nanowire cross section. The dislocation-templated amorphization explains the large on/off resistance ratio of the device.

  12. Change in Photosystem II Photochemistry During Algal Growth Phases of Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Oukarroum, Abdallah

    2016-06-01

    Sensitivity of photosynthetic processes towards environmental stress is used as a bioanalytical tool to evaluate the responses of aquatic plants to a changing environment. In this paper, change of biomass density, chlorophyll a fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters during growth phases of two microalgae Chlorella vulgaris and Scenedesmus obliquus were studied. The photosynthetic growth behaviour changed significantly with cell age and algae species. During the exponential phase of growth, the photosynthesis capacity reached its maximum and decreased in ageing algal culture during stationary phase. In conclusion, the chlorophyll a fluorescence OJIP method and the derived fluorescence parameters would be an accurate method for obtaining information on maximum photosynthetic capacities and monitoring algal cell growth. This will contribute to more understanding, for example, of toxic actions of pollutants in microalgae test. PMID:26868257

  13. Effects of adding fibrous feedstuffs to the diet of young pigs on growth performance, intestinal cytokines, and circulating acute phase proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of adding fibrous feedstuffs on growth performance, intestinal cytokine expression, markers of inflammation, abundance of phosphorylated S6 kinase (S6K), and the expression of genes that control intestinal growth was evaluated in weanling pigs. Pigs (n = 120; 5.2 kg and 24 d of age) wer...

  14. Report of the Ad Hoc Committee to Review the Status of Women at The Ohio State University, Phases I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Kathryn T.; And Others

    In the late summer of 1970, an Ad Hoc Committee at the Ohio State University was appointed (1) to review the status of all women at the University; and (2) to submit a report of the findings and recommendations. The Committee consisted of 3 undergraduate students, 1 graduate student, 2 administrative personnel, and 3 faculty members, one of whom…

  15. The effectiveness of adding cognitive behavioural therapy aimed at changing lifestyle to managed diabetes care for patients with type 2 diabetes: design of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Welschen, Laura MC; van Oppen, Patricia; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Bouter, Lex M; Stalman, Wim AB; Nijpels, Giel

    2007-01-01

    Background In patients with type 2 diabetes, the risk for cardiovascular disease is substantial. To achieve a more favourable risk profile, lifestyle changes on diet, physical activity and smoking status are needed. This will involve changes in behaviour, which is difficult to achieve. Cognitive behavioural therapies focussing on self-management have been shown to be effective. We have developed an intervention combining techniques of Motivational Interviewing (MI) and Problem Solving Treatment (PST). The aim of our study is to investigate if adding a combined behavioural intervention to managed care, is effective in achieving changes in lifestyle and cardiovascular risk profile. Methods Patients with type 2 diabetes will be selected from general practices (n = 13), who are participating in a managed diabetes care system. Patients will be randomised into an intervention group receiving cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in addition to managed care, and a control group that will receive managed care only. The CBT consists of three to six individual sessions of 30 minutes to increase the patient's motivation, by using principles of MI, and ability to change their lifestyle, by using PST. The first session will start with a risk assessment of diabetes complications that will be used to focus the intervention. The primary outcome measure is the difference between intervention and control group in change in cardiovascular risk score. For this purpose blood pressure, HbA1c, total and HDL-cholesterol and smoking status will be assessed. Secondary outcome measures are quality of life, patient satisfaction, physical activity, eating behaviour, smoking status, depression and determinants of behaviour change. Differences between changes in the two groups will be analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle, with 95% confidence intervals. The power calculation is based on the risk for cardiovascular disease and we calculated that 97 patients should be included in

  16. Phase changes of filled ice Ih methane hydrate under low temperature and high pressure.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Takehiko; Hirai, Hisako; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo; Yagi, Takehiko; Ohtake, Michika; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Nakano, Satoshi; Irifune, Tetsuo

    2013-09-14

    Low-temperature and high-pressure experiments were performed with filled ice Ih structure of methane hydrate under 2.0-77.0 GPa and 30-300 K using diamond anvil cells and a helium-refrigeration cryostat. In situ X-ray diffractometry revealed distinct changes in the compressibility of the axial ratios of the host framework with pressure. Raman spectroscopy showed a split in the C-H vibration modes of the guest methane molecules, which was previously explained by the orientational ordering of the guest molecules. The pressure and temperature conditions at the split of the vibration modes agreed well with those of the compressibility change. The results indicate the following: (i) the orientational ordering of the guest methane molecules from an orientationally disordered state occurred at high pressures and low temperatures; and (ii) this guest ordering led to anisotropic contraction in the host framework. Such guest orientational ordering and subsequent anisotropic contraction of the host framework were similar to that reported previously for filled ice Ic hydrogen hydrate. Since phases with different guest-ordering manners were regarded as different phases, existing regions of the guest disordered-phase and the guest ordered-phase were roughly estimated by the X-ray study. In addition, above the pressure of the guest-ordered phase, another high-pressure phase developed in the low-temperature region. The deuterated-water host samples were also examined, and the influence of isotopic effects on guest ordering and phase transformation was observed.

  17. Electronic Structure and Spin Configuration Trends of Single Transition Metal Impurity in Phase Change Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Pei, J.; Shi, L. P.

    2016-10-01

    Fe doped phase change material GexSbyTez has shown experimentally the ability to alter its magnetic properties by phase change. This engineered spin degree of freedom into the phase change material offers the possibility of logic devices or spintronic devices where they may enable fast manipulation of ferromagnetism by a phase change mechanism. The electronic structures and spin configurations of isolated transition metal dopant in phase change material (iTM-PCM) is important to understand the interaction between localized metal d states and the unique delocalized host states of phase change material. Identifying an impurity center that has, in isolation, a nonvanishing magnetic moment is the first step to study the collective magnetic ordering, which originates from the interaction among close enough individual impurities. Theoretical description of iTM-PCM is challenging. In this work, we use a screened exchange hybrid functional to study the single 3d transition metal impurity in crystalline GeTe and GeSb2Te4. By curing the problem of local density functional (LDA) such as over-delocalization of the 3d states, we find that Fe on the Ge/Sb site has its majority d states fully occupied while its minority d states are empty, which is different from the previously predicted electronic configuration by LDA. From early transition metal Cr to heavier Ni, the majority 3d states are gradually populated until fully occupied and then the minority 3d states begin to be filled. Interpretive orbital interaction pictures are presented for understanding the local and total magnetic moments.

  18. Electronic Structure and Spin Configuration Trends of Single Transition Metal Impurity in Phase Change Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Pei, J.; Shi, L. P.

    2016-06-01

    Fe doped phase change material GexSbyTez has shown experimentally the ability to alter its magnetic properties by phase change. This engineered spin degree of freedom into the phase change material offers the possibility of logic devices or spintronic devices where they may enable fast manipulation of ferromagnetism by a phase change mechanism. The electronic structures and spin configurations of isolated transition metal dopant in phase change material (iTM-PCM) is important to understand the interaction between localized metal d states and the unique delocalized host states of phase change material. Identifying an impurity center that has, in isolation, a nonvanishing magnetic moment is the first step to study the collective magnetic ordering, which originates from the interaction among close enough individual impurities. Theoretical description of iTM-PCM is challenging. In this work, we use a screened exchange hybrid functional to study the single 3d transition metal impurity in crystalline GeTe and GeSb2Te4. By curing the problem of local density functional (LDA) such as over-delocalization of the 3d states, we find that Fe on the Ge/Sb site has its majority d states fully occupied while its minority d states are empty, which is different from the previously predicted electronic configuration by LDA. From early transition metal Cr to heavier Ni, the majority 3d states are gradually populated until fully occupied and then the minority 3d states begin to be filled. Interpretive orbital interaction pictures are presented for understanding the local and total magnetic moments.

  19. A computational framework for mapping the timing of vegetative phase change.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Jiang, Libo; Zhu, Sheng; Zhou, Chunguo; Ye, Meixia; Mao, Ke; Sun, Lidan; Su, Xiaohua; Pan, Huixin; Zhang, Shougong; Huang, Minren; Wu, Rongling

    2016-07-01

    Phase change plays a prominent role in determining the form of growth and development. Although considerable attention has been focused on identifying the regulatory control mechanisms of phase change, a detailed understanding of the genetic architecture of this phenomenon is still lacking. We address this issue by deriving a computational model. The model is founded on the framework of functional mapping aimed at characterizing the interplay between quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and development through biologically meaningful mathematical equations. A multiphasic growth equation was implemented into functional mapping, which, via a series of hypothesis tests, allows the quantification of how QTLs regulate the timing and pattern of vegetative phase transition between independently regulated, temporally coordinated processes. The model was applied to analyze stem radial growth data of an interspecific hybrid family derived from two Populus species during the first 24 yr of ontogeny. Several key QTLs related to phase change have been characterized, most of which were observed to be in the adjacent regions of candidate genes. The identification of phase transition QTLs, whose expression is regulated by endogenous and environmental signals, may enhance our understanding of the evolution of development in changing environments. PMID:26958803

  20. A computational framework for mapping the timing of vegetative phase change.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng; Jiang, Libo; Zhu, Sheng; Zhou, Chunguo; Ye, Meixia; Mao, Ke; Sun, Lidan; Su, Xiaohua; Pan, Huixin; Zhang, Shougong; Huang, Minren; Wu, Rongling

    2016-07-01

    Phase change plays a prominent role in determining the form of growth and development. Although considerable attention has been focused on identifying the regulatory control mechanisms of phase change, a detailed understanding of the genetic architecture of this phenomenon is still lacking. We address this issue by deriving a computational model. The model is founded on the framework of functional mapping aimed at characterizing the interplay between quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and development through biologically meaningful mathematical equations. A multiphasic growth equation was implemented into functional mapping, which, via a series of hypothesis tests, allows the quantification of how QTLs regulate the timing and pattern of vegetative phase transition between independently regulated, temporally coordinated processes. The model was applied to analyze stem radial growth data of an interspecific hybrid family derived from two Populus species during the first 24 yr of ontogeny. Several key QTLs related to phase change have been characterized, most of which were observed to be in the adjacent regions of candidate genes. The identification of phase transition QTLs, whose expression is regulated by endogenous and environmental signals, may enhance our understanding of the evolution of development in changing environments.

  1. Nanoelectronic programmable synapses based on phase change materials for brain-inspired computing.

    PubMed

    Kuzum, Duygu; Jeyasingh, Rakesh G D; Lee, Byoungil; Wong, H-S Philip

    2012-05-01

    Brain-inspired computing is an emerging field, which aims to extend the capabilities of information technology beyond digital logic. A compact nanoscale device, emulating biological synapses, is needed as the building block for brain-like computational systems. Here, we report a new nanoscale electronic synapse based on technologically mature phase change materials employed in optical data storage and nonvolatile memory applications. We utilize continuous resistance transitions in phase change materials to mimic the analog nature of biological synapses, enabling the implementation of a synaptic learning rule. We demonstrate different forms of spike-timing-dependent plasticity using the same nanoscale synapse with picojoule level energy consumption. PMID:21668029

  2. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of phase change Ge1Sb2Te4 nanowires.

    PubMed

    Longo, Massimo; Fallica, Roberto; Wiemer, Claudia; Salicio, Olivier; Fanciulli, Marco; Rotunno, Enzo; Lazzarini, Laura

    2012-03-14

    The self-assembly of Ge(1)Sb(2)Te(4) nanowires (NWs) for phase change memories application was achieved by metal organic chemical vapor deposition, catalyzed by Au nanoislands in a narrow range of temperatures and deposition pressures. In the optimized conditions of 400 °C, 50 mbar, the NWs are Ge(1)Sb(2)Te(4) single hexagonal crystals. Phase change memory switching was reversibly induced by nanosecond current pulses through metal-contacted NWs with threshold voltage of about 1.35 V.

  3. Review of Development Survey of Phase Change Material Models in Building Applications

    PubMed Central

    Akeiber, Hussein J.; Wahid, Mazlan A.; Hussen, Hasanen M.; Mohammad, Abdulrahman Th.

    2014-01-01

    The application of phase change materials (PCMs) in green buildings has been increasing rapidly. PCM applications in green buildings include several development models. This paper briefly surveys the recent research and development activities of PCM technology in building applications. Firstly, a basic description of phase change and their principles is provided; the classification and applications of PCMs are also included. Secondly, PCM models in buildings are reviewed and discussed according to the wall, roof, floor, and cooling systems. Finally, conclusions are presented based on the collected data. PMID:25313367

  4. Review of development survey of phase change material models in building applications.

    PubMed

    Akeiber, Hussein J; Wahid, Mazlan A; Hussen, Hasanen M; Mohammad, Abdulrahman Th

    2014-01-01

    The application of phase change materials (PCMs) in green buildings has been increasing rapidly. PCM applications in green buildings include several development models. This paper briefly surveys the recent research and development activities of PCM technology in building applications. Firstly, a basic description of phase change and their principles is provided; the classification and applications of PCMs are also included. Secondly, PCM models in buildings are reviewed and discussed according to the wall, roof, floor, and cooling systems. Finally, conclusions are presented based on the collected data.

  5. Modeling of liquid-vapor phase change using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A. K.; Das, P. K.

    2015-12-01

    A model has been proposed based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics to describe gas liquid phase change. Pseudo particles of zero mass are initially placed to locate the interface. Mass generated due to phase change is assigned to the pseudo particles and their positions are updated at intervals to track the mobility of the interface. The developed algorithm has been used to simulate vapor formation around solid spheres both in the absence of gravity and in the normal gravitational field. Finally, bubble growth over a hot horizontal surface due to boiling has been simulated. Simulated results showed good matching with the reported literature.

  6. MICRO- AND NANOSCALE MEASUREMENT METHODS FOR PHASE CHANGE HEAT TRANSFER ON PLANAR AND STRUCTURED SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Buongiorno, J; Cahill, DG; Hidrovo, CH; Moghaddam, S; Schmidt, AJ; Shi, L

    2014-07-23

    In this opinion piece, we discuss recent advances in experimental methods for characterizing phase change heat transfer. We begin with a survey of techniques for high-resolution measurements of temperature and heat flux at the solid surface and in the working fluid. Next, we focus on diagnostic tools for boiling heat transfer and describe techniques for visualizing the temperature and velocity fields, as well as measurements at the single bubble level. Finally, we discuss techniques to probe the kinetics of vapor formation within a few molecular layers of the interface. We conclude with our outlook for future progress in experimental methods for phase change heat transfer.

  7. Superlattice-like film for high data retention and high speed phase change random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Le; Song, Sannian; Zhang, Zhonghua; Chen, Liangliang; Song, Zhitang; Lv, Shilong; Liu, Bo; Guo, Tianqi

    2016-06-01

    Superlattice-like film (SLF) was formed alternately by Ti0.43Sb2Te3 (TST) and TiN, and TST is employed as phase change layers and TiN is employed as isolation layers of TST film. Comparing with single TST film with the same thickness, SLF owns higher data retention, higher phase change speed (5 ns) and endurance up to 1 × 105 cycles, and its power consumption of reset operation is significantly decreased by 65.2%. Two-dimensional thermal transient simulation of reset operation indicates that SLF-based device owns higher heating efficiency than 30-nm-thick TST-based device.

  8. Review of development survey of phase change material models in building applications.

    PubMed

    Akeiber, Hussein J; Wahid, Mazlan A; Hussen, Hasanen M; Mohammad, Abdulrahman Th

    2014-01-01

    The application of phase change materials (PCMs) in green buildings has been increasing rapidly. PCM applications in green buildings include several development models. This paper briefly surveys the recent research and development activities of PCM technology in building applications. Firstly, a basic description of phase change and their principles is provided; the classification and applications of PCMs are also included. Secondly, PCM models in buildings are reviewed and discussed according to the wall, roof, floor, and cooling systems. Finally, conclusions are presented based on the collected data. PMID:25313367

  9. New Improvement Methods for Multispeed Initialization-Free Phase-Change Optical Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, X. S.; Shi, L. P.; Tan, P. K.; Li, J. M.; Lim, K. G.; Chong, T. C.

    2004-07-01

    Disk structure optimization, thermal balance design and a new writing strategy are proposed to further widen the speed range of multispeed recording for an initialization-free phase-change disk. Simulated results show a high cooling rate. Experimental results show that the initialization-free phase-change disk with three improvement methods has a broad range of recording speeds from 3.49 to 20.94 m/s, which correspond to a rotation speed of 1 to 6 times that of digital versatile disk-read only memory (DVD-ROM), respectively.

  10. Structural and phase changes in carbides of the high-speed steel upon heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaus, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of austenitizing temperature on structural and phase changes in carbides of the tungsten-molybdenum high-speed steel has been studied. The results of metallographic analysis and energy dispersive microanalysis have been discussed. It has been shown that an increase in austenitizing temperature from 1180 to 1260°C causes structural transformations in carbide particles of eutectic origin crushed upon hot plastic deformation, which are related to their dissolution and coalescence, and changes in the phase composition of the carbides themselves.

  11. Parametric Analysis of Cyclic Phase Change and Energy Storage in Solar Heat Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Carsie A., III; Glakpe, Emmanuel K.; Cannon, Joseph N.; Kerslake, Thomas W.

    1997-01-01

    A parametric study on cyclic melting and freezing of an encapsulated phase change material (PCM), integrated into a solar heat receiver, has been performed. The cyclic nature of the present melt/freeze problem is relevant to latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems used to power solar Brayton engines in microgravity environments. Specifically, a physical and numerical model of the solar heat receiver component of NASA Lewis Research Center's Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) project was developed. Multi-conjugate effects such as the convective fluid flow of a low-Prandtl-number fluid, coupled with thermal conduction in the phase change material, containment tube and working fluid conduit were accounted for in the model. A single-band thermal radiation model was also included to quantify reradiative energy exchange inside the receiver and losses through the aperture. The eutectic LiF-CaF2 was used as the phase change material (PCM) and a mixture of He/Xe was used as the working fluid coolant. A modified version of the computer code HOTTube was used to generate results in the two-phase regime. Results indicate that parametric changes in receiver gas inlet temperature and receiver heat input effects higher sensitivity to changes in receiver gas exit temperatures.

  12. Investigation of phase-change coatings for variable thermal control of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelliher, W. C.; Young, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing a spacecraft coating system that could vary the ratio of its solar absorptance to thermal emittance to adjust automatically for changes in the thermal balance of a spacecraft. This study resulted in a new concept called the phase-change effect which uses the change that occurs in the optical properties of many materials during the phase transition from a crystalline solid to an amorphous material. A series of two-component model coatings was developed which, when placed on a highly reflecting substrate, exhibited a sharp decrease in solar absorptance within a narrow temperature range. A variable thermal control coating can have a significant amount of temperature regulation with the phase-change effect. Data are presented on several crystallite-polymer formulations, their physical and optical properties, and associated phase-change temperatures. Aspects pertaining to their use in a space environment and an example of the degree of thermal regulation attainable with these coatings is also given.

  13. Systemic and renal hemodynamic changes in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle mimic early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chapman, A B; Zamudio, S; Woodmansee, W; Merouani, A; Osorio, F; Johnson, A; Moore, L G; Dahms, T; Coffin, C; Abraham, W T; Schrier, R W

    1997-11-01

    Blood pressure decreases during early pregnancy in association with a decrease in peripheral vascular resistance and increases in renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate. These early changes suggest a potential association with corpora lutea function. To determine whether peripheral vasodilation occurs following ovulation, we studied 16 healthy women in the midfollicular and midluteal phases of the menstrual cycle. A significant decrease in mean arterial pressure in the midluteal phase of the cycle (midfollicular of 81.7 +/- 2.0 vs. midluteal of 75.4 +/- 2.3 mmHg, P < 0.005) was found in association with a decrease in systemic vascular resistance and an increase in cardiac output. Renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate increased. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentration increased significantly in the luteal phase accompanied by a decrease in atrial natriuretic peptide concentration. Serum sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate concentrations and osmolarity also declined significantly in the midluteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Urinary adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) excretion increased in the luteal compared with the follicular phase, whereas no changes in urinary cGMP or NO2/NO3 excretion were found. Thus peripheral vasodilation occurs in the luteal phase of the normal menstrual cycle in association with an increase in renal plasma flow and filtration. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis is found in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. These changes are accompanied by an increase in urinary cAMP excretion indicating potential vasodilating mediators responsible for the observed hemodynamic changes. PMID:9374841

  14. Shuttle-run synchronization in mobile ad hoc networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Sheng-Fei; Bi, Hong-Jie; Zou, Yong; Liu, Zong-Hua; Guan, Shu-Guang

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we study the collective dynamics of phase oscillators in a mobile ad hoc network whose topology changes dynamically. As the network size or the communication radius of individual oscillators increases, the topology of the ad hoc network first undergoes percolation, forming a giant cluster, and then gradually achieves global connectivity. It is shown that oscillator mobility generally enhances the coherence in such networks. Interestingly, we find a new type of phase synchronization/clustering, in which the phases of the oscillators are distributed in a certain narrow range, while the instantaneous frequencies change signs frequently, leading to shuttle-run-like motion of the oscillators in phase space. We conduct a theoretical analysis to explain the mechanism of this synchronization and obtain the critical transition point.

  15. On the penetration of the 660 km phase change by mantle downflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bercovici, David; Schubert, Gerald; Tackley, Paul J.

    1993-01-01

    We present a simple analytic model of the interaction of cold convective downwelling currents with an endothermic phase change. The model describes the ponding and lateral spreading of downflows along the phase transition interface. A simple comparison of the vertical forces on the ponding material provides a necessary condition for a downflow to penetrate the phase boundary. This condition is fundamentally dependent on the geometry of the downflow. For planar downwellings, the model predicts a minimum ponding time before the structure can penetrate the phase boundary. For columnar (axisymmetric) downflows, there is no minimum time of spreading required before penetration can proceed. The model thus provides an explanation for the observation that in numerical models of three-dimensional convection with an endothermic phase change, cylindrical downflows penetrate the phase interface while planar ones do not. Since descending slabs in the Earth's mantle display a wide spectrum of geometries between planar and cylindrical (given various trench curvatures, as well as intersections of two or more subduction zones), this phenomenon may explain, in part, why some slabs appear to extend into the lower mantle while others are deflected at the 660 km discontinuity.

  16. Strongly nonlinear optical glass fibers from noncentrosymmetric phase-change chalcogenide materials.

    PubMed

    Chung, In; Jang, Joon I; Malliakas, Christos D; Ketterson, John B; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2010-01-13

    We report that the one-dimensional polar selenophosphate compounds APSe(6) (A = K, Rb), which show crystal-glass phase-change behavior, exhibit strong second harmonic generation (SHG) response in both crystal and glassy forms. The crystalline materials are type-I phase-matchable with SHG coefficients chi((2)) of 151.3 and 149.4 pm V(-1) for K(+) and Rb(+) salts, respectively, which is the highest among phase-matchable nonlinear optical (NLO) materials with band gaps over 1.0 eV. The glass of APSe(6) exhibits comparable SHG intensities to the top infrared NLO material AgGaSe(2) without any poling treatments. APSe(6) exhibit excellent mid-IR transparency. We demonstrate that starting from noncentrosymmetric phase-change materials such as APSe(6) (A = K, Rb), we can obtain optical glass fibers with strong, intrinsic, and temporally stable second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) response. The as-prepared glass fibers exhibit SHG and difference frequency generation (DFG) responses over a wide range of wavelengths. Raman spectroscopy and pair distribution function (PDF) analyses provide further understanding of the local structure in amorphous state of KPSe(6) bulk glass and glass fiber. We propose that this approach can be widely applied to prepare permanent NLO glass from materials that undergo a phase-change process.

  17. Strongly Nonlinear Optical Glass Fibers from Noncentrosymmetric Phase-Change Chalcogenide Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, In; Jang, Joon I.; Malliakas, Christos D.; Ketterson, John B.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2010-08-27

    We report that the one-dimensional polar selenophosphate compounds APSe{sub 6} (A = K, Rb), which show crystal-glass phase-change behavior, exhibit strong second harmonic generation (SHG) response in both crystal and glassy forms. The crystalline materials are type-I phase-matchable with SHG coefficients {chi}{sup (2)} of 151.3 and 149.4 pm V{sup -1} for K{sup +} and Rb{sup +} salts, respectively, which is the highest among phase-matchable nonlinear optical (NLO) materials with band gaps over 1.0 eV. The glass of APSe{sub 6} exhibits comparable SHG intensities to the top infrared NLO material AgGaSe{sub 2} without any poling treatments. APSe{sub 6} exhibit excellent mid-IR transparency. We demonstrate that starting from noncentrosymmetric phase-change materials such as APSe{sub 6} (A = K, Rb), we can obtain optical glass fibers with strong, intrinsic, and temporally stable second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) response. The as-prepared glass fibers exhibit SHG and difference frequency generation (DFG) responses over a wide range of wavelengths. Raman spectroscopy and pair distribution function (PDF) analyses provide further understanding of the local structure in amorphous state of KPSe{sub 6} bulk glass and glass fiber. We propose that this approach can be widely applied to prepare permanent NLO glass from materials that undergo a phase-change process.

  18. A Newton method with adaptive finite elements for solving phase-change problems with natural convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danaila, Ionut; Moglan, Raluca; Hecht, Frédéric; Le Masson, Stéphane

    2014-10-01

    We present a new numerical system using finite elements with mesh adaptivity for the simulation of solid-liquid phase change systems. In the liquid phase, the natural convection flow is simulated by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with Boussinesq approximation. A variable viscosity model allows the velocity to progressively vanish in the solid phase, through an intermediate mushy region. The phase change is modeled by introducing an implicit enthalpy source term in the heat equation. The final system of equations describing the liquid-solid system by a single domain approach is solved using a Newton iterative algorithm. The space discretization is based on a P2-P1 Taylor-Hood finite elements and mesh adaptivity by metric control is used to accurately track the solid-liquid interface or the density inversion interface for water flows. The numerical method is validated against classical benchmarks that progressively add strong non-linearities in the system of equations: natural convection of air, natural convection of water, melting of a phase-change material and water freezing. Very good agreement with experimental data is obtained for each test case, proving the capability of the method to deal with both melting and solidification problems with convection. The presented numerical method is easy to implement using FreeFem++ software using a syntax close to the mathematical formulation.

  19. The tropicalization of temperate marine ecosystems: climate-mediated changes in herbivory and community phase shifts.

    PubMed

    Vergés, Adriana; Steinberg, Peter D; Hay, Mark E; Poore, Alistair G B; Campbell, Alexandra H; Ballesteros, Enric; Heck, Kenneth L; Booth, David J; Coleman, Melinda A; Feary, David A; Figueira, Will; Langlois, Tim; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M; Mizerek, Toni; Mumby, Peter J; Nakamura, Yohei; Roughan, Moninya; van Sebille, Erik; Gupta, Alex Sen; Smale, Dan A; Tomas, Fiona; Wernberg, Thomas; Wilson, Shaun K

    2014-08-22

    Climate-driven changes in biotic interactions can profoundly alter ecological communities, particularly when they impact foundation species. In marine systems, changes in herbivory and the consequent loss of dominant habitat forming species can result in dramatic community phase shifts, such as from coral to macroalgal dominance when tropical fish herbivory decreases, and from algal forests to 'barrens' when temperate urchin grazing increases. Here, we propose a novel phase-shift away from macroalgal dominance caused by tropical herbivores extending their range into temperate regions. We argue that this phase shift is facilitated by poleward-flowing boundary currents that are creating ocean warming hotspots around the globe, enabling the range expansion of tropical species and increasing their grazing rates in temperate areas. Overgrazing of temperate macroalgae by tropical herbivorous fishes has already occurred in Japan and the Mediterranean. Emerging evidence suggests similar phenomena are occurring in other temperate regions, with increasing occurrence of tropical fishes on temperate reefs. PMID:25009065

  20. Nanostructured thin film-based near-infrared tunable perfect absorber using phase-change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocer, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured thin film absorbers embedded with phase-change thermochromic material can provide a large level of absorption tunability in the near-infrared region. Vanadium dioxide was employed as the phase-change material in the designed structures. The optical absorption properties of the designed structures with respect to the geometric and material parameters were systematically investigated using finite-difference time-domain computations. Absorption level of the resonance wavelength in the near-IR region was tuned from the perfect absorption level to a low level (17%) with a high positive dynamic range of near-infrared absorption intensity tunability (83%). Due to the phase transition of vanadium dioxide, the resonance at the near-infrared region is being turned on and turned off actively and reversibly under the thermal bias, thereby rendering these nanostructures suitable for infrared camouflage, emitters, and sensors.

  1. Computation of solid/liquid phase change including free convection - Comparison with data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, G. E.

    1990-01-01

    A computational model is presented for solid/liquid phase-change energy transport including free convection fluid flow in the liquid phase. The computational model considers the velocity components of all nonliquid control volumes to be zero but fully solves the coupled mass-momentum problem within the liquid. The thermal energy model includes the entire domain and employs an enthalpy-like model and a recently developed method for handling the phase-change interface nonlinearity. Convergence studies are performed and comparisons made with experimental data for two different problems. Grid independence is achieved, and the comparison with experimental data indicates excellent quantitative prediction of the melt fraction evolution. Qualitative data are also provided as velocity vector and isotherm plots. The computational costs incurred are quite low by comparison with other models.

  2. The tropicalization of temperate marine ecosystems: climate-mediated changes in herbivory and community phase shifts

    PubMed Central

    Vergés, Adriana; Steinberg, Peter D.; Hay, Mark E.; Poore, Alistair G. B.; Campbell, Alexandra H.; Ballesteros, Enric; Heck, Kenneth L.; Booth, David J.; Coleman, Melinda A.; Feary, David A.; Figueira, Will; Langlois, Tim; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M.; Mizerek, Toni; Mumby, Peter J.; Nakamura, Yohei; Roughan, Moninya; van Sebille, Erik; Gupta, Alex Sen; Smale, Dan A.; Tomas, Fiona; Wernberg, Thomas; Wilson, Shaun K.

    2014-01-01

    Climate-driven changes in biotic interactions can profoundly alter ecological communities, particularly when they impact foundation species. In marine systems, changes in herbivory and the consequent loss of dominant habitat forming species can result in dramatic community phase shifts, such as from coral to macroalgal dominance when tropical fish herbivory decreases, and from algal forests to ‘barrens’ when temperate urchin grazing increases. Here, we propose a novel phase-shift away from macroalgal dominance caused by tropical herbivores extending their range into temperate regions. We argue that this phase shift is facilitated by poleward-flowing boundary currents that are creating ocean warming hotspots around the globe, enabling the range expansion of tropical species and increasing their grazing rates in temperate areas. Overgrazing of temperate macroalgae by tropical herbivorous fishes has already occurred in Japan and the Mediterranean. Emerging evidence suggests similar phenomena are occurring in other temperate regions, with increasing occurrence of tropical fishes on temperate reefs. PMID:25009065

  3. The tropicalization of temperate marine ecosystems: climate-mediated changes in herbivory and community phase shifts.

    PubMed

    Vergés, Adriana; Steinberg, Peter D; Hay, Mark E; Poore, Alistair G B; Campbell, Alexandra H; Ballesteros, Enric; Heck, Kenneth L; Booth, David J; Coleman, Melinda A; Feary, David A; Figueira, Will; Langlois, Tim; Marzinelli, Ezequiel M; Mizerek, Toni; Mumby, Peter J; Nakamura, Yohei; Roughan, Moninya; van Sebille, Erik; Gupta, Alex Sen; Smale, Dan A; Tomas, Fiona; Wernberg, Thomas; Wilson, Shaun K

    2014-08-22

    Climate-driven changes in biotic interactions can profoundly alter ecological communities, particularly when they impact foundation species. In marine systems, changes in herbivory and the consequent loss of dominant habitat forming species can result in dramatic community phase shifts, such as from coral to macroalgal dominance when tropical fish herbivory decreases, and from algal forests to 'barrens' when temperate urchin grazing increases. Here, we propose a novel phase-shift away from macroalgal dominance caused by tropical herbivores extending their range into temperate regions. We argue that this phase shift is facilitated by poleward-flowing boundary currents that are creating ocean warming hotspots around the globe, enabling the range expansion of tropical species and increasing their grazing rates in temperate areas. Overgrazing of temperate macroalgae by tropical herbivorous fishes has already occurred in Japan and the Mediterranean. Emerging evidence suggests similar phenomena are occurring in other temperate regions, with increasing occurrence of tropical fishes on temperate reefs.

  4. Methodological Aspects of the Phase II Study AFF006 Evaluating Amyloid-beta -Targeting Vaccine AFFITOPE® AD02 in Early Alzheimer’s Disease – Prospective Use of Novel Composite Scales

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, S.; Ellison, N.; Stanworth, S.; Tierney, L.; Mattner, F.; Schmidt, W.; Dubois, B.; Schneeberger, A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Optimized scales and composite outcomes have been proposed as a way to more accurately measure Alzheimer’s disease related decline. AFFITOPE® AD02, is an amyloid-beta (Aβ)-targeting vaccine to elicit anti-Aβ antibodies. IMM-AD04, commonly known as Alum, originally designated as a control agent, appeared to have disease-modifying activity in a multicenter, parallel group phase II study in early AD patients. OBJECTIVES To develop adapted outcomes for cognition, function and a composite scale with improved sensitivity to decline and treatment effects in early AD (mild plus prodromal AD) based on historical data and to assess these adapted outcomes in this phase II study. DESIGN Data from public datasets was analyzed using a partial least squares model in order to identify an optimally weighted cognitive outcome, Adapted ADAS-cog, and an optimally weighted ADL outcome, Adapted ADCS-ADL which were prospectively defined as co-primary endpoints for the study and were also combined into a composite scale. Data from 162 patients in the placebo groups of ADCS studies and 156 mild patients in the ADNI I study were pooled for this analysis. The Adapted ADAS-cog scale considered 13 ADAS-cog items as well as several Neuropsychological test items and CogState items, the Adapted ADCS-ADL considered all ADCS-ADL items. After the pre-specified analyses were complete, additional adapted and composite scales were investigated in a post-hoc manner. Evaluation of the adapted and composite scales was performed on Phase II trial data for AFFITOPE® AD02 (AFF006, Clinical Trial Identifier: NCT01117818) and historic data in early AD. Least square means, standard deviations, and least squares mean to standard deviation ratios were compared among adapted and composite scales and traditional scales for the 5 treatment groups in the phase II study and overall for the historic data. Treatment effect sizes and p-values were also compared for the phase II study. RESULTS Cognitive

  5. Experimental data showing the thermal behavior of a flat roof with phase change material

    PubMed Central

    Tokuç, Ayça; Başaran, Tahsin; Yesügey, S. Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    The selection and configuration of building materials for optimal energy efficiency in a building require some assumptions and models for the thermal behavior of the utilized materials. Although the models for many materials can be considered acceptable for simulation and calculation purposes, the work for modeling the real time behavior of phase change materials is still under development. The data given in this article shows the thermal behavior of a flat roof element with a phase change material (PCM) layer. The temperature and energy given to and taken from the building element are reported. In addition the solid–liquid behavior of the PCM is tracked through images. The resulting thermal behavior of the phase change material is discussed and simulated in [1] A. Tokuç, T. Başaran, S.C. Yesügey, An experimental and numerical investigation on the use of phase change materials in building elements: the case of a flat roof in Istanbul, Build. Energy, vol. 102, 2015, pp. 91–104. PMID:26629490

  6. Non-Toxic, Non-Flammable, -80 C Phase Change Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutbirth, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this effort was to develop a non-toxic, non-flammable, -80 C phase change material (PCM) to be used in NASA's ICEPAC capsules for biological sample preservation in flight to and from Earth orbit. A temperature of about -68 C or lower is a critical temperature for maintaining stable cell, tissue, and cell fragment storage.

  7. Antioxidant-Based Phase-Change Thermal Interface Materials with High Thermal Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyagi, Yasuhiro; Chung, D. D. L.

    2008-04-01

    This work provides phase-change thermal interface materials (TIMs) with high thermal stability and high heat of fusion. They are based on antioxidants mainly in the form of hydrocarbons with linear segments. The thermal stability is superior to paraffin wax and four commercial phase-change materials (PCMs). The use of 98.0 wt.% thiopropionate antioxidant (SUMILIZER TP-D) with 2.0 wt.% sterically half-hindered phenolic antioxidant (GA80) as the matrix and the use of 16 vol.% boron nitride particles as the solid component give a PCM with a 100°C lifetime indicator of 5.3 years, in contrast to 0.95 year or less for the commercial PCMs. The heat of fusion is much higher than those of commercial PCMs; the values for antioxidants with nonbranched molecular structures exceed that of wax; the value for one with a branched structure is slightly below that of wax. The phase-change properties are degraded by heating at 150°C much less than those of the commercial PCMs. The stability of the heat of fusion upon phase-change cycling is also superior. The viscosity is essentially unaffected by heating at 150°C. Commercial PCMs give slightly lower values of the thermal contact conductance for the case of rough (12 μm) mating surfaces, in spite of the lower values of the bond-line thickness.

  8. Optimal design variable considerations in the use of phase change materials in indirect evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilakapaty, Ankit Paul

    The demand for sustainable, energy efficient and cost effective heating and cooling solutions is exponentially increasing with the rapid advancement of computation and information technology. Use of latent heat storage materials also known as phase change materials (PCMs) for load leveling is an innovative solution to the data center cooling demands. These materials are commercially available in the form of microcapsules dispersed in water, referred to as the microencapsulated phase change slurries and have higher heat capacity than water. The composition and physical properties of phase change slurries play significant role in energy efficiency of the cooling systems designed implementing these PCM slurries. Objective of this project is to study the effect of PCM particle size, shape and volumetric concentration on overall heat transfer potential of the cooling systems designed with PCM slurries as the heat transfer fluid (HTF). In this study uniform volume heat source model is developed for the simulation of heat transfer potential using phase change materials in the form of bulk temperature difference in a fully developed flow through a circular duct. Results indicate the heat transfer potential increases with PCM volumetric concentration with gradually diminishing returns. Also, spherical PCM particles offer greater heat transfer potential when compared to cylindrical particles. Results of this project will aid in efficient design of cooling systems based on PCM slurries.

  9. Experimental data showing the thermal behavior of a flat roof with phase change material.

    PubMed

    Tokuç, Ayça; Başaran, Tahsin; Yesügey, S Cengiz

    2015-12-01

    The selection and configuration of building materials for optimal energy efficiency in a building require some assumptions and models for the thermal behavior of the utilized materials. Although the models for many materials can be considered acceptable for simulation and calculation purposes, the work for modeling the real time behavior of phase change materials is still under development. The data given in this article shows the thermal behavior of a flat roof element with a phase change material (PCM) layer. The temperature and energy given to and taken from the building element are reported. In addition the solid-liquid behavior of the PCM is tracked through images. The resulting thermal behavior of the phase change material is discussed and simulated in [1] A. Tokuç, T. Başaran, S.C. Yesügey, An experimental and numerical investigation on the use of phase change materials in building elements: the case of a flat roof in Istanbul, Build. Energy, vol. 102, 2015, pp. 91-104.

  10. Analysis of thermal energy storage material with change-of-phase volumetric effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Space Station Freedom proposed hybrid power system includes photovoltaic arrays with nickel hydrogen batteries for energy storage and solar dynamic collectors driving Brayton heat engines with change-of-phase Thermal Energy Storage (TES) devices. A TES device is comprised of multiple metallic, annular canisters which contain a eutectic composition LiF-CaF2 Phase Change Material (PCM) that melts at 1040 K. A moderately sophisticated LiF-CaF2 PCM computer model is being developed in three stages considering 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D canister geometries, respectively. The 1-D model results indicate that the void has a marked effect on the phase change process due to PCM displacement and dynamic void heat transfer resistance. Equally influential are the effects of different boundary conditions and liquid PCM natural convection. For the second stage, successful numerical techniques used in the 1-D phase change model are extended to a 2-D (r,z) PCM containment canister model. A prototypical PCM containment canister is analyzed and the results are discussed.

  11. Analysis of thermal energy storage material with change-of-phase volumetric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    1990-02-01

    NASA's Space Station Freedom proposed hybrid power system includes photovoltaic arrays with nickel hydrogen batteries for energy storage and solar dynamic collectors driving Brayton heat engines with change-of-phase Thermal Energy Storage (TES) devices. A TES device is comprised of multiple metallic, annular canisters which contain a eutectic composition LiF-CaF2 Phase Change Material (PCM) that melts at 1040 K. A moderately sophisticated LiF-CaF2 PCM computer model is being developed in three stages considering 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D canister geometries, respectively. The 1-D model results indicate that the void has a marked effect on the phase change process due to PCM displacement and dynamic void heat transfer resistance. Equally influential are the effects of different boundary conditions and liquid PCM natural convection. For the second stage, successful numerical techniques used in the 1-D phase change model are extended to a 2-D (r,z) PCM containment canister model. A prototypical PCM containment canister is analyzed and the results are discussed.

  12. Replacement of Ablators with Phase-Change Material for Thermal Protection of STS Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Raj K.; Stuckey, Irvin; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As part of the research and development program to develop new Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials for aerospace applications at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), an experimental study was conducted on a new concept for a non-ablative TPS material. Potential loss of TPS material and ablation by-products from the External Tank (ET) or Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) during Shuttle flight with the related Orbiter tile damage necessitates development of a non-ablative thermal protection system. The new Thermal Management Coating (TMC) consists of phase-change material encapsulated in micro spheres and a two-part resin system to adhere the coating to the structure material. The TMC uses a phase-change material to dissipate the heat produced during supersonic flight rather than an ablative material. This new material absorbs energy as it goes through a phase change during the heating portion of the flight profile and then the energy is slowly released as the phase-change material cools and returns to its solid state inside the micro spheres. The coating was subjected to different test conditions simulating design flight environments at the NASA/MSFC Improved Hot Gas Facility (IHGF) to study its performance.

  13. Experimental data showing the thermal behavior of a flat roof with phase change material.

    PubMed

    Tokuç, Ayça; Başaran, Tahsin; Yesügey, S Cengiz

    2015-12-01

    The selection and configuration of building materials for optimal energy efficiency in a building require some assumptions and models for the thermal behavior of the utilized materials. Although the models for many materials can be considered acceptable for simulation and calculation purposes, the work for modeling the real time behavior of phase change materials is still under development. The data given in this article shows the thermal behavior of a flat roof element with a phase change material (PCM) layer. The temperature and energy given to and taken from the building element are reported. In addition the solid-liquid behavior of the PCM is tracked through images. The resulting thermal behavior of the phase change material is discussed and simulated in [1] A. Tokuç, T. Başaran, S.C. Yesügey, An experimental and numerical investigation on the use of phase change materials in building elements: the case of a flat roof in Istanbul, Build. Energy, vol. 102, 2015, pp. 91-104. PMID:26629490

  14. A theoretical model of phase changes of a klystron due to variation of operating parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kupiszewski, A.

    1980-01-01

    A mathematical model for phase changes of the VA-876 CW klystron amplifier output is presented and variations of several operating parameters are considered. The theoretical approach to the problem is based upon a gridded gap modeling with inclusion of a second order correction term so that actual gap geometry is reflected in the formulation. Physical measurements are contrasted to theoretical calculations.

  15. Direct contact heat transfer to a dispersal droplet with change of phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elshaik, Nagwa Mahmoud

    1990-08-01

    Direct contact, three-phase heat transfer in which latent heat from a dispersed, volatile liquid is transferred to a nonvolatile, immiscible liquid is important to many industrial processes. Here, two modes of evaporation are identified depending on the temperature difference between the dispersed and continuous phase. If the temperature difference is high, the mode is likely to be film boiling in which a droplet is supported in a bubble by a vapor film which flows out from beneath the droplet. The heat transfer responsible for the change in phase takes place across the film. The other mode of evaporation is nucleate boiling in which a thin liquid layer exists at the bottom of the bubble and there is a direct contact heat exchange between the continuous phase and the liquid layer. Analytic models for both film boiling and nucleate boiling were developed.

  16. Measurement of cell volume loss in the liquid region preceding an advancing phase change interface.

    PubMed

    Harmison, H R; Diller, K R; Walsh, J R; Neils, C M; Brand, J J

    1998-09-11

    It is well understood that the solidification of a solution results in a redistribution of solute in the liquid zone. For the freezing of suspensions of cells it is anticipated that accumulation of solute in the region leading a growing ice phase will cause an osmotic response in cells before the ice phase reaches the cells. To measure this phenomenon in a specific algal species, the volume changes in Chlorococcum texanum during freezing were studied using directional solidification cryomicroscopy. The relative cell volume was tracked continuously as a function of temperature and position as cells encountered the moving phase front. The loss of cell volume was measured in the liquid region containing concentrated solute ahead of the growing solid phase.

  17. Silica phase changes: Diagenetic agent for oil entrapment, Lost Hills field, California

    SciTech Connect

    Julander, D.R.; Szymanski, D.L. )

    1991-02-01

    The siliceous shales of the Monterey Group are the primary development target at Lost Hills. Silica phase changes have influenced the distribution and entrapment of hydrocarbons. With increasing temperature, opal A phase diatomite is converted to opal CT and finally quartz phase rock. All phases are low in permeability. The opal A diatomite is characteristically high in oil saturation and productive saturation. Productivity from this phase is dependent on structural position and fieldwide variations in oil viscosity and biodegradation. The deeper chert reservoir coincides with the opal CT to quartz phase transition. Porosity is again reduced in this transition, but saturations in the quartz phase rocks increase. Tests in the chert reservoir indicate a single, low-permeability system, suggesting the importance of matric contribution. resistivity and porosity in the diatomite, and resistivity and velocity in the chert, are the physical properties which best reflect saturation. Methods exploiting these properties (FMS, BHTV, borehole, and surface shear wave studies) should be helpful in further characterizing the reservoirs and identifying future pay.

  18. Epigenetic remodelling of brain, body and behaviour during phase change in locusts

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The environment has a central role in shaping developmental trajectories and determining the phenotype so that animals are adapted to the specific conditions they encounter. Epigenetic mechanisms can have many effects, with changes in the nervous and musculoskeletal systems occurring at different rates. How is the function of an animal maintained whilst these transitions happen? Phenotypic plasticity can change the ways in which animals respond to the environment and even how they sense it, particularly in the context of social interactions between members of their own species. In the present article, we review the mechanisms and consequences of phenotypic plasticity by drawing upon the desert locust as an unparalleled model system. Locusts change reversibly between solitarious and gregarious phases that differ dramatically in appearance, general physiology, brain function and structure, and behaviour. Solitarious locusts actively avoid contact with other locusts, but gregarious locusts may live in vast, migrating swarms dominated by competition for scarce resources and interactions with other locusts. Different phase traits change at different rates: some behaviours take just a few hours, colouration takes a lifetime and the muscles and skeleton take several generations. The behavioural demands of group living are reflected in gregarious locusts having substantially larger brains with increased space devoted to higher processing. Phase differences are also apparent in the functioning of identified neurons and circuits. The whole transformation process of phase change pivots on the initial and rapid behavioural decision of whether or not to join with other locusts. The resulting positive feedback loops from the presence or absence of other locusts drives the process to completion. Phase change is accompanied by dramatic changes in neurochemistry, but only serotonin shows a substantial increase during the critical one- to four-hour window during which gregarious

  19. High-fat diet-induced memory impairment in triple-transgenic Alzheimer's disease (3xTgAD) mice is independent of changes in amyloid and tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Knight, Elysse M; Martins, Isaura V A; Gümüsgöz, Sarah; Allan, Stuart M; Lawrence, Catherine B

    2014-08-01

    Obesity and consumption of a high-fat diet are known to increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Diets high in fat also increase disease neuropathology and/or cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. However, the effect of a high-fat diet on both the neuropathology and memory impairments in the triple-transgenic mouse model of AD (3xTgAD) is unknown. Therefore, groups of 2-month-old male 3xTgAD and control (non-Tg) mice were maintained on a high-fat or control diet and memory was assessed at the age of 3-4, 7-8, 11-12, and 15-16 months using a series of behavioral tests. A comparable increase in body weight was observed in non-Tg and 3xTgAD mice after high-fat feeding at all ages tested but a significantly greater increase in epididymal adipose tissue was observed in 3xTgAD mice at the age of 7-8, 11-12, and 15-16 months. A high-fat diet caused memory impairments in non-Tg control mice as early as the age of 3-4 months. In 3xTgAD mice, high-fat consumption led to a reduction in the age of onset and an increase in the extent of memory impairments. Some of these effects of high-fat diet on cognition in non-Tg and 3xTgAD mice were transient, and the age at which cognitive impairment was detected depended on the behavioral test. The effect of high-fat diet on memory in the 3xTgAD mice was independent of changes in AD neuropathology as no significant differences in (plaques, oligomers) or tau neuropathology were observed. An acute increase in microglial activation was seen in high-fat fed 3xTgAD mice at the age of 3-4 months but in non-Tg control mice microglial activation was not observed until the age of 15-16 months. These data indicate therefore that a high-fat diet has rapid and long-lasting negative effects on memory in both control and AD mice that are associated with neuroinflammation, but independent of changes in beta amyloid and tau neuropathology in the AD mice.

  20. Multidimensional patterns of change in outpatient psychotherapy: the phase model revisited.

    PubMed

    Stulz, Niklaus; Lutz, Wolfgang

    2007-09-01

    In this study, groups of psychotherapy outpatients were identified on the basis of shared change patterns in the three dimensions of the phase model of psychotherapeutic outcome: well-being, symptom distress, and life functioning. Treatment courses provided by a national provider network of a managed care company in the United States (N = 1128) were analyzed using growth mixture models. Several initial patient characteristics (treatment expectations, amount of prior psychotherapy, and global assessment of functioning) allowed for the discrimination between three patient groups of shared change patterns. Those patterns can be classified into three groups as phase model consistent, partial rapid responders, or symptomatically highly impaired patients with each having typical change patterns. PMID:17674397

  1. Ab Initio Molecular-Dynamics Simulation of Neuromorphic Computing in Phase-Change Memory Materials.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Jonathan M; Loke, Desmond; Lee, Taehoon; Elliott, Stephen R

    2015-07-01

    We present an in silico study of the neuromorphic-computing behavior of the prototypical phase-change material, Ge2Sb2Te5, using ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations. Stepwise changes in structural order in response to temperature pulses of varying length and duration are observed, and a good reproduction of the spike-timing-dependent plasticity observed in nanoelectronic synapses is demonstrated. Short above-melting pulses lead to instantaneous loss of structural and chemical order, followed by delayed partial recovery upon structural relaxation. We also investigate the link between structural order and electrical and optical properties. These results pave the way toward a first-principles understanding of phase-change physics beyond binary switching. PMID:26040531

  2. Changes in protein structure monitored by use of gas‐phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange

    PubMed Central

    Beeston, Helen S.; Ault, James R.; Pringle, Steven D.; Brown, Jeffery M.

    2015-01-01

    The study of protein conformation by solution‐phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) coupled to MS is well documented. This involves monitoring the exchange of backbone amide protons with deuterium and provides details concerning the protein's tertiary structure. However, undesired back‐exchange during post‐HDX analyses can be difficult to control. Here, gas‐phase HDX‐MS, during which labile hydrogens on amino acid side chains are exchanged in sub‐millisecond time scales, has been employed to probe changes within protein structures. Addition of the solvent 2,2,2‐trifluoroethanol to a protein in solution can affect the structure of the protein, resulting in an increase in secondary and/or tertiary structure which is detected using circular dichroism. Using a Synapt G2‐S ESI‐mass spectrometer modified to allow deuterated ammonia into the transfer ion guide (situated between the ion mobility cell and the TOF analyser), gas‐phase HDX‐MS is shown to reflect minor structural changes experienced by the proteins β‐lactoglobulin and ubiquitin, as observed by the reduction in the level of deuterium incorporation. Additionally, the use of gas‐phase HDX‐MS to distinguish between co‐populated proteins conformers within a solution is demonstrated with the disordered protein calmodulin; the gas‐phase HDX‐MS results correspond directly with complementary data obtained by use of ion mobility spectrometry‐MS. PMID:25603979

  3. The Validity of Value-Added Estimates from Low-Stakes Testing Contexts: The Impact of Change in Test-Taking Motivation and Test Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finney, Sara J.; Sundre, Donna L.; Swain, Matthew S.; Williams, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    Accountability mandates often prompt assessment of student learning gains (e.g., value-added estimates) via achievement tests. The validity of these estimates have been questioned when performance on tests is low stakes for students. To assess the effects of motivation on value-added estimates, we assigned students to one of three test consequence…

  4. Relative permittivity behavior and temperature changes in linoleic acid during the phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kościesza, R.; Siegoczyński, R. M.; Rostocki, A. J.; Tefelski, D. B.; Kos, A.; Ejchart, W.

    2008-07-01

    In our earlier works several fatty liquids (edible oils and unsaturated fatty acids) which exhibit existence of a new phase induced by high pressure were presented. Conclusion of those experiments is that C=C bonds existence in these liquids plays a dominant role in a new phase occurrence. Relative permittivity in pure acids investigated till now seems to behave in specific way. That is why we decided to investigate linoleic acid (C18H32O2) under high pressure. In our experiment such quantities as: electric capacity, pressure and temperature were recorded. The experimental setup gives us also a possibility to conduct optical investigations. We observed a transmitted and scattered beams of close infrared light (λ = 800nm) in directions 0° and 90° towards the incident beam. Due to the rapid grow of temperature and the rapid change of transmitted and scattered beams we may say that observed phenomenon is a first order phase transition and a proof for the significant change of liquid structure. This paper contains time dependencies of permittivity, temperature, transmitted and scattered light intensity and also permittivity vs. pressure changes during the phase transition in linoleic acid and first of all measured data analysis which lets us explain the transition reasons.

  5. Modeling Cyclic Phase Change and Energy Storage in Solar Heat Receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Carsie A., III; Glakpe, Emmanuel K.; Cannon, Joseph N.; Kerslake, Thomas W.

    1997-01-01

    Numerical results pertaining to cyclic melting and freezing of an encapsulated phase change material (PCM), integrated into a solar heat receiver, have been reported. The cyclic nature of the present melt/freeze problem is relevant to latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems used to power solar Brayton engines in microgravity environments. Specifically, a physical and numerical model of the solar heat receiver component of NASA Lewis Research Center's Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) project was developed and results compared with available experimental data. Multi-conjugate effects such as the convective fluid flow of a low-Prandtl-number fluid, coupled with thermal conduction in the phase change material, containment tube and working fluid conduit were accounted for in the model. A single-band thermal radiation model was also included to quantify reradiative energy exchange inside the receiver and losses through the aperture. The eutectic LiF-CaF2 was used as the phase change material (PCM) and a mixture of He/Xe was used as the working fluid coolant. A modified version of the computer code HOTTube was used to generate results for comparisons with GTD data for both the subcooled and two-phase regimes. While qualitative trends were in close agreement for the balanced orbit modes, excellent quantitative agreement was observed for steady-state modes.

  6. Relation between bandgap and resistance drift in amorphous phase change materials

    PubMed Central

    Rütten, Martin; Kaes, Matthias; Albert, Andreas; Wuttig, Matthias; Salinga, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Memory based on phase change materials is currently the most promising candidate for bridging the gap in access time between memory and storage in traditional memory hierarchy. However, multilevel storage is still hindered by the so-called resistance drift commonly related to structural relaxation of the amorphous phase. Here, we present the temporal evolution of infrared spectra measured on amorphous thin films of the three phase change materials Ag4In3Sb67Te26, GeTe and the most popular Ge2Sb2Te5. A widening of the bandgap upon annealing accompanied by a decrease of the optical dielectric constant ε∞ is observed for all three materials. Quantitative comparison with experimental data for the apparent activation energy of conduction reveals that the temporal evolution of bandgap and activation energy can be decoupled. The case of Ag4In3Sb67Te26, where the increase of activation energy is significantly smaller than the bandgap widening, demonstrates the possibility to identify new phase change materials with reduced resistance drift. PMID:26621533

  7. Absorption intensity tunability in the near infrared region using phase-change nanostructure (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Abdurrahman; Saraydemir, Safak; Barut, Bilal; Kocer, Hasan

    2015-08-01

    Nanostructured thin film absorbers embedded with phase-change material (PCM) can provide large level of absorption intensity tunability in the near-infrared region. Germanium Antimonide Tellurite (Ge2Sb1Te4-GST) was employed as the phase-change material in the designed structures. The structure is composed of a periodic grating-type array of 200 nm thick Au buried with 100 nm-thick GST layer from the top of the Au layer. The period of the gratings is 2 μm and in each period, GST width is 0.5 μm. GST was selected as the active PCM because its optical properties undergo a substantial change during a structural transition from the amorphous to the crystalline phase. The optical absorption properties of the designed structures with respect to the geometric and material parameters were systematically investigated using finite-difference time-domain computations. It was shown that absorption intensity in the near-infrared region was tuned from the near-perfect to the near-zero level by switching the PCM from its amorphous to crystalline states. The distributions of the electric field and absorbed power at the resonant wavelengths with respect to different phases of the GST were investigated to further explain the physical origin of the absorption tuning. This study provides a path toward the realization of tunable infrared absorbers for the applications, such as selective infrared emitters, infrared camouflage, sensors, and photovoltaic devices.

  8. Detection and quantification of pipe damage from change in time of flight and phase.

    PubMed

    Amjad, Umar; Yadav, Susheel K; Kundu, Tribikram

    2015-09-01

    The use of ultrasonic guided waves for damage detection in pipes is continuously increasing. Generally longitudinal (axial symmetric) modes are excited and detected by PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) transducers in transmission mode for this purpose. In most studies the change in the received signal strength with the extent of damage has been investigated while in this study the change in the phase and the time-of-flight (TOF) of the propagating wave modes with the damage size is investigated. The cross-correlation technique is used to record the small changes in the TOF as the damage size varies in steel pipes. Dispersion curves are calculated to carefully identify the propagating wave modes. Differential TOF is recorded and compared for different propagating wave modes. Feature extraction techniques are used for extracting phase and time-frequency information. The main advantage of this approach is that unlike the recorded signal strength the TOF and the phase are not affected by the bonding condition between the transducer and the pipe. Therefore, if the pipe is not damaged but the transducer-pipe bonding is deteriorated then although the received signal strength is altered the TOF and phase remain same avoiding the false positive alarms of damage.

  9. A candidate Zr-doped Sb2Te alloy for phase change memory application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yonghui; Cheng, Yan; Zhu, Min; Ji, Xinglong; Wang, Qing; Song, Sannian; Song, Zhitang; Liu, Weili; Feng, Songlin

    2016-02-01

    Here, Zr-doped Sb2Te alloy is proposed for phase change memory (PCM). Zr-doping enhances the crystallization temperature and thermal stability of Sb2Te alloy effectively. Crystalline Zr2(Sb2Te)98 film is manifested as a single phase without phase separation and the growth of crystal grain is dramatically suppressed. The density change of Zr2(Sb2Te)98 material between amorphous and crystalline is ˜2.65 ± 0.03%, which is much smaller than that of Ge2Sb2Te5 (6.5%). Phase change memory cells based on Zr2(Sb2Te)98 material can be reversibly switched by applying 40-400 ns width voltage pulses, and the reset current is relatively small when comparing with the prototypical Ge2Sb2Sb5 material. The resistance ON-OFF ratio of about 1.3 orders of magnitude is enough for figuring "0" and "1" out. Besides, endurance up to 4.1 × 104 cycles makes Zr-doped Sb2Te alloy a potential candidate for PCM.

  10. Shock waves and phase changes in a large-heat-capacity fluid emerging from a tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, P. A.; Kim, Y.-G.; Carofano, G. C.

    1986-05-01

    The emergence of a shockwave from the open end of a shock tube is studied, with special emphasis on test fluids of high molar heat capacity, i.e. retrograde fluids. A variety of wavelike vapour-liquid phase changes are observed in such fluids, including the liquefaction shock, mixture-evaporation shock, condensation waves associated with shock splitting and liquid-evaporation waves (these phenomena have analogues in the polymorphic phase changes of solids; only the first two are treated in this paper). The open end of the shock-tube test section discharges into an observation chamber where photographs of the emerging flow are taken. Calculations were performed with the Benedict-Webb-Rubin, van der Waals and other equations of state. Numerical (finite-difference) predictions of the flow were made for single-phase and two-phase flows: solutions were tested against the experimental shock diffraction and vortex data of Skews. The phase-change properties of the test fluid can be quantified by the 'retrogradicity' r(T), measuring the difference in slope between the P, T isentrope and the vapour-pressure curve, and the 'kink' k(T), measuring the difference between the single-phase and mixture sound speeds. Mixture-evaporation (i.e. rerefaction) shocks appear to have a sonic-sonic or double Chapman-Jouguet structure and show agreement with amplitude predictions based on k(T). Liquefaction shocks are found to show a reproducible transition from regular, smooth shock fronts to irregular, chaotic shock fronts with increasing shock Mach number. This transition can be correlated with published stability limits.

  11. The measurement of red blood cell volume change induced by Ca2+ based on full field quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungrag; Lee, Ji Yong; Yang, Wenzhong; Kim, Dug Young

    2009-02-01

    We present the measurement of red blood cell (RBC) volume change induced by Ca2+ for a live cell imaging with full field quantitative phase microscopy (FFQPM). FFQPM is based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer combined with an inverted microscopy system. We present the effective method to obtain a clear image and an accurate volume of the cells. An edge detection technique is used to accurately resolve the boundary between the cell line and the suspension medium. The measurement of the polystyrene bead diameter and volume has been demonstrated the validity of our proposed method. The measured phase profile can be easily converted into thickness profile. The measured polystyrene bead volume and the simulated result are about 14.74 μm3 and 14.14 μm3, respectively. The experimental results of our proposed method agree well with the simulated results within less than 4 %. We have also measured the volume variation of a single RBC on a millisecond time scale. Its mean volume is 54.02 μm3 and its standard deviation is 0.52 μm3. With the proposed system, the shape and volume changes of RBC induced by the increased intracellular Ca2+ are measured after adding ionophore A23187. A discocyte RBC is deformed to a spherocyte due to the increased intracellular Ca2+ in RBC. The volume of the spherocyte is 47.88 μm3 and its standard deviation is 0.19 μm3. We have demonstrated that the volume measurement technique is easy, accurate, and robust method with high volume sensitivity (<0.0000452 μm3) and this provides the ability to study a biological phenomenon in Hematology.

  12. Potential for added value in temperature simulated by high-resolution nested RCMs in present climate and in the climate change signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Luca, Alejandro; de Elía, Ramón; Laprise, René

    2013-01-01

    Regional Climate Models (RCMs) have been developed in the last two decades in order to produce high-resolution climate information by downscaling Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models (AOGCMs) simulations or analyses of observed data. A crucial evaluation of RCMs worth is given by the assessment of the value added compared to the driving data. This evaluation is usually very complex due to the manifold circumstances that can preclude a fair assessment. In order to circumvent these issues, here we limit ourselves to estimating the potential of RCMs to add value over coarse-resolution data. We do this by quantifying the importance of fine-scale RCM-resolved features in the near-surface temperature, but disregarding their skill. The Reynolds decomposition technique is used to separate the variance of the time-varying RCM-simulated temperature field according to the contribution of large and small spatial scales and of stationary and transient processes. The temperature variance is then approximated by the contribution of four terms, two of them associated with coarse-scales (e.g., corresponding to the scales that can be simulated by AOGCMs) and two of them describing the original contribution of RCM simulations. Results show that the potential added value (PAV) emerges almost exclusively in regions characterised by important surface forcings either due to the presence of fine-scale topography or land-water contrasts. Moreover, some of the processes leading to small-scale variability appear to be related with relatively simple mechanisms such as the distinct physical properties of the Earth surface and the general variation of temperature with altitude in the Earth atmosphere. Finally, the article includes some results of the application of the PAV framework to the future temperature change signal due to anthropogenic greenhouse gasses. Here, contrary to previous studies centred on precipitation, findings suggest for surface temperature a relatively low potential

  13. Photo-induced optical activity in phase-change memory materials.

    PubMed

    Borisenko, Konstantin B; Shanmugam, Janaki; Williams, Benjamin A O; Ewart, Paul; Gholipour, Behrad; Hewak, Daniel W; Hussain, Rohanah; Jávorfi, Tamás; Siligardi, Giuliano; Kirkland, Angus I

    2015-03-05

    We demonstrate that optical activity in amorphous isotropic thin films of pure Ge2Sb2Te5 and N-doped Ge2Sb2Te5N phase-change memory materials can be induced using rapid photo crystallisation with circularly polarised laser light. The new anisotropic phase transition has been confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. This opens up the possibility of controlled induction of optical activity at the nanosecond time scale for exploitation in a new generation of high-density optical memory, fast chiroptical switches and chiral metamaterials.

  14. Structural transformation of Sb-based high-speed phase-change material.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Rie; Yamada, Noboru; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kifune, Kouichi

    2012-12-01

    The crystal structure of a phase-change recording material (the compound Ag(3.4)In(3.7)Sb(76.4)Te(16.5)) enclosed in a vacuum capillary tube was investigated at various temperatures in a heating process using a large Debye-Scherrer camera installed in BL02B2 at SPring-8. The amorphous phase of this material turns into a crystalline phase at around 416 K; this crystalline phase has an A7-type structure with atoms of Ag, In, Sb or Te randomly occupying the 6c site in the space group. This structure was maintained up to around 545 K as a single phase, although thermal expansion of the crystal lattice was observed. However, above this temperature, phase separation into AgInTe(2) and Sb-Te transpired. The first fragment, AgInTe(2), reliably maintained its crystal structure up to the melting temperature. On the other hand, the atomic configuration of the Sb-Te gradually varied with increasing temperature. This gradual structural transformation can be described as a continuous growth of the modulation period γ. PMID:23165592

  15. Numerical analysis of phase change materials for thermal control of power battery of high power dissipations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, X.; Zhang, H. Y.; Deng, Y. C.

    2016-08-01

    Solid-fluid phase change materials have been of increasing interest in various applications due to their high latent heat with minimum volume change. In this work, numerical analysis of phase change materials is carried out for the purpose of thermal control of the cylindrical power battery cells for applications in electric vehicles. Uniform heat density is applied at the battery cell, which is surrounded by phase change material (PCM) of paraffin wax type and contained in a metal housing. A two-dimensional geometry model is considered due to the model symmetry. The effects of power densities, heat transfer coefficients and onset melting temperatures are examined for the battery temperature evolution. Temperature plateaus can be observed from the present numerical analysis for the pure PCM cases, with the temperature level depending on the power densities, heat transfer coefficients, and melting temperatures. In addition, the copper foam of high thermal conductivity is inserted into the copper foam to enhance the heat transfer. In the modeling, the local thermal non-equilibrium between the metal foam and the PCM is taken into account and the temperatures for the metal foam and PCM are obtained respectively.

  16. Phase change cells and the verification of gallium as a thermal calibration reference in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latvikoski, Harri; Bingham, Gail E.; Topham, T. S.; Podolski, Igor

    2015-09-01

    The validation of models of global climate change and accurate measurement of the atmosphere and surface temperatures require that orbital sensors have low drift rates, and are monitored or regularly recalibrated by accepted standards. Phase change materials (PCM), such as those that make up the ITS-90 standard, are the basis for international commerce and have been suggested for monitoring and recalibration of orbital temperature sensors. Space Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) and its partners have been developing miniaturized phase change reference technologies that could be deployed on an orbital blackbody for nearly a decade. A significant part of this effort has been the exploration of the behavior of gallium (Ga) and its eutectics, gallium-tin (GaSn) and gallium-indium (GaIn) in conditions expected to be encountered in this application. In this paper, these behaviors are detailed and an example of a hardware design that could be used as an infrared blackbody calibration monitor is presented. To determine if and how microgravity will affect the behavior of Ga, the authors conducted an experiment on the International Space Station (ISS) and compared the observed phase change temperature with earth-based measurements. This paper also provides a brief description of the experiment hardware, microgravity considerations, and the pre-flight, flight and post-flight data analysis.

  17. Segmented strings in AdS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callebaut, Nele; Gubser, Steven S.; Samberg, Andreas; Toldo, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    We study segmented strings in flat space and in AdS 3. In flat space, these well known classical motions describe strings which at any instant of time are piecewise linear. In AdS 3, the worldsheet is composed of faces each of which is a region bounded by null geodesics in an AdS 2 subspace of AdS 3. The time evolution can be described by specifying the null geodesic motion of kinks in the string at which two segments are joined. The outcome of collisions of kinks on the worldsheet can be worked out essentially using considerations of causality. We study several examples of closed segmented strings in AdS 3 and find an unexpected quasi-periodic behavior. We also work out a WKB analysis of quantum states of yo-yo strings in AdS 5 and find a logarithmic term reminiscent of the logarithmic twist of string states on the leading Regge trajectory.

  18. The Safety and Immunological Effects of rAd5-EBV-LMP2 Vaccine in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients: A Phase I Clinical Trial and Two-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Si, Yongfeng; Deng, Zhuoxia; Lan, Guiping; Du, Haijun; Wang, Yongli; Si, Jinyuan; Wei, Jiazhang; Weng, Jingjin; Qin, Yangda; Huang, Bo; Yang, Yong; Qin, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded latent membrane protein 2 (LMP2) promotes nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) progression. Previously, we reported that the dendritic cells (DCs) transfected with EBV-LMP2 recombinant serotype 5 adenoviruses (rAd5) induced anti-tumor effect by eliciting cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs)-mediated immune response in vitro and the adenoviral vaccine of EBV-LMP2 (rAd5-EBV-LMP2) stimulated antigen-specific cellular immunity in mice. However, the safety and immunological effect of rAd5-EBV-LMP2 vaccine in human still remained unknown. Here we conducted a single-center, non-randomized, open-label, single-arm phase I clinical trial to clarify this unsolved issue. A total of 24 patients with regional advanced NPC were sequentially enrolled into three dose level groups (2×10(9), 2×10(10), 2×10(11) vp). The rAd5-EBV-LMP2 vaccines were intramuscularly injected for four times within 28 d (D0, D7, D14, D28). Blood samples were harvested immediately before every vaccination, one week and one month after the last vaccination (D0, D7, D14, D28, D35, D58). All the vaccine inoculation-related toxicities presented as grade I/II adverse events. The most frequent systemic adverse reactions were fatigue (33.0%, 8/24), myalgia (29.2%, 7/24) and cough (29.2%, 7/24), while the most common regional adverse reaction was tenderness in the inoculation site (54.2%, 13/24). In addition, proportion of CD(3+)CD(4+) cells in peripheral blood was significantly increased in the high dose group (2×10(11) vp). The rAd5-EBV-LMP2 vaccine was generally well-tolerated and the high dose (2×10(11) vp) is recommended to be adopted in phase II studies. The long-term outcome of rAd5-EBV-LMP2 vaccine inoculation is required to be determined in following placebo-controlled trials. PMID:27477649

  19. Phase-change material-based nanoantennas with tunable radiation patterns.

    PubMed

    Alaee, R; Albooyeh, M; Tretyakov, S; Rockstuhl, C

    2016-09-01

    We suggest a novel switchable plasmonic dipole nanoantenna operating at mid-infrared frequencies that exploits phase-change materials. We show that the induced dipole moments of a nanoantenna, where a germanium antimony telluride (Ge3Sb2Te6 or GST for short) nanopatch acts as a spacer between two coupled metallic nanopatches, can be controlled in a disruptive sense. By switching GST between its crystalline and amorphous phases, the nanoantenna can exhibit either an electric or a balanced magneto-electric dipole-like radiation. While the former radiation pattern is omnidirectional, the latter is directive. Based on this property exciting switching devices can be perceived, such as a metasurface whose functionality can be switched between an absorber and a reflector. The switching between stable amorphous and crystalline phases occurs on timescales of nanoseconds and can be achieved by an electrical or optical pulse. PMID:27607982

  20. Ultrafast terahertz-induced response of GeSbTe phase-change materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Michael J.; Zalden, Peter; Chen, Frank; Weems, Ben; Chatzakis, Ioannis; Xiong, Feng; Jeyasingh, Rakesh; Pop, Eric; Philip Wong, H.-S.; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Wuttig, Matthias; Lindenberg, Aaron M.

    2014-06-23

    The time-resolved ultrafast electric field-driven response of crystalline and amorphous GeSbTe films has been measured all-optically, pumping with single-cycle terahertz pulses as a means of biasing phase-change materials on a sub-picosecond time-scale. Utilizing the near-band-gap transmission as a probe of the electronic and structural response below the switching threshold, we observe a field-induced heating of the carrier system and resolve the picosecond-time-scale energy relaxation processes and their dependence on the sample annealing condition in the crystalline phase. In the amorphous phase, an instantaneous electroabsorption response is observed, quadratic in the terahertz field, followed by field-driven lattice heating, with Ohmic behavior up to 200 kV/cm.

  1. Numerical Modeling of Three-Dimensional Fluid Flow with Phase Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esmaeeli, Asghar; Arpaci, Vedat

    1999-01-01

    We present a numerical method to compute phase change dynamics of three-dimensional deformable bubbles. The full Navier-Stokes and energy equations are solved for both phases by a front tracking/finite difference technique. The fluid boundary is explicitly tracked by discrete points that are connected by triangular elements to form a front that is used to keep the stratification of material properties sharp and to calculate the interfacial source terms. Two simulations are presented to show robustness of the method in handling complex phase boundaries. In the first case, growth of a vapor bubble in zero gravity is studied where large volume increase of the bubble is managed by adaptively increasing the front resolution. In the second case, growth of a bubble under high gravity is studied where indentation at the rear of the bubble results in a region of large curvature which challenges the front tracking in three dimensions.

  2. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Liquid-Gas Taylor Flows incorporating Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.; Walsh, P. A.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the heat transfer characteristics associated with liquid-gas Taylor flows in mini channels incorporating microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM). Taylor flows have been shown to result in heat transfer enhancements due to the fluid recirculation experienced within liquid slugs which is attributable to the alternating liquid slug and gas bubble flow structure. Microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM) also offer significant potential with increased thermal capacity due to the latent heat required to cause phase change. The primary aim of this work was to examine the overall heat transfer potential associated with combining these two novel liquid cooling technologies. By investigating the local heat transfer characteristics, the augmentation/degradation over single phase liquid cooling was quantified while examining the effects of dimensionless variables, including Reynolds number, liquid slug length and gas void fraction. An experimental test facility was developed which had a heated test section and allowed MPCM-air Taylor flows to be subjected to a constant heat flux boundary condition. Infrared thermography was used to record high resolution experimental wall temperature measurements and determine local heat transfer coefficients from the thermal entrance point. 30.2% mass particle concentration of the MPCM suspension fluid was examined as it provided the maximum latent heat for absorption. Results demonstrate a significant reduction in experimental wall temperatures associated with MPCM-air Taylor flows when compared with the Graetz solution for conventional single phase coolants. Total enhancement in the thermally developed region is observed to be a combination of the individual contributions due to recirculation within the liquid slugs and also absorption of latent heat. Overall, the study highlights the potential heat transfer enhancements that are attainable within heat exchange devices employing MPCM

  3. Heat transfer enhancement for thermal energy storage using metal foams embedded within phase change materials (PCMs)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, C.Y.; Lu, W.; Tian, Y.

    2010-08-15

    In this paper the experimental investigation on the solid/liquid phase change (melting and solidification) processes have been carried out. Paraffin wax RT58 is used as phase change material (PCM), in which metal foams are embedded to enhance the heat transfer. During the melting process, the test samples are electrically heated on the bottom surface with a constant heat flux. The PCM with metal foams has been heated from the solid state to the pure liquid phase. The temperature differences between the heated wall and PCM have been analysed to examine the effects of heat flux and metal foam structure (pore size and relative density). Compared to the results of the pure PCM sample, the effect of metal foam on solid/liquid phase change heat transfer is very significant, particularly at the solid zone of PCMs. When the PCM starts melting, natural convection can improve the heat transfer performance, thereby reducing the temperature difference between the wall and PCM. The addition of metal foam can increase the overall heat transfer rate by 3-10 times (depending on the metal foam structures and materials) during the melting process (two-phase zone) and the pure liquid zone. The tests for investigating the solidification process under different cooling conditions (e.g. natural convection and forced convection) have been carried out. The results show that the use of metal foams can make the sample solidified much faster than pure PCM samples, evidenced by the solidification time being reduced by more than half. In addition, a two-dimensional numerical analysis has been carried out for heat transfer enhancement in PCMs by using metal foams, and the prediction results agree reasonably well with the experimental data. (author)

  4. Effects of the post-perovskite phase change on the thermal evolution of the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, T.; Tackley, P. J.

    2005-05-01

    The heat flow through the core-mantle boundary is a key quantity for understanding the thermal evolution of the Earth??s core, as the geodynamo is presumably strongly affected by the temporal variation of CMB heat flow. A major challenge is to understand how this heat flux can have remained high enough to power the geodynamo over geological history without resulting in larger-than-observed cooling of the core and growth of the inner core. This problem has been approached using various coupled models of mantle convection and core heat balance: (1) Simple isochemical models using parameterized mantle convection and core heat balance [Buffett, 2002; Labrosse, 2003; Nimmo et al., 2004] have too rapid core cooling hence a too large inner core, (2) models with a global layer of dense material above the CMB [McNamara and van Keken, 2000] have a CMB heat flow that is too low for the geodynamo to occur, but (3) with discontinuous chemical layering [Nakagawa and Tackley, 2004], viable evolution solutions are obtained, with the best scenarios requiring 100-200 ppm radioactive potassium in the core [Nakagawa et al., 2004]. Recently, using high pressure experiments and ab initio calculations, a new perovskite to post-perovskite phase change was discovered near the CMB [Murakami et al., 2004; Oganov and Ono, 2004]. Dynamically, such a phase change results in small-scale instabilities in lower thermal boundary layer and higher CMB heat flow [Nakagawa and Tackley, 2004]. Furthermore, if the CMB is in the perovskite stability field then a double-crossing of the phase boundary may occur [Hernlund et al., 2005]. As the core and mantle cool with time, the location and thickness of the layer of post-perovskite phase will change [Nakagawa and Tackley, 2005]. In this study, a coupled model of thermo-chemical mantle convection including the post-perovskite phase change and a global heat balance in the core based on the entropy variation is used to assess the CMB heat flow, thermo

  5. The effect of Ta interface on the crystallization of amorphous phase change material thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzi, G. E.; Noé, P. Marra, M.; Sabbione, C.; Fillot, F.; Bernier, N.; Ferrand, J.; Maîtrejean, S.; Hippert, F.

    2014-06-02

    The crystallization of amorphous GeTe and Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase change material films, with thickness between 10 and 100 nm, sandwiched between either Ta or SiO{sub 2} layers, was investigated by optical reflectivity. Ta cladding layers were found to increase the crystallization temperature, even for films as thick as 100 nm. X-Ray diffraction investigations of crystallized GeTe films showed a very weak texture in Ta cladded films, in contrast with the strong texture observed for SiO{sub 2} cladding layers. This study shows that crystallization mechanism of phase change materials can be highly impacted by interface effects, even for relatively thick films.

  6. Time-resolved analysis of the set process in an electrical phase-change memory device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dae-Hwan; Cheong, Byung-ki; Jeong, Jeung-hyun; Lee, Taek Sung; Kim, In Ho; Kim, Won Mok; Huh, Joo-Youl

    2005-12-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out on the kinetic nature of the set process in a phase change memory device by combined analyses of set voltage wave forms and time-resolved low-field resistances. As it turned out, the progress of a set process may be measured in terms of three characteristic times in sequence i.e., threshold switching time tth, incubation time for crystallization tinc, and complete set time tset. These characteristic times are supposed to demarcate, in some measure, different stages of crystallization in the memory material during a set process. Each of these times has a strong dependence on input pulse voltage and particularly threshold switching time tth was found to have an exponentially decaying dependence. The latter may be related to the decreasing capacitance of an amorphous phase-change material with approaching threshold switching.

  7. Characterization of a lime-pozzolan plaster containing phase change material

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlíková, Milena; Pavlík, Zbyšek; Trník, Anton; Pokorný, Jaroslav; Černý, Robert

    2015-03-10

    A PCM (Phase Change Material) modified lime-pozzolan plaster for improvement of thermal energy storage of building envelopes is studied in the paper. The investigated plaster is composed of lime hydrate, pozzolan admixture based on metakaolin and mudstone, silica sand, water and paraffin wax encapsulated in polymer capsule. The reference plaster without PCM application is studied as well. The analyzed materials are characterized by bulk density, matrix density, total open porosity, compressive strength and pore size distribution. The temperature of phase change, heat of fusion and crystallization are studied using DSC (Difference Scanning Calorimetry) analysis performed in air atmosphere. In order to get information on materials hygrothermal performance, determination of thermal and hygric properties is done in laboratory conditions. Experimental data reveal a substantial improvement of heat storage capacity of PCM-modified plaster as compared to the reference material without PCM.

  8. A microreactor with phase-change microvalves for batch chemical synthesis at high temperatures and pressures.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoxiao; Tseng, Wei-Yu; Eddings, Mark; Keng, Pei Yuin; van Dam, R Michael

    2014-01-21

    We present a simple microreactor with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) phase-change valves suitable for performing batch organic chemistry under high temperature and pressure conditions. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate a radiofluorination reaction important in the synthesis of [(18)F]FAC, a new positron emission tomography biomarker for immune system monitoring and prediction of chemotherapy response. We achieved high radioactivity recovery (97 ± 1%, n = 3) and conversion efficiency (83 ± 1%, n = 3), comparable to that achieved with macroscale systems, but with a volume 30× smaller. This platform overcomes the limitations of previously reported phase-change valves in terms of compatibility with organic chemistry, and extends the range of reaction conditions for carrying out harsh batch chemistry at the microscale.

  9. Simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers with over three orders of concentration difference using phase change nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaoming; Sun, Zhaoyong; Ma, Liyuan; Su, Ming

    2011-03-15

    A big challenge for multiplexed detection of cancer biomarkers is that biomarker concentrations in body fluid differs several orders of magnitude. Existing techniques are not suitable to detect low- and high-concentration biomarkers (protein and DNA) at the same time, and liquid chromatography or electrophoresis is used to separate or purify target biomarkers before analysis. This paper describes a new broad-range biomarker assay using solid to liquid phase change nanoparticles, where a panel of metallic nanoparticles (i.e., metals and eutectic alloys) are modified with a panel of ligands to establish a one-to-one correspondence and attached onto ligand-modified substrates by forming sandwiched complexes. The melting peak and fusion enthalpy of phase change nanoparticles during thermal analysis reflect the type and concentration of biomarkers, respectively. The thermal readout condition can be adjusted in such a way that multiple biomarkers with concentration difference over 3 orders of magnitude have been simultaneously detected under the same condition.

  10. Study on WSb3Te material for phase-change memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yun; Zhou, Xilin; Han, Peigao; Song, Zhitang; Wu, Liangcai; Zhu, Chengqiu; Guo, Wenjing; Xu, Ling; Ma, Zhongyuan; Song, Lianke

    2015-11-01

    The phase-change performance of WxSb3Te material were systemically investigated by in situ resistance-temperature measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman scattering, adhesive strength test and transmission electron microscope (TEM) in this paper. Experimental results show that the thermal stability of Sb3Te was increased significantly with W doping. XRD and TEM results prove that the incorporation of W plays a role in suppressing the crystallization of Sb3Te films, causing smaller grain size. Furthermore, the adhesive strength between W electrode and phase-change material was increased obviously by W addition and a relatively rapid SET/RESET operation of 10 ns is realized with large sensing margin.

  11. High thermal stable and fast switching Ni-Ge-Te alloy for phase change memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liangliang; Wu, Liangcai; Zhu, Wenqing; Ji, Xinglong; Zheng, Yonghui; Song, Zhitang; Rao, Feng; Song, Sannian; Ma, Zhongyuan; Xu, Ling

    2015-12-01

    Ni-Ge-Te phase change material is proposed and investigated for phase change memory (PCM) applications. With Ni addition, the crystallization temperature, the data retention ability, and the crystallization speed are remarkably improved. The Ni-Ge-Te material has a high crystallization temperature (250 °C) and good data retention ability (149 °C). A reversible switching between SET and RESET state can be achieved by an electrical pulse as short as 6 ns. Up to ˜3 × 104 SET/RESET cycles are obtained with a resistance ratio of about two orders of magnitude. All of these demonstrate that Ni-Ge-Te alloy is a promising material for high speed and high temperature PCM applications.

  12. Conditional entropies, phase synchronization and changes in the directionality of information flow in neural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zochowski, Michal; Dzakpasu, Rhonda

    2004-03-01

    We devised a novel measure that dynamically evaluates temporal interdependences between two coupled units based on the properties of the distributions of their relative interevent intervals. We investigate its properties on the system of two coupled non-identical Rössler oscillators and a system of non-identical Hindmarsh-Rose models of thalamocortical neurons and show that the measure highlights the properties of phase synchronization observed in those two systems. We postulate that the observed properties of the phase lag, in conjunction with the experimentally observed activity-dependent synaptic modification in the neural systems, may drive the changes of the direction of information flow in a neural network, and thus the measure can play an important role in assessing those changes.

  13. Lateral conduction effects on heat-transfer data obtained with the phase-change paint technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maise, G.; Rossi, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    A computerized tool, CAPE, (Conduction Analysis Program using Eigenvalues) has been developed to account for lateral heat conduction in wind tunnel models in the data reduction of the phase-change paint technique. The tool also accounts for the effects of finite thickness (thin wings) and surface curvature. A special reduction procedure using just one time of melt is also possible on leading edges. A novel iterative numerical scheme was used, with discretized spatial coordinates but analytic integration in time, to solve the inverse conduction problem involved in the data reduction. A yes-no chart is provided which tells the test engineer when various corrections are large enough so that CAPE should be used. The accuracy of the phase-change paint technique in the presence of finite thickness and lateral conduction is also investigated.

  14. Quantification of unsteady heat transfer and phase changing process inside small icing water droplets.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zheyan; Hu, Hui

    2009-05-01

    We report progress made in our recent effort to develop and implement a novel, lifetime-based molecular tagging thermometry (MTT) technique to quantify unsteady heat transfer and phase changing process inside small icing water droplets pertinent to wind turbine icing phenomena. The lifetime-based MTT technique was used to achieve temporally and spatially resolved temperature distribution measurements within small, convectively cooled water droplets to quantify unsteady heat transfer within the small water droplets in the course of convective cooling process. The transient behavior of phase changing process within small icing water droplets was also revealed clearly by using the MTT technique. Such measurements are highly desirable to elucidate underlying physics to improve our understanding about important microphysical phenomena pertinent to ice formation and accreting process as water droplets impinging onto wind turbine blades. PMID:19485525

  15. In-situ crystallization of GeTe\\GaSb phase change memory stacked films

    SciTech Connect

    Velea, A.; Borca, C. N.; Grolimund, D.; Socol, G.; Galca, A. C.; Popescu, M.; Bokhoven, J. A. van

    2014-12-21

    Single and double layer phase change memory structures based on GeTe and GaSb thin films were deposited by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Their crystallization behavior was studied using in-situ synchrotron techniques. Electrical resistance vs. temperature investigations, using the four points probe method, showed transition temperatures of 138 °C and 198 °C for GeTe and GaSb single films, respectively. It was found that after GeTe crystallization in the stacked films, Ga atoms from the GaSb layer diffused in the vacancies of the GeTe crystalline structure. Therefore, the crystallization temperature of the Sb-rich GaSb layer is decreased by more than 30 °C. Furthermore, at 210 °C, the antimony excess from GaSb films crystallizes as a secondary phase. At higher annealing temperatures, the crystalline Sb phase increased on the expense of GaSb crystalline phase which was reduced. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements at the Ga and Ge K-edges revealed changes in their local atomic environments as a function of the annealing temperature. Simulations unveil a tetrahedral configuration in the amorphous state and octahedral configuration in the crystalline state for Ge atoms, while Ga is four-fold coordinated in both as-deposited and annealed samples.

  16. A general analysis of phase change energy storage for solar energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, C.K.; Choi, C.Y. . Lab. for Computer Science and Engineering)

    1992-11-01

    A unified approach is developed for the analysis of one, two, or three-phase melting of solidification of a semi-infinite medium with or without subcooling or superheating and imposed with constant, monotonic, or cyclic temperature or flux conditions. A source and sink method is presented in which a sink front is used to characterize a freeze front. An integrodifferential equation is then derived for the interface position which is linearized locally for numerical solution. This position is, in turn, used as input for the determination of the temperature distrubution and energy storage and release in different phases of the medium. The numerical solution presented in this paper has shown to be unique, convergent, stable, and accurate. The analysis has been applied to the study of phase change in a subcooled paraffin wax immposed with a cyclic temperature condition. Test results yield some interesting phenomena related to the merging of phase-change fronts and hysteresis of energy storage and release, among others, which have not previously been reported in the literature. Their relations to the energy storage and release are particularly stressed in the paper.

  17. Numerical solution for melting of unfixed rectangular phase-change material under low-gravity environment

    SciTech Connect

    Asako, Y. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Faghri, M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Charmchi, M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Bahrami, P.A. )

    1994-02-01

    An enthalpy method is employed to solve transport processes associated with melting of an unfixed rectangular phase change material (PCM) in a low-gravitational environment. This method permits the phase-change problems to be solved within fixed numerical grids, hence eliminating the need for coordinate transformation. The PCM, initially at its melting temperature, is placed inside a rectangular enclosure. The lower surface of the container is then exposed to a uniform temperature higher than the PCM melting temperature. The difference in densities of solid and liquid causes a force imbalance on the solid phase exceeds that of the liquid, the solid continually moves downward as melting progresses and hence generates a flow field within the liquid. The problem is formulated as a one-domain problem with the possibility of melting from all the PCM surfaces, and no approximation is made about the liquid film thickness under the melt. The governing equations are discretized by using a control-volume-based finite difference scheme with a new iterative method to correct for the downward solid-phase velocity. This will also speed up the convergence of the numerical procedure. The results are presented in the form of a parametric study of the effects of Archimedes number, Stefan number, Prandtl number, and the geometric parameters on the melt thickness, the downward solid velocity, the elevation of the top surface, and the volume of the solid PCM. They show that in a low-gravitational environment, the melting rate is very slow.

  18. Switchable Ultrathin Quarter-wave Plate in Terahertz Using Active Phase-change Metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dacheng; Zhang, Lingchao; Gu, Yinghong; Mehmood, M. Q.; Gong, Yandong; Srivastava, Amar; Jian, Linke; Venkatesan, T.; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hong, Minghui

    2015-10-01

    Metamaterials open up various exotic means to control electromagnetic waves and among them polarization manipulations with metamaterials have attracted intense attention. As of today, static responses of resonators in metamaterials lead to a narrow-band and single-function operation. Extension of the working frequency relies on multilayer metamaterials or different unit cells, which hinder the development of ultra-compact optical systems. In this work, we demonstrate a switchable ultrathin terahertz quarter-wave plate by hybridizing a phase change material, vanadium dioxide (VO2), with a metasurface. Before the phase transition, VO2 behaves as a semiconductor and the metasurface operates as a quarter-wave plate at 0.468 THz. After the transition to metal phase, the quarter-wave plate operates at 0.502 THz. At the corresponding operating frequencies, the metasurface converts a linearly polarized light into a circularly polarized light. This work reveals the feasibility to realize tunable/active and extremely low-profile polarization manipulation devices in the terahertz regime through the incorporation of such phase-change metasurfaces, enabling novel applications of ultrathin terahertz meta-devices.

  19. Switchable Ultrathin Quarter-wave Plate in Terahertz Using Active Phase-change Metasurface

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dacheng; Zhang, Lingchao; Gu, Yinghong; Mehmood, M. Q.; Gong, Yandong; Srivastava, Amar; Jian, Linke; Venkatesan, T.; Qiu, Cheng-Wei; Hong, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials open up various exotic means to control electromagnetic waves and among them polarization manipulations with metamaterials have attracted intense attention. As of today, static responses of resonators in metamaterials lead to a narrow-band and single-function operation. Extension of the working frequency relies on multilayer metamaterials or different unit cells, which hinder the development of ultra-compact optical systems. In this work, we demonstrate a switchable ultrathin terahertz quarter-wave plate by hybridizing a phase change material, vanadium dioxide (VO2), with a metasurface. Before the phase transition, VO2 behaves as a semiconductor and the metasurface operates as a quarter-wave plate at 0.468 THz. After the transition to metal phase, the quarter-wave plate operates at 0.502 THz. At the corresponding operating frequencies, the metasurface converts a linearly polarized light into a circularly polarized light. This work reveals the feasibility to realize tunable/active and extremely low-profile polarization manipulation devices in the terahertz regime through the incorporation of such phase-change metasurfaces, enabling novel applications of ultrathin terahertz meta-devices. PMID:26442614

  20. Two dopamine receptors play different roles in phase change of the migratory locust

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaojiao; Ma, Zongyuan; Kang, Le

    2015-01-01

    The migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, shows remarkable phenotypic plasticity at behavioral, physiological, and morphological levels in response to fluctuation in population density. Our previous studies demonstrated that dopamine (DA) and the genes in the dopamine metabolic pathway mediate phase change in Locusta. However, the functions of different dopamine receptors in modulating locust phase change have not been fully explored. In the present study, DA concentration in the brain increased during crowding and decreased during isolation. The expression level of dopamine receptor 1 (Dop1) increased from 1 to 4 h of crowding, but remained unchanged during isolation. Injection of Dop1 agonist SKF38393 into the brains of solitary locusts promoted gregarization, induced conspecific attraction-response and increased locomotion. RNAi knockdown of Dop1 and injection of antagonist SCH23390 in gregarious locusts induced solitary behavior, promoted the shift to repulsion-response and reduced locomotion. By contrast, the expression level of dopamine receptor 2 (Dop2) gradually increased during isolation, but remained stable during crowding. During the isolation of gregarious locusts, injection of Dop2 antagonist S(–)-sulpiride or RNAi knockdown of Dop2 inhibited solitarization, maintained conspecific attraction-response and increased locomotion; by comparison, the isolated controls displayed conspecific repulsion-response and weaker motility. Activation of Dop2 in solitary locusts through injection of agonist, R(-)-TNPA, did not affect their behavioral state. Thus, DA-Dop1 signaling in the brain of Locusta induced the gregariousness, whereas DA-Dop2 signaling mediated the solitariness. Our study demonstrated that Dop1 and Dop2 modulated locust phase change in two different directions. Further investigation of Locusta Dop1 and Dop2 functions in modulating phase change will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying phenotypic plasticity in locusts