Science.gov

Sample records for adding white noise

  1. Different Effects of Adding White Noise on Cognitive Performance of Sub-, Normal and Super-Attentive School Children

    PubMed Central

    Helps, Suzannah K.; Bamford, Susan; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.; Söderlund, Göran B. W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Noise often has detrimental effects on performance. However, because of the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), auditory white noise (WN) can alter the “signal to noise” ratio and improve performance. The Moderate Brain Arousal (MBA) model postulates different levels of internal “neural noise” in individuals with different attentional capacities. This in turn determines the particular WN level most beneficial in each individual case–with one level of WN facilitating poor attenders but hindering super-attentive children. The objective of the present study is to find out if added WN affects cognitive performance differently in children that differ in attention ability. Methods Participants were teacher-rated super- (N = 25); normal- (N = 29) and sub-attentive (N = 36) children (aged 8 to 10 years). Two non-executive function (EF) tasks (a verbal episodic recall task and a delayed verbal recognition task) and two EF tasks (a visuo-spatial working memory test and a Go-NoGo task) were performed under three WN levels. The non-WN condition was only used to control for potential differences in background noise in the group testing situations. Results There were different effects of WN on performance in the three groups-adding moderate WN worsened the performance of super-attentive children for both task types and improved EF performance in sub-attentive children. The normal-attentive children’s performance was unaffected by WN exposure. The shift from moderate to high levels of WN had little further effect on performance in any group. Significance The predicted differential effect of WN on performance was confirmed. However, the failure to find evidence for an inverted U function challenges current theories. Alternative explanations are discussed. We propose that WN therapy should be further investigated as a possible non-pharmacological treatment for inattention. PMID:25393410

  2. Hypermedicalization in White Noise.

    PubMed

    Benson, Josef

    2015-09-01

    The Nazis hijacked Germany's medical establishment and appropriated medical language to hegemonize their ideology. In White Noise, shifting medical information stifles the public into docility. In Nazi Germany the primacy of language and medical authority magnified the importance of academic doctors. The muddling of identities caused complex insecurities and the need for psychological doubles. In White Noise, Professor Gladney is driven by professional insecurities to enact a double in Murray. Through the manipulation of language and medical overreach the U.S., exemplified in the novel White Noise, has become a hypermedicalized society where the spirit of the Hippocratic Oath has eroded.

  3. White noise and sleep induction.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, J A; Moran, D J; Lee, A; Talbert, D

    1990-01-01

    We studied two groups of 20 neonates, between 2 and 7 days old, in a randomised trial. Sixteen (80%) fell asleep within five minutes in response to white noise compared with only five (25%) who fell asleep spontaneously in the control group. White noise may help mothers settle difficult babies. PMID:2405784

  4. Entangled light from white noise.

    PubMed

    Plenio, M B; Huelga, S F

    2002-05-13

    An atom that couples to two distinct leaky optical cavities is driven by an external optical white noise field. We describe how entanglement between the light fields sustained by two optical cavities arises in such a situation. The entanglement is maximized for intermediate values of the cavity damping rates and the intensity of the white noise field, vanishing both for small and for large values of these parameters and thus exhibiting a stochastic-resonancelike behavior. This example illustrates the possibility of generating entanglement by exclusively incoherent means and sheds new light on the constructive role noise may play in certain tasks of interest for quantum information processing.

  5. 1/f noise outperforms white noise in sensitizing baroreflex function in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Soma, Rika; Nozaki, Daichi; Kwak, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2003-08-15

    We show that externally added 1/f noise more effectively sensitizes the baroreflex centers in the human brain than white noise. We examined the compensatory heart rate response to a weak periodic signal introduced via venous blood pressure receptors while adding 1/f or white noise with the same variance to the brain stem through bilateral cutaneous stimulation of the vestibular afferents. In both cases, this noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation optimized covariance between the weak input signals and the heart rate responses. However, the optimal level with 1/f noise was significantly lower than with white noise, suggesting a functional benefit of 1/f noise for neuronal information transfer in the brain.

  6. 1/f Noise Outperforms White Noise in Sensitizing Baroreflex Function in the Human Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soma, Rika; Nozaki, Daichi; Kwak, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2003-08-01

    We show that externally added 1/f noise more effectively sensitizes the baroreflex centers in the human brain than white noise. We examined the compensatory heart rate response to a weak periodic signal introduced via venous blood pressure receptors while adding 1/f or white noise with the same variance to the brain stem through bilateral cutaneous stimulation of the vestibular afferents. In both cases, this noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation optimized covariance between the weak input signals and the heart rate responses. However, the optimal level with 1/f noise was significantly lower than with white noise, suggesting a functional benefit of 1/f noise for neuronal information transfer in the brain.

  7. White Noise Path Integrals in Stochastic Neurodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpio-Bernido, M. Victoria; Bernido, Christopher C.

    2008-06-01

    The white noise path integral approach is used in stochastic modeling of neural activity, where the primary dynamical variables are the relative membrane potentials, while information on transmembrane ionic currents is contained in the drift coefficient. The white noise path integral allows a natural framework and can be evaluated explicitly to yield a closed form for the conditional probability density.

  8. Facilitation of Retention by White Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumeister, Alfred A.; Kistler, Doris

    1975-01-01

    This study attempted to determine if white noise (an arousing stimulus), when presented at the time of recall, facilitates performance of second and fifth grade students, and if this effect generalizes across different kinds of learning tasks. Findings indicate that white noise produces improvements in performance in both age groups. (GO)

  9. White noise does not induce fetal sleep.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, E Z; Jakobi, P; Talmon, R; Shenhav, R; Weissman, A

    1993-01-01

    White noise has been shown to induce sleep in newborns. We sought to examine whether this type of sound will also induce a quiet state in the fetus. Twenty-two fetuses at 36-41 weeks of gestation were exposed to white noise during an active state. The sound was delivered for 5 min at an intensity of 100 dB. No significant change in fetal activity was noted following the sound.

  10. High level white noise generator

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  11. Titration of chaos with added noise

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Chi-Sang; Barahona, Mauricio

    2001-01-01

    Deterministic chaos has been implicated in numerous natural and man-made complex phenomena ranging from quantum to astronomical scales and in disciplines as diverse as meteorology, physiology, ecology, and economics. However, the lack of a definitive test of chaos vs. random noise in experimental time series has led to considerable controversy in many fields. Here we propose a numerical titration procedure as a simple “litmus test” for highly sensitive, specific, and robust detection of chaos in short noisy data without the need for intensive surrogate data testing. We show that the controlled addition of white or colored noise to a signal with a preexisting noise floor results in a titration index that: (i) faithfully tracks the onset of deterministic chaos in all standard bifurcation routes to chaos; and (ii) gives a relative measure of chaos intensity. Such reliable detection and quantification of chaos under severe conditions of relatively low signal-to-noise ratio is of great interest, as it may open potential practical ways of identifying, forecasting, and controlling complex behaviors in a wide variety of physical, biomedical, and socioeconomic systems. PMID:11416195

  12. P3a from white noise.

    PubMed

    Frank, David W; Yee, Ryan B; Polich, John

    2012-08-01

    P3a and P3b event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were elicited with an auditory three-stimulus (target, distracter, and standard) discrimination task in which subjects responded only to the target. Distracter stimuli consisted of white noise or novel sounds with stimulus characteristics perceptually matched. Target/standard discrimination difficulty was manipulated by varying target/standard pitch differences to produce relatively easy, medium, and hard tasks. Error rate and response time increased with increases in task difficulty. P3a was larger for the white noise compared to novel sounds, maximum over the central/parietal recording sites, and did not differ in size across difficulty levels. P3b was unaffected by distracter type, decreased as task difficulty increased, and maximum over the parietal recording sites. The findings indicate that P3a from white noise is robust and should be useful for applied studies as it removes stimulus novelty variability. Theoretical perspectives are discussed.

  13. Note on Generalized White Noise Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hida, Takeyuki

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to give a detailed interpretations to white noise variables Ḃ(t), t ∈ R1 and their functionals, including the idea of renormalization. By doing so, we can see an infinite dimensional analysis and some applications follow naturally

  14. Escape driven by α -stable white noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybiec, B.; Gudowska-Nowak, E.; Hänggi, P.

    2007-02-01

    We explore the archetype problem of an escape dynamics occurring in a symmetric double well potential when the Brownian particle is driven by white Lévy noise in a dynamical regime where inertial effects can safely be neglected. The behavior of escaping trajectories from one well to another is investigated by pointing to the special character that underpins the noise-induced discontinuity which is caused by the generalized Brownian paths that jump beyond the barrier location without actually hitting it. This fact implies that the boundary conditions for the mean first passage time (MFPT) are no longer determined by the well-known local boundary conditions that characterize the case with normal diffusion. By numerically implementing properly the set up boundary conditions, we investigate the survival probability and the average escape time as a function of the corresponding Lévy white noise parameters. Depending on the value of the skewness β of the Lévy noise, the escape can either become enhanced or suppressed: a negative asymmetry parameter β typically yields a decrease for the escape rate while the rate itself depicts a non-monotonic behavior as a function of the stability index α that characterizes the jump length distribution of Lévy noise, exhibiting a marked discontinuity at α=1 . We find that the typical factor of 2 that characterizes for normal diffusion the ratio between the MFPT for well-bottom-to-well-bottom and well-bottom-to-barrier-top no longer holds true. For sufficiently high barriers the survival probabilities assume an exponential behavior versus time. Distinct non-exponential deviations occur, however, for low barrier heights.

  15. White noise improves learning by modulating activity in dopaminergic midbrain regions and right superior temporal sulcus.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Vanessa H; Bauch, Eva M; Bunzeck, Nico

    2014-07-01

    In neural systems, information processing can be facilitated by adding an optimal level of white noise. Although this phenomenon, the so-called stochastic resonance, has traditionally been linked with perception, recent evidence indicates that white noise may also exert positive effects on cognitive functions, such as learning and memory. The underlying neural mechanisms, however, remain unclear. Here, on the basis of recent theories, we tested the hypothesis that auditory white noise, when presented during the encoding of scene images, enhances subsequent recognition memory performance and modulates activity within the dopaminergic midbrain (i.e., substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area, SN/VTA). Indeed, in a behavioral experiment, we can show in healthy humans that auditory white noise-but not control sounds, such as a sinus tone-slightly improves recognition memory. In an fMRI experiment, white noise selectively enhances stimulus-driven phasic activity in the SN/VTA and auditory cortex. Moreover, it induces stronger connectivity between SN/VTA and right STS, which, in addition, exhibited a positive correlation with subsequent memory improvement by white noise. Our results suggest that the beneficial effects of auditory white noise on learning depend on dopaminergic neuromodulation and enhanced connectivity between midbrain regions and the STS-a key player in attention modulation. Moreover, they indicate that white noise could be particularly useful to facilitate learning in conditions where changes of the mesolimbic system are causally related to memory deficits including healthy and pathological aging.

  16. Some Aspects of Quadratic Generalized White Noise Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Si, Si; Hida, Takeyuki

    2009-02-01

    We shall discuss some particular roles of quadratic generalized white noise functionals. First observation is made from the viewpoint of the so-called "la passage du fini à l'infini". We then come to a dual pairing of spaces formed by quadratic generalized white noise functionals. In this line, we can further discuss quadratic forms of differential operators acting on the space of white noise functionals.

  17. Audio-visual identification of place of articulation and voicing in white and babble noise.

    PubMed

    Alm, Magnus; Behne, Dawn M; Wang, Yue; Eg, Ragnhild

    2009-07-01

    Research shows that noise and phonetic attributes influence the degree to which auditory and visual modalities are used in audio-visual speech perception (AVSP). Research has, however, mainly focused on white noise and single phonetic attributes, thus neglecting the more common babble noise and possible interactions between phonetic attributes. This study explores whether white and babble noise differentially influence AVSP and whether these differences depend on phonetic attributes. White and babble noise of 0 and -12 dB signal-to-noise ratio were added to congruent and incongruent audio-visual stop consonant-vowel stimuli. The audio (A) and video (V) of incongruent stimuli differed either in place of articulation (POA) or voicing. Responses from 15 young adults show that, compared to white noise, babble resulted in more audio responses for POA stimuli, and fewer for voicing stimuli. Voiced syllables received more audio responses than voiceless syllables. Results can be attributed to discrepancies in the acoustic spectra of both the noise and speech target. Voiced consonants may be more auditorily salient than voiceless consonants which are more spectrally similar to white noise. Visual cues contribute to identification of voicing, but only if the POA is visually salient and auditorily susceptible to the noise type.

  18. Signal with Flat Phase Noise Using a Carrier and the Power Spectral Density of White Noise for Phase Noise Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watabe, Ken-ichi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Ikegami, Takeshi; Iida, Hitoshi; Shimada, Yozo

    2012-01-01

    We have realized a phase noise standard of a signal with a -100 dBc/Hz flat phase noise at 10 MHz for Fourier frequencies of 1 Hz to 100 kHz, which ensures traceability to the International System of Units (SI). The flat phase noise signal is produced using a carrier combined with white noise. To ensure traceability, both the flat phase noise signal power and the power spectral density of white noise are determined with a calibrated power meter and the noise standard, respectively. The flatness of the phase noise standard is within ±0.7 dB.

  19. Visual evoked potentials and heart rate during white noise stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, F; Mecacci, L

    1999-03-01

    Visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded in 12 adult participants as a function of the temporal frequency of a phase-reversed checkerboard, with or without a simultaneously presented white noise. During the VEP recordings also the pulse rate was measured. VEP amplitude changed as function of temporal frequency, but it was not affected by noise. Pulse rate was stable during the session without noise, but it increased during the white noise stimulation at high temporal frequencies. Heart acceleration might be associated to conditions when processing at low levels of visual sensitivity (high temporal frequencies) is furthermore disturbed by interfering stimulation (noise).

  20. Absolute negative mobility induced by white Poissonian noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiechowicz, J.; Łuczka, J.; Hänggi, P.

    2013-02-01

    We study the transport properties of inertial Brownian particles which move in a symmetric periodic potential and are subjected to both a symmetric, unbiased time-periodic external force and a biased Poissonian white shot noise (of non-zero average F) which is composed of a random sequence of δ-shaped pulses with random amplitudes. Upon varying the parameters of the white shot noise, one can conveniently manipulate the transport direction and the overall nonlinear response behavior. We find that within tailored parameter regimes the response is opposite to the applied average bias F of such white shot noise. This particular transport characteristic thus mimics that of a nonlinear absolute negative mobility (ANM) regime. Moreover, such white shot noise driven ANM is robust with respect to the statistics of the shot noise spikes. Our findings can be checked and corroborated experimentally by the use of a setup that consists of a single resistively and capacitively shunted Josephson junction device.

  1. Verhulst model with Lévy white noise excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubkov, A. A.; Spagnolo, B.

    2008-10-01

    The transient dynamics of the Verhulst model perturbed by arbitrary non-Gaussian white noise is investigated. Based on the infinitely divisible distribution of the Lévy process we study the nonlinear relaxation of the population density for three cases of white non-Gaussian noise: (i) shot noise; (ii) noise with a probability density of increments expressed in terms of Gamma function; and (iii) Cauchy stable noise. We obtain exact results for the probability distribution of the population density in all cases, and for Cauchy stable noise the exact expression of the nonlinear relaxation time is derived. Moreover starting from an initial delta function distribution, we find a transition induced by the multiplicative Lévy noise, from a trimodal probability distribution to a bimodal probability distribution in asymptotics. Finally we find a nonmonotonic behavior of the nonlinear relaxation time as a function of the Cauchy stable noise intensity.

  2. Auditory white noise reduces postural fluctuations even in the absence of vision.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jessica Marie; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2015-08-01

    The contributions of somatosensory, vestibular, and visual feedback to balance control are well documented, but the influence of auditory information, especially acoustic noise, on balance is less clear. Because somatosensory noise has been shown to reduce postural sway, we hypothesized that noise from the auditory modality might have a similar effect. Given that the nervous system uses noise to optimize signal transfer, adding mechanical or auditory noise should lead to increased feedback about sensory frames of reference used in balance control. In the present experiment, postural sway was analyzed in healthy young adults where they were presented with continuous white noise, in the presence and absence of visual information. Our results show reduced postural sway variability (as indexed by the body's center of pressure) in the presence of auditory noise, even when visual information was not present. Nonlinear time series analysis revealed that auditory noise has an additive effect, independent of vision, on postural stability. Further analysis revealed that auditory noise reduced postural sway variability in both low- and high-frequency regimes (> or <0.3 Hz) of sway, suggesting that both spontaneous and feedback-driven aspects of postural fluctuations were influenced by acoustic noise. Our results support the idea that auditory white noise reduces postural sway, suggesting that auditory noise might be used for therapeutic and rehabilitation purposes in older individuals and those with balance disorders.

  3. Differential effects of white noise in cognitive and perceptual tasks.

    PubMed

    Herweg, Nora A; Bunzeck, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Beneficial effects of noise on higher cognition have recently attracted attention. Hypothesizing an involvement of the mesolimbic dopamine system and its functional interactions with cortical areas, the current study aimed to demonstrate a facilitation of dopamine-dependent attentional and mnemonic functions by externally applying white noise in five behavioral experiments including a total sample of 167 healthy human subjects. During working memory, acoustic white noise impaired accuracy when presented during the maintenance period (Experiments 1-3). In a reward based long-term memory task, white noise accelerated perceptual judgments for scene images during encoding but left subsequent recognition memory unaffected (Experiment 4). In a modified Posner task (Experiment 5), the benefit due to white noise in attentional orienting correlated weakly with reward dependence, a personality trait that has been associated with the dopaminergic system. These results suggest that white noise has no general effect on cognitive functions. Instead, they indicate differential effects on perception and cognition depending on a variety of factors such as task demands and timing of white noise presentation.

  4. Some of the Recent Topics in White Noise Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hida, Takeyuki

    2010-01-01

    The identity of white noise B(t) has been given, so that we proceed to the space that is spanned by the B(t)'s. The system consists of continuously many independent variables and, in fact, spans a separable space. The system is total in that space. Harmonic analysis by introducing transformation groups will be discussed briefly. Together with other notions we can prepare for the analysis of nonlinear functionals of white noise.

  5. White matter abnormalities of microstructure and physiological noise in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Sharlene D.; Kent, Jerillyn S.; Bolbecker, Amanda; Klaunig, Mallory J.; O'Donnell, Brian F.; Puce, Aina; Hetrick, William P.

    2015-01-01

    White matter abnormalities in schizophrenia have been revealed by many imaging techniques and analysis methods. One of the findings by diffusion tensor imaging is a decrease in fractional anisotropy (FA), which is an indicator of white matter integrity. On the other hand, elevation of metabolic rate in white matter was observed from positron emission tomography (PET) studies. In this report, we aim to compare the two structural and functional effects on the same subjects. Our comparison is based on the hypothesis that signal fluctuation in white matter is associated with white matter functional activity. We examined the variance of the signal in resting state fMRI and found significant differences between individuals with schizophrenia and non-psychiatric controls specifically in white matter tissue. Controls showed higher temporal signal-to-noise ratios clustered in regions including temporal, frontal, and parietal lobes, cerebellum, corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and other major white matter tracts. These regions with higher temporal signal-to-noise ratio agree well with those showing higher metabolic activity reported by studies using PET. The results suggest that individuals with schizophrenia tend to have higher functional activity in white matter in certain brain regions relative to healthy controls. Despite some overlaps, the distinct regions for physiological noise are different from those for FA derived from diffusion tensor imaging, and therefore provide a unique angle to explore potential mechanisms to white matter abnormality. PMID:25560665

  6. White matter abnormalities of microstructure and physiological noise in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hu; Newman, Sharlene D; Kent, Jerillyn S; Bolbecker, Amanda; Klaunig, Mallory J; O'Donnell, Brian F; Puce, Aina; Hetrick, William P

    2015-12-01

    White matter abnormalities in schizophrenia have been revealed by many imaging techniques and analysis methods. One of the findings by diffusion tensor imaging is a decrease in fractional anisotropy (FA), which is an indicator of white matter integrity. On the other hand, elevation of metabolic rate in white matter was observed from positron emission tomography (PET) studies. In this report, we aim to compare the two structural and functional effects on the same subjects. Our comparison is based on the hypothesis that signal fluctuation in white matter is associated with white matter functional activity. We examined the variance of the signal in resting state fMRI and found significant differences between individuals with schizophrenia and non-psychiatric controls specifically in white matter tissue. Controls showed higher temporal signal-to-noise ratios clustered in regions including temporal, frontal, and parietal lobes, cerebellum, corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and other major white matter tracts. These regions with higher temporal signal-to-noise ratio agree well with those showing higher metabolic activity reported by studies using PET. The results suggest that individuals with schizophrenia tend to have higher functional activity in white matter in certain brain regions relative to healthy controls. Despite some overlaps, the distinct regions for physiological noise are different from those for FA derived from diffusion tensor imaging, and therefore provide a unique angle to explore potential mechanisms to white matter abnormality.

  7. Thermal ratchets driven by Poissonian white shot noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czernik, T.; Kula, J.; Łuczka, J.; Häautnggi, P.

    1997-04-01

    We investigate the overdamped transport of Brownian particles that are placed in spatially periodic potentials (without and with reflection symmetry) that are subjected to both Poissonian white shot noise and thermal, i.e., Gaussian, white equilibrium fluctuations. The probability current of the output process, which is shown to obey a second-order ordinary differential equation, is analyzed. The limit of strong Poissonian white shot noise is studied analytically; the resulting current is given in closed form in terms of two quadratures. For general forms of the periodic potential we present asymptotic expansions in terms of the ratio between the thermal and the shot noise intensity. Analytic results are presented for the class of piecewise linear, sawtoothlike ratchet potentials. Under specific conditions, the current exhibits a distinctive nonmonotonic dependence on such parameters as temperature and/or asymmetry of the periodic potential.

  8. Gaussian white noise as a resource for work extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dechant, Andreas; Baule, Adrian; Sasa, Shin-ichi

    2017-03-01

    We show that uncorrelated Gaussian noise can drive a system out of equilibrium and can serve as a resource from which work can be extracted. We consider an overdamped particle in a periodic potential with an internal degree of freedom and a state-dependent friction, coupled to an equilibrium bath. Applying additional Gaussian white noise drives the system into a nonequilibrium steady state and causes a finite current if the potential is spatially asymmetric. The model thus operates as a Brownian ratchet, whose current we calculate explicitly in three complementary limits. Since the particle current is driven solely by additive Gaussian white noise, this shows that the latter can potentially perform work against an external load. By comparing the extracted power to the energy injection due to the noise, we discuss the efficiency of such a ratchet.

  9. Large bandwidth op-amp based white noise current source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusi, Gino; Scandurra, Graziella; Ciofi, Carmine

    2014-02-01

    Electrical noise sources are basic building blocks in many measurement and instrumentation applications and in communication systems. In this paper, we propose a quite simple topology for the realization of a programmable, wide bandwidth, white noise current source that requires only two resistors and one operational amplifier. We validate the proposed approach by means of SPICE simulations and demonstrate, by means of proper measurements, the capability of generating a flat current noise spectrum in a frequency range up to four decades from a few Hz up to 100 kHz.

  10. Chaotic dynamics of flexible beams driven by external white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awrejcewicz, J.; Krysko, A. V.; Papkova, I. V.; Zakharov, V. M.; Erofeev, N. P.; Krylova, E. Yu.; Mrozowski, J.; Krysko, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    Mathematical models of continuous structural members (beams, plates and shells) subjected to an external additive white noise are studied. The structural members are considered as systems with infinite number of degrees of freedom. We show that in mechanical structural systems external noise can not only lead to quantitative changes in the system dynamics (that is obvious), but also cause the qualitative, and sometimes surprising changes in the vibration regimes. Furthermore, we show that scenarios of the transition from regular to chaotic regimes quantified by Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) can lead to erroneous conclusions, and a support of the wavelet analysis is needed. We have detected and illustrated the modifications of classical three scenarios of transition from regular vibrations to deterministic chaos. The carried out numerical experiment shows that the white noise lowers the threshold for transition into spatio-temporal chaotic dynamics. A transition into chaos via the proposed modified scenarios developed in this work is sensitive to small noise and significantly reduces occurrence of periodic vibrations. Increase of noise intensity yields decrease of the duration of the laminar signal range, i.e., time between two successive turbulent bursts decreases. Scenario of transition into chaos of the studied mechanical structures essentially depends on the control parameters, and it can be different in different zones of the constructed charts (control parameter planes). Furthermore, we found an interesting phenomenon, when increase of the noise intensity yields surprisingly the vibrational characteristics with a lack of noisy effect (chaos is destroyed by noise and windows of periodicity appear).

  11. Auditory white noise reduces age-related fluctuations in balance.

    PubMed

    Ross, J M; Will, O J; McGann, Z; Balasubramaniam, R

    2016-09-06

    Fall prevention technologies have the potential to improve the lives of older adults. Because of the multisensory nature of human balance control, sensory therapies, including some involving tactile and auditory noise, are being explored that might reduce increased balance variability due to typical age-related sensory declines. Auditory white noise has previously been shown to reduce postural sway variability in healthy young adults. In the present experiment, we examined this treatment in young adults and typically aging older adults. We measured postural sway of healthy young adults and adults over the age of 65 years during silence and auditory white noise, with and without vision. Our results show reduced postural sway variability in young and older adults with auditory noise, even in the absence of vision. We show that vision and noise can reduce sway variability for both feedback-based and exploratory balance processes. In addition, we show changes with auditory noise in nonlinear patterns of sway in older adults that reflect what is more typical of young adults, and these changes did not interfere with the typical random walk behavior of sway. Our results suggest that auditory noise might be valuable for therapeutic and rehabilitative purposes in older adults with typical age-related balance variability.

  12. Oblivious Transfer from the Additive White Gaussian Noise Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaka, Motohiko

    We consider the use of the additive white Gaussian noise channel to achieve information theoretically secure oblivious transfer. A protocol for this primitive that ensures the correctness and privacy for players is presented together with the signal design. We also study the information theoretic efficiency of the protocol, and some more practical issues where the parameter of the channel is unknown to the players.

  13. A White Noise Theory of Infinite Dimensional Calculus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    a general theory; however it is his hope that this attempt would be the very first step towards the study of Gaussian random fields using variational ... calculus . Contents: White noise; Generalized functionals; Rotation group and harmonic analysis; Applications to Physics; Gaussian random fields. Keywords: Statistic processes.

  14. Red spectra from white and blue noise

    PubMed Central

    Balmforth, N. J.; Provenzale, A.; Spiegel, E. A.; Martens, M.; Tresser, C.; Wu, C. W.

    1999-01-01

    The value of maps of the interval in modelling population dynamics has recently been called into question because temporal variations from such maps have blue or white power spectra, whereas many observations of real populations show time-series with red spectra. One way to deal with this discrepancy is to introduce chaotic or stochastic fluctuations in the parameters of the map. This leads to on–off intermittency and can markedly redden the spectrum produced by a model that does not by itself have a red spectrum. The parameter fluctuations need not themselves have a red spectrum in order to achieve this effect. Because the power spectrum is not invariant under a change of variable, another way to redden the spectrum is by a suitable transformation of the variables used. The question this poses is whether spectra are the best means of characterizing a fluctuating variable.

  15. An Improved Detection Method for Hyperspectral Imagery Based on White Gaussian Noise.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiting; Huang, Shiqi; Wang, Hongxia; Liu, Daizhi

    2015-07-01

    To solve the low detection efficiency of the present hyperspectral detection method based on adaptive coherence estimator (ACE), an improved detection method based on white Gaussian noise (WGN) is proposed in this paper. Primarily the method uses the spectral angle mapping (SAM) method to adaptively set an optimal signal-to-noise (SNR) parameter based on the hyperspectral image. Then, a corresponding white Gaussian noise is generated according to this SNR parameter and is added to the original image to get a new image data. Finally, based on the new image data, a better target detection result can be obtained by using the ACE detection algorithm. The image data, added to the white Gaussian noise, are more consistent with the theoretical hypotheses of the ACE algorithm. Therefore the detection performance of the algorithm can be efficiently improved. Meanwhile, the adaptivity of setting the optimum SNR parameter in various images can make the method more universal. Experimental results of real world hyperspectral data show that the proposed ACE-WGN method can effectively improve detection performance.

  16. Phase-shifting interferometry corrupted by white and non-white additive noise.

    PubMed

    Servin, M; Quiroga, J A; Estrada, J C

    2011-05-09

    The standard tool to estimate the phase of a sequence of phase-shifted interferograms is the Phase Shifting Algorithm (PSA). The performance of PSAs to a sequence of interferograms corrupted by non-white additive noise has not been reported before. In this paper we use the Frequency Transfer Function (FTF) of a PSA to generalize previous white additive noise analysis to non-white additive noisy interferograms. That is, we find the ensemble average and the variance of the estimated phase in a general PSA when interferograms corrupted by non-white additive noise are available. Moreover, for the special case of additive white-noise, and using the Parseval's theorem, we show (for the first time in the PSA literature) a useful relationship of the PSA's noise robustness; in terms of its FTF spectrum, and in terms of its coefficients. In other words, we find the PSA's estimated phase variance, in the spectral space as well as in the PSA's coefficients space.

  17. Digital whitening of band-limited white noise in the presence of colored noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, A. K.; Penafiel, M.

    1986-06-01

    Four all zero whitening filters, one-sided and two-sided Wiener and linear prediction filters, are compared on the basis of reduction of input noise power, when the sum of a band-limited white noise and the colored noise is the input to a unity gain whitening filter. The colored noise is assumed to be one of the three types: equally spaced, equal power multiple tones, a periodic pulsetrain of random strength, and a random process having a first-order Butterworth spectrum.

  18. Effect of contralateral white noise masking on the mismatch negativity.

    PubMed

    Salo, S K; Lang, A H; Salmivalli, A J

    1995-01-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN), an auditive event-related potential (ERP) component, evoked by deviant stimuli in a homogeneous stream of standard stimuli was studied in a unilateral stimulation and contralateral white noise masking condition. Eleven subjects (Ss) with normal hearing (aged 20-35 years) were examined using sine tone stimuli (70 dB HL, interstimulus interval 300 ms, duration 40 ms with 5 ms rise and fall times). Three blocks of standard (std)/deviant (dev) series of stimuli were used: std 500/dev 600 Hz, std 2000/dev 1900 Hz, and std 2000/dev 1600 Hz. The first block was repeated for another group of 11 Ss with normal hearing (aged 17-27 years). The MMN was analysed from the difference curves recorded at Fz, Cz and Pz. The stimuli were delivered unilaterally, either with or without 50 dB effective masking level white noise to the contralateral ear. The MMN amplitude attenuated significantly when contralateral masking was used. In addition, there was interaction between noise masking and the stimulated ear. The MMN latencies were not affected by white noise masking.

  19. The Feynman integrand as a white noise distribution beyond perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Grothaus, Martin; Vogel, Anna

    2008-06-18

    In this note the concepts of path integrals and techniques how to construct them are presented. Here we concentrate on a White Noise approach. Combining White Noise techniques with a generalized time-dependent Doss' formula Feynman integrands are constructed as white noise distributions beyond perturbation theory.

  20. Electric Stimulation with Sinusoids and White Noise for Neural Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Daniel K.; Rizzo, Joseph F.; Fried, Shelley I.

    2010-01-01

    We are investigating the use of novel stimulus waveforms in neural prostheses to determine whether they can provide more precise control over the temporal and spatial pattern of elicited activity as compared to conventional pulsatile stimulation. To study this, we measured the response of retinal ganglion cells to both sinusoidal and white noise waveforms. The use of cell-attached and whole cell patch clamp recordings allowed the responses to be observed without significant obstruction from the stimulus artifact. Electric stimulation with sinusoids elicited robust responses. White noise analysis was used to derive the linear kernel for the ganglion cell's spiking response as well as for the underlying excitatory currents. These results suggest that in response to electric stimulation, presynaptic retinal neurons exhibit bandpass filtering characteristics with a peak response that occurs 25 ms after onset. The experimental approach demonstrated here may be useful for studying the temporal response properties of other neurons in the CNS. PMID:20582268

  1. The White Noise Generator programed on the Raspberry Pi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGill, Ken; Ham, Katie; Schock, Kris; Dowling, Patrick; Kuzell, Chaz

    2014-03-01

    A Raspberry Pi computer, running a Linux based operating system, was programmed for use as a white noise generator. The program was written to output sine waves at a specific frequency with a randomly generated phase. This function generator was programmed specifically for an ongoing undergraduate research project. This research project involves the calculation of the speed of flow through a cylindrical pipe with 128 transducers equally spaced by 0.4 inches down the length of the pipe. The inputted white noise generated serves as an effective technique to induce multiple sine waves of a given frequency to the pipe, as the sine waves are generated at a random phase. Our research group would like to thank Dr. Ken McGill for all of his help, guidance, and time with this research project. We would also like to thank Georgia College and State University for providing the materials used in this experiment.

  2. Supersymmetric formulation of multiplicative white-noise stochastic processes.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Zochil González; Barci, Daniel G

    2012-04-01

    We present a supersymmetric formulation of Markov processes, represented by a family of Langevin equations with multiplicative white noise. The hidden symmetry encodes equilibrium properties such as fluctuation-dissipation relations. The formulation does not depend on the particular prescription to define the Wiener integral. In this way, different equilibrium distributions, reached at long times for each prescription, can be formally treated on the same footing.

  3. Stepping molecular motor amid Lévy white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisowski, Bartosz; Valenti, Davide; Spagnolo, Bernardo; Bier, Martin; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2015-04-01

    We consider a model of a stepping molecular motor consisting of two connected heads. Directional motion of the stepper takes place along a one-dimensional track. Each head is subject to a periodic potential without spatial reflection symmetry. When the potential for one head is switched on, it is switched off for the other head. Additionally, the system is subject to the influence of symmetric, white Lévy noise that mimics the action of external random forcing. The stepper exhibits motion with a preferred direction which is examined by analyzing the median of the displacement of a midpoint between the positions of the two heads. We study the modified dynamics of the stepper by numerical simulations. We find flux reversals as noise parameters are changed. Speed and direction appear to very sensitively depend on characteristics of the noise.

  4. Listening to white noise counteracts visual and haptic pseudoneglect.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Lega, Carlotta; Vecchi, Tomaso; Vallar, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Neurologically intact individuals usually show a leftward bias in line bisection, a tendency known as "pseudoneglect", likely reflecting a right-hemisphere dominance in controlling the allocation of spatial attention. Studies in brain-damaged patients with left visuospatial neglect have reported that auditory stimulation may reduce the deficit, both in a spatially dependent and in a spatially independent way. Here we show for the first time that the concurrent binaural presentation of auditory white noise affects healthy individuals' performance in both visual and haptic bisection, reducing their leftward error. We suggest that this effect depends on the noise boosting alertness and restoring the hemispheric activation balance. Our data clearly show that task-irrelevant auditory noise crossmodally affects the allocation of spatial resources in both the haptic and the visual space; future research may clarify whether these effects are specific for the type of auditory stimulation.

  5. Gaussian white noise analysis and its application to Feynman path integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryawan, Herry Pribawanto

    2016-02-01

    In applied science, Gaussian white noise (the time derivative of Brownian motion) is often chosen as a mathematical idealization of phenomena involving sudden and extremely large fluctuations. It is also possible to define and study Gaussian white noise in a mathematically rigorous framework. In this survey paper we review the Gaussian white noise as an object in an infinite dimensional topological vector space. A brief construction of Gaussian white noise space and Gaussian white noise distributions will be presented. Gaussian white noise analysis provides a framework which offers various generalization of concept known from finite dimensional analysis to the infinite dimensional case, among them are differential operators, Fourier transform, and distribution theory. We will also present some recent developments and results on the application of Gaussian white noise theory to Feynman's path integral approach for quantum mechanics.

  6. Changing the state of a memristive system with white noise.

    PubMed

    Slipko, Valeriy A; Pershin, Yuriy V; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2013-04-01

    Can we change the average state of a resistor by simply applying white noise? We show that the answer to this question is positive if the resistor has memory of its past dynamics (a memristive system). We also prove that, if the memory arises only from the charge flowing through the resistor-an ideal memristor-then the current flowing through such memristor cannot charge a capacitor connected in series and, therefore, cannot produce useful work. However, the memristive system may skew the charge probability density on the capacitor, an effect that can be measured experimentally.

  7. Changing the state of a memristive system with white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slipko, Valeriy A.; Pershin, Yuriy V.; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2013-04-01

    Can we change the average state of a resistor by simply applying white noise? We show that the answer to this question is positive if the resistor has memory of its past dynamics (a memristive system). We also prove that, if the memory arises only from the charge flowing through the resistor—an ideal memristor—then the current flowing through such memristor cannot charge a capacitor connected in series and, therefore, cannot produce useful work. However, the memristive system may skew the charge probability density on the capacitor, an effect that can be measured experimentally.

  8. A microscopic model for noise induced transport: Heat-bath nonlinearly driven by external white noise

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Pradipta; Shit, Anindita; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Chaudhuri, Jyotipratim Ray

    2011-03-15

    This work explores the observation that, even in the absence of a net externally applied bias, a symmetric homogeneous system coupled linearly to two heat baths is capable of producing unidirectional motion simply by nonlinearly driving one of the heat baths by an external Gaussian white noise. This is quite contrary to the traditional observation that, in order to obtain a net drift current, a state-dependent dissipation, which is a consequence of nonlinear system-bath coupling, is ubiquitous.

  9. Effects of white noise on off-task behavior and academic responding for children with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Cook, Andrew; Bradley-Johnson, Sharon; Johnson, C Merle

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of white noise played through headphones on off-task behavior, percentage of items completed, and percentage of items completed correctly for 3 students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Headphones plus white noise were associated with decreases in off-task behavior relative to baseline and headphones-only (no white noise) control conditions. Little change in academic responding occurred across conditions for all participants.

  10. Effects of noise and parameter deviations in a bichromatic Raman white light cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Qingqing; Zubairy, M. Suhail; Shahriar, M. Selim

    2010-03-15

    We analyze the effects of noise and parameter deviations in a bichromatic Raman type white light cavity, with potential applications in precision measurements. The results show that the dispersion variation induced by parameter deviation can be controlled with an accuracy of 10{sup -4}. The laser phase noise decreases the dispersion magnitude while the amplitude noise increases it. Although we can always adjust the parameters to satisfy the white light condition, both types of noise make the cavity transmission curve uneven.

  11. GHZ argument for four-qubit entangled states in the presence of white and colored noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ming-jun; Ren, Chang-liang; Chong, Bo; Du, Jiang-feng

    2008-04-01

    Greenberger-Horn-Zeilinger (GHZ) argument of nonlocality without inequalities is extended to the case of four-qubit mixed states. Three different kinds of entangled states are analyzed in presence of white and colored noise. The nonlocality properties of these states will be weakened and destroyed by the noise. We found that all these states have the same ability to resist the influence of white noise, while the cluster state is the most robust against colored noise.

  12. A simple white noise analysis of neuronal light responses.

    PubMed

    Chichilnisky, E J

    2001-05-01

    A white noise technique is presented for estimating the response properties of spiking visual system neurons. The technique is simple, robust, efficient and well suited to simultaneous recordings from multiple neurons. It provides a complete and easily interpretable model of light responses even for neurons that display a common form of response nonlinearity that precludes classical linear systems analysis. A theoretical justification of the technique is presented that relies only on elementary linear algebra and statistics. Implementation is described with examples. The technique and the underlying model of neural responses are validated using recordings from retinal ganglion cells, and in principle are applicable to other neurons. Advantages and disadvantages of the technique relative to classical approaches are discussed.

  13. Effects of White Noise on Off-Task Behavior and Academic Responding for Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Andrew; Bradley-Johnson, Sharon; Johnson, C. Merle

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of white noise played through headphones on off-task behavior, percentage of items completed, and percentage of items completed correctly for 3 students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Headphones plus white noise were associated with decreases in off-task behavior relative to baseline and…

  14. The fractional coupled KdV equations: Exact solutions and white noise functional approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossam, A. Ghany; S. Okb El Bab, A.; M. Zabel, A.; Abd-Allah, Hyder

    2013-08-01

    Variable coefficients and Wick-type stochastic fractional coupled KdV equations are investigated. By using the modified fractional sub-equation method, Hermite transform, and white noise theory the exact travelling wave solutions and white noise functional solutions are obtained, including the generalized exponential, hyperbolic, and trigonometric types.

  15. On low-frequency errors of uniformly modulated filtered white-noise models for ground motions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, Erdal; Boore, David M.

    1988-01-01

    Low-frequency errors of a commonly used non-stationary stochastic model (uniformly modulated filtered white-noise model) for earthquake ground motions are investigated. It is shown both analytically and by numerical simulation that uniformly modulated filter white-noise-type models systematically overestimate the spectral response for periods longer than the effective duration of the earthquake, because of the built-in low-frequency errors in the model. The errors, which are significant for low-magnitude short-duration earthquakes, can be eliminated by using the filtered shot-noise-type models (i. e. white noise, modulated by the envelope first, and then filtered).

  16. Roles of White Noise in Stochastic Analysis and Some of Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hida, Takeyuki

    2011-01-01

    White Noise analysis may be thought of a well-established theory. This is true in a sense, however we are surprised to find that there are so many profound properties still remain undiscovered. In this report, we shall have a quick review of white noise theory, then we shall propose some of future directions to be investigated, from our viewpoint. Further, we shall discuss a new noise which is of Poisson type.

  17. Permutation entropy of finite-length white-noise time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Douglas J.; Kane, Deb M.

    2016-08-01

    Permutation entropy (PE) is commonly used to discriminate complex structure from white noise in a time series. While the PE of white noise is well understood in the long time-series limit, analysis in the general case is currently lacking. Here the expectation value and variance of white-noise PE are derived as functions of the number of ordinal pattern trials, N , and the embedding dimension, D . It is demonstrated that the probability distribution of the white-noise PE converges to a χ2 distribution with D !-1 degrees of freedom as N becomes large. It is further demonstrated that the PE variance for an arbitrary time series can be estimated as the variance of a related metric, the Kullback-Leibler entropy (KLE), allowing the qualitative N ≫D ! condition to be recast as a quantitative estimate of the N required to achieve a desired PE calculation precision. Application of this theory to statistical inference is demonstrated in the case of an experimentally obtained noise series, where the probability of obtaining the observed PE value was calculated assuming a white-noise time series. Standard statistical inference can be used to draw conclusions whether the white-noise null hypothesis can be accepted or rejected. This methodology can be applied to other null hypotheses, such as discriminating whether two time series are generated from different complex system states.

  18. Permutation entropy of finite-length white-noise time series.

    PubMed

    Little, Douglas J; Kane, Deb M

    2016-08-01

    Permutation entropy (PE) is commonly used to discriminate complex structure from white noise in a time series. While the PE of white noise is well understood in the long time-series limit, analysis in the general case is currently lacking. Here the expectation value and variance of white-noise PE are derived as functions of the number of ordinal pattern trials, N, and the embedding dimension, D. It is demonstrated that the probability distribution of the white-noise PE converges to a χ^{2} distribution with D!-1 degrees of freedom as N becomes large. It is further demonstrated that the PE variance for an arbitrary time series can be estimated as the variance of a related metric, the Kullback-Leibler entropy (KLE), allowing the qualitative N≫D! condition to be recast as a quantitative estimate of the N required to achieve a desired PE calculation precision. Application of this theory to statistical inference is demonstrated in the case of an experimentally obtained noise series, where the probability of obtaining the observed PE value was calculated assuming a white-noise time series. Standard statistical inference can be used to draw conclusions whether the white-noise null hypothesis can be accepted or rejected. This methodology can be applied to other null hypotheses, such as discriminating whether two time series are generated from different complex system states.

  19. Stochastic resonance in a piecewise nonlinear model driven by multiplicative non-Gaussian noise and additive white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yongfeng; Shen, Yajun; Tan, Jianguo

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR) in a piecewise nonlinear model driven by a periodic signal and correlated noises for the cases of a multiplicative non-Gaussian noise and an additive Gaussian white noise is investigated. Applying the path integral approach, the unified colored noise approximation and the two-state model theory, the analytical expression of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is derived. It is found that conventional stochastic resonance exists in this system. From numerical computations we obtain that: (i) As a function of the non-Gaussian noise intensity, the SNR is increased when the non-Gaussian noise deviation parameter q is increased. (ii) As a function of the Gaussian noise intensity, the SNR is decreased when q is increased. This demonstrates that the effect of the non-Gaussian noise on SNR is different from that of the Gaussian noise in this system. Moreover, we further discuss the effect of the correlation time of the non-Gaussian noise, cross-correlation strength, the amplitude and frequency of the periodic signal on SR.

  20. Noise-Coupled Image Rejection Architecture of Complex Bandpass ΔΣAD Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San, Hao; Kobayashi, Haruo

    This paper proposes a new realization technique of image rejection function by noise-coupling architecture, which is used for a complex bandpass ΔΣAD modulator. The complex bandpass ΔΣAD modulator processes just input I and Q signals, not image signals, and the AD conversion can be realized with low power dissipation. It realizes an asymmetric noise-shaped spectra, which is desirable for such low-IF receiver applications. However, the performance of the complex bandpass ΔΣAD modulator suffers from the mismatch between internal analog I and Q paths. I/Q path mismatch causes an image signal, and the quantization noise of the mirror image band aliases into the desired signal band, which degrades the SQNDR (Signal to Quantization Noise and Distortion Ratio) of the modulator. In our proposed modulator architecture, an extra notch for image rejection is realized by noise-coupled topology. We just add some passive capacitors and switches to the modulator; the additional integrator circuit composed of an operational amplifier in the conventional image rejection realization is not necessary. Therefore, the performance of the complex modulator can be effectively raised without additional power dissipation. We have performed simulation with MATLAB to confirm the validity of the proposed architecture. The simulation results show that the proposed architecture can achieve the realization of image-rejection effectively, and improve the SQNDR of the complex bandpass ΔΣAD modulator.

  1. The Effects of Hearing Aids on Localization of White Noise by Blind Subjects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen, Bruce R.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to observe the effects of hearing aids on the ability of 20 blind veterans to localize white noise. In all cases, Ss performed more poorly on a localization task while wearing a hearing aid. (Author)

  2. Accurate identification of periodic oscillations buried in white or colored noise using fast orthogonal search.

    PubMed

    Chon, K H

    2001-06-01

    We use a previously introduced fast orthogonal search algorithm to detect sinusoidal frequency components buried in either white or colored noise. We show that the method outperforms the correlogram, modified covariance autoregressive (MODCOVAR) and multiple-signal classification (MUSIC) methods. Fast orthogonal search method achieves accurate detection of sinusoids even with signal-to-noise ratios as low as -10 dB, and is superior at detecting sinusoids buried in 1/f noise. Since the utilized method accurately detects sinusoids even under colored noise, it can be used to extract a 1/f noise process observed in physiological signals such as heart rate and renal blood pressure and flow data.

  3. On stochastic differential equations driven by the renormalized square of the Gaussian white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Ammou, Bilel Kacem; Lanconelli, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the properties of the Wick square of Gaussian white noises through a new method to perform nonlinear operations on Hida distributions. This method lays in between the Wick product interpretation and the usual definition of nonlinear functions. We prove an Itô-type formula and solve stochastic differential equations driven by the renormalized square of the Gaussian white noise. Our approach works with standard assumptions on the coefficients of the equations, global Lipschitz continuity, and produces existence and uniqueness results in the space where the noise lives. The linear case is studied in details and positivity of the solution is proved.

  4. Probabilistic solutions of nonlinear oscillators excited by combined colored and white noise excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu-Siu, Guo; Qingxuan, Shi

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) systems combined to Gaussian white noise and Gaussian/non-Gaussian colored noise excitations are investigated. By expressing colored noise excitation as a second-order filtered white noise process and introducing colored noise as an additional state variable, the equation of motion for SDOF system under colored noise is then transferred artificially to multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) system under white noise excitations with four-coupled first-order differential equations. As a consequence, corresponding Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov (FPK) equation governing the joint probabilistic density function (PDF) of state variables increases to 4-dimension (4-D). Solution procedure and computer programme become much more sophisticated. The exponential-polynomial closure (EPC) method, widely applied for cases of SDOF systems under white noise excitations, is developed and improved for cases of systems under colored noise excitations and for solving the complex 4-D FPK equation. On the other hand, Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) method is performed to test the approximate EPC solutions. Two examples associated with Gaussian and non-Gaussian colored noise excitations are considered. Corresponding band-limited power spectral densities (PSDs) for colored noise excitations are separately given. Numerical studies show that the developed EPC method provides relatively accurate estimates of the stationary probabilistic solutions, especially the ones in the tail regions of the PDFs. Moreover, statistical parameter of mean-up crossing rate (MCR) is taken into account, which is important for reliability and failure analysis. Hopefully, our present work could provide insights into the investigation of structures under random loadings.

  5. Effects of white noise and holding on pain perception in newborns.

    PubMed

    Karakoç, Ayse; Türker, Funda

    2014-12-01

    This experimental study on newborns was conducted to compare the effects of various atraumatic care procedures during an infant's crying response to pain. Included in this study were 120 newborns chosen from among healthy infants admitted to the Obstetrics Department of Çanakkale State Hospital between April 2010 and June 2010. The patients were divided into three physically homogeneous groups. Infants in group 1 were held on the mothers' laps, infants in group 2 were held on the mother's laps and listened to white noise, and infants in group 3 lay in their cribs and listened to white noise while undergoing a painful procedure. Data collection included the Neonatal Infant Pain Scale, which was used to evaluate the behavioral responses to pain during a heel prick blood draw and a newborn information sheet developed by the researcher. Changes in cardiac and respiratory rates recorded during the invasive procedure were statistically significant among the three groups (p < .05). The shortest crying period and the lowest behavioral reactions were among those infants lying in their cribs and listening to white noise. This group was then followed by the infants who listened to white noise while being held by their mothers. The highest behavioral reaction was reported by those infants who were held by their mothers but did not listen to white noise. According to the results, white noise is an effective nonpharmacologic method to control pain, reduce crying time, and positively effect vital signs. Therefore, it is recommended that the use of white noise be practiced on newborns when they undergo painful procedures.

  6. Visual signal detection in structured backgrounds. II. Effects of contrast gain control, background variations, and white noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstein, M. P.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of visual detection of a signal superimposed on one of two identical backgrounds show performance degradation when the background has high contrast and is similar in spatial frequency and/or orientation to the signal. To account for this finding, models include a contrast gain control mechanism that pools activity across spatial frequency, orientation and space to inhibit (divisively) the response of the receptor sensitive to the signal. In tasks in which the observer has to detect a known signal added to one of M different backgrounds grounds due to added visual noise, the main sources of degradation are the stochastic noise in the image and the suboptimal visual processing. We investigate how these two sources of degradation (contrast gain control and variations in the background) interact in a task in which the signal is embedded in one of M locations in a complex spatially varying background (structured background). We use backgrounds extracted from patient digital medical images. To isolate effects of the fixed deterministic background (the contrast gain control) from the effects of the background variations, we conduct detection experiments with three different background conditions: (1) uniform background, (2) a repeated sample of structured background, and (3) different samples of structured background. Results show that human visual detection degrades from the uniform background condition to the repeated background condition and degrades even further in the different backgrounds condition. These results suggest that both the contrast gain control mechanism and the background random variations degrade human performance in detection of a signal in a complex, spatially varying background. A filter model and added white noise are used to generate estimates of sampling efficiencies, an equivalent internal noise, an equivalent contrast-gain-control-induced noise, and an equivalent noise due to the variations in the structured background.

  7. Evoked response of heart rate variability using short-duration white noise.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guo-She; Chen, Mei-Ling; Wang, Gin-You

    2010-06-24

    To investigate and to establish a model for evaluation of the instant cardiovascular responses to the noises of low-to-moderate intensity, sixteen healthy subjects were enrolled. The white noises were binaurally presented with a supra-aural earphone. The test intensities of noises were no noise, 50, 60, 70 and 80 dBA. Each noise was continued for 5 min and the electrocardiogram was simultaneously recorded. The cardiac autonomic responses were evaluated using power spectral analysis of the R-R contour obtained from digital signal processing of the ECG tracings. The result showed that the mean heart rate and mean blood pressure did not change significantly with the noises. However, the low-frequency power (LF) which represents cardiac autonomic modulations and the ratio (LHR) of LF to high-frequency power (HF) which reflects cardiac sympathetic modulations were significantly greater in the noise intensity of 50, 60, 70 and 80dBA (p<0.01, repeated measures ANOVA). In addition, the LHR was significantly correlated with the noise intensity (rho=0.90, p<0.05, Spearman's correlation analysis). The instant autonomic responses to white noises can be detected using power spectral analysis of heart rate variability and the evoked responses may provide a sensitive way to evaluate the instant effect of noise to humans.

  8. Variable perception of white noise in ambiguous phonetic contexts: the case of /p/ and /f/.

    PubMed

    Shafiro, Valeriy; Raphael, Lawrence J

    2007-11-01

    The roles of spectro-temporal coherence, lexical status, and word position in the perception of speech in acoustic signals containing a mixture of speech and nonspeech sounds were investigated. Stimuli consisted of nine (non)words in which either white noise was inserted only into the silent interval preceding and/or following the onset of vocalic transitions ambiguous between /p/ and /f/, or in which white noise overlaid the entire utterance. Ten listeners perceived 85% /f/s when noise was inserted only into the silent interval signaling a stop closure, 47% /f/s when noise overlaid the entire (non)words, and 1% in the control condition that contained no noise. Effects of spectro-temporal coherence seemed to have dominated perceptual outcomes, although the lexical status and position of the critical phoneme also appeared to affect responses. The results are explained more adequately by the theory of Auditory Scene Analysis than by the Motor Theory of Speech Perception.

  9. Characterization of pulmonary nodules on computer tomography (CT) scans: the effect of additive white noise on features selection and classification performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osicka, Teresa; Freedman, Matthew T.; Ahmed, Farid

    2007-03-01

    The goal of this project is to use computer analysis to classify small lung nodules, identified on CT, into likely benign and likely malignant categories. We compared discrete wavelet transforms (DWT) based features and a modification of classical features used and reported by others. To determine the best combination of features for classification, several intensities of white noise were added to the original images to determine the effect of such noise on classification accuracy. Two different approaches were used to determine the effect of noise: in the first method the best features for classification of nodules on the original image were retained as noise was added. In the second approach, we recalculated the results to reselect the best classification features for each particular level of added noise. The CT images are from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). For this study, nodules were extracted in window frames of three sizes. Malignant nodules were cytologically or histogically diagnosed, while benign had two-year follow-up. A linear discriminant analysis with Fisher criterion (FLDA) approach was used for feature selection and classification, and decision matrix for matched sample to compare the classification accuracy. The initial features mode revealed sensitivity to both the amount of noise and the size of window frame. The recalculated feature mode proved more robust to noise with no change in terms of classification accuracy. This indicates that the best features for computer classification of lung nodules will differ with noise, and, therefore, with exposure.

  10. Homoclinic Spike adding in a neuronal model in the presence of noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuwape, Ibiyinka; Neiman, Alexander; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2008-03-01

    We study the influence of noise on a spike adding transitions within the bursting activity in a Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of the leech heart interneuron. Spike adding in this model occur via homoclinic bifurcation of a saddle periodic orbit. Although narrow chaotic regions are observed near bifurcation transition, overall bursting dynamics is regular and is characterized by a constant number of spikes per burst. Experimental studies, however, show variability of bursting patterns whereby number of spikes per burst varies randomly. Thus, introduction of external synaptic noise is a necessary step to account for variability of burst durations observed experimentally. We show that near every such transition the neuron is highly sensitive to random perturbations that lead to and enhance broadly the regions of chaotic dynamics of the cell. For each spike adding transition there is a critical noise level beyond which the dynamics of the neuron becomes chaotic throughout the entire region of the given transition. Noise-induced chaotic dynamics is characterized in terms of the Lyapunov exponents and the Shannon entropy and reflects variability of firing patterns with various numbers of spikes per burst, traversing wide range of the neuron's parameters

  11. Spatial pattern formation induced by Gaussian white noise.

    PubMed

    Scarsoglio, Stefania; Laio, Francesco; D'Odorico, Paolo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2011-02-01

    The ability of Gaussian noise to induce ordered states in dynamical systems is here presented in an overview of the main stochastic mechanisms able to generate spatial patterns. These mechanisms involve: (i) a deterministic local dynamics term, accounting for the local rate of variation of the field variable, (ii) a noise component (additive or multiplicative) accounting for the unavoidable environmental disturbances, and (iii) a linear spatial coupling component, which provides spatial coherence and takes into account diffusion mechanisms. We investigate these dynamics using analytical tools, such as mean-field theory, linear stability analysis and structure function analysis, and use numerical simulations to confirm these analytical results.

  12. Effects of music and white noise on working memory performance in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Carlson, S; Rämä, P; Artchakov, D; Linnankoski, I

    1997-09-08

    It has been suggested that Mozart's music may have beneficial effects on the performance of cognitive tasks in humans. In the present study the effects of Mozart's piano music, white noise, simple rhythm and silence were studied on the performance of a delayed response (DR) task in monkeys. The acoustic treatments were given for 15 min, either before or during DR testing. The acoustic treatments did not affect DR performance when given before testing. However, Mozart's piano music played during DR testing caused a significant deterioration in the performance of the monkeys, whereas white noise improved it. It is suggested that Mozart's music serves as distractive stimulation during DR performance thus affecting working-memory-related neuronal processing and performance. White background noise, on the other hand, may improve DR performance by protecting against environmental distraction during testing.

  13. Effect of White Noise in Relieving Vaccination Pain in Premature Infants.

    PubMed

    Kucukoglu, Sibel; Aytekin, Aynur; Celebioglu, Ayda; Celebi, Arzu; Caner, Ibrahim; Maden, Rukiye

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of white noise as a distraction method in relieving procedural pain caused by vaccination for premature infants. This experimental study was performed at a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of a university hospital in Turkey between July and September 2013. The study population was composed of 75 premature infants (35 in the study group and 40 in the control group) who met the inclusion criteria. Premature infants in the study group were exposed to white noise using MP3 players placed at the head of the infants' open crib for 1 minute before vaccination. The white noise continued until 1 minute after vaccination. Premature infants in the control group were not exposed to white noise. The Premature Infant Information Form, Intervention Follow-up Form, and Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) were used to collect study data. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test, and independent sample t-tests were used to evaluate the data. The pain level of the control group (PIPP = 14.35 ± 2.59) was significantly higher than the pain level of the study group (PIPP = 8.14 ± 3.14) (p < .05). The authors found that 67.6% of the infants in the study group had moderate pain during vaccination and only 2.9% had severe pain. Most of the infants in the control group (82.5%) had severe pain, whereas 17.5% had moderate pain (p < .05). White noise was found to be effective for this sample; however, there is a dire need for extensive research on white noise and its use with this vulnerable population.

  14. Exploring diamagnetic susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots in presence of Gaussian white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Aindrila; Saha, Surajit; Ganguly, Jayanta; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-11-01

    We explore diamagnetic susceptibility (DMS) of impurity doped quantum dot (QD) in presence of Gaussian white noise. Noise has been introduced to the system additively and multiplicatively. In view of these profiles of DMS have been pursued with variations of several important quantities e.g. magnetic field strength, confinement frequency, dopant location, dopant potential, and aluminium concentration, both in presence and absence of noise. We have invariably envisaged noise-induced suppression of DMS. Moreover, the extent of suppression noticeably depends on mode of application (additive/multiplicative) of noise. The said mode of application also plays a governing role in the onset of saturation of DMS values. The present study provides a deep insight into the promising role played by noise in controlling effective confinement imposed on the system which bears significant relevance.

  15. Correlated and uncorrelated invisible temporal white noise alters mesopic rod signaling.

    PubMed

    Hathibelagal, Amithavikram R; Feigl, Beatrix; Kremers, Jan; Zele, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    We determined how rod signaling at mesopic light levels is altered by extrinsic temporal white noise that is correlated or uncorrelated with the activity of one (magnocellular, parvocellular, or koniocellular) postreceptoral pathway. Rod and cone photoreceptor excitations were independently controlled using a four-primary photostimulator. Psychometric (Weibull) functions were measured for incremental rod pulses (50 to 250 ms) in the presence (or absence; control) of perceptually invisible subthreshold extrinsic noise. Uncorrelated (rod) noise facilitates rod detection. Correlated postreceptoral pathway noise produces differential changes in rod detection thresholds and decreases the slope of the psychometric functions. We demonstrate that invisible extrinsic noise changes rod-signaling characteristics within the three retinogeniculate pathways at mesopic illumination depending on the temporal profile of the rod stimulus and the extrinsic noise type.

  16. Signal-to-noise limitations in white light holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribak, Erez; Breckinridge, James B.; Roddier, Claude; Roddier, Francois

    1988-01-01

    A simple derivation is given for the SNR in images reconstructed from incoherent holograms. Dependence is shown to be on the hologram SNR, object complexity, and the number of pixels in the detector. Reconstruction of involved objects becomes possible with high-dynamic-range detectors such as CCDs. White-light holograms have been produced by means of a rotational shear interferometer combined with a chromatic corrector. A digital inverse transform recreated the object.

  17. Numeric Solutions of Dirac-Gursey Spinor Field Equation Under External Gaussian White Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogmus, Fatma

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the Dirac-Gursey spinor field equation that has particle-like solutions derived classical field equations so-called instantons, formed by using Heisenberg ansatz, under the effect of an additional Gaussian white noise term. Our purpose is to understand how the behavior of spinor-type excited instantons in four dimensions can be affected by noise. Thus, we simulate the phase portraits and Poincaré sections of the obtained system numerically both with and without noise. Recurrence plots are also given for more detailed information regarding the system.

  18. Variable Perception of White Noise in Ambiguous Phonetic Contexts: The Case of /p/ and /f/

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafiro, Valeriy; Raphael, Lawrence J.

    2007-01-01

    The roles of spectro-temporal coherence, lexical status, and word position in the perception of speech in acoustic signals containing a mixture of speech and nonspeech sounds were investigated. Stimuli consisted of nine (non)words in which either white noise was inserted only into the silent interval preceding and/or following the onset of vocalic…

  19. Continuous White Noise to Reduce Resistance Going to Sleep and Night Wakings in Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forquer, LeAnne M.; Johnson, C. Merle

    2005-01-01

    White noise generators were turned on at 75 dB at bedtime and kept on all night to treat resistance going to sleep and night wakings in one-year-old toddlers. In a multiple baseline design four sets of parents recorded duration of resistance going to sleep, number of night wakings, completed surveys of their child's feeding and sleeping patterns…

  20. Implementation problem for the canonical commutation relation in terms of quantum white noise derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Un Cig; Obata, Nobuaki

    2010-12-15

    The implementation problem for the canonical commutation relation is reduced to a system of differential equations for Fock space operators containing new type of derivatives. We solve these differential equations systematically by means of quantum white noise calculus, and obtain the solution to the implementation problem.

  1. Transduction of a bistable inductive generator driven by white and exponentially correlated Gaussian noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daqaq, Mohammed F.

    2011-05-01

    In this theoretical study, the response of an inductive power generator with a bistable symmetric potential to stationary random environmental excitations is investigated. Both white and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck-type excitations are considered. In the white noise limit, the stationary Fokker-Plank-Kolmagorov equation is solved for the exact joint probability density function (PDF) of the response. The PDF is then used to obtain analytical expressions for the response statistics. It is shown that the expected value of the generator's output power is independent of the potential shape leading to the conclusion that under white noise excitations, bistabilities in the potential do not provide any enhancement over the traditional linear resonant generators which have a single-well potential. In the case of Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (exponentially correlated) noise, an approximate expression for the mean power of the generator which depends on the potential shape, the generator's design parameters and the noise bandwidth and intensity is obtained. It is shown that there exists an optimal potential shape which maximizes the output power. This optimal shape guarantees an optimal escapement frequency between the potential wells which remains constant even as the noise intensity is varied.

  2. Effects of white noise on Callsign Acquisition Test and Modified Rhyme Test scores.

    PubMed

    Blue-Terry, Misty; Letowski, Tomasz

    2011-02-01

    The Callsign Acquisition Test (CAT) is a speech intelligibility test developed by the US Army Research Laboratory. The test has been used to evaluate speech transmission through various communication systems but has not been yet sufficiently standardised and validated. The aim of this study was to compare CAT and Modified Rhyme Test (MRT) performance in the presence of white noise across a range of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). A group of 16 normal-hearing listeners participated in the study. The speech items were presented at 65 dB(A) in the background of white noise at SNRs of -18, -15, -12, -9 and -6 dB. The results showed a strong positive association (75.14%) between the two tests, but significant differences between the CAT and MRT absolute scores in the range of investigated SNRs. Based on the data, a function to predict CAT scores based on existing MRT scores and vice versa was formulated. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This work compares performance data of a common speech intelligibility test (MRT) with a new test (CAT) in the presence of white noise. The results here can be used as a part of the standardisation procedures and provide insights to the predictive capabilities of the CAT to quantify speech intelligibility communication in high-noise military environments.

  3. Acoustic and vibration response of a structure with added noise control treatment under various excitations.

    PubMed

    Rhazi, Dilal; Atalla, Noureddine

    2014-02-01

    The evaluation of the acoustic performance of noise control treatments is of great importance in many engineering applications, e.g., aircraft, automotive, and building acoustics applications. Numerical methods such as finite- and boundary elements allow for the study of complex structures with added noise control treatment. However, these methods are computationally expensive when used for complex structures. At an early stage of the acoustic trim design process, many industries look for simple and easy to use tools that provide sufficient physical insight that can help to formulate design criteria. The paper presents a simple and tractable approach for the acoustic design of noise control treatments. It presents and compares two transfer matrix-based methods to investigate the vibroacoustic behavior of noise control treatments. The first is based on a modal approach, while the second is based on wave-number space decomposition. In addition to the classical rain-on-the-roof and diffuse acoustic field excitations, the paper also addresses turbulent boundary layer and point source (monopole) excitations. Various examples are presented and compared to a finite element calculation to validate the methodology and to confirm its relevance along with its limitations.

  4. White light Fourier spectrometer: Monte Carlo noise analysis and test measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoykova, Elena; Ivanov, Branimir

    2007-06-01

    This work reports on investigation of the sensitivity of a Fourier-transform spectrometer to noise sources based on Monte-Carlo simulation of measurement of a single spectrum. Flexibility of this approach permits easily to imitate various noise contaminations of the interferograms and to obtain statistically reliable results for widely varying noise characteristics. More specifically, we evaluate the accuracy of restoration of a single absorption peak for the cases of an additive detection noise and the noise which adds a fluctuating component to the carrier frequency in the source and the measurement channel of the interferometer. Comparison of spectra of an etalon He-Ne source calculated from more than 200 measured interferograms with the true spectrum supports a hypothesis that the latter fluctuations have characteristics of a coloured noise. Taking into account that the signal-to-noise ratio in the Fourier spectroscopy is constantly increasing, we focus on limitations on the achievable accuracy of spectrum restoration that are set by this type of noise which modifies the shape of the recorded interferograms. We present also results of the test measurements of the spectrum of a laser diode chosen as a test source using a three-channel Fourier spectroscopic system based on a white-sourced Michelson interferometer realized with the Twyman-Green scheme. The obtained results exhibit that fluctuations in the current displacement of the movable mirror of the interferometer should remain below 20 nm to restore the absorption spectrum with acceptable accuracy, especially at higher frequency bandwidth of the fluctuations.

  5. Tuning third harmonic generation of impurity doped quantum dots in the presence of Gaussian white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Surajit; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-03-01

    We perform a broad exploration of profiles of third harmonic generation (THG) susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) in the presence and absence of noise. We have invoked Gaussian white noise in the present study. A Gaussian impurity has been introduced into the QD. Noise has been applied to the system additively and multiplicatively. A perpendicular magnetic field emerges out as a confinement source and a static external electric field has been applied. The THG profiles have been pursued as a function of incident photon energy when several important parameters such as electric field strength, magnetic field strength, confinement energy, dopant location, Al concentration, dopant potential, relaxation time and noise strength assume different values. Moreover, the role of the pathway through which noise is applied (additive/multiplicative) on the THG profiles has also been deciphered. The THG profiles are found to be decorated with interesting observations such as shift of THG peak position and maximization/minimization of THG peak intensity. Presence of noise alters the characteristics of THG profiles and sometimes enhances the THG peak intensity. Furthermore, the mode of application of noise (additive/multiplicative) also regulates the THG profiles in a few occasions in contrasting manners. The observations highlight the possible scope of tuning the THG coefficient of doped QD systems in the presence of noise and bears tremendous technological importance.

  6. Analysis of regularized inversion of data corrupted by white Gaussian noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekkonen, Hanne; Lassas, Matti; Siltanen, Samuli

    2014-04-01

    Tikhonov regularization is studied in the case of linear pseudodifferential operator as the forward map and additive white Gaussian noise as the measurement error. The measurement model for an unknown function u(x) is \\begin{eqnarray*} m(x) = Au(x) + \\delta \\varepsilon (x), \\end{eqnarray*} where δ > 0 is the noise magnitude. If ɛ was an L2-function, Tikhonov regularization gives an estimate \\begin{eqnarray*} T_\\alpha (m) = \\mathop {{arg\\, min}}_{u\\in H^r} \\big \\lbrace \\Vert A u-m\\Vert _{L^2}^2+ \\alpha \\Vert u\\Vert _{H^r}^2 \\big \\rbrace \\end{eqnarray*} for u where α = α(δ) is the regularization parameter. Here penalization of the Sobolev norm \\Vert u\\Vert _{H^r} covers the cases of standard Tikhonov regularization (r = 0) and first derivative penalty (r = 1). Realizations of white Gaussian noise are almost never in L2, but do belong to Hs with probability one if s < 0 is small enough. A modification of Tikhonov regularization theory is presented, covering the case of white Gaussian measurement noise. Furthermore, the convergence of regularized reconstructions to the correct solution as δ → 0 is proven in appropriate function spaces using microlocal analysis. The convergence of the related finite-dimensional problems to the infinite-dimensional problem is also analysed.

  7. The Parkes front-end controller and noise-adding radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunzie, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    A new front-end controller (FEC) was installed on the 64-m antenna in Parkes, Australia, to support the 1989 Voyager 2 Neptune encounter. The FEC was added to automate operation of the front-end microwave hardware as part of the Deep Space Network's Parkes-Canberra Telemetry Array. Much of the front-end hardware was refurbished and reimplemented from a front-end system installed in 1985 by the European Space Agency for the Uranus encounter; however, the FEC and its associated noise-adding radiometer (NAR) were new Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) designs. Project requirements and other factors led to the development of capabilities not found in standard Deep Space Network (DSN) controllers and radiometers. The Parkes FEC/NAR performed satisfactorily throughout the Neptune encounter and was removed in October 1989.

  8. White-throated sparrows alter songs differentially in response to chorusing anurans and other background noise.

    PubMed

    Lenske, Ariel K; La, Van T

    2014-06-01

    Animals can use acoustic signals to attract mates and defend territories. As a consequence, background noise that interferes with signal transmission has the potential to reduce fitness, especially in birds that rely on song. While much research on bird song has investigated vocal flexibility in response to urban noise, weather and other birds, the possibility of inter-class acoustic competition from anurans has not been previously studied. Using sound recordings from central Ontario wetlands, we tested if white-throated sparrows (Zonotrichia albicolis) make short-term changes to their singing behaviour in response to chorusing spring peepers (Pseudacris crucifer), as well as to car noise, wind and other bird vocalizations. White-throated sparrow songs that were sung during the spring peeper chorus were shorter with higher minimum frequencies and narrower bandwidths resulting in reduced frequency overlap. Additionally, sparrows were less likely to sing when car noise and the vocalizations of other birds were present. These patterns suggest that birds use multiple adjustment strategies. This is the first report to demonstrate that birds may alter their songs differentially in response to different sources of noise. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: insert SI title.

  9. Correlated speckle noise in white-light interferometry: theoretical analysis of measurement uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Hering, Marco; Koerner, Klaus; Jaehne, Bernd

    2009-01-20

    The partial coherent illumination of the specimen, which is required for white-light interferometric measurements of optically rough surfaces, directly leads to speckle. The electric field of such speckle patterns strongly fluctuates in amplitude and phase. This spatially correlated noise influences the accuracy of the measuring device. Although a variety of noise sources in white-light interferometry has been studied in recent years, they do not account for spatial correlation and, hence, they cannot be applied to speckle noise. Thus, we derive a new model enabling quantitative predictions for measurement uncertainty caused by speckle. The model reveals that the accuracy can be attributed mainly to the degree of spatial correlation, i.e., the average size of a speckle, and to the coherence length of the light source. The same parameters define the signal-to-noise ratio in the spectral domain. The model helps to design filter functions that are perfectly adapted to the noise characteristics of the respective device, thus improving the accuracy of postprocessing algorithms for envelope detection. The derived expressions are also compared to numerical simulations and experimental data of two different types of interferometers. These results are a first validation of the theoretical considerations of this article.

  10. Mean first passage times of processes driven by white shot noise.

    PubMed

    Laio, F; Porporato, A; Ridolfi, L; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I

    2001-03-01

    We consider mean first passage times in systems driven by white shot noise with exponentially distributed jump heights. Simple interpretable results are obtained and the linkage between those results and the steady-state probability density function of the process is presented. The virtual waiting-time or Takács process (constant losses) and the shot noise process with linear losses are analyzed in depth, along with a more complex process with useful implications for the modeling of the soil moisture dynamics in hydrology.

  11. Heating and thermal squeezing in parametrically driven oscillators with added noise.

    PubMed

    Batista, Adriano A

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we report a theoretical model based on Green's functions, Floquet theory, and averaging techniques up to second order that describes the dynamics of parametrically driven oscillators with added thermal noise. Quantitative estimates for heating and quadrature thermal noise squeezing near and below the transition line of the first parametric instability zone of the oscillator are given. Furthermore, we give an intuitive explanation as to why heating and thermal squeezing occur. For small amplitudes of the parametric pump the Floquet multipliers are complex conjugate of each other with a constant magnitude. As the pump amplitude is increased past a threshold value in the stable zone near the first parametric instability, the two Floquet multipliers become real and have different magnitudes. This creates two different effective dissipation rates (one smaller and the other larger than the real dissipation rate) along the stable manifolds of the first-return Poincaré map. We also show that the statistical average of the input power due to thermal noise is constant and independent of the pump amplitude and frequency. The combination of these effects causes most of heating and thermal squeezing. Very good agreement between analytical and numerical estimates of the thermal fluctuations is achieved.

  12. Dynamics of a prey-predator system under Poisson white noise excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Shan-Shan; Zhu, Wei-Qiu

    2014-10-01

    The classical Lotka-Volterra (LV) model is a well-known mathematical model for prey-predator ecosystems. In the present paper, the pulse-type version of stochastic LV model, in which the effect of a random natural environment has been modeled as Poisson white noise, is investigated by using the stochastic averaging method. The averaged generalized Itô stochastic differential equation and Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov (FPK) equation are derived for prey-predator ecosystem driven by Poisson white noise. Approximate stationary solution for the averaged generalized FPK equation is obtained by using the perturbation method. The effect of prey self-competition parameter ɛ2 s on ecosystem behavior is evaluated. The analytical result is confirmed by corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation.

  13. On signal design by the R/0/ criterion for non-white Gaussian noise channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bordelon, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    The use of the cut-off rate criterion for modulation system design is investigated for channels with non-white Gaussian noise. A signal space representation of the waveform channel is developed, and the cut-off rate for vector channels with additive non-white Gaussian noise and unquantized demodulation is derived. When the signal input to the channel is a continuous random vector, maximization of the cut-off rate with constrained average signal energy leads to a water-filling interpretation of optimal energy distribution in signal space. The necessary condition for a finite signal set to maximize the cut-off rate with constrained energy and an equally likely probability assignment of signal vectors is presented, and an algorithm is outlined for numerically computing the optimum signal set. As an example, the rectangular signal set which has the water-filling average energy distribution and the optimum rectangular set are compared.

  14. Airpuff startle probes: an efficacious and less aversive alternative to white-noise.

    PubMed

    Lissek, Shmuel; Baas, Johanna M P; Pine, Daniel S; Orme, Kaebah; Dvir, Sharone; Nugent, Monique; Rosenberger, Emily; Rawson, Elizabeth; Grillon, Christian

    2005-03-01

    Fear-potentiated startle (FPS) is an increasingly popular psychophysiological method for the objective assessment of fear and anxiety. Studies applying this method often elicit the startle reflex with loud white-noise stimuli. Such intense stimuli may, however, alter psychological processes of interest by creating unintended emotional or attentional artifacts. Additionally, loud acoustic probes may be unsuitable for use with infants, children, the elderly, and those with hearing damage. Past studies have noted robust and reliable startle reflexes elicited by low intensity airpuffs. The current study compares the aversiveness of white-noise (102 dB) and airpuff (3 psi) probes and examines the sensitivity of each probe for the assessment of fear-potentiated startle. Results point to less physiological arousal and self-reported reactivity to airpuff versus white-noise probes. Additionally, both probes elicited equal startle magnitudes, response probabilities, and levels of fear-potentiated startle. Such results support the use of low intensity airpuffs as efficacious and relatively non-aversive startle probes.

  15. Using white noise to gate organic transistors for dynamic monitoring of cultured cell layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivnay, Jonathan; Leleux, Pierre; Hama, Adel; Ramuz, Marc; Huerta, Miriam; Malliaras, George G.; Owens, Roisin M.

    2015-06-01

    Impedance sensing of biological systems allows for monitoring of cell and tissue properties, including cell-substrate attachment, layer confluence, and the “tightness” of an epithelial tissue. These properties are critical for electrical detection of tissue health and viability in applications such as toxicological screening. Organic transistors based on conducting polymers offer a promising route to efficiently transduce ionic currents to attain high quality impedance spectra, but collection of complete impedance spectra can be time consuming (minutes). By applying uniform white noise at the gate of an organic electrochemical transistor (OECT), and measuring the resulting current noise, we are able to dynamically monitor the impedance and thus integrity of cultured epithelial monolayers. We show that noise sourcing can be used to track rapid monolayer disruption due to compounds which interfere with dynamic polymerization events crucial for maintaining cytoskeletal integrity, and to resolve sub-second alterations to the monolayer integrity.

  16. Using white noise to gate organic transistors for dynamic monitoring of cultured cell layers.

    PubMed

    Rivnay, Jonathan; Leleux, Pierre; Hama, Adel; Ramuz, Marc; Huerta, Miriam; Malliaras, George G; Owens, Roisin M

    2015-06-26

    Impedance sensing of biological systems allows for monitoring of cell and tissue properties, including cell-substrate attachment, layer confluence, and the "tightness" of an epithelial tissue. These properties are critical for electrical detection of tissue health and viability in applications such as toxicological screening. Organic transistors based on conducting polymers offer a promising route to efficiently transduce ionic currents to attain high quality impedance spectra, but collection of complete impedance spectra can be time consuming (minutes). By applying uniform white noise at the gate of an organic electrochemical transistor (OECT), and measuring the resulting current noise, we are able to dynamically monitor the impedance and thus integrity of cultured epithelial monolayers. We show that noise sourcing can be used to track rapid monolayer disruption due to compounds which interfere with dynamic polymerization events crucial for maintaining cytoskeletal integrity, and to resolve sub-second alterations to the monolayer integrity.

  17. Delay-induced stochastic bifurcations in a bistable system under white noise

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhongkui Fu, Jin; Xu, Wei; Xiao, Yuzhu

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, the effects of noise and time delay on stochastic bifurcations are investigated theoretically and numerically in a time-delayed Duffing-Van der Pol oscillator subjected to white noise. Due to the time delay, the random response is not Markovian. Thereby, approximate methods have been adopted to obtain the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equation and the stationary probability density function for amplitude of the response. Based on the knowledge that stochastic bifurcation is characterized by the qualitative properties of the steady-state probability distribution, it is found that time delay and feedback intensity as well as noise intensity will induce the appearance of stochastic P-bifurcation. Besides, results demonstrated that the effects of the strength of the delayed displacement feedback on stochastic bifurcation are accompanied by the sensitive dependence on time delay. Furthermore, the results from numerical simulations best confirm the effectiveness of the theoretical analyses.

  18. Effects of High Intensity White Noise on Short-Term Memory for Position in a List and Sequence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daee, Safar; Wilding, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Seven experiments are described investigating the effecy of high intensity white noise during the visual presentation of words on a number of short-term memory tasks. Examines results relative to position learning and sequence learning. (Editor/RK)

  19. Investigation of Spectral-Based Techniques for Classification of Wideband Transient Signals in Additive White Gaussian Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    normalized cross- correlation coefficient ; the modified normalized cross- correlation coefficient , and; the divergence and the Bhattacharyya distance. Noise was...added to the signals to create signal to noise ratios of 0 dB to -20 dB. Results show that as noise levels increase, the modified normalized cross- correlation coefficient spectral measure remains the most robust scheme.

  20. White-noise susceptibility and critical slowing in neurons near spiking threshold.

    PubMed

    Steyn-Ross, D A; Steyn-Ross, Moira L; Wilson, M T; Sleigh, J W

    2006-11-01

    We present mathematical and simulation analyses of the below-threshold noisy response of two biophysically motivated models for excitable membrane due to H. R. Wilson: a squid axon ("resonator") and a human cortical neuron ("integrator"). When stimulated with a low-intensity white noise superimposed on a dc control current, both membrane types generate voltage fluctuations that exhibit critical slowing down--that is, the voltage responsiveness to noisy input currents grows in amplitude while slowing in frequency--as the membrane approaches spiking threshold from below. We define threshold unambiguously as that dc current that renders a zero real eigenvalue for the Jacobian matrix for the integrator neuron, and, for the resonator neuron, as the dc current that gives a complex eigenvalue pair whose real part is zero. Using a linear Ornstein-Uhlenbeck analysis, we give exact small-noise expressions for the variance, power spectrum, and correlation function of the voltage fluctuations, and we derive the scaling laws for the divergence of susceptibility and correlation times for approach to threshold. We compare these predictions with numerical simulations of the nonlinear stochastic equations, and demonstrate that, provided the white-noise perturbations are kept sufficiently small, the linearized theory works well. These predictions should be testable in the laboratory using a current-clamped cell configuration. If confirmed, then the proximity of a neuron to its spike-transition point can be judged by measuring its subthreshold susceptibility to white-noise stimulation. We postulate that such temporally correlated fluctuations could provide a means of subthreshold signaling via gap-junction connections with neighboring neurons.

  1. Physisporinus vitreus: a versatile white rot fungus for engineering value-added wood products.

    PubMed

    Schwarze, Francis W M R; Schubert, Mark

    2011-11-01

    The credo of every scientist working in the field of applied science is to transfer knowledge "from science to market," a process that combines (1) science (fundamental discoveries and basic research) with (2) technology development (performance assessment and optimization) and (3) technology transfer (industrial application). Over the past 7 years, we have intensively investigated the potential of the white rot fungus, Physisporinus vitreus, for engineering value-added wood products. Because of its exceptional wood degradation pattern, i.e., selective lignification without significant wood strength losses and a preferential degradation of bordered pit membranes, it is possible to use this fungus under controlled conditions to improve the acoustic properties of tonewood (i.e., "mycowood") as well as to enhance the uptake of preservatives and wood modification substances in refractory wood species (e.g., Norway spruce), a process known as "bioincising." This minireview summarizes the research that we have performed with P. vitreus and critically discusses the challenges encountered during the development of two distinct processes for engineering value-added wood products. Finally, we peep into the future potential of the bioincising and mycowood processes for additional applications in the forest and wood industry.

  2. Robust matched-field processing using a coherent broadband white noise constraint processor.

    PubMed

    Debever, Claire; Kuperman, W A

    2007-10-01

    Adaptive matched-field processing (MFP) is not only very sensitive to mismatch, but also requires the received sound levels to exceed a threshold signal-to-noise ratio. Furthermore, acoustic sources and interferers have to move slowly enough across resolution cells so that a full rank cross-spectral density matrix can be constructed. Coherent-broadband MFP takes advantage of the temporal complexity of the signal, and therefore offers an additional gain over narrow-band processing by augmenting the dimension of the data space. However, the sensitivity to mismatch is also increased in the process, since a single constraint is usually not enough to achieve robustness and the snapshot requirement becomes even more problematic. The white noise constraint method, typically used for narrow-band processing, is applied to a previously derived broadband processor to enhance its robustness to environmental mismatch and snapshot deficiency. The broadband white noise constraint theory is presented and validated through simulation and experimental data. The dynamic range bias obtained from the snapshot-deficient processing is shown to be consistent with that previously presented in the literature for a single frequency.

  3. Dynamic quantised feedback stabilisation of discrete-time linear system with white noise input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Mingming; He, Xing; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we mainly focus on the problem of quantised feedback stabilisation of a stochastic discrete-time linear system with white noise input. The dynamic quantiser is used here. The stability of the system under state quantisation and input quantisation is analysed in detail, respectively. Both the convergence of the state's mean and the boundedness of the state's covariance matrix norm should be considered when analysing its stability. It is shown that for the two situations of the state quantisation and the input quantisation, if the system without noise input can be stabilised by a linear feedback law, it must be stabilised by the dynamic quantised feedback control policy. The sufficient conditions that the dynamic quantiser should satisfy are given. Using the results obtained in this paper, one can test whether the stochastic system is stabilisable or not. Numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of the results.

  4. Martingale integrals over Poissonian processes and the Ito-type equations with white shot noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zygadło, Ryszard

    2003-10-01

    The construction of the Ito-type stochastic integrals and differential equations for compound Poisson processes is provided. The general martingale and nonanticipating properties of the ordinary (Gaussian) Ito theory are conserved. These properties appear particularly important if the stochastic description has to be proposed according to game theory or the linear relaxation (or the exponential growth) requirements. In contrast to the ordinary Ito theory the (uncorrelated) parametric fluctuation of a definite sign can be still modeled by asymmetric white shot noise, so the general scope of applications is not restricted by the positivity requirements. The possible use of the developed formalism in econophysics is addressed.

  5. Functors of White Noise Associated to Characters of the Infinite Symmetric Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bożejko, Marek; Guţă, Mădălin

    The characters of the infinite symmetric group are extended to multiplicative positive definite functions on pair partitions by using an explicit representation due to Veršik and Kerov. The von Neumann algebra generated by the fields with f in an infinite dimensional real Hilbert space is infinite and the vacuum vector is not separating. For a family depending on an integer N< - 1 an ``exclusion principle'' is found allowing at most ``identical particles'' on the same state: The algebras are type factors. Functors of white noise are constructed and proved to be non-equivalent for different values of N.

  6. Martingale integrals over Poissonian processes and the Ito-type equations with white shot noise.

    PubMed

    Zygadło, Ryszard

    2003-10-01

    The construction of the Ito-type stochastic integrals and differential equations for compound Poisson processes is provided. The general martingale and nonanticipating properties of the ordinary (Gaussian) Ito theory are conserved. These properties appear particularly important if the stochastic description has to be proposed according to game theory or the linear relaxation (or the exponential growth) requirements. In contrast to the ordinary Ito theory the (uncorrelated) parametric fluctuation of a definite sign can be still modeled by asymmetric white shot noise, so the general scope of applications is not restricted by the positivity requirements. The possible use of the developed formalism in econophysics is addressed.

  7. On the identifiability of linear dynamical systems. [parameters observation in presence of white noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glover, K.; Willems, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Consider the situation in which the unknown parameters of a stationary linear system may be parametrized by a set of unknown parameters. The question thus arises of when such a set of parameters can be uniquely identified on the basis of observed data. This problem is considered here both in the case of input and output observations and in the case of output observations in the presence of a white noise input. Conditions for local identifiability are derived for both situations and a sufficient condition for global identifiability is given for the former situation, i.e., when simultaneous input and output observations are available.

  8. Polarizabilities of Impurity Doped Quantum Dots Under Pulsed Field: Role of Multiplicative White Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Surajit; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-02-01

    We perform a rigorous analysis of the profiles of a few diagonal and off-diagonal components of linear ( α xx , α yy , α xy , and α yx ), first nonlinear ( β xxx , β yyy , β xyy , and β yxx ), and second nonlinear ( γ xxxx , γ yyyy , γ xxyy , and γ yyxx ) polarizabilities of quantum dots exposed to an external pulsed field. Simultaneous presence of multiplicative white noise has also been taken into account. The quantum dot contains a dopant represented by a Gaussian potential. The number of pulse and the dopant location have been found to fabricate the said profiles through their interplay. Moreover, a variation in the noise strength also contributes evidently in designing the profiles of above polarizability components. In general, the off-diagonal components have been found to be somewhat more responsive to a variation of noise strength. However, we have found some exception to the above fact for the off-diagonal β yxx component. The study projects some pathways of achieving stable, enhanced, and often maximized output of linear and nonlinear polarizabilities of doped quantum dots driven by multiplicative noise.

  9. The what and where of adding channel noise to the Hodgkin-Huxley equations.

    PubMed

    Goldwyn, Joshua H; Shea-Brown, Eric

    2011-11-01

    Conductance-based equations for electrically active cells form one of the most widely studied mathematical frameworks in computational biology. This framework, as expressed through a set of differential equations by Hodgkin and Huxley, synthesizes the impact of ionic currents on a cell's voltage--and the highly nonlinear impact of that voltage back on the currents themselves--into the rapid push and pull of the action potential. Later studies confirmed that these cellular dynamics are orchestrated by individual ion channels, whose conformational changes regulate the conductance of each ionic current. Thus, kinetic equations familiar from physical chemistry are the natural setting for describing conductances; for small-to-moderate numbers of channels, these will predict fluctuations in conductances and stochasticity in the resulting action potentials. At first glance, the kinetic equations provide a far more complex (and higher-dimensional) description than the original Hodgkin-Huxley equations or their counterparts. This has prompted more than a decade of efforts to capture channel fluctuations with noise terms added to the equations of Hodgkin-Huxley type. Many of these approaches, while intuitively appealing, produce quantitative errors when compared to kinetic equations; others, as only very recently demonstrated, are both accurate and relatively simple. We review what works, what doesn't, and why, seeking to build a bridge to well-established results for the deterministic equations of Hodgkin-Huxley type as well as to more modern models of ion channel dynamics. As such, we hope that this review will speed emerging studies of how channel noise modulates electrophysiological dynamics and function. We supply user-friendly MATLAB simulation code of these stochastic versions of the Hodgkin-Huxley equations on the ModelDB website (accession number 138950) and http://www.amath.washington.edu/~etsb/tutorials.html.

  10. Influence of Gaussian white noise on the frequency-dependent first nonlinear polarizability of doped quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Ghosh, Manas

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the profiles of diagonal components of frequency-dependent first nonlinear (βxxx and βyyy) optical response of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots. We have assumed a Gaussian function to represent the dopant impurity potential. This study primarily addresses the role of noise on the polarizability components. We have invoked Gaussian white noise consisting of additive and multiplicative characteristics (in Stratonovich sense). The doped system has been subjected to an oscillating electric field of given intensity, and the frequency-dependent first nonlinear polarizabilities are computed. The noise characteristics are manifested in an interesting way in the nonlinear polarizability components. In case of additive noise, the noise strength remains practically ineffective in influencing the optical responses. The situation completely changes with the replacement of additive noise by its multiplicative analog. The replacement enhances the nonlinear optical response dramatically and also causes their maximization at some typical value of noise strength that depends on oscillation frequency.

  11. Influence of Gaussian white noise on the frequency-dependent first nonlinear polarizability of doped quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Ghosh, Manas

    2014-05-07

    We investigate the profiles of diagonal components of frequency-dependent first nonlinear (β{sub xxx} and β{sub yyy}) optical response of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots. We have assumed a Gaussian function to represent the dopant impurity potential. This study primarily addresses the role of noise on the polarizability components. We have invoked Gaussian white noise consisting of additive and multiplicative characteristics (in Stratonovich sense). The doped system has been subjected to an oscillating electric field of given intensity, and the frequency-dependent first nonlinear polarizabilities are computed. The noise characteristics are manifested in an interesting way in the nonlinear polarizability components. In case of additive noise, the noise strength remains practically ineffective in influencing the optical responses. The situation completely changes with the replacement of additive noise by its multiplicative analog. The replacement enhances the nonlinear optical response dramatically and also causes their maximization at some typical value of noise strength that depends on oscillation frequency.

  12. Escape through an unstable limit cycle driven by multiplicative colored non-Gaussian and additive white Gaussian noises.

    PubMed

    Bag, Bidhan Chandra; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2007-04-01

    In a previous paper [Bag and Hu, Phys. Rev. E 73, 061107 (2006)], we studied the mean lifetime (MLT) for the escape of a Brownian particle through an unstable limit cycle driven by multiplicative colored Gaussian and additive Gaussian white noises and found resonant activation (RA) behavior. In the present paper we switch from Gaussian to non-Gaussian multiplicative colored noise. We find that in the RA phenomenon, the minimum appears at a smaller noise correlation time (tau) for non-Gaussian noises compared to Gaussian noises in the plot of MLT vs tau for a fixed noise variance; the same plot for a given noise strength increases linearly and the increasing rate is smaller for non-Gaussian noises than for the Gaussian noises; the plot of logarithm of inverse of MLT vs inverse of the strength of additive noise is Arrhenius-like for Gaussian colored noise and it becomes similar to the quantum-Kramers rate if the multiplicative noise is non-Gaussian.

  13. Non-white noise in fMRI: does modelling have an impact?

    PubMed

    Lund, Torben E; Madsen, Kristoffer H; Sidaros, Karam; Luo, Wen-Lin; Nichols, Thomas E

    2006-01-01

    The sources of non-white noise in Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) are many. Familiar sources include low-frequency drift due to hardware imperfections, oscillatory noise due to respiration and cardiac pulsation and residual movement artefacts not accounted for by rigid body registration. These contributions give rise to temporal autocorrelation in the residuals of the fMRI signal and invalidate the statistical analysis as the errors are no longer independent. The low-frequency drift is often removed by high-pass filtering, and other effects are typically modelled as an autoregressive (AR) process. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach: Nuisance Variable Regression (NVR). By inclusion of confounding effects in a general linear model (GLM), we first confirm that the spatial distribution of the various fMRI noise sources is similar to what has already been described in the literature. Subsequently, we demonstrate, using diagnostic statistics, that removal of these contributions reduces first and higher order autocorrelation as well as non-normality in the residuals, thereby improving the validity of the drawn inferences. In addition, we also compare the performance of the NVR method to the whitening approach implemented in SPM2.

  14. RTS noise and dark current white defects reduction using selective averaging based on a multi-aperture system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Takasawa, Taishi; Seo, Min Woong; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2014-01-16

    In extremely low-light conditions, random telegraph signal (RTS) noise and dark current white defects become visible. In this paper, a multi-aperture imaging system and selective averaging method which removes the RTS noise and the dark current white defects by minimizing the synthetic sensor noise at every pixel is proposed. In the multi-aperture imaging system, a very small synthetic F-number which is much smaller than 1.0 is achieved by increasing optical gain with multiple lenses. It is verified by simulation that the effective noise normalized by optical gain in the peak of noise histogram is reduced from 1.38e⁻ to 0.48 e⁻ in a 3 × 3-aperture system using low-noise CMOS image sensors based on folding-integration and cyclic column ADCs. In the experiment, a prototype 3 × 3-aperture camera, where each aperture has 200 × 200 pixels and an imaging lens with a focal length of 3.0 mm and F-number of 3.0, is developed. Under a low-light condition, in which the maximum average signal is 11e⁻ per aperture, the RTS and dark current white defects are removed and the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) of the image is increased by 6.3 dB.

  15. Response analysis of a class of quasi-linear systems with fractional derivative excited by Poisson white noise.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongge; Xu, Wei; Yang, Guidong; Jia, Wantao

    2016-08-01

    The Poisson white noise, as a typical non-Gaussian excitation, has attracted much attention recently. However, little work was referred to the study of stochastic systems with fractional derivative under Poisson white noise excitation. This paper investigates the stationary response of a class of quasi-linear systems with fractional derivative excited by Poisson white noise. The equivalent stochastic system of the original stochastic system is obtained. Then, approximate stationary solutions are obtained with the help of the perturbation method. Finally, two typical examples are discussed in detail to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The analysis also shows that the fractional order and the fractional coefficient significantly affect the responses of the stochastic systems with fractional derivative.

  16. Tuning diagonal components of static linear and first nonlinear polarizabilities of doped quantum dots by Gaussian white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Ghosh, Manas

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the modulation of diagonal components of static linear (αxx, αyy) and first nonlinear (βxxx, βyyy) polarizabilities of quantum dots by Gaussian white noise. Quantum dot is doped with impurity represented by a Gaussian potential and repulsive in nature. The study reveals the importance of mode of application of noise (additive/multiplicative) on the polarizability components. The doped system is further exposed to a static external electric field of given intensity. As important observation we have found that the strength of additive noise becomes unable to influence the polarizability components. However, the multiplicative noise influences them conspicuously and gives rise to additional interesting features. Multiplicative noise even enhances the magnitude of the polarizability components immensely. The present investigation deems importance in view of the fact that noise seriously affects the optical properties of doped quantum dot devices.

  17. White noise approach for estimating the passive electrical properties of neurons.

    PubMed

    Wright, W N; Bardakjian, B L; Valiante, T A; Perez-Velazquez, J L; Carlen, P L

    1996-11-01

    1. The passive electrical properties of whole cell patched dentate granule cells were studied with the use of zero-mean Gaussian white noise current stimuli. Transmembrane voltage responses were used to compute the first-order Wiener kernels describing the current-voltage relationship at the soma for six cells. Frequency domain optimization techniques using a gradient method for function minimization were then employed to identify the optimal electrical parameter values. Low-power white noise stimuli are presented as a favorable alternative to the use of short-pulse current inputs for investigating neuronal passive electrical properties. 2. The optimization results demonstrated that the lumped resistive and capacitive properties of the recording electrode must be included in the analytic input impedance expression to optimally fit the measured cellular responses. The addition of the electrode resistance (Re) and capacitance (Ce) to the original parameters (somatic conductance, somatic capacitance, axial resistance, dendritic conductance, and dendritic capacitance) results in a seven-parameter model. The mean Ce value from the six cells was 5.4 +/- 0.3 (SE) pF, whereas Re following formation of the patch was found to be 20 +/- 2 M omega. 3. The six dentate granule cells were found to have an input resistance of 600 +/- 20 M omega and a dendritic to somatic conductance ratio of 6.3 +/- 1.1. The electronic length of the equivalent dendritic cylinder was found to be 0.42 +/- 0.03. The membrane time constant in the soma was found to be 13 +/- 3 ms, whereas the membrane time constant of the dendrites was 58 +/- 5 ms. Incorporation of morphological estimations led to the following distributed electrical parameters: somatic membrane resistance = 25 +/- 4 k omega cm2, somatic membrane capacitance = 0.48 +/- 0.05 microF/cm2, Ri (input resistance) = 72 +/- 5 omega cm, dendritic membrane resistance = 59 +/- 4 k omega cm2, and dendritic membrane capacitance = 0.97 +/- 0

  18. Langevin equation with multiplicative white noise: Transformation of diffusion processes into the Wiener process in different prescriptions

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Sau Fa

    2012-08-15

    A Langevin equation with multiplicative white noise and its corresponding Fokker-Planck equation are considered in this work. From the Fokker-Planck equation a transformation into the Wiener process is provided for different orders of prescription in discretization rule for the stochastic integrals. A few applications are also discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fokker-Planck equation corresponding to the Langevin equation with mul- tiplicative white noise is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformation of diffusion processes into the Wiener process in different prescriptions is provided. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The prescription parameter is associated with the growth rate for a Gompertz-type model.

  19. Ocular-following responses to white noise stimuli in humans reveal a novel nonlinearity that results from temporal sampling

    PubMed Central

    Sheliga, Boris M.; Quaia, Christian; FitzGibbon, Edmond J.; Cumming, Bruce G.

    2016-01-01

    White noise stimuli are frequently used to study the visual processing of broadband images in the laboratory. A common goal is to describe how responses are derived from Fourier components in the image. We investigated this issue by recording the ocular-following responses (OFRs) to white noise stimuli in human subjects. For a given speed we compared OFRs to unfiltered white noise with those to noise filtered with band-pass filters and notch filters. Removing components with low spatial frequency (SF) reduced OFR magnitudes, and the SF associated with the greatest reduction matched the SF that produced the maximal response when presented alone. This reduction declined rapidly with SF, compatible with a winner-take-all operation. Removing higher SF components increased OFR magnitudes. For higher speeds this effect became larger and propagated toward lower SFs. All of these effects were quantitatively well described by a model that combined two factors: (a) an excitatory drive that reflected the OFRs to individual Fourier components and (b) a suppression by higher SF channels where the temporal sampling of the display led to flicker. This nonlinear interaction has an important practical implication: Even with high refresh rates (150 Hz), the temporal sampling introduced by visual displays has a significant impact on visual processing. For instance, we show that this distorts speed tuning curves, shifting the peak to lower speeds. Careful attention to spectral content, in the light of this nonlinearity, is necessary to minimize the resulting artifact when using white noise patterns undergoing apparent motion. PMID:26762277

  20. Ocular-following responses to white noise stimuli in humans reveal a novel nonlinearity that results from temporal sampling.

    PubMed

    Sheliga, Boris M; Quaia, Christian; FitzGibbon, Edmond J; Cumming, Bruce G

    2016-01-01

    White noise stimuli are frequently used to study the visual processing of broadband images in the laboratory. A common goal is to describe how responses are derived from Fourier components in the image. We investigated this issue by recording the ocular-following responses (OFRs) to white noise stimuli in human subjects. For a given speed we compared OFRs to unfiltered white noise with those to noise filtered with band-pass filters and notch filters. Removing components with low spatial frequency (SF) reduced OFR magnitudes, and the SF associated with the greatest reduction matched the SF that produced the maximal response when presented alone. This reduction declined rapidly with SF, compatible with a winner-take-all operation. Removing higher SF components increased OFR magnitudes. For higher speeds this effect became larger and propagated toward lower SFs. All of these effects were quantitatively well described by a model that combined two factors: (a) an excitatory drive that reflected the OFRs to individual Fourier components and (b) a suppression by higher SF channels where the temporal sampling of the display led to flicker. This nonlinear interaction has an important practical implication: Even with high refresh rates (150 Hz), the temporal sampling introduced by visual displays has a significant impact on visual processing. For instance, we show that this distorts speed tuning curves, shifting the peak to lower speeds. Careful attention to spectral content, in the light of this nonlinearity, is necessary to minimize the resulting artifact when using white noise patterns undergoing apparent motion.

  1. White noise analysis of pace-maker-response interactions and non-linearities in slowly adapting crayfish stretch receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Buño, W; Bustamante, J; Fuentes, J

    1984-01-01

    Input-output relations were investigated in the slowly adapting stretch receptor organ of crayfish using a Gaussian white noise length input with a 0.03-12.5 Hz band width and the resulting action potential output. The noise input was presented to the de-efferented receptor in situ, at three mean elongations and at four different amplitudes. The three mean elongations were set within the normal range in vivo, two at the extremes close to the minimum and maximum physiological lengths and the other in the mid-range. With white noise inputs there is a finite probability that the system will be tested in all possible conditions within the chosen band width because white noise has the advantage that it contains, with a finite probability, all possible stimulus wave forms at random. The analysis indicated similarities between the effects of the input variables, namely white noise amplitude and mean elongation. With low input variables the activity was periodic. With larger inputs, impulse rates were higher and irregular. The average length trajectories leading to a spike (i.e. the average stimulus) were either biphasic with high inputs or multiphasic and periodic with lower input variables. The frequency of periodicity increased with mean elongation. Although for a given length and noise amplitude a variety of individual length trajectories preceded spikes, the final biphasic shortening-lengthening average stimulus sequence before a spike was similar in all cases irrespective of the input variables. The number of possible trajectories decreased with increments in the input variables. The standard deviation of length values for each average stimulus was computed and displayed as a function of time relative to the spike. It was first constant, and decreased gradually to a minimum value at the spike reference. Standard deviation values were lower for higher white noise amplitudes and mean elongation. Simple, short-lasting stimulus wave forms in the white noise were isolated

  2. Coherent information of one-mode Gaussian channels—the general case of non-zero added classical noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brádler, Kamil

    2015-03-01

    We prove that whenever the coherent information of a one-mode Gaussian (OMG) channel is non-zero its supremum is achieved for the infinite input power. This is a well established fact for zero added classical noise, whereas the non-zero case has not been studied in detail. The presented analysis fills the gap for three canonical classes of OMG channels: the lossy, amplifying and additive classical noise channel class. For the remaining OMG channel classes the coherent information is known to vanish.

  3. Langevin dynamics for vector variables driven by multiplicative white noise: A functional formalism.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Miguel Vera; Arenas, Zochil González; Barci, Daniel G

    2015-04-01

    We discuss general multidimensional stochastic processes driven by a system of Langevin equations with multiplicative white noise. In particular, we address the problem of how time reversal diffusion processes are affected by the variety of conventions available to deal with stochastic integrals. We present a functional formalism to build up the generating functional of correlation functions without any type of discretization of the Langevin equations at any intermediate step. The generating functional is characterized by a functional integration over two sets of commuting variables, as well as Grassmann variables. In this representation, time reversal transformation became a linear transformation in the extended variables, simplifying in this way the complexity introduced by the mixture of prescriptions and the associated calculus rules. The stochastic calculus is codified in our formalism in the structure of the Grassmann algebra. We study some examples such as higher order derivative Langevin equations and the functional representation of the micromagnetic stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation.

  4. Excess white noise to probe transport mechanisms in a membrane channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queralt-Martín, María; López, M. Lidón; Alcaraz, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Current fluctuation analysis has been successfully used over the years to investigate the physical properties of different systems. Here, we perform single-channel time-resolved current experiments in a protein channel to evaluate the different transport mechanisms governing the channel function. Using different salts of monovalent and divalent cations in a wide range of concentrations and applied potentials, we analyze current fluctuations focusing on the voltage dependence of the additional white noise that appears in the low-frequency range of the spectra. We demonstrate that the channel displays two characteristic transport regimes: at low salt concentrations (10 mM to 1 M) ion permeation is controlled by the protein fixed charges that induce accumulation or exclusion of ions to preserve local electroneutrality. At high salt concentrations (>1 M ) adsorption processes associated to the binding of cations to the channel charges regulate the transport properties.

  5. Structural damage detection based on covariance of covariance matrix with general white noise excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Yi; Law, Siu Seong; Ku, Chiu Jen

    2017-02-01

    Covariance of the auto/cross-covariance matrix based method is studied for the damage identification of a structure with illustrations on its advantages and limitations. The original method is extended for structures under direct white noise excitations. The auto/cross-covariance function of the measured acceleration and its corresponding derivatives are formulated analytically, and the method is modified in two new strategies to enable successful identification with much fewer sensors. Numerical examples are adopted to illustrate the improved method, and the effects of sampling frequency and sampling duration are discussed. Results show that the covariance of covariance calculated from responses of higher order modes of a structure play an important role to the accurate identification of local damage in a structure.

  6. Stationary and Nontationary Response Probability Density Function of a Beam under Poisson White Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasta, M.; Di Paola, M.

    In this paper an approximate explicit probability density function for the analysis of external oscillations of a linear and geometric nonlinear simply supported beam driven by random pulses is proposed. The adopted impulsive loading model is the Poisson White Noise , that is a process having Dirac's delta occurrences with random intensity distributed in time according to Poisson's law. The response probability density function can be obtained solving the related Kolmogorov-Feller (KF) integro-differential equation. An approximated solution, using path integral method, is derived transforming the KF equation to a first order partial differential equation. The method of characteristic is then applied to obtain an explicit solution. Different levels of approximation, depending on the physical assumption on the transition probability density function, are found and the solution for the response density is obtained as series expansion using convolution integrals.

  7. A separation theorem for the stochastic sampled-data LQG problem. [control of continuous linear plant disturbed by white noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, N.; Caglayan, A. K.

    1976-01-01

    This paper considers the control of a continuous linear plant disturbed by white plant noise when the control is constrained to be a piecewise constant function of time; i.e. a stochastic sampled-data system. The cost function is the integral of quadratic error terms in the state and control, thus penalizing errors at every instant of time while the plant noise disturbs the system continuously. The problem is solved by reducing the constrained continuous problem to an unconstrained discrete one. It is shown that the separation principle for estimation and control still holds for this problem when the plant disturbance and measurement noise are Gaussian.

  8. Effects of experimentally elevated traffic noise on nestling white-crowned sparrow stress physiology, immune function and life history.

    PubMed

    Crino, Ondi L; Johnson, Erin E; Blickley, Jessica L; Patricelli, Gail L; Breuner, Creagh W

    2013-06-01

    Roads have been associated with behavioral and physiological changes in wildlife. In birds, roads decrease reproductive success and biodiversity and increase physiological stress. Although the consequences of roads on individuals and communities have been well described, the mechanisms through which roads affect birds remain largely unexplored. Here, we examine one mechanism through which roads could affect birds: traffic noise. We exposed nestling mountain white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys oriantha) to experimentally elevated traffic noise for 5 days during the nestling period. Following exposure to traffic noise we measured nestling stress physiology, immune function, body size, condition and survival. Based on prior studies, we expected the traffic noise treatment to result in elevated stress hormones (glucocorticoids), and declines in immune function, body size, condition and survival. Surprisingly, nestlings exposed to traffic noise had lower glucocorticoid levels and improved condition relative to control nests. These results indicate that traffic noise does affect physiology and development in white-crowned sparrows, but not at all as predicted. Therefore, when evaluating the mechanisms through which roads affect avian populations, other factors (e.g. edge effects, pollution and mechanical vibration) may be more important than traffic noise in explaining elevated nestling stress responses in this species.

  9. Choosing channel quantization levels and viterbi decoding for space diversity reception over the additive white Guassian noise channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalson, S.

    1986-01-01

    Previous work in the area of choosing channel quantization levels for a additive white Gaussian noise channel composed of one receiver-demodulator is reviewed, and how this applies to the Deep Space Network composed of several receiver-demodulators (space diversity reception) is shown. Viterbi decoding for the resulting quantized channel is discussed.

  10. Fabricating third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots in the presence of Gaussian white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Saha, Surajit; Pal, Suvajit; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-03-01

    We perform a meticulous analysis of profiles of third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility (TONOS) of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) in the presence and absence of noise. We have invoked Gaussian white noise in the present study and noise has been introduced to the system additively and multiplicatively. The QD is doped with a Gaussian impurity. A magnetic field applied perpendicularly serves as a confinement source and the doped system has been exposed to a static external electric field. The TONOS profiles have been monitored against a continuous variation of incident photon energy when several important parameters such as electric field strength, magnetic field strength, confinement energy, dopant location, Al concentration, dopant potential, relaxation time, anisotropy, and noise strength assume different values. Moreover, the influence of mode of introduction of noise (additive/multiplicative) on the TONOS profiles has also been addressed. The said profiles are found to be consisting of interesting observations such as shift of TONOS peak position and maximization/minimization of TONOS peak intensity. The presence of noise alters the features of TONOS profiles and sometimes enhances the TONOS peak intensity from that of noise-free state. Furthermore, the mode of application of noise also often tailors the TONOS profiles in diverse fashions. The observations accentuate the possibility of tuning the TONOS of doped QD systems in the presence of noise.

  11. Neural correlates of top-down processing in emotion perception: an ERP study of emotional faces in white noise versus noise-alone stimuli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu-Yong; Lee, Tae-Ho; Yoon, So-Jeong; Cho, Yang Seok; Choi, June-Seek; Kim, Hyun Taek

    2010-06-14

    In the present study, we investigated the neural correlates underlying the perception of emotion in response to facial stimuli in order to elucidate the extent to which emotional perception is affected by the top-down process. Subjects performed a forced, two-choice emotion discrimination task towards ambiguous visual stimuli consisted of emotional faces embedded in different levels of visual white noise, including white noise-alone stimuli. ERP recordings and behavioral responses were analyzed according to the four response categories: hit, miss, false alarm and correct rejection. We observed enlarged EPN and LPP amplitudes when subjects reported seeing fearful faces and a typical emotional EPN response in the white noise-alone conditions when fearful faces were not presented. The two components of the ERP data which imply the characteristic modulation reflecting emotional processing showed the type of emotion each individual subjectively perceived. The results suggest that top-down modulations might be indispensable for emotional perception, which consists of two distinct stages of stimulus processing in the brain.

  12. Added noise due to the effect of an upstream wake on a propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takallu, M. A.; Spence, P. L.; Block, P. J. W.

    1987-10-01

    An analytical/computational study has been conducted to predict the effect of an upstream wing or pylon on the noise of an operating propeller. The wing trailing edge was placed at variable distances (0.1 and 0.3 chord) upstream of a scaled model propeller (SR-2). The wake was modeled using a similarity formulation. The instantaneous pressure distribution on the propeller blades during the passage through the wake was formulated in terms of a time-dependent variation of each blade section's angle of attack and in terms of the shed vortices from the blade trailing edge. It was found that the final expressions for the unsteady loads considerably altered the radiated noise pattern. Predicted noise for various observer positions, rotational speeds, and propeller/pylon distances were computed and are presented in terms of the pressure time history, harmonics of the Fourier analysis, and overall sound pressure levels (OASPL). The addition of the tangential stress due to skin friction was found to have a damping effect on the acoustic pressure time history and the resulting spectrum of the generated noise. It is shown that the positioning of a pylon upstream of a propeller indeed increases the overall noise.

  13. How much image noise can be added in cardiac x-ray imaging without loss in perceived image quality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gislason-Lee, Amber J.; Kumcu, Asli; Kengyelics, Stephen M.; Rhodes, Laura A.; Davies, Andrew G.

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic X-ray imaging systems are used for interventional cardiac procedures to treat coronary heart disease. X-ray settings are controlled automatically by specially-designed X-ray dose control mechanisms whose role is to ensure an adequate level of image quality is maintained with an acceptable radiation dose to the patient. Current commonplace dose control designs quantify image quality by performing a simple technical measurement directly from the image. However, the utility of cardiac X-ray images is in their interpretation by a cardiologist during an interventional procedure, rather than in a technical measurement. With the long term goal of devising a clinically-relevant image quality metric for an intelligent dose control system, we aim to investigate the relationship of image noise with clinical professionals' perception of dynamic image sequences. Computer-generated noise was added, in incremental amounts, to angiograms of five different patients selected to represent the range of adult cardiac patient sizes. A two alternative forced choice staircase experiment was used to determine the amount of noise which can be added to a patient image sequences without changing image quality as perceived by clinical professionals. Twenty-five viewing sessions (five for each patient) were completed by thirteen observers. Results demonstrated scope to increase the noise of cardiac X-ray images by up to 21% +/- 8% before it is noticeable by clinical professionals. This indicates a potential for 21% radiation dose reduction since X-ray image noise and radiation dose are directly related; this would be beneficial to both patients and personnel.

  14. Modulating nonlinear optical properties of impurity doped quantum dots via the interplay between anisotropy and Gaussian white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Sucharita; Ghosh, Arghya Pratim; Mandal, Arkajit; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-02-01

    The influence of anisotropy on various nonlinear optical (NLO) properties such as total optical absorption coefficient (TOAC), nonlinear optical rectification (NOR), second harmonic generation (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) have been investigated in presence and absence of noise. Noise has been applied to the system additively and multiplicatively. The impurity potential is modeled by a Gaussian function and the noise applied being Gaussian white noise. A perpendicular magnetic field emerges out as a confinement source and a static external electric field has been applied. Profiles of the optical properties have been monitored as a function of incident photon energy for different values of anisotropy. In this connection the role of mode of application of noise (additive/multiplicative) has also been analysed. The interplay between noise and anisotropy has been found to profoundly affect the NLO properties. The investigation reveals that there are only one or two anisotropy regimes (depending on the particular NLO property under consideration) where noise-induced enhancement of the NLO property can be realized. Thus, anisotropy appears to be the central parameter by which the noise-induced enhancement of NLO properties of doped QD systems can be tailored.

  15. Quantum noise limits in white-light-cavity-enhanced gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Minchuan; Zhou, Zifan; Shahriar, Selim M.

    2015-10-01

    Previously, we had proposed a gravitational wave detector that incorporates the white-light-cavity (WLC) effect using a compound cavity for signal recycling (CC-SR). Here, we first use an idealized model for the negative dispersion medium (NDM) and use the so-called Caves model for a phase-insensitive linear amplifier to account for the quantum noise (QN) contributed by the NDM, in order to determine the upper bound of the enhancement in the sensitivity-bandwidth product. We calculate the quantum noise limited sensitivity curves for the CC-SR design, and find that the broadening of sensitivity predicted by the classical analysis is also present in these curves, but is somewhat reduced. Furthermore, we find that the curves always stay above the standard quantum limit. To circumvent this limitation, we modify the dispersion to compensate the nonlinear phase variation produced by the optomechanical resonance effects. We find that the upper bound of the factor by which the sensitivity-bandwidth product is increased, compared to the highest-sensitivity result predicted by Bunanno and Chen [Phys. Rev. D 64, 042006 (2001)], is ˜14 . We also present a simpler scheme (WLC-SR), where a dispersion medium is inserted into the SR cavity. For this scheme, we found the upper bound of the enhancement factor to be ˜18 . We then consider an explicit system for realizing the NDM, which makes use of five energy levels in M configuration to produce gain, accompanied by electromagnetically induced transparency (the GEIT system). For this explicit system, we employ the rigorous approach based on Master Equation to compute the QN contributed by the NDM, thus enabling us to determine the enhancement in the sensitivity-bandwidth product definitively rather than the upper bound thereof. Specifically, we identify a set of parameters for which the sensitivity-bandwidth product is enhanced by a factor of 17.66.

  16. White noise and synchronization shaping the age structure of the human population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebrat, Stanislaw; Biecek, Przemyslaw; Bonkowska, Katarzyna; Kula, Mateusz

    2007-06-01

    We have modified the standard diploid Penna model of ageing in such a way that instead of threshold of defective loci resulting in genetic death of individuals, the fluctuation of environment and "personal" fluctuations of individuals were introduced. The sum of the both fluctuations describes the health status of the individual. While environmental fluctuations are the same for all individuals in the population, the personal component of fluctuations is composed of fluctuations corresponding to each physiological function (gene, genetic locus). It is rather accepted hypothesis that physiological parameters of any organism fluctuate highly nonlinearly. Transition to the synchronized behaviors could be a very strong diagnostic signal of the life threatening disorder. Thus, in our model, mutations of genes change the chaotic fluctuations representing the function of a wild gene to the synchronized signals generated by mutated genes. Genes are switched on chronologically, like in the standard Penna model. Accumulation of defective genes predicted by Medawar's theory of ageing leads to the replacement of uncorrelated white noise corresponding to the healthy organism by the correlated signals of defective functions. As a result we have got the age distribution of population corresponding to the human demographic data.

  17. Proposed mechanism for learning and memory erasure in a white-noise-driven sleeping cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyn-Ross, Moira L.; Steyn-Ross, D. A.; Sleigh, J. W.; Wilson, M. T.; Wilcocks, Lara C.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding the structure and purpose of sleep remains one of the grand challenges of neurobiology. Here we use a mean-field linearized theory of the sleeping cortex to derive statistics for synaptic learning and memory erasure. The growth in correlated low-frequency high-amplitude voltage fluctuations during slow-wave sleep (SWS) is characterized by a probability density function that becomes broader and shallower as the transition into rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep is approached. At transition, the Shannon information entropy of the fluctuations is maximized. If we assume Hebbian-learning rules apply to the cortex, then its correlated response to white-noise stimulation during SWS provides a natural mechanism for a synaptic weight change that will tend to shut down reverberant neural activity. In contrast, during REM sleep the weights will evolve in a direction that encourages excitatory activity. These entropy and weight-change predictions lead us to identify the final portion of deep SWS that occurs immediately prior to transition into REM sleep as a time of enhanced erasure of labile memory. We draw a link between the sleeping cortex and Landauer’s dissipation theorem for irreversible computing [R. Landauer, IBM J. Res. Devel. 5, 183 (1961)], arguing that because information erasure is an irreversible computation, there is an inherent entropy cost as the cortex transits from SWS into REM sleep.

  18. A white noise approach to the Feynman integrand for electrons in random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grothaus, M.; Riemann, F.; Suryawan, H. P.

    2014-01-01

    Using the Feynman path integral representation of quantum mechanics it is possible to derive a model of an electron in a random system containing dense and weakly coupled scatterers [see F. Edwards and Y. B. Gulyaev, "The density of states of a highly impure semiconductor," Proc. Phys. Soc. 83, 495-496 (1964)]. The main goal of this paper is to give a mathematically rigorous realization of the corresponding Feynman integrand in dimension one based on the theory of white noise analysis. We refine and apply a Wick formula for the product of a square-integrable function with Donsker's delta functions and use a method of complex scaling. As an essential part of the proof we also establish the existence of the exponential of the self-intersection local times of a one-dimensional Brownian bridge. As a result we obtain a neat formula for the propagator with identical start and end point. Thus, we obtain a well-defined mathematical object which is used to calculate the density of states [see, e.g., F. Edwards and Y. B. Gulyaev, "The density of states of a highly impure semiconductor," Proc. Phys. Soc. 83, 495-496 (1964)].

  19. A white noise approach to the Feynman integrand for electrons in random media

    SciTech Connect

    Grothaus, M. Riemann, F.; Suryawan, H. P.

    2014-01-15

    Using the Feynman path integral representation of quantum mechanics it is possible to derive a model of an electron in a random system containing dense and weakly coupled scatterers [see F. Edwards and Y. B. Gulyaev, “The density of states of a highly impure semiconductor,” Proc. Phys. Soc. 83, 495–496 (1964)]. The main goal of this paper is to give a mathematically rigorous realization of the corresponding Feynman integrand in dimension one based on the theory of white noise analysis. We refine and apply a Wick formula for the product of a square-integrable function with Donsker's delta functions and use a method of complex scaling. As an essential part of the proof we also establish the existence of the exponential of the self-intersection local times of a one-dimensional Brownian bridge. As a result we obtain a neat formula for the propagator with identical start and end point. Thus, we obtain a well-defined mathematical object which is used to calculate the density of states [see, e.g., F. Edwards and Y. B. Gulyaev, “The density of states of a highly impure semiconductor,” Proc. Phys. Soc. 83, 495–496 (1964)].

  20. Added transmission capacity in VLC systems using white RGB based LEDs and WDM devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louro, P.; Silva, V.; Costa, J.; Vieira, M. A.; Vieira, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper an integrated wavelength optical filter and photodetector working as a DEMUX device is used to detect modulated optical signals of visible wavelengths for Visible Light Communication (VLC). The proposed application demonstrates the viability of indoors positioning using VLC technology established by the modulation of indoor warm light lamps lighting with ultra-bright white tri-cromatic LEDs. The signals were transmitted into free space and the generated photocurrent was measured by a pin-pin photodetector based on a-SiC:H/a-Si:H. This device operates in the visible spectrum, allowing thus the detection of the pulsed light emitted by the modulated chips of the white RGB LEDs. However, as the device works also as a visible optical filter with controlled wavelength sensitivity through the use of adequate optical biasing light, it is able to detect different wavelengths, turning it into a DEMUX device. This feature allows the detection of the individual components of the tri-chromatic white LED and is the basis for the indoors location algorithm. We demonstrate the possibility of decoding four transmission optical channels supplied by two different wavelength LEDs modulated under different bit sequences, which allows the location identification and indoor navigation.

  1. The stability of a predator-prey system with linear mass-action functional response perturbed by white noise.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiumei; Wen, Xiangdan; Jiang, Daqing; Liu, Zhenwen

    The present paper deals with the problem of an ecoepidemiological model with linear mass-action functional response perturbed by white noise. The essential mathematical features are analyzed with the help of the stochastic stability, its long time behavior around the equilibrium of deterministic ecoepidemiological model, and the stochastic asymptotic stability by Lyapunov analysis methods. Numerical simulations for a hypothetical set of parameter values are presented to illustrate the analytical findings.

  2. The hamiltonian path integral for potentials of the albeverio høegh-krohn class-a white noise approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Wolfgang; Capraro, Patrick

    2017-02-01

    We identify the integrand for the Hamiltonian path integral in space representation as a Kondratiev distribution. For this purpose we use methods from white noise analysis to compute also the Green's function of the underlying Schrödinger equation. We show that its generalized expectation solves the Schrödinger equation and that a functional form of the canonical commutation realtions is fulfilled.

  3. Contralateral white noise attenuates 40-Hz auditory steady-state fields but not N100m in auditory evoked fields.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Tetsuaki; Maki, Atsuko; Kanno, Akitake; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Sato, Mika; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu

    2012-01-16

    The different response characteristics of the different auditory cortical responses under conventional central masking conditions were examined by comparing the effects of contralateral white noise on the cortical component of 40-Hz auditory steady state fields (ASSFs) and the N100 m component in auditory evoked fields (AEFs) for tone bursts using a helmet-shaped magnetoencephalography system in 8 healthy volunteers (7 males, mean age 32.6 years). The ASSFs were elicited by monaural 1000 Hz amplitude modulation tones at 80 dB SPL, with the amplitude modulated at 39 Hz. The AEFs were elicited by monaural 1000 Hz tone bursts of 60 ms duration (rise and fall times of 10 ms, plateau time of 40 ms) at 80 dB SPL. The results indicated that continuous white noise at 70 dB SPL presented to the contralateral ear did not suppress the N100 m response in either hemisphere, but significantly reduced the amplitude of the 40-Hz ASSF in both hemispheres with asymmetry in that suppression of the 40-Hz ASSF was greater in the right hemisphere. Different effects of contralateral white noise on these two responses may reflect different functional auditory processes in the cortices.

  4. White noise analysis of Phycomyces light growth response system. I. Normal intensity range.

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, E D

    1975-01-01

    The Wiener-Lee-Schetzen method for the identification of a nonlinear system through white gaussian noise stimulation was applied to the transient light growth response of the sporangiophore of Phycomyces. In order to cover a moderate dynamic range of light intensity I, the imput variable was defined to be log I. The experiments were performed in the normal range of light intensity, centered about I0 = 10(-6) W/cm2. The kernels of the Wierner functionals were computed up to second order. Within the range of a few decades the system is reasonably linear with log I. The main nonlinear feature of the second-order kernel corresponds to the property of rectification. Power spectral analysis reveals that the slow dynamics of the system are of at least fifth order. The system can be represented approximately by a linear transfer function, including a first-order high-pass (adaptation) filter with a 4 min time constant and an underdamped fourth-order low-pass filter. Accordingly a linear electronic circuit was constructed to simulate the small scale response characteristics. In terms of the adaptation model of Delbrück and Reichardt (1956, in Cellular Mechanisms in Differentiation and Growth, Princeton University Press), kernels were deduced for the dynamic dependence of the growth velocity (output) on the "subjective intensity", a presumed internal variable. Finally the linear electronic simulator above was generalized to accommodate the large scale nonlinearity of the adaptation model and to serve as a tool for deeper test of the model. PMID:1203444

  5. Auditory filter shapes for the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and the white whale (Delphinapterus leucas) derived with notched noise.

    PubMed

    Finneran, James J; Schlundt, Carolyn E; Carder, Donald A; Ridgway, Sam H

    2002-07-01

    Auditory filter shapes were estimated in two bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and one white whale (Delphinapterus leucas) using a behavioral response paradigm and notched noise. Masked thresholds were measured at 20 and 30 kHz. Masking noise was centered at the test tone and had a bandwidth of 1.5 times the tone frequency. Half-notch width to center frequency ratios were 0, 0.125, 0.25, 0.375, and 0.5. Noise spectral density levels were 90 and 105 dB re: 1 microPa2/Hz. Filter shapes were approximated using a roex(p,r) function; the parameters p and r were found by fitting the integral of the roex(p,r) function to the measured threshold data. Mean equivalent rectangular bandwidths (ERBs) calculated from the filter shapes were 11.8 and 17.1% of the center frequency at 20 and 30 kHz, respectively, for the dolphins and 9.1 and 15.3% of the center frequency at 20 and 30 kHz, respectively, for the white whale. Filter shapes were broader at 30 kHz and 105 dB re: 1 microPa2/Hz masking noise. The results are in general agreement with previous estimates of ERBs in Tursiops obtained with a behavioral response paradigm.

  6. White and relaxed noises in optimal velocity models for pedestrian flow with stop-and-go waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tordeux, Antoine; Schadschneider, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    A class of microscopic stochastic models is proposed to describe 1D pedestrian trajectories obtained in laboratory experiments. The class contains continuous first-order models that are based on statistically calibrated optimal velocity functions. More specifically, we consider a model with an additive white noise and another one where the noise is determined by the inertial Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Simulation results show that both stochastic models give a good description of the characteristic relation between speed and spacing (fundamental diagram) and its variability. However, only the inertial noise model can reproduce the observed stop-and-go waves, bimodal speed distributions, and non-zero speed or spacing autocorrelations. This allows us to identify minimal microscopic stochastic mechanisms for the emergence of stable traffic waves.

  7. The intensitive DL of tones: dependence of signal/masker ratio on tone level and on spectrum of added noise.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, D D

    1993-02-01

    In Greenwood [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 33, 484-502 (1961a)] the ratio of masked signal threshold to masker level (S/M) decreased about 4 dB at a masker level of about 50 dB SL, the 'transition' level, when noise bands were subcritical but not when supercritical. Schlauch et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 71, S73 (1982)] report a related result. A pilot study [Greenwood, Harvard Psychoacoustic Lab. Status Report 37, 8-9 (1961)] in which pure tones masked identical tones in-phase showed a larger change in S/M. Detailed tone-tone growth-of-masking curves from over a dozen subjects in 1967-69, and in 1960, are reported here. A transition in slope, of variable abruptness, often begins to occur at about 50 dB SL, dropping S/M ratio by 6 to 8 dB or more [Rabinowitz et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 35, 1053 (1976)]; the curves sometimes possess two segments, sometimes are simply convex. All have overall slopes less than 1.0, known also as the 'near miss'. Consistent with other results [Zwicker, Acustica 6, 365-396 (1956); Viemeister, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 51, 1265-1296 (1972); Moore and Raab, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 55, 1049-1060 (1974)], addition of low-level wide-band and high-pass noise was found to counteract the change in S/M, i.e., to raise the high-level section of the growth-of-masking curve. However, the ability of narrow 'band-pass' noise to exert this effect was greatest when added at a frequency ratio (band/masking-tone) of 1.3 to 1.5, which seems more closely to link the effects of added noise to the effects of increasing a masking band from sub- to supercritical width (above). Interpretation of the decrease in DL with level begins by noting that the 'transition' level correlates approximately with the level at which a primary unit population excited by a given pure tone begins rapidly to expand basally. Underlying this, the basalward shift of a tone's displacement envelope peak accelerates at about the same level [Rhode, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 49, 1218-1231 (1971); Sellick et al., J

  8. Improving the signal-to-noise ratio of an ECL-based sensor using ad hoc carbon nanotube electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanginario, A.; Giorcelli, M.; Tagliaferro, A.; Demarchi, D.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that mechanically modified cylinder-shaped carbon nanotube (CNT) working electrodes (WEs), combined with an averaging processing algorithm, can increase electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) limit of detection by more than one order of magnitude, compared to gold electrodes. With CNT WEs, we obtained a stable light emission that lasts for hundreds of voltammetric cycles. This stability was further exploited to increase the detection limit with a simple algorithm, based on mean calculation. Ad hoc fabricated sensors are characterized with a full-custom potentiostat testbed and software platform, using tris(2,2-bipyridyl)ruthenium (II) as ECL labels. Our measurement results show that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) improves by a factor of larger than 20 compared to standard gold WEs to reach a detection limit up to 40 pg μl-1.

  9. Additive white Gaussian noise level estimation in SVD domain for images.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Lin, Weisi

    2013-03-01

    Accurate estimation of Gaussian noise level is of fundamental interest in a wide variety of vision and image processing applications as it is critical to the processing techniques that follow. In this paper, a new effective noise level estimation method is proposed on the basis of the study of singular values of noise-corrupted images. Two novel aspects of this paper address the major challenges in noise estimation: 1) the use of the tail of singular values for noise estimation to alleviate the influence of the signal on the data basis for the noise estimation process and 2) the addition of known noise to estimate the content-dependent parameter, so that the proposed scheme is adaptive to visual signals, thereby enabling a wider application scope of the proposed scheme. The analysis and experiment results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can reliably infer noise levels and show robust behavior over a wide range of visual content and noise conditions, and that is outperforms relevant existing methods.

  10. Influence of boat noises on escape behaviour of white-spotted eagle ray Aetobatus ocellatus at Moorea Island (French Polynesia).

    PubMed

    Berthe, Cecile; Lecchini, David

    2016-02-01

    The present study tested different sounds that could disturb eagle rays (Aetobatus ocellatus) during their foraging activities at Moorea, French Polynesia. Results showed that artificial white sound and single-frequency tones (40 Hz, 600 Hz or 1 kHz) did not have an effect on rays (at least 90% of rays continued to forage over sand), while playbacks of boat motor sound significantly disturbed rays during foraging activity (60% exhibited an escape behaviour). Overall, our study highlighted the negative effect of boat noises on the foraging activity of eagle rays. These noises produced by boat traffic could, however, have some positive effects for marine aquaculture if they could be used as a deterrent to repel the eagle rays, main predators of the pearl oysters.

  11. An all digital phase locked loop for synchronization of a sinusoidal signal embedded in white Gaussian noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. P.; Gupta, S. C.

    1973-01-01

    An all digital phase locked loop which tracks the phase of the incoming sinusoidal signal once per carrier cycle is proposed. The different elements and their functions and the phase lock operation are explained in detail. The nonlinear difference equations which govern the operation of the digital loop when the incoming signal is embedded in white Gaussian noise are derived, and a suitable model is specified. The performance of the digital loop is considered for the synchronization of a sinusoidal signal. For this, the noise term is suitably modelled which allows specification of the output probabilities for the two level quantizer in the loop at any given phase error. The loop filter considered increases the probability of proper phase correction. The phase error states in modulo two-pi forms a finite state Markov chain which enables the calculation of steady state probabilities, RMS phase error, transient response and mean time for cycle skipping.

  12. Analysis of first and second order binary quantized digital phase-locked loops for ideal and white Gaussian noise inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasche, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    Specific configurations of first and second order all digital phase locked loops are analyzed for both ideal and additive white gaussian noise inputs. In addition, a design for a hardware digital phase locked loop capable of either first or second order operation is presented along with appropriate experimental data obtained from testing of the hardware loop. All parameters chosen for the analysis and the design of the digital phase locked loop are consistent with an application to an Omega navigation receiver although neither the analysis nor the design are limited to this application.

  13. Bias-compensation-based least-squares estimation with a forgetting factor for output error models with white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, A. G.; Chen, S.; Jia, D. L.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the bias-compensation-based recursive least-squares (LS) estimation algorithm with a forgetting factor is proposed for output error models. First, for the unknown white noise, the so-called weighted average variance is introduced. With this weighted average variance, a bias-compensation term is first formulated to achieve the bias-eliminated estimates of the system parameters. Then, the weighted average variance is estimated. Finally, the final estimation algorithm is obtained by combining the estimation of the weighted average variance and the recursive LS estimation algorithm with a forgetting factor. The effectiveness of the proposed identification algorithm is verified by a numerical example.

  14. Quantum Fields Obtained from Convoluted Generalized White Noise Never Have Positive Metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albeverio, Sergio; Gottschalk, Hanno

    2016-05-01

    It is proven that the relativistic quantum fields obtained from analytic continuation of convoluted generalized (Lévy type) noise fields have positive metric, if and only if the noise is Gaussian. This follows as an easy observation from a criterion by Baumann, based on the Dell'Antonio-Robinson-Greenberg theorem, for a relativistic quantum field in positive metric to be a free field.

  15. Adaptive subspace detection of extended target in white Gaussian noise using sinc basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Li, Ming; Qu, Jian-She; Yang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    For the high resolution radar (HRR), the problem of detecting the extended target is considered in this paper. Based on a single observation, a new two-step detection based on sparse representation (TSDSR) method is proposed to detect the extended target in the presence of Gaussian noise with unknown covariance. In the new method, the Sinc dictionary is introduced to sparsely represent the high resolution range profile (HRRP). Meanwhile, adaptive subspace pursuit (ASP) is presented to recover the HRRP embedded in the Gaussian noise and estimate the noise covariance matrix. Based on the Sinc dictionary and the estimated noise covariance matrix, one step subspace detector (OSSD) for the first-order Gaussian (FOG) model without secondary data is adopted to realise the extended target detection. Finally, the proposed TSDSR method is applied to raw HRR data. Experimental results demonstrate that HRRPs of different targets can be sparsely represented very well with the Sinc dictionary. Moreover, the new method can estimate the noise power with tiny errors and have a good detection performance.

  16. The effectiveness of correcting codes in reception in the whole in additive normal white noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shtarkov, Y. M.

    1974-01-01

    Some possible criteria for estimating the effectiveness of correcting codes are presented, and the energy effectiveness of correcting codes is studied for symbol-by-symbol reception. Expressions for the energetic effectiveness of binary correcting codes for reception in the whole are produced. Asymptotic energetic effectiveness and finite signal/noise ratio cases are considered.

  17. Effects of high intensity white noise on short-term memory for position in a list and sequence.

    PubMed

    Daee, S; Wilding, J M

    1977-08-01

    Seven experiments are described investigating the effect of high intensity white noise during the visual presentation of words on a number of short-term memory tasks. The findings were: 1. In a free recall task recall of items decreased at the highest intensity used (85 dB) compared with a quiet and a 75 dB condition. 2. In free recall, recall by category decreased and recall in the original sequence increased in the 75 dB compared with the other two conditions. 3. Recall of the position of words in the list increased as noise intensity increased, but only when the learning of position was incidental, not when it was intentional. It is inferred that the effect is due to direction of attention or change in the learning strategy. 4. Recall of the original sequence (as shown by the ability to give in response to a word from a list the word which had followed it in the original list) was superior in the 75 dB compared with the other two conditions, but only when recall of the second word was required, not when it had to be recognized among all the items from the original list. It is argued that this can be explained if noise intensity affects the strength of traces and hence the interconnexions established between them, on which retrieval depends. The results for position learning are compatible with the theories of Hockey & Hamilton (1970) or Dornic (1973), but the results for sequence learning cannot be explained by either of these theories. A final experiment confirmed a prediction from the above theory that when recalling the original sequence, omissions (recalling no word) will decrease and transpositions (giving the wrong word) will increase as noise level increases.

  18. Optimization of structures undergoing harmonic or stochastic excitation. Ph.D. Thesis; [atmospheric turbulence and white noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    The optimal design was investigated of simple structures subjected to dynamic loads, with constraints on the structures' responses. Optimal designs were examined for one dimensional structures excited by harmonically oscillating loads, similar structures excited by white noise, and a wing in the presence of continuous atmospheric turbulence. The first has constraints on the maximum allowable stress while the last two place bounds on the probability of failure of the structure. Approximations were made to replace the time parameter with a frequency parameter. For the first problem, this involved the steady state response, and in the remaining cases, power spectral techniques were employed to find the root mean square values of the responses. Optimal solutions were found by using computer algorithms which combined finite elements methods with optimization techniques based on mathematical programming. It was found that the inertial loads for these dynamic problems result in optimal structures that are radically different from those obtained for structures loaded statically by forces of comparable magnitude.

  19. Exponential distribution of long heart beat intervals during atrial fibrillation and their relevance for white noise behaviour in power spectrum.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Thomas; Maass, Philipp; Hayano, Junichiro; Heinrichs, Stefan

    2006-11-01

    The statistical properties of heart beat intervals of 130 long-term surface electrocardiogram recordings during atrial fibrillation (AF) are investigated. We find that the distribution of interbeat intervals exhibits a characteristic exponential tail, which is absent during sinus rhythm, as tested in a corresponding control study with 72 healthy persons. The rate gamma of the exponential decay lies in the range 3-12 Hz and shows diurnal variations. It equals, up to statistical uncertainties, the level of the previously uncovered white noise part of the power spectrum, which is also characteristic for AF. The overall statistical features can be described by decomposing the intervals into two statistically independent times, where the first one is associated with a correlated process with 1/f noise characteristics, while the second one belongs to an uncorrelated process and is responsible for the exponential tail. It is suggested to use gamma as a further parameter for a better classification of AF and for the medical diagnosis. The relevance of the findings with respect to a general understanding of AF is discussed.

  20. Stochastic responses of Van der Pol vibro-impact system with fractional derivative damping excited by Gaussian white noise.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yanwen; Xu, Wei; Wang, Liang

    2016-03-01

    This paper focuses on the study of the stochastic Van der Pol vibro-impact system with fractional derivative damping under Gaussian white noise excitation. The equations of the original system are simplified by non-smooth transformation. For the simplified equation, the stochastic averaging approach is applied to solve it. Then, the fractional derivative damping term is facilitated by a numerical scheme, therewith the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method is used to obtain the numerical results. And the numerical simulation results fit the analytical solutions. Therefore, the proposed analytical means to study this system are proved to be feasible. In this context, the effects on the response stationary probability density functions (PDFs) caused by noise excitation, restitution condition, and fractional derivative damping are considered, in addition the stochastic P-bifurcation is also explored in this paper through varying the value of the coefficient of fractional derivative damping and the restitution coefficient. These system parameters not only influence the response PDFs of this system but also can cause the stochastic P-bifurcation.

  1. Gaussian closure technique applied to the hysteretic Bouc model with non-zero mean white noise excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waubke, Holger; Kasess, Christian H.

    2016-11-01

    Devices that emit structure-borne sound are commonly decoupled by elastic components to shield the environment from acoustical noise and vibrations. The elastic elements often have a hysteretic behavior that is typically neglected. In order to take hysteretic behavior into account, Bouc developed a differential equation for such materials, especially joints made of rubber or equipped with dampers. In this work, the Bouc model is solved by means of the Gaussian closure technique based on the Kolmogorov equation. Kolmogorov developed a method to derive probability density functions for arbitrary explicit first-order vector differential equations under white noise excitation using a partial differential equation of a multivariate conditional probability distribution. Up to now no analytical solution of the Kolmogorov equation in conjunction with the Bouc model exists. Therefore a wide range of approximate solutions, especially the statistical linearization, were developed. Using the Gaussian closure technique that is an approximation to the Kolmogorov equation assuming a multivariate Gaussian distribution an analytic solution is derived in this paper for the Bouc model. For the stationary case the two methods yield equivalent results, however, in contrast to statistical linearization the presented solution allows to calculate the transient behavior explicitly. Further, stationary case leads to an implicit set of equations that can be solved iteratively with a small number of iterations and without instabilities for specific parameter sets.

  2. Performance of peaky template matching under additive white Gaussian noise and uniform quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Matthew S.; Rigling, Brian D.

    2015-05-01

    Peaky template matching (PTM) is a special case of a general algorithm known as multinomial pattern matching originally developed for automatic target recognition of synthetic aperture radar data. The algorithm is a model- based approach that first quantizes pixel values into Nq = 2 discrete values yielding generative Beta-Bernoulli models as class-conditional templates. Here, we consider the case of classification of target chips in AWGN and develop approximations to image-to-template classification performance as a function of the noise power. We focus specifically on the case of a uniform quantization" scheme, where a fixed number of the largest pixels are quantized high as opposed to using a fixed threshold. This quantization method reduces sensitivity to the scaling of pixel intensities and quantization in general reduces sensitivity to various nuisance parameters difficult to account for a priori. Our performance expressions are verified using forward-looking infrared imagery from the Army Research Laboratory Comanche dataset.

  3. Singularities of fluctuational paths for an overdamped two-well system driven by white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Liu, Xianbin

    2017-03-01

    Noise-induced escape from a metastable state in an overdamped double-well system is investigated. With the WKB approximation employed, the pattern of fluctuational paths is given. By using the action plot, which gives rise to MPEPs, the pattern is divided into various regions where fluctuational paths inside show qualitatively distinguished characteristics. The global quasi-potential is calculated and its value at the saddle on the boundary agrees with the one obtained by action plot. We show a contour and 3D plot of the quasi-potential to illustrate the relative stabilities of metastable states. The bifurcations of singularities as the system parameter varies are analyzed by the second-order term of the WKB expansion in the vicinity of x axis. Its asymptotic behavior determines the positions of cusps and furthermore, its evolution turns out to delineate the twisting structure of the Lagrangian manifold.

  4. Effects of white noise masking and low pass filtering on speech kinematics.

    PubMed

    Forrest, K; Abbas, P J; Zimmermann, G N

    1986-12-01

    The effects of reduced auditory information on spatial and temporal parameters of speech production were investigated using cinefluorographic techniques. While subjects read a series of test words embedded in carrier sentences, they received normal auditory information, auditory information regarding only the first formant of their production, or high level noise to mask all formant information. Kinematic analyses indicated that while there were some changes across conditions, these changes were not consistent either within or across the subjects. Parameters that were affected included mean displacement, vocal tract shape, interarticulator timing, and steady state duration. The results suggest that auditory information plays a role in maintaining dynamic aspects of speech kinematics. That is, while speech can be produced without auditory information, the precise action and coordination that characteristic normal production may be altered.

  5. The Electrical Activity of Neurons Subject to Electromagnetic Induction and Gaussian White Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ya; Ma, Jun; Xu, Ying; Wu, Fuqiang; Zhou, Ping

    Neurons can give appropriate response to external electrical stimuli and the modes in electrical activities can be carefully selected. Most of the neuron models mainly emphasize on the ion channel currents embedded into the membrane and the properties in electrical activities can be produced in the theoretical models. Indeed, some physical effect should be considered during the model setting for neuronal activities. In fact, induced current and the electrical field will cause the membrane potential to change and an exchange of charged ions during the fluctuation of ion concentration in cell. As a result, the effect of electromagnetic induction should be seriously considered. In this paper, magnetic flux is proposed to describe the effect of electromagnetic field, and the memristor is used to realize coupling on membrane by inputting induced current based on consensus of physical unit. Noise is also considered to detect the dynamical response in electrical activities and stochastic resonance, it is found that multiple modes can be selected in the electrical activities and it could be associated with memory effect and self-adaption in neurons.

  6. Joint assessment of white matter integrity, cortical and subcortical atrophy to distinguish AD from behavioral variant FTD: A two-center study.

    PubMed

    Möller, Christiane; Hafkemeijer, Anne; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; Rombouts, Serge A R B; van der Grond, Jeroen; Dopper, Elise; van Swieten, John; Versteeg, Adriaan; Pouwels, Petra J W; Barkhof, Frederik; Scheltens, Philip; Vrenken, Hugo; van der Flier, Wiesje M

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the ability of cortical and subcortical gray matter (GM) atrophy in combination with white matter (WM) integrity to distinguish behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) from Alzheimer's disease (AD) and from controls using voxel-based morphometry, subcortical structure segmentation, and tract-based spatial statistics. To determine which combination of MR markers differentiated the three groups with the highest accuracy, we conducted discriminant function analyses. Adjusted for age, sex and center, both types of dementia had more GM atrophy, lower fractional anisotropy (FA) and higher mean (MD), axial (L1) and radial diffusivity (L23) values than controls. BvFTD patients had more GM atrophy in orbitofrontal and inferior frontal areas than AD patients. In addition, caudate nucleus and nucleus accumbens were smaller in bvFTD than in AD. FA values were lower; MD, L1 and L23 values were higher, especially in frontal areas of the brain for bvFTD compared to AD patients. The combination of cortical GM, hippocampal volume and WM integrity measurements, classified 97-100% of controls, 81-100% of AD and 67-75% of bvFTD patients correctly. Our results suggest that WM integrity measures add complementary information to measures of GM atrophy, thereby improving the classification between AD and bvFTD.

  7. Joint assessment of white matter integrity, cortical and subcortical atrophy to distinguish AD from behavioral variant FTD: A two-center study

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Christiane; Hafkemeijer, Anne; Pijnenburg, Yolande A.L.; Rombouts, Serge A.R.B.; van der Grond, Jeroen; Dopper, Elise; van Swieten, John; Versteeg, Adriaan; Pouwels, Petra J.W.; Barkhof, Frederik; Scheltens, Philip; Vrenken, Hugo; van der Flier, Wiesje M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the ability of cortical and subcortical gray matter (GM) atrophy in combination with white matter (WM) integrity to distinguish behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) from Alzheimer's disease (AD) and from controls using voxel-based morphometry, subcortical structure segmentation, and tract-based spatial statistics. To determine which combination of MR markers differentiated the three groups with the highest accuracy, we conducted discriminant function analyses. Adjusted for age, sex and center, both types of dementia had more GM atrophy, lower fractional anisotropy (FA) and higher mean (MD), axial (L1) and radial diffusivity (L23) values than controls. BvFTD patients had more GM atrophy in orbitofrontal and inferior frontal areas than AD patients. In addition, caudate nucleus and nucleus accumbens were smaller in bvFTD than in AD. FA values were lower; MD, L1 and L23 values were higher, especially in frontal areas of the brain for bvFTD compared to AD patients. The combination of cortical GM, hippocampal volume and WM integrity measurements, classified 97–100% of controls, 81–100% of AD and 67–75% of bvFTD patients correctly. Our results suggest that WM integrity measures add complementary information to measures of GM atrophy, thereby improving the classification between AD and bvFTD. PMID:26594624

  8. Probabilistic solution of some multi-degree-of-freedom nonlinear systems under external independent Poisson white noises.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H T

    2012-06-01

    This paper studies the stationary probability density function (PDF) of the response of multi-degree-of-freedom nonlinear systems under external independent Poisson white noises. The PDF is governed by the high-dimensional generalized Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov (FPK) equation. The state-space-split (3S) method is adopted to reduce the high-dimensional generalized FPK equation to a low-dimensional equation. Subsequently, the exponential-polynomial closure (EPC) method is further used to solve the reduced FPK equation for the PDF solution. Two illustrative examples are presented to examine the accuracy of the 3S-EPC solution procedure. One example involves a two-degree-of-freedom coupled nonlinear system. The other example is concerned with a ten-degree-of-freedom system with cubic terms in displacement. A Monte Carlo simulation is also performed for simulating the PDF solution of the response. The comparison with the simulated result shows that the 3S-EPC solution procedure can provide satisfactory PDF solutions. The good agreement is also observed in the tail regions of the PDF solutions.

  9. Critical ratios in harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) for tonal signals between 0.315 and 150 kHz in random Gaussian white noise.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Wensveen, Paul J; Hoek, Lean; Au, Whitlow W L; Terhune, John M; de Jong, Christ A F

    2009-09-01

    A psychoacoustic behavioral technique was used to determine the critical ratios (CRs) of two harbor porpoises for tonal signals with frequencies between 0.315 and 150 kHz, in random Gaussian white noise. The masked 50% detection hearing thresholds were measured using a "go/no-go" response paradigm and an up-down staircase psychometric method. CRs were determined at one masking noise level for each test frequency and were similar in both animals. For signals between 0.315 and 4 kHz, the CRs were relatively constant at around 18 dB. Between 4 and 150 kHz the CR increased gradually from 18 to 39 dB ( approximately 3.3 dB/octave). Generally harbor porpoises can detect tonal signals in Gaussian white noise slightly better than most odontocetes tested so far. By combining the mean CRs found in the present study with the spectrum level of the background noise levels at sea, the basic audiogram, and the directivity index, the detection threshold levels of harbor porpoises for tonal signals in various sea states can be calculated.

  10. Zero-dimensional noise: the best mask you never saw.

    PubMed

    Baker, Daniel H; Meese, Tim S

    2012-09-29

    The transmission of weak signals through the visual system is limited by internal noise. Its level can be estimated by adding external noise, which increases the variance within the detecting mechanism, causing masking. But experiments with white noise fail to meet three predictions: (a) noise has too small an influence on the slope of the psychometric function, (b) masking occurs even when the noise sample is identical in each two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) interval, and (c) double-pass consistency is too low. We show that much of the energy of 2D white noise masks extends well beyond the pass-band of plausible detecting mechanisms and that this suppresses signal activity. These problems are avoided by restricting the external noise energy to the target mechanisms by introducing a pedestal with a mean contrast of 0% and independent contrast jitter in each 2AFC interval (termed zero-dimensional [0D] noise). We compared the jitter condition to masking from 2D white noise in double-pass masking and (novel) contrast matching experiments. Zero-dimensional noise produced the strongest masking, greatest double-pass consistency, and no suppression of perceived contrast, consistent with a noisy ideal observer. Deviations from this behavior for 2D white noise were explained by cross-channel suppression with no need to appeal to induced internal noise or uncertainty. We conclude that (a) results from previous experiments using white pixel noise should be re-evaluated and (b) 0D noise provides a cleaner method for investigating internal variability than pixel noise. Ironically then, the best external noise stimulus does not look noisy.

  11. Broadband 2D electronic spectrometer using white light and pulse shaping: noise and signal evaluation at 1 and 100 kHz.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Nicholas M; Mehlenbacher, Randy D; Jones, Andrew C; Zanni, Martin T

    2017-04-03

    We have developed a broad bandwidth two-dimensional electronic spectrometer that operates shot-to-shot at repetition rates up to 100 kHz using an acousto-optic pulse shaper. It is called a two-dimensional white-light (2D-WL) spectrometer because the input is white-light supercontinuum. Methods for 100 kHz data collection are studied to understand how laser noise is incorporated into 2D spectra during measurement. At 100 kHz, shot-to-shot scanning of the delays and phases of the pulses in the pulse sequence produces a 2D spectrum 13-times faster and with the same signal-to-noise as using mechanical stages and a chopper. Comparing 100 to 1 kHz repetition rates, data acquisition time is decreased by a factor of 200, which is beyond the improvement expected by the repetition rates alone due to reduction in 1/f noise. These improvements arise because shot-to-shot readout and modulation of the pulse train at 100 kHz enables the electronic coherences to be measured faster than the decay in correlation between laser intensities. Using white light supercontinuum for the pump and probe pulses produces high signal-to-noise spectra on samples with optical densities <0.1 within a few minutes of averaging and an instrument response time of <46 fs thereby demonstrating that that simple broadband continuum sources, although weak, are sufficient to create high quality 2D spectra with >200 nm bandwidth.

  12. Early continuous white noise exposure alters auditory spatial sensitivity and expression of GAD65 and GABAA receptor subunits in rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinghong; Yu, Liping; Cai, Rui; Zhang, Jiping; Sun, Xinde

    2010-04-01

    Sensory experiences have important roles in the functional development of the mammalian auditory cortex. Here, we show how early continuous noise rearing influences spatial sensitivity in the rat primary auditory cortex (A1) and its underlying mechanisms. By rearing infant rat pups under conditions of continuous, moderate level white noise, we found that noise rearing markedly attenuated the spatial sensitivity of A1 neurons. Compared with rats reared under normal conditions, spike counts of A1 neurons were more poorly modulated by changes in stimulus location, and their preferred locations were distributed over a larger area. We further show that early continuous noise rearing induced significant decreases in glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)(A) receptor alpha1 subunit expression, and an increase in GABA(A) receptor alpha3 expression, which indicates a returned to the juvenile form of GABA(A) receptor, with no effect on the expression of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. These observations indicate that noise rearing has powerful adverse effects on the maturation of cortical GABAergic inhibition, which might be responsible for the reduced spatial sensitivity.

  13. White noise of Nb-based microwave superconducting quantum interference device multiplexers with NbN coplanar resonators for readout of transition edge sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kohjiro, Satoshi; Hirayama, Fuminori; Yamamori, Hirotake; Nagasawa, Shuichi; Fukuda, Daiji; Hidaka, Mutsuo

    2014-06-14

    White noise of dissipationless microwave radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (RF-SQUID) multiplexers has been experimentally studied to evaluate their readout performance for transition edge sensor (TES) photon counters ranging from near infrared to gamma ray. The characterization has been carried out at 4 K, first to avoid the low-frequency fluctuations present at around 0.1 K, and second, for a feasibility study of readout operation at 4 K for extended applications. To increase the resonant Q at 4 K and maintain low noise SQUID operation, multiplexer chips consisting of niobium nitride (NbN)-based coplanar-waveguide resonators and niobium (Nb)-based RF-SQUIDs have been developed. This hybrid multiplexer exhibited 1 × 10{sup 4} ≤ Q ≤ 2 × 10{sup 4} and the square root of spectral density of current noise referred to the SQUID input √S{sub I} = 31 pA/√Hz. The former and the latter are factor-of-five and seven improvements from our previous results on Nb-based resonators, respectively. Two-directional readout on the complex plane of the transmission component of scattering matrix S{sub 21} enables us to distinguish the flux noise from noise originating from other sources, such as the cryogenic high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier. Systematic noise measurements with various microwave readout powers P{sub MR} make it possible to distinguish the contribution of noise sources within the system as follows: (1) The achieved √S{sub I} is dominated by the Nyquist noise from a resistor at 4 K in parallel to the SQUID input coil which is present to prevent microwave leakage to the TES. (2) The next dominant source is either the HEMT-amplifier noise (for small values of P{sub MR}) or the quantization noise due to the resolution of 300-K electronics (for large values of P{sub MR}). By a decrease of these noise levels to a degree that is achievable by current technology, we predict that the

  14. White noise of Nb-based microwave superconducting quantum interference device multiplexers with NbN coplanar resonators for readout of transition edge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohjiro, Satoshi; Hirayama, Fuminori; Yamamori, Hirotake; Nagasawa, Shuichi; Fukuda, Daiji; Hidaka, Mutsuo

    2014-06-01

    White noise of dissipationless microwave radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (RF-SQUID) multiplexers has been experimentally studied to evaluate their readout performance for transition edge sensor (TES) photon counters ranging from near infrared to gamma ray. The characterization has been carried out at 4 K, first to avoid the low-frequency fluctuations present at around 0.1 K, and second, for a feasibility study of readout operation at 4 K for extended applications. To increase the resonant Q at 4 K and maintain low noise SQUID operation, multiplexer chips consisting of niobium nitride (NbN)-based coplanar-waveguide resonators and niobium (Nb)-based RF-SQUIDs have been developed. This hybrid multiplexer exhibited 1 × 104 ≤ Q ≤ 2 × 104 and the square root of spectral density of current noise referred to the SQUID input √SI = 31 pA/√Hz. The former and the latter are factor-of-five and seven improvements from our previous results on Nb-based resonators, respectively. Two-directional readout on the complex plane of the transmission component of scattering matrix S21 enables us to distinguish the flux noise from noise originating from other sources, such as the cryogenic high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier. Systematic noise measurements with various microwave readout powers PMR make it possible to distinguish the contribution of noise sources within the system as follows: (1) The achieved √SI is dominated by the Nyquist noise from a resistor at 4 K in parallel to the SQUID input coil which is present to prevent microwave leakage to the TES. (2) The next dominant source is either the HEMT-amplifier noise (for small values of PMR) or the quantization noise due to the resolution of 300-K electronics (for large values of PMR). By a decrease of these noise levels to a degree that is achievable by current technology, we predict that the microwave RF-SQUID multiplexer can exhibit √SI ≤ 5 pA/√Hz, i.e., close to √SI of

  15. Rapid calculation of diffuse reflectance from a multilayered model by combination of the white Monte Carlo and adding-doubling methods

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kenichiro; Nishidate, Izumi

    2014-01-01

    To rapidly derive a result for diffuse reflectance from a multilayered model that is equivalent to that of a Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS), we propose a combination of a layered white MCS and the adding-doubling method. For slabs with various scattering coefficients assuming a certain anisotropy factor and without absorption, we calculate the transition matrices for light flow with respect to the incident and exit angles. From this series of precalculated transition matrices, we can calculate the transition matrices for the multilayered model with the specific anisotropy factor. The relative errors of the results of this method compared to a conventional MCS were less than 1%. We successfully used this method to estimate the chromophore concentration from the reflectance spectrum of a numerical model of skin and in vivo human skin tissue. PMID:25426319

  16. Statistical investigation of the noise added to a model of the effect of solar activities on the plasma of the ionosphere using DEMETER satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharzehei, Mahmoud; Masnadi-Shirazi, M. A.; Golbahar-Haghighi, Sh.

    2015-08-01

    Although a relation between ionospheric anomalies and occurrence of strong earthquake has been studied for several decades, the issue of finding anomalies in ionospheric parameter before earthquakes has been always a matter of controversy among scientific community. In this way, the study of the ionosphere by satellite observers plays a significant role in assessing the feasibility of finding anomalies in ionospheric parameters as short-term precursors of earthquakes. Regardless of whether this assertion about ionospheric precursor is true or false, the ionosphere has been shown to be affected more by solar activities than other events such as seismic activities; thus, the modeling of ionospheric variation caused by solar activities is valuable in assessing the possibility of ionospheric precursors. One of the most famous satellites launched to investigate the ionospheric plasma perturbation associated with solar and seismic activities is the DEMETER, the French micro-satellite. To carry on such investigation, one of its payloads, the onboard IAP experiment, allows for the measurement of important plasma parameters including ion composition densities and their temperature. The current work presents a statistical distribution for the noise added to the proposed model describing the regular effect of solar activities on the ionospheric plasma above Iran during one half-orbit time of the DEMETER (~35 min) in the absence of an earthquake and a quiet time condition. The results of this study show that the proposed modeling noise statistically agrees with the Gaussian distribution; however, its variance may vary from one day to another. In other words, the noise is a non-stationary random process. The proposed model is then evaluated by a set of experimental data. The results of this evaluation show that the measured data follow the proposed model.

  17. The Importance of Spatiotemporal Information in Biological Motion Perception: White Noise Presented with a Step-like Motion Activates the Biological Motion Area.

    PubMed

    Callan, Akiko; Callan, Daniel; Ando, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    Humans can easily recognize the motion of living creatures using only a handful of point-lights that describe the motion of the main joints (biological motion perception). This special ability to perceive the motion of animate objects signifies the importance of the spatiotemporal information in perceiving biological motion. The posterior STS (pSTS) and posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG) region have been established by many functional neuroimaging studies as a locus for biological motion perception. Because listening to a walking human also activates the pSTS/pMTG region, the region has been proposed to be supramodal in nature. In this study, we investigated whether the spatiotemporal information from simple auditory stimuli is sufficient to activate this biological motion area. We compared spatially moving white noise, having a running-like tempo that was consistent with biological motion, with stationary white noise. The moving-minus-stationary contrast showed significant differences in activation of the pSTS/pMTG region. Our results suggest that the spatiotemporal information of the auditory stimuli is sufficient to activate the biological motion area.

  18. Evaluation of closure strategies for a periodically-forced Duffing oscillator with slowly modulated frequency subject to Gaussian white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalim, Jason; Welfert, Bruno D.; Lopez, Juan M.

    2017-03-01

    The response of a Duffing oscillator subject to a periodic forcing with slowly and stochastically modulated frequency is analyzed numerically. The results of both moment and cumulant-based stochastic reductions are compared to Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown how the explicit characterization of higher-order central moments of the (Gaussian) noise source and the periodic nature of the forcing enable a reliable reduction strategy providing a faithful description of the mean behavior of stochastic solutions. The reduced model is then used to illustrate how a large noise level and fast frequency drift may combine to sustain a strong response that is normally associated to resonance in the noiseless static case.

  19. FET Noise Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    The predominant sources of nonlinearity in the FET, relevant to oscillator analysis, are the transconductance gm and the source-gate capacitance C sg...two general categories of noise mechanisms in an FET: intrinsic sources, i.e., noise associated with the FET operation itself, and extrinsic noise...very high drain voltages, also produces white noise. Noise produced by para- sitic resistance, one of the extrinsic noise sources, is also flat. These

  20. NR2B subunit-dependent long-term potentiation enhancement in the rat cortical auditory system in vivo following masking of patterned auditory input by white noise exposure during early postnatal life.

    PubMed

    Hogsden, Jennifer L; Dringenberg, Hans C

    2009-08-01

    The composition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits influences the degree of synaptic plasticity expressed during development and into adulthood. Here, we show that theta-burst stimulation of the medial geniculate nucleus reliably induced NMDA receptor-dependent long-term potentiation (LTP) of field postsynaptic potentials recorded in the primary auditory cortex (A1) of urethane-anesthetized rats. Furthermore, substantially greater levels of LTP were elicited in juvenile animals (30-37 days old; approximately 55% maximal potentiation) than in adult animals (approximately 30% potentiation). Masking patterned sound via continuous white noise exposure during early postnatal life (from postnatal day 5 to postnatal day 50-60) resulted in enhanced, juvenile-like levels of LTP (approximately 70% maximal potentiation) relative to age-matched controls reared in unaltered acoustic environments (approximately 30%). Rats reared in white noise and then placed in unaltered acoustic environments for 40-50 days showed levels of LTP comparable to those of adult controls, indicating that white noise rearing results in a form of developmental arrest that can be overcome by subsequent patterned sound exposure. We explored the mechanisms mediating white noise-induced plasticity enhancements by local NR2B subunit antagonist application in A1. NR2B subunit antagonists (Ro 25-6981 or ifenprodil) completely reversed white noise-induced LTP enhancement at concentrations that did not affect LTP in adult or age-matched controls. We conclude that white noise exposure during early postnatal life results in the maintenance of juvenile-like, higher levels of plasticity in A1, an effect that appears to be critically dependent on NR2B subunit activation.

  1. Implicit memory bias for eating- and body appearance-related sentences in eating disorders: an application of Jacoby's white noise task.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Linda; Ghaderi, Ata; Hällgren, Mathias; Andersson, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Jacoby's white noise task and an explicit recognition task were used to investigate whether individuals with eating disorders demonstrate implicit memory bias and explicit memory bias, respectively, for information related to eating and body appearance. Included were 33 women with eating disorders (seven with anorexia nervosa and 26 with bulimia nervosa), 29 with nonclinical eating disorder-related concerns, and 36 healthy controls. Results showed partial support for implicit memory bias but no support for explicit memory bias. These findings suggest that eating disorders may be characterized by relative initial automatic bias for eating disorder-relevant information but not by bias at later stages of information processing. However, previous studies have demonstrated explicit memory bias in eating disorders, which is inconsistent with this interpretation. Future research is required to clarify the precise cognitive biases associated with eating disorders.

  2. [Stapedial reflex under auditory masking of bone canal: 1- The effect of white noise on threshold values].

    PubMed

    Cassano, P; Mininni, F; Paulillo, A

    1983-11-30

    The authors have studied the behaviour of the A.R. threshold under bone way masking sent to the vertex. The masking caused changings of the recorded track; a change of the compliance was observed in the 60% of the subjects and a rythmic waving of the (isoelectric) line was observed in 40% of the subjects. Upon these changes the A.R. were recorded for the tone test sent at similar values (almost equal) at those recorded without any kind of masker, even if a threshold shift sometimes big, existed because of the high intensity of the masking noise. The authors are making further researches to explain the meaning of these changes.

  3. Demonstration of 1 /f Fluctuations and White Noise in the Human Heart Rate by the Variance-Time Implications for Self-Similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesmann, Malte; Boese, Jan; Chialvo, Dante R.; Kowallik, Peter; Bauer, Wolfgang R.; Peters, Werner; GrÜNeis, Ferdinand; Kniffki, Klaus-Dietrich

    Spectral analysis of heart rate variability is usually performed by Fast Fourier Transform. Here we demonstrate the self-affine properties of the human heart rate using a spectral analysis based on counting statistics. Each QRS complex is considered to be a point event and from the number of events N(Δt) in consecutive time windows Δt the variance is calculated. From the finding that the variance of N(Δt) follows a power law proportional to (Δt)1+b in case of l/fb noise, it is shown that the variance of the heart rate as determined for windows of length Δt, i.e., N(Δt)/Δt, is proportional to (Δt)b-1. From a 12-day Holter recording, the scaling region could be determined to cover 0.16 to 0.000136 Hz. A function X(t) is self-affine if X(t) and X(rt)/rH have the same distribution functions. From the variance-time-curve, it can be shown that the exponent H is dependent on b with b = 2H - 1. In young healthy men, the parameter b fluctuates between 0.2 and 1.0 during 24 h and thus determines the self-affine scaling factor H = (b - 1)/2 for the amplitude of heart rate, if the time axis is scaled by r. Thus, during periods of 1/f noise, the heart rate scales with H = 0, and for periods of almost white noise, with H close to - 1/2.

  4. The added value of auditory cortex transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) after bifrontal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for tinnitus.

    PubMed

    To, Wing Ting; Ost, Jan; Hart, John; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Tinnitus is the perception of a sound in the absence of a corresponding external sound source. Research has suggested that functional abnormalities in tinnitus patients involve auditory as well as non-auditory brain areas. Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES), such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) to the auditory cortex, has demonstrated modulation of brain activity to transiently suppress tinnitus symptoms. Targeting two core regions of the tinnitus network by tES might establish a promising strategy to enhance treatment effects. This proof-of-concept study aims to investigate the effect of a multisite tES treatment protocol on tinnitus intensity and distress. A total of 40 tinnitus patients were enrolled in this study and received either bifrontal tDCS or the multisite treatment of bifrontal tDCS before bilateral auditory cortex tRNS. Both groups were treated on eight sessions (two times a week for 4 weeks). Our results show that a multisite treatment protocol resulted in more pronounced effects when compared with the bifrontal tDCS protocol or the waiting list group, suggesting an added value of auditory cortex tRNS to the bifrontal tDCS protocol for tinnitus patients. These findings support the involvement of the auditory as well as non-auditory brain areas in the pathophysiology of tinnitus and demonstrate the idea of the efficacy of network stimulation in the treatment of neurological disorders. This multisite tES treatment protocol proved to be save and feasible for clinical routine in tinnitus patients.

  5. Performance analysis of precoding-based asymmetrically clipped optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing wireless system in additive white Gaussian noise and indoor multipath channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjha, Bilal; Zhou, Zhou; Kavehrad, Mohsen

    2014-08-01

    We have compared the bit error rate (BER) performance of precoding-based asymmetrically clipped optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (ACO-OFDM) and pulse amplitude modulated discrete multitone (PAM-DMT) optical wireless (OW) systems in additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) and indoor multipath frequency selective channel. Simulation and analytical results show that precoding schemes such as discrete Fourier transform, discrete cosine transform, and Zadoff-Chu sequences do not affect the performance of the OW systems in the AWGN channel while they do reduce the peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) of the OFDM output signal. However, in a multipath indoor channel, using zero forcing frequency domain equalization precoding-based systems give better BER performance than their conventional counterparts. With additional clipping to further reduce the PAPR, precoding-based systems also show better BER performance compared to nonprecoded systems when clipped relative to the peak of nonprecoded systems. Therefore, precoding-based ACO-OFDM and PAM-DMT systems offer better BER performance, zero signaling overhead, and low PAPR compared to conventional systems.

  6. Superposition of the Neyman-Scott Rectangular Pulses Model and the Poisson White Noise Model for the Representation of Tropical Rain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrissey, M. L.

    2009-12-01

    A point process model for tropical rain rates is developed through the derivation of the third moment expression for a combined point process model. The model is a superposition of a Neyman-Scott rectangular pulse model and a Poisson white noise process model. The model is scalable in the temporal dimension. The derivation of the third moment for this model allows the inclusion of the skewness parameter which is necessary to adequately represent rainfall intensity. Analysis of the model fit to tropical tipping bucket raingauge data ranging in temporal scale from 5 minutes to one day indicates that it can adequately produce synthesized rainfall having the statistical characteristics of rain rate over the range of scales tested. Of special interest is the model’s capability to accurately preserve the probability of extreme tropical rain rates at different scales. In addition to various hydrological applications, the model also has many potential uses in the field of meteorology, such as the study and development of radar rain rate algorithms for the tropics which need to parameterized attenuation due to heavy rain.

  7. Investigations of internal noise levels for different target sizes, contrasts, and noise structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Minah; Choi, Shinkook; Baek, Jongduk

    2014-03-01

    To describe internal noise levels for different target sizes, contrasts, and noise structures, Gaussian targets with four different sizes (i.e., standard deviation of 2,4,6 and 8) and three different noise structures(i.e., white, low-pass, and highpass) were generated. The generated noise images were scaled to have standard deviation of 0.15. For each noise type, target contrasts were adjusted to have the same detectability based on NPW, and the detectability of CHO was calculated accordingly. For human observer study, 3 trained observers performed 2AFC detection tasks, and correction rate, Pc, was calculated for each task. By adding proper internal noise level to numerical observer (i.e., NPW and CHO), detectability of human observer was matched with that of numerical observers. Even though target contrasts were adjusted to have the same detectability of NPW observer, detectability of human observer decreases as the target size increases. The internal noise level varies for different target sizes, contrasts, and noise structures, demonstrating different internal noise levels should be considered in numerical observer to predict the detection performance of human observer.

  8. Linear measures of temporal lobe atrophy on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) but not visual rating of white matter changes can help discrimination of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD).

    PubMed

    Saka, Esen; Dogan, Ebru Apaydin; Topcuoglu, Mehmet Akif; Senol, Utku; Balkan, Sevin

    2007-01-01

    Clinical discrimination of the early stages of AD and MCI is challenging. MRI indices which are simple enough to be applied by non-radiologists on hard copies would be of practical importance in the discrimination. We studied 45 consecutive patients (17 with MCI, 25 with AD, 3 with normal cognitive findings) with at least one white matter lesion (WML) on axial fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI sequences. WML load was evaluated by Fazekas' scoring system; temporal lobe atrophy by interuncal distance (IUD) measurement. WML pattern had no significant discriminative value of AD and MCI. No significant correlation between periventricular/subcortical WML scores and neuropsychological test results was observed. The mean IUD was significantly smaller in patients with MCI compared to those with AD. The cut-off value of IUD was 28.3 mm with receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis. Area under the curve was 0.925 (95% CI: 0.800-0.983). A significant negative correlation between IUD and the mini mental state examination (MMSE), verbal fluency, clock drawing, and Rey Auditory verbal learning test (AVLT) was noted. The results indicate that measurement of IUD is a clinically useful test in discrimination of AD and MCI patients with WML(s) on brain MRI. However, severity of these lesions is not useful for distinctions.

  9. Stochastic relaxation of the contact line of a water drop on a solid substrate subjected to white noise vibration: roles of hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Mettu, Srinivas; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2010-06-01

    Relaxation of the three phase contact line of a sessile drop of water on a low energy surface is studied by subjecting it to a white noise vibration. While a spring force acts on the contact line whenever the contact angle deviates from its equilibrium value, it is opposed by hysteresis. The drop, therefore, remains pinned at a metastable state. With an appropriate amount of vibration, the drop can reach a global equilibrium state irrespective of its initial state, be it advanced or retreated. While the end state is free of hysteresis, the current study sheds light on the dynamics of relaxation that is analyzed in conjunction with a modified Langevin equation. Instead of exhibiting a smooth relaxation as predicted by the Langevin equation with a smooth background potential, stepwise relaxation is observed in most cases. These stepwise relaxations can be explained if the background potential is made slightly corrugated that signifies the existence of metastable states of a drop on a surface. The fluctuation of the displacement of the contact line is highly non-Gaussian. It is shown that an exponential distribution of the displacement fluctuation arises due to the nonlinear hysteresis term in the Langevin equation. The observations of stick-slip motion, the large time of relaxation, and the anomalous displacement fluctuation suggest that hysteresis is present during the relaxation process of the drop even though the final state reached by the drop is free of hysteresis. Finally, we compare the displacement fluctuations of the contact line on two different surfaces: a silicone rubber and a fluorocarbon monolayer. Although the displacement fluctuation is exponential in both cases, the later surface exhibits a greater variance of the distribution than the former plausibly due to differences in hysteresis. This result indicates that the fluctuation of displacement may be used as a tool to study the surface property of a low energy substrate.

  10. Impact of adding white pomace to red grapes on the phenolic composition and color stability of Syrah wines from a warm climate.

    PubMed

    Gordillo, Belén; Cejudo-Bastante, María Jesús; Rodríguez-Pulido, Francisco J; Jara-Palacios, M José; Ramírez-Pérez, Pilar; González-Miret, M Lourdes; Heredia, Francisco J

    2014-03-26

    The influence of the fermentative addition of Pedro Ximenez grape pomace (PXGP, white variety) on the phenolic composition and color of Syrah red wines from a warm climate was studied. Changes on phenolic composition (HPLC), copigmentation/polymerization (spectrophotometry), and color (tristimulus colorimetry) allowed differences among the maceration treatments to be established. PXGP additions at the rates studied increased the extraction of total phenolics, phenolic acids, and monomeric flavanols. However, the effect on the anthocyanins, copigmentation, and polymerization depended on the doses applied, with important consequences on the color. PXGP addition at 10% led to wines with higher polymerization, more stable colors, and bluish hues. in contrast, perceptibly lighter and less intense wines were obtained with PXGP addition at 20%. Thus, the use of white grape byproducts as wine additives at appropriate levels (10% w/w) could improve the phenolic potential of red young wines from a warm climate, contributing to preserve their color characteristic.

  11. A high resolution model of linear trend in mass variations from DMT-2: Added value of accounting for coloured noise in GRACE data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahani, Hassan H.; Ditmar, Pavel; Inácio, Pedro; Didova, Olga; Gunter, Brian; Klees, Roland; Guo, Xiang; Guo, Jing; Sun, Yu; Liu, Xianglin; Zhao, Qile; Riva, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    We present a high resolution model of the linear trend in the Earth's mass variations based on DMT-2 (Delft Mass Transport model, release 2). DMT-2 was produced primarily from K-Band Ranging (KBR) data of the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE). It comprises a time series of monthly solutions complete to spherical harmonic degree 120. A novel feature in its production was the accurate computation and incorporation of stochastic properties of coloured noise when processing KBR data. The unconstrained DMT-2 monthly solutions are used to estimate the linear trend together with a bias, as well as annual and semi-annual sinusoidal terms. The linear term is further processed with an anisotropic Wiener filter, which uses full noise and signal covariance matrices. Given the fact that noise in an unconstrained model of the trend is reduced substantially as compared to monthly solutions, the Wiener filter associated with the trend is much less aggressive compared to a Wiener filter applied to monthly solutions. Consequently, the trend estimate shows an enhanced spatial resolution. It allows signals in relatively small water bodies, such as Aral sea and Ladoga lake, to be detected. Over the ice sheets, it allows for a clear identification of signals associated with some outlet glaciers or their groups. We compare the obtained trend estimate with the ones from the CSR-RL05 model using (i) the same approach based on monthly noise covariance matrices and (ii) a commonly-used approach based on the DDK-filtered monthly solutions. We use satellite altimetry data as independent control data. The comparison demonstrates a high spatial resolution of the DMT-2 linear trend. We link this to the usage of high-accuracy monthly noise covariance matrices, which is due to an accurate computation and incorporation of coloured noise when processing KBR data. A preliminary comparison of the linear trend based on DMT-2 with that computed from GSFC_global_mascons_v01 reveals, among

  12. Minimum requirement of artificial noise level for using noise-assisted correlation algorithm to suppress artifacts in ultrasonic Nakagami images.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang

    2012-04-01

    The Nakagami image is a complementary imaging mode for pulse-echo ultrasound B-scan to characterize tissues. White noise in anechoic areas induces artifacts in the Nakagami image. Recently, we proposed a noise-assisted correlation algorithm (NCA) for suppressing the Nakagami artifact. In the NCA, artificial white noise is intentionally added twice to backscattered signals to produce two noisy data, which are used to establish a correlation profile for rejecting noise. This study explored the effects of artificial noise level on the NCA to suppress the artifact of the Nakagami image. Simulations were conducted to produce B-mode images of anechoic regions under signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of 20, 10 and 5 dB. Various artificial noise levels ranging from 0.1- to 1-fold of the intrinsic noise amplitude were used in the NCA for constructing the Nakagami images. Phantom experiments were conducted to validate the performance of using the optimal artificial noise level suggested by the simulation results to suppress the Nakagami artifacts by the NCA. The simulation results indicated that the artifacts of the Nakagami image in the anechoic regions can be gradually suppressed by increasing the artificial noise level used in the NCA to improve the image contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The CNR of the Nakagami image reached 20 dB when the artificial noise level was 0.7-fold of the intrinsic noise amplitude. This criterion was demonstrated by the phantom results to provide the NCA with an excellent ability to obtain artifact-free Nakagami images.

  13. Speaker Intelligibility of Black and White School Children for Black and White Adult Listeners under Varying Listening Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nober, E. Harris; Seymour, Harry N.

    1979-01-01

    Black children and White children were equally intelligible to Black adult listeners, while White adult listeners found White children significantly more intelligible than Black children. Noise deteriorated word discrimination scores of the Black and White listeners differently. (Author/RL)

  14. Effects of linear trends on estimation of noise in GNSS position time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieva, K.; Segall, P.; Bradley, A. M.

    2016-10-01

    A thorough understanding of time dependent noise in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) position time series is necessary for computing uncertainties in any signals found in the data. However, estimation of time-correlated noise is a challenging task and is complicated by the difficulty in separating noise from signal, the features of greatest interest in the time series. In this paper we investigate how linear trends affect the estimation of noise in daily GNSS position time series. We use synthetic time series to study the relationship between linear trends and estimates of time-correlated noise for the six most commonly cited noise models. We find that the effects of added linear trends, or conversely de-trending, vary depending on the noise model. The commonly adopted model of random walk (RW), flicker noise (FN), and white noise (WN) is the most severely affected by de-trending, with estimates of low amplitude RW most severely biased. Flicker noise plus white noise is least affected by adding or removing trends. Non-integer power-law noise estimates are also less affected by de-trending, but are very sensitive to the addition of trend when the spectral index is less than one. We derive an analytical relationship between linear trends and the estimated random walk variance for the special case of pure random walk noise. Overall, we find that to ascertain the correct noise model for GNSS position time series and to estimate the correct noise parameters, it is important to have independent constraints on the actual trends in the data.

  15. Enhanced corticomuscular coherence by external stochastic noise

    PubMed Central

    Trenado, Carlos; Mendez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Manjarrez, Elias; Huethe, Frank; Schulte-Mönting, Jürgen; Feige, Bernd; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Kristeva, Rumyana

    2014-01-01

    Noise can have beneficial effects as shown by the stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon which is characterized by performance improvement when an optimal noise is added. Modern attempts to improve human performance utilize this phenomenon. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether performance improvement by addition of optimum noise (ON) is related to increased cortical motor spectral power (SP) and increased corticomuscular coherence. Eight subjects performed a visuomotor task requiring to compensate with the right index finger a static force (SF) generated by a manipulandum on which Gaussian noise was applied. The finger position was displayed on-line on a monitor as a small white dot which the subjects had to maintain in the center of a green bigger circle. Electroencephalogram from the contralateral motor area, electromyogram from active muscles and finger position were recorded. The performance was measured by the mean absolute deviation (MAD) of the white dot from the zero position. ON compared to the zero noise condition induced an improvement in motor accuracy together with an enhancement of cortical motor SP and corticomuscular coherence in beta-range. These data suggest that the improved sensorimotor performance via SR is consistent with an increase in the cortical motor SP and in the corticomuscular coherence. PMID:24904365

  16. Teledyne H1RG, H2RG, and H4RG Noise Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes the near-infrared detector system noise generator (NG) that we wrote for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec). NG simulates many important noise components including; (1) white "read noise," (2) residual bias drifts, (3) pink $1/f$ noise, (4) alternating column noise, and (5) picture frame noise. By adjusting the input parameters, NG can simulate noise for Teledyne's H1RG, H2RG, and H4RG detectors with and without Teledyne's SIDECAR ASIC IR array controller. NG can be used as a starting point for simulating astronomical scenes by adding dark current, scattered light, and astronomical sources into the results from NG. NG is written in Python-3.4. The source code is freely available for download from http://jwst.nasa.gov/publications.html.

  17. Teledyne H1RG, H2RG, and H4RG Noise Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the near-infrared detector system noise generator (NG) that we wrote for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec). NG simulates many important noise components including; (1) white "read noise", (2) residual bias drifts, (3) pink 1/f noise, (4) alternating column noise, and (5) picture frame noise. By adjusting the input parameters, NG can simulate noise for Teledyne's H1RG, H2RG, and H4RG detectors with and without Teledyne's SIDECAR ASIC IR array controller. NG can be used as a starting point for simulating astronomical scenes by adding dark current, scattered light, and astronomical sources into the results from NG. NG is written in Python-3.4.

  18. Spring-Summer Temperatures Since AD 1780 Reconstructed from Stable Oxygen Isotope Ratios in White Spruce Tree-Rings from the Mackenzie Delta, Northwestern Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Trevor J.; Pisaric, Michael F. J.; Field, Robert D.; Kokelj, Steven V.; Edwards, Thomas W. D.; deMontigny, Peter; Healy, Richard; LeGrande, Allegra N.

    2013-01-01

    High-latitude delta(exp 18)O archives deriving from meteoric water (e.g., tree-rings and ice-cores) can provide valuable information on past temperature variability, but stationarity of temperature signals in these archives depends on the stability of moisture source/trajectory and precipitation seasonality, both of which can be affected by atmospheric circulation changes. A tree-ring delta(exp 18)O record (AD 1780-2003) from the Mackenzie Delta is evaluated as a temperature proxy based on linear regression diagnostics. The primary source of moisture for this region is the North Pacific and, thus, North Pacific atmospheric circulation variability could potentially affect the tree-ring delta(exp 18)O-temperature signal. Over the instrumental period (AD 1892-2003), tree-ring delta(exp 18)O explained 29% of interannual variability in April-July minimum temperatures, and the explained variability increases substantially at lower-frequencies. A split-period calibration/verification analysis found the delta(exp 18)O-temperature relation was time-stable, which supported a temperature reconstruction back to AD 1780. The stability of the delta(exp 18)O-temperature signal indirectly implies the study region is insensitive to North Pacific circulation effects, since North Pacific circulation was not constant over the calibration period. Simulations from the NASA-GISS ModelE isotope-enabled general circulation model confirm that meteoric delta(exp 18)O and precipitation seasonality in the study region are likely insensitive to North Pacific circulation effects, highlighting the paleoclimatic value of tree-ring and possibly other delta(exp 18)O records from this region. Our delta(exp 18)O-based temperature reconstruction is the first of its kind in northwestern North America, and one of few worldwide, and provides a long-term context for evaluating recent climate warming in the Mackenzie Delta region.

  19. [The association of arithmetic calculation and noise as a mental stressor in the functional evaluation of recent myocardial infarction].

    PubMed

    Mazzuero, G; Trani, C; Caporale, R; Bettinardi, O; Bertolotti, G; Tavazzi, L

    1989-11-01

    To evaluate the possible augmented power of mental arithmetic when given to the subjects during noise, 12 postinfarct patients underwent mental arithmetic in the standard way and then the same stressor with a white noise: mental arithmetic significantly increased (p less than 0.05) the heart rate, while mental arithmetic and white noise significantly increased (p less than 0.05) heart rate, systolic and mean blood pressure, as well as skin conductance. Nevertheless, the increments in heart rate, blood pressure and skin conductance induced by the two different ways of stressing did not significantly differ. Thus, adding white noise to mental arithmetic does not seem to be useful to increase the power of mental arithmetic in order to elicit cardiovascular responses.

  20. The design and research of anti-color-noise chaos M-ary communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yongqing; Li, Xingyuan; Li, Yanan; Zhang, Lin

    2016-03-01

    Previously a novel chaos M-ary digital communication method based on spatiotemporal chaos Hamilton oscillator has been proposed. Without chaos synchronization circumstance, it has performance improvement in bandwidth efficiency, transmission efficiency and anti-white-noise performance compared with traditional communication method. In this paper, the channel noise influence on chaotic modulation signals and the construction problem of anti-color-noise chaotic M-ary communication system are studied. The formula of zone partition demodulator's boundary in additive white Gaussian noise is derived, besides, the problem about how to determine the boundary of zone partition demodulator in additive color noise is deeply studied; Then an approach on constructing anti-color-noise chaos M-ary communication system is proposed, in which a pre-distortion filter is added after the chaos baseband modulator in the transmitter and whitening filter is added before zone partition demodulator in the receiver. Finally, the chaos M-ary communication system based on Hamilton oscillator is constructed and simulated in different channel noise. The result shows that the proposed method in this paper can improve the anti-color-noise performance of the whole communication system compared with the former system, and it has better anti-fading and resisting disturbance performance than Quadrature Phase Shift Keying system.

  1. Gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) response to three music stimuli (Mozart--"Eine Kleine Nachtmusik," Anonymous--"Romanza," Bach--"Violin Concerto No. 1") and white noise under recirculating water conditions.

    PubMed

    Papoutsoglou, Sofronios E; Karakatsouli, Nafsika; Psarrou, Anna; Apostolidou, Sofia; Papoutsoglou, Eustratios S; Batzina, Alkisti; Leondaritis, Georgios; Sakellaridis, N

    2015-02-01

    This study presents the results of the response of Sparus aurata to three different musical stimuli, derived from the transmission (4 h per day, 5 days per week) of particular music pieces by Mozart, Romanza and Bach (140 dB(rms) re 1 μPa), compared to the same transmission level of white noise, while the underwater ambient noise in all the experimental tanks was 121 dB(rms) re 1 μPa. Using recirculating sea water facilities, 10 groups, 2 for each treatment, of 20 specimens of 11.2 ± 0.02 g (S.E.), were reared for 94 days, under 150 ± 10 l× 12L-12D, and were fed an artificial diet three times per day. Fish body weight showed significant differences after 55 days, while its maximum level was observed after the 69th day until the end of the experiment, the highest value demonstrated in Mozart (M) groups, followed by those of Romanza (R), Bach (B), control (C) and white noise (WN). SGR (M = B), %WG (M = B) and FCR (all groups fed same % b.w.) were also improved for M group. Brain neurotransmitters results exhibited significant differences in DA-dopamine, (M > B), 5HIAA (C > B), 5HIAA:5HT (WN > R), DOPAC (M > B), DOPAC:DA and (DOPAC + HVA):DA, (C > M), while no significant differences were observed in 5HT, NA, HVA and HVA:DA. No differences were observed in biometric measurements, protease activity, % fatty acids of fillet, visceral fat and liver, while differences were observed regarding carbohydrase activity and the amount (mg/g w.w.) of some fatty acids in liver, fillet and visceral fat. In conclusion, present results confirm those reported for S. aurata, concerning the observed relaxing influence--due to its brain neurotransmitters action--of the transmission of Mozart music (compared to R and B), which resulted in the achievement of maximum growth rate, body weight and improved FCR. This conclusion definitely supports the musical "understanding" and sensitivity of S. aurata to music stimuli as well as suggesting a specific effect of white noise.

  2. Optical Johnson noise thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, R. L.; Blalock, T. V.; Maxey, L. C.; Roberts, M. J.; Simpson, M. L.

    1989-01-01

    A concept is being explored that an optical analog of the electrical Johnson noise may be used to measure temperature independently of emissivity. The concept is that a laser beam may be modulated on reflection from a hot surface by interaction of the laser photons with the thermally agitated conduction electrons or the lattice phonons, thereby adding noise to the reflected laser beam. If the reflectance noise can be detected and quantified in a background of other noise in the optical and signal processing systems, the reflectance noise may provide a noncontact measurement of the absolute surface temperature and may be independent of the surface's emissivity.

  3. Noise Hazard Evaluation Sound Level Data on Noise Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    AD-A021 465 NOISE HAZARD EfALUATION SOUND LEVEL DATA ON NOISE SOURCES Jeffrey Goldstein Army Environmental Hygiene Agency Prepared for: Army Health ...A. Noise Hazard Evaluation. B. Engineering Noise Control. C. Health Education. D. Audiometry. E. Hearing Protection. This technical guide concerns the...SOUND LEVEL DATA OF NOISE SOURCES Approved for public release, distribution unlimited. jGI4A C4C SENTINEL HEALTH I 5 US ARMY ENVIROIN.MENTAL HYGIENE

  4. Noise and the Perceptual Filling-in effect

    PubMed Central

    Zomet, Ativ; Polat, Uri; Levi, Dennis M.

    2016-01-01

    Nearby collinear flankers increase the false alarm rate (reports of the target being present when it is not) in a Yes-No experiment. This effect has been attributed to “filling-in” of the target location due to increased activity induced by the flankers. According to signal detection theory, false alarms are attributed to noise in the visual nervous system. Here we investigated the effect of external noise on the filling-in effect by adding white noise to a low contrast Gabor target presented between two collinear Gabor flankers at a range of target-flanker separations. External noise modulates the filling-in effect, reducing visual sensitivity (d′) and increasing the filling-in effect (False Alarm rate). We estimated the amount of external noise at which the false alarm rate increases by the √2 (which we refer to as NFA). Across flank distances, both the false alarm rate and d′ (with no external noise) are correlated with NFA. These results are consistent with the notion that nearby collinear flankers add both signal and noise to the target location. The increased signal results in higher d′ values; the increased noise to higher false alarm rates (the filling effect). PMID:27103594

  5. Hairy AdS solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabalón, Andrés; Astefanesei, Dumitru; Choque, David

    2016-11-01

    We construct exact hairy AdS soliton solutions in Einstein-dilaton gravity theory. We examine their thermodynamic properties and discuss the role of these solutions for the existence of first order phase transitions for hairy black holes. The negative energy density associated to hairy AdS solitons can be interpreted as the Casimir energy that is generated in the dual filed theory when the fermions are antiperiodic on the compact coordinate.

  6. Phase noise in RF and microwave amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Boudot, Rodolphe; Rubiola, Enrico

    2012-12-01

    Understanding amplifier phase noise is a critical issue in many fields of engineering and physics, such as oscillators, frequency synthesis, telecommunication, radar, and spectroscopy; in the emerging domain of microwave photonics; and in exotic fields, such as radio astronomy, particle accelerators, etc. Focusing on the two main types of base noise in amplifiers, white and flicker, the power spectral density of the random phase φ(t) is Sφ(f) = b(0) + b(-1)/f. White phase noise results from adding white noise to the RF spectrum in the carrier region. For a given RF noise level, b(0) is proportional to the reciprocal of the carrier power P(0). By contrast, flicker results from a near-dc 1/f noise-present in all electronic devices-which modulates the carrier through some parametric effect in the semiconductor. Thus, b(-1) is a parameter of the amplifier, constant in a wide range of P(0). The consequences are the following: Connecting m equal amplifiers in parallel, b(-1) is 1/m times that of one device. Cascading m equal amplifiers, b(-1) is m times that of one amplifier. Recirculating the signal in an amplifier so that the gain increases by a power of m (a factor of m in decibels) as a result of positive feedback (regeneration), we find that b(-1) is m(2) times that of the amplifier alone. The feedforward amplifier exhibits extremely low b(-1) because the carrier is ideally nulled at the input of its internal error amplifier. Starting with an extensive review of the literature, this article introduces a system-oriented model which describes the phase flickering. Several amplifier architectures (cascaded, parallel, etc.) are analyzed systematically, deriving the phase noise from the general model. There follow numerous measurements of amplifiers using different technologies, including some old samples, and in a wide frequency range (HF to microwaves), which validate the theory. In turn, theory and results provide design guidelines and give suggestions for CAD and

  7. Effects of linear trends on estimation of noise in GNSS position time-series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieva, K.; Segall, P.; Bradley, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    A thorough understanding of time-dependent noise in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) position time-series is necessary for computing uncertainties in any signals found in the data. However, estimation of time-correlated noise is a challenging task and is complicated by the difficulty in separating noise from signal, the features of greatest interest in the time-series. In this paper, we investigate how linear trends affect the estimation of noise in daily GNSS position time-series. We use synthetic time-series to study the relationship between linear trends and estimates of time-correlated noise for the six most commonly cited noise models. We find that the effects of added linear trends, or conversely de-trending, vary depending on the noise model. The commonly adopted model of random walk (RW), flicker noise (FN) and white noise (WN) is the most severely affected by de-trending, with estimates of low-amplitude RW most severely biased. FN plus WN is least affected by adding or removing trends. Non-integer power-law noise estimates are also less affected by de-trending, but are very sensitive to the addition of trend when the spectral index is less than one. We derive an analytical relationship between linear trends and the estimated RW variance for the special case of pure RW noise. Overall, we find that to ascertain the correct noise model for GNSS position time-series and to estimate the correct noise parameters, it is important to have independent constraints on the actual trends in the data.

  8. Effects of linear trends on estimation of noise in GNSS position time-series

    DOE PAGES

    Dmitrieva, K.; Segall, P.; Bradley, A. M.

    2016-10-20

    A thorough understanding of time-dependent noise in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) position time-series is necessary for computing uncertainties in any signals found in the data. However, estimation of time-correlated noise is a challenging task and is complicated by the difficulty in separating noise from signal, the features of greatest interest in the time-series. In this study, we investigate how linear trends affect the estimation of noise in daily GNSS position time-series. We use synthetic time-series to study the relationship between linear trends and estimates of time-correlated noise for the six most commonly cited noise models. We find that themore » effects of added linear trends, or conversely de-trending, vary depending on the noise model. The commonly adopted model of random walk (RW), flicker noise (FN) and white noise (WN) is the most severely affected by de-trending, with estimates of low-amplitude RW most severely biased. FN plus WN is least affected by adding or removing trends. Non-integer power-law noise estimates are also less affected by de-trending, but are very sensitive to the addition of trend when the spectral index is less than one. We derive an analytical relationship between linear trends and the estimated RW variance for the special case of pure RW noise. Finally, overall, we find that to ascertain the correct noise model for GNSS position time-series and to estimate the correct noise parameters, it is important to have independent constraints on the actual trends in the data.« less

  9. Effects of linear trends on estimation of noise in GNSS position time-series

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitrieva, K.; Segall, P.; Bradley, A. M.

    2016-10-20

    A thorough understanding of time-dependent noise in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) position time-series is necessary for computing uncertainties in any signals found in the data. However, estimation of time-correlated noise is a challenging task and is complicated by the difficulty in separating noise from signal, the features of greatest interest in the time-series. In this study, we investigate how linear trends affect the estimation of noise in daily GNSS position time-series. We use synthetic time-series to study the relationship between linear trends and estimates of time-correlated noise for the six most commonly cited noise models. We find that the effects of added linear trends, or conversely de-trending, vary depending on the noise model. The commonly adopted model of random walk (RW), flicker noise (FN) and white noise (WN) is the most severely affected by de-trending, with estimates of low-amplitude RW most severely biased. FN plus WN is least affected by adding or removing trends. Non-integer power-law noise estimates are also less affected by de-trending, but are very sensitive to the addition of trend when the spectral index is less than one. We derive an analytical relationship between linear trends and the estimated RW variance for the special case of pure RW noise. Finally, overall, we find that to ascertain the correct noise model for GNSS position time-series and to estimate the correct noise parameters, it is important to have independent constraints on the actual trends in the data.

  10. Added Sugars

    MedlinePlus

    ... need sugar to function properly. Added sugars contribute zero nutrients but many added calories that can lead to extra pounds or even obesity, thereby reducing heart health. If you think of your daily calorie needs as a budget, you want to “spend” ...

  11. Value Added?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UCLA IDEA, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Value added measures (VAM) uses changes in student test scores to determine how much "value" an individual teacher has "added" to student growth during the school year. Some policymakers, school districts, and educational advocates have applauded VAM as a straightforward measure of teacher effectiveness: the better a teacher,…

  12. Rotorcraft noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. J. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    The establishment of a realistic plan for NASA and the U.S. helicopter industry to develop a design-for-noise methodology, including plans for the identification and development of promising noise reduction technology was discussed. Topics included: noise reduction techniques, scaling laws, empirical noise prediction, psychoacoustics, and methods of developing and validing noise prediction methods.

  13. Improved Segmentation of White Matter Tracts with Adaptive Riemannian Metrics

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiang; Zygmunt, Kristen; Whitaker, Ross T.; Fletcher, P. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel geodesic approach to segmentation of white matter tracts from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Compared to deterministic and stochastic tractography, geodesic approaches treat the geometry of the brain white matter as a manifold, often using the inverse tensor field as a Riemannian metric. The white matter pathways are then inferred from the resulting geodesics, which have the desirable property that they tend to follow the main eigenvectors of the tensors, yet still have the flexibility to deviate from these directions when it results in lower costs. While this makes such methods more robust to noise, the choice of Riemannian metric in these methods is ad hoc. A serious drawback of current geodesic methods is that geodesics tend to deviate from the major eigenvectors in high-curvature areas in order to achieve the shortest path. In this paper we propose a method for learning an adaptive Riemannian metric from the DTI data, where the resulting geodesics more closely follow the principal eigenvector of the diffusion tensors even in high-curvature regions. We also develop a way to automatically segment the white matter tracts based on the computed geodesics. We show the robustness of our method on simulated data with different noise levels. We also compare our method with tractography methods and geodesic approaches using other Riemannian metrics and demonstrate that the proposed method results in improved geodesics and segmentations using both synthetic and real DTI data. PMID:24211814

  14. Adding Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsini, Larry L.; Hudack, Lawrence R.; Zekan, Donald L.

    1999-01-01

    The value-added statement (VAS), relatively unknown in the United States, is used in financial reports by many European companies. Saint Bonaventure University (New York) has adapted a VAS to make it appropriate for not-for-profit universities by identifying stakeholder groups (students, faculty, administrators/support personnel, creditors, the…

  15. White noise effects of U.S. crude oil spot prices on stock prices of a publicly traded company: A case study cross-correlation analysis based on green energy management theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Peter M.

    The purpose of this study was to examine white noise effects of U.S. crude oil spot prices on the stock prices of a green energy company. Epistemological, Phenomenological, Axiological and Ontological assumptions of Green Energy Management (GEM) Theory were utilized for selecting Air Products and Chemicals Inc. (APD) as the case study. Exxon Mobil (XOM) was used as a control for triangulation purposes. The period of time examined was between January of 1999 and December of 2008. Monthly stock prices for APD and XOM for the ten year period of time were collected from the New York Stock Exchange. Monthly U.S. crude oil spot prices for the ten year period of time were collected from the US Energy Information Administration. The data was entered into SPSS 17.0 software in order to conduct cross-correlation analysis. The six cross-correlation assumptions were satisfied in order to conduct a Cross-correlation Mirror Test (CCMT). The CCMT established the lag time direction and verified that U.S. crude oil spot prices serve as white noise for stock prices of APD and XOM. The Theory of Relative Weakness was employed in order to analyze the results. A 2 year period of time between December, 2006 and December, 2008 was examined. The correlation coefficient r = - .155 indicates that U.S. crude oil spot prices lead APD stock prices by 4 months. During the same 2 year period of time, U.S. crude oil spot prices lead XOM stock prices by 4 months at r = -.283. XOM stock prices and APD stock prices were positively correlated with 0 lag in time with a positive r = .566. The 4 month cycle was an exact match between APD stock prices, XOM stock prices and U.S. crude oil spot prices. The 4 month cycle was due to the random price fluctuation of U.S. crude oil spot prices that obscured the true stock prices of APD and XOM for the 2 year period of time.

  16. Flux-coherent series SQUID array magnetometers operating above 77 K with superior white flux noise than single-SQUIDs at 4.2 K

    SciTech Connect

    Chesca, Boris John, Daniel; Mellor, Christopher J.

    2015-10-19

    A very promising direction to improve the sensitivity of magnetometers based on superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) is to build a series-array of N non-interacting SQUIDs operating flux-coherently, because in this case their voltage modulation depth, ΔV, linearly scales with N whereas the white flux noise S{sub Φ}{sup 1/2} decreases as 1/N{sup 1/2}. Here, we report the realization of both these improvements in an advanced layout of very large SQUID arrays made of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. Specially designed with large area narrow flux focusers for increased field sensitivity and improved flux-coherency, our arrays have extremely low values for S{sub Φ}{sup 1/2} between (0.25 and 0.44) μΦ{sub 0}/Hz{sup 1/2} for temperatures in the range (77–83) K. In this respect, they outperform niobium/aluminium trilayer technology-based single-SQUIDs operating at 4.2 K. Moreover, with values for ΔV and transimpedance in the range of (10–17) mV and (0.3–2.5) kΩ, respectively, a direct connection to a low-noise room temperature amplifier is allowed, while matching for such readout is simplified and the available bandwidth is greatly increased. These landmark performances suggest such series SQUID arrays are ideal candidates to replace single-SQUIDs operating at 4.2 K in many applications.

  17. Noise Improves Visual Motion Discrimination via a Stochastic Resonance-Like Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Treviño, Mario; De la Torre-Valdovinos, Braniff; Manjarrez, Elias

    2016-01-01

    The stochastic resonance (SR) is a phenomenon in which adding a moderate amount of noise can improve the signal-to-noise ratio and performance of non-linear systems. SR occurs in all sensory modalities including the visual system in which noise can enhance contrast detection sensitivity and the perception of ambiguous figures embedded in static scenes. Here, we explored how adding background white pixel-noise to a random dot motion (RDM) stimulus produced changes in visual motion discrimination in healthy human adults. We found that, although the average reaction times (RTs) remained constant, an intermediate level of noise improved the subjects’ ability to discriminate motion direction in the RDM task. The psychophysical responses followed an inverted U-like function of the input noise, whereas the incorrect responses with short RTs did not exhibit such modulation by external noise. Moreover, by applying stimulus and noisy signals to different eyes, we found that the SR phenomenon occurred presumably in the primary visual cortex, where these two signals first converge. Our results suggest that a SR-like phenomenon mediates the improvement of visual motion perception in the RDM task. PMID:27932960

  18. Noise contaminated transmittance

    SciTech Connect

    Zardecki, A.; McVey, B.D.; Nelson, D.H.

    1997-09-01

    The authors compare the efficiency of a classifier based on probabilistic neural networks and the general least squares method. Both methods must accommodate noise due to uncertainty in the measured spectrum at each wavelength. The evaluation of both methods is based on a simulated transmittance spectrum, in which the received signal is supplemented by an additive admixture of noise. To obtain a realistic description of the noise model, they generate several hundred laser pulses for each wavelength under consideration. These pulses have a predetermined correlation matrix for different wavelengths; furthermore, they are composed of three components accounting for the randomness of the observed spectrum. The first component is the correlated 1/f noise; the second component is due to uncorrelated 1/f noise; the third one is the uncorrelated white noise. The probabilistic neural network fails to retrieve the species concentration correctly for large noise levels; on the other hand, its predictions being confined to a fixed number of concentration bins, the network produces relatively small variances. To a large extent, the general least square method avoids the false alarms. It reproduces the average concentrations correctly; however, the concentration variances can be large.

  19. Airport noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of airport noise at several airports and air bases is detailed. Community reactions to the noise, steps taken to reduce jet engine noise, and the effect of airport use restrictions and curfews on air transportation are discussed. The adverse effect of changes in allowable operational noise on airport safety and altenative means for reducing noise pollution are considered. Community-airport relations and public relations are discussed.

  20. Combustion noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahle, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the subject of combustion generated noise is presented. Combustion noise is an important noise source in industrial furnaces and process heaters, turbopropulsion and gas turbine systems, flaring operations, Diesel engines, and rocket engines. The state-of-the-art in combustion noise importance, understanding, prediction and scaling is presented for these systems. The fundamentals and available theories of combustion noise are given. Controversies in the field are discussed and recommendations for future research are made.

  1. Quantifying the Effects of Noise on Diffuse Interface Models: Cahn-Hilliard-Cook equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Spencer; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar

    2015-03-01

    We present an investigation into the dynamics of phase separation through numerical simulations of the Cahn-Hilliard-Cook (CHC) equation. This model is an extension of the well-known Cahn- Hilliard equation, perturbed by an additive white noise. Studies have shown that random fluctuations are critical for proper resolution of physical phenomena. This is especially true for phase critical systems. We explore the transient behavior of the solution space for varying levels of noise. This is enabled by our massively scalable finite element-based numerical framework. We briefly examine the interplay between noise level and discretization (spatial and temporal) in obtaining statistically consistent solutions. We show that the added noise accelerates progress towards phase separation, but retards dynamics throughout subsequent coarsening. We identify a scaling exponent relating morphology metrics with the level of noise. We observe a very clear scaling effect of finite domain size, which is observed to be offset by increasing levels of noise. Domain scaling reveals a clear microstructural asymmetry at various stages of the evolution for lower noise levels. In contrast, higher noise levels tend to produce more uniform morphologies.

  2. Investigating binocular summation in human vision using complementary fused external noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Christopher L.; Olson, Jeffrey T.

    2016-05-01

    The impact noise has on the processing of visual information at various stages within the human visual system (HVS) is still an open research area. To gain additional insight, twelve experiments were administered to human observers using sine wave targets to determine their contrast thresholds. A single frame of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) and its complement were used to investigate the effect of noise on the summation of visual information within the HVS. A standard contrast threshold experiment served as the baseline for comparisons. In the standard experiment, a range of sine wave targets are shown to the observers and their ability to detect the targets at varying contrast levels were recorded. The remaining experiments added some form of noise (noise image or its complement) and/or an additional sine wave target separated between one to three octaves to the test target. All of these experiments were tested using either a single monitor for viewing the targets or with a dual monitor presentation method for comparison. In the dual monitor experiments, a ninety degree mirror was used to direct each target to a different eye, allowing for the information to be fused binocularly. The experiments in this study present different approaches for delivering external noise to the HVS, and should allow for an improved understanding regarding how noise enters the HVS and what impact noise has on the processing of visual information.

  3. Acoustic effects of oil-production activities on bowhead and white whales visible during spring migration near Pt. Barrow, Alaska-1990 phase: sound propagation and whale responses to playbacks of continuous drilling noise from an ice platform, as studied in pack ice conditions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, W.J.; Greene, C.R.; Koski, W.R.; Smultea, M.A.; Cameron, G.

    1991-10-01

    The report concerns the effects of underwater noise from simulated oil production operations on the movements and behavior of bowhead and white whales migrating around northern Alaska in spring. An underwater sound projector suspended from pack ice was used to introduce recorded drilling noise and other test sounds into leads through the pack ice. These sounds were received and measured at various distances to determine the rate of sound attenuation with distance and frequency. The movements and behavior of bowhead and white whales approaching the operating projector were studied by aircraft- and ice-based observers. Some individuals of both species were observed to approach well within the ensonified area. However, behavioral changes and avoidance reactions were evident when the received sound level became sufficiently high. Reactions to aircraft are also discussed.

  4. White House

    MedlinePlus

    ... to main content Jump to navigation the WHITE HOUSE President Donald J. Trump Get in Touch Home ... News Read the latest news from the White House Video Gallery View the most recent videos from ...

  5. Magnetic Flux Noise in dc SQUIDs: Temperature and Geometry Dependence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-05

    with a slope that flattens at higher frequencies as the white noise from the shunt resistors becomes significant. At low frequencies (f & 101 Hz) and...ðfÞ. We performed a least squares fit to SðfÞ ¼ A2=ðf=1 HzÞ þ C2, representing the flux 1=f noise and the white noise from the resistive shunts, to...we made measure- ments at dI=d ¼ 0, enabling us to determine the critical current 1=f noise . We verified that the power spectrum of the white noise

  6. Effects of correlated noise on the full-spectrum combining and complex-symbol combining arraying techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazirani, P.

    1995-01-01

    The process of combining telemetry signals received at multiple antennas, commonly referred to as arraying, can be used to improve communication link performance in the Deep Space Network (DSN). By coherently adding telemetry from multiple receiving sites, arraying produces an enhancement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over that achievable with any single antenna in the array. A number of different techniques for arraying have been proposed and their performances analyzed in past literature. These analyses have compared different arraying schemes under the assumption that the signals contain additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) and that the noise observed at distinct antennas is independent. In situations where an unwanted background body is visible to multiple antennas in the array, however, the assumption of independent noises is no longer applicable. A planet with significant radiation emissions in the frequency band of interest can be one such source of correlated noise. For example, during much of Galileo's tour of Jupiter, the planet will contribute significantly to the total system noise at various ground stations. This article analyzes the effects of correlated noise on two arraying schemes currently being considered for DSN applications: full-spectrum combining (FSC) and complex-symbol combining (CSC). A framework is presented for characterizing the correlated noise based on physical parameters, and the impact of the noise correlation on the array performance is assessed for each scheme.

  7. Community noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragdon, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Airport and community land use planning as they relate to airport noise reduction are discussed. Legislation, community relations, and the physiological effect of airport noise are considered. Noise at the Logan, Los Angeles, and Minneapolis/St. Paul airports is discussed.

  8. Two Stochastic Resonances Induced by Two Different Multiplicative Telegraphic Noises for an Electric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-Hui

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, an electric system with two dichotomous resistors is investigated. It is shown that this system can display two stochastic resonances, which are the amplitude of the periodic response as the functions of the two dichotomous resistors strengthes respectively. In the limits of Gaussian white noise and shot white noise (i.e., the two noises are both Gaussian white noise or shot white noise), no phenomena of resonance appear. By further study, we find that when the system is with three or more multiplicative telegraphic noises, there are three or more stochastic resonances.

  9. Mode-hopping mechanism generating colored noise in a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Raghav; Dürrenfeld, P.; Iacocca, E.; Heinonen, O. G.; Åkerman, J.; Muduli, P. K.

    2014-09-29

    The frequency noise spectrum of a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator is examined where multiple modes and mode-hopping events are observed. The frequency noise spectrum is found to consist of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise. We find a systematic and similar dependence of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise on bias current and the relative angle between the reference and free layers, which changes the effective damping and hence the mode-hopping behavior in this system. The frequency at which the 1/f frequency noise changes to white noise increases as the free layer is aligned away from the anti-parallel orientation w.r.t the reference layer. These results indicate that the origin of 1/f frequency noise is related to mode-hopping, which produces both white noise as well as 1/f frequency noise similar to the case of ring lasers.

  10. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. 2: Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    A randomized sequence of tone bursts was delivered to subjects at short inter-stimulus intervals with the tones originating from one of three spatially and frequency specific channels. The subject's task was to count the tones in one of the three channels at a time, ignoring the other two, and press a button after each tenth tone. In different conditions, tones were given at high and low intensities and with or without a background white noise to mask the tones. The N sub 1 component of the auditory vertex potential was found to be larger in response to attended channel tones in relation to unattended tones. This selective enhancement of N sub 1 was minimal for loud tones presented without noise and increased markedly for the lower tone intensity and in noise added conditions.

  11. Effect of noise on higher nervous activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, K.

    1988-12-01

    The effects of continuous, regular and irregular intermittent white noises consisting of three kinds of unpleasant noises (frying pan noise (FN), synthesizer noise (SN) and white noise (WN)), pure tones of 125, 250, 500, 1k, 2k, 4k and 8k Hz, and band-limited noises with the same center frequencies as pure tones were estimated by using electroencephalograms (EEG) and auditory evoked potential (AEP), to make clear the relationship between the unpleasantness of noise and brain activity. The results obtained were as follows. Alpha-wave appearance rate differed in continuous, regular and irregular intermittent white noise exposures. Psychologically unpleasant noises, estimated by the method of paired comparisons and a rating scale, brought about changes in brain waves that corresponded to the degree of unpleasantness. Changes in the number and the total power of the peak frequency in brain waves of the subjects exposed to pure tones showed a tendency to be similar to the equal loudness contour. Changes in the AEP components of N 1 and P 2 latencies and P 2 amplitude due to both pure tones and band noises with the same center frequency as each pure tone showed the same pattern, with the shortest latency and amplitude between the frequencies of 1 kHz and 2 kHz. The changes in AEP were also similar to the equal loudness contour.

  12. Psychophysical measurement of night vision goggle noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasgow, Rachael L.; Marasco, Peter L.; Havig, Paul R.; Martinsen, Gary L.; Reis, George A.; Heft, Eric L.

    2003-09-01

    Pilots, developers, and other users of night-vision goggles (NVGs) have pointed out that different NVG image intensifier tubes have different subjective noise characteristics. Currently, no good model of the visual impact of NVG noise exists. Because it is very difficult to objectively measure the noise of a NVG, a method for assessing noise subjectively using simple psychophysical procedures was developed. This paper discusses the use of a computer program to generate noise images similar to what an observer sees through an NVG, based on filtered white noise. The images generated were based on 1/f (where f is frequency) filtered white noise with several adjustable parameters. Adjusting each of these parameters varied different characteristics of the noise. This paper discusses a study where observers compared the computer-generated noise images to true NVG noise and were asked to determine which computer-generated image was the best representation of the true noise. This method was repeated with different types of NVGs and at different luminance levels to study what NVG parameters cause variations in NVG noise.

  13. The subjective importance of noise spectral content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Donald; Phillips, Jonathan; Denman, Hugh

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents secondary Standard Quality Scale (SQS2) rankings in overall quality JNDs for a subjective analysis of the 3 axes of noise, amplitude, spectral content, and noise type, based on the ISO 20462 softcopy ruler protocol. For the initial pilot study, a Python noise simulation model was created to generate the matrix of noise masks for the softcopy ruler base images with different levels of noise, different low pass filter noise bandwidths and different band pass filter center frequencies, and 3 different types of noise: luma only, chroma only, and luma and chroma combined. Based on the lessons learned, the full subjective experiment, involving 27 observers from Google, NVIDIA and STMicroelectronics was modified to incorporate a wider set of base image scenes, and the removal of band pass filtered noise masks to ease observer fatigue. Good correlation was observed with the Aptina subjective noise study. The absence of tone mapping in the noise simulation model visibly reduced the contrast at high levels of noise, due to the clipping of the high levels of noise near black and white. Under the 34-inch viewing distance, no significant difference was found between the luma only noise masks and the combined luma and chroma noise masks. This was not the intuitive expectation. Two of the base images with large uniform areas, `restaurant' and `no parking', were found to be consistently more sensitive to noise than the texture rich scenes. Two key conclusions are (1) there are fundamentally different sensitivities to noise on a flat patch versus noise in real images and (2) magnification of an image accentuates visual noise in a way that is non-representative of typical noise reduction algorithms generating the same output frequency. Analysis of our experimental noise masks applied to a synthetic Macbeth ColorChecker Chart confirmed the color-dependent nature of the visibility of luma and chroma noise.

  14. White vegetables: glycemia and satiety.

    PubMed

    Anderson, G Harvey; Soeandy, Chesarahmia Dojo; Smith, Christopher E

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this review is to discuss the effect of white vegetable consumption on glycemia, satiety, and food intake. White vegetables is a term used to refer to vegetables that are white or near white in color and include potatoes, cauliflowers, turnips, onions, parsnips, white corn, kohlrabi, and mushrooms (technically fungi but generally considered a vegetable). They vary greatly in their contribution to the energy and nutrient content of the diet and glycemia and satiety. As with other foods, the glycemic effect of many white vegetables has been measured. The results illustrate that interpretation of the semiquantitative comparative ratings of white vegetables as derived by the glycemic index must be context dependent. As illustrated by using the potato as an example, the glycemic index of white vegetables can be misleading if not interpreted in the context of the overall contribution that the white vegetable makes to the carbohydrate and nutrient composition of the diet and their functionality in satiety and metabolic control within usual meals. It is concluded that application of the glycemic index in isolation to judge the role of white vegetables in the diet and, specifically in the case of potato as consumed in ad libitum meals, has led to premature and possibly counterproductive dietary guidance.

  15. Orientifolded locally AdS3 geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loran, F.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Continuing the analysis of [Loran F and Sheikh-Jabbari M M 2010 Phys. Lett. B 693 184-7], we classify all locally AdS3 stationary axi-symmetric unorientable solutions to AdS3 Einstein gravity and show that they are obtained by applying certain orientifold projection on AdS3, BTZ or AdS3 self-dual orbifold, respectively, O-AdS3, O-BTZ and O-SDO geometries. Depending on the orientifold fixed surface, the O-surface, which is either a space-like 2D plane or a cylinder, or a light-like 2D plane or a cylinder, one can distinguish four distinct cases. For the space-like orientifold plane or cylinder cases, these geometries solve AdS3 Einstein equations and are hence locally AdS3 everywhere except at the O-surface, where there is a delta-function source. For the light-like cases, the geometry is a solution to Einstein equations even at the O-surface. We discuss the causal structure for static, extremal and general rotating O-BTZ and O-SDO cases as well as the geodesic motion on these geometries. We also discuss orientifolding Poincaré patch AdS3 and AdS2 geometries as a way to geodesic completion of these spaces and comment on the 2D CFT dual to the O-geometries.

  16. Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mixson, John S.; Wilby, John F.

    1991-01-01

    The generation and control of flight vehicle interior noise is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of transmission through airborne and structure-borne paths and the control of cabin noise by path modification. Techniques for identifying the relative contributions of the various source-path combinations are also discussed along with methods for the prediction of aircraft interior noise such as those based on the general modal theory and statistical energy analysis.

  17. Noise Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Environmental Health Systems puts forth an increasing effort in the U.S. to develop ways of controlling noise, particularly in industrial environments due to Federal and State laws, labor union insistence and new findings relative to noise pollution impact on human health. NASA's Apollo guidance control system aided in the development of a noise protection product, SMART. The basis of all SMART products is SMART compound a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy/sound absorbing qualities. The basic compound was later refined for noise protection use.

  18. Noise in any frequency range can enhance information transmission in a sensory neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, Jacob E.

    1997-05-01

    The effect of noise on the neural encoding of broadband signals was investigated in the cricket cercal system, a mechanosensory system sensitive to small near-field air particle disturbances. Known air current stimuli were presented to the cricket through audio speakers in a controlled environment in a variety of background noise conditions. Spike trains from the second layer of neuronal processing, the primary sensory interneurons, were recorded with intracellular Electrodes and the performance of these neurons characterized with the tools of information theory. SNR, mutual information rates, and other measures of encoding accuracy were calculated for single frequency, narrowband, and broadband signals over the entire amplitude sensitivity range of the cells, in the presence of uncorrelated noise background also spanning the cells' frequency and amplitude sensitivity range. Significant enhancements of transmitted information through the addition of external noise were observed regardless of the frequency range of either the signal or noise waveforms, provided both were within the operating range of the cell. Considerable improvements in signal encoding were observed for almost an entire order of magnitude of near-threshold signal amplitudes. This included sinusoidal signals embedded in broadband white noise, broadband signals in broadband noise, and even broadband signals presented with narrowband noise in a completely non-overlapping frequency range. The noise related increases in mutual information rate for broadband signals were as high as 150%, and up to 600% increases in SNR were observed for sinusoidal signals. Additionally, it was shown that the amount of information about the signal carried, on average, by each spike was INCREASED for small signals when presented with noise—implying that added input noise can, in certain situations, actually improve the accuracy of the encoding process itself.

  19. Adaptive filtering with correlated state noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argentiero, P.

    1972-01-01

    An adaptive filter which uses a minimum variance criteria to estimate state noise covariance is presented. It is not necessary to assume white state noise in order to implement the filter. Simulation results are given which demonstrate that the filter tracks a satellite in the presence of modeling errors better than a conventional minimum variance filter with state noise. It is also shown that the propagated convariance matrix of the filter is an accurate indicator of the filter's performance.

  20. Noise in phase-preserving linear amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Shashank; Jiang, Zhang; Combes, Joshua; Caves, Carlton M.

    2014-12-04

    The purpose of a phase-preserving linear amplifier is to make a small signal larger, so that it can be perceived by instruments incapable of resolving the original signal, while sacrificing as little as possible in signal-to-noise. Quantum mechanics limits how well this can be done: the noise added by the amplifier, referred to the input, must be at least half a quantum at the operating frequency. This well-known quantum limit only constrains the second moments of the added noise. Here we provide the quantum constraints on the entire distribution of added noise: any phasepreserving linear amplifier is equivalent to a parametric amplifier with a physical state σ for the ancillary mode; σ determines the properties of the added noise.

  1. Chronic noise exposure causes persistence of tau hyperphosphorylation and formation of NFT tau in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cui, Bo; Zhu, Lixing; She, Xiaojun; Wu, Mingquan; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Tianhui; Zhang, Na; Xu, Chuanxiang; Chen, Xuewei; An, Gaihong; Liu, Hongtao

    2012-12-01

    The non-auditory effects of noise exposure on the central nervous system have been established both epidemiologically and experimentally. Chronic noise exposure (CNE) has been associated with tau hyperphosphorylation and Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like pathological changes. However, experimental evidence for these associations remains limited. The aim of the current study was to explore the effects of CNE [100 dB sound pressure level (SPL) white noise, 4 h/d×14 d] on tau phosphorylation in the rat hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to two groups: a noise-exposed group and a control group. The levels of radioimmunoprecipitation assay (RIPA)-soluble and RIPA-insoluble phosphorylated tau at Ser202, Ser396, Ser404, and Ser422 in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex were measured at different time points (days 0, 3, 7, and 14) after the end of the last noise exposure. Exposure to white noise for 14 consecutive days significantly increased the levels of tau phosphorylation at Ser202, Ser396, Ser404, and Ser422, the sites typically phosphorylated in AD brains, in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. Tau hyperphosphorylation persisted for 7 to 14 d after the cessation of noise exposure. These alterations were also concomitant with the generation of pathological neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) tau 3, 7 and 14 d after the end of the stimulus. Furthermore, lasting increases in proteins involved in hyperphosphorylation, namely glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), were found to occur in close correspondence with increase in tau hyperphosphorylation. The results of this study show that CNE leads to long-lasting increases in non-NFT hyperphosphorylated tau and delayed formation of misfolded NFT tau in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. Our results also provide evidence for the involvement of GSK3β and PP2A in these processes.

  2. Warped AdS3 black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anninos, Dionysios; Li, Wei; Padi, Megha; Song, Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    Three dimensional topologically massive gravity (TMG) with a negative cosmological constant -l-2 and positive Newton constant G admits an AdS3 vacuum solution for any value of the graviton mass μ. These are all known to be perturbatively unstable except at the recently explored chiral point μl = 1. However we show herein that for every value of μl ≠ 3 there are two other (potentially stable) vacuum solutions given by SL(2,Bbb R) × U(1)-invariant warped AdS3 geometries, with a timelike or spacelike U(1) isometry. Critical behavior occurs at μl = 3, where the warping transitions from a stretching to a squashing, and there are a pair of warped solutions with a null U(1) isometry. For μl > 3, there are known warped black hole solutions which are asymptotic to warped AdS3. We show that these black holes are discrete quotients of warped AdS3 just as BTZ black holes are discrete quotients of ordinary AdS3. Moreover new solutions of this type, relevant to any theory with warped AdS3 solutions, are exhibited. Finally we note that the black hole thermodynamics is consistent with the hypothesis that, for μl > 3, the warped AdS3 ground state of TMG is holographically dual to a 2D boundary CFT with central charges c_R-formula and c_L-formula.

  3. Warped AdS3 black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Anninos, Dionysios; Li, Wei; Padi, Megha; Strominger, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    Three dimensional topologically massive gravity (TMG) with a negative cosmological constant -ell-2 and positive Newton constant G admits an AdS3 vacuum solution for any value of the graviton mass μ. These are all known to be perturbatively unstable except at the recently explored chiral point μell = 1. However we show herein that for every value of μell ≠ 3 there are two other (potentially stable) vacuum solutions given by SL(2,Bbb R) × U(1)-invariant warped AdS3 geometries, with a timelike or spacelike U(1) isometry. Critical behavior occurs at μell = 3, where the warping transitions from a stretching to a squashing, and there are a pair of warped solutions with a null U(1) isometry. For μell > 3, there are known warped black hole solutions which are asymptotic to warped AdS3. We show that these black holes are discrete quotients of warped AdS3 just as BTZ black holes are discrete quotients of ordinary AdS3. Moreover new solutions of this type, relevant to any theory with warped AdS3 solutions, are exhibited. Finally we note that the black hole thermodynamics is consistent with the hypothesis that, for μell > 3, the warped AdS3 ground state of TMG is holographically dual to a 2D boundary CFT with central charges c_R-formula and c_L-formula.

  4. The Effect of Noise and Display Orientation on Cognitive Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    letters among which digits were interspersed. The task was to add up the series of digits . When a series of such sums had been completed, the noise...different abilities (reaction time, rate control, and time sharing). The effect of random 85 dB white noise on performance depended on the type of task and...continuous 95 dB white noise, 95 dB patterned noise, and random intermittent noise. An analysis of the above conflict, that is, the facili- tative effect

  5. Early continuous white noise exposure alters l-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor subunit glutamate receptor 2 and gamma-aminobutyric acid type a receptor subunit beta3 protein expression in rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinghong; Yu, Liping; Zhang, Jiping; Cai, Rui; Sun, Xinde

    2010-02-15

    Auditory experience during the postnatal critical period is essential for the normal maturation of auditory function. Previous studies have shown that rearing infant rat pups under conditions of continuous moderate-level noise delayed the emergence of adult-like topographic representational order and the refinement of response selectivity in the primary auditory cortex (A1) beyond normal developmental benchmarks and indefinitely blocked the closure of a brief, critical-period window. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms of these physiological changes after noise rearing, we studied expression of the AMPA receptor subunit GluR2 and GABA(A) receptor subunit beta3 in the auditory cortex after noise rearing. Our results show that continuous moderate-level noise rearing during the early stages of development decreases the expression levels of GluR2 and GABA(A)beta3. Furthermore, noise rearing also induced a significant decrease in the level of GABA(A) receptors relative to AMPA receptors. However, in adult rats, noise rearing did not have significant effects on GluR2 and GABA(A)beta3 expression or the ratio between the two units. These changes could have a role in the cellular mechanisms involved in the delayed maturation of auditory receptive field structure and topographic organization of A1 after noise rearing.

  6. The Combined Effect of Periodic Signals and Noise on the Dilution of Precision of GNSS Station Velocity Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klos, Anna; Olivares, German; Teferle, Felix Norman; Bogusz, Janusz

    2016-04-01

    important. In other words, for time series long enough, the assumed periodic signals do not affect the velocity uncertainties as much as the assumed noise model. We calculated the GDP to be the ratio between two errors of velocity: without and with inclusion of seasonal terms of periods equal to one year and its overtones till 3rd. To all these cases power-law processes of white, flicker and random-walk noise were added separately. Few oscillations in GDP can be noticed for integer years, which arise from periodic terms added. Their amplitudes in GDP increase along with the increasing spectral index. Strong peaks of oscillations in GDP are indicated for short time scales, especially for random-walk processes. This means that badly monumented stations are affected the most. Local minima and maxima in GDP are also enlarged as the noise approaches random walk. We noticed that the semi-annual signal increased the local GDP minimum for white noise. This suggests that adding power-law noise to a deterministic model with annual term or adding a semi-annual term to white noise causes an increased velocity uncertainty even at the points, where determined velocity is not biased.

  7. Stochastic resonance with colored noise for neural signal detection.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fabing; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Abbott, Derek

    2014-01-01

    We analyze signal detection with nonlinear test statistics in the presence of colored noise. In the limits of small signal and weak noise correlation, the optimal test statistic and its performance are derived under general conditions, especially concerning the type of noise. We also analyze, for a threshold nonlinearity-a key component of a neural model, the conditions for noise-enhanced performance, establishing that colored noise is superior to white noise for detection. For a parallel array of nonlinear elements, approximating neurons, we demonstrate even broader conditions allowing noise-enhanced detection, via a form of suprathreshold stochastic resonance.

  8. Segmented strings in AdS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callebaut, Nele; Gubser, Steven S.; Samberg, Andreas; Toldo, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    We study segmented strings in flat space and in AdS 3. In flat space, these well known classical motions describe strings which at any instant of time are piecewise linear. In AdS 3, the worldsheet is composed of faces each of which is a region bounded by null geodesics in an AdS 2 subspace of AdS 3. The time evolution can be described by specifying the null geodesic motion of kinks in the string at which two segments are joined. The outcome of collisions of kinks on the worldsheet can be worked out essentially using considerations of causality. We study several examples of closed segmented strings in AdS 3 and find an unexpected quasi-periodic behavior. We also work out a WKB analysis of quantum states of yo-yo strings in AdS 5 and find a logarithmic term reminiscent of the logarithmic twist of string states on the leading Regge trajectory.

  9. En route noise: NASA propfan test aircraft (calculated source noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickley, E. J.

    1990-01-01

    The second phase of a joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) program to study the high-altitude, low-frequency acoustic noise propagation characteristics of the Advanced Turboprop (propfan) Aircraft was conducted on April 3-13, 1989 at the White Sands Missile Range (WSMR), New Mexico. The first phase was conducted on October 26-31, 1987 in Huntsville, Alabama. NASA (Lewis) measured the source noise of the test aircraft during both phases while NASA (Langley) measured surface noise only during the second phase. FAA/NASA designed a program to obtain noise level data from the propfan test bed aircraft, both in the near field and at ground level, during simulated en route flights (35,000 and 20,000 feet ASL), and to test low frequency atmospheric absorption algorithms and prediction technology to provide insight into the necessity for regulatory measures. The curves of calculated source noise versus emission angle are based on a second order best-fit curve of the peak envelope of the adjusted ground data. Centerline and sideline derived source noise levels are shown to be in good agreement. A comparison of the Alabama chase plane source data and the calculated source noise at centerline for both the Alabama and New Mexico data shows good agreement for the 35,000 and the 20,000 feet (ASL) overflights. With the availability of the New Mexico in-flight data, further in depth comparisons will be made.

  10. Using noise to shape motor learning.

    PubMed

    Thorp, Elias B; Kording, Konrad P; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A

    2017-02-01

    Each of our movements is selected from any number of alternative movements. Some studies have shown evidence that the central nervous system (CNS) chooses to make the specific movements that are least affected by motor noise. Previous results showing that the CNS has a natural tendency to minimize the effects of noise make the direct prediction that if the relationship between movements and noise were to change, the specific movements people learn to make would also change in a predictable manner. Indeed, this has been shown for well-practiced movements such as reaching. Here, we artificially manipulated the relationship between movements and visuomotor noise by adding noise to a motor task in a novel redundant geometry such that there arose a single control policy that minimized the noise. This allowed us to see whether, for a novel motor task, people could learn the specific control policy that minimized noise or would need to employ other compensation strategies to overcome the added noise. As predicted, subjects were able to learn movements that were biased toward the specific ones that minimized the noise, suggesting not only that the CNS can learn to minimize the effects of noise in a novel motor task but also that artificial visuomotor noise can be a useful tool for teaching people to make specific movements. Using noise as a teaching signal promises to be useful for rehabilitative therapies and movement training with human-machine interfaces.

  11. Effect of selective suppression of spatial frequency domain noise on visual detection of a sample object in an inhomogeneous background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; McDonald, J. Scott; Brennan, Patrick C.; Bourne, Roger M.

    2012-02-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of selective suppression of spatial frequency (SF) domain Gaussian white noise on visibility of a sample object in inhomogeneous backgrounds. SF-specific variation in signal-to-noise ratio due to selective signal averaging in the SF domain is a consequence of some of MRI acquisition methods. This study models the potential effect on visibility of an object in a complex image. A single disc was randomly positioned in 25 of 50 synthetic clustered lumpy background images. Neutral, low mid and high frequency suppressed Gaussian white noise was added in the frequency domain to simulate SF-weighted MRI signal averaging. Twelve readers performed visual searching and localization tasks on ordered sets. Subjects were asked to detect and locate discs and to rank confidence level. Sensitivity, specificity and ROC analyses were performed. Readers achieved significantly higher ROC AUC - Azscores - (p<0.001) and case-based sensitivity (p<0.001) and target-based sensitivity (p<0.001) with images in which low SF noise was suppressed. Also, significant higher cased-based sensitivity (p=0.005), target-based sensitivity (p=0.022) and Az-values (p=0.01) were scored under mid SF noise filtration. No significant differences were observed when images with SF-neutral noise suppression were compared with high SF noise suppression. In conclusion, increase of low and also mid SF signal signal-to-noise ratio significantly improves human performance in visual detection of simple targets in inhomogeneous backgrounds and suggests that a low SF bias in MRI signal averaging may enhance diagnostic quality.

  12. Noise in nonlinear nanomechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Andrew

    2006-03-01

    Noise limits the sensitivity of linear sensors, in a manner that is well understood, but also limits nonlinear systems in a less trivial way. Nonlinear nanomechanical resonators present interesting possibilities for the sensitive detection of forces and masses, but the noise limitations have not been explored much to date. Here we report on noise effects on nonlinear resonators operated in regimes where they have either one or two stable attractors. We have made quantitative measurements of the nonlinear response of a radiofrequency mechanical resonator with very high quality factor, measuring the noise-free transitions between the two attractors, and find good agreement with theory. We measure the transition rate response to controlled levels of white noise, and extract the basin activation energy. This allows us to obtain precise values for the relevant frequencies and the cubic nonlinearity in the Duffing oscillator, with applications to parametric sensing, in particular mass sensing. References: ``Noise-enabled precision measurements of a Duffing nanomechanical resonator,'' J.S. Aldridge and A.N. Cleland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 156403 (2005). ``Thermomechanical noise limits on parametric sensing with nanomechanical resonators,'' A.N. Cleland, New J. Phys. 7, 235 (2005).

  13. Effect of Poisson noise on adiabatic quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiely, A.; Muga, J. G.; Ruschhaupt, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a detailed derivation of the master equation describing a general time-dependent quantum system with classical Poisson white noise and outline its various properties. We discuss the limiting cases of Poisson white noise and provide approximations for the different noise strength regimes. We show that using the eigenstates of the noise superoperator as a basis can be a useful way of expressing the master equation. Using this, we simulate various settings to illustrate different effects of Poisson noise. In particular, we show a dip in the fidelity as a function of noise strength where high fidelity can occur in the strong-noise regime for some cases. We also investigate recent claims [J. Jing et al., Phys. Rev. A 89, 032110 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.89.032110] that this type of noise may improve rather than destroy adiabaticity.

  14. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  15. Noise-assisted correlation algorithm for suppressing noise-induced artifacts in ultrasonic Nakagami images.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Huang, Chih-Chung

    2012-05-01

    Ultrasonic Nakagami images can complement conventional B-mode images for scatterer characterization. White noise in anechoic areas leads to artifacts that affect the Nakagami image to characterize tissues. Artifact removal requires rejection of the white noise without deforming the backscattered waveform. This study proposes a noise-assisted correlation algorithm (NCA) and carries out simulations, phantom experiments, and clinical measurements to validate its feasibility and practicality. The simulation results show that the NCA can reject white noise in an anechoic area without any deformation of the backscattered waveforms. The results obtained from phantoms and tissues further demonstrate that the proposed NCA can suppress a Nakagami image artifact without changing the texture of the Nakagami image of the scattering background. The NCA is an essential algorithm to construct artifact-free Nakagami image for correctly reflecting scatterer properties of biological tissues.

  16. White phosphorus

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    White phosphorus ; CASRN 7723 - 14 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  17. White Flight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Christine

    1975-01-01

    Focuses on the issue of whether the implementation of school desegregation significantly increases the decline in percentage of resident white. Presents data from a study conducted in 86 Northern school districts from a 91-city study. Data were obtained from statistics published by the Department of Health, Education and Welfare beginning in 1967.…

  18. Barkhausen Noise Analysis and Ferromagnetic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    MTL TR 89-108 AD BARKHAUSEN NOISE ANALYSIS ANDV SFERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS DOUGLAS J. STRAND MATERIEL DURABILIW BRANCH DTIC ELECTE December 1989 FEB...PERIOD COVERED Final Report BARKHAUSEN NOISE ANALYSIS AND FERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS . PERFORMING OR. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) 6. CONTRACT OR GRANT...K Y WORDS (Conmw on Mm, jA& fneceiar and id&nfy bl Wock ;,,mb) Barkhausen Noise Analysis Residual stress TOW missile Ferromagnetic Hysteresis

  19. Implementation of noise budgets for civil airports

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    An increasing number of airports are faced with the need for establishing a lid on the noise from aircraft operations and for developing programs for reducing airport noise on a year-to-year basis. As an example, the California Airport Noise Standard acts to impose such programs on a number of airports in California. Any airport faced with the need to establish a quantitative reduction of noise obviously wants to achieve this reduction with the least impact on numbers of operations and reduction in air transportation services to the community. A reduction in noise and an increase in operations usually can be achieved only by encouraging use of the quietest aircraft available and, further adding incentives for operating procedures that minimize noise. One approach in administering airport noise reduction is to adopt an airport noise budget. As used in this paper, the noise budget concept implies that quantitative limits on the noise environment and on the noise contributions by major airport users will be established. Having methods for enforcing compliance with the airport budget for those airport users that exceed their budget will be established. Thus, the noise budget provides airport management, and major airport users, with quantitative measures for defining noise goals, and actual progress in achieving such goals.

  20. AdS duals of matrix strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Jose F.; Samtleben, Henning

    2003-06-01

    We review recent work on the holographic duals of type II and heterotic matrix string theories described by warped AdS3 supergravities. In particular, we compute the spectra of Kaluza-Klein primaries for type I, II supergravities on warped AdS3 × S7 and match them with the primary operators in the dual two-dimensional gauge theories. The presence of non-trivial warp factors and dilaton profiles requires a modification of the familiar dictionary between masses and 'scaling' dimensions of fields and operators. We present these modifications for the general case of domain wall/QFT correspondences between supergravities on warped AdSd+1 × Sq geometries and super Yang-Mills theories with 16 supercharges.

  1. Influence of embedding parameters and noise in center of pressure recurrence quantification analysis.

    PubMed

    Hasson, Christopher J; Van Emmerik, Richard E A; Caldwell, Graham E; Haddad, Jeffrey M; Gagnon, Jeff L; Hamill, Joseph

    2008-04-01

    Recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) can extract the dynamics of postural control from center of pressure (CoP) data by quantifying the system's repeatability, complexity, and local dynamic stability through several variables. Computation of these variables requires the selection of suitable embedding parameters for state space reconstruction (i.e. time delay and embedding dimension); however, it is unclear how the parameters influence RQA variables when examining noisy CoP data. This study evaluated the sensitivity of RQA variables to embedding parameter values and noise level, and assessed methods of selecting embedding parameters for CoP data. Five healthy male subjects maintained quiet stance for 30s while the anterior-posterior CoP was measured. The effect of noise was evaluated by adding uniform white noise of increasing amplitude to the raw CoP signal. The magnitude of all RQA variables decreased with increasing noise amplitude for all subjects. A sensitivity analysis was performed by systematically altering the embedding parameters for the raw data with and without a selected level of added noise. The key result was that, for all subjects, the RQA variables were sensitive to the embedding parameter values and the level of noise in the CoP data. Finally, the performance of false nearest neighbors and average displacement algorithms for choosing embedding parameters was evaluated. Both methods gave clear and consistent results for all subjects with either raw or noisy data. The results suggest that careful selection of embedding parameters is essential when using RQA to examine postural control based on noisy CoP data.

  2. Human hearing enhanced by noise.

    PubMed

    Zeng, F G; Fu, Q J; Morse, R

    2000-06-30

    Noise was traditionally regarded as a nuisance, which should be minimized if possible. However, recent research has shown that addition of an appropriate amount of noise can actually improve signal detection in a nonlinear system, an effect called stochastic resonance. While stochastic resonance has been described in a variety of physical and biological systems, its functional significance in human sensory systems remains mostly unexplored. Here we report psychophysical data showing that signal detection and discrimination can be enhanced by noise in human subjects whose hearing is evoked by either normal acoustic stimulation or electric stimulation of the auditory nerve or the brainstem. Our results suggest that noise is an integral part of the normal sensory process and should be added to auditory prostheses.

  3. White-light optical information processing and holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Francis T.

    1987-01-01

    A report on white-light optical information processing and holography contains the following: Smeared Image Deblurring; Image Subtraction; Visualization of Phase Object; Coherence Requirement; Apparent Transfer Function; Source Encoding and Signal Sampling; Broadband Image Deblurring; Color Image Subtraction; Rainbow Holographic Aberration; Pseudocolor Encoding with Three Primary Colors; Partial Coherent Measurement; Restoration of Out of Focused Color Image; Solar Light Optical Signal Processing; White light Processing with Magnetooptic Device; Measurement of Noise Performance; White Light Fourier Holography; Optical Generation of Speech Spectrogram with White-Light Source; Progress on Archival Color Film Storage; Generating False Color Composites for LANDSAT data; Developed a Low Cost White-Light Processor; White Light Talbot Interferometer; Analysis of Cross Spectral Density Function for White Light Processing; Computer Generated Filters in White Light Processor; Holographic Tomography for 3 D Object Field; Medical Imaging with White Light; Dual Aperture Sampling with Partially Coherent Light; Application of LCTV; and Computer Generated Tricolor Sampling and Application.

  4. Improving Gabor noise.

    PubMed

    Lagae, Ares; Lefebvre, Sylvain; Dutré, Philip

    2011-08-01

    We have recently proposed a new procedural noise function, Gabor noise, which offers a combination of properties not found in the existing noise functions. In this paper, we present three significant improvements to Gabor noise: 1) an isotropic kernel for Gabor noise, which speeds up isotropic Gabor noise with a factor of roughly two, 2) an error analysis of Gabor noise, which relates the kernel truncation radius to the relative error of the noise, and 3) spatially varying Gabor noise, which enables spatial variation of all noise parameters. These improvements make Gabor noise an even more attractive alternative for the existing noise functions.

  5. Numerical treatment of stochastic river quality models driven by colored noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stijnen, J. W.; Heemink, A. W.; Ponnambalam, K.

    2003-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is a popular method of risk and uncertainty analysis in oceanographic, atmospheric, and environmental applications. It is common practice to introduce a stochastic part to an already existing deterministic model and, after many simulations, to provide the user with statistics of the model outcome. The underlying deterministic model is often a discretization of a set of partial differential equations describing physical processes such as transport, turbulence, buoyancy effects, and continuity. Much effort is also put into deriving numerically efficient schemes for the time integration. The resulting model is often quite large and complex. In sharp contrast the stochastic extension used for Monte Carlo experiments is usually achieved by adding white noise. Unfortunately, the order of time integration in the stochastic model is reduced compared to the deterministic model because white noise is not a smooth process. Instead of completely replacing the old numerical scheme and implementing a higher-order scheme for stochastic differential equations, we suggest a different approach that is able to use existing numerical schemes. The method uses a smooth colored noise process as the driving force, resulting in a higher order of convergence. We show promising results from numerical experiments, including parametric uncertainty.

  6. Community noise sources and noise control issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nihart, Gene L.

    1992-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: community noise sources and noise control issues; noise components for turbine bypass turbojet engine (TBE) turbojet; engine cycle selection and noise; nozzle development schedule; NACA nozzle design; NACA nozzle test results; nearly fully mixed (NFM) nozzle design; noise versus aspiration rate; peak noise test results; nozzle test in the Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF); and Schlieren pictures of NACA nozzle.

  7. Information Accumulation over Time in Monkey Inferior Temporal Cortex Neurons Explains Pattern Recognition Reaction Time under Visual Noise

    PubMed Central

    Kuboki, Ryosuke; Sugase-Miyamoto, Yasuko; Matsumoto, Narihisa; Richmond, Barry J.; Shidara, Munetaka

    2017-01-01

    We recognize objects even when they are partially degraded by visual noise. We studied the relation between the amount of visual noise (5, 10, 15, 20, or 25%) degrading 8 black-and-white stimuli and stimulus identification in 2 monkeys performing a sequential delayed match-to-sample task. We measured the accuracy and speed with which matching stimuli were identified. The performance decreased slightly (errors increased) as the amount of visual noise increased for both monkeys. The performance remained above 80% correct, even with 25% noise. However, the reaction times markedly increased as the noise increased, indicating that the monkeys took progressively longer to decide what the correct response would be as the amount of visual noise increased, showing that the monkeys trade time to maintain accuracy. Thus, as time unfolds the monkeys act as if they are accumulating the information and/or testing hypotheses about whether the test stimulus is likely to be a match for the sample being held in short-term memory. We recorded responses from 13 single neurons in area TE of the 2 monkeys. We found that stimulus-selective information in the neuronal responses began accumulating when the match stimulus appeared. We found that the greater the amount of noise obscuring the test stimulus, the more slowly stimulus-related information by the 13 neurons accumulated. The noise induced slowing was about the same for both behavior and information. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that area TE neuron population carries information about stimulus identity that accumulates over time in such a manner that it progressively overcomes the signal degradation imposed by adding visual noise. PMID:28127279

  8. Information Accumulation over Time in Monkey Inferior Temporal Cortex Neurons Explains Pattern Recognition Reaction Time under Visual Noise.

    PubMed

    Kuboki, Ryosuke; Sugase-Miyamoto, Yasuko; Matsumoto, Narihisa; Richmond, Barry J; Shidara, Munetaka

    2016-01-01

    We recognize objects even when they are partially degraded by visual noise. We studied the relation between the amount of visual noise (5, 10, 15, 20, or 25%) degrading 8 black-and-white stimuli and stimulus identification in 2 monkeys performing a sequential delayed match-to-sample task. We measured the accuracy and speed with which matching stimuli were identified. The performance decreased slightly (errors increased) as the amount of visual noise increased for both monkeys. The performance remained above 80% correct, even with 25% noise. However, the reaction times markedly increased as the noise increased, indicating that the monkeys took progressively longer to decide what the correct response would be as the amount of visual noise increased, showing that the monkeys trade time to maintain accuracy. Thus, as time unfolds the monkeys act as if they are accumulating the information and/or testing hypotheses about whether the test stimulus is likely to be a match for the sample being held in short-term memory. We recorded responses from 13 single neurons in area TE of the 2 monkeys. We found that stimulus-selective information in the neuronal responses began accumulating when the match stimulus appeared. We found that the greater the amount of noise obscuring the test stimulus, the more slowly stimulus-related information by the 13 neurons accumulated. The noise induced slowing was about the same for both behavior and information. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that area TE neuron population carries information about stimulus identity that accumulates over time in such a manner that it progressively overcomes the signal degradation imposed by adding visual noise.

  9. Noise in CdZnTe detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, P. N.; Amman, M.; Lee J. S.; Manfredi, P. F.

    2000-10-10

    Noise in CdZnTe devices with different electrode configurations was investigated. Measurements on devices with guard-ring electrode structures showed that surface leakage current does not produce any significant noise. The parallel white noise component of the devices appeared to be generated by the bulk current alone, even though the surface current was substantially higher. This implies that reducing the surface leakage current of a CdZnTe detector may not necessarily result in a significant improvement in noise performance. The noise generated by the bulk current is also observed to be below full shot noise. This partial suppression of shot noise may be the result of Coulomb interaction between carriers or carrier trapping. Devices with coplanar strip electrodes were observed to produce a 1/f noise term at the preamplifier output. Higher levels of this 1/f noise were observed with decreasing gap widths between electrodes. The level of this 1/f noise appeared to be independent of bias voltage and leakage current but was substantially reduced after certain surface treatments.

  10. G-CSF attenuates noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ze-tao; Lin, Ying; Wang, Jie; Wu, Jin; Wang, Ren-feng; Chen, Fu-quan; Mi, Wen-juan; Qiu, Jian-hua

    2014-03-06

    In this study, we investigated the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) for the treatment of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) in a guinea pig model. Forty guinea pigs were randomly divided into four groups: control, noise (white noise, 3 h/d for 2 days at 115 dB), noise+G-CSF (350 μg/kg/d for 5 days), and noise+saline. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) were used to determine the hearing threshold and outer hair cell function, respectively, in each group. Cochlear morphology was examined to evaluate hair cell injury induced by intense noise exposure. Fourteen days after noise exposure, the noise+G-CSF group had a lower ABR value than the noise group (P<0.05) or the noise+saline group (P<0.01). At most frequencies, the DPOAE value of the noise+G-CSF group showed a significant rise (P<0.05) compared to the noise group or the noise+saline group. Neither the ABR value nor the DPOAE value differed between the noise group and the noise+saline group. The morphology of the phalloidin-stained organ of Corti was consistent with the functional measurements. In conclusion, G-CSF can preserve hearing in an experimental model of NIHL in guinea pigs, by preserving hair cells after intense noise exposure.

  11. Control of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Paul

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the physical properties, sources, physiological effects, and legislation pertaining to noise, especially noise characteristics in the community. Indicates that noise reduction steps can be taken more intelligently after determination of the true noise sources and paths. (CC)

  12. Bootstrapping white matter segmentation, Eve++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plassard, Andrew; Hinton, Kendra E.; Venkatraman, Vijay; Gonzalez, Christopher; Resnick, Susan M.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2015-03-01

    Multi-atlas labeling has come in wide spread use for whole brain labeling on magnetic resonance imaging. Recent challenges have shown that leading techniques are near (or at) human expert reproducibility for cortical gray matter labels. However, these approaches tend to treat white matter as essentially homogeneous (as white matter exhibits isointense signal on structural MRI). The state-of-the-art for white matter atlas is the single-subject Johns Hopkins Eve atlas. Numerous approaches have attempted to use tractography and/or orientation information to identify homologous white matter structures across subjects. Despite success with large tracts, these approaches have been plagued by difficulties in with subtle differences in course, low signal to noise, and complex structural relationships for smaller tracts. Here, we investigate use of atlas-based labeling to propagate the Eve atlas to unlabeled datasets. We evaluate single atlas labeling and multi-atlas labeling using synthetic atlases derived from the single manually labeled atlas. On 5 representative tracts for 10 subjects, we demonstrate that (1) single atlas labeling generally provides segmentations within 2mm mean surface distance, (2) morphologically constraining DTI labels within structural MRI white matter reduces variability, and (3) multi-atlas labeling did not improve accuracy. These efforts present a preliminary indication that single atlas labels with correction is reasonable, but caution should be applied. To purse multi-atlas labeling and more fully characterize overall performance, more labeled datasets would be necessary.

  13. An AdS Crunch in Supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertog, Thomas

    2004-12-01

    We review some properties of N=8 gauged supergravity in four dimensions with modified, but AdS invariant boundary conditions on the m2 = -2 scalars. There is a one-parameter class of asymptotic conditions on these fields and the metric components, for which the full AdS symmetry group is preserved. The generators of the asymptotic symmetries are finite, but acquire a contribution from the scalar fields. For a large class of such boundary conditions, we find there exist black holes with scalar hair that are specified by a single conserved charge. Since Schwarschild-AdS is a solution too for all boundary conditions, this provides an example of black hole non-uniqueness. We also show there exist solutions where smooth initial data evolve to a big crunch singularity. This opens up the possibility of using the dual conformal field theory to obtain a fully quantum description of the cosmological singularity, and we report on a preliminary study of this.

  14. Noise pollution resources compendium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Abstracts of reports concerning noise pollution are presented. The abstracts are grouped in the following areas of activity: (1) sources of noise, (2) noise detection and measurement, (3) noise abatement and control, (4) physical effects of noise and (5) social effects of noise.

  15. Noise Abatement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    SMART, Sound Modification and Regulated Temperature compound, is a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy and sound absorbing qualities. It is derived from a very elastic plastic which was an effective noise abatement material in the Apollo Guidance System. Discovered by a NASA employee, it is marketed by Environmental Health Systems, Inc. (EHS). The product has been successfully employed by a diaper company with noisy dryers and a sugar company with noisy blowers. The company also manufactures an audiometric test booth and acoustical office partitions.

  16. Towards thermal noise free optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Michael A.; Zhao, Chunnong; Blair, David G.; Ju, Li; Ma, Yiqiu; Pan, Huang-Wei; Chao, Shiuh; Mitrofanov, Valery P.; Sadeghian, Hamed

    2016-11-01

    Thermal noise generally greatly exceeds quantum noise in optomechanical devices unless the mechanical frequency is very high or the thermodynamic temperature is very low. This paper addresses the design concept for a novel optomechanical device capable of ultrahigh quality factors in the audio frequency band with negligible thermal noise. The proposed system consists of a minimally supported millimeter scale pendulum mounted in a double end-mirror sloshing cavity that is topologically equivalent to a membrane-in-the-middle cavity. The radiation pressure inside the high-finesse cavity allows for high optical stiffness, cancellation of terms which lead to unwanted negative damping and suppression of quantum radiation pressure noise. We solve the optical spring dynamics of the system using the Hamiltonian, find the noise spectral density and show that stable optical trapping is possible. We also assess various loss mechanisms, one of the most important being the acceleration loss due to the optical spring. We show that practical devices, starting from a centre-of-mass pendulum frequency of 0.1 Hz, could achieve a maximum quality factor of (1014) with optical spring stiffened frequency 1-10 kHz. Small resonators of mass 1 ≤ft(μ \\right) g or less could achieve a Q-factor of (1011) at a frequency of 100 kHz. Applications for such devices include white light cavities for improvement of gravitational wave detectors, or sensors able to operate near the quantum limit.

  17. Matched filtering incorporating colored-noise compensation for joint transform correlators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inbar, Hanni; Marom, Emanuel

    1995-10-01

    Optimal recognition of patterns with respect to noise tolerance is obtained when matched filtering is applied with colored-noise compensation, for which input-noise spectral characteristics have to be known in advance. Conventional joint transform correlator systems provide such optimality only when the input noise is white. We propose general means to facilitate colored-noise tolerance by incorporating either a priori or adaptive noise compensation in joint transform correlator-based matched filtering schemes. Adaptive compensation for colored noise may be achieved in real-time operation by estimation of the noise power spectral density distribution from input power spectra information.

  18. Logic signals driven stochastic resonance in bistable dynamics subjected to 1/f noise floor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Song, A. G.; He, J.

    2011-03-01

    In the presence of 1/ f β noise, we investigate the logical stochastic resonance (LSR) in an asymmetric bistable model driven by various cycling combinations of two logic inputs. The probability of correct logic outputs is calculated according to true table of logic relationships. Two major results are presented. Firstly, it is shown that the LSR effect can be obtained by changing noise strength. Over entire range of noise variance, white noise can be considered to be better than 1/ f noise or 1/ f 2 noise to obtain clean logic operation. At a smaller noise level, 1/ f noise can realize higher output probability than white noise or 1/ f 2 noise. In the sense, 1/ f noise can be considered to be better than white noise or 1/ f 2. On the other hand, the correct probability can evolves nonmonotonically as noise exponent β increases, and a kind of SR-like effect can be obtained as a result of β. At certain intermediate noise variance, the output probability is able to attain its minimum at β = 1. It is also shown that actually some finite β sometime can be better than β = 0 at small range of noise variance. The study might provide some potential complement to LSR effect in the presence of 1/ f β noise.

  19. KEPLER MISSION STELLAR AND INSTRUMENT NOISE PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliland, Ronald L.; Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Miglio, Andrea; Dunham, Edward W.; Argabright, Vic S.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Koch, David G.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Basri, Gibor; Buzasi, Derek L.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Welsh, William F.

    2011-11-01

    Kepler mission results are rapidly contributing to fundamentally new discoveries in both the exoplanet and asteroseismology fields. The data returned from Kepler are unique in terms of the number of stars observed, precision of photometry for time series observations, and the temporal extent of high duty cycle observations. As the first mission to provide extensive time series measurements on thousands of stars over months to years at a level hitherto possible only for the Sun, the results from Kepler will vastly increase our knowledge of stellar variability for quiet solar-type stars. Here, we report on the stellar noise inferred on the timescale of a few hours of most interest for detection of exoplanets via transits. By design the data from moderately bright Kepler stars are expected to have roughly comparable levels of noise intrinsic to the stars and arising from a combination of fundamental limitations such as Poisson statistics and any instrument noise. The noise levels attained by Kepler on-orbit exceed by some 50% the target levels for solar-type, quiet stars. We provide a decomposition of observed noise for an ensemble of 12th magnitude stars arising from fundamental terms (Poisson and readout noise), added noise due to the instrument and that intrinsic to the stars. The largest factor in the modestly higher than anticipated noise follows from intrinsic stellar noise. We show that using stellar parameters from galactic stellar synthesis models, and projections to stellar rotation, activity, and hence noise levels reproduce the primary intrinsic stellar noise features.

  20. Pitch Estimation, Voicing Decision, and Noise Spectrum Estimation for Speech Corrupted by High Levels of Additive Noise.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krubsack, David Allan

    1990-01-01

    This dissertation presents two algorithms that extract parameters which are important to speech processing in high levels of noise. The first algorithm determines whether a signal containing noise corrupted human speech is voiced or not and estimates the fundamental frequency (pitch) of voiced speech. The second algorithm produces an estimate of the additive noise which is corrupting the speech. Previous research related to the voicing decision and pitch estimation has been concentrated at signal-to -noise ratios (SNRs) above 0 dB. Consequently, speech processing requiring the extraction of these parameters in higher levels of noise could not be performed with much success. The research presented in this dissertation concentrates on SNRs around and below 0 dB. Although the algorithm, based on the autocorrelation function, is designed to work well for high levels of noise, good results for the no noise case have been maintained. The idea of a confidence measure for parameter estimation is introduced. Confidence measures are defined and developed for both the voicing decision and the pitch estimation algorithms. Estimation of noise that is corrupting a speech signal has been motivated by the need to enhance the corrupted speech. Previous research has concentrated on speech which is band limited to about 3500 Hz. Therefore, the estimation of the noise corrupting high frequency speech had not been considered. The noise estimation algorithm presented in this dissertation considers the effects of high frequency speech on the noise estimate in addition to the effects of low frequency speech. A new spectral averaging method is introduced which significantly reduces the corrupting effect of the speech components on the noise estimate for SNRs above 0 dB. The algorithm is tested for stationary white noise, stationary non-white noise, and non-stationary white noise.

  1. Classification image weights and internal noise level estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J Jr

    2002-01-01

    For the linear discrimination of two stimuli in white Gaussian noise in the presence of internal noise, a method is described for estimating linear classification weights from the sum of noise images segregated by stimulus and response. The recommended method for combining the two response images for the same stimulus is to difference the average images. Weights are derived for combining images over stimuli and observers. Methods for estimating the level of internal noise are described with emphasis on the case of repeated presentations of the same noise sample. Simple tests for particular hypotheses about the weights are shown based on observer agreement with a noiseless version of the hypothesis.

  2. White Vegetables: Glycemia and Satiety12

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, G. Harvey; Soeandy, Chesarahmia Dojo; Smith, Christopher E.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this review is to discuss the effect of white vegetable consumption on glycemia, satiety, and food intake. White vegetables is a term used to refer to vegetables that are white or near white in color and include potatoes, cauliflowers, turnips, onions, parsnips, white corn, kohlrabi, and mushrooms (technically fungi but generally considered a vegetable). They vary greatly in their contribution to the energy and nutrient content of the diet and glycemia and satiety. As with other foods, the glycemic effect of many white vegetables has been measured. The results illustrate that interpretation of the semiquantitative comparative ratings of white vegetables as derived by the glycemic index must be context dependent. As illustrated by using the potato as an example, the glycemic index of white vegetables can be misleading if not interpreted in the context of the overall contribution that the white vegetable makes to the carbohydrate and nutrient composition of the diet and their functionality in satiety and metabolic control within usual meals. It is concluded that application of the glycemic index in isolation to judge the role of white vegetables in the diet and, specifically in the case of potato as consumed in ad libitum meals, has led to premature and possibly counterproductive dietary guidance. PMID:23674805

  3. Design of phase-only, binary phase-only, and complex ternary matched filters with increased signal-to-noise ratios for colored noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, B. V. K. V.; Juday, Richard D.

    1991-01-01

    An algorithm is provided for treating nonwhite additive noise in determining regions of support for phase-only filters, binary phase-only filters, and complex ternary matched filters. It is analytically shown to be optimal in the signal-to-noise ratio sense. It extends earlier research that assumed white noise.

  4. AdS and Lifshitz scalar hairy black holes in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Fan, Zhong-Ying; Zhu, Lu-Yao

    2016-09-01

    We consider Gauss-Bonnet (GB) gravity in general dimensions, which is nonminimally coupled to a scalar field. By choosing a scalar potential of the type V (ϕ )=2 Λ0+1/2 m2ϕ2+γ4ϕ4 , we first obtain large classes of scalar hairy black holes with spherical/hyperbolic/planar topologies that are asymptotic to locally anti- de Sitter (AdS) space-times. We derive the first law of black hole thermodynamics using Wald formalism. In particular, for one class of the solutions, the scalar hair forms a thermodynamic conjugate with the graviton and nontrivially contributes to the thermodynamical first law. We observe that except for one class of the planar black holes, all these solutions are constructed at the critical point of GB gravity where there exist unique AdS vacua. In fact, a Lifshitz vacuum is also allowed at the critical point. We then construct many new classes of neutral and charged Lifshitz black hole solutions for an either minimally or nonminimally coupled scalar and derive the thermodynamical first laws. We also obtain new classes of exact dynamical AdS and Lifshitz solutions which describe radiating white holes. The solutions eventually become AdS or Lifshitz vacua at late retarded times. However, for one class of the solutions, the final state is an AdS space-time with a globally naked singularity.

  5. A theory of 1/f noise in human cognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigolini, Paolo; Aquino, Gerardo; Bologna, Mauro; Luković, Mirko; West, Bruce J.

    2009-10-01

    The brain is probably the most interesting example of a complex network having 1/f variability as determined through the analysis of EEG time series and magnetoencephalogram recordings. Herein we develop a theory of 1/f noise of human cognition to explain the recent experimental observations that increasing the difficultly of cognitive tasks accelerates the transition from observed 1/f noise to white noise in decision-making time series.

  6. AdS3: the NHEK generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Heurtier, Lucien; Puhm, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    It was argued in [1] that the five-dimensional near-horizon extremal Kerr (NHEK) geometry can be embedded in String Theory as the infrared region of an infinite family of non-supersymmetric geometries that have D1, D5, momentum and KK monopole charges. We show that there exists a method to embed these geometries into asymptotically- {AdS}_3× {S}^3/{{Z}}_N solutions, and hence to obtain infinite families of flows whose infrared is NHEK. This indicates that the CFT dual to the NHEK geometry is the IR fixed point of a Renormalization Group flow from a known local UV CFT and opens the door to its explicit construction.

  7. AdS2 holographic dictionary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetič, Mirjam; Papadimitriou, Ioannis

    2016-12-01

    We construct the holographic dictionary for both running and constant dilaton solutions of the two dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theory that is obtained by a circle reduction from Einstein-Hilbert gravity with negative cosmological constant in three dimensions. This specific model ensures that the dual theory has a well defined ultraviolet completion in terms of a two dimensional conformal field theory, but our results apply qualitatively to a wider class of two dimensional dilaton gravity theories. For each type of solutions we perform holographic renormalization, compute the exact renormalized one-point functions in the presence of arbitrary sources, and derive the asymptotic symmetries and the corresponding conserved charges. In both cases we find that the scalar operator dual to the dilaton plays a crucial role in the description of the dynamics. Its source gives rise to a matter conformal anomaly for the running dilaton solutions, while its expectation value is the only non trivial observable for constant dilaton solutions. The role of this operator has been largely overlooked in the literature. We further show that the only non trivial conserved charges for running dilaton solutions are the mass and the electric charge, while for constant dilaton solutions only the electric charge is non zero. However, by uplifting the solutions to three dimensions we show that constant dilaton solutions can support non trivial extended symmetry algebras, including the one found by Compère, Song and Strominger [1], in agreement with the results of Castro and Song [2]. Finally, we demonstrate that any solution of this specific dilaton gravity model can be uplifted to a family of asymptotically AdS2 × S 2 or conformally AdS2 × S 2 solutions of the STU model in four dimensions, including non extremal black holes. The four dimensional solutions obtained by uplifting the running dilaton solutions coincide with the so called `subtracted geometries', while those obtained

  8. Indirect combustion noise of auxiliary power units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Parrish, Sarah A.; Xu, Jun; Schuster, Bill

    2013-08-01

    Recent advances in noise suppression technology have significantly reduced jet and fan noise from commercial jet engines. This leads many investigators in the aeroacoustics community to suggest that core noise could well be the next aircraft noise barrier. Core noise consists of turbine noise and combustion noise. There is direct combustion noise generated by the combustion processes, and there is indirect combustion noise generated by the passage of combustion hot spots, or entropy waves, through constrictions in an engine. The present work focuses on indirect combustion noise. Indirect combustion noise has now been found in laboratory experiments. The primary objective of this work is to investigate whether indirect combustion noise is also generated in jet and other engines. In a jet engine, there are numerous noise sources. This makes the identification of indirect combustion noise a formidable task. Here, our effort concentrates exclusively on auxiliary power units (APUs). This choice is motivated by the fact that APUs are relatively simple engines with only a few noise sources. It is, therefore, expected that the chance of success is higher. Accordingly, a theoretical model study of the generation of indirect combustion noise in an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) is carried out. The cross-sectional areas of an APU from the combustor to the turbine exit are scaled off to form an equivalent nozzle. A principal function of a turbine in an APU is to extract mechanical energy from the flow stream through the exertion of a resistive force. Therefore, the turbine is modeled by adding a negative body force to the momentum equation. This model is used to predict the ranges of frequencies over which there is a high probability for indirect combustion noise generation. Experimental spectra of internal pressure fluctuations and far-field noise of an RE220 APU are examined to identify anomalous peaks. These peaks are possible indirection combustion noise. In the case of the

  9. Compression station upgrades include advanced noise reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, V.R.; Sherikar, S.

    1998-10-01

    Since its inception in the mid-`80s, AlintaGas` Dampier to Bunbury natural gas pipeline has been constantly undergoing a series of upgrades to boost capacity and meet other needs. Extending northward about 850 miles from near Perth to the northwest shelf, the 26-inch line was originally served by five compressor stations. In the 1989-91 period, three new compressor stations were added to increase capacity and a ninth station was added in 1997. Instead of using noise-path-treatment mufflers to reduce existing noise, it was decided to use noise-source-treatment technology to prevent noise creation in the first place. In the field, operation of these new noise-source treatment attenuators has been very quiet. If there was any thought earlier of guaranteed noise-level verification, it is not considered a priority now. It`s also anticipated that as AlintaGas proceeds with its pipeline and compressor station upgrade program, similar noise-source treatment equipment will be employed and retrofitted into older stations where the need to reduce noise and potential radiant-heat exposure is indicated.

  10. White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? White Blood Cell Count Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Count; Leukocyte Count; White Count Formal name: White Blood Cell Count Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Blood Smear , ...

  11. Community Response to Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidell, Sandy

    The primary effects of community noise on residential populations are speech interference, sleep disturbance, and annoyance. This chapter focuses on transportation noise in general and on aircraft noise in particular because aircraft noise is one of the most prominent community noise sources, because airport/community controversies are often the most contentious and widespread, and because industrial and other specialized formsofcommunitynoise generally posemorelocalized problems.

  12. Local-geometric-projection method for noise reduction in chaotic maps and flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawley, Robert; Hsu, Guan-Hsong

    1992-09-01

    We describe a method for noise reduction in chaotic systems that is based on projection of the set of points comprising an embedded noisy orbit in openRd toward a finite patchwork of best-fit local approximations to an m-dimensional surface M'⊂openRd, m<=d. We generate the orbits by the delay coordinate construction of Ruelle and Takens [N. H. Packard et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 712 (1980); F. Takens, in Dynamical Systems and Turbulence, Warwick, 1980, edited by D. A. Rand and L.-S. Young (Springer, Berlin, 1981)] from time series v(t), which in an experimental situation we would assume to have come, together with additional high-dimensional background noise, from an underlying dynamical system ft: M-->M existing on some low m-dimensional manifold M. The surface M' in openRd is the assumed embedded image of M. We give results of systematic studies of linear (tangent plane) projection schemes. We describe in detail the basic algorithm for implementing these schemes. We apply the algorithm iteratively to known map and flow time series to which white noise has been added. In controlled studies, we measure the signal-to-noise ratio improvements, iterating nM times until a stable maximum δM is achieved. We present extensive results for δM and nM for a wide range of values of embedding trial dimension d, projection dimension k, number of nearest-neighbor points for local approximation ν, embedding delay Δ, sampling interval ΔT, initial noise amplitude scrN, and trajectory length N. We give results for very low and very high noise amplitudes 0%<=scrN<=100%. We develop an empirical method for estimating the initial noise level for a given experimental time series, and for the optimal choice of algorithm parameters to achieve peak reduction. We present interesting results of application of the noise-reduction algorithm to a chaotic time series produced from a periodically driven magnetoelastic ribbon experiment on the control of chaos. Two noteworthy elements of the

  13. Evaluation of the risk of noise-induced hearing loss among unscreened male industrial workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, Mary M.; Gilbert, Stephen J.; Smith, Randall J.; Stayner, Leslie T.

    2003-02-01

    Variability in background risk and distribution of various risk factors for hearing loss may explain some of the diversity in excess risk of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). This paper examines the impact of various risk factors on excess risk estimates of NIHL using data from the 1968-1972 NIOSH Occupational Noise and Hearing Survey (ONHS). Previous analyses of a subset of these data focused on 1172 highly ``screened'' workers. In the current analysis, an additional 894 white males (609 noise-exposed and 285 controls), who were excluded for various reasons (i.e., nonoccupational noise exposure, otologic or medical conditions affecting hearing, prior occupational noise exposure) have been added (n=2066) to assess excess risk of noise-induced material impairment in an unscreened population. Data are analyzed by age, duration of exposure, and sound level (8-h TWA) for four different definitions of noise-induced hearing impairment, defined as the binaural pure-tone average (PTA) hearing threshold level greater than 25 dB for the following frequencies: (a) 1-4 kHz (PTA1234), (b) 1-3 kHz (PTA123), (c) 0.5, 1, and 2 kHz (PTA512), and (d) 3, 4, and 6 kHz (PTA346). Results indicate that populations with higher background risks of hearing loss may show lower excess risks attributable to noise relative to highly screened populations. Estimates of lifetime excess risk of hearing impairment were found to be significantly different between screened and unscreened population for noise levels greater than 90 dBA. Predicted age-related risk of material hearing impairment in the ONHS unscreened population was similar to that predicted from Annex B and C of ANSI S3.44 for ages less than 60 years. Results underscore the importance of understanding differential risk patterns for hearing loss and the use of appropriate reference (control) populations when evaluating risk of noise-induced hearing impairment among contemporary industrial populations.

  14. Noise and Dynamical Pattern Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtze, Douglas A.

    1996-01-01

    In pattern-forming systems, such as Rayleigh-Benard convection or directional solidification, a large number of linearly stable, patterned steady states exist when the basic, simple steady state is unstable. Which of these steady states will be realized in a given experiment appears to depend on unobservable details of the system's initial conditions. We show, however, that weak, Gaussian white noise drives such a system toward a preferred wave number which depends only on the system parameters and is independent of initial conditions. We give a prescription for calculating this wave number, analytically near the onset of instability and numerically otherwise.

  15. Noise optimization of the source follower of a CMOS pixel using BSIM3 noise model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahato, Swaraj; Meynants, Guy; Raskin, Gert; De Ridder, J.; Van Winckel, H.

    2016-07-01

    CMOS imagers are becoming increasingly popular in astronomy. A very low noise level is required to observe extremely faint targets and to get high-precision flux measurements. Although CMOS technology offers many advantages over CCDs, a major bottleneck is still the read noise. To move from an industrial CMOS sensor to one suitable for scientific applications, an improved design that optimizes the noise level is essential. Here, we study the 1/f and thermal noise performance of the source follower (SF) of a CMOS pixel in detail. We identify the relevant design parameters, and analytically study their impact on the noise level using the BSIM3v3 noise model with an enhanced model of gate capacitance. Our detailed analysis shows that the dependence of the 1/f noise on the geometrical size of the source follower is not limited to minimum channel length, compared to the classical approach to achieve the minimum 1/f noise. We derive the optimal gate dimensions (the width and the length) of the source follower that minimize the 1/f noise, and validate our results using numerical simulations. By considering the thermal noise or white noise along with 1/f noise, the total input noise of the source follower depends on the capacitor ratio CG/CFD and the drain current (Id). Here, CG is the total gate capacitance of the source follower and CFD is the total floating diffusion capacitor at the input of the source follower. We demonstrate that the optimum gate capacitance (CG) depends on the chosen bias current but ranges from CFD/3 to CFD to achieve the minimum total noise of the source follower. Numerical calculation and circuit simulation with 180nm CMOS technology are performed to validate our results.

  16. Turbomachinery noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Sofrin, Thomas G.; Rice, Edward J.; Gliebe, Phillip R.

    1991-08-01

    Summarized here are key advances in experimental techniques and theoretical applications which point the way to a broad understanding and control of turbomachinery noise. On the experimental side, the development of effective inflow control techniques makes it possible to conduct, in ground based facilities, definitive experiments in internally controlled blade row interactions. Results can now be valid indicators of flight behavior and can provide a firm base for comparison with analytical results. Inflow control coupled with detailed diagnostic tools such as blade pressure measurements can be used to uncover the more subtle mechanisms such as rotor strut interaction, which can set tone levels for some engine configurations. Initial mappings of rotor wake-vortex flow fields have provided a data base for a first generation semiempirical flow disturbance model. Laser velocimetry offers a nonintrusive method for validating and improving the model. Digital data systems and signal processing algorithms are bringing mode measurement closer to a working tool that can be frequently applied to a real machine such as a turbofan engine. On the analytical side, models of most of the links in the chain from turbomachine blade source to far field observation point have been formulated. Three dimensional lifting surface theory for blade rows, including source noncompactness and cascade effects, blade row transmission models incorporating mode and frequency scattering, and modal radiation calculations, including hybrid numerical-analytical approaches, are tools which await further application.

  17. Turbomachinery noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groeneweg, John F.; Sofrin, Thomas G.; Rice, Edward J.; Gliebe, Phillip R.

    1991-01-01

    Summarized here are key advances in experimental techniques and theoretical applications which point the way to a broad understanding and control of turbomachinery noise. On the experimental side, the development of effective inflow control techniques makes it possible to conduct, in ground based facilities, definitive experiments in internally controlled blade row interactions. Results can now be valid indicators of flight behavior and can provide a firm base for comparison with analytical results. Inflow control coupled with detailed diagnostic tools such as blade pressure measurements can be used to uncover the more subtle mechanisms such as rotor strut interaction, which can set tone levels for some engine configurations. Initial mappings of rotor wake-vortex flow fields have provided a data base for a first generation semiempirical flow disturbance model. Laser velocimetry offers a nonintrusive method for validating and improving the model. Digital data systems and signal processing algorithms are bringing mode measurement closer to a working tool that can be frequently applied to a real machine such as a turbofan engine. On the analytical side, models of most of the links in the chain from turbomachine blade source to far field observation point have been formulated. Three dimensional lifting surface theory for blade rows, including source noncompactness and cascade effects, blade row transmission models incorporating mode and frequency scattering, and modal radiation calculations, including hybrid numerical-analytical approaches, are tools which await further application.

  18. The Availability of Logical Operation Induced by Dichotomous Noise for a Nonlinear Bistable System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong; Jin, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Huiqing; Yang, Tingting

    2013-08-01

    Instead of a continuous system driven by Gaussian white noise, logical stochastic resonance will be investigated in a nonlinear bistable system with two thresholds driven by dichotomous noise, which shows a phenomenon different from Gaussian white noise. We can realize two parallel logical operations by simply adjusting the values of these two thresholds. Besides, to quantify the reliability of obtaining the correct logic output, we numerically calculate the success probability, and effects of dichotomous noise on the success probability are observed, these observations show that the reliability of realizing logical operation in the bistable system can be improved through optimizing parameters of dichotomous noise.

  19. Noise characteristics research of Overhauser magnetometer sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tala; Gu, Lingjia; Zhang, Shuang; Fu, Haoyang

    2015-09-01

    Overhauser magnetometer, a kind of weak-magnetic measurement system based on the Overhauser effect, has been widely used in satellite magnetic survey, aeromagnetic survey and other engineering and environmental applications. Overhauser magnetometer plays an important role in the application of magnetic field measurement for its advantages of low power consumption and high accuracy. Weak field magnetic resonance is usually limited by the signal to noise ratio (SNR). In order to improve the SNR of Overhauser magnetometer, noise characteristics of Overhauser magnetometer sensor are investigated in this paper. A background noise model of Overhauser magnetometer sensor is presented. The calculated results indicate that the noise power spectral density shows a band-limited white noise characteristic. The maximum value of the noise power spectral density observed at the resonant frequency. The measured results coincide with the calculated results. The correlation between the SNR and the matched resistance is investigated by using the noise model. The calculated results demonstrate that large matched resistance is beneficial to improve the SNR of the sensor. When matched resistance is larger than 100kΩ, the SNR tends to be a constant. On the premise of stability, the sensor will achieve the optimal SNR when the matched resistance is around 100kΩ. This investigation is beneficial to improve noise performance of Overhauser magnetometer sensor.

  20. Duct Liner Optimization for Turbomachinery Noise Sources

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    AD-A279 441lIIIflhIh* NASA TECHNICAL NASA TMA X-72789 MEMORANDUM oo £ 00 r-:. DUCT LINER OPTIMIZATION FOR TURBOMACHINERY w NOISE SOURCES By Harold C...Recipient’s r.atalog No. NASA TM X-72789! 4 Title diid Subtitle 5. Rewrt Date Duct Liner Optimization for Turbomachinery Noise Sources November 1975...profiles is combined wit., a numerical minimization algorithm to predict optimal liner configurations having one, two, and three sections. Source models

  1. Noise Prediction for Hydrophone/Preamplifier Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-03

    NUWC-NPT Technical Report 10,369 AD-A265 915 ’---:3 June 1993 Noise Prediction for Hydrophone/Preamplifier Systems T. B. Straw Engineering and...COVERED 3 June 1993 Final 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Noise Prediction for Hydrophone Preamplifier Systems PR B65766 6. AUTHOR(S) T. B. Straw...FUNCTION ................. .B-1 DERIVATION APPENDIX C. MATLAB LISTINGS ................................................................. C-I i LIST OF

  2. Research on infrared-image denoising algorithm based on the noise analysis of the detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Songtao; Zhou, Xiaodong; Shen, Tongsheng; Han, Yanli

    2005-01-01

    Since the conventional denoising algorithms have not considered the influence of certain concrete detector, they are not very effective to remove various noises contained in the low signal-to-noise ration infrared image. In this paper, a new thinking for infrared image denoising is proposed, which is based on the noise analyses of detector with an example of L model infrared multi-element detector. According to the noise analyses of this detector, the emphasis is placed on how to filter white noise and fractal noise in the preprocessing phase. Wavelet analysis is a good tool for analyzing 1/f process. 1/f process can be viewed as white noise approximately since its wavelet coefficients are stationary and uncorrelated. So if wavelet transform is adopted, the problem of removing white noise and fraction noise is simplified as the only one problem, i.e., removing white noise. To address this problem, a new wavelet domain adaptive wiener filtering algorithm is presented. From the viewpoint of quantitative and qualitative analyses, the filtering effect of our method is compared with those of traditional median filter, mean filter and wavelet thresholding algorithm in detail. The results show that our method can reduce various noises effectively and raise the ratio of signal-to-noise evidently.

  3. Low-Resistant Band-Passing Noise and Its Dynamical Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhan-Wu

    2007-07-01

    We propose an n-order noise, which is realized by driving an n-order linear differential equation with a Gaussian white noise. The time-derivative noise is a low-resistant band-passing noise. If the derivative noise is regarded as a thermal one, the system has a vanishing effective friction and it should induce ballistic diffusion of a free particle at long times. The simulation method for the generalized Langevin equation driven by the n-order noise is discussed systematically. The features of three-order derivative noises are presented when they are applied to a ratchet system.

  4. Cabin Noise Control for Twin Engine General Aviation Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, R.; Slazak, M.

    1982-01-01

    An analytical model based on modal analysis was developed to predict the noise transmission into a twin-engine light aircraft. The model was applied to optimize the interior noise to an A-weighted level of 85 dBA. To achieve the required noise attenuation, add-on treatments in the form of honeycomb panels, damping tapes, acoustic blankets, septum barriers and limp trim panels were added to the existing structure. The added weight of the noise control treatment is about 1.1 percent of the total gross take-off weight of the aircraft.

  5. Noise effects in two different biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolo, B.; Spezia, S.; Curcio, L.; Pizzolato, N.; Fiasconaro, A.; Valenti, D.; Lo Bue, P.; Peri, E.; Colazza, S.

    2009-05-01

    We investigate the role of the colored noise in two biological systems: (i) adults of Nezara viridula (L.) (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), and (ii) polymer translocation. In the first system we analyze, by directionality tests, the response of N. viridula individuals to subthreshold signals plus noise in their mating behaviour. The percentage of insects that react to the subthreshold signal shows a nonmonotonic behaviour, characterized by the presence of a maximum, as a function of the noise intensity. This is the signature of the non-dynamical stochastic resonance phenomenon. By using a “soft” threshold model we find that the maximum of the input-output cross correlation occurs in the same range of noise intensity values for which the behavioural activation of the insects has a maximum. Moreover this maximum value is lowered and shifted towards higher noise intensities, compared to the case of white noise. In the second biological system the noise driven translocation of short polymers in crowded solutions is analyzed. An improved version of the Rouse model for a flexible polymer is adopted to mimic the molecular dynamics by taking into account both the interactions between adjacent monomers and the effects of a Lennard-Jones potential between all beads. The polymer dynamics is simulated in a two-dimensional domain by numerically solving the Langevin equations of motion in the presence of thermal fluctuations and a colored noise source. At low temperatures or for strong colored noise intensities the translocation process of the polymer chain is delayed. At low noise intensity, as the polymer length increases, we find a nonmonotonic behaviour for the mean first translocation time of the polymer centre of inertia. We show how colored noise influences the motion of short polymers, by inducing two different regimes of translocation in the dynamics of molecule transport.

  6. Noise and blast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, D. C.; Garinther, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    Noise and blast environments are described, providing a definition of units and techniques of noise measurement and giving representative booster-launch and spacecraft noise data. The effects of noise on hearing sensitivity and performance are reviewed, and community response to noise exposure is discussed. Physiological, or nonauditory, effects of noise exposure are also treated, as are design criteria and methods for minimizing the noise effects of hearing sensitivity and communications. The low level sound detection and speech reception are included, along with subjective and behavioral responses to noise.

  7. Demonstration of Johnson noise thermometry with all-superconducting quantum voltage noise source

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Takahiro Urano, Chiharu; Maezawa, Masaaki

    2016-01-25

    We present a Johnson noise thermometry (JNT) system based on an integrated quantum voltage noise source (IQVNS) that has been fully implemented using superconducting circuit technology. To enable precise measurement of Boltzmann's constant, an IQVNS chip was designed to produce intrinsically calculable pseudo-white noise to calibrate the JNT system. On-chip real-time generation of pseudo-random codes via simple circuits produced pseudo-voltage noise with a harmonic tone interval of less than 1 Hz, which was one order of magnitude finer than the harmonic tone interval of conventional quantum voltage noise sources. We estimated a value for Boltzmann's constant experimentally by performing JNT measurements at the temperature of the triple point of water using the IQVNS chip.

  8. Colored noise effects on batch attitude accuracy estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanow, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    The effects of colored noise on the accuracy of batch least squares parameter estimates with applications to attitude determination cases are investigated. The standard approaches used for estimating the accuracy of a computed attitude commonly assume uncorrelated (white) measurement noise, while in actual flight experience measurement noise often contains significant time correlations and thus is colored. For example, horizon scanner measurements from low Earth orbit were observed to show correlations over many minutes in response to large scale atmospheric phenomena. A general approach to the analysis of the effects of colored noise is investigated, and interpretation of the resulting equations provides insight into the effects of any particular noise color and the worst case noise coloring for any particular parameter estimate. It is shown that for certain cases, the effects of relatively short term correlations can be accommodated by a simple correction factor. The errors in the predicted accuracy assuming white noise and the reduced accuracy due to the suboptimal nature of estimators that do not take into account the noise color characteristics are discussed. The appearance of a variety of sample noise color characteristics are demonstrated through simulation, and their effects are discussed for sample estimation cases. Based on the analysis, options for dealing with the effects of colored noise are discussed.

  9. Noise-induced sensitization of human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Hidaka, Ichiro; Nozaki, Daichi; Iso-o, Noriko; Soma, Rika; Kwak, Shin

    2002-11-01

    In the past decade, it has been recognized that noise can enhance the response of nonlinear systems to weak signals, via a mechanism known as stochastic resonance (SR). Particularly, the concept of SR has generated considerable interest in sensory biology, because it has been shown in several experimental studies that noise can assist neural systems in detecting weak signals which could not be detected in its absence. Recently, we have shown a similar type of noise-induced sensitization of human brain; externally added noise to the brain stem baroreflex centers sensitized their responses in maintaining adequate blood perfusion to the brain itself. Furthermore, the addition of noise has also shown to be useful in compensating for dysfunctions of the baroreflex centers in certain neurological diseases. It is concluded that the statistical physics concept of SR could be useful in sensitizing human brain in health and disease.

  10. Aircraft and airport noise control prospective outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, N.

    1982-01-01

    In a perspective look at aircraft and airport noise control over the past ten years or more - or more is added here because the Federal Aviation Regulation Part 36 of 1969 is a more significant milestone for the air transportation system than is the Noise Control Act of 1972 - we see an appreciable reduction in the noise emitted by newly designed and newly produced airplanes, particularly those powered by the new high bypass engines, but only, at best, a moderate alleviation of airport noise. The change in airport noise exposure was the consequence of the introduction of some new, quieter airplanes into the airlines fleets and some operational modifications or restrictions at the airports.

  11. Noise and Chaos in Driven Josephson Junctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    dimension and (e) experimental noise power measurements at 10 kHz as a function of dc bias. Fig. 5.14 Effect of added noise on the Poincare sections...kHz 0.008 0.011 0.0008 IMHz 0.003 0.003 0.0003 10 MHz 0.0008 0.001 0.00008 Table 3.1. Skin Depth of Various Materials. ( Henry W. Ott "Noise... Henry & Prober design^^ and the Magerlein design.^^ 1) Henry & Prober design It uses a VCO (Voltage-Controlled-Oscillator) to generate a pulse sequence

  12. Extra-auditory effects of noise in laboratory animals: the relationship between noise and sleep.

    PubMed

    Rabat, Arnaud

    2007-01-01

    Noise has both auditory and extra-auditory effects. Some of the most deleterious extra-auditory effects of noise are those leading to sleep disturbances. These disturbances seem to be related to both endogenous (physical parameters) and exogenous (sex, age) factors of noise. Despite correlative relations between noise level and awakenings, the scientific community has not reached consensus regarding a specific action of these factors on the different sleep stages. In animal research, 2 complementary main fields of research exist. One is focused on the positive modulation of sleep by repeated tone stimulation. The other concerns noise-related sleep disturbances. The few studies that have investigated noise-related sleep disturbances suggest the following conclusions. First, sleep disturbances are greater upon exposure to environmental noise, whose frequency spectrum is characterized by high and ultrasonic sounds, than white noise. Second, unpredictability and pattern of noise events are responsible for extractions from both SWS and PS. Third, chronic exposure to noise permanently reduces and fragments sleep. Finally, in chronic noise exposure, an inter-individual variability in SWS deficits is observed and correlated to a psychobiological profile related to an incapability to face stressful situations. Based on results from other research, acute noise-related sleep perturbations could result from an imbalance in the sleep-wake cycle in favor of arousing ascending systems. Chronic noise-related sleep disturbances may arise due to imbalance of the sleep-wake cycle and malfunctioning of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis which may both contribute to the development of pathology.

  13. AD(H)D.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christopher; Charles, Janice; Britt, Helena

    2008-06-01

    The BEACH program (Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health) shows that management of attention deficit (hyperactivity) disorder (AD(H)D) was rare in general practice, occurring only six times per 1,000 encounters with children aged 5-17 years, between April 2000 and December 2007. This suggests that general practitioners manage AD(H)D about 46,000 times for this age group nationally each year.

  14. ADS pilot program Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauson, J.; Heuser, J.

    1981-01-01

    The Applications Data Service (ADS) is a system based on an electronic data communications network which will permit scientists to share the data stored in data bases at universities and at government and private installations. It is designed to allow users to readily locate and access high quality, timely data from multiple sources. The ADS Pilot program objectives and the current plans for accomplishing those objectives are described.

  15. White Men's Racial Others

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lensmire, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Context: Increasingly, researchers and educators have argued that alternative conceptions of Whiteness and White racial identity are needed because current conceptions have undermined, rather than strengthened, our critical pedagogies with White people. Grounded in critical Whiteness studies, and drawing especially on the writings of…

  16. Control of absolute negative mobility via noise recycling procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, C. H.; Wang, H.; Qing, S.; Hu, J. H.; Li, K. Z.

    2012-10-01

    Absolute negative mobility (ANM) is investigated in a spatially-periodic symmetric system under the influence of noise consisting of the superposition of a white Gaussian noise with the same noise delayed by time τ. The effects of the noise intensity σ, the time delay τ and feedback intensity ɛ in the noise recycling are discussed. It is found that the noise intensity σ and time delay τ can induce the phenomenon of ANM, while the feedback intensity ɛ can not induce it. This phenomenon of ANM can be tested in the setup consisting of a resistively and capacitively shunted Josephson junction device by using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser to generate the noise recycling procedure.

  17. Analytical expressions for transition edge sensor excess noise models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Daniel; Fraser, George W.

    2010-08-01

    Transition edge sensors (TESs) are high-sensitivity thermometers used in cryogenic microcalorimeters which exploit the steep gradient in resistivity with temperature during the superconducting phase transition. Practical TES devices tend to exhibit a white noise of uncertain origin, arising inside the device. We discuss two candidate models for this excess noise, phase slip shot noise (PSSN) and percolation noise. We extend the existing PSSN model to include a magnetic field dependence and derive a basic analytical model for percolation noise. We compare the predicted functional forms of the noise current vs. resistivity curves of both models with experimental data and provide a set of equations for both models to facilitate future experimental efforts to clearly identify the source of excess noise.

  18. Noise robust estimates of correlation dimension and K2 entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, Guido; Ziehe, Andreas; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2001-07-01

    Using Gaussian kernels to define the correlation sum we derive simple formulas that correct the noise bias in estimates of the correlation dimension and K2 entropy of chaotic time series. The corrections are only based on the difference of correlation dimensions for adjacent embedding dimensions and hence preserve the full functional dependencies on both the scale parameter and embedding dimension. It is shown theoretically that the estimates, which are derived for additive white Gaussian noise, are also robust for moderately colored noise. Simulations underline the usefulness of the proposed correction schemes. It is demonstrated that the method gives satisfactory results also for non-Gaussian and dynamical noise.

  19. Entanglement criteria for noise resistance of two-qudit states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Arijit; Ryu, Junghee; Laskowski, Wiesław; Żukowski, Marek

    2016-06-01

    Noise affects production and transmission of entanglement. We use a handy approach for a noise resistance of entanglement of two-qudit systems. A geometric concept using correlation tensors of separable and entangled states is implemented to formulate entanglement criterion. We apply the criterion to the various types of noise (white, colored, local depolarizing and amplitude damping) admixtures with the initial (pure) state. We also study the noise resistance with respect to the violation of specific family of Bell inequalities (CGLMP). A broad set of numerical and analytical results is presented.

  20. Turbulent mixing noise from supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Chen, Ping

    1994-01-01

    There is now a substantial body of theoretical and experimental evidence that the dominant part of the turbulent noise of supersonic jets is generated directly by the large turbulence structures/instability waves of the jet flow. Earlier, Tam and Burton provided a description of the physical mechanism by which supersonically traveling instability waves can generate sound efficiently. They used the method of matched asymptotic expansions to construct an instability wave solution which is valid in the far field. The present work is an extension of the theory of Tam and Burton. It is argued that the instability wave spectrum of the jet may be regarded as generated by stochastic white noise excitation at the nozzle lip region. The reason why the excitation has white noise characteristics is that near the nozzle lip region the flow in the jet mixing layer has no intrinsic length and time scales. The present stochastic wave model theory of supersonic jet noise contains a single unknown multiplicative constant. Comparisons between the calculated noise directivities at selected Strouhal numbers and experimental measurements of a Mach 2 jet at different jet temperatures have been carried out. Favorable agreements are found.

  1. Noise, Health, and Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beranek, Leo L.

    There is reasonable agreement that hearing impairment is related to noise exposure. This hearing loss due to noise is considered a serious health injury, but there is still difficulty in delineating the importance of noise related to people's general non-auditory well-being and health. Beside hearing loss, noise inhibits satisfactory speech…

  2. Active Noise Control for Dishwasher noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nokhaeng; Park, Youngjin

    2016-09-01

    The dishwasher is a useful home appliance and continually used for automatically washing dishes. It's commonly placed in the kitchen with built-in style for practicality and better use of space. In this environment, people are easily exposed to dishwasher noise, so it is an important issue for the consumers, especially for the people living in open and narrow space. Recently, the sound power levels of the noise are about 40 - 50 dBA. It could be achieved by removal of noise sources and passive means of insulating acoustical path. For more reduction, such a quiet mode with the lower speed of cycle has been introduced, but this deteriorates the washing capacity. Under this background, we propose active noise control for dishwasher noise. It is observed that the noise is propagating mainly from the lower part of the front side. Control speakers are placed in the part for the collocation. Observation part of estimating sound field distribution and control part of generating the anti-noise are designed for active noise control. Simulation result shows proposed active noise control scheme could have a potential application for dishwasher noise reduction.

  3. Stochastic memory: memory enhancement due to noise.

    PubMed

    Stotland, Alexander; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2012-01-01

    There are certain classes of resistors, capacitors, and inductors that, when subject to a periodic input of appropriate frequency, develop hysteresis loops in their characteristic response. Here we show that the hysteresis of such memory elements can also be induced by white noise of appropriate intensity even at very low frequencies of the external driving field. We illustrate this phenomenon using a physical model of memory resistor realized by TiO(2) thin films sandwiched between metallic electrodes and discuss under which conditions this effect can be observed experimentally. We also discuss its implications on existing memory systems described in the literature and the role of colored noise.

  4. Stochastic memory: Memory enhancement due to noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotland, Alexander; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2012-01-01

    There are certain classes of resistors, capacitors, and inductors that, when subject to a periodic input of appropriate frequency, develop hysteresis loops in their characteristic response. Here we show that the hysteresis of such memory elements can also be induced by white noise of appropriate intensity even at very low frequencies of the external driving field. We illustrate this phenomenon using a physical model of memory resistor realized by TiO2 thin films sandwiched between metallic electrodes and discuss under which conditions this effect can be observed experimentally. We also discuss its implications on existing memory systems described in the literature and the role of colored noise.

  5. An adaptive segment method for smoothing lidar signal based on noise estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuzhao; Luo, Pingping

    2014-10-01

    An adaptive segmentation smoothing method (ASSM) is introduced in the paper to smooth the signal and suppress the noise. In the ASSM, the noise is defined as the 3σ of the background signal. An integer number N is defined for finding the changing positions in the signal curve. If the difference of adjacent two points is greater than 3Nσ, the position is recorded as an end point of the smoothing segment. All the end points detected as above are recorded and the curves between them will be smoothed separately. In the traditional method, the end points of the smoothing windows in the signals are fixed. The ASSM creates changing end points in different signals and the smoothing windows could be set adaptively. The windows are always set as the half of the segmentations and then the average smoothing method will be applied in the segmentations. The Iterative process is required for reducing the end-point aberration effect in the average smoothing method and two or three times are enough. In ASSM, the signals are smoothed in the spacial area nor frequent area, that means the frequent disturbance will be avoided. A lidar echo was simulated in the experimental work. The echo was supposed to be created by a space-born lidar (e.g. CALIOP). And white Gaussian noise was added to the echo to act as the random noise resulted from environment and the detector. The novel method, ASSM, was applied to the noisy echo to filter the noise. In the test, N was set to 3 and the Iteration time is two. The results show that, the signal could be smoothed adaptively by the ASSM, but the N and the Iteration time might be optimized when the ASSM is applied in a different lidar.

  6. Experimental noise-resistant Bell-inequality violations for polarization-entangled photons

    SciTech Connect

    Bovino, Fabio A.; Castagnoli, Giuseppe; Cabello, Adan; Lamas-Linares, Antia

    2006-06-15

    We experimentally demonstrate that violations of Bell's inequalities for two-photon polarization-entangled states with colored noise are extremely robust, whereas this is not the case for states with white noise. Controlling the amount of noise by using the timing compensation scheme introduced by Kim et al. [Phys. Rev. A 67, 010301(R) (2003)], we have observed violations even for states with very high noise, in excellent agrement with the predictions of Cabello et al. [Phys. Rev. A 72, 052112 (2005)].

  7. Experimental noise-resistant Bell-inequality violations for polarization-entangled photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovino, Fabio A.; Castagnoli, Giuseppe; Cabello, Adán; Lamas-Linares, Antía

    2006-06-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that violations of Bell’s inequalities for two-photon polarization-entangled states with colored noise are extremely robust, whereas this is not the case for states with white noise. Controlling the amount of noise by using the timing compensation scheme introduced by Kim [Phys. Rev. A 67, 010301(R) (2003)], we have observed violations even for states with very high noise, in excellent agrement with the predictions of Cabello [Phys. Rev. A 72, 052112 (2005)].

  8. Adding and Deleting Images

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Images are added via the Drupal WebCMS Editor. Once an image is uploaded onto a page, it is available via the Library and your files. You can edit the metadata, delete the image permanently, and/or replace images on the Files tab.

  9. What Value "Value Added"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Two quantitative measures of school performance are currently used, the average points score (APS) at Key Stage 2 and value-added (VA), which measures the rate of academic improvement between Key Stage 1 and 2. These figures are used by parents and the Office for Standards in Education to make judgements and comparisons. However, simple…

  10. Noise figure of hybrid optical parametric amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Marhic, Michel E

    2012-12-17

    Following a fiber optical parametric amplifier, used as a wavelength converter or in the phase-sensitive mode, by a phase-insensitive amplifier (PIA) can significantly reduce four-wave mixing between signals in broadband systems. We derive the quantum mechanical noise figures (NF) for these two hybrid configurations, and show that adding the PIA only leads to a moderate increase in NF.

  11. Detection of whale calls in noise: performance comparison between a beluga whale, human listeners, and a neural network.

    PubMed

    Erbe, C

    2000-07-01

    This article examines the masking by anthropogenic noise of beluga whale calls. Results from human masking experiments and a software backpropagation neural network are compared to the performance of a trained beluga whale. The goal was to find an accurate, reliable, and fast model to replace lengthy and expensive animal experiments. A beluga call was masked by three types of noise, an icebreaker's bubbler system and propeller noise, and ambient arctic ice-cracking noise. Both the human experiment and the neural network successfully modeled the beluga data in the sense that they classified the noises in the same order from strongest to weakest masking as the whale and with similar call-detection thresholds. The neural network slightly outperformed the humans. Both models were then used to predict the masking of a fourth type of noise, Gaussian white noise. Their prediction ability was judged by returning to the aquarium to measure masked-hearing thresholds of a beluga in white noise. Both models and the whale identified bubbler noise as the strongest masker, followed by ramming, then white noise. Natural ice-cracking noise masked the least. However, the humans and the neural network slightly overpredicted the amount of masking for white noise. This is neglecting individual variation in belugas, because only one animal could be trained. Comparing the human model to the neural network model, the latter has the advantage of objectivity, reproducibility of results, and efficiency, particularly if the interference of a large number of signals and noise is to be examined.

  12. Aviation noise effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J. S.; Beattie, K. R.

    1985-03-01

    This report summarizes the effects of aviation noise in many areas, ranging from human annoyance to impact on real estate values. It also synthesizes the findings of literature on several topics. Included in the literature were many original studies carried out under FAA and other Federal funding over the past two decades. Efforts have been made to present the critical findings and conclusions of pertinent research, providing, when possible, a bottom line conclusion, criterion or perspective. Issues related to aviation noise are highlighted, and current policy is presented. Specific topic addressed include: annoyance; Hearing and hearing loss; noise metrics; human response to noise; speech interference; sleep interference; non-auditory health effects of noise; effects of noise on wild and domesticated animals; low frequency acoustical energy; impulsive noise; time of day weightings; noise contours; land use compatibility; and real estate values. This document is designed for a variety of users, from the individual completely unfamiliar with aviation noise to experts in the field.

  13. ADS in a Nutshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Eichhorn, G.; Grant, C. S.; Accomazzi, A.; Murray, S. S.; Kurtz, M. J.

    1999-05-01

    The bibliographic databases maintained by the NASA Astrophysics Data System are updated approximately biweekly with records gathered from over 125 sources all over the world. Data are either sent to us electronically, retrieved by our staff via semi-automated procedures, or entered in our databases through supervised OCR procedures. PERL scripts are run on the data to convert them from their incoming format to our standard format so that they can be added to the master database at SAO. Once new data has been added, separate index files are created for authors, objects, title words, and text word, allowing these fields to be searched for individually or in combination with each other. During the indexing procedure, discipline-specific knowledge is taken into account through the use of rule-based procedures performing string normalization, context-sensitive word translation, and synonym and stop word replacement. Once the master text and index files have been updated at SAO, an automated procedure mirrors the changes in the database to the ADS mirror site via a secure network connection. The use of a public domain software tool called rsync allows incremental updating of the database files, with significant savings in the amount of data being transferred. In the past year, the ADS Abstract Service databases have grown by approximately 30%, including 50% growth in Physics, 25% growth in Astronomy and 10% growth in the Instrumentation datasets. The ADS Abstract Service now contains over 1.4 million abstracts (475K in Astronomy, 430K in Physics, 510K in Instrumentation, and 3K in Preprints), 175,000 journal abstracts, and 115,000 full text articles. In addition, we provide links to over 40,000 electronic HTML articles at other sites, 20,000 PDF articles, and 10,000 postscript articles, as well as many links to other external data sources.

  14. Thermal Noise Behavior of the Bridge Circuit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-03-01

    is Gaussian white noise. 37 References [1] C.A. Desoer and E.S. Kuh, Basic Circuit Theory, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1969. [2] E. Polak and E. Wong...86, no. 5, pp. 702-710, 1952. [7] L.O. Chua, C.A. Desoer , and E.S. Kuh, Linear and Nonlinear Circuits, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1987. See in

  15. 46 CFR 58.01-50 - Machinery space, noise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... than 82 dB(A) when noise is measured using a sound-level meter and an A-weighting filter. (b) Except as... around machinery—90 dB(A) (c) If adding a source of noise would cause a machinery space to exceed...

  16. 46 CFR 58.01-50 - Machinery space, noise.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... than 82 dB(A) when noise is measured using a sound-level meter and an A-weighting filter. (b) Except as... around machinery—90 dB(A) (c) If adding a source of noise would cause a machinery space to exceed...

  17. Colored Noise Induced Bistable Switch in the Genetic Toggle Switch Systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Lü, Jinhu; Yu, Xinghuo

    2015-01-01

    Noise can induce various dynamical behaviors in nonlinear systems. White noise perturbed systems have been extensively investigated during the last decades. In gene networks, experimentally observed extrinsic noise is colored. As an attempt, we investigate the genetic toggle switch systems perturbed by colored extrinsic noise and with kinetic parameters. Compared with white noise perturbed systems, we show there also exists optimal colored noise strength to induce the best stochastic switch behaviors in the single toggle switch, and the best synchronized switching in the networked systems, which demonstrate that noise-induced optimal switch behaviors are widely in existence. Moreover, under a wide range of system parameter regions, we find there exist wider ranges of white and colored noises strengths to induce good switch and synchronization behaviors, respectively; therefore, white noise is beneficial for switch and colored noise is beneficial for population synchronization. Our observations are very robust to extrinsic stimulus strength, cell density, and diffusion rate. Finally, based on the Waddington's epigenetic landscape and the Wiener-Khintchine theorem, physical mechanisms underlying the observations are interpreted. Our investigations can provide guidelines for experimental design, and have potential clinical implications in gene therapy and synthetic biology.

  18. Dual correlated pumping scheme for phase noise preservation in all-optical wavelength conversion.

    PubMed

    Anthur, Aravind P; Watts, Regan T; Shi, Kai; Carroll, John O'; Venkitesh, Deepa; Barry, Liam P

    2013-07-01

    We study the effect of transfer of phase noise in different four wave mixing schemes using a coherent phase noise measurement technique. The nature of phase noise transfer from the pump to the generated wavelengths is shown to be independent of the type of phase noise (1 / f or white noise frequency components). We then propose a novel scheme using dual correlated pumps to prevent the increase in phase noise in the conjugate wavelengths. The proposed scheme is experimentally verified by the all-optical wavelength conversion of a DQPSK signal at 10.7 GBaud.

  19. [Subjective sensitivity to noise].

    PubMed

    Belojević, G

    1991-01-01

    It is likely that individual variations in subjectively estimated noise sensitivity influence different social and psychophysiological reactions of people exposed to noise. Subjective noise sensitivity might be a relatively stable personal characteristic. A correlation have been found between high sensitiveness to noise and some medical symptoms (sleep disturbance, nervousness, depression), and worse work performance in noisy environments. An introvert person with neurotic symptoms is more frequently found in people highly sensitive to noise. Testing for subjective sensitivity to noise might be helpful in professional selection and orientation for noisy work-places as well as in housing advising.

  20. Highly noise resistant multiqubit quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskowski, Wiesław; Vértesi, Tamás; Wieśniak, Marcin

    2015-11-01

    We analyze robustness of correlations of the N-qubit GHZ and Dicke states against white noise admixture. For sufficiently large N, the Dicke states (for any number of excitations) lead to more robust violation of local realism than the GHZ states (e.g. for N > 8 for the W state). We also identify states that are the most resistant to white noise. Surprisingly, it turns out that these states are the GHZ states augmented with fully product states. Based on our numerical analysis conducted up to N = 8, and an analytical formula derived for any N parties, we conjecture that the three-qubit GHZ state augmented with a product of (N - 3) pure qubits is the most robust against white noise admixture among any N-qubit state. As a by-product, we derive a single Bell inequality and show that it is violated by all pure entangled states of a given number of parties. This gives an alternative proof of Gisin’s theorem.

  1. Confronting White Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swalwell, Katy

    2012-01-01

    Even as the United States becomes more diverse, a new era of "white flight" is unfolding. Whether they live in urban, suburban or rural communities, white students are likely to attend schools that reinforce their perceptions of cultural dominance. The average white student attends a school where 77 percent of the student body is of their race.…

  2. Laser line shape and spectral density of frequency noise

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, G.M.; Blin, S.; Besnard, P.; Tam, T.T.; Tetu, M.

    2005-04-01

    Published experimental results show that single-mode laser light is characterized in the microwave range by a frequency noise which essentially includes a white part and a 1/f (flicker) part. We theoretically show that the spectral density (the line shape) which is compatible with these results is a Voigt profile whose Lorentzian part or homogeneous component is linked to the white noise and the Gaussian part to the 1/f noise. We measure semiconductor laser line profiles and verify that they can be fit with Voigt functions. It is also verified that the width of the Lorentzian part varies like 1/P where P is the laser power while the width of the Gaussian part is more of a constant. Finally, we theoretically show from first principles that laser line shapes are also described by Voigt functions where the Lorentzian part is the laser Airy function and the Gaussian part originates from population noise.

  3. White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Peering deep inside a cluster of several hundred thousand stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered the oldest burned-out stars in our Milky Way Galaxy, giving astronomers a fresh reading on the age of the universe.

    Located in the globular cluster M4, these small, burned-out stars -- called white dwarfs -- are about 12 to 13 billion years old. By adding the one billion years it took the cluster to form after the Big Bang, astronomers found that the age of the white dwarfs agrees with previous estimates that the universe is 13 to 14 billion years old.

    The images, including some taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, are available online at

    http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/10/ or

    http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc .

    The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    In the top panel, a ground-based observatory snapped a panoramic view of the entire cluster, which contains several hundred thousand stars within a volume of 10 to 30 light-years across. The Kitt Peak National Observatory's .9-meter telescope took this picture in March 1995. The box at left indicates the region observed by the Hubble telescope.

    The Hubble telescope studied a small region of the cluster. A section of that region is seen in the picture at bottom left. A sampling of an even smaller region is shown at bottom right. This region is only about one light-year across. In this smaller region, Hubble pinpointed a number of faint white dwarfs. The blue circles indicate the dwarfs. It took nearly eight days of exposure time over a 67-day period to find these extremely faint stars.

    Globular clusters are among the oldest clusters of stars in the universe. The faintest and coolest white dwarfs within globular clusters can yield a globular cluster's age. Earlier Hubble observations showed that the first stars formed less than 1 billion years after the universe's birth in the big bang. So, finding the

  4. Hearing in Cichlid Fishes under Noise Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ladich, Friedrich; Schulz-Mirbach, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Background Hearing thresholds of fishes are typically acquired under laboratory conditions. This does not reflect the situation in natural habitats, where ambient noise may mask their hearing sensitivities. In the current study we investigate hearing in terms of sound pressure (SPL) and particle acceleration levels (PAL) of two cichlid species within the naturally occurring range of noise levels. This enabled us to determine whether species with and without hearing specializations are differently affected by noise. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated auditory sensitivities in the orange chromide Etroplus maculatus, which possesses anterior swim bladder extensions, and the slender lionhead cichlid Steatocranus tinanti, in which the swim bladder is much smaller and lacks extensions. E. maculatus was tested between 0.2 and 3kHz and S. tinanti between 0.1 and 0.5 kHz using the auditory evoked potential (AEP) recording technique. In both species, SPL and PAL audiograms were determined in the presence of quiet laboratory conditions (baseline) and continuous white noise of 110 and 130 dB RMS. Baseline thresholds showed greatest hearing sensitivity around 0.5 kHz (SPL) and 0.2 kHz (PAL) in E. maculatus and 0.2 kHz in S. tinanti. White noise of 110 dB elevated the thresholds by 0–11 dB (SPL) and 7–11 dB (PAL) in E. maculatus and by 1–2 dB (SPL) and by 1–4 dB (PAL) in S. tinanti. White noise of 130 dB elevated hearing thresholds by 13–29 dB (SPL) and 26–32 dB (PAL) in E. maculatus and 6–16 dB (SPL) and 6–19 dB (PAL) in S. tinanti. Conclusions Our data showed for the first time for SPL and PAL thresholds that the specialized species was masked by different noise regimes at almost all frequencies, whereas the non-specialized species was much less affected. This indicates that noise can limit sound detection and acoustic orientation differently within a single fish family. PMID:23469032

  5. Propagation of Environmental Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    Solutions for environmental noise pollution lie in systematic study of many basic processes such as reflection, scattering, and spreading. Noise propagation processes should be identified in different situations and assessed for their relative importance. (PS)

  6. Noise Scaling and Community Noise Metrics for the Hybrid Wing Body Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Casey L.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Hutcheson, Florence V.; Doty, Michael J.; Lopes, Leonard V.; Nickol, Craig L.; Vicroy, Dan D.; Pope, D. Stuart

    2014-01-01

    An aircraft system noise assessment was performed for the hybrid wing body aircraft concept, known as the N2A-EXTE. This assessment is a result of an effort by NASA to explore a realistic HWB design that has the potential to substantially reduce noise and fuel burn. Under contract to NASA, Boeing designed the aircraft using practical aircraft design princip0les with incorporation of noise technologies projected to be available in the 2020 timeframe. NASA tested 5.8% scale-mode of the design in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel to provide source noise directivity and installation effects for aircraft engine and airframe configurations. Analysis permitted direct scaling of the model-scale jet, airframe, and engine shielding effect measurements to full-scale. Use of these in combination with ANOPP predictions enabled computations of the cumulative (CUM) noise margins relative to FAA Stage 4 limits. The CUM margins were computed for a baseline N2A-EXTE configuration and for configurations with added noise reduction strategies. The strategies include reduced approach speed, over-the-rotor line and soft-vane fan technologies, vertical tail placement and orientation, and modified landing gear designs with fairings. Combining the inherent HWB engine shielding by the airframe with added noise technologies, the cumulative noise was assessed at 38.7 dB below FAA Stage 4 certification level, just 3.3 dB short of the NASA N+2 goal of 42 dB. This new result shows that the NASA N+2 goal is approachable and that significant reduction in overall aircraft noise is possible through configurations with noise reduction technologies and operational changes.

  7. Analysis and removing noise from speech using wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomala, Karel; Voznak, Miroslav; Partila, Pavol; Rezac, Filip; Safarik, Jakub

    2013-05-01

    The paper discusses the use of Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) and Stationary Wavelet Transform (SWT) wavelet in removing noise from voice samples and evaluation of its impact on speech quality. One significant part of Quality of Service (QoS) in communication technology is the speech quality assessment. However, this part is seriously overlooked as telecommunication providers often focus on increasing network capacity, expansion of services offered and their enforcement in the market. Among the fundamental factors affecting the transmission properties of the communication chain is noise, either at the transmitter or the receiver side. A wavelet transform (WT) is a modern tool for signal processing. One of the most significant areas in which wavelet transforms are used is applications designed to suppress noise in signals. To remove noise from the voice sample in our experiment, we used the reference segment of the voice which was distorted by Gaussian white noise. An evaluation of the impact on speech quality was carried out by an intrusive objective algorithm Perceptual Evaluation of Speech Quality (PESQ). DWT and SWT transformation was applied to voice samples that were devalued by Gaussian white noise. Afterwards, we determined the effectiveness of DWT and SWT by means of objective algorithm PESQ. The decisive criterion for determining the quality of a voice sample once the noise had been removed was Mean Opinion Score (MOS) which we obtained in PESQ. The contribution of this work lies in the evaluation of efficiency of wavelet transformation to suppress noise in voice samples.

  8. Growth of bermudagrass with white clover or nitrogen fertilizer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White clover (Trifolium repens) var ‘Durana’ was oversown into established bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) in 2009. Soil analysis indicated potassium (K) was low and potash at 112 and 336 kg/ha was added as main plots. Nitrogen as ammonium nitrate or an ammonium sulfate/urea blend was added as 0, 34...

  9. Evaluation of the annoyance due to helicopter rotor noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sternfeld, H., Jr.; Doyle, L. B.

    1978-01-01

    A program was conducted in which 25 test subjects adjusted the levels of various helicopter rotor spectra until the combination of the harmonic noise and a broadband background noise was judged equally annoying as a higher level of the same broadband noise spectrum. The subjective measure of added harmonic noise was equated to the difference in the two levels of broadband noise. The test participants also made subjective evaluations of the rotor noise signatures which they created. The test stimuli consisted of three degrees of rotor impulsiveness, each presented at four blade passage rates. Each of these 12 harmonic sounds was combined with three broadband spectra and was adjusted to match the annoyance of three different sound pressure levels of broadband noise. Analysis of variance indicated that the important variables were level and impulsiveness. Regression analyses indicated that inclusion of crest factor improved correlation between the subjective measures and various objective or physical measures.

  10. Ocean Ambient Noise Studies for Improved Sonar Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    Whale clicks are impulsive, so multipath structure is evident in raw time-domain data. However, this is not true of vessel noise, so this...multipath arrivals provides information about the received elevation angle and relative time lag. The compact size of the array minimized the white noise...Nosal 2006] E. Nosal and L. Neilfrazer, "Track of a sperm whale from delays between direct and surface-reflected clicks," Applied Acoustics, vol. 67, no

  11. Noise Reduction Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallas, Tony

    There are two distinct kinds of noise - structural and color. Each requires a specific method of attack to minimize. The great challenge is to reduce the noise without reducing the faint and delicate detail in the image. My most-used and favorite noise suppression is found in Photoshop CS 5 Camera Raw. If I cannot get the desired results with the first choice, I will use Noise Ninja, which has certain advantages in some situations that we will cover.

  12. On Noise Assessment for Blended Wing Body Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Yueping; Burley, Casey L; Thomas, Russell H.

    2014-01-01

    A system noise study is presented for the blended-wing-body (BWB) aircraft configured with advanced technologies that are projected to be available in the 2025 timeframe of the NASA N+2 definition. This system noise assessment shows that the noise levels of the baseline configuration, measured by the cumulative Effective Perceived Noise Level (EPNL), have a large margin of 34 dB to the aircraft noise regulation of Stage 4. This confirms the acoustic benefits of the BWB shielding of engine noise, as well as other projected noise reduction technologies, but the noise margins are less than previously published assessments and are short of meeting the NASA N+2 noise goal. In establishing the relevance of the acoustic assessment framework, the design of the BWB configuration, the technical approach of the noise analysis, the databases and prediction tools used in the assessment are first described and discussed. The predicted noise levels and the component decomposition are then analyzed to identify the ranking order of importance of various noise components, revealing the prominence of airframe noise, which holds up the levels at all three noise certification locations and renders engine noise reduction technologies less effective. When projected airframe component noise reduction is added to the HWB configuration, it is shown that the cumulative noise margin to Stage 4 can reach 41.6 dB, nearly at the NASA goal. These results are compared with a previous NASA assessment with a different study framework. The approaches that yield projections of such low noise levels are discussed including aggressive assumptions on future technologies, assumptions on flight profile management, engine installation, and component noise reduction technologies. It is shown that reliable predictions of component noise also play an important role in the system noise assessment. The comparisons and discussions illustrate the importance of practical feasibilities and constraints in aircraft

  13. Handbook of noise ratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearsons, K. S.; Bennett, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The handbook was compiled to provide information in a concise form, describing the multitude of noise rating schemes. It is hoped that by describing the noise rating methods in a single volume the user will have better access to the definitions, application and calculation procedures of the current noise rating methods.

  14. Dragline noise survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vipperman, Jeffrey S.; Bauer, Eric R.

    2002-05-01

    It is estimated that 70%-90% of miners have enough noise induced hearing loss (NIHL) to be classified as a disability (NIOSH, Publication No. 76-172, 1976; Franks, NIOSH Internal Report, 1996). In response, NIOSH is conducting a cross-sectional survey of the mining industry in order to determine the sources of mining noise and offer recommendations on how to mitigate high noise levels, and bring mining operations into compliance with the recent mining noise regulation: 30CFR, Part 62. This paper will outline the results from noise surveys of eight draglines which operate in above-ground coal mining operations. The data recorded include noise dosimetry in conjunction with time-at-task studies and 1/3-octave sound level (Leq, Lmin, and Lmax) measurements. The 1/3-octave band readings were used to create noise contour maps which allowed the spatial and frequency information of the noise to be considered. Comparison of Lmin and Lmax levels offer insight into the variability of the noise levels inside the dragline. The potential for administrative controls is limited due to consistently high noise levels throughout the deck. Implementation of engineering controls is also hindered by the size and number of the noise sources and the frequency content of the noise.

  15. Characteristics of USB noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, J. S.; Searle, N.

    1976-01-01

    An extensive series of noise measurements, for a variety of geometric and operational parameters, was made on models of upper surface blowing (USB) powered lift systems. The data obtained were analyzed and the effects and trends of parametric variation defined. The behavior and nature of USB noise and the design of USB systems with low noise characteristics is examined.

  16. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  17. Classical noise, quantum noise and secure communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannous, C.; Langlois, J.

    2016-01-01

    Secure communication based on message encryption might be performed by combining the message with controlled noise (called pseudo-noise) as performed in spread-spectrum communication used presently in Wi-Fi and smartphone telecommunication systems. Quantum communication based on entanglement is another route for securing communications as demonstrated by several important experiments described in this work. The central role played by the photon in unifying the description of classical and quantum noise as major ingredients of secure communication systems is highlighted and described on the basis of the classical and quantum fluctuation dissipation theorems.

  18. Uniform apparent contrast noise: A picture of the noise of the visual contrast detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, A. J., Jr.; Watson, A. B.

    1984-01-01

    A picture which is a sample of random contrast noise is generated. The noise amplitude spectrum in each region of the picture is inversely proportional to spatial frequency contrast sensitivity for that region, assuming the observer fixates the center of the picture and is the appropriate distance from it. In this case, the picture appears to have approximately the same contrast everywhere. To the extent that contrast detection thresholds are determined by visual system noise, this picture can be regarded as a picture of the noise of that system. There is evidence that, at different eccentricities, contrast sensitivity functions differ only by a magnification factor. The picture was generated by filtering a sample of white noise with a filter whose frequency response is inversely proportional to foveal contrast sensitivity. It was then stretched by a space-varying magnification function. The picture summmarizes a noise linear model of detection and discrimination of contrast signals by referring the model noise to the input picture domain.

  19. Measuring Value Added in Higher Education: A Proposed Methodology for Developing a Performance Indicator Based on the Economic Value Added to Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    The 2003 UK higher education White Paper suggested that the sector needed to re-examine the potential of the value added concept. This paper describes a possible methodology for developing a performance indicator based on the economic value added to graduates. The paper examines how an entry-quality-adjusted measure of a graduate's…

  20. Anthropogenic noise affects song structure in red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus).

    PubMed

    Hanna, Dalal; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel; Wilson, David R; Mennill, Daniel J

    2011-11-01

    Anthropogenic noise can mask animal signals that are crucial for communicating information about food, predators and mating opportunities. In response to noise masking, signallers can potentially improve acoustic signal transmission by adjusting the timing, frequency or amplitude of their signals. These changes can be a short-term modification in response to transient noise or a long-term modification in response to chronic noise. An animal's ability to adapt to anthropogenic noise can be crucial to its success. In this study, we evaluated the effects of anthropogenic noise on the structure of red-winged blackbird song. First, we manipulated the presence of anthropogenic noise by experimentally broadcasting either silence or low-frequency white noise to subjects inhabiting quiet marshes located away from roadsides. Subjects exhibited increased signal tonality when temporarily exposed to low-frequency white noise, suggesting that red-winged blackbirds can alter their signals rapidly in response to sudden noise. Second, we compared songs produced in quiet marshes located away from roadsides with songs produced during quiet periods at roadside marshes that are normally noisy. This allowed us to test whether birds that are exposed to chronic anthropogenic noise exhibit altered song structure during temporarily quiet periods. Subjects residing in roadside marshes that are normally polluted with anthropogenic noise sang songs with increased tonality during quiet periods. Overall, our results show that anthropogenic noise influences the structure of birdsong. These effects should be considered in conservation and wildlife management.

  1. Experimental Study of SBS Suppression via White Noise Phase Modulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-10

    ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Brian Anderson , Craig Robin, Angel Flores, Iyad Dajani 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7...2014-0067; 10 February 2014. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Accepted for publication in the SPIE Proceedings: B. Anderson , C. Robin, A. Flores, and I...modulation Brian Anderson 1,* , Craig Robin 2 , Angel Flores 2 , Iyad Dajani 2 1 CREOL, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd, Orlando

  2. [Cardiovascular effects of noise].

    PubMed

    Vacheron, A

    1992-03-01

    The circulatory response to noise is dominated by a peripheral blood vessels vasoconstriction, of greater magnitude when asleep than awake. Noise of lower frequency seems more able to produce this response. With repetition of the noise, adaptation and tolerance to it quickly appears. Meanwhile prolonged high level noise exposition induces an increasing prevalence of arterial hypertension among industrial workers. This increase is also clearly found in residential communities living near airports. Long-term exposure to noise is a dangerous nuisance, that can lead to an increase in arterial blood pressure and favour coronary artery disease development.

  3. Combat aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgarbozza, M.; Depitre, A.

    1992-04-01

    A discussion of the characteristics and the noise levels of combat aircraft and of a transport aircraft in taking off and landing are presented. Some methods of noise reduction are discussed, including the following: operational anti-noise procedures; and concepts of future engines (silent post-combustion and variable cycle). Some measurement results concerning the noise generated in flight at great speeds and low altitude will also be examined. Finally, the protection of the environment of French air bases against noise will be described and the possibilities of regulation examined.

  4. Interpreting Transistor Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospieszalski, M. W.

    2010-10-01

    The simple noise models of field effect and bipolar transistors reviewed in this article are quite useful in engineering practice, as illustrated by measured and modeled results. The exact and approximate expressions for the noise parameters of FETs and bipolar transistors reveal certain common noise properties and some general noise properties of both devices. The usefulness of these expressions in interpreting the dependence of measured noise parameters on frequency, bias, and temperature and, consequently, in checking of consistency of measured data has been demonstrated.

  5. Mixed noise removal by weighted encoding with sparse nonlocal regularization.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jielin; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Jian

    2014-06-01

    Mixed noise removal from natural images is a challenging task since the noise distribution usually does not have a parametric model and has a heavy tail. One typical kind of mixed noise is additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) coupled with impulse noise (IN). Many mixed noise removal methods are detection based methods. They first detect the locations of IN pixels and then remove the mixed noise. However, such methods tend to generate many artifacts when the mixed noise is strong. In this paper, we propose a simple yet effective method, namely weighted encoding with sparse nonlocal regularization (WESNR), for mixed noise removal. In WESNR, there is not an explicit step of impulse pixel detection; instead, soft impulse pixel detection via weighted encoding is used to deal with IN and AWGN simultaneously. Meanwhile, the image sparsity prior and nonlocal self-similarity prior are integrated into a regularization term and introduced into the variational encoding framework. Experimental results show that the proposed WESNR method achieves leading mixed noise removal performance in terms of both quantitative measures and visual quality.

  6. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  7. Beneficial role of noise in artificial neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Monterola, Christopher; Saloma, Caesar; Zapotocky, Martin

    2008-06-18

    We demonstrate enhancement of neural networks efficacy to recognize frequency encoded signals and/or to categorize spatial patterns of neural activity as a result of noise addition. For temporal information recovery, noise directly added to the receiving neurons allow instantaneous improvement of signal-to-noise ratio [Monterola and Saloma, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2002]. For spatial patterns however, recurrence is necessary to extend and homogenize the operating range of a feed-forward neural network [Monterola and Zapotocky, Phys. Rev. E 2005]. Finally, using the size of the basin of attraction of the networks learned patterns (dynamical fixed points), a procedure for estimating the optimal noise is demonstrated.

  8. Low flicker-noise amplifier for 50 Ω sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiola, Enrico; Lardet-Vieudrin, Franck

    2004-05-01

    This article analyzes the design of a low-noise amplifier intended as the input front-end for the measurement of the low-frequency components (below 10 Hz) of a 50 Ω source. Low residual flicker is the main desired performance. This feature can only be appreciated if white noise is sufficiently low, and if an appropriate design ensures dc stability. An optimal solution is proposed, in which the low-noise and dc-stability features are achieved at a reasonable complexity. Gain is accurate to more than 100 kHz, which makes the amplifier an appealing external front-end for fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzers.

  9. Computer-controlled noise adaption for acoustical test facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedig, W. V.; Ams, A.

    1990-09-01

    For acoustical noise tests of elastic structures, statistically representative signals generated from white noise by means of spectrum shapers and band pass filters are needed. Subsequently, these signals are amplified and transformed into physical test noise by acoustical sirens. A mathematical model of the entire system based on measurements of frequency transfer functions in order to predict an optimal amplitude modulation of the spectrum shaper is presented. The prediction is performed by means of a nonlinear optimization procedure which iterates the tuning parameters of the shaper with respect to the stored frequency data of the entire system.

  10. Contact Noise in Sodium Beta Alumina.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    AD-Al~i 128 CONTACT NOISE IN SODIUM BETA ALUMINA(U) UTANHUNIV SALT i/i LAKE CITY DEPT OF PHYSICS C K KUD ET AL MAY 87 UN SLR55IF IED FG 1,b2 NL UN...by Chu Kun Kuo* and James J. Brophy Physics Department University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 ABSTRACT/ Contact noise in sodium 0alumina cells...ZIPCo*I) UNIVERSITY OF UTAH UNIVERISTY OF NEW MEXICO SALT LAKE CITY UT 84112 Bandelier Hall West Alhkq..u u. m (1 71-11 so NAME of FUNDING /SPONSORING Sb

  11. Jet Noise Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda

    2008-01-01

    A presentation outlining current jet noise work at NASA was given at the NAVAIR Noise Workshop. Jet noise tasks in the Supersonics project of the Fundamental Aeronautics program were highlighted. The presentation gave an overview of developing jet noise reduction technologies and noise prediction capabilities. Advanced flow and noise diagnostic tools were also presented.

  12. Heat, cold, noise, and vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, S.M.; Bedi, J.F. )

    1990-03-01

    Exposure to a cold environment induces a number of physiological alterations, the most serious being hypothermia. This state can occur in all individuals, but the very young and the elderly are more susceptible. Environmental and industrially generated high ambient temperature can place further stress on aged individuals and workers, resulting in a complex symptom picture. Morbidity and death may result from such exposures. Causative factors have been identified. Noise exposure induces hearing losses above those secondary to the aging process. Psychophysiological effects during noise exposure are considered to result from the sympathetic activity secondary to a general stress reaction. Vibration from the use of power tools results in Raynaud's phenomenon. However, modification of power tools has reduced the symptoms associated with vibration exposure. Termination of exposure to vibration appears eventually to reduce symptoms related to white-finger spasms. Interaction between these stressors has not been clarified because of the complex effects of each. The need for additional information about the response to these stressors is evident. 38 references.

  13. Evaluation of internal noise methods for Hotelling observer models

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yani; Pham, Binh T.; Eckstein, Miguel P.

    2007-08-15

    The inclusion of internal noise in model observers is a common method to allow for quantitative comparisons between human and model observer performance in visual detection tasks. In this article, we studied two different strategies for inserting internal noise into Hotelling model observers. In the first strategy, internal noise was added to the output of individual channels: (a) Independent nonuniform channel noise, (b) independent uniform channel noise. In the second strategy, internal noise was added to the decision variable arising from the combination of channel responses. The standard deviation of the zero mean internal noise was either constant or proportional to: (a) the decision variable's standard deviation due to the external noise, (b) the decision variable's variance caused by the external noise, (c) the decision variable magnitude on a trial to trial basis. We tested three model observers: square window Hotelling observer (HO), channelized Hotelling observer (CHO), and Laguerre-Gauss Hotelling observer (LGHO) using a four alternative forced choice (4AFC) signal known exactly but variable task with a simulated signal embedded in real x-ray coronary angiogram backgrounds. The results showed that the internal noise method that led to the best prediction of human performance differed across the studied model observers. The CHO model best predicted human observer performance with the channel internal noise. The HO and LGHO best predicted human observer performance with the decision variable internal noise. The present results might guide researchers with the choice of methods to include internal noise into Hotelling model observers when evaluating and optimizing medical image quality.

  14. Judgments of aircraft noise in a traffic noise background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, C. A.; Rice, C. G.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine subjective response to aircraft noise in different road traffic backgrounds. In addition, two laboratory techniques for presenting the aircraft noise with the background noise were evaluated. For one technique, the background noise was continuous over an entire test session; for the other, the background noise level was changed with each aircraft noise during a session. Subjective response to aircraft noise was found to decrease with increasing background noise level, for a range of typical indoor noise levels. Subjective response was found to be highly correlated with the Noise Pollution Level (NPL) measurement scale.

  15. Improved Measurement of Coherence in Presence of Instrument Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merceret, Francis J.

    2003-01-01

    A method for correcting measured coherence spectra for the effect of incoherent instrument noise has been developed and demonstrated. Coherence measurements are widely used in engineering and science to determine the extent to which two signals are alike. The signals may come from two different sources or from the same source at different times. The coherence of time-lagged signals from a single source is an excellent indication of the effective lifetime of the signal components as a function of their frequency. Unfortunately, incoherent instrument noise will bias the measurement to lower values and may lead the user of the data to false conclusions about the longevity of significant features. The new method may be used whenever both the signal and noise power spectra are known and the noise is incoherent both with the signal and with itself at the applicable time delays. It provides a corrected coherence spectrum given the measured coherence and power spectra. For powerlaw signal spectra and instrumental white noise, the correction formula takes a particularly simple and explicit form. Since many geophysical signals exhibit powerlaw behavior and most instrument noise spectra approach white noise, the simplified form should be widely applicable in meteorology, oceanography, geology, and planetary geophysics.

  16. Noise analysis of DC SQUIDs with damped superconducting flux transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faley, M. I.; Poppe, U.; Urban, K.; Fagaly, R. L.

    2010-06-01

    An analysis was performed of intrinsic noise for high-Tc DC SQUID with superconducting flux transformer (FT) containing resistive elements. For a SQUID with a loop inductance of about 40 pH we observed voltage swings of ~55 μV and a flux noise of ~4 μΦ0/√Hz at 77 K. Inductive coupling of an 8-mm multilayer superconducting FT to the SQUID increased voltage swings to ~70 μV due to effective reduction of the SQUID loop inductance. This also increased the flux noise to ~6μΦ0/√Hz, corresponding to a field resolution of ~18 fT/√Hz at 77 K with a white noise spectrum down to frequency ~10 Hz. The main sources of white flux noise were the Nyquist noise in the Josephson junctions and the FT, as well as the suppression of the DC SQUID voltage swings caused by parasitic capacitance between the FT and the SQUID. An ultra-low-ohmic resistor with resistance value between the flux-creep-induced resistances of superconductors (below ~0.1 nΩ) and resistances of conventional resistors (above ~0.1 mΩ) was developed. An RL-circuit based high-pass filter (HPF) with time constant ~7 sec was realized and integrated in the superconducting FT. The contribution of the HPF to the noise of the sensors was measured and compared with calculated values.

  17. Statistics of a neuron model driven by asymmetric colored noise.

    PubMed

    Müller-Hansen, Finn; Droste, Felix; Lindner, Benjamin

    2015-02-01

    Irregular firing of neurons can be modeled as a stochastic process. Here we study the perfect integrate-and-fire neuron driven by dichotomous noise, a Markovian process that jumps between two states (i.e., possesses a non-Gaussian statistics) and exhibits nonvanishing temporal correlations (i.e., represents a colored noise). Specifically, we consider asymmetric dichotomous noise with two different transition rates. Using a first-passage-time formulation, we derive exact expressions for the probability density and the serial correlation coefficient of the interspike interval (time interval between two subsequent neural action potentials) and the power spectrum of the spike train. Furthermore, we extend the model by including additional Gaussian white noise, and we give approximations for the interspike interval (ISI) statistics in this case. Numerical simulations are used to validate the exact analytical results for pure dichotomous noise, and to test the approximations of the ISI statistics when Gaussian white noise is included. The results may help to understand how correlations and asymmetry of noise and signals in nerve cells shape neuronal firing statistics.

  18. Hot topics in noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinson, Michael R.

    2003-10-01

    Our world continues to be a noisy place and the challenge to ``increase and diffuse knowledge of noise propagation, passive and active noise control, and the effects of noise'' remains. In the last several years, noise in the classroom has emerged as one of the hotter topics: Considerable progress has been made in the underpinning research, the formulation of recommendations, and the process of educating society on the social and personal impact of inadequate acoustical conditions in classrooms. The establishment of the ANSI S12.60-2002 standard for classroom acoustics was a milestone event. Noise in cities and the understanding of our soundscapes are subjects of ongoing significance. The development of standards and regulations is a continuing process, with urban community noise regulations, aviation noise, and the preservation of natural quiet in national parks being of current concern. New methods to reduce noise are under development and include passive and active methods of noise control, techniques for modeling the performance of noise barriers, and approaches for designing product sound quality.

  19. Noise Mapping and Annoyance.

    PubMed

    Knauss, D.

    2002-01-01

    The EC has published a Green Paper on noise policy in the EU and has issued a directive on the assessment and reduction of environmental noise. This directive will make noise mapping mandatory for cities with at least 250.000 inhabitants. Due to the development in computer technology it is possible to calculate noise maps for large urban areas using the available data on buildings, ground profile, road and rail traffic. Examples for noise mapping are Birmingham (GB), Linz (A) and various German cities. Based on noise maps and empirical data on the correlation between annoyance and noise levels annoyance maps for different sources (rail, road, aircraft) can be calculated. Under the assumption that the annoyance for the different sources are only weakly correlated, a combined annoyance map can be calculated. In a second step using the distribution of the population the actual number of annoyed people can be evaluated. This analysis can be used, for example, to identify noise hot spots and to assess the impact of major traffic projects - roads, airports- on the noise situation as well as the impact on the population. Furthermore, the combined annoyance maps can be used to investigate on health effects and to check whether or not empirical correlations between annoyance and noise levels are sufficiently correct.

  20. Pulse-noise approach for classical spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garanin, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    For systems of classical spins interacting with the bath via damping and thermal noise, an approach is suggested to replace the white noise by a pulse noise acting at regular time intervals Δ t , within which the system evolves conservatively. The method is working well in the typical case of a small dimensionless damping constant λ and allows a considerable speedup of computations by using high-order numerical integrators with a large time step δ t (up to a fraction of the precession period), while keeping δ t ≪Δ t to reduce the relative contribution of noise-related operations. In cases when precession can be discarded, δ t can be increased up to a fraction of the relaxation time ∝1 /λ that leads to a further speedup. This makes equilibration speed comparable with that of the Metropolis Monte Carlo method. The pulse-noise approach is tested on single-spin and multispin models.

  1. Pulse-noise approach for classical spin systems.

    PubMed

    Garanin, D A

    2017-01-01

    For systems of classical spins interacting with the bath via damping and thermal noise, an approach is suggested to replace the white noise by a pulse noise acting at regular time intervals Δt, within which the system evolves conservatively. The method is working well in the typical case of a small dimensionless damping constant λ and allows a considerable speedup of computations by using high-order numerical integrators with a large time step δt (up to a fraction of the precession period), while keeping δt≪Δt to reduce the relative contribution of noise-related operations. In cases when precession can be discarded, δt can be increased up to a fraction of the relaxation time ∝1/λ that leads to a further speedup. This makes equilibration speed comparable with that of the Metropolis Monte Carlo method. The pulse-noise approach is tested on single-spin and multispin models.

  2. Transport driven by biharmonic forces: Impact of correlated thermal noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machura, L.; Łuczka, J.

    2010-09-01

    We study an inertial Brownian particle moving in a symmetric periodic substrate, driven by a zero-mean biharmonic force and correlated thermal noise. The Brownian motion is described in terms of a generalized Langevin equation with an exponentially correlated Gaussian noise term, obeying the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. We analyze impact of nonzero correlation time of thermal noise on transport properties of the Brownian particle. We identify regimes where the increase of the correlation time intensifies long-time transport of the Brownian particle. The opposite effect is also found: longer correlation time reduces the stationary velocity of the particle. The correlation time induced multiple current reversal is detected. We reveal that thermal noise of nonzero correlation time can radically enhance long-time velocity of the Brownian particle in regimes where in the white noise limit the velocity is extremely small. All transport properties can be tested in the setup consisting of a resistively and capacitively shunted Josephson junction device.

  3. Detection in fixed and random noise in foveal and parafoveal vision explained by template learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, B. L.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Foveal and parafoveal contrast detection thresholds for Gabor and checkerboard targets were measured in white noise by means of a two-interval forced-choice paradigm. Two white-noise conditions were used: fixed and twin. In the fixed noise condition a single noise sample was presented in both intervals of all the trials. In the twin noise condition the same noise sample was used in the two intervals of a trial, but a new sample was generated for each trial. Fixed noise conditions usually resulted in lower thresholds than twin noise. Template learning models are presented that attribute this advantage of fixed over twin noise either to fixed memory templates' reducing uncertainty by incorporation of the noise or to the introduction, by the learning process itself, of more variability in the twin noise condition. Quantitative predictions of the template learning process show that it contributes to the accelerating nonlinear increase in performance with signal amplitude at low signal-to-noise ratios.

  4. Supersymmetry of AdS and flat IIB backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, S.; Gutowski, J.; Papadopoulos, G.

    2015-02-01

    We present a systematic description of all warped AdS n × w M 10- n and IIB backgrounds and identify the a priori number of supersymmetries N preserved by these solutions. In particular, we find that the AdS n backgrounds preserve for n ≤ 4 and for 4 < n ≤ 6 supersymmetries and for suitably restricted. In addition under some assumptions required for the applicability of the maximum principle, we demonstrate that the Killing spinors of AdS n backgrounds can be identified with the zero modes of Dirac-like operators on M 10- n establishing a new class of Lichnerowicz type theorems. Furthermore, we adapt some of these results to backgrounds with fluxes by taking the AdS radius to infinity. We find that these backgrounds preserve for 2 < n ≤ 4 and for 4 < n ≤ 7 supersymmetries. We also demonstrate that the Killing spinors of AdS n × w M 10- n do not factorize into Killing spinors on AdS n and Killing spinors on M 10- n .

  5. [Value-Added--Adding Economic Value in the Food Industry].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Mary A., Ed.

    1989-01-01

    This booklet focuses on the economic concept of "value added" to goods and services. A student activity worksheet illustrates how the steps involved in processing food are examples of the concept of value added. The booklet further links food processing to the idea of value added to the Gross National Product (GNP). Discussion questions,…

  6. Whiteness in Social Work Education Authentic White Allies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornung, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is guided by the following questions: How do People of Color define and experience White people as "authentic" allies? What does a White ally look like to People of Color? How do White allies view themselves as "authentic" White allies? What experiences lead White people to anti-racism and anti-racist praxis?…

  7. Impact of colored noise in pulse amplitude measurements: A time-domain approach using differintegrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regadío, Alberto; Tabero, Jesús; Sánchez-Prieto, Sebastián

    2016-03-01

    In particle detectors, pulse shaping is the process of changing the waveform of the pulses in order to maximize the signal to noise ratio. This shaping usually only takes into account white, pink (flicker) and red (Brownian) noise. In this paper, a generalization of noise indexes as a function to an arbitrary fβ noise type, where β is a real number, is presented. This generalization has been created using the differintegral operator, defined in Fractional Calculus. These formulas are used to calculate the Equivalent Noise Change (ENC) in detector particle systems.

  8. Investigation of Allan variance for determining noise spectral forms with application to microwave radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, William D.

    1994-01-01

    An investigation of the Allan variance method as a possible means for characterizing fluctuations in radiometric noise diodes has been performed. The goal is to separate fluctuation components into white noise, flicker noise, and random-walk noise. The primary means is by discrete-time processing, and the study focused primarily on the digital processes involved. Noise satisfying the requirements was generated by direct convolution, fast Fourier transformation (FFT) processing in the time domain, and FFT processing in the frequency domain. Some of the numerous results obtained are presented along with the programs used in the study.

  9. Non-Linear Dynamical Classification of Short Time Series of the Rössler System in High Noise Regimes

    PubMed Central

    Lainscsek, Claudia; Weyhenmeyer, Jonathan; Hernandez, Manuel E.; Poizner, Howard; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2013-01-01

    Time series analysis with delay differential equations (DDEs) reveals non-linear properties of the underlying dynamical system and can serve as a non-linear time-domain classification tool. Here global DDE models were used to analyze short segments of simulated time series from a known dynamical system, the Rössler system, in high noise regimes. In a companion paper, we apply the DDE model developed here to classify short segments of encephalographic (EEG) data recorded from patients with Parkinson’s disease and healthy subjects. Nine simulated subjects in each of two distinct classes were generated by varying the bifurcation parameter b and keeping the other two parameters (a and c) of the Rössler system fixed. All choices of b were in the chaotic parameter range. We diluted the simulated data using white noise ranging from 10 to −30 dB signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Structure selection was supervised by selecting the number of terms, delays, and order of non-linearity of the model DDE model that best linearly separated the two classes of data. The distances d from the linear dividing hyperplane was then used to assess the classification performance by computing the area A′ under the ROC curve. The selected model was tested on untrained data using repeated random sub-sampling validation. DDEs were able to accurately distinguish the two dynamical conditions, and moreover, to quantify the changes in the dynamics. There was a significant correlation between the dynamical bifurcation parameter b of the simulated data and the classification parameter d from our analysis. This correlation still held for new simulated subjects with new dynamical parameters selected from each of the two dynamical regimes. Furthermore, the correlation was robust to added noise, being significant even when the noise was greater than the signal. We conclude that DDE models may be used as a generalizable and reliable classification tool for even small segments of noisy data. PMID

  10. Commercial aircraft noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. J.

    The history of aircraft noise control development is traced with an eye to forecasting the future. Noise control became imperative with the advent of the first generation of commercial jet aircraft, which were extremely loud. The steady increases in the size of turbofans have nearly matched the progress in noise reduction capabilities in recent years. Only 5 dB of reduction in fleet noise has been achieved since early standards were met. Current engine design is concentrated on increasing fuel efficiency rather than lowering noise emissions. Further difficulties exist because of continued flights with older aircraft. Gains in noise reduction have been made mainly by decreasing exhaust velocities from 600-700 m/sec to 300-400 m/sec. New techniques being explored comprise mixing the core and bypass flows, interaction tone control, reduction of broadband sources, development of acoustic liner technology and alterations in the number of fan blades and stage spacing.

  11. Poultry Plant Noise Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A demonstration conducted last winter at the Tip Top Poultry Plant intended to show poultry plant managers from all over the U.S. potential solutions to the problem of plant noise. Plastic covers used over sound absorbing materials need to meet cleanability requirements, high- pressure water cleaning and other harsh maintenance procedures peculiar to the poultry processing industry. For the demonstration, Fiber Flex, Inc. manufactured and donated 750 noise panels; Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation donated the fiberglas cores; and the cover material was purchased from Howe and Bainbridge. The Engineering Experiment Station (EES) conducted before and after noise surveys and is evaluating the effect of noise reduction on turnover and productivity in the demonstration plant. EES plans to conduct a noise abatement workshop and update a handbook to help poultry processors with noise problems. EES study and demonstration may be applicable to other food processing plants where similar sanitary constraints exist.

  12. Toward the Measurement of Functional Proficiency: Contextualization of the Noise Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaies, Stephen J.

    1977-01-01

    The "noise" test is a dictation of English sentences recorded on tape with accompanying background white noise; it is used to evaluate English proficiency. This study describes a revision to increase test validity. Technical aspects of recording, syntactic comparability of test items, and data on revised instrument performance are discussed. (CHK)

  13. Aviation Noise Effects,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    demonstrated little tolerance of aircraft noise and have shown few signs of adapting to it. Since no well-established guidelines concerning noise and animals ...vary from almost no reaction to virtually no tolerance of the sound. The question of how adaptable animals are remains largely unanswered. Both wild...report include"the-folowing:- Annoyance, --Effects of Noise on Wild and Domesticated Animal Hearing and Hearing Loss) Low .Fequency Pcoustical oEhergy

  14. AdS3 Solutions of IIB Supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Nakwoo

    2005-12-02

    We consider pure D3-brane configurations of IIB string theory which lead to supergravity solutions containing an AdS3 factor. They can provide new examples of AdS3/CFT2 examples on D3-branes whose worldvolume is partially compactified. When the internal 7 dimensional space is non-compact, they are related to fluctuations of higher dimensional AdS/CFT duality examples, thus dual to the BPS operators of D = 4 superconformal field theories. We find that supersymmetry requires the 7 dimensional space is warped Hopf-fibration of (real) 6 dimensional Kahler manifolds.

  15. Effects of noise on models of spiny dendrites.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Emma J; Lord, Gabriel J

    2013-04-01

    We study the effects of noise in two models of spiny dendrites. Through the introduction of different types of noise to both the Spike-diffuse-spike (SDS) and Baer-Rinzel (BR) models we investigate the change in behaviour of the travelling wave solution present in both deterministic systems, as noise intensity increases. We show that the speed of wave propagation in both the SDS and BR models respectively differs as the noise intensity in the spine heads increases. In contrast the cable is very robust to noise and as such the speed shows very little variation from the deterministic system. We introduce a space-dependent spine density, ρ(x), to the original Baer-Rinzel model and show how this modified model can mimic behaviour (under influence of noise) of both original systems, through variation of one parameter. We also show that the correlation time and length scales of the noise can enhance propagation of travelling wave solutions where the white noise dominates the underlying signal and produces noise induced phenomena.

  16. Landing gear noise attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  17. Structureborne noise in aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenson, S. A.; Metcalf, V. L.

    1987-01-01

    The amount of noise reaching an aircraft's interior by structureborne paths, when high levels of other noises are present, involves the measurement of transfer functions between vibrating levels on the wing and interior noise. The magnitude of the structureborne noise transfer function is established by exciting the aircraft with an electrodynamic shaker; a second transfer function is measured using the same sensor locations with the aircraft engines operating. Attention is given to the case of a twin-turboprop OV-10A aircraft; the resulting transfer function values at the discrete frequencies corresponding to the propeller blade passage frequency and its first four harmonics are tabulated and illustrated.

  18. Understanding jet noise.

    PubMed

    Karabasov, S A

    2010-08-13

    Jets are one of the most fascinating topics in fluid mechanics. For aeronautics, turbulent jet-noise modelling is particularly challenging, not only because of the poor understanding of high Reynolds number turbulence, but also because of the extremely low acoustic efficiency of high-speed jets. Turbulent jet-noise models starting from the classical Lighthill acoustic analogy to state-of-the art models were considered. No attempt was made to present any complete overview of jet-noise theories. Instead, the aim was to emphasize the importance of sound generation and mean-flow propagation effects, as well as their interference, for the understanding and prediction of jet noise.

  19. Action growth for AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Ruan, Shan-Ming; Wang, Shao-Jiang; Yang, Run-Qiu; Peng, Rong-Hui

    2016-09-01

    Recently a Complexity-Action (CA) duality conjecture has been proposed, which relates the quantum complexity of a holographic boundary state to the action of a Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) patch in the anti-de Sitter (AdS) bulk. In this paper we further investigate the duality conjecture for stationary AdS black holes and derive some exact results for the growth rate of action within the Wheeler-DeWitt (WDW) patch at late time approximation, which is supposed to be dual to the growth rate of quantum complexity of holographic state. Based on the results from the general D-dimensional Reissner-Nordström (RN)-AdS black hole, rotating/charged Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole, Kerr-AdS black hole and charged Gauss-Bonnet-AdS black hole, we present a universal formula for the action growth expressed in terms of some thermodynamical quantities associated with the outer and inner horizons of the AdS black holes. And we leave the conjecture unchanged that the stationary AdS black hole in Einstein gravity is the fastest computer in nature.

  20. Stress effects of noise in a field experiment in comparison to reactions to short term noise exposure in the laboratory.

    PubMed

    Ising, H; Michalak, R

    2004-01-01

    Reactions to noise-induced communication disturbance of 42 men during a seminar were investigated. Stress reactions with or without road traffic noise (Lm = 60 dBA) were compared. Traffic noise was played back via loudspeakers during one day in the seminar room. The following parameters were measured: Fatigue and mental tension by questionnaire; blood pressure and heart rate; excretion of adrenaline, noradrenaline and cAMP from the collected urine. The same subjects participated in a laboratory test where the blood pressure was measured during 5 minutes of rest and after 5 minutes of exposure to intermittent white noise (Lm=97 dBA). It was found that the noise in the field experiment caused psychological and physiological stress effects in half of the subjects. Increased mental tension was correlated to increases as well as decreases of the blood pressure. Systolic blood pressure reactions were stronger than the reactions of diastolic blood pressure. Noise sensitive subjects reacted stronger than the others. In the short-term laboratory test, systolic blood pressure increases were smaller than the diastolic increases. At the end of the 5 minutes noise exposure only the diastolic blood pressure increases were significant. There was no correlation between the blood pressure reactions in the two different noise exposure experiments. There existed a positive correlation between noise sensitivity and the systolic blood pressure increases during the seminar, whilst the correlation, between noise sensitivity and systolic blood pressure increases in the laboratory exposure, was negative. From these results we conclude that short-term noise exposure experiments do not provide information about the effects of long-term real life exposure to environmental noise. Potential health effects of chronic noise-induced disturbances of activities are discussed.

  1. Value Added in English Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Andrew; McCormack, Tanya; Evans, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Value-added indicators are now a central part of school accountability in England, and value-added information is routinely used in school improvement at both the national and the local levels. This article describes the value-added models that are being used in the academic year 2007-8 by schools, parents, school inspectors, and other…

  2. Constructing the AdS dual of a Fermi liquid: AdS black holes with Dirac hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čubrović, Mihailo; Zaanen, Jan; Schalm, Koenraad

    2011-10-01

    We provide evidence that the holographic dual to a strongly coupled charged Fermi liquid has a non-zero fermion density in the bulk. We show that the pole-strength of the stable quasiparticle characterizing the Fermi surface is encoded in the AdS probability density of a single normalizable fermion wavefunction in AdS. Recalling Migdal's theorem which relates the pole strength to the Fermi-Dirac characteristic discontinuity in the number density at ω F , we conclude that the AdS dual of a Fermi liquid is described by occupied on-shell fermionic modes in AdS. Encoding the occupied levels in the total spatially averaged probability density of the fermion field directly, we show that an AdS Reissner-Nordström black holein a theory with charged fermions has a critical temperature, at which the system undergoes a first-order transition to a black hole with a non-vanishing profile for the bulk fermion field. Thermodynamics and spectral analysis support that the solution with non-zero AdS fermion-profile is the preferred ground state at low temperatures.

  3. CO{sub 2} dial transmitter/receiver noise characterization and related correlated noise issues

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, B.; Schmitt, M.; Goeller, R.; Czuchlewski, S.; Fuller, K.; Olivas, N.; Laubscher, B.; Sander, R.

    1996-02-01

    Our approach concerning the development of hard target return CO{sub 2} DIAL transmitter/receiver systems is two phased- (i) through analysis and experiment, develop a fundamental understanding of the transmitter/receiver physics specific to DIAL systems and (ii) apply these fundamentals in the development of optimal performance DIAL transmitter/receiver systems. We present our progress and results towards these objectives with the following topics addressed: A general overview of the DIAL transmitter/receiver system characterization effort with a focus on transceiver noise processes. The effects of correlated noise on DIAL performance, especially those effecting statistical convergence over long sample structures, is , introduced. And, preliminary measurements of a low-noise, ``white`` receiver prototype are presented.

  4. White Flight: Some Hypotheses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegmann, Robert G.

    The available literature on white flight, or, more properly, school resegregation -- the phenomenon of white withdrawal (total or partial) from desegregated schools -- is reviewed in this paper which also reports some new research in this area. The distinction is made between those schools located on the fringes of the inner city, which first…

  5. White Teachers Talking Race

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, Avner; Garrett, James

    2013-01-01

    In light of the increasing racial diversity in American schools and the consistently homogenous teacher workforce in the United States, understanding the ways white teachers consider and attend to racial issues is of crucial importance to the educational landscape. This paper, based on a qualitative study, explores five white American teachers'…

  6. The Hidden Curriculum of Whiteness: White Teachers, White Territory, and White Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Ricky Lee

    This paper suggests that space and spatiality are major features of racial identity and the formation of student resistance. It brings together critical studies of "Whiteness," human territoriality, and theories of resistance in education. The problems between white teachers and students of color can be understood better through a combination of…

  7. Sailing to White Boat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a composite red-green-blue image of the rock called White Boat. It is the first rock target that Spirit drove to after finishing a series of investigations on the rock Adirondack. White Boat stood out to scientists due to its light color and more tabular shape compared to the dark, rounded rocks that surround it.

  8. Whites in Desegregated Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL. Center for Equal Education.

    In 1972, over 1.3 million white children attended schools in which they were a minority. This document consists of articles addressing this little studied phenomenon. In Gretchen Schafft's article, an anthropological method is employed to study the role of white children in a predominantly black junior high school in Washington, D.C. Jean Le…

  9. Ambient Noise in Shallow Water: A Survey of the Unclassified Literature.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    hypothesis which would explain this observation is that the source of noise near the low 7. ..7.. ~~u-~m".. .- - p -~~* - %R -vi w - AlJ’ Wf % --’,Wkz...Shallow water ambient noise surprisingly flat (white) for high wind speed, in contrast to typical ambient noise spectra. p The difference is explained...taken * .. . . . . .. p .-... . . ..-.. :; ..- ..- ... ; .. ’...’~~. ... ".. .. ’.-.-...... . ..... - .... ...... ..... . .. . - 18 Shallow water ambient

  10. Working decks for buoy maintenance. White Sage on left, White ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Working decks for buoy maintenance. White Sage on left, White Holly on right. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HOLLY, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, 4640 Urquhart Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

  11. Elevation from east. White Holly in foreground, with White Sage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevation from east. White Holly in foreground, with White Sage behind. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HOLLY, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, 4640 Urquhart Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

  12. Image discrimination models predict detection in fixed but not random noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Beard, B. L.; Watson, A. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    By means of a two-interval forced-choice procedure, contrast detection thresholds for an aircraft positioned on a simulated airport runway scene were measured with fixed and random white-noise masks. The term fixed noise refers to a constant, or unchanging, noise pattern for each stimulus presentation. The random noise was either the same or different in the two intervals. Contrary to simple image discrimination model predictions, the same random noise condition produced greater masking than the fixed noise. This suggests that observers seem unable to hold a new noisy image for comparison. Also, performance appeared limited by internal process variability rather than by external noise variability, since similar masking was obtained for both random noise types.

  13. Far-field errors due to random noise in cylindrical near-field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeu, Jordi; Jofre, Luis; Cardama, Angel

    1992-01-01

    A full characterization of the far-field noise obtained from cylindrical near- to far-field transformation, for a white Gaussian, space stationary, near-field noise is derived. A possible source for such noise is the receiver additive noise. The noise characterization is done by obtaining the autocorrelation of the far-field noise, which is shown to be easily computed during the transformation process. Even for this simple case, the far-field noise has complex behavior dependent on the measurement probe. Once the statistical properties of the far-field noise are determined, it is possible to compute upper and lower bounds for the radiation pattern for a given probability. These bounds define a strip within the radiation pattern with the desired probability. This may be used as part of a complete near-field error analysis of a particular cylindrical near-field facility.

  14. Reactions to diversity in recruitment advertising--are differences black and white?

    PubMed

    Avery, Derek R

    2003-08-01

    The portrayal of racial diversity in corporate recruitment advertisements has become increasingly common. Despite widespread sentiment that ad diversity attracts a broader scope of applicants, empirical research on this topic is sparse. Consequently, the present study manipulated ad diversity at 2 hierarchical levels to assess its impact on organizational attractiveness for 273 Black and White university students. In contrast to the predictions of relational demography, White viewers exhibited no effect for ad diversity. Black viewers were attracted by ad diversity but only when it extended to supervisorylevel positions. More importantly, the effect of race on reactions to ad diversity was contingent on the viewer's openness to racial diversity (other-group orientation).

  15. Sounds and Noises. A Position Paper on Noise Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Thomas L.

    This position paper focuses on noise pollution and the problems and solutions associated with this form of pollution. The paper is divided into the following five sections: Noise and the Ear, Noise Measurement, III Effects of Noise, Acoustics and Action, and Programs and Activities. The first section identifies noise and sound, the beginnings of…

  16. AdS-Carroll branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, T. E.; ter Veldhuis, T.

    2016-11-01

    Coset methods are used to determine the action of a co-dimension one brane (domain wall) embedded in (d + 1)-dimensional AdS space in the Carroll limit in which the speed of light goes to zero. The action is invariant under the non-linearly realized symmetries of the AdS-Carroll spacetime. The Nambu-Goldstone field exhibits a static spatial distribution for the brane with a time varying momentum density related to the brane's spatial shape as well as the AdS-C geometry. The AdS-C vector field dual theory is obtained.

  17. ADS Based on Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Weimin; Dai, Jianping

    An accelerator-driven system (ADS), which combines a particle accelerator with a subcritical core, is commonly regarded as a promising device for the transmutation of nuclear waste, as well as a potential scheme for thorium-based energy production. So far the predominant choice of the accelerator for ADS is a superconducting linear accelerator (linac). This article gives a brief overview of ADS based on linacs, including the motivation, principle, challenges and research activities around the world. The status and future plan of the Chinease ADS (C-ADS) project will be highlighted and discussed in depth as an example.

  18. AdS spacetimes from wrapped D3-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauntlett, Jerome P.; MacConamhna, Oisín A. P.

    2007-12-01

    We derive a geometrical characterization of a large class of AdS3 and AdS2 supersymmetric spacetimes in type IIB supergravity with non-vanishing five-form flux using G-structures. These are obtained as special cases of a class of supersymmetric spacetimes with an {{\\bb R}}^{1,1} or {{\\bb R}} (time) factor that are associated with D3 branes wrapping calibrated two or three cycles, respectively, in manifolds with SU(2), SU(3), SU(4) and G2 holonomy. We show how two explicit AdS solutions, previously constructed in gauged supergravity, satisfy our more general G-structure conditions. For each explicit solution, we also derive a special holonomy metric which, although singular, has an appropriate calibrated cycle. After analytic continuation, some of the classes of AdS spacetimes give rise to known classes of BPS bubble solutions with {{\\bb R}}\\times {\\it SO}(4)\\times {\\it SO}(4), {{\\bb R}}\\times {\\it SO}(4)\\times U(1) and {{\\bb R}}\\times {\\it SO}(4) symmetry. These have 1/2, 1/4 and 1/8 supersymmetry, respectively. We present a new class of 1/8 BPS geometries with {{\\bb R}}\\times {\\it SU}(2) symmetry, obtained by analytic continuation of the class of AdS spacetimes associated with D3-brane wrapped on associative three cycles.

  19. Step detection in single-molecule real time trajectories embedded in correlated noise.

    PubMed

    Arunajadai, Srikesh G; Cheng, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Single-molecule real time trajectories are embedded in high noise. To extract kinetic or dynamic information of the molecules from these trajectories often requires idealization of the data in steps and dwells. One major premise behind the existing single-molecule data analysis algorithms is the gaussian 'white' noise, which displays no correlation in time and whose amplitude is independent on data sampling frequency. This so-called 'white' noise is widely assumed but its validity has not been critically evaluated. We show that correlated noise exists in single-molecule real time trajectories collected from optical tweezers. The assumption of white noise during analysis of these data can lead to serious over- or underestimation of the number of steps depending on the algorithms employed. We present a statistical method that quantitatively evaluates the structure of the underlying noise, takes the noise structure into account, and identifies steps and dwells in a single-molecule trajectory. Unlike existing data analysis algorithms, this method uses Generalized Least Squares (GLS) to detect steps and dwells. Under the GLS framework, the optimal number of steps is chosen using model selection criteria such as Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC). Comparison with existing step detection algorithms showed that this GLS method can detect step locations with highest accuracy in the presence of correlated noise. Because this method is automated, and directly works with high bandwidth data without pre-filtering or assumption of gaussian noise, it may be broadly useful for analysis of single-molecule real time trajectories.

  20. The Embeddedness of White Fragility within White Pre-Service Principals' Reflections on White Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Mack T., III

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes the prevalence of white fragility within the six white, pre-service principals' online responses to readings about white privilege. Six white, pre-service principals were asked to provide commentary to class readings on the relevance of white privilege to their preparation for future positions as principals. The findings showed…

  1. Sounding Off about Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumpton, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Noise in a community college library can be part of the nature of the environment. It can also become a huge distraction for those who see the library as their sanctuary for quiet study and review of resources. This article describes the steps that should be taken by library staff in order to be proactive about noise and the library environment,…

  2. Speech communications in noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The physical characteristics of speech, the methods of speech masking measurement, and the effects of noise on speech communication are investigated. Topics include the speech signal and intelligibility, the effects of noise on intelligibility, the articulation index, and various devices for evaluating speech systems.

  3. Speech communications in noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-07-01

    The physical characteristics of speech, the methods of speech masking measurement, and the effects of noise on speech communication are investigated. Topics include the speech signal and intelligibility, the effects of noise on intelligibility, the articulation index, and various devices for evaluating speech systems.

  4. Noise Pollution, Teachers' Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Patrick A.; Lavaroni, Charles W.

    One of three in a series about pollution, this teacher's guide for a unit on noise pollution is designed for use in junior high school grades. It offers suggestions for extending the information and activities contained in the textual material for students. Chapter 1 discusses the problem of noise pollution and involves students in processes of…

  5. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  6. Geosat Follow-On (GFO) Altimeter Document Series. Volume 2; GFO On-Orbit Altimeter Noise Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, Mavis L.; Sailor, Richard V.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of an analysis of the white noise in Geosat Follow-On (GFO) altimeter data. The Repeat-Track Method was used to determine noise level. This approach was developed at TASC and has been used to quantify noise levels of all previous satellite altimeter missions. The GFO altimeter was designed to have an RMS white noise level of less than 3.5 centimeters for significant wave height less than 2 meters. The results of the analysis presented here show that the GFO altimeter meets this specification.

  7. Pulsating White Dwarf Star GD99

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chynoweth, K. M.; Thompson, S.; Mullally, F.; Yeates, C.

    2004-12-01

    We present 15 hours of time-series photometry of the variable white dwarf star GD99. These data were obtained at the McDonald Observatory 2.1m Otto Struve Telescope in January 2003, using the Argos CCD photometer. We achieved a noise level as low as 0.07 %, as measured from the power spectrum of our first night. Our observations confirm that GD99 is a unique pulsating white dwarf whose modes show characteristics of both the hot and cold type of DA variable stars. Additionally, GD99 has a large number of modes, making it a good candidate for asteroseismological study. Our preliminary results indicate that this star merits further study to decipher its abundant set of unusual modes. With such a rich period structure, longer continuous data sets will be required to fully resolve the pulsation spectrum.

  8. Noise in coevolving networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakonova, Marina; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; San Miguel, Maxi

    2015-09-01

    Coupling dynamics of the states of the nodes of a network to the dynamics of the network topology leads to generic absorbing and fragmentation transitions. The coevolving voter model is a typical system that exhibits such transitions at some critical rewiring. We study the robustness of these transitions under two distinct ways of introducing noise. Noise affecting all the nodes destroys the absorbing-fragmentation transition, giving rise in finite-size systems to two regimes: bimodal magnetization and dynamic fragmentation. Noise targeting a fraction of nodes preserves the transitions but introduces shattered fragmentation with its characteristic fraction of isolated nodes and one or two giant components. Both the lack of absorbing state for homogeneous noise and the shift in the absorbing transition to higher rewiring for targeted noise are supported by analytical approximations.

  9. Revisiting the thermodynamic relations in AdS /CMT models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Seungjoon; Park, Sang-A.; Yi, Sang-Heon

    2017-03-01

    Motivated by the recent unified approach to the Smarr-like relation of anti-de Sitter (AdS) planar black holes in conjunction with the quasilocal formalism on conserved charges, we revisit the quantum statistical and thermodynamic relations of hairy AdS planar black holes. By extending the previous results, we identify the hairy contribution in the bulk and show that the holographic computation can be improved so that it is consistent with the bulk computation. We argue that the first law can be retained in its universal form and that the relation between the on-shell renormalized Euclidean action and its free energy interpretation in gravity may also be undeformed even with the hairy contribution in hairy AdS black holes.

  10. Entanglement entropy for free scalar fields in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugishita, Sotaro

    2016-09-01

    We compute entanglement entropy for free massive scalar fields in anti-de Sitter (AdS) space. The entangling surface is a minimal surface whose boundary is a sphere at the boundary of AdS. The entropy can be evaluated from the thermal free energy of the fields on a topological black hole by using the replica method. In odd-dimensional AdS, exact expressions of the Rényi entropy S n are obtained for arbitrary n. We also evaluate 1-loop corrections coming from the scalar fields to holographic entanglement entropy. Applying the results, we compute the leading difference of entanglement entropy between two holographic CFTs related by a renormalization group flow triggered by a double trace deformation. The difference is proportional to the shift of a central charge under the flow.

  11. Solutions of free higher spins in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, H.; Shao, Kai-Nan

    2011-11-01

    We consider free massive and massless higher integer spins in AdS backgrounds in general D dimensions. We obtain the solutions corresponding to the highest-weight state of the spin-ℓ representations of the SO (2 , D - 1) isometry groups. The solution for the spin-ℓ field is expressed recursively in terms of that for the spin- (ℓ - 1). Thus starting from the explicit spin-0, all the higher-spin solutions can be obtained. These solutions allow us to derive the generalized Breitenlohner-Freedman bound, and analyze the asymptotic falloffs. In particular, solutions with negative mass square in general have falloffs slower than those of the Schwarzschild AdS black holes in the AdS boundaries.

  12. Jet Noise Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda S.; Huff,Dennis

    2009-01-01

    A presentation outlining current jet noise work at NASA was given to the Naval Research Advisory Committee. Jet noise tasks in the Supersonics project of the Fundamental Aeronautics program were highlighted. The presentation gave an overview of developing jet noise reduction technologies and noise prediction capabilities. Advanced flow and noise diagnostic tools were also presented.

  13. White dwarfs identified in LAMOST DR 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jincheng; Zhao, Jingkun; Tziamtzis, Anestis; Liu, Jifeng; Li, Lifang; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei

    2015-12-01

    Here we present a catalogue of 1056 spectroscopically identified hydrogen-dominated white dwarfs (DAWDs), 34 helium-dominated white dwarfs (DBWDs) and 276 white dwarf main sequence (WDMS) binaries from the Large sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) survey data release 2 (DR2). 383 DAWDs, 4 DBWDs and 138 WDMSs are new identifications after cross-match with literature. There are ˜4100 k spectra in total from DR 2. The low ratio of white dwarfs found in LAMOST is attributed to biased selection of LAMOST input catalogue and much brighter targets relative to stars observed in Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In this paper, a new DAWD selection method is adopted as a new attempt and supplement to the traditional methods. The effective temperature, surface gravity, mass, cooling age and distance of high signal-to-noise DAWDs are estimated. The peak of the mass distribution is found to be ˜0.6 M⊙, which is consistent with previous work. The parameters of WDMS binaries are also provided in this paper. As the foundation of our future work, which is to identify more WDs with debris disc, WDs found in LAMOST showed a lot of potential. Interesting infrared-excess WDs will be reported in our forthcoming paper.

  14. Mapping joint grey and white matter reductions in Alzheimer's disease using joint independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaojuan; Han, Yuan; Chen, Kewei; Wang, Yan; Yao, Li

    2012-12-07

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease concomitant with grey and white matter damages. However, the interrelationship of volumetric changes between grey and white matter remains poorly understood in AD. Using joint independent component analysis, this study identified joint grey and white matter volume reductions based on structural magnetic resonance imaging data to construct the covariant networks in twelve AD patients and fourteen normal controls (NC). We found that three networks showed significant volume reductions in joint grey-white matter sources in AD patients, including (1) frontal/parietal/temporal-superior longitudinal fasciculus/corpus callosum, (2) temporal/parietal/occipital-frontal/occipital, and (3) temporal-precentral/postcentral. The corresponding expression scores distinguished AD patients from NC with 85.7%, 100% and 85.7% sensitivity for joint sources 1, 2 and 3, respectively; 75.0%, 66.7% and 75.0% specificity for joint sources 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Furthermore, the combined source of three significant joint sources best predicted the AD/NC group membership with 92.9% sensitivity and 83.3% specificity. Our findings revealed joint grey and white matter loss in AD patients, and these results can help elucidate the mechanism of grey and white matter reductions in the development of AD.

  15. Prediction, simulation, and verification of the phase noise in 80-MHz low-phase-noise crystal oscillators.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xianhe; Chen, Pingping; Fu, Wei; Jiao, Junjie

    2015-09-01

    To predict the phase noise in an 80-MHz crystal oscillator, on the basis of the classical Leeson model, we analyzed and selected the oscillator noise figure F and transistor corner frequency fc reasonably, and then calculated the loaded Q (QL) value of the oscillator according to the parameters in the selected Butler oscillation circuit. Thus, we obtained the predicted phase noise in an 80-MHz crystal oscillator according to the Leeson phase noise formula. Next, the simulation curve of the phase noise in this 80-MHz low-phase-noise crystal oscillator was obtained by establishing a transistor nonlinear model using commercial design software. Then, we debugged the 80-MHz low-phase-noise crystal oscillator prototype under the guidance of the prediction and simulation results and tested it. The measured results show that the phase noise predicted after selecting reasonable parameters for the Leeson model and the ADS simulation curve of the phase noise obtained by using the nonlinear transistor model are both close to the actual measured result. This result may be beneficial in simplifying the design process for low-phase-noise crystal oscillators.

  16. Diffusion and chaos from near AdS2 horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Mike; Donos, Aristomenis

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the thermal diffusivity D = κ/c ρ and butterfly velocity v B in holographic models that flow to AdS2 × R d fixed points in the infra-red. We show that both these quantities are governed by the same irrelevant deformation of AdS2 and hence establish a simple relationship between them. When this deformation corresponds to a universal dilaton mode of dimension Δ = 2 then this relationship is always given by D = v B 2 /(2 πT).

  17. The behavior of quantization spectra as a function of signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    An expression for the spectrum of quantization error in a discrete-time system whose input is a sinusoid plus white Gaussian noise is derived. This quantization spectrum consists of two components: a white-noise floor and spurious harmonics. The dithering effect of the input Gaussian noise in both components of the spectrum is considered. Quantitative results in a discrete Fourier transform (DFT) example show the behavior of spurious harmonics as a function of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). These results have strong implications for digital reception and signal analysis systems. At low SNRs, spurious harmonics decay exponentially on a log-log scale, and the resulting spectrum is white. As the SNR increases, the spurious harmonics figure prominently in the output spectrum. A useful expression is given that roughly bounds the magnitude of a spurious harmonic as a function of the SNR.

  18. Cortical gray and subcortical white matter associations in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Nicholas W; Du, Guangwei; Lewis, Mechelle M; Swavely, Steven; Kong, Lan; Styner, Martin; Huang, Xuemei

    2017-01-01

    Cortical atrophy has been documented in both Parkinson's disease (PD) and healthy aging, but its relationship to changes in subcortical white matter is unknown. This was investigated by obtaining T1- and diffusion-weighted images from 76 PD and 70 controls at baseline and 18 and 36 months, from which cortical volumes and underlying subcortical white matter axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), and fractional anisotropy (FA) were determined. Twelve of 69 cortical subregions had significant group differences, and for these, underlying subcortical white matter was explored. At baseline, higher cortical volumes were significantly correlated with lower underlying subcortical white matter AD, RD, and higher FA (ps ≤ 0.017) in PD. Longitudinally, higher rates of cortical atrophy in PD were associated with increased rates of change in AD RD, and FA values (ps ≤ 0.0013) in 2 subregions explored. The significant gray-white matter associations were not found in controls. Thus, unlike healthy aging, cortical atrophy and subcortical white matter changes may not be independent events in PD.

  19. Astrometric Binaries: White Dwarfs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliversen, Nancy A.

    We propose to observe a selection of astrometric or spectroscopicastrometric binaries nearer than about 20 pc with unseen low mass companions. Systems of this type are important for determining the luminosity function of low mass stars (white dwarfs and very late main sequence M stars), and their contribution to the total mass of the galaxy. Systems of this type are also important because the low mass, invisible companions are potential candidates in the search for planets. Our target list is selected primarily from the list of 31 astrometric binaries near the sun by Lippincott (1978, Space Sci. Rev., 22, 153), with additional candidates from recent observations by Kamper. The elimination of stars with previous IUE observations, red companions resolved by infrared speckle interferometry, or primaries later than M1 (because if white dwarf companions are present they should have been detected in the visible region) reduces the list to 5 targets which need further information. IUE SWP low dispersion observations of these targets will show clearly whether the remaining unseen companions are white dwarfs, thus eliminating very cool main sequence stars or planets. This is also important in providing complete statistical information about the nearest stars. The discovery of a white dwarf in such a nearby system would provide important additional information about the masses of white dwarfs. Recent results by Greenstein (1986, A. J., 92, 859) from binary systems containing white dwarfs imply that 80% of such systems are as yet undetected. The preference of binaries for companions of approximately equal mass makes the Lippincott-Kamper list of A through K primaries with unseen companions a good one to use to search for white dwarfs. The mass and light dominance of the current primary over the white dwarf in the visible makes ultraviolet observations essential to obtain an accurate census of white dwarf binaries.

  20. Wave climate of the White Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipkin, Victor; Dobrolyubov, Sergey; Myslenkov, Stanislav; Korablina, Anastasia

    2016-04-01

    The implementation of the SWAN spectral wave model for the White Sea with using unstructured grid was presented. The main area of the Barents Sea was added to calculation region because it produces swell which incomes to the White Sea from the outside. Spatial resolution of unstructured grid is 500 m-5 km for the White Sea and 10-20 km for the Barents sea. NCEP/CFSR (~0.3°) input wind forcing was used. The results of the numerical modeling include wind wave fields for the White Sea with time step of 3 hours from 1979 to 2010. Spatial extreme value analysis of significant wave heights was performed. The storm situations, when the significant wave height exceeded 3 and 4 meters, were identified for the 32-year period. It allowed to analyze the variability of wind wave climate in the White Sea. The storminess of the White Sea tended to increase from 1979 to 1991, then decreased to minimum at 2000 and increased again till 2010. This work showed the following results. For example, in the Voronka (part of the White Sea) the synoptic situations with a wave height of more than 2 m (50-60 cases) took place about three times more than in the Basin (part of the White Sea), with heights of more than 3 m (25-40 cases) five or six times more. Cases with wave heights greater than 5 m in the Basin is extremely rare, while in the Voronka they occur 10 times a year. The significant wave height of a possible one time in 100 years is up to 7 meters in the Basin, up to 13 m in the Voronka, up to 3 m in the Onega Bay. In May, the smallest wavelength occurs in the Onega Bay, and is only 25 m. In the Basin wavelength is increased to 50 m. The longer wavelengths observed in the Voronka - 100 m. In November in the Basin (especially in the western part) and in the Voronka wavelength greatly increased to 75 and 200 m, respectively. In May, in the Onega Bay, Basin and Gorlo (part of the White Sea) swell height does not exceed 1 m. Only in the Voronka, it increases up to 3 meters. By November

  1. Testing Models for Perceptual Discrimination Using Repeatable Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Adding noise to stimuli to be discriminated allows estimation of observer classification functions based on the correlation between observer responses and relevant features of the noisy stimuli. Examples will be presented of stimulus features that are found in auditory tone detection and visual Vernier acuity. Using the standard signal detection model (Thurstone scaling), we derive formulas to estimate the proportion of the observer's decision variable variance that is controlled by the added noise. One is based on the probability of agreement of the observer with him/herself on trials with the same noise sample. Another is based on the relative performance of the observer and the model. When these do not agree, the model can be rejected. A second derivation gives the probability of agreement of observer and model when the observer follows the model except for internal noise. Agreement significantly less than this amount allows rejection of the model.

  2. Graph Theory-Based Approach for Stability Analysis of Stochastic Coupled Systems With Lévy Noise on Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunmei; Li, Wenxue; Wang, Ke

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a novel class of stochastic coupled systems with Lévy noise on networks (SCSLNNs) is presented. Both white noise and Lévy noise are considered in the networks. By exploiting graph theory and Lyapunov stability theory, criteria ensuring p th moment exponential stability and stability in probability of these SCSLNNs are established, respectively. These principles are closely related to the topology of the network and the perturbation intensity of white noise and Lévy noise. Moreover, to verify the theoretical results, stochastic coupled oscillators with Lévy noise on a network and stochastic Volterra predator-prey system with Lévy noise are performed. Finally, a numerical example about oscillators' network is provided to illustrate the feasibility of our analytical results.

  3. Lévy stable noise-induced transitions: stochastic resonance, resonant activation and dynamic hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dybiec, Bartłomiej; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2009-05-01

    A standard approach to analysis of noise-induced effects in stochastic dynamics assumes a Gaussian character of the noise term describing interaction of the analyzed system with its complex surroundings. An additional assumption about the existence of timescale separation between the dynamics of the measured observable and the typical timescale of the noise allows external fluctuations to be modeled as temporally uncorrelated and therefore white. However, in many natural phenomena the assumptions concerning the above mentioned properties of 'Gaussianity' and 'whiteness' of the noise can be violated. In this context, in contrast to the spatiotemporal coupling characterizing general forms of non-Markovian or semi-Markovian Lévy walks, so called Lévy flights correspond to the class of Markov processes which can still be interpreted as white, but distributed according to a more general, infinitely divisible, stable and non-Gaussian law. Lévy noise-driven non-equilibrium systems are known to manifest interesting physical properties and have been addressed in various scenarios of physical transport exhibiting a superdiffusive behavior. Here we present a brief overview of our recent investigations aimed at understanding features of stochastic dynamics under the influence of Lévy white noise perturbations. We find that the archetypal phenomena of noise-induced ordering are robust and can be detected also in systems driven by memoryless, non-Gaussian, heavy-tailed fluctuations with infinite variance.

  4. Effects of background noise on total noise annoyance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the effects of combined community noise sources on annoyance. The first experiment baseline relationships between annoyance and noise level for three community noise sources (jet aircraft flyovers, traffic and air conditioners) presented individually. Forty eight subjects evaluated the annoyance of each noise source presented at four different noise levels. Results indicated the slope of the linear relationship between annoyance and noise level for the traffic noise was significantly different from that of aircraft and of air conditioner noise, which had equal slopes. The second experiment investigated annoyance response to combined noise sources, with aircraft noise defined as the major noise source and traffic and air conditioner noise as background noise sources. Effects on annoyance of noise level differences between aircraft and background noise for three total noise levels and for both background noise sources were determined. A total of 216 subjects were required to make either total or source specific annoyance judgements, or a combination of the two, for a wide range of combined noise conditions.

  5. 1/f noise and effort on implicit measures of bias.

    PubMed

    Correll, Joshua

    2008-01-01

    Phenomena that vary over time can often be represented as a complex waveform. Fourier analysis decomposes this complex wave into a set of sinusoidal component waves. In some phenomena, the amplitude of these waves varies in inverse relation to frequency. This pattern has been called 1/f noise and, unlike white noise, it reflects nonrandom variation. Latencies in simple computer tasks typically reveal 1/f noise, but the magnitude of the noise decreases as tasks become more challenging. The current work hypothesizes a correspondence between 1/f noise and effort, leading to the prediction that increasing effort will reduce 1/f noise. In 2 studies, the author examined the relationship between an individual's attempts to avoid bias (measured in Study 1, manipulated in Study 2) and 1/f noise in implicit measures of stereotyping and prejudice. In each study, participants who made an effort to modulate the use of racial information showed less 1/f noise than did participants who made less effort. The potential value of this analytic approach to social psychology is discussed.

  6. A de-noising algorithm based on wavelet threshold-exponential adaptive window width-fitting for ground electrical source airborne transient electromagnetic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yanju; Li, Dongsheng; Yu, Mingmei; Wang, Yuan; Wu, Qiong; Lin, Jun

    2016-05-01

    The ground electrical source airborne transient electromagnetic system (GREATEM) on an unmanned aircraft enjoys considerable prospecting depth, lateral resolution and detection efficiency, etc. In recent years it has become an important technical means of rapid resources exploration. However, GREATEM data are extremely vulnerable to stationary white noise and non-stationary electromagnetic noise (sferics noise, aircraft engine noise and other human electromagnetic noises). These noises will cause degradation of the imaging quality for data interpretation. Based on the characteristics of the GREATEM data and major noises, we propose a de-noising algorithm utilizing wavelet threshold method and exponential adaptive window width-fitting. Firstly, the white noise is filtered in the measured data using the wavelet threshold method. Then, the data are segmented using data window whose step length is even logarithmic intervals. The data polluted by electromagnetic noise are identified within each window based on the discriminating principle of energy detection, and the attenuation characteristics of the data slope are extracted. Eventually, an exponential fitting algorithm is adopted to fit the attenuation curve of each window, and the data polluted by non-stationary electromagnetic noise are replaced with their fitting results. Thus the non-stationary electromagnetic noise can be effectively removed. The proposed algorithm is verified by the synthetic and real GREATEM signals. The results show that in GREATEM signal, stationary white noise and non-stationary electromagnetic noise can be effectively filtered using the wavelet threshold-exponential adaptive window width-fitting algorithm, which enhances the imaging quality.

  7. Noise and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi; Yu, Clare C.

    2006-03-01

    Noise is present in many physical systems and is often viewed as a nuisance. Yet it can also be a probe of microscopic fluctuations. There have been indications recently that the noise in the resistivity increases in the vicinity of the metal-insulator transition. But what are the characteristics of the noise associated with well-understood first and second order phase transitions? It is well known that critical fluctuations are associated with second order phase transitions, but do these fluctuations lead to enhanced noise? We have addressed these questions using Monte Carlo simulations to study the noise in the 2D Ising model which undergoes a second order phase transition, and in the 5-state Potts model which undergoes a first order phase transition. We monitor these systems as the temperature drops below the critical temperature. At each temperature, after equilibration is established, we obtain the time series of quantities characterizing the properties of the system, i.e., the energy and magnetization per site. We apply different methods, such as the noise power spectrum, the Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) and the second spectrum of the noise, to analyze the fluctuations in these quantities.

  8. Analyzing nocturnal noise stratification.

    PubMed

    Rey Gozalo, Guillermo; Barrigón Morillas, Juan Miguel; Gómez Escobar, Valentín

    2014-05-01

    Pollution associated to traffic can be considered as one of the most relevant pollution sources in our cities; noise is one of the major components of traffic pollution; thus, efforts are necessary to search adequate noise assessment methods and low pollution city designs. Different methods have been proposed for the evaluation of noise in cities, including the categorization method, which is based on the functionality concept. Until now, this method has only been studied (with encouraging results) for short-term, diurnal measurements, but nocturnal noise presents a behavior clearly different on respect to the diurnal one. In this work 45 continuous measurements of approximately one week each in duration are statistically analyzed to identify differences between the proposed categories. The results show that the five proposed categories highlight the noise stratification of the studied city in each period of the day (day, evening, and night). A comparison of the continuous measurements with previous short-term measurements indicates that the latter can be a good approximation of the former in diurnal period, reducing the resource expenditure for noise evaluation. Annoyance estimated from the measured noise levels was compared with the response of population obtained from a questionnaire with good agreement. The categorization method can yield good information about the distribution of a pollutant associated to traffic in our cities in each period of the day and, therefore, is a powerful tool for town planning and the design of pollution prevention policies.

  9. Nature of orchestral noise.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Ian; Wilson, Wayne; Bradley, Andrew

    2008-08-01

    Professional orchestral musicians are at risk of exposure to excessive noise when at work. This is an industry-wide problem that threatens not only the hearing of orchestral musicians but also the way orchestras operate. The research described in this paper recorded noise levels within a professional orchestra over three years in order to provide greater insight to the orchestral noise environment; to guide future research into orchestral noise management and hearing conservation strategies; and to provide a basis for the future education of musicians and their managers. Every rehearsal, performance, and recording from May 2004 to May 2007 was monitored, with the woodwind, brass, and percussion sections monitored in greatest detail. The study recorded dBALEQ and dBC peak data, which are presented in graphical form with accompanying summarized data tables. The findings indicate that the principal trumpet, first and third horns, and principal trombone are at greatest risk of exposure to excessive sustained noise levels and that the percussion and timpani are at greatest risk of exposure to excessive peak noise levels. However, the findings also strongly support the notion that the true nature of orchestral noise is a great deal more complex than this simple statement would imply.

  10. Mystery cloud of AD 536

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    The possible cause of the densest and most persistent dry fog on record, which was observed in Europe and the Middle East during AD 536 and 537, is discussed. The fog's long duration toward the south and the high sulfuric acid signal detected in Greenland in ice cores dated around AD 540 support the theory that the fog was due to the explosion of the Rabaul volcano, the occurrence of which has been dated at about AD 540 by the radiocarbon method.

  11. ESCO White Paper

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA developed this white paper to explore energy performance contracting with Energy Service Companies (ESCOs) and its potential to be a best practice for installing solar thermal water heating systems in the commercial and industrial sector.

  12. Distribution System White Papers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA worked with stakeholders and developed a series of white papers on distribution system issues ranked of potentially significant public health concern (see list below) to serve as background material for EPA, expert and stakeholder discussions.

  13. White Lake AOC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    White Lake is in Muskegon County along the eastern shore of Lake Michigan. It was named an Area of Concern on the Great Lakes under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement of 1987 and delisted in 2014.

  14. Carpenter in White Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Inside Hangar S at the White Room Facility at Cape Canaveral, Florida, Mercury astronaut M. Scott Carpenter examines the honeycomb protective material on the main pressure bulkhead (heat shield) of his Mercury capsule nicknamed 'Aurora 7.'

  15. Pollack Crater's White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of White Rock in Pollack crater was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on February 3, 2007 at 1750 UTC (12:50 p.m. EST), near 8 degrees south latitude, 25 degrees east longitude. The CRISM image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 40 meters (132 feet) across. The region covered is roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) long and 10 kilometers (6 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    First imaged by the Mariner 9 spacecraft in 1972, the enigmatic group of wind-eroded ridges known as White Rock has been the subject of many subsequent investigations. White Rock is located on the floor of Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. It measures some 15 by 18 kilometers (9 by 11 miles) and was named for its light-colored appearance. In contrast-enhanced images, the feature's higher albedo or reflectivity compared with the darker material on the floor of the crater makes it appear white. In reality, White Rock has a dull, reddish color more akin to Martian dust. This higher albedo as well as its location in a topographic low suggested to some researchers that White Rock may be an eroded remnant of an ancient lake deposit. As water in a desert lake on Earth evaporates, it leaves behind white-colored salts that it leached or dissolved out of the surrounding terrain. These salt deposits may include carbonates, sulfates, and chlorides.

    In 2001, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor measured White Rock and found no obvious signature of carbonates or sulfates, or any other indication that White Rock holds evaporite minerals. Instead, it found Martian dust.

    CRISM's challenge was to obtain greater detail of White Rock's mineralogical composition and how it formed. The instrument operates at a different wavelength range than TES, giving it greater sensitivity to carbonate, sulfate and phyllosilicate (clay-like) minerals. It also

  16. Fourth Aircraft Interior Noise Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, David G. (Compiler)

    1992-01-01

    The fourth in a series of NASA/SAE Interior Noise Workshops was held on May 19 and 20, 1992. The theme of the workshop was new technology and applications for aircraft noise with emphasis on source noise prediction; cabin noise prediction; cabin noise control, including active and passive methods; and cabin interior noise procedures. This report is a compilation of the presentations made at the meeting which addressed the above issues.

  17. Propfan noise propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Albert R.; Sim, Ben WEL-C.

    1993-01-01

    The unconventional supersonic tip speed of advanced propellers has led to uncertainties about Propfan's noise acceptability and compliance with Federal Aviation Noise Regulation (FAR 36). Overhead flight testing of the Propfan with an SR-7L blade during 1989's Propfan Test Assessment (PTA) Program have shown unexpectedly high far-field sound pressure levels. This study here attempts to provide insights into the acoustics of a single-rotating propeller (SRP) with supersonic tip speed. At the same time, the role of the atmosphere in shaping the far-field noise characteristics is investigated.

  18. Quantum phase slip noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Andrew G.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum phase slips (QPSs) generate voltage fluctuations in superconducting nanowires. Employing the Keldysh technique and making use of the phase-charge duality arguments, we develop a theory of QPS-induced voltage noise in such nanowires. We demonstrate that quantum tunneling of the magnetic flux quanta across the wire yields quantum shot noise which obeys Poisson statistics and is characterized by a power-law dependence of its spectrum SΩ on the external bias. In long wires, SΩ decreases with increasing frequency Ω and vanishes beyond a threshold value of Ω at T →0 . The quantum coherent nature of QPS noise yields nonmonotonous dependence of SΩ on T at small Ω .

  19. Blown flap noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, N. N.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental developments of flow-surface interaction noise with a particular emphasis on blown-flap noise were reviewed. Several blown-flap noise prediction methods were evaluated by comparing predicted acoustic levels, directivity, and spectra with a recently obtained data base. A prediction method was selected and a detailed step-by-step description of this method was provided to develop a computer module to calculate one-third octave band frequency spectra at any given location in the far-field for under-the-wing and upper surface blown configurations as a function of geometric and operational parameters.

  20. White Racial Identity Statuses as Predictors of White Privilege Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Danica G.; Chang, Catherine Y.; Havice, Pamela

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between White privilege awareness and White racial identity development for 197 counseling trainees. Results indicated that 3 of J. E. Helms's (1984, 1990, 1995) White racial identity statuses (i.e., Contact, Reintegration, and Immersion/Emersian) significantly predicted White privilege awareness. Implications…

  1. Coset construction of AdS particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, Martin; Jorjadze, George; Megrelidze, Luka

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of the AdSN+1 particle realized on the coset SO(2, N)/SO (1,N). Hamiltonian reduction provides the physical phase space in terms of the coadjoint orbit obtained by boosting a timelike element of 𝔰𝔬(2, N). We show equivalence of this approach to geometric quantization and to the SO(N) covariant oscillator description, for which the boost generators entail a complicated operator ordering. As an alternative scheme, we introduce dual oscillator variables and derive their algebra at the classical and the quantum levels. This simplifies the calculations of the commutators for the boost generators and leads to unitary irreducible representations of 𝔰𝔬(2, N) for all admissible values of the mass parameter. We furthermore discuss an SO(N) covariant supersymmetric extension of the oscillator quantization, with its realization for superparticles in AdS2 and AdS3 given by recent works.

  2. Entanglement temperature and perturbed AdS3 geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, G. C.; Caravan, B.

    2016-06-01

    Generalizing the first law of thermodynamics, the increase in entropy density δ S (x ) of a conformal field theory (CFT) is proportional to the increase in energy density, δ E (x ) , of a subsystem divided by a spatially dependent entanglement temperature, TE(x ) , a fixed parameter determined by the geometry of the subsystem, crossing over to thermodynamic temperature at high temperatures. In this paper we derive a generalization of the thermodynamic Clausius relation, showing that deformations of the CFT by marginal operators are associated with spatial temperature variations, δ TE(x ) , and spatial energy correlations play the role of specific heat. Using AdS/CFT duality we develop a relationship between a perturbation in the local entanglement temperature of the CFT and the perturbation of the bulk AdS metric. In two dimensions, we demonstrate a method through which direct diagonalizations of the boundary quantum theory may be used to construct geometric perturbations of AdS3 .

  3. AdS5 backgrounds with 24 supersymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, S.; Gutowski, J.; Papadopoulos, G.

    2016-06-01

    We prove a non-existence theorem for smooth AdS 5 solutions with connected, compact without boundary internal space that preserve strictly 24 supersymmetries. In particular, we show that D = 11 supergravity does not admit such solutions, and that all such solutions of IIB supergravity are locally isometric to the AdS 5 × S 5 maximally supersymmetric background. Furthermore, we prove that (massive) IIA supergravity also does not admit such solutions, provided that the homogeneity conjecture for massive IIA supergravity is valid. In the context of AdS/CFT these results imply that if gravitational duals for strictly mathcal{N}=3 superconformal theories in 4-dimensions exist, they are either singular or their internal spaces are not compact.

  4. Inspection of high-attenuation and high-noise materials using ultrasonic pulse compression technique

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, P.

    1996-12-31

    Within a highly attenuating material, it is often difficult to identify relevant target signals due to the system`s white noise that is elevated by high gain settings on a conventional ultrasonic system. Ultrasonic pulse compression technique resolves such problem. The ultrasonic pulse compression technique permits an ultrasonic system to operate with long transmitted pulses for an increased detection range, but without sacrificing the depth resolution by signal correlation. The data contains 2048 points sampled at 40 nsec interval using 256 bits long and 100 nsec wide (single bit) Golay codes. Typical pulse compression systems transmit random or pseudorandom codes such as Barker code, maximal-length sequence, and linear FM chirp. And the configuration of such systems varies depending upon the type of code and its generation and processing methodology. However, such systems suffer from inherent limitation, called self noise or range sidelobes when finite integration time limits are used to approximate the signal correlation. To reduce the self noise to a tolerable level, Center for NDE, Iowa State University, has implemented a set of complementary binary codes, known as Golay codes, into a laboratory prototype pulse compression system. Golay code is a set of complementary series of the same length, each has its own auto-correlation having one main response, but the relative polarities are opposite except the main peak. So, if these two correlation results are added, the main response doubles and all others cancel. These characteristics of the Golay codes allow us to obtain a correlated signal of an enhanced SNR without the range sidelobe that is normally produced in other random or pseudorandom codes.

  5. Noise-induced precursors of state transitions in the stochastic Wilson-cowan model.

    PubMed

    Negahbani, Ehsan; Steyn-Ross, D Alistair; Steyn-Ross, Moira L; Wilson, Marcus T; Sleigh, Jamie W

    2015-01-01

    The Wilson-Cowan neural field equations describe the dynamical behavior of a 1-D continuum of excitatory and inhibitory cortical neural aggregates, using a pair of coupled integro-differential equations. Here we use bifurcation theory and small-noise linear stochastics to study the range of a phase transitions-sudden qualitative changes in the state of a dynamical system emerging from a bifurcation-accessible to the Wilson-Cowan network. Specifically, we examine saddle-node, Hopf, Turing, and Turing-Hopf instabilities. We introduce stochasticity by adding small-amplitude spatio-temporal white noise, and analyze the resulting subthreshold fluctuations using an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck linearization. This analysis predicts divergent changes in correlation and spectral characteristics of neural activity during close approach to bifurcation from below. We validate these theoretical predictions using numerical simulations. The results demonstrate the role of noise in the emergence of critically slowed precursors in both space and time, and suggest that these early-warning signals are a universal feature of a neural system close to bifurcation. In particular, these precursor signals are likely to have neurobiological significance as early warnings of impending state change in the cortex. We support this claim with an analysis of the in vitro local field potentials recorded from slices of mouse-brain tissue. We show that in the period leading up to emergence of spontaneous seizure-like events, the mouse field potentials show a characteristic spectral focusing toward lower frequencies concomitant with a growth in fluctuation variance, consistent with critical slowing near a bifurcation point. This observation of biological criticality has clear implications regarding the feasibility of seizure prediction.

  6. Robotics Strategy White Paper

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-19

    VIRGINIA 23651-1087 REPlY TO A1Tl!NTlON OF ATFC-DS 19 MEMORANDUM FOR SEE DISTRIBUTION SUBJECT: Robotics Strategy White Paper 1. The enclosed... Robotics Strategy White Paper is the result of a collaborative effort between the U.S. Anny Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) and the Tank-Automotive...Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC). This paper builds on a confederated Anny robotics "strategy" that is described by senior leader

  7. Signal-to-noise ratio in parametrically driven oscillators.

    PubMed

    Batista, Adriano A; Moreira, Raoni S N

    2011-12-01

    We report a theoretical model based on Green's functions and averaging techniques that gives analytical estimates to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) near the first parametric instability zone in parametrically driven oscillators in the presence of added ac drive and added thermal noise. The signal term is given by the response of the parametrically driven oscillator to the added ac drive, while the noise term has two different measures: one is dc and the other is ac. The dc measure of noise is given by a time average of the statistically averaged fluctuations of the displacement from equilibrium in the parametric oscillator due to thermal noise. The ac measure of noise is given by the amplitude of the statistically averaged fluctuations at the frequency of the parametric pump. We observe a strong dependence of the SNR on the phase between the external drive and the parametric pump. For some range of the phase there is a high SNR, while for other values of phase the SNR remains flat or decreases with increasing pump amplitude. Very good agreement between analytical estimates and numerical results is achieved.

  8. Age-Related Changes in 1/f Neural Electrophysiological Noise.

    PubMed

    Voytek, Bradley; Kramer, Mark A; Case, John; Lepage, Kyle Q; Tempesta, Zechari R; Knight, Robert T; Gazzaley, Adam

    2015-09-23

    Aging is associated with performance decrements across multiple cognitive domains. The neural noise hypothesis, a dominant view of the basis of this decline, posits that aging is accompanied by an increase in spontaneous, noisy baseline neural activity. Here we analyze data from two different groups of human subjects: intracranial electrocorticography from 15 participants over a 38 year age range (15-53 years) and scalp EEG data from healthy younger (20-30 years) and older (60-70 years) adults to test the neural noise hypothesis from a 1/f noise perspective. Many natural phenomena, including electrophysiology, are characterized by 1/f noise. The defining characteristic of 1/f is that the power of the signal frequency content decreases rapidly as a function of the frequency (f) itself. The slope of this decay, the noise exponent (χ), is often <-1 for electrophysiological data and has been shown to approach white noise (defined as χ = 0) with increasing task difficulty. We observed, in both electrophysiological datasets, that aging is associated with a flatter (more noisy) 1/f power spectral density, even at rest, and that visual cortical 1/f noise statistically mediates age-related impairments in visual working memory. These results provide electrophysiological support for the neural noise hypothesis of aging. Significance statement: Understanding the neurobiological origins of age-related cognitive decline is of critical scientific, medical, and public health importance, especially considering the rapid aging of the world's population. We find, in two separate human studies, that 1/f electrophysiological noise increases with aging. In addition, we observe that this age-related 1/f noise statistically mediates age-related working memory decline. These results significantly add to this understanding and contextualize a long-standing problem in cognition by encapsulating age-related cognitive decline within a neurocomputational model of 1/f noise-induced deficits in

  9. Reduction of propeller noise by active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bschorr, O.; Kubanke, D.

    1992-04-01

    Active noise control, a method of cancelling noise by means of interference with a secondary anti-noise source, is now in full development. The first commercial application of this technique is in the case of active electronically controlled head sets. The next step will be the active noise cancellation in air ducts and in passenger cabins. The aim of this paper is to assess the possibilities of the anti-noise technique for reducing propeller noise. First, by a mathematical simulation the theoretical noise reduction on the ground was calculated and found to be promising for further investigations. In the case of the periodic engine and propeller noise, for example, with only a single anti-noise source, the noise foot prints of the lower propeller harmonics can be reduced by up to 10 dB. In laboratory tests the theoretical values will be confirmed experimentally. For cancellation of the periodic noise one can use synchronous anti-noise generators. Compared with the engine and propeller noise the reduction of jet noise by the anti-noise technique is much more difficult. Therefore a sensor and controlling unit are necessary because of the stochastic nature of jet noise. Since aircraft noise is a severe problem, all methods are to be considered.

  10. Cochlear implant optimized noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Stefan J; Arora, Komal; Dawson, Pam W

    2012-12-01

    Noise-reduction methods have provided significant improvements in speech perception for cochlear implant recipients, where only quality improvements have been found in hearing aid recipients. Recent psychoacoustic studies have suggested changes to noise-reduction techniques specifically for cochlear implants, due to differences between hearing aid recipient and cochlear implant recipient hearing. An optimized noise-reduction method was developed with significantly increased temporal smoothing of the signal-to-noise ratio estimate and a more aggressive gain function compared to current noise-reduction methods. This optimized noise-reduction algorithm was tested with 12 cochlear implant recipients over four test sessions. Speech perception was assessed through speech in noise tests with three noise types; speech-weighted noise, 20-talker babble and 4-talker babble. A significant speech perception improvement using optimized noise reduction over standard processing was found in babble noise and speech-weighted noise and over a current noise-reduction method in speech-weighted noise. Speech perception in quiet was not degraded. Listening quality testing for noise annoyance and overall preference found significant improvements over the standard processing and over a current noise-reduction method in speech-weighted and babble noise types. This optimized method has shown significant speech perception and quality improvements compared to the standard processing and a current noise-reduction method.

  11. Noise reduction combining time-frequency epsilon-filter and M-transform.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tomomi; Matsumoto, Mitsuharu; Hashimoto, Shuji

    2008-08-01

    This paper introduces noise reduction combining time-frequency epsilon-filter (TF epsilon-filter) and time-frequency M-transform (TF M-transform). Musical noise is an offensive noise generated due to noise reduction in the time-frequency domain such as spectral subtraction and TF epsilon-filter. It has a deleterious effect on speech recognition. To solve the problem, M-transform is introduced. M-transform is a linear transform based on M-sequence. The method combining the time-domain epsilon-filter (TD epsilon-filter) and time-domain M-transform (TD M-transform) can reduce not only white noise but also impulse noise. Musical noise is isolated in the time-frequency domain, which is similar to impulse noise in the time domain. On these prospects, this paper aims to reduce musical noise by improving M-transform for the time-frequency domain. Noise reduction by using TD M-transform and the TD epsilon-filter is first explained to clarify its features. Then, an improved method applying M-transform to the time-frequency domain, namely TF M-transform, is described. Noise reduction combining the TF epsilon-filter and TF M-transform is also proposed. The proposed method can reduce not only high-level nonstationary noise but also musical noise. Experimental results are also given to demonstrate the performance of the proposed method.

  12. Noise to lubricate qubit transfer in a spin network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Morteza; Lupo, Cosmo; Mancini, Stefano

    2013-09-01

    We consider quantum state transfer in a fully connected spin network, in which the results indicate that it is impossible to achieve high fidelity by free dynamics. However, the addition of certain kinds of noise can be helpful for this purpose. In fact, we introduce a model of Gaussian white noise affecting the spin-spin couplings (edges), except those linked to the input and output node, and prove that it enhances the fidelity of state transfer. The observed noise benefit is scale free as it applies to a quantum network of any size. The amount of the fidelity enhancement, depending on the noise strength as well as on the number of edges to which it is applied, can be so high as to take the fidelity close to one.

  13. Reducing low-frequency noise during reversible fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, Ralph V.

    2017-02-01

    The noise from most materials exhibits a power-spectral density that tends to diverge as S(f) ∝ 1/f at low frequencies, f. A fundamental mechanism for this 1/f noise comes from the thermodynamics of small systems applied to reversible fluctuations of nanometer-sized regions inside bulk samples. Here this "nanothermodynamics" is used to derive a nonlinear correction to Boltzmann's factor. Specifically: Boltzmann's factor comes from the first-order (linear) derivative of entropy with respect to energy, whereas the nonlinear correction comes from higher-order terms. The nonlinear correction is applied to Monte Carlo simulations of small regions in the Ising model, yielding a low-frequency crossover to white noise that keeps the power-spectral density finite as f → 0. It is shown that the low-frequency noise in the model is reduced by reducing the size of the regions.

  14. Power Laws, Flicker Noise, and the Barkhausen Effect

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    AD-A274 702 AD TECHNICAL REPORT ARCCB-TR-93038 POWER LAWS, FLICKER NOISE, AND THE BARKHAUSEN EFFECT DTIC ELECTE JA~N 211994 3 L.V. MEISEL S D P.J...CATES C&MORD October 1993 Fuel 4. TITLE AND SUBTITU S. FUNDING NUMBERS POWER LAWS. FUCKER NOISE. AND THE BARKHAUSEN EFFECT AMCMS: 611L02.H61L1 6. AUTHOR... Barkhausen effect was studied in three ferromagnetic metals: an amorphous alloy, iron. and alumel. The data exhibit all the characteristics of self

  15. Reduction of SEM noise and extended application to prediction of CD uniformity and its experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hoyeon; Hwang, Chan; Oh, Seok-hwan; Yeo, Jeongho; Kim, Young hee

    2011-03-01

    As the design rule of Integrated Circuits(IC) becomes smaller, the precise measurement of Critical Dimension (CD) of features and minimization of deviation in CD measured becomes a vital issue. In this paper, a simple frequency analysis method to extract the noise from SEM images was used to evaluate the contribution of SEM noise in CD Uniformity. Multiple SEM images of simple Line and Space (L/S) patterns were analyzed and a model of frequency profile (Power Spectrum Density (PSD) model) was made using an offline analyzing tool based on Matlab®. From this profile, white noise and 1/f profile were separated. Noises are eliminated to generate a noise reduced PSD profile to make CD results. The contribution of white noise on CD measurement can be assessed using Line Width Roughness (LWR) measurement. Furthermore, CD uniformity can be also predicted from the model. This prediction is based on an assumption that CD uniformity is equal to LWR if the inspection area is extended to infinity and appropriate sampling method is applied. The results showed that the contribution of white noise on LWR can be up to around 70% (in power) without any noise reduction measures (sum line averaging) after imaging in photo resist image. For experimental validation, CD uniformity is predicted from the model for different measurement conditions and compared with real measurement. For a result, CD uniformity prediction (3sigma) from the model shows within 20% in accuracy with real CD uniformity value measured from the photo resist image.

  16. Optimal application of Morrison's iterative noise removal for deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.

    1986-01-01

    Morrison's iterative method of noise removal can be applied for both noise removal alone and noise removal prior to deconvolution. This method is applied to noise of various noise levels added to determine the optimum use of the method. The phase shift method of migration and modeling is evaluated and the results are compared to Stolt's approach. A method is introduced by which the optimum iterative number for deconvolution can be found. Statistical computer simulation is used to describe the optimum use of two convergent iterative techniques for seismic data. The Always-Convergent deconvolution technique was applied to data recorded during the quantitative analysis of materials through NonDestructive Evaluation (NDE) in which ultrasonic signals were used to detect flaws in substances such as composites.

  17. Noise and Hearing Protection

    MedlinePlus

    ... when using power tools, noisy yard equipment, or firearms, or riding a motorcycle or snowmobile. Hearing protectors ... Sandblasting, loud rock concert, auto horn: – 115 dB Gun muzzle blast, jet engine (such noise can cause ...

  18. Airframe noise prediction evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, Kingo J.; Donelson, Michael J.; Huang, Shumei C.; Joshi, Mahendra C.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and adequacy of current airframe noise prediction methods using available airframe noise measurements from tests of a narrow body transport (DC-9) and a wide body transport (DC-10) in addition to scale model test data. General features of the airframe noise from these aircraft and models are outlined. The results of the assessment of two airframe prediction methods, Fink's and Munson's methods, against flight test data of these aircraft and scale model wind tunnel test data are presented. These methods were extensively evaluated against measured data from several configurations including clean, slat deployed, landing gear-deployed, flap deployed, and landing configurations of both DC-9 and DC-10. They were also assessed against a limited number of configurations of scale models. The evaluation was conducted in terms of overall sound pressure level (OASPL), tone corrected perceived noise level (PNLT), and one-third-octave band sound pressure level (SPL).

  19. Occupational Noise Exposure

    MedlinePlus

    ... is pervasive. It is also preventable. More Exposure & Controls Exposure to loud noise kills the nerve endings ... endorse, takes no responsibility for, and exercises no control over the linked organization or its views, or ...

  20. Noise Characteristics of Superconducting Low-Inductance Undulatory Galvanometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenshuo; Vavilov, Maxim; McDermott, Robert

    2015-03-01

    We describe theoretical studies of the Superconducting Low-Inductance Undulatory Galvanometer (SLUG), a non-reciprocal gain element based on Josephson junctions. We use both analytical and numerical methods to calculate various properties of the SLUG, including power gain, added noise and back-action in both the thermal and quantum regimes. We derive the distribution functions of the output signals in the presence of classical noise using the Fokker-Planck equation. We also discuss optimal matching of the SLUG amplifier so that gain, bandwidth and noise performance can meet the criteria of high-fidelity multiplexed qubit readout.

  1. Quality issues in blue noise halftoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qing; Parker, Kevin J.

    1998-01-01

    The blue noise mask (BNM) is a halftone screen that produces unstructured visually pleasing dot patterns. The BNM combines the blue-noise characteristics of error diffusion and the simplicity of ordered dither. A BNM is constructed by designing a set of interdependent binary patterns for individual gray levels. In this paper, we investigate the quality issues in blue-noise binary pattern design and mask generation as well as in application to color reproduction. Using a global filtering technique and a local 'force' process for rearranging black and white pixels, we are able to generate a series of binary patterns, all representing a certain gray level, ranging from white-noise pattern to highly structured pattern. The quality of these individual patterns are studied in terms of low-frequency structure and graininess. Typically, the low-frequency structure (LF) is identified with a measurement of the energy around dc in the spatial frequency domain, while the graininess is quantified by a measurement of the average minimum distance (AMD) between minority dots as well as the kurtosis of the local kurtosis distribution (KLK) for minority pixels of the binary pattern. A set of partial BNMs are generated by using the different patterns as unique starting 'seeds.' In this way, we are able to study the quality of binary patterns over a range of gray levels. We observe that the optimality of a binary pattern for mask generation is related to its own quality mertirc values as well as the transition smoothness of those quality metric values over neighboring levels. Several schemes have been developed to apply blue-noise halftoning to color reproduction. Different schemes generate halftone patterns with different textures. In a previous paper, a human visual system (HVS) model was used to study the color halftone quality in terms of luminance and chrominance error in CIELAB color space. In this paper, a new series of psycho-visual experiments address the 'preferred' color

  2. JPL noise control program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klascius, A. F.

    1975-01-01

    Exposures of personnel to noise pollution at the Jet Propulsion Laboratories, Pasadena, California, were investigated. As a result of the study several protective measures were taken: (1) employees exposed to noise hazards were required to wear ear-protection devices, (2) mufflers and air diversion devices were installed around the wind tunnels; and (3) all personnel that are required to wear ear protection are given annual audimeter tests.

  3. Noise Abatement Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A former NASA employee who discovered a kind of plastic that soaked up energy, dampened vibrations, and was a good noise abatement material, founded a company to market noise deadening adhesives, sheets, panels and enclosures. Known as SMART products, they are 75-80% lighter than ordinary soundproofing material and have demonstrated a high degree of effectiveness. The company, Varian Associates, makes enclosures for high voltage terminals and other electronic system components, and easily transportable audiometric test booths.

  4. Television noise reduction device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, B. L.; Stamps, J. C. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A noise reduction system that divides the color video signal into its luminance and chrominance components is reported. The luminance component of a given frame is summed with the luminance component of at least one preceding frame which was stored on a disc recorder. The summation is carried out so as to achieve a signal amplitude equivalent to that of the original signal. The averaged luminance signal is then recombined with the chrominance signal to achieve a noise-reduced television signal.

  5. Low White Blood Cell Count

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms Low white blood cell count By Mayo Clinic Staff A low white blood cell count (leukopenia) is a decrease in disease-fighting cells ( ... a decrease in a certain type of white blood cell (neutrophil). The definition of low white blood cell ...

  6. Lorentzian AdS geometries, wormholes, and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Raul E.; Silva, Guillermo A.; Botta Cantcheff, Marcelo

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the structure of two-point functions for the quantum field theory dual to an asymptotically Lorentzian Anti de Sitter (AdS) wormhole. The bulk geometry is a solution of five-dimensional second-order Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity and causally connects two asymptotically AdS spacetimes. We revisit the Gubser-Klebanov-Polyakov-Witten prescription for computing two-point correlation functions for dual quantum field theories operators O in Lorentzian signature and we propose to express the bulk fields in terms of the independent boundary values {phi}{sub 0}{sup {+-}} at each of the two asymptotic AdS regions; along the way we exhibit how the ambiguity of normalizable modes in the bulk, related to initial and final states, show up in the computations. The independent boundary values are interpreted as sources for dual operators O{sup {+-}} and we argue that, apart from the possibility of entanglement, there exists a coupling between the degrees of freedom living at each boundary. The AdS{sub 1+1} geometry is also discussed in view of its similar boundary structure. Based on the analysis, we propose a very simple geometric criterion to distinguish coupling from entanglement effects among two sets of degrees of freedom associated with each of the disconnected parts of the boundary.

  7. Contribution of tonal components to the overall loudness, annoyance and noisiness of noise: Relation between single tones and noise spectral shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellman, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    A large scale laboratory investigation of loudness, annoyance, and noisiness produced by single-tone-noise complexes was undertaken to establish a broader data base for quanitification and prediction of perceived annoyance of sounds containing tonal components. Loudness, annoyance, and noisiness were distinguished as separate, distinct, attributes of sound. Three different spectral patterns of broadband noise with and without added tones were studied: broadband-flat, low-pass, and high-pass. Judgments were obtained by absolute magnitude estimation supplement by loudness matching. The data were examined and evaluated to determine the potential effects of (1) the overall sound pressure level (SPL) of the noise-tone complex, (2) tone SPL, (3) noise SPL, (4) tone-to-noise ratio, (5) the frequency of the added tone, (6) noise spectral shape, and (7) subjective attribute judged on absolute magnitude of annoyance. Results showed that, in contrast to noisiness, loudness and annoyance growth behavior depends on the relationship between the frequency of the added tone and the spectral shape of the noise. The close correspondence between the frequency of the added tone and the spectral shape of the noise. The close correspondence between loundness and annoyance suggests that, to better understand perceived annoyance of sound mixtures, it is necessary to relate the results to basic auditory mechanisms governing loudness and masking.

  8. Modeling of quantization noise in linear analog-to-digital converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švihlík, Jan; Fliegel, Karel

    2013-09-01

    Quantization noise is present in all the current digital imaging systems, therefore its understanding and modeling is crucial for optimization of image reconstruction techniques. Hence, this paper deals with modeling of the quantization noise. We exploit the undecimated wavelet transform (UWT) for signal representation. We assume that the quantization noise in the spatial domain can be seen as additive, white and uniformly distributed. Hence, the UWT causes the transform of noise distribution due to weighted sum of noise samples and filter coefficients. From the known quantization step we are able to estimate suitable moments of noise uniform probability density function (PDF). These moments then could be directly evaluated in the undecimated wavelet domain using the derived equations. The presented algorithm gives the a priori information about the quantization noise and can be used for the suppression of it.

  9. Extra-auditory responses to long-term intermittent noise stimulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Fruhstorfer, B; Hensel, H

    1980-12-01

    Respiration, heart rate, cutaneous blood flow, and electroencephalogram (EEG) reactions to long-term intermittent noise exposure were recorded from 13 volunteers (20-29 yr) with normal hearing and vegetative reactivity. They received daily within 1 h 12 noise stimuli (16 s 100 dB (A) white noise) for 10 or 21 days, respectively. Most subjects reported partial subjective adaptation to the noise. Heart rate adapted within a session but did not change considerably during successive days. Vascular responses did not change during one session but diminished mainly during the first 10 days. Noise responses in the EEG remained constant, but a decrease in vigilance occurred during the whole experimental series. Respiration responses were unpredictable and showed no trend within the sessions. It was concluded that certain physiological responses adapt to loud noise but that the time course of adaptation is different. Therefore a general statement about physiological noise adaptation is not possible.

  10. The method of narrow-band audio classification based on universal noise background model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui, Rui; Bao, Chang-chun

    2013-03-01

    Audio classification is the basis of content-based audio analysis and retrieval. The conventional classification methods mainly depend on feature extraction of audio clip, which certainly increase the time requirement for classification. An approach for classifying the narrow-band audio stream based on feature extraction of audio frame-level is presented in this paper. The audio signals are divided into speech, instrumental music, song with accompaniment and noise using the Gaussian mixture model (GMM). In order to satisfy the demand of actual environment changing, a universal noise background model (UNBM) for white noise, street noise, factory noise and car interior noise is built. In addition, three feature schemes are considered to optimize feature selection. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm achieves a high accuracy for audio classification, especially under each noise background we used and keep the classification time less than one second.

  11. Optimal application of Morrison's iterative noise removal for deconvolution. Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.

    1987-01-01

    Morrison's iterative method of noise removal, or Morrison's smoothing, is applied in a simulation to noise-added data sets of various noise levels to determine its optimum use. Morrison's smoothing is applied for noise removal alone, and for noise removal prior to deconvolution. For the latter, an accurate method is analyzed to provide confidence in the optimization. The method consists of convolving the data with an inverse filter calculated by taking the inverse discrete Fourier transform of the reciprocal of the transform of the response of the system. Various length filters are calculated for the narrow and wide Gaussian response functions used. Deconvolution of non-noisy data is performed, and the error in each deconvolution calculated. Plots are produced of error versus filter length; and from these plots the most accurate length filters determined. The statistical methodologies employed in the optimizations of Morrison's method are similar. A typical peak-type input is selected and convolved with the two response functions to produce the data sets to be analyzed. Both constant and ordinate-dependent Gaussian distributed noise is added to the data, where the noise levels of the data are characterized by their signal-to-noise ratios. The error measures employed in the optimizations are the L1 and L2 norms. Results of the optimizations for both Gaussians, both noise types, and both norms include figures of optimum iteration number and error improvement versus signal-to-noise ratio, and tables of results. The statistical variation of all quantities considered is also given.

  12. USAF Bioenvironmental Noise Data Handbook. Volume 123. F-100D Aircraft, Near and Far-Field Noise.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    AD-A783 934 AIR FORCE AEROSPACE MEDICAL RESEARCH LAB WRIGHT;PATT--ETC OF/ G12C USAF BIOENVIRONMENTAL NOISE DATA HANDBOOK. VOLUME 123 F- 10 A -ETC(U...AUG 79 R S POWELL UNCLASSIFIED AMRL-TR75-50-VOL- 123 NL mmmmmmmmmmu Ellllll~llEEEEE EEEuihEEE-EuiE, -EhhhE EI AMRL-TR-75-50 Volume 123 CIO: SUSAF...BIOENVIRONMENTAL NOISE DATA HANDBOOK ’ Volume 123 SF-100D Aircraft, Near and Far-Field Noise D TIC " .. MAYD AUGUST 1979 Approved for public release

  13. USAF Bioenvironmental Noise Data Handbook. Volume 124. F-104D Aircraft, Near and Far-Field Noise.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    20-22 4. A coustic Pow er Level ................................................................ 23-25 5. Overall Sound...7 AD-AB" 845 AEROSPACE MEDICAL RESEARCH LAB WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OH F/B 1/2 USAF IENVIRONM4ENTAL NOISE DATA HANDBOOK. VOLUME 121t. 010D A -ETClU...COVERED *0- NVIRONMENTALUOISE TA Volume 124 of a Series D FK -1𔃾D Aircraft, ear and r-Field Noise.s4 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(< S

  14. Principal component analysis with pre-normalization improves the signal-to-noise ratio and image quality in positron emission tomography studies of amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razifar, Pasha; Engler, Henry; Blomquist, Gunnar; Ringheim, Anna; Estrada, Sergio; Långström, Bengt; Bergström, Mats

    2009-06-01

    This study introduces a new approach for the application of principal component analysis (PCA) with pre-normalization on dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) images. These images are generated using the amyloid imaging agent N-methyl [11C]2-(4'-methylaminophenyl)-6-hydroxy-benzothiazole ([11C]PIB) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy volunteers (HVs). The aim was to introduce a method which, by using the whole dataset and without assuming a specific kinetic model, could generate images with improved signal-to-noise and detect, extract and illustrate changes in kinetic behavior between different regions in the brain. Eight AD patients and eight HVs from a previously published study with [11C]PIB were used. The approach includes enhancement of brain regions where the kinetics of the radiotracer are different from what is seen in the reference region, pre-normalization for differences in noise levels and removal of negative values. This is followed by slice-wise application of PCA (SW-PCA) on the dynamic PET images. Results obtained using the new approach were compared with results obtained using reference Patlak and summed images. The new approach generated images with good quality in which cortical brain regions in AD patients showed high uptake, compared to cerebellum and white matter. Cortical structures in HVs showed low uptake as expected and in good agreement with data generated using kinetic modeling. The introduced approach generated images with enhanced contrast and improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and discrimination power (DP) compared to summed images and parametric images. This method is expected to be an important clinical tool in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of dementia.

  15. Several specific and nonspecific responses of the human and animal body to ship noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markaryan, S. S.; Volkov, S. S.; Sysoyev, A. B.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of noise on cargo boats on a long voyage differs considerably from the effect of noise in factories and in service industries. The peculiarities of the effect of round-the-clock noises at sea at 55 to 85 decibels, typical for cargo boats, were studied in white rats in the laboratory and aboard ship (each of the experiments lasted three months) and in young naval cadets and experienced seamen on voyages lasting one, two, and three months. The findings helped to derive health standards for maximum admissible noise level at sea.

  16. Percolation model of excess electrical noise in transition-edge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindeman, M. A.; Anderson, M. B.; Bandler, S. R.; Bilgri, N.; Chervenak, J.; Gwynne Crowder, S.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Finkbeiner, F.; Iyomoto, N.; Kelley, R.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lai, T.; Man, J.; McCammon, D.; Nelms, K. L.; Porter, F. S.; Rocks, L. E.; Saab, T.; Sadleir, J.; Vidugiris, G.

    2006-04-01

    We present a geometrical model to describe excess electrical noise in transition-edge sensors (TESs). In this model, a network of fluctuating resistors represents the complex dynamics inside a TES. The fluctuations can cause several resistors in series to become superconducting. Such events short out part of the TES and generate noise because much of the current percolates through low resistance paths. The model predicts that excess white noise increases with decreasing TES bias resistance ( R/ RN) and that perpendicular zebra stripes reduce noise and alpha of the TES by reducing percolation.

  17. A deformation of AdS5 × S5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauntlett, Jerome P.; Gutowski, Jan B.; Suryanarayana, Nemani V.

    2004-11-01

    We analyse a one-parameter family of supersymmetric solutions of type IIB supergravity that includes AdS5 × S5. For small values of the parameter the solutions are causally well behaved, but beyond a critical value closed timelike curves (CTCs) appear. The solutions are holographically dual to {\\cal N}=4 supersymmetric Yang Mills theory on a non-conformally flat background with non-vanishing R-currents. We compute the holographic energy momentum tensor for the spacetime and show that it remains finite even when the CTCs appear. The solutions, as well as the uplift of some recently discovered AdS5 black-hole solutions, are shown to preserve precisely two supersymmetries.

  18. Supersymmetric AdS_6 solutions of type IIB supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyojoong; Kim, Nakwoo; Suh, Minwoo

    2015-10-01

    We study the general requirement for supersymmetric AdS_6 solutions in type IIB supergravity. We employ the Killing spinor technique and study the differential and algebraic relations among various Killing spinor bilinears to find the canonical form of the solutions. Our result agrees precisely with the work of Apruzzi et al. (JHEP 1411:099, 2014), which used the pure spinor technique. Hoping to identify the geometry of the problem, we also computed four-dimensional theory through the dimensional reduction of type IIB supergravity on AdS_6. This effective action is essentially a non-linear sigma model with five scalar fields parametrizing {SL}(3,{R})/{SO}(2,1), modified by a scalar potential and coupled to Einstein gravity in Euclidean signature. We argue that the scalar potential can be explained by a subgroup CSO(1,1,1) subset {SL}(3,{R}) in a way analogous to gauged supergravity.

  19. Universal isolation in the AdS landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielsson, U. H.; Dibitetto, G.; Vargas, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    We study the universal conditions for quantum nonperturbative stability against bubble nucleation for pertubatively stable AdS vacua based on positive energy theorems. We also compare our analysis with the preexisting ones in the literature carried out within the thin-wall approximation. The aforementioned criterion is then tested in two explicit examples describing massive type IIA string theory compactified on S3 and S3×S3, respectively. The AdS landscape of both classes of compactifications is known to consist of a set of isolated points. The main result is that all critical points respecting the Breitenlohner-Freedman (BF) bound also turn out be stable at a nonperturbative level. Finally, we speculate on the possible universal features that may be extracted from the above specific examples.

  20. Tachyon inflation in an AdS braneworld with backreaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilić, Neven; Dimitrijevic, Dragoljub D.; Djordjevic, Goran S.; Milosevic, Milan

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the inflationary scenario based on the tachyon field coupled with the radion of the second Randall-Sundrum model (RSII). The tachyon Lagrangian is derived from the dynamics of a 3-brane moving in the five-dimensional bulk. The AdS5 geometry of the bulk is extended to include the radion. Using the Hamiltonian formalism we find four nonlinear field equations supplemented by the modified Friedmann equations of the RSII braneworld cosmology. After a suitable rescaling we reduce the parameters of our model to only one free parameter related to the brane tension and the AdS5 curvature. We solve the equations numerically assuming a reasonably wide range of initial conditions determined by physical considerations. Varying the free parameter and initial conditions we confront our results with the Planck 2015 data.