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Sample records for adding yeast extract

  1. Effects of added chelated trace minerals, organic selenium, yeast culture, direct-fed microbials, and Yucca schidigera extract in horses: II. Nutrient excretion and potential environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Gordon, M E; Edwards, M S; Sweeney, C R; Jerina, M L

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that an equine diet formulated with chelated trace minerals, organic selenium, yeast culture, direct-fed microbials (DFM) and Yucca schidigera extract would decrease excretion of nutrients that have potential for environmental impact. Horses were acclimated to 100% pelleted diets formulated with (ADD) and without (CTRL) the aforementioned additives. Chelated sources of Cu, Zn, Mn, and Co were included in the ADD diet at a 100% replacement rate of sulfate forms used in the CTRL diet. Additionally, the ADD diet included organic selenium yeast, DFM, and Yucca schidigera extract. Ten horses were fed the 2 experimental diets during two 42-d periods in a crossover design. Total fecal and urine collection occurred during the last 14 d of each period. Results indicate no significant differences between Cu, Zn, Mn, and Co concentrations excreted via urine (P > 0.05) due to dietary treatment. There was no difference between fecal Cu and Mn concentrations (P > 0.05) based on diet consumed. Mean fecal Zn and Co concentrations excreted by horses consuming ADD were greater than CTRL (P < 0.003). Differences due to diet were found for selenium fecal (P < 0.0001) and urine (P < 0.0001) excretions, with decreased concentrations found for horses consuming organic selenium yeast (ADD). In contrast, fecal K (%) was greater (P = 0.0421) for horses consuming ADD, whereas concentrations of fecal solids, total N, ammonia N, P, total ammonia, and fecal output did not differ between dietary treatments (P > 0.05). In feces stockpiled to simulate a crude composting method, no differences (P > 0.05) due to diet were detected for particle size, temperature, moisture, OM, total N, P, phosphate, K, moisture, potash, or ammonia N (P > 0.05). Although no difference (P = 0.2737) in feces stockpile temperature due to diet was found, temperature differences over time were documented (P < 0.0001). In conclusion, the addition of certain chelated

  2. Effects of added chelated trace minerals, organic selenium, yeast culture, direct-fed microbials, and Yucca schidigera extract in horses. Part I: Blood nutrient concentration and digestibility.

    PubMed

    Gordon, M E; Edwards, M S; Sweeney, C R; Jerina, M L

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that feed additives such as chelated minerals, organic Se, yeast culture, direct-fed microbials, and Yucca schidigera extract would improve nutrient digestibility when included in an equine diet. Horses (Quarter Horse geldings 4.5 to 16 yr of age; mean BW 522 kg ± 46 kg) were acclimated to 100% pelleted diets formulated with (ADD) and without (CTRL) commercially available sources of the aforementioned additives followed by a 14-d collection period of feces and urine. Chelated sources of Cu, Zn, Mn and Co were utilized versus sulfated forms, at a 100% replacement rate. No significant differences among apparent the digestibility of DM, ADF, or NDF (P= 0.665, P = 0.866, P = 0.747, respectively) were detected between dietary treatments. Likewise, no differences in apparent digestibility of Cu (P = 0.724), Zn (P = 0.256), Mn (P = 0.888), Co (P = 0.71), or Se (P = 0.588) were observed. No differences were observed in serum Cu, Mn, or Co concentrations between ADD and CTRL at acclimation or collection time points (P > 0.05). While no difference in serum Zn concentrations were observed between ADD and CTRL groups at acclimation (P > 0.05), they were statistically higher at the collection time period for horses consuming CTRL (P < 0.0001). Whole blood Se concentration was greater in the CTRL group versus the ADD group both at acclimation (P = 0.041) and collection (P = 0.005) time periods. In reference to time, serum Cu concentrations increased (P = 0.012) for animals consuming CTRL, but not ADD (P > 0.05). Serum Zn concentrations of horses consuming both ADD (P = 0.021) and CTRL (P < 0.0001) increased over time from acclimation to collection time points. No time differences (P > 0.05) were observed in serum Mn concentrations. Serum Co concentrations increased over time in horses consuming both ADD (P = 0.001) and CTRL (P = 0.021). From acclimation to collection, whole blood Se concentration increased for horses

  3. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172.590... Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout extract, as described in this section, may... produced by partial hydrolysis of yeast extract (derived from Saccharomyces cereviseae,...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  5. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172.590... CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout... prescribed conditions: (a) The additive is produced by partial hydrolysis of yeast extract (derived...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  7. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172.590... CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout... prescribed conditions: (a) The additive is produced by partial hydrolysis of yeast extract (derived...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  9. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172.590... CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout... prescribed conditions: (a) The additive is produced by partial hydrolysis of yeast extract (derived...

  10. 21 CFR 172.590 - Yeast-malt sprout extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Yeast-malt sprout extract. 172.590 Section 172.590... CONSUMPTION Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.590 Yeast-malt sprout extract. Yeast-malt sprout... prescribed conditions: (a) The additive is produced by partial hydrolysis of yeast extract (derived...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract is the food ingredient resulting from concentration of the solubles of mechanically ruptured cells of a selected strain of yeast,...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1983 - Bakers yeast extract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast extract. 184.1983 Section 184.1983... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1983 Bakers yeast extract. (a) Bakers yeast extract... a selected strain of yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It may be concentrated or dried. (b)...

  13. ADS's Dexter Data Extraction Applet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Accomazzi, A.; Eichhorn, G.; Grant, C. S.; Kurtz, M. J.; Murray, S. S.

    The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) now holds 1.3 million scanned pages, containing numerous plots and figures for which the original data sets are lost or inaccessible. The availability of scans of the figures can significantly ease the regeneration of the data sets. For this purpose, the ADS has developed Dexter, a Java applet that supports the user in this process. Dexter's basic functionality is to let the user manually digitize a plot by marking points and defining the coordinate transformation from the logical to the physical coordinate system. Advanced features include automatic identification of axes, tracing lines and finding points matching a template. This contribution both describes the operation of Dexter from a user's point of view and discusses some of the architectural issues we faced during implementation.

  14. Vegemite Beer: yeast extract spreads as nutrient supplements to promote fermentation.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Edward D; Schulz, Benjamin L

    2016-01-01

    Vegemite is an iconic Australian food spread made from spent brewers' yeast extract, which has been reported to be used as an ingredient in illegal home brewing. In this study, we tested the utility of Vegemite and the similar spread Marmite in promoting fermentation. We could not culture microorganisms from either Vegemite or Marmite, consistent with these food-grade spreads being essentially sterile. To test if the addition of Vegemite or Marmite could assist in fermentation when additional viable yeast was also present, solutions containing glucose and a range of concentrations of either Vegemite or Marmite were inoculated with brewers' yeast. No fermentation occurred in any condition without addition of extra brewer's yeast. Fermentation did not occur when yeast was inoculated into solutions containing only glucose, but progressed efficiently with when Vegemite or Marmite was also added. Gas Chromatography confirmed that ethanol was present at ∼3% v/v post-fermentation in all samples which contained glucose, Vegemite or Marmite, and brewers' yeast. Trace amounts of methanol were also detected. Mass spectrometry proteomics identified abundant intracellular yeast proteins and barley proteins in Vegemite and Marmite, and abundant secreted yeast proteins from actively growing yeast in those samples to which extra brewers' yeast had been added. We estimate that the real-world cost of home brewed "Vegemite Beer" would be very low. Our results show that Vegemite or other yeast extract spreads could provide cheap and readily available sources of nutrient supplementation to increase the efficiency of fermentation in home brewing or other settings. PMID:27602264

  15. Vegemite Beer: yeast extract spreads as nutrient supplements to promote fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Edward D.

    2016-01-01

    Vegemite is an iconic Australian food spread made from spent brewers’ yeast extract, which has been reported to be used as an ingredient in illegal home brewing. In this study, we tested the utility of Vegemite and the similar spread Marmite in promoting fermentation. We could not culture microorganisms from either Vegemite or Marmite, consistent with these food-grade spreads being essentially sterile. To test if the addition of Vegemite or Marmite could assist in fermentation when additional viable yeast was also present, solutions containing glucose and a range of concentrations of either Vegemite or Marmite were inoculated with brewers’ yeast. No fermentation occurred in any condition without addition of extra brewer’s yeast. Fermentation did not occur when yeast was inoculated into solutions containing only glucose, but progressed efficiently with when Vegemite or Marmite was also added. Gas Chromatography confirmed that ethanol was present at ∼3% v/v post-fermentation in all samples which contained glucose, Vegemite or Marmite, and brewers’ yeast. Trace amounts of methanol were also detected. Mass spectrometry proteomics identified abundant intracellular yeast proteins and barley proteins in Vegemite and Marmite, and abundant secreted yeast proteins from actively growing yeast in those samples to which extra brewers’ yeast had been added. We estimate that the real-world cost of home brewed “Vegemite Beer” would be very low. Our results show that Vegemite or other yeast extract spreads could provide cheap and readily available sources of nutrient supplementation to increase the efficiency of fermentation in home brewing or other settings. PMID:27602264

  16. Quality assessment of lager brewery yeast samples and strains using barley malt extracts with anti-yeast activity.

    PubMed

    van Nierop, Sandra N E; Axcell, Barry C; Cantrell, Ian C; Rautenbach, Marina

    2009-04-01

    Membrane active anti-yeast compounds, such as antimicrobial peptides and proteins, cause yeast membrane damage which is likely to affect yeast vitality and fermentation performance, parameters which are notoriously difficult to analyse. In this work the sensitivity of lager brewery yeast strains towards barley malt extracts with anti-yeast activity was assessed with an optimised assay. It was found that yeast, obtained directly from a brewery, was much more sensitive towards the malt extracts than the same yeast strain propagated in the laboratory. Sensitivity to the malt extracts increased during the course of a laboratory scale fermentation when inoculated with brewery yeast. As the assay was able to differentiate yeast samples with different histories, it shows promise as a yeast quality assay measuring the yeast's ability to withstand stress which can be equated to vitality. The assay was also able to differentiate between different lager yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae propagated in the laboratory when challenged with a number of malt extracts of varying anti-yeast activity. The assessment of yeast strains in the presence of malt extracts will lead to the identification of yeast strains with improved quality/vitality that can withstand malt-associated anti-yeast activity during brewery fermentations. PMID:19171262

  17. [Study of the Sporothrix schenkii (yeast forms) extract. Electrophoretic and immunoelectrophoretic analyses: characterization of enzymatic activities].

    PubMed

    Walbaum, S; Duriez, T; Dujardin, L; Biguet, J

    1978-07-28

    An extract from living yeast forms of S. schenckii was prepared. The yeasts originated from a shake culture in B.H.I. broth (Difco) incubated for 3 days at 35 degrees C in darkness; they were harvested, washed and disrupted with glass beads in a model MSK Braun mechanical cell homogenizer; a freezing-thawing was added to improve the extract. After electrophoretic separation in agarose gel, the extract's components were characterized by their enzymic activity; with this technique, 30 bands were revealed. These enzymic activities were also investigated on the antigenic fractions of the extract revealed by a rabbit hyperimmunserum: 16 among 22 immunoprecipitates are identified by their catalytic properties. Study of the earliest precipitating antibodies (appearing-order and enzymic caracterization) in rabbits just immunized completes this work. How to ameliorate the quality of the extract by culture and extraction conditions is also specified. PMID:692628

  18. Oleaginous yeast: a value-added platform for renewable oils.

    PubMed

    Probst, Kyle V; Schulte, Leslie R; Durrett, Timothy P; Rezac, Mary E; Vadlani, Praveen V

    2016-10-01

    Yeast single cell oil (SCO) is a non-crop-based, renewable oil source that can be used for the production of bio-based oleochemicals. Stand-alone production of SCO for oleochemicals is currently not cost-competitive because lower-cost alternatives from petroleum and crop-based resources are available. Utilizing low-valued nutrient sources, implementing cost-efficient downstream processes and adopting biotechnological advancements such as systems biology and metabolic engineering could prove valuable in making an SCO platform a reality in the emerging bio-based economy. This review aims to consider key biochemical pathways for storage lipid synthesis, possible pathways for SCO yield improvement, previously used bioprocessing techniques for SCO production, challenges in SCO commercialization and advantages of adopting a renewable SCO platform. PMID:26180999

  19. Spent brewer's yeast extract as an ingredient in cooked hams.

    PubMed

    Pancrazio, Gaston; Cunha, Sara C; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Loureiro, Mónica; Meireles, Sónia; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O; Pinho, Olívia

    2016-11-01

    This work describes the effect of the incorporation of 1% spent yeast extract into cooked hams. Physical/chemical/sensorial characteristics and changes during 12 and 90days storage were evaluated on control and treated cooked hams processed for 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 or 3h. Spent yeast extract addition increased hardness, chewiness, ash, protein and free amino acid content. Similar volatile profiles were obtained, although there were some quantitative differences. No advantages were observed for increased cooking time. No significant differences were observed for physical and sensorial parameters of cooked hams with spent yeast extract at 12 and 90days post production, but His, aldehydes and esters increased at the end of storage. This behaviour was similar to that observed for control hams. The higher hardness of cooked ham with 1% yeast extract was due to the stronger gel formed during cooking and was maintained during storage. This additive acts as gel stabilizer for cooked ham production and could potentially improve other processing characteristics. PMID:27449232

  20. Extraction and analysis of soluble inositol polyphosphates from yeast.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Cristina; Saiardi, Adolfo

    2006-01-01

    Soluble inositol polyphosphates are implicated in the regulation of many important cellular functions. This protocol to extract and separate inositol polyphosphates from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is divided into three steps: labeling of yeast, extraction of soluble inositol polyphosphates and chromatographic separation. Yeast cells are incubated with tritiated inositol, which is taken up and metabolized into different phosphorylated forms. Soluble inositol polyphosphates are then acid-extracted and fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography. The radioactivity of each fraction is determined by scintillation counting. This highly sensitive and reproducible method allows the accurate detection of subtle changes in the inositol polyphosphate profile and takes less than 48 h. It can easily be applied to other systems and we have included two adaptations of the protocol, one optimized for mammalian cells and the other for Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:17406485

  1. Some properties of an alcohol dehydrogenase partially purified from baker's yeast grown without added zinc.

    PubMed Central

    Dickenson, C J; Dickinson, F M

    1976-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase was partially purified from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) grown in the presence of 20 muM-MnSO4 without added Zn2+ and from yeast grown in the presence of 1.8 muM-MnSO4. The enzyme from yeast grown with added Zn2+ has the same properties as the crystalline enzyme from commercial supplies of baker's yeast. The enzyme from yeast grown without added An2+ has quite different properties. It has a mol.wt. in the region of 72000 and an S 20 w of 5.8S. The values can be compared with a mol.wt. of 141000 and an S 20 w of 7.6S for the crystalline enzyme. ADP-ribose, a common impurity in commercial samples of NAD+, is a potent competitive inhibitor of the new enzyme (K1 = 0.5 muM), but is not so for the crystalline enzyme. The observed maximum rate of ethanol oxidation at pH 7.05 and 25 degrees C was decreased 12-fold by the presence of 0.06 mol of inhibitor/mol of NAD+ when using the enzyme from Zn2+-deficient yeast, but with crystalline enzyme the maximum rate was essentially unchanged by this concentration of inhibitor. The kinetic characteristics for the two enzymes with ethanol, butan-1-ol, acetaldehyde and butyraldehyde as substrates are markedly different. These kinetic differences are discussed in relation to the mechanism of catalysis for the enzyme from Zn2+-deficient yeast. PMID:179534

  2. Inhibition of spoiling yeasts of fruit juices through citrus extracts.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Antonio; Speranza, Barbara; Campaniello, Daniela; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2013-10-01

    This article reports on the bioactivities of citrus extracts (citrus extract, lemon extract, and neroli) toward Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Pichia membranifaciens, and Rhodotorula bacarum. The bioactivities of the extracts (from 10 to 100 ppm) were evaluated through a microdilution method; thereafter, citrus extracts (0 to 80 ppm) were tested in combination with either pH (3.0 to 5.0) or temperature (5 to 25°C). Finally, a confirmatory experiment was run in a commercial drink (referred to as red fruit juice) containing citrus extract (40 ppm) that was inoculated with either S. cerevisiae or Z. bailii (5 log CFU/ml) and stored at 4 and 25°C. Yeasts increased to 7 log CFU/ml (Z. bailii) or 8 log CFU/ml (S. cerevisiae) in the control at 25°C, but the citrus extract addition controlled yeast growth for at least 3 days; under refrigeration, the effect was significant for 10 days. PMID:24112576

  3. Effect of scenedesmus acuminatus green algae extracts on the development of Candida lipolytic yeast in gas condensate-containing media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilmes, B. I.; Kasymova, G. A.; Runov, V. I.; Karavayeva, N. N.

    1980-01-01

    Data are given of a comparative study of the growth and development as well as the characteristics of the biomass of the C. Lipolytica yeast according to the content of raw protein, protein, lipids, vitamins in the B group, and residual hydrocarbons during growth in media with de-aromatized gas-condensate FNZ as the carbon source with aqueous and alcohol extracts of S. acuminatus as the biostimulants. It is shown that the decoction and aqueous extract of green algae has the most intensive stimulating effect on the yeast growth. When a decoction of algae is added to the medium, the content of residual hydrocarbons in the biomass of C. lipolytica yeast is reduced by 4%; the quantity of protein, lipids, thamine and inositol with replacement of the yeast autolysate by the decoction of algae is altered little.

  4. Recovery of spores of Clostridium botulinum in yeast extract agar and pork infusion agar after heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Odlaug, T E; Pflug, I J

    1977-10-01

    Yeast extract agar, pork infusion agar, and modifications of these media were used to recover heated Clostridium botulinum spores. The D- and z-values were determined. Two type A strains and one type B strain of C. botulinum were studied. In all cases the D-values were largest when the spores were recovered in yeast extract agar, compared to the D-values for spores recovered in pork infusion agar. The z-values for strains 62A and A16037 were largest when the spores were recovered in pork infusion agar. The addition of sodium bicarbonate and sodium thioglycolate to pork infusion agar resulted in D-values for C. botulinum 62A spores similar to those for the same spores recovered in yeast extract agar. The results suggest that sodium bicarbonate and sodium thioglycolate should be added to recovery media for heated C. botulinum spores to obtain maximum plate counts. PMID:335970

  5. Antiulcer and antiproliferative properties of spent brewer's yeast peptide extracts for incorporation into foods.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Maria M; Pereira, Joana O; Monteiro, Karin M; Ruiz, Ana L; Carvalho, João E; Pinheiro, Hélder; Pintado, Manuela

    2016-05-18

    The main objective was to study the antiulcer and antiproliferative potential of yeast peptide extract for further incorporation into functional foods. Peptide concentrates were obtained by hydrolysis of spent brewer's yeast proteins followed by a filtration process. In order to prove the possible protection of gastric mucosa, an animal model with ulcerative lesions caused by oral administration of absolute ethanol was used. The peptide fraction <3 kDa was able to reduce gastric injuries to significant levels (p < 0.001) and the effective dose (DE50) was 816 mg per kg bw. The cytoprotective effect appears to depend on a prostaglandin-mediated mechanism and also on a nonspecific mechanism. The antiproliferative activity of the extract in nine different human tumoral cell lines was tested. The results exhibited a promising antiproliferative activity against the cell line K-562 (leukemia). The results suggest that a new peptide extract can be used to develop new value-added functional food products, although further studies are required. PMID:27125503

  6. Fractionation of Phenolic Compounds Extracted from Propolis and Their Activity in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Petelinc, Tanja; Polak, Tomaž; Demšar, Lea; Jamnik, Polona

    2013-01-01

    We have here investigated the activities of Slovenian propolis extracts in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and identified the phenolic compounds that appear to contribute to these activities. We correlated changes in intracellular oxidation and cellular metabolic energy in these yeasts with the individual fractions of the propolis extracts obtained following solid-phase extraction. The most effective fraction was further investigated according to its phenolic compounds. PMID:23409133

  7. The effect of a yeast extract feed additive on turkeys challenged with Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes and subjected to transport stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need to develop nutritional methods for controlling pathogens in poultry production. A yeast extract supplement, Alphamune™ (YE) was added to the diet of turkeys which were exposed to E. coli and L. monocytogenes Scott A at 16 wks of age using coarse spray and feed inclusion. Positive c...

  8. Enumeration and rapid identification of yeasts during extraction processes of extra virgin olive oil in Tuscany.

    PubMed

    Mari, Eleonora; Guerrini, Simona; Granchi, Lisa; Vincenzini, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of yeast populations during different olive oil extraction processes, carried out in three consecutive years in Tuscany (Italy), by analysing crushed pastes, kneaded pastes, oil from decanter and pomaces. The results showed yeast concentrations ranging between 10(3) and 10(5) CFU/g or per mL. Seventeen dominant yeast species were identified by random amplified polymorphic DNA with primer M13 and their identification was confirmed by restriction fragments length polymorphism of ribosomal internal transcribed spacer and sequencing rRNA genes. The isolation frequencies of each species in the collected samples pointed out that the occurrence of the various yeast species in olive oil extraction process was dependent not only on the yeasts contaminating the olives but also on the yeasts colonizing the plant for oil extraction. In fact, eleven dominant yeast species were detected from the washed olives, but only three of them were also found in oil samples at significant isolation frequency. On the contrary, the most abundant species in oil samples, Yamadazyma terventina, did not occur in washed olive samples. These findings suggest a phenomenon of contamination of the plant for oil extraction that selects some yeast species that could affect the quality of olive oil. PMID:27116959

  9. Yeast extract stimulates production of glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, by Pseudozyma hubeiensis SY62.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Masaaki; Nagahama, Takahiko; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Morita, Tomotake; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai; Hatada, Yuji

    2011-06-01

    We improved the culture conditions for a biosurfactant producing yeast, Pseudozyma hubeiensis SY62. We found that yeast extract greatly stimulates MEL production. Furthermore, we demonstrated a highly efficient production of MELs in the improved medium by fed-batch cultivation. The final concentration of MELs reached 129 ± 8.2g/l for one week. PMID:21393057

  10. 40 CFR 180.1246 - Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1246 Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from... exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of the biochemical pesticide Yeast...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1246 - Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1246 Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from... exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of the biochemical pesticide Yeast...

  12. 40 CFR 180.1246 - Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1246 Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from... exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of the biochemical pesticide Yeast...

  13. 40 CFR 180.1246 - Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1246 Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from... exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of the biochemical pesticide Yeast...

  14. 40 CFR 180.1246 - Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: exemption from the requirement of a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1246 Yeast Extract Hydrolysate from... exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of the biochemical pesticide Yeast...

  15. Specific initiation by RNA polymerase I in a whole-cell extract from yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, M C; Choe, S Y; Reeder, R H

    1991-01-01

    A protocol is described for making a soluble whole-cell extract from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) that supports active and specific transcription initiation by RNA polymerases I, II, and III. Specific initiation by polymerase I decreases in high-density cultures, paralleling the decrease in abundance of the endogenous 35S rRNA precursor. This extract should be useful for studying the molecular mechanisms that regulate rRNA transcription in yeast. Images PMID:1992452

  16. Improving the performance of the Granulosis virus of Codling moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricideae) by adding the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with sugar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies evaluated the effectiveness of adding Saccharomyces cerevisiae with brown cane sugar (sugar) to the codling moth granulosis virus, CpGV, to improve larval control of Cydia pomonella (L.), on apple. Neither the use of the yeast or sugar alone caused larval mortality greater than the water con...

  17. Extraction of genomic DNA from yeasts for PCR-based applications.

    PubMed

    Lõoke, Marko; Kristjuhan, Kersti; Kristjuhan, Arnold

    2011-05-01

    We have developed a quick and low-cost genomic DNA extraction protocol from yeast cells for PCR-based applications. This method does not require any enzymes, hazardous chemicals, or extreme temperatures, and is especially powerful for simultaneous analysis of a large number of samples. DNA can be efficiently extracted from different yeast species (Kluyveromyces lactis, Hansenula polymorpha, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Candida albicans, Pichia pastoris, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The protocol involves lysis of yeast colonies or cells from liquid culture in a lithium acetate (LiOAc)-SDS solution and subsequent precipitation of DNA with ethanol. Approximately 100 nanograms of total genomic DNA can be extracted from 1 × 10(7) cells. DNA extracted by this method is suitable for a variety of PCR-based applications (including colony PCR, real-time qPCR, and DNA sequencing) for amplification of DNA fragments of ≤ 3500 bp. PMID:21548894

  18. Effect of added autochthonous yeasts on the volatile compounds of dry-cured hams.

    PubMed

    Simoncini, Nicoletta; Pinna, Anna; Toscani, Tania; Virgili, Roberta

    2015-11-01

    Three yeast strains belonging to Debaryomyces and Hyphopichia spp., isolated from dry-cured hams and previously tested for biocontrol activity against toxigenic Penicillium nordicum, were investigated for ability in colonising ham surface. Hams were twice yeast-inoculated onto the unskinned muscle surface during ripening and processed up to full maturation in two manufacturing plants. The yeast strains and the manufacturing plants differed (P < 0.05) in surface populations, volatile compounds and sensory descriptors of matured hams. Sensory scores for each of the yeast-inoculated groups were higher or similar to the non-inoculated ones (controls). Debaryomyces strains were regarded as those most fit to colonise the ham surface under the ecological conditions of dry-curing rooms, hence to qualify as biocontrol agents against the growth of undesired mould and preserve the typical sensory properties of dry-cured hams. PMID:26210478

  19. Use of Non-Conventional Cell Disruption Method for Extraction of Proteins from Black Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Čolnik, Maja; Primožič, Mateja; Knez, Željko; Leitgeb, Maja

    2016-01-01

    The influence of pressure and treatment time on cells disruption of different black yeasts and on activities of extracted proteins using supercritical carbon dioxide process was studied. The cells of three different black yeasts Phaeotheca triangularis, Trimatostroma salinum, and Wallemia ichthyophaga were exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2) by varying pressure at fixed temperature (35°C). The black yeasts cell walls were disrupted, and the content of the cells was spilled into the liquid medium. The impact of SC CO2 conditions on secretion of enzymes and proteins from black yeast cells suspension was studied. The residual activity of the enzymes cellulase, β-glucosidase, α-amylase, and protease was studied by enzymatic assay. The viability of black yeast cells was determined by measuring the optical density of the cell suspension at 600 nm. The total protein concentration in the suspension was determined on UV-Vis spectrophotometer at 595 nm. The release of intracellular and extracellular products from black yeast cells was achieved. Also, the observation by an environmental scanning electron microscopy shows major morphological changes with SC CO2-treated cells. The advantages of the proposed method are in a simple use, which is also possible for heat-sensitive materials on one hand and on the other hand integration of the extraction of enzymes and their use in biocatalytical reactions. PMID:27148527

  20. Use of Non-Conventional Cell Disruption Method for Extraction of Proteins from Black Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Čolnik, Maja; Primožič, Mateja; Knez, Željko; Leitgeb, Maja

    2016-01-01

    The influence of pressure and treatment time on cells disruption of different black yeasts and on activities of extracted proteins using supercritical carbon dioxide process was studied. The cells of three different black yeasts Phaeotheca triangularis, Trimatostroma salinum, and Wallemia ichthyophaga were exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2) by varying pressure at fixed temperature (35°C). The black yeasts cell walls were disrupted, and the content of the cells was spilled into the liquid medium. The impact of SC CO2 conditions on secretion of enzymes and proteins from black yeast cells suspension was studied. The residual activity of the enzymes cellulase, β-glucosidase, α-amylase, and protease was studied by enzymatic assay. The viability of black yeast cells was determined by measuring the optical density of the cell suspension at 600 nm. The total protein concentration in the suspension was determined on UV–Vis spectrophotometer at 595 nm. The release of intracellular and extracellular products from black yeast cells was achieved. Also, the observation by an environmental scanning electron microscopy shows major morphological changes with SC CO2-treated cells. The advantages of the proposed method are in a simple use, which is also possible for heat-sensitive materials on one hand and on the other hand integration of the extraction of enzymes and their use in biocatalytical reactions. PMID:27148527

  1. Effects of dietary yeast extract on turkey stress response and heterophil oxidative burst activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective nutritional approaches to counteract the negative effects of stress would both improve human health and provide food animal producers with useful alternatives to antibiotics. In this study, turkeys were fed a standard diet or the same diet supplemented with yeast extract (Alphamune™, YE), ...

  2. Gastrointestinal Maturation is Accelerated in Turkey Poults Supplemented with a Mannan-Oligosaccharide Yeast Extract (Alphamune)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alphamune™, a yeast extract antibiotic alternative, has been shown to stimulate the immune system, increase body weight in pigs, and reduce Salmonella colonization in chickens. The influence of Alphamune™ on gastrointestinal tract development has not been reported. Two trials were conducted to evalu...

  3. A single protocol for extraction of gDNA from bacteria and yeast.

    PubMed

    Vingataramin, Laurie; Frost, Eric H

    2015-03-01

    Guanidine thiocyanate breakage of microorganisms has been the standard initial step in genomic DNA (gDNA) extraction of microbial DNA for two decades, despite the requirement for pretreatments to extract DNA from microorganisms other than Gram-negative bacteria. We report a quick and low-cost gDNA extraction protocol called EtNa that is efficient for bacteria and yeast over a broad range of concentrations. EtNa is based on a hot alkaline ethanol lysis. The solution can be immediately centrifuged to yield a crude gDNA extract suitable for PCR, or it can be directly applied to a silica column for purification. PMID:25757544

  4. Unveiling the potential of novel yeast protein extracts in white wines clarification and stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Joana P.; Neto, Rodrigo; Centeno, Filipe; De Fátima Teixeira, Maria; Gomes, Ana Catarina

    2015-01-01

    Fining agents derived from animal and mineral sources are widely used to clarify and stabilize white wines. Nevertheless, health and environmental problems are being raised, concerning the allergenic and environmental impact of some of those fining products. In this study, our aim is to validate the potential of yeast protein extracts, obtained from an alternative and safe source, naturally present in wine: oenological yeasts. Three untreated white wines were used in this work in order to evaluate the impact of these novel yeast protein extracts (YPE) in terms of the wine clarification and stabilization improvement. Two separated fining trials were thus conducted at laboratory scale and the yeast alternatives were compared with reference fining agents, obtained from mineral, animal and vegetable origins. Our results indicate that YPE were capable to promote (i) brilliance/color improvement, (ii) turbidity reduction (76–89% comparing with the untreated wines), and (iii) production of compact and homogeneous lees (44% smaller volume than obtained with bentonite). Additionally, after submitting wines to natural and forced oxidations, YPE treatments revealed (iv) different forms of colloidal stabilization, by presenting comparable or superior effects when particularly compared to casein. Altogether, this study reveals that YPE represent a promising alternative for white wine fining, since they are resultant from a natural and more sustainable origin, at present not regarded as potential allergenic according to Regulation (EC) No. 1169/2011. PMID:25853122

  5. Unveiling the potential of novel yeast protein extracts in white wines clarification and stabilization.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Joana P; Neto, Rodrigo; Centeno, Filipe; De Fátima Teixeira, Maria; Gomes, Ana Catarina

    2015-01-01

    Fining agents derived from animal and mineral sources are widely used to clarify and stabilize white wines. Nevertheless, health and environmental problems are being raised, concerning the allergenic and environmental impact of some of those fining products. In this study, our aim is to validate the potential of yeast protein extracts, obtained from an alternative and safe source, naturally present in wine: oenological yeasts. Three untreated white wines were used in this work in order to evaluate the impact of these novel yeast protein extracts (YPE) in terms of the wine clarification and stabilization improvement. Two separated fining trials were thus conducted at laboratory scale and the yeast alternatives were compared with reference fining agents, obtained from mineral, animal and vegetable origins. Our results indicate that YPE were capable to promote (i) brilliance/color improvement, (ii) turbidity reduction (76-89% comparing with the untreated wines), and (iii) production of compact and homogeneous lees (44% smaller volume than obtained with bentonite). Additionally, after submitting wines to natural and forced oxidations, YPE treatments revealed (iv) different forms of colloidal stabilization, by presenting comparable or superior effects when particularly compared to casein. Altogether, this study reveals that YPE represent a promising alternative for white wine fining, since they are resultant from a natural and more sustainable origin, at present not regarded as potential allergenic according to Regulation (EC) No. 1169/2011. PMID:25853122

  6. GC Preps: Fast and Easy Extraction of Stable Yeast Genomic DNA

    PubMed Central

    Blount, Benjamin A.; Driessen, Maureen R. M.; Ellis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Existing yeast genomic DNA extraction methods are not ideally suited to extensive screening of colonies by PCR, due to being too lengthy, too laborious or yielding poor quality DNA and inconsistent results. We developed the GC prep method as a solution to this problem. Yeast cells from colonies or liquid cultures are lysed by vortex mixing with glass beads and then boiled in the presence of a metal chelating resin. In around 12 minutes, multiple samples can be processed to extract high yields of genomic DNA. These preparations perform as effectively in PCR screening as DNA purified by organic solvent methods, are stable for up to 1 year at room temperature and can be used as the template for PCR amplification of fragments of at least 8 kb. PMID:27240644

  7. Dextransucrase production using cashew apple juice as substrate: effect of phosphate and yeast extract addition.

    PubMed

    Chagas, Clarice M A; Honorato, Talita L; Pinto, Gustavo A S; Maia, Geraldo A; Rodrigues, Sueli

    2007-05-01

    Cashew apples are considered agriculture excess in the Brazilian Northeast because cashew trees are cultivated primarily with the aim of cashew nut production. In this work, the use of cashew apple juice as a substrate for Leuconostoc mesenteroides cultivation was investigated. The effect of yeast extract and phosphate addition was evaluated using factorial planning tools. Both phosphate and yeast extract addition were significant factors for biomass growth, but had no significant effect on maximum enzyme activity. The enzyme activities found in cashew apple juice assays were at least 3.5 times higher than the activity found in the synthetic medium. Assays with pH control (pH = 6.5) were also carried out. The pH-controlled fermentation enhanced biomass growth, but decreased the enzyme activity. Crude enzyme free of cells produced using cashew apple juice was stable for 16 h at 30 degrees C at a pH of 5.0. PMID:17323142

  8. GC Preps: Fast and Easy Extraction of Stable Yeast Genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Blount, Benjamin A; Driessen, Maureen R M; Ellis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Existing yeast genomic DNA extraction methods are not ideally suited to extensive screening of colonies by PCR, due to being too lengthy, too laborious or yielding poor quality DNA and inconsistent results. We developed the GC prep method as a solution to this problem. Yeast cells from colonies or liquid cultures are lysed by vortex mixing with glass beads and then boiled in the presence of a metal chelating resin. In around 12 minutes, multiple samples can be processed to extract high yields of genomic DNA. These preparations perform as effectively in PCR screening as DNA purified by organic solvent methods, are stable for up to 1 year at room temperature and can be used as the template for PCR amplification of fragments of at least 8 kb. PMID:27240644

  9. Methyl jasmonate and yeast extract stimulate mitragynine production in Mitragyna speciosa (Roxb.) Korth. shoot culture.

    PubMed

    Wungsintaweekul, Juraithip; Choo-Malee, Jutarat; Charoonratana, Tossaton; Keawpradub, Niwat

    2012-10-01

    Mitragynine is a pharmacologically-active terpenoid indole alkaloid found in Mitragyna speciosa leaves. Treatment with methyl jasmonate (10 μM) for 24 h and yeast extract (0.1 mg/ml) for 12 h were the optimum conditions of elicitation of mitragynine accumulation in a M. speciosa shoot culture. The former elicitor gave 0.11 mg mitragynine/g dry wt. Tryptophan decarboxylase and strictosidine synthase mRNA levels were enhanced in accordance with mitragynine accumulation. PMID:22714271

  10. Ultrasound assisted extraction of carbohydrates from microalgae as feedstock for yeast fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guili; Chen, Xue; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Shixiao; Feng, Huixing; Chen, Wei Ning; Lau, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Recently, carbohydrates biomass from microalgae is considered as a promising and inexpensive feedstock for biofeuls production by microorganism fermentation. The main obstacle of the process is microalgae pretreatment and carbohydrates extraction from algal cell. In this study, comparison of three pretreatment methods was performed and the results showed that ultrasonic assisted extraction (UAE) was very effective. The effects of four parameters (ultrasonic power, extraction time, flow rate and algal cell concentration, respectively) on extraction efficiency were also investigated. Additionally, in order to identify significant factors for glucose yield, combination of these four parameters was examined by using fractional factorial design (FFD) and the regression model was obtained. Meanwhile, the refined model was confirmed as a good fitting model via analysis of variance (ANOVA). After extraction, glucose obtained from microalgae was used as substrate for Rhodosporidium toruloides fermentation and yeast biomass was much higher than that of control culture. PMID:23196255

  11. Microbial dynamics during azo dye degradation in a UASB reactor supplied with yeast extract

    PubMed Central

    Silva, S.Q.; Silva, D.C.; Lanna, M.C.S.; Baeta, B.E.L.; Aquino, S.F.

    2014-01-01

    The present work aimed to investigate the microbial dynamics during the anaerobic treatment of the azo dye blue HRFL in bench scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor operated at ambient temperature. Sludge samples were collected under distinct operational phases, when the reactor were stable (low variation of color removal), to assess the effect of glucose and yeast extract as source of carbon and redox mediators, respectively. Reactors performance was evaluated based on COD (chemical oxygen demand) and color removal. The microbial dynamics were investigated by PCR-DGGE (Polimerase Chain Reaction - Denaturing Gradient of Gel Electrophoresis) technique by comparing the 16S rDNA profiles among samples. The results suggest that the composition of microorganisms changed from the beginning to the end of the reactor operation, probably in response to the presence of azo dye and/or its degradation byproducts. Despite the highest efficiency of color removal was observed in the presence of 500 mg/L of yeast extract (up to 93%), there were no differences regarding the microbial profiles that could indicate a microbial selection by the yeast extract addition. On the other hand Methosarcina barkeri was detected only in the end of operation when the best efficiencies on color removal occurred. Nevertheless the biomass selection observed in the last stages of UASB operation is probably a result of the washout of the sludge in response of accumulation of aromatic amines which led to tolerant and very active biomass that contributed to high efficiencies on color removal. PMID:25763018

  12. Microbial dynamics during azo dye degradation in a UASB reactor supplied with yeast extract.

    PubMed

    Silva, S Q; Silva, D C; Lanna, M C S; Baeta, B E L; Aquino, S F

    2014-01-01

    The present work aimed to investigate the microbial dynamics during the anaerobic treatment of the azo dye blue HRFL in bench scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor operated at ambient temperature. Sludge samples were collected under distinct operational phases, when the reactor were stable (low variation of color removal), to assess the effect of glucose and yeast extract as source of carbon and redox mediators, respectively. Reactors performance was evaluated based on COD (chemical oxygen demand) and color removal. The microbial dynamics were investigated by PCR-DGGE (Polimerase Chain Reaction - Denaturing Gradient of Gel Electrophoresis) technique by comparing the 16S rDNA profiles among samples. The results suggest that the composition of microorganisms changed from the beginning to the end of the reactor operation, probably in response to the presence of azo dye and/or its degradation byproducts. Despite the highest efficiency of color removal was observed in the presence of 500 mg/L of yeast extract (up to 93%), there were no differences regarding the microbial profiles that could indicate a microbial selection by the yeast extract addition. On the other hand Methosarcina barkeri was detected only in the end of operation when the best efficiencies on color removal occurred. Nevertheless the biomass selection observed in the last stages of UASB operation is probably a result of the washout of the sludge in response of accumulation of aromatic amines which led to tolerant and very active biomass that contributed to high efficiencies on color removal. PMID:25763018

  13. Improving the Performance of the Granulosis Virus of Codling Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) by Adding the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with Sugar.

    PubMed

    Knight, Alan L; Basoalto, Esteban; Witzgall, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Studies were conducted with the codling moth granulosis virus (CpGV) to evaluate whether adding the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Meyen ex E. C. Hansen with brown cane sugar could improve larval control of Cydia pomonella (L.). Larval mortalities in dipped-apple bioassays with S. cerevisiae or sugar alone were not significantly different from the water control. The addition of S. cerevisiae but not sugar with CpGV significantly increased larval mortality compared with CpGV alone. The combination of S. cerevisiae and sugar with CpGV significantly increased larval mortality compared with CpGV plus either additive alone. The addition of S. cerevisiae improved the efficacy of CpGV similarly to the use of the yeast Metschnikowia pulcherrima (isolated from field-collected larvae). The proportion of uninjured fruit in field trials was significantly increased with the addition of S. cerevisiae and sugar to CpGV compared with CpGV alone only in year 1, and from the controls in both years. In comparison, larval mortality was significantly increased in both years with the addition of S. cerevisiae and sugar with CpGV compared with CpGV alone or from the controls. The numbers of overwintering larvae on trees was significantly reduced from the control following a seasonal program of CpGV plus S. cerevisiae and sugar. The addition of a microencapsulated formulation of pear ester did not improve the performance of CpGV or CpGV plus S. cerevisiae and sugar. These data suggest that yeasts can enhance the effectiveness of the biological control agent CpGV, in managing and maintaining codling moth at low densities. PMID:26313179

  14. Inaccurate DNA Synthesis in Cell Extracts of Yeast Producing Active Human DNA Polymerase Iota

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Alena V.; Grabow, Corinn; Gening, Leonid V.; Tarantul, Vyacheslav Z.; Tahirov, Tahir H.; Bessho, Tadayoshi; Pavlov, Youri I.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian Pol ι has an unusual combination of properties: it is stimulated by Mn2+ ions, can bypass some DNA lesions and misincorporates “G” opposite template “T” more frequently than incorporates the correct “A.” We recently proposed a method of detection of Pol ι activity in animal cell extracts, based on primer extension opposite the template T with a high concentration of only two nucleotides, dGTP and dATP (incorporation of “G” versus “A” method of Gening, abbreviated as “misGvA”). We provide unambiguous proof of the “misGvA” approach concept and extend the applicability of the method for the studies of variants of Pol ι in the yeast model system with different cation cofactors. We produced human Pol ι in baker's yeast, which do not have a POLI ortholog. The “misGvA” activity is absent in cell extracts containing an empty vector, or producing catalytically dead Pol ι, or Pol ι lacking exon 2, but is robust in the strain producing wild-type Pol ι or its catalytic core, or protein with the active center L62I mutant. The signature pattern of primer extension products resulting from inaccurate DNA synthesis by extracts of cells producing either Pol ι or human Pol η is different. The DNA sequence of the template is critical for the detection of the infidelity of DNA synthesis attributed to DNA Pol ι. The primer/template and composition of the exogenous DNA precursor pool can be adapted to monitor replication fidelity in cell extracts expressing various error-prone Pols or mutator variants of accurate Pols. Finally, we demonstrate that the mutation rates in yeast strains producing human DNA Pols ι and η are not elevated over the control strain, despite highly inaccurate DNA synthesis by their extracts. PMID:21304950

  15. Detergent assisted lipid extraction from wet yeast biomass for biodiesel: A response surface methodology approach.

    PubMed

    Yellapu, Sravan Kumar; Bezawada, Jyothi; Kaur, Rajwinder; Kuttiraja, Mathiazhakan; Tyagi, Rajeshwar D

    2016-10-01

    The lipid extraction from the microbial biomass is a tedious and high cost dependent process. In the present study, detergent assisted lipids extraction from the culture of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica SKY-7 was carried out. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to investigate the effect of three principle parameters (N-LS concentration, time and temperature) on microbial lipid extraction efficiency % (w/w). The results obtained by statistical analysis showed that the quadratic model fits in all cases. Maximum lipid recovery of 95.3±0.3% w/w was obtained at the optimum level of process variables [N-LS concentration 24.42mg (equal to 48mgN-LS/g dry biomass), treatment time 8.8min and reaction temperature 30.2°C]. Whereas the conventional chloroform and methanol extraction to achieve total lipid recovery required 12h at 60°C. The study confirmed that oleaginous yeast biomass treatment with N-lauroyl sarcosine would be a promising approach for industrial scale microbial lipid recovery. PMID:27416517

  16. Ionic liquid solutions as extractive solvents for value-added compounds from biomass

    PubMed Central

    Passos, Helena; Freire, Mara G.; Coutinho, João A. P.

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, the number of studies regarding the application of ionic liquids (ILs) as alternative solvents to extract value-added compounds from biomass has been growing. Based on an extended compilation and analysis of the data hitherto reported, the main objective of this review is to provide an overview on the use of ILs and their mixtures with molecular solvents for the extraction of value-added compounds present in natural sources. The ILs (or IL solutions) investigated as solvents for the extraction of natural compounds, such as alkaloids, flavonoids, terpenoids, lipids, among others, are outlined. The extraction techniques employed, namely solid–liquid extraction, and microwave-assisted and ultrasound-assisted extractions, are emphasized and discussed in terms of extraction yields and purification factors. Furthermore, the evaluation of the IL chemical structure and the optimization of the process conditions (IL concentration, temperature, biomass–solvent ratio, etc.) are critically addressed. Major conclusions on the role of the ILs towards the extraction mechanisms and improved extraction yields are additionally provided. The isolation and recovery procedures of the value-added compounds are ascertained as well as some scattered strategies already reported for the IL solvent recovery and reusability. Finally, a critical analysis on the economic impact versus the extraction performance of IL-based methodologies was also carried out and is here presented and discussed. PMID:25516718

  17. A Yeast Metabolite Extraction Protocol Optimised for Time-Series Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, Kalesh; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Tomita, Masaru; Murray, Douglas B.

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing call for the absolute quantification of time-resolved metabolite data. However, a number of technical issues exist, such as metabolites being modified/degraded either chemically or enzymatically during the extraction process. Additionally, capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry (CE-MS) is incompatible with high salt concentrations often used in extraction protocols. In microbial systems, metabolite yield is influenced by the extraction protocol used and the cell disruption rate. Here we present a method that rapidly quenches metabolism using dry-ice ethanol bath and methanol N-ethylmaleimide solution (thus stabilising thiols), disrupts cells efficiently using bead-beating and avoids artefacts created by live-cell pelleting. Rapid sample processing minimised metabolite leaching. Cell weight, number and size distribution was used to calculate metabolites to an attomol/cell level. We apply this method to samples obtained from the respiratory oscillation that occurs when yeast are grown continuously. PMID:22952947

  18. Purification and full characterisation of citreoviridin produced by Penicillium citreonigrum in yeast extract sucrose (YES) medium.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, Mariana Wagner; Resck, Inês Sabioni; Caldas, Eloisa Dutra

    2015-01-01

    The mycotoxin citreoviridin has been associated with the 'yellow rice' disease, which caused cardiac beriberi in Japan. In Brazil, the consumption of contaminated rice was suspected to be involved in a recent beriberi outbreak. In this work, citreoviridin was produced by Penicillium citreonigrum, cultivated in 500 ml yeast extract sucrose (YES) liquid medium for 8 days at 25ºC, and the toxin extracted with chloroform from the liquid medium and the mycelium. A total of 15.3 g of crude extract was obtained from 48 culture flasks, with an estimated citreoviridin contend of 5.54 g, 74.3% being present in the mycelia. Semi-preparative HPLC of the crude extract yielded 27.1% citreoviridin. The HPLC-purified citreoviridin fraction was fully characterised by UV/VIS, FT-IR, (1)H- and (13)C-NMR, LC-MS/MS and LC-MSD TOF, and purity confirmed by gravimetric analysis. Isocitreoviridin was also produced by P. citreonigrum, accounting for about 10% of the citreoviridin present in the crude extract, most transformed into citreoviridin after 10 months under freezing conditions protected from light. Citreoviridin was shown to be stable under the same conditions, although it can suffer isomerisation after a longer storage period. Isomerisation is a potential source of variability in toxicological studies and purity of the material should be checked before study initiation. PMID:25190053

  19. [Effects of 33% grapefruit extract on the growth of the yeast--like fungi, dermatopytes and moulds].

    PubMed

    Krajewska-Kułak, E; Lukaszuk, C; Niczyporuk, W

    2001-01-01

    Grapefruit seed extract was discovered by Jacob Harich an american immunologist in 1980. Assessment of the influence of grapefruit extract on the yeast-like fungi strains--Candida albicans growth. Material used in this investigation was ATCC test Candida albicans strains no 10231, 200 of Candida albicans strains, 5 of Candida sp. strains isolated from patients with candidiasis symptoms from different ontocenosis and 12 of dermatophytes and moulds isolated from patients. The susceptibility of the Candida was determined by serial dilution method. It seems that 33% grapefruit extract exert a potent antifungal activity against the yeast like fungi strains and had low activity against dermatophytes and moulds. Further studies in vitro and in vivo on greater number of the yeast-like fungi strains and other fungi species are needed. PMID:16886437

  20. Photocatalytic activity of biogenic silver nanoparticles synthesized using yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae) extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Kaushik; Sarkar, C. K.; Ghosh, C. K.

    2015-11-01

    Synthesis of metallic and semiconductor nanoparticles through physical and chemical route is quiet common but biological synthesis procedures are gaining momentum due to their simplicity, cost-effectivity and eco-friendliness. Here, we report green synthesis of silver nanoparticles from aqueous solution of silver salts using yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae) extract. The nanoparticles formation was gradually investigated by UV-Vis spectrometer. X-ray diffraction analysis was done to identify different phases of biosynthesized Ag nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy was performed to study the particle size and morphology of silver nanoparticles. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the nanoparticles was performed to study the role of biomolecules capped on the surface of Ag nanoparticles during interaction. Photocatalytic activity of these biosynthesized nanoparticles was studied using an organic dye, methylene blue under solar irradiation and these nanoparticles showed efficacy in degrading the dye within a few hours of exposure.

  1. Effect of Yeast Extract and Vitamin B(12) on Ethanol Production from Cellulose by Clostridium thermocellum I-1-B.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Goto, S; Yonemura, S; Sekine, K; Okuma, E; Takagi, Y; Hon-Nami, K; Saiki, T

    1992-02-01

    Addition to media of yeast extract, a vitamin mixture containing vitamin B(12), biotin, pyridoxamine, and p-aminobenzoic acid, or vitamin B(12) alone enhanced formation of ethanol but decreased lactate production in the fermentation of cellulose by Clostridium thermocellum I-1-B. A similar effect was not observed with C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 and JW20. PMID:16348657

  2. Effects of yeast extract and vitamin D on turkey mortality and cellulitis incidence in a transport stress model.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated yeast extract (YE) and vitamin D (VD) in turkeys treated with dexamethasone (Dex) at intervals designed to simulate transport stress during a 3 stage growout. YE but not VD decreased early mortality (P = 0.001) and mortality at wk 7 (P= 0.02) and wk 12 (P = 0.002) but not wk 16. Celluli...

  3. Yeast Extract: Sucrose Ratio Effects on Egg Load, Survival, and Mortality Caused by GF-120 in Western Cherry Fruit Fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extrinsic sources of nitrogen are needed by tephritid fruit flies for optimal nutrition. In this study, relationships between yeast extract diets containing 0, 0.109, 0.545, 1.09, 2.18, 3.27, and 5.45% nitrogen (N) and diet intake, survival, egg production, and responses to spinosad bait in western...

  4. Use of yeast cell wall extract as a tool to reduce the impact of necrotic enteritis in broilers.

    PubMed

    M'Sadeq, Shawkat A; Wu, Shu-Biao; Choct, Mingan; Forder, Rebecca; Swick, Robert A

    2015-05-01

    The use of a yeast cell wall extract derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Actigen(®)) has been proposed as an alternative to in-feed antibiotics. This experiment was conducted to investigate the efficacy of yeast cell extract as an alternative to zinc bacitracin or salinomycin using a necrotic enteritis challenge model. A feeding study was conducted using 480-day-old male Ross 308 chicks assigned to 48 floor pens. A 2 × 4 factorial arrangement of treatments was employed. The factors were: challenge (- or +) and feed additive (control, zinc bacitracin at 100/50 mg/kg, yeast cell wall extract at 400/800/200 mg/kg, or salinomycin at 60 mg/kg in starter, grower, and finisher, respectively). Diets based on wheat, sorghum, soybean meal, meat and bone meal, and canola meal were formulated according to the Ross 308 nutrient specifications. Birds were challenged using a previously established protocol (attenuated Eimeria spp oocysts) on d 9 and 10(8) to 10(9) Clostridium perfringens (type A strain EHE-NE18) on d 14 and 15). Challenged and unchallenged birds were partitioned to avoid cross contamination. Challenged birds had lower weight gain, feed intake and livability compared to unchallenged birds on d 24 and d 35 (P < 0.05). Birds given zinc bacitracin, yeast cell wall extract, or salinomycin had improved weight gain and livability when compared to control birds given no additives. Challenge × additive interactions were observed for feed intake and weight gain on d 24 and d 35 (P < 0.01). The additives all had a greater positive impact on feed intake, weight gain, and livability in challenged than unchallenged birds. All challenged birds showed higher necrotic enteritis lesion scores in the small intestine sections when compared to unchallenged birds (P < 0.01). Birds fed yeast cell wall extract exhibited increased villus height, decreased crypt depth, and increased villus:crypt ratio when challenged. Yeast cell wall extract, zinc bacitracin, and salinomycin were

  5. In Vivo Hypocholesterolemic Effect of MARDI Fermented Red Yeast Rice Water Extract in High Cholesterol Diet Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Beh, Boon Kee; Kong, Joan; Ho, Wan Yong; Mohd Yusof, Hamidah; Hussin, Aminuddin bin; Jaganath, Indu Bala; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Jamaluddin, Anisah

    2014-01-01

    Fermented red yeast rice has been traditionally consumed as medication in Asian cuisine. This study aimed to determine the in vivo hypocholesterolemic and antioxidant effects of fermented red yeast rice water extract produced using Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI) Monascus purpureus strains in mice fed with high cholesterol diet. Absence of monacolin-k, lower level of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), higher content of total amino acids, and antioxidant activities were detected in MARDI fermented red yeast rice water extract (MFRYR). In vivo MFRYR treatment on hypercholesterolemic mice recorded similar lipid lowering effect as commercial red yeast rice extract (CRYR) as it helps to reduce the elevated serum liver enzyme and increased the antioxidant levels in liver. This effect was also associated with the upregulation of apolipoproteins-E and inhibition of Von Willebrand factor expression. In summary, MFRYR enriched in antioxidant and amino acid without monacolin-k showed similar hypocholesterolemic effect as CRYR that was rich in monacolin-k and GABA. PMID:25031606

  6. In Vivo Hypocholesterolemic Effect of MARDI Fermented Red Yeast Rice Water Extract in High Cholesterol Diet Fed Mice.

    PubMed

    Yeap, Swee Keong; Beh, Boon Kee; Kong, Joan; Ho, Wan Yong; Mohd Yusof, Hamidah; Mohamad, Nurul Elyani; Hussin, Aminuddin Bin; Jaganath, Indu Bala; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Jamaluddin, Anisah; Long, Kamariah

    2014-01-01

    Fermented red yeast rice has been traditionally consumed as medication in Asian cuisine. This study aimed to determine the in vivo hypocholesterolemic and antioxidant effects of fermented red yeast rice water extract produced using Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (MARDI) Monascus purpureus strains in mice fed with high cholesterol diet. Absence of monacolin-k, lower level of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), higher content of total amino acids, and antioxidant activities were detected in MARDI fermented red yeast rice water extract (MFRYR). In vivo MFRYR treatment on hypercholesterolemic mice recorded similar lipid lowering effect as commercial red yeast rice extract (CRYR) as it helps to reduce the elevated serum liver enzyme and increased the antioxidant levels in liver. This effect was also associated with the upregulation of apolipoproteins-E and inhibition of Von Willebrand factor expression. In summary, MFRYR enriched in antioxidant and amino acid without monacolin-k showed similar hypocholesterolemic effect as CRYR that was rich in monacolin-k and GABA. PMID:25031606

  7. Methyl jasmonate, yeast extract and sucrose stimulate phenolic acids accumulation in Eryngium planum L. shoot cultures.

    PubMed

    Kikowska, Małgorzata; Kędziora, Izabela; Krawczyk, Aldona; Thiem, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Eryngium planum L. has been reported as a medicinal plant used in traditional medicine in Europe. The tissue cultures may be an alternative source of the biomass rich in desired bioactive compounds. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the biotechnological techniques on the selected phenolic acids accumulation in the agitated shoot cultures of E. planum. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of those compounds in 50% aqueous - methanolic extracts from the biomass were conducted by applying the HPLC method. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA), yeast extract (YE) and sucrose (Suc) stimulated accumulation of the phenolic acids: rosmarinic (RA), chlorogenic (CGA) and caffeic (CA) in in vitro shoot cultures. Cultivation of shoots in liquid MS media supplemented with 1.0 mg L(-1) 6-benzyladenine and 0.1 mg L(-1) indole-3-acetic acid in the presence of 100 µM MeJA for 48h was an optimum condition of elicitation and resulted in approximately 4.5-fold increased content of RA + CGA + CA in plant material compared to the control (19.795 mg g(-1) DW, 4.36 mg g(-1) DW, respectively). The results provide the first evidence that the selected phenolic acids can be synthesized in elicited shoot cultures of flat sea holly in higher amount than in untreated shoots. PMID:25856557

  8. The optimized capsid gene of porcine circovirus type 2 expressed in yeast forms virus-like particles and elicits antibody responses in mice fed with recombinant yeast extracts.

    PubMed

    Bucarey, Sergio A; Noriega, Jorge; Reyes, Paulina; Tapia, Cecilia; Sáenz, Leonardo; Zuñiga, Alejandro; Tobar, Jaime A

    2009-09-25

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2)-associated diseases are considered to be the biggest problem for the worldwide swine industry. The PCV2 capsid protein (Cap) is an important antigen for development of vaccines. At present, most anti-PCV2 vaccines are produced as injectable formulations. Although effective, these vaccines have certain drawbacks, including stress with concomitant immunosuppresion, and involve laborious and time-consuming procedures. In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as a vehicle to deliver PCV2 antigen in a preliminary attempt to develop an oral vaccine, and its immunogenic potential in mice was tested after oral gavage-mediated delivery. The cap gene with a yeast-optimized codon usage sequence (opt-cap) was chemically synthesized and cloned into Escherichia coli/Saccharomyces cerevisiae shuttle vector, pYES2, under the control of the Gal1 promoter. Intracellular expression of the Cap protein was confirmed by Western blot analysis and its antigenic properties were compared with those of baculovirus/insect cell-produced Cap protein derived from the native PCV2 cap gene. It was further demonstrated by electron micrography that the yeast-derived PCV2 Cap protein self-assembles into virus-like particles (VLPs) that are morphologically and antigenically similar to insect cell-derived VLPs. Feeding raw yeast extract containing Cap protein to mice elicited both serum- and fecal-specific antibodies against the antigen. These results show that it is feasible to use S. cerevisiae as a safe and simple system to produce PCV2 virus-like particles, and that oral yeast-mediated antigen delivery is an alternative strategy to efficiently induce anti-PCV2 antibodies in a mouse model, which is worthy of further investigation in swine. PMID:19664739

  9. Preparation and characterization of yeast nuclear extracts for efficient RNA polymerase B (II)-dependent transcription in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Verdier, J M; Stalder, R; Roberge, M; Amati, B; Sentenac, A; Gasser, S M

    1990-01-01

    We present a reproducible method for the preparation of nuclear extracts from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that support efficient RNA polymerase B (II)-dependent transcription. Extracts from both a crude nuclear fraction and Percoll-purified nuclei are highly active for site-specific initiation and transcription of a G-free cassette under the Adenovirus major late promoter. At optimal extract concentrations transcription is at least 5 times more efficient with the yeast extracts than with HeLa whole cell extracts. We show that the transcriptional activity is sensitive to alpha-amanitin and to depletion of factor(s) recognizing the TATA-box of the promoter. The in vitro reaction showed maximal activity after 45 min, was very sensitive to Cl-, but was not affected by high concentrations of potassium. We find that the efficiency of in vitro transcription in nuclear extracts is reproducibly high when spheroplasting is performed with a partially purified beta 1,3-glucanase (lyticase). Therefore a simplified method to isolate the lyticase from the supernatant of Oerskovia xanthineolytica is also presented. Images PMID:2263463

  10. Components of yeast (Sacchromyces cervisiae) extract as defined media additives that support the growth and productivity of CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Spearman, Maureen; Chan, Sarah; Jung, Vince; Kowbel, Vanessa; Mendoza, Meg; Miranda, Vivian; Butler, Michael

    2016-09-10

    Yeast and plant hydrolysates are used as media supplements to support the growth and productivity of CHO cultures for biopharmaceutical production. Through fractionation of a yeast lysate and metabolic analysis of a fraction that had bioactivity equivalent to commercial yeast extract (YE), bioactive components were identified that promoted growth and productivity of two recombinant CHO cell lines (CHO-Luc and CHO-hFcEG2) equivalent to or greater than YE-supplemented media. Autolysis of the yeast lysate was not necessary for full activity, suggesting that the active components are present in untreated yeast cells. A bioactive fraction (3KF) of the yeast lysate was isolated from the permeate using a 3kDa molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) filter. Supplementation of this 3KF fraction into the base media supported growth of CHO-Luc cells over eight passages equivalent to YE-supplemented media. The 3KF fraction was fractionated further by a cation exchange spin column using a stepwise pH elution. Metabolomic analysis of a bioactive fraction isolated at high pH identified several arginine and lysine-containing peptides as well as two polyamines, spermine and spermidine, with 3.5× and 4.5× higher levels compared to a fraction showing no bioactivity. The addition of a mixture of polyamines and their precursors (putrescine, spermine, spermidine, ornithine and citrulline) as well as increasing the concentration of some of the components of the original base medium resulted in a chemically-defined (CD) formulation that produced an equivalent viable cell density (VCD) and productivity of the CHO-Luc cells as the YE-supplemented medium. The VCD of the CHO-hFcEG2 culture in the CD medium was 1.9× greater and with equivalent productivity to the YE-supplemented media. PMID:27165505

  11. Identification and quantitation of phosphorus metabolites in yeast neutral pH extracts by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Teleman, A; Richard, P; Toivari, M; Penttilä, M

    1999-07-15

    (31)P NMR spectroscopy offers a possibility to obtain a survey of all low-molecular-weight phosphorylated compounds in yeast. The yeast cells have been extracted using chloroform into a neutral aqueous phase. The use of high fields and the neutral pH extracts, which are suitable for NMR analysis, results in well-resolved (31)P NMR spectra. Two-dimensional NMR experiments, such as proton-detected heteronuclear single quantum ((1)H-(31)P HSQC) and (31)P correlation spectroscopy ((31)P COSY), have been used to assign the resonances. In the phosphomonoester region many of the signals could be assigned to known metabolites in the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways, although some signals remain unidentified. Accumulation of ribulose 5-phosphate, xylulose 5-phosphate, and ribose 5-phosphate was observed in a strain lacking transketolase activity when grown in synthetic complete medium. No such accumulation occurred when the cells were grown in yeast-peptone-dextrose medium. Trimetaphosphate (intracellular concentration about 0.2 mM) was detected in both cold methanol-chloroform and perchloric acid extracts. PMID:10405295

  12. Impact of Phosphate, Potassium, Yeast Extract, and Trace Metals on Chitosan and Metabolite Production by Mucor indicus.

    PubMed

    Safaei, Zahra; Karimi, Keikhosro; Zamani, Akram

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effects of phosphate, potassium, yeast extract, and trace metals on the growth of Mucor indicus and chitosan, chitin, and metabolite production by the fungus were investigated. Maximum yield of chitosan (0.32 g/g cell wall) was obtained in a phosphate-free medium. Reversely, cell growth and ethanol formation by the fungus were positively affected in the presence of phosphate. In a phosphate-free medium, the highest chitosan content (0.42 g/g cell wall) and cell growth (0.66 g/g sugar) were obtained at 2.5 g/L of KOH. Potassium concentration had no significant effect on ethanol and glycerol yields. The presence of trace metals significantly increased the chitosan yield at an optimal phosphate and potassium concentration (0.50 g/g cell wall). By contrast, production of ethanol by the fungus was negatively affected (0.33 g/g sugars). A remarkable increase in chitin and decrease in chitosan were observed in the absence of yeast extract and concentrations lower than 2 g/L. The maximum chitosan yield of 51% cell wall was obtained at 5 g/L of yeast extract when the medium contained no phosphate, 2.5 g/L KOH, and 1 mL/L trace metal solution. PMID:27589726

  13. Yeast Extract and Silver Nitrate Induce the Expression of Phenylpropanoid Biosynthetic Genes and Induce the Accumulation of Rosmarinic Acid in Agastache rugosa Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo Tae; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Yeo, Sun Kyung; Jeon, Jin; Park, Jong Seok; Lee, Sook Young; Park, Sang Un

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of yeast extract and silver nitrate on the enhancement of phenylpropanoid pathway genes and accumulation of rosmarinic acid in Agastache rugosa cell cultures. The treatment of cell cultures with yeast extract (500 mg/L) and silver nitrate (30 mg/L) for varying times enhanced the expression of genes in the phenylpropanoid pathway and the production of rosmarinic acid. The results indicated that the expression of RAS and HPPR was proportional to the amount of yeast extract and silver nitrate. The transcript levels of HPPR under yeast extract treatment were 1.84-, 1.97-, and 2.86-fold higher than the control treatments after 3, 6, and 12 h, respectively, whereas PAL expression under silver nitrate treatment was 52.31-fold higher than in the non-treated controls after 24 h of elicitation. The concentration of rosmarinic acid was directly proportional to the concentration of the applied elicitors. Yeast extract supplementation documented the highest amount of rosmarinic acid at 4.98 mg/g, whereas silver nitrate addition resulted in a comparatively lower amount of rosmarinic acid at 0.65 mg/g. In conclusion, addition of yeast extract to the cell cultures enhanced the accumulation of rosmarinic acid, which was evidenced by the expression levels of the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway genes in A. rugosa. PMID:27043507

  14. Discovery of plant extracts that greatly delay yeast chronological aging and have different effects on longevity-defining cellular processes.

    PubMed

    Lutchman, Vicky; Medkour, Younes; Samson, Eugenie; Arlia-Ciommo, Anthony; Dakik, Pamela; Cortes, Berly; Feldman, Rachel; Mohtashami, Sadaf; McAuley, Mélissa; Chancharoen, Marisa; Rukundo, Belise; Simard, Éric; Titorenko, Vladimir I

    2016-03-29

    We discovered six plant extracts that increase yeast chronological lifespan to a significantly greater extent than any of the presently known longevity-extending chemical compounds. One of these extracts is the most potent longevity-extending pharmacological intervention yet described. We show that each of the six plant extracts is a geroprotector which delays the onset and decreases the rate of yeast chronological aging by eliciting a hormetic stress response. We also show that each of these extracts has different effects on cellular processes that define longevity in organisms across phyla. These effects include the following: 1) increased mitochondrial respiration and membrane potential; 2) augmented or reduced concentrations of reactive oxygen species; 3) decreased oxidative damage to cellular proteins, membrane lipids, and mitochondrial and nuclear genomes; 4) enhanced cell resistance to oxidative and thermal stresses; and 5) accelerated degradation of neutral lipids deposited in lipid droplets. Our findings provide new insights into mechanisms through which chemicals extracted from certain plants can slow biological aging. PMID:26918729

  15. Discovery of plant extracts that greatly delay yeast chronological aging and have different effects on longevity-defining cellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Eugenie; Arlia-Ciommo, Anthony; Dakik, Pamela; Cortes, Berly; Feldman, Rachel; Mohtashami, Sadaf; McAuley, Mélissa; Chancharoen, Marisa; Rukundo, Belise; Simard, Éric; Titorenko, Vladimir I.

    2016-01-01

    We discovered six plant extracts that increase yeast chronological lifespan to a significantly greater extent than any of the presently known longevity-extending chemical compounds. One of these extracts is the most potent longevity-extending pharmacological intervention yet described. We show that each of the six plant extracts is a geroprotector which delays the onset and decreases the rate of yeast chronological aging by eliciting a hormetic stress response. We also show that each of these extracts has different effects on cellular processes that define longevity in organisms across phyla. These effects include the following: 1) increased mitochondrial respiration and membrane potential; 2) augmented or reduced concentrations of reactive oxygen species; 3) decreased oxidative damage to cellular proteins, membrane lipids, and mitochondrial and nuclear genomes; 4) enhanced cell resistance to oxidative and thermal stresses; and 5) accelerated degradation of neutral lipids deposited in lipid droplets. Our findings provide new insights into mechanisms through which chemicals extracted from certain plants can slow biological aging. PMID:26918729

  16. Improvement on the productivity of continuous tequila fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae of Agave tequilana juice with supplementation of yeast extract and aeration.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Cortés, Guillermo; Valle-Rodríguez, Juan Octavio; Herrera-López, Enrique J; Díaz-Montaño, Dulce María; González-García, Yolanda; Escalona-Buendía, Héctor B; Córdova, Jesús

    2016-12-01

    of adding yeast extract and air to the continuous fermentations resulted in 88 % increase in ethanol productivity. For all cultures, pH was not controlled, reaching low pH values (from 2.6 to 3). This feature suggested a reduced probability of contamination for prolonged continuous cultures and explained why no significant differences were found between continuous cultures fed with sterilized or non-sterilized media. Concentrations of volatile compounds quantified in the distillates (tequila) were in the allowed ranges established by the Mexican regulation of tequila (NOM-006-SCFI-2012, Norma Oficial Mexicana: Bebidas alcohólicas-Tequila-specificaciones, 2012). The preference level of the distillates was similar to that of two well-known commercial tequilas. The results suggested the possibility of implementing this innovative technology on an industrial scale, attaining high productivities and using non-sterilized agave juice. PMID:27447701

  17. DNA synthesis in yeast cell-free extracts dependent on recombinant DNA plasmids purified from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Jong, A Y; Scott, J F

    1985-01-01

    In our attempts to establish a cell-free DNA replication system for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have observed that recombinant DNA plasmids purified from Escherichia coli by a common procedure (lysozyme-detergent lysis and equilibrium banding in cesium chloride ethidium bromide gradients) often serve as templates for DNA synthesis by elongation enzymes. The templates could be elongated equally well by enzymes present in the yeast cell-free extracts, by the large proteolytic fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I or by T4 DNA polymerase. The template activity of the purified plasmids was dependent on the presence of heterologous DNA segments in the bacterial vectors. The template activity could be diminished by treatment with alkali. We propose that the ability of recombinant plasmids isolated from bacterial hosts to serve as elongation templates may lead to erroneous conclusions when these plasmids are used as templates for in vitro replication or transcription reactions. Images PMID:3889851

  18. Interactions of grape tannins and wine polyphenols with a yeast protein extract, mannoproteins and β-glucan.

    PubMed

    Mekoue Nguela, J; Poncet-Legrand, C; Sieczkowski, N; Vernhet, A

    2016-11-01

    At present, there is a great interest in enology for yeast derived products to replace aging on lees in winemaking or as an alternative for wine fining. These are yeast protein extracts (YPE), cell walls and mannoproteins. Our aim was to further understand the mechanisms that drive interactions between these components and red wine polyphenols. To this end, interactions between grape skin tannins or wine polyphenols or tannins and a YPE, a mannoprotein fraction and a β-glucan were monitored by binding experiments, ITC and DLS. Depending on the tannin structure, a different affinity between the polyphenols and the YPE was observed, as well as differences in the stability of the aggregates. This was attributed to the mean degree of polymerization of tannins in the polyphenol fractions and to chemical changes that occur during winemaking. Much lower affinities were found between polyphenols and polysaccharides, with different behaviors between mannoproteins and β-glucans. PMID:27211695

  19. Yeast improves resistance to environmental challenges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alphamune™, a yeast extract antibiotic alternative, was added at either 1 lb/ton or 2 lb/ton to a turkey starter diet. Two trials were conducted to evaluate the effects of Alphamune™ on gut maturation of 7 and 21 day old poults. Sections from the mid-point of the duodenum, jejunum and ileum of each ...

  20. Overcoming the toxicity effects of municipal wastewater sludge and biosolid extracts in the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES) assay.

    PubMed

    Citulski, Joel; Farahbakhsh, Khosrow

    2012-04-01

    For nearly two decades, the Yeast Estrogen Screen (YES) has been used as a valuable tool for determining the total estrogenic potency of various environmental samples, including influent and effluent streams at municipal wastewater plants. However, applying the YES assay to wastewater sludges and stabilized biosolids has been problematic. This is due to co-extracted compounds from the solids either proving toxic to the yeast or masking the presence of estrogenic substances. The present research describes the development and validation of sample preparation steps that mitigate the toxicity effects of municipal wastewater sludge and biosolid samples in the YES assay, while allowing for reliable dose-dependent expression of estrogenic activity. A copper work-up for sulfur removal and chromatographic cleanup with silica and alumina were required in addition to solid-phase extraction to adequately remove interfering compounds. Sample stabilization methods such as autoclaving, lyophilization and formaldehyde treatment were found to be detrimental to the assay. Hence, heat-drying is recommended to prevent cytotoxicity and the degradation of estrogenic substances. PMID:22277884

  1. Asymmetric bioreduction of acetophenones by Baker's yeast and its cell-free extract encapsulated in sol-gel silica materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Katsuya; Nakamura, Hitomi; Nakanishi, Kazuma

    2014-02-01

    Baker's yeast (BY) encapsulated in silica materials was synthesized using a yeast cell suspension and its cell-free extract during a sol-gel reaction of tetramethoxysilane with nitric acid as a catalyst. The synthesized samples were fully characterized using various methods, such as scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and differential thermal analysis. The BY cells were easily encapsulated inside silica-gel networks, and the ratio of the cells in the silica gel was approximately 75 wt%, which indicated that a large volume of BY was trapped with a small amount of silica. The enzyme activity (asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones) of BY and its cell-free extract encapsulated in silica gel was investigated in detail. The activities and enantioselectivities of free and encapsulated BY were similar to those of acetophenone and its fluorine derivatives, which indicated that the conformation structure of BY enzymes inside silica-gel networks did not change. In addition, the encapsulated BY exhibited considerably better solvent (methanol) stability and recyclability compared to free BY solution. We expect that the development of BY encapsulated in sol-gel silica materials will significantly impact the industrial-scale advancement of high-efficiency and low-cost biocatalysts for the synthesis of valuable chiral alcohols.

  2. Malt-yeast extract-sucrose agar, a suitable medium for enumeration and isolation of fungi from silage.

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, I; Stenwig, H

    1996-01-01

    A general medium named malt-yeast extract-sucrose agar (MYSA) containing oxgall was designed. The medium was intended for the enumeration and isolation of molds and yeasts in routine examinations of animal feed stuffs. In this study MYSA was tested as a general medium for mycological examination of silage. The medium was compared with dichloran-rose bengal medium (DRBC) in an examination of more than 500 specimens of big bale grass silage. Selected characteristics of known fungal species commonly isolated from feeds were examined after growth on MYSA and DRBC and on malt extract agar, used as a noninhibitory control medium. MYSA suppressed bacterial growth, without affecting the growth of fungi common in feeds. The fungi growing on MYSA were easily recognized, and the medium seemed to slow radial growth of fungal colonies, which permitted, easy counting. The number of species found was higher on MYSA than on DRBC. When we compared MYSA with DRBC for mycological examination of grass silage samples, MYSA was found to be the medium of choice. PMID:8837416

  3. Monitoring of Extraction Efficiency by a Sample Process Control Virus Added Immediately Upon Sample Receipt.

    PubMed

    Ruhanya, Vurayai; Diez-Valcarce, Marta; D'Agostino, Martin; Cook, Nigel; Hernández, Marta; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David

    2015-12-01

    When analysing food samples for enteric viruses, a sample process control virus (SPCV) must be added at the commencement of the analytical procedure, to verify that the analysis has been performed correctly. Samples can on occasion arrive at the laboratory late in the working day or week. The analyst may consequently have insufficient time to commence and complete the complex procedure, and the samples must consequently be stored. To maintain the validity of the analytical result, it will be necessary to consider storage as part of the process, and the analytical procedure as commencing on sample receipt. The aim of this study was to verify that an SPCV can be recovered after sample storage, and thus indicate the effective recovery of enteric viruses. Two types of samples (fresh and frozen raspberries) and two types of storage (refrigerated and frozen) were studied using Mengovirus vMC0 as SPCV. SPCV recovery was not significantly different (P > 0.5) regardless of sample type or duration of storage (up to 14 days at -20 °C). Accordingly, samples can be stored without a significant effect on the performance of the analysis. The results of this study should assist the analyst by demonstrating that they can verify that viruses can be extracted from food samples even if samples have been stored. PMID:26297430

  4. [Studies on the effects of carbon:nitrogen ratio, inoculum type and yeast extract addition on jasmonic acid production by Botryodiplodia theobromae Pat. strain RC1].

    PubMed

    Eng Sánchez, Felipe; Gutiérrez-Rojas, Mariano; Favela-Torres, Ernesto

    2008-09-30

    Jasmonic acid is a native plant growth regulator produced by algae, microorganisms and higher plants. This regulator is involved in the activation of defence mechanisms against pathogens and wounding in plants. Studies concerning the effects of carbon: nitrogen ratio (C/Nr: 17, 35 and 70), type of inoculum (spores or mycelium) and the yeast extract addition in the media on jasmonic acid production by Botryodiplodia theobromae were evaluated. Jasmonic acid production was stimulated at the carbon: nitrogen ratio of 17. Jasmonic acid productivity was higher in the media inoculated with mycelium and in the media with yeast extract 1.7 and 1.3 times, respectively. PMID:18785793

  5. Bio-Based Solvents for Green Extraction of Lipids from Oleaginous Yeast Biomass for Sustainable Aviation Biofuel.

    PubMed

    Breil, Cassandra; Meullemiestre, Alice; Vian, Maryline; Chemat, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-based oleaginous microorganisms are potential candidates and resources for the sustainable production of biofuels. This study was designed to evaluate the performance of several alternative bio-based solvents for extracting lipids from yeasts. We used experimental design and simulation with Hansen solubility simulations and the conductor-like screening model for realistic solvation (COSMO-RS) to simulate the solubilization of lipids in each of these solvents. Lipid extracts were analyzed by high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) to obtain the distribution of lipids classes and gas chromatography coupled with a flame ionization detector (GC/FID) to obtain fatty acid profiles. Our aim was to correlate simulation with experimentation for extraction and solvation of lipids with bio-based solvents in order to make a preliminary evaluation for the replacement of hexane to extract lipids from microorganisms. Differences between theory and practice were noted for several solvents, such as CPME, MeTHF and ethyl acetate, which appeared to be good candidates to replace hexane. PMID:26861274

  6. Effect of added herb extracts on oxidative stability of ghee (butter oil) during accelerated oxidation condition.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Nilkanth; Gandhi, Kamal; Purohit, Akash; Arora, Sumit; Singh, R R B

    2014-10-01

    The antioxidant activities of vidarikand (Pueraria tuberosa), shatavari (Asparagus racemosus) and ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) extracts (aqueous and ethanolic) were evaluated and compared with BHA using β-carotene bleaching assay, DPPH assay and Rancimat method. Phenolic contents of ethanolic extracts of herbs were high compared to their aqueous extracts. The ethanolic extracts showed more antioxidant activity (β-carotene-linoleic acid model system) than their aqueous counterparts. In DPPH system also, ethanolic extracts were superior to that of aqueous extracts. The ethanolic extracts of the herbs were more effective in preventing the development of the peroxide value and conjugated diene in ghee compared to their aqueous extracts. Ethanolic extracts of herbs showed the higher induction period as compared to their aqueous counter parts in the Rancimat. Antioxidant activity of the herbs decreased in the order vidarikand > ashwagandha > shatavari. Thus, the ethanolic extract of vidarikand was having the maximum antioxidant activity among all the herbs. PMID:25328218

  7. Selection and use of pectinolytic yeasts for improving clarification and phenolic extraction in winemaking.

    PubMed

    Belda, Ignacio; Conchillo, Lorena B; Ruiz, Javier; Navascués, Eva; Marquina, Domingo; Santos, Antonio

    2016-04-16

    Pectinase enzymes have shown a considerable influence in both, sensitive and technological properties of wines. They can help to improve clarification process, releasing more color and flavor compounds entrapped in grape skin, facilitating the liberation of phenolic compounds. This work aims to find yeasts that, because of their native pectinases, can be applied on combined fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae obtaining significant benefits over single-inoculated traditional fermentations. 462 yeast strains isolated from wineries were identified and tested for several enzymatic activities of recognized interest for enology industry. Considering the 7 identified species, only Aureobasidium pullulans, Metschnikowia pulcherrima and Metschnikowia fructicola showed polygalacturonase activity. Because of its interest in winemaking, due to its reported incidence in wine flavor, the impact of M. pulcherrima as a source of pectinolytic enzymes was analyzed by measuring its influence in filterability, turbidity and the increase on color, anthocyanin and polyphenol content of wines fermented in combination with S. cerevisiae. Among the strains screened, M. pulcherrima NS-EM-34 was selected, due to its polygalacturonase activity, for further characterization in both, laboratory and semi-industrial scale assays. The kinetics concerning several metabolites of enological concern were followed during the entire fermentation process at microvinification scale. Improved results were obtained in the expected parameters when M. pulcherrima NS-EM-34 was used, in comparison to wines fermented with S. cerevisiae alone and combined with other pectinolytic and non-pectinolytic yeasts (A. pullulans and Lachancea thermotolerans, respectively), even working better than commercial enzymes preparations in most parameters. Additionally, M. pulcherrima NS-EM-34 was used at a semi-industrial scale combined with three different S. cerevisiae strains, confirming its potential application for

  8. Photodynamic inactivation of yeast and bacteria by extracts of Alternanthera brasiliana.

    PubMed

    Andreazza, Nathalia L; de Lourenco, Caroline C; Siqueira, Carlos A T; Sawaya, Alexandra C H F; Lapinski, Tadia F; Gasparetto, Adriana; Khouri, Sonia; Zamuner, Stella R; Munin, Egberto; Salvador, Marcos Jose

    2013-08-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of Alternathera brasiliana (Amaranthaceae) extracts as photosensitizing agents in photodynamic antimicrobial therapies (PACT) against Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida dubliniensis. The crude hexane and ethanol extracts were obtained from A. brasiliana whole plant and showed absortion from 650 to 700 nm. Also, singlet molecular oxygen (1O2) production (type II photosensitization reaction) was examined, and the results show that 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran photodegradation was greatly enhanced in the presence of the A. brasiliana extracts. One plate in each assay was irradiated while the other was not irradiated, the number of colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) was obtained, and data analyzed by the Tukey test. The chemical composition of the extracts was determined by chromatographic and spectrometric techniques; steroids, triterpenes, and flavonoids were identified. Laser irradiation alone at 685 nm using diode laser, output power of 35 mW, and energy of 28 J/cm2, or non-irradiated crude extracts in sub-inhibitory concentration did not reduce the number of CFU/mL significantly, whereas irradiated hexane and ethanol extracts, in sub-inhibitory concentrations, inhibited the growth of these microorganisms. The photoactivation of hexane and ethanol extracts of A. brasiliana, in sub-inhibitory concentrations, using red laser radiation at 685 nm had an antimicrobial effect. PMID:23547779

  9. Effects of bentonite and yeast extract as nutrient on decrease in hydraulic conductivity of porous media due to CaCO3 precipitation induced by Sporosarcina pasteurii.

    PubMed

    Eryürük, Kağan; Yang, Suyin; Suzuki, Daisuke; Sakaguchi, Iwao; Katayama, Arata

    2015-10-01

    The reduction mechanism of hydraulic conductivity was investigated in porous media treated with bentonite and CaCO3 precipitates induced by growing cells of Sporosarcina pasteurii (ATCC 11859). Bentonite, the bacterial cells, and a precipitation solution, composing of 0.5 M CaCl2 and 0.5 M urea with or without 2% weight/volume yeast extract allowing the bacterial growth were sequentially introduced into the continuous-flow columns containing glass beads between 0.05 and 3 mm in diameter. The treatments reduced the hydraulic conductivity of the columns from between 8.4 × 10(-1) and 4.1 × 10(-3) cm/s to between 9.9 × 10(-4) and 2.1 × 10(-6) cm/s as the lowest. With yeast extract, the conductivity continuously decreased during four days of the experiment, while became stable after two days without yeast extract. Introduction of the bacterial cells did not decrease the conductivity. The reduction in hydraulic conductivity was inversely correlated with the volume occupied by the depositions of bentonite and CaCO3 precipitates in column, showing the same efficiency but a larger effect of the CaCO3 precipitates with increasing volume by bacterial growth. The smaller glass beads resulted in larger volume of the depositions. Bentonite increased the deposition of CaCO3 precipitates. Analysis using the Kozeny-Carman equation suggested that without yeast extract, bentonite and the CaCO3 precipitates formed aggregates with glass beads, thus increasing their diameter and consequently decreasing the pore size in the column. With yeast extract, in addition to the aggregates, the individual CaCO3 precipitates formed separately from the aggregates reduced the hydraulic conductivity. PMID:25736267

  10. Simple method for the extraction and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of carotenoid pigments from red yeasts (Basidiomycota, Fungi).

    PubMed

    Weber, Roland W S; Anke, Heidrun; Davoli, Paolo

    2007-03-23

    A simple method for the extraction of carotenoid pigments from frozen wet cells of red yeasts (Basidiomycota) and their analysis by reversed-phase HPLC using a C(18) column and a water/acetone solvent system is described. Typical red yeast carotenoids belonging to an oxidative series from the monocyclic gamma-carotene to 2-hydroxytorularhodin and from the bicyclic beta-carotene to astaxanthin were separated. Pigment identity was confirmed by LC-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) mass spectrometry using similar chromatographic conditions. PMID:17266973

  11. Improvement of grape and wine phenolic content by foliar application to grapevine of three different elicitors: Methyl jasmonate, chitosan, and yeast extract.

    PubMed

    Portu, Javier; López, Rosa; Baroja, Elisa; Santamaría, Pilar; Garde-Cerdán, Teresa

    2016-06-15

    Phenolic compounds play a key role in grape and wine organoleptic properties, being therefore a key parameter in wine quality. Elicitor application constitutes an interesting field of research since it is indirectly involved in the accumulation of phenolic compounds. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of the application of three different elicitors on both grape and wine phenolic content. Methyl jasmonate, chitosan, and a commercial yeast extract were applied to the canopy at veraison and one week later. Results showed that foliar treatments carried out with methyl jasmonate and yeast extract achieved the best results, increasing grape and wine anthocyanin content when compared to the control. Moreover, the application of the yeast elicitor also enhanced grape stilbene content. In contrast, the chitosan treatment did not have a substantial impact on the phenolic compounds. The results of this study indicate that methyl jasmonate and yeast extract applications could be a simple practice to increase grape and wine phenolic content. PMID:26868568

  12. A new β-glucosidase producing yeast for lower-cost cellulosic ethanol production from xylose-extracted corncob residues by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z Lewis; Weber, Scott A; Cotta, Michael A; Li, Shi-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    This study reports a new yeast strain of Clavispora NRRL Y-50464 that is able to utilize cellobiose as sole source of carbon and produce sufficient native β-glucosidase enzyme activity for cellulosic ethanol production using SSF. In addition, this yeast is tolerant to the major inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass pre-treatment such as 2-furaldehyde (furfural) and 5-(hydroxymethyl)-2-furaldehyde (HMF), and converted furfural into furan methanol in less than 12h and HMF into furan-2,5-dimethanol within 24h in the presence of 15 mM each of furfural and HMF. Using xylose-extracted corncob residue as cellulosic feedstock, an ethanol production of 23 g/l was obtained using 25% solids loading at 37 °C by SSF without addition of exogenous β-glucosidase. Development of this yeast aids renewable biofuels development efforts for economic consolidated SSF bio-processing. PMID:22133603

  13. Extraction of ethanol with higher carboxylic acid solvents and their toxicity to yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a screening exercise for ethanol-selective extraction solvents, partitioning of ethanol and water from a 5 wt% aqueous solution into several C8 – C18 carboxylic acids was studied. Results for the acids are compared with those from alcohols of similar structure. In all cases studied, the acids exh...

  14. Extraction of high added value biological compounds from sardine, sardine-type fish and mackerel canning residues--a review.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Vincenza; Carvalho, Ana P; Piccirillo, Clara; Santos, Manuela M; Castro, Paula M L; Pintado, Manuela E

    2013-08-01

    Different valuable compounds, which can be employed in medicine or in other industries (i.e. food, agrochemical, pharmaceutical) can be recovered from by-products and waste from the fish canning industries. They include lipids, proteins, bio-polymers, minerals, amino acids and enzymes; they can be extracted from wastewaters and/or from solid residues (head, viscera, skin, tails and flesh) generated along the canning process, through the filleting, cooking, salting or smoking stages. In this review, the opportunities for the extraction and the valorisation of bioactive compounds from sardine, sardine-type fish and mackerel canning residues are examined and discussed. These are amongst the most consumed fishes in the Mediterranean area; moreover, canning is one of the most important and common methods of preservation. The large quantities of by-products generated have great potentials for the extraction of biologically desirable high added value compounds. PMID:23706190

  15. Budding yeast protein extraction and purification for the study of function, interactions, and post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Eva Paige; Kerscher, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Homogenization by bead beating is a fast and efficient way to release DNA, RNA, proteins, and metabolites from budding yeast cells, which are notoriously hard to disrupt. Here we describe the use of a bead mill homogenizer for the extraction of proteins into buffers optimized to maintain the functions, interactions and post-translational modifications of proteins. Logarithmically growing cells expressing the protein of interest are grown in a liquid growth media of choice. The growth media may be supplemented with reagents to induce protein expression from inducible promoters (e.g. galactose), synchronize cell cycle stage (e.g. nocodazole), or inhibit proteasome function (e.g. MG132). Cells are then pelleted and resuspended in a suitable buffer containing protease and/or phosphatase inhibitors and are either processed immediately or frozen in liquid nitrogen for later use. Homogenization is accomplished by six cycles of 20 sec bead-beating (5.5 m/sec), each followed by one minute incubation on ice. The resulting homogenate is cleared by centrifugation and small particulates can be removed by filtration. The resulting cleared whole cell extract (WCE) is precipitated using 20% TCA for direct analysis of total proteins by SDS-PAGE followed by Western blotting. Extracts are also suitable for affinity purification of specific proteins, the detection of post-translational modifications, or the analysis of co-purifying proteins. As is the case for most protein purification protocols, some enzymes and proteins may require unique conditions or buffer compositions for their purification and others may be unstable or insoluble under the conditions stated. In the latter case, the protocol presented may provide a useful starting point to empirically determine the best bead-beating strategy for protein extraction and purification. We show the extraction and purification of an epitope-tagged SUMO E3 ligase, Siz1, a cell cycle regulated protein that becomes both sumoylated and

  16. Featured Article: Inhibition of diabetic cataract by glucose tolerance factor extracted from yeast.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, Nitsa; Cohen, Revital; Eliaz, Anat; Dovrat, Ahuva

    2016-04-01

    Diabetes leads to many complications; among them is the development of cataract. Hyperglycemia brings to increased polyol concentration in the lens, to glycation of lens proteins, and to elevated level of ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) causing oxidative stress. The glucose tolerance factor (GTF) was found by several groups to decrease hyperglycemia and oxidative stress both in diabetic animals and humans. The aim of our study was to explore the damages induced by high glucose to the eye lens and to assess the protective effects of GTF both in vivo and in vitro The in vivo study included control healthy rats, streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic untreated rats, and STZ diabetic rats orally treated with 15 doses of GTF. The diabetic untreated rats developed cataracts, whereas the development of cataract was totally or partially prevented in GTF treated animals. In vitro studies were done on bovine lenses incubated for 14 days. Half of the lenses were incubated in normal glucose conditions, and half in high glucose conditions (450 mg%). To one group of the normal or high glucose condition GTF was added. The optical quality of all the lenses was measured daily by an automated scanning laser system. The control lenses, whether with or without GTF addition, did not show any reduction in their quality. High glucose conditions induced optical damage to the lenses. Addition of GTF to high glucose conditions prevented this damage. High glucose conditions affected the activity of aldose reductase and sodium potassium ATPase in lens epithelial cell. Addition of GTF decreased the destructive changes induced by high glucose conditions. The amount of soluble cortical lens proteins was decreased and structural changes were detected in lenses incubated in high glucose medium. These changes could be prevented when GTF was added to high glucose medium. Our findings demonstrate the anticataractogenic potential of GTF. PMID:26825353

  17. Yeast cell wall extract induces disease resistance against bacterial and fungal pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica crop.

    PubMed

    Narusaka, Mari; Minami, Taichi; Iwabuchi, Chikako; Hamasaki, Takashi; Takasaki, Satoko; Kawamura, Kimito; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Housaku Monogatari (HM) is a plant activator prepared from a yeast cell wall extract. We examined the efficacy of HM application and observed that HM treatment increased the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa leaves to bacterial and fungal infections. HM reduced the severity of bacterial leaf spot and anthracnose on A. thaliana and Brassica crop leaves with protective effects. In addition, gene expression analysis of A. thaliana plants after treatment with HM indicated increased expression of several plant defense-related genes. HM treatment appears to induce early activation of jasmonate/ethylene and late activation of salicylic acid (SA) pathways. Analysis using signaling mutants revealed that HM required SA accumulation and SA signaling to facilitate resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. In addition, HM-induced resistance conferred chitin-independent disease resistance to bacterial pathogens in A. thaliana. These results suggest that HM contains multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns that activate defense responses in plants. These findings suggest that the application of HM is a useful tool that may facilitate new disease control methods. PMID:25565273

  18. Synthesis of yeast extract-stabilized Cu nanoclusters for sensitive fluorescent detection of sulfide ions in water.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lihua; Zhang, Zaihua; Tang, Anwen; Li, Cong; Shen, Yehua

    2016-05-15

    In this work, we have presented a novel strategy to utilize as-synthesized yeast extract-stabilized Cu nanoclusters (Cu NCs) for sensitive and selective detection of S(2-). The fluorescence intensity of Cu NCs was enhanced significantly in the presence of both Na2S2O8 and S(2-). By virtue of this specific response, a Cu NC-based fluorescent turn-on sensor was developed, which allows the detection of S(2-) in the range of 0.02-0.8 μM with a detection limit of 10nM. The enhancing mechanism was also discussed based on fluorescence decay, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies, indicating that S(2-) enhanced the Cu NCs emission mainly through sulfide-induced aggregation of Cu NCs. Furthermore, we demonstrated the usability of the present approach for the detection of S(2-) in water samples, which illustrates its great potential for the environmental monitoring and water quality inspection fields. PMID:26703988

  19. Yeast Cell Wall Extract Induces Disease Resistance against Bacterial and Fungal Pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica Crop

    PubMed Central

    Narusaka, Mari; Minami, Taichi; Iwabuchi, Chikako; Hamasaki, Takashi; Takasaki, Satoko; Kawamura, Kimito; Narusaka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Housaku Monogatari (HM) is a plant activator prepared from a yeast cell wall extract. We examined the efficacy of HM application and observed that HM treatment increased the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa leaves to bacterial and fungal infections. HM reduced the severity of bacterial leaf spot and anthracnose on A. thaliana and Brassica crop leaves with protective effects. In addition, gene expression analysis of A. thaliana plants after treatment with HM indicated increased expression of several plant defense-related genes. HM treatment appears to induce early activation of jasmonate/ethylene and late activation of salicylic acid (SA) pathways. Analysis using signaling mutants revealed that HM required SA accumulation and SA signaling to facilitate resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. In addition, HM-induced resistance conferred chitin-independent disease resistance to bacterial pathogens in A. thaliana. These results suggest that HM contains multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns that activate defense responses in plants. These findings suggest that the application of HM is a useful tool that may facilitate new disease control methods. PMID:25565273

  20. Yeast extract promotes decolorization of azo dyes by stimulating azoreductase activity in Shewanella sp. strain IFN4.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Arshad, Muhammad; Negm, Fayek; Khalid, Azeem; Shaharoona, Baby; Hussain, Sabir; Mahmood Nadeem, Sajid; Crowley, David E

    2016-02-01

    Biological treatment of azo dyes commonly requires a combined anaerobic-aerobic process in which initial decolorization is achieved by reductive cleavage of azo bonds on the parent molecule. The present study was conducted to examine the relative importance of co-substrates for driving reductive decolorization of azo dyes by Shewanella sp. strain IFN4 using whole cells and enzyme assays. Results showed that the dye decolorization by strain IFN4 was faster in medium containing 1gL(-1) yeast extract (YE) as compared to nine other co-substrates. Moreover, only YE stimulated azoreductase activity (increased from 1.32 to 4.19U/mg protein). Increasing the level of YE up to 8gL(-)(1) resulted into 81% decolorization of the dye in 1h along with an increase in azoreductase activity up to 6.16U/mg protein. Among the components of YE, only riboflavin stimulated the decolorization process as well as enzyme activity. Moreover, strain IFN4 demonstrated flavin reductase activity, and a significant correlation (r(2)=0.98) between flavin reduction and dye reduction by this strain emphasized the involvement of flavin compounds in the decolorization process. The results of this study show that YE serves both as a source of reducing equivalents and an electron shuttle for catalyzing dye reduction. PMID:26454074

  1. Extraction of high value added gelatin biopolymer from black tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) head bones

    SciTech Connect

    Sockalingam, K. Abdullah, H. Z.

    2015-07-22

    Black tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) fish head bones were evaluated for its possibilities in extracting gelatin. Head bones were subjected to pre-treatment with 3% of hydrochloric acid (HCl) for demineralization before undergoes thermal extraction process. The raw head bones were characterized via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in order to investigate the external and internal surface morphology. SEM images also reveal the presence of collagen fiber with 1 µm diameter in the head bone. The black tilapia fish head bones yields 5.75 % of gelatin in wet weight basis, indicating the possibility of this fish species as sources of gelatin. Further characterizations were done on both raw head bones and extracted gelatin through Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and proximate analysis. The head bones gelatin shows high protein (10.55%) and ash (3.11 %) content with low moisture. This further proves the effectiveness of demineralization and extraction method used. The black tilapia fish head bones are found to be a prospective source of gelatin with good chemical and functional properties.

  2. Ultrasound-assisted green solvent extraction of high-added value compounds from microalgae Nannochloropsis spp.

    PubMed

    Parniakov, O; Apicella, E; Koubaa, M; Barba, F J; Grimi, N; Lebovka, N; Pataro, G; Ferrari, G; Vorobiev, E

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate ultrasound (US)-assisted green solvent extraction of valuable compounds from the microalgae Nannochloropsis spp. Individual green solvents (water, ethanol (EtOH), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)) and binary mixture of solvents (water-DMSO and water-EtOH) were used for the extraction procedures. Maximum total phenolic compounds yield (Yp ≈ 0.33) was obtained after US pre-treatment (W=400 W, 15 min), being almost 5-folds higher compared to that found for the untreated samples and aqueous extraction (Yp ≈ 0.06). The highest yield of total chlorophylls (Yc ≈ 0.043) was obtained after US (W=400 W, 7.5 min), being more than 9-folds higher than those obtained for the untreated samples and aqueous extraction (Yc ≈ 0.004). The recovery efficiency decreased as DMSO>EtOH>H2O. The optimal conditions to recover phenolic compounds and chlorophylls from microalgae were obtained after US pre-treatment (400 W, 5 min), binary mixtures of solvents (water-DMSO and water-EtOH) at 25-30%, and microalgae concentration of 10%. PMID:26398670

  3. Extraction of high value added gelatin biopolymer from black tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) head bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sockalingam, K.; Abdullah, H. Z.

    2015-07-01

    Black tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) fish head bones were evaluated for its possibilities in extracting gelatin. Head bones were subjected to pre-treatment with 3% of hydrochloric acid (HCl) for demineralization before undergoes thermal extraction process. The raw head bones were characterized via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in order to investigate the external and internal surface morphology. SEM images also reveal the presence of collagen fiber with 1 µm diameter in the head bone. The black tilapia fish head bones yields 5.75 % of gelatin in wet weight basis, indicating the possibility of this fish species as sources of gelatin. Further characterizations were done on both raw head bones and extracted gelatin through Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and proximate analysis. The head bones gelatin shows high protein (10.55%) and ash (3.11 %) content with low moisture. This further proves the effectiveness of demineralization and extraction method used. The black tilapia fish head bones are found to be a prospective source of gelatin with good chemical and functional properties.

  4. Value Added Processing of Aflatoxin Contaminated Peanut Meal: Aflatoxin Sequestration During Protein Extraction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of a bentonite clay, Astra-Ben 20A (AB20A), to sequester aflatoxin from contaminated (~110 ppb) peanut meal during protein extraction was studied. Aqueous peanut meal dispersions (10% w/w) were prepared varying pH, temperature, enzymatic hydrolysis conditions, and concentrations of AB2...

  5. The evaluation of mixtures of yeast and potato extracts in growth media for biomass production of lactic cultures.

    PubMed

    Gaudreau, H; Renard, N; Champagne, C P; Van Horn, D

    2002-07-01

    The effectiveness of yeast extracts (YE) and potato extracts (PE) to promote growth of seven lactic cultures was evaluated by automated spectrophotometry (AS). Two aspects of the growth curve were analysed: (1) maximum biomass obtained (using ODmax) and (2) highest specific growth rate mu(max)) Eleven lots from the same PE-manufacturing process were examined for lot-to-lot variability. The ODmax values of three of the seven strains were significantly affected by lot source, but mu(max) was not significantly affected. The growth of bacteria was systematically lower in base medium containing 100% PE than in base medium containing 100% YE for both ODmax or mu(max) data, which could be related to the lower content in nitrogen-based compounds in PE. In AS assays, highest OD values for Lactobacillus casei EQ28, Lactobacillus rhamnosus R-011, Lactobacillus plantarum EQ12, and Streptococcus thermophilus R-083 were obtained with a mixture of PE and YE. Fermentations (2 L) were also carried out to determine the accuracy of AS to predict biomass levels obtained under fermentation trials. In these fermentations, replacement of 50% YE with PE was shown to enable good growth of S. thermophilus. With L. rhamnosus R-011, a high correlation (R2 = 0.95) was found between ODmax data obtained in the AS assays and that of the 2-L bioreactor when the same growth medium was used for both series of fermentations. However, AS was not as efficient when industrial media were used for the bioreactor assays. The relationship was still good for ODmax between AS data and that of the bioreactor data with L. rhamnosus R-011 in industrial LBS medium (R2 = 0.87), but was very poor with the S. thermophilus R-083 on Rosell #43 industrial medium (R2 = 0.33). Since PE cost 40% less than YE, there are strong economic advantages in considering such a partial replacement of YE by PE. PMID:12224561

  6. Observations of comets from 611 B.C. to A.D. 1640. Extracted from theChinese Annals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J.

    Reprint of a work first published in 1871.The texts were extracted from the Chinese Annals and translated from the original language by John Williams F.S.A. The book presents descriptions of 372 observations, the first being July 611 B.C. and the last May A.D. 1621. An introductory section comments on the original sources and describes ancient Chinese observational techniques and the Chinese nomenclature for the celestial sphere. The appendix consists oftables for reducing Chinese time to European reckoning and a Chinese celestial atlas of 16 plates.

  7. Time-dependent changes of phytoavailability of Cs added to allophanic Andosols in laboratory cultivations and extraction tests.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Akira; Tsukada, Hirofumi; Nakao, Atsushi; Takaku, Yuichi; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2013-08-01

    Although it is well known that phytoavailability of radiocaesium is gradually lost after its deposition on the ground by fixation to soil minerals, the decreasing rates during early period after the deposition is not yet quantitatively evaluated. In this study, stable Cs was added to 5 types of soil, including Andosols, a sand-dune regosol and a smectic lowland soil, in a laboratory soil incubation experiment to assess the aging effect of radiocaesium. Aliquots of a soil sample were put into pots and incubated in an artificial climate chamber. Orchardgrass or red clover was cultivated for 28 d in soil pots containing one of the allophanic Andosol samples seven times during about 1200 d using new pots for each cultivation. The soil-to-plant transfer factors of Cs declined exponentially until about 100 d and were almost constant thereafter. The extractabilities of Cs by water and 1 M NH4OAc solution from this allophanic Andosol soil sample also decreased with time and their decreasing patterns were similar to that of the transfer factor. The temporal changes of extractabilities of Cs in other soil samples were also examined 6 times during about 600 d. Rate of decline for the extracted yield of the added Cs by 1 M NH4OAc varied widely among all the soil types. Two allophanic Andosol samples showed relatively higher extractabilities in comparison with the other soils throughout the incubation experiment, which may be attributable to the lower contribution of Cs specific sorption sites to total cation exchange capacity of the allophonic Andosol soil samples. PMID:23528867

  8. Physicochemical and Sensory Properties of Red Ginseng Extracts or Red Ginseng Hydrolyzates-added Asiago Cheese during Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung-Hoon; Min, Ji-Young; Ganesan, Palanivel; Bae, In-Hyu; Kwak, Hae-Soo

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate physicochemical properties of different concentrations (0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.5%) of red ginseng hydrolyzates (RGH)- or red ginseng extract (RGE)-added Asiago cheeses (AC) during ripening at 14°C for 4 months. The moisture content significantly increased with increasing concentrations of both RGH- and RGE- added AC (p<0.05). While RGHAC and RGEAC were more yellow and darker with increasing concentrations than that of control (p<0.05), the color was not influenced from the hydrolysis. In texture analysis, hardness, cohesiveness, and chewiness of RGHAC and RGEAC significantly decreased compared to the control during the ripening (p<0.05). In sensory analysis, bitterness and ginseng flavor and taste scores increased significantly with increasing the concentrations of RGH and RGE during ripening (p<0.05). In conclusion, the addition of RGH and RGE into cheese slightly influenced the properties of Asiago cheese, and similarities were observed between RGHAC and RGEAC. Thus, the lower concentrations (0.1% to 0.3%) of RGH and RGE added to AC were preferred for color, texture, and sensory during the ripening, therefore, these cheeses would be worth developing commercially. PMID:25557683

  9. Physicochemical and Sensory Properties of Red Ginseng Extracts or Red Ginseng Hydrolyzates-added Asiago Cheese during Ripening.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyung-Hoon; Min, Ji-Young; Ganesan, Palanivel; Bae, In-Hyu; Kwak, Hae-Soo

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate physicochemical properties of different concentrations (0.1%, 0.3%, and 0.5%) of red ginseng hydrolyzates (RGH)- or red ginseng extract (RGE)-added Asiago cheeses (AC) during ripening at 14°C for 4 months. The moisture content significantly increased with increasing concentrations of both RGH- and RGE- added AC (p<0.05). While RGHAC and RGEAC were more yellow and darker with increasing concentrations than that of control (p<0.05), the color was not influenced from the hydrolysis. In texture analysis, hardness, cohesiveness, and chewiness of RGHAC and RGEAC significantly decreased compared to the control during the ripening (p<0.05). In sensory analysis, bitterness and ginseng flavor and taste scores increased significantly with increasing the concentrations of RGH and RGE during ripening (p<0.05). In conclusion, the addition of RGH and RGE into cheese slightly influenced the properties of Asiago cheese, and similarities were observed between RGHAC and RGEAC. Thus, the lower concentrations (0.1% to 0.3%) of RGH and RGE added to AC were preferred for color, texture, and sensory during the ripening, therefore, these cheeses would be worth developing commercially. PMID:25557683

  10. Creatine co-ingestion with carbohydrate or cinnamon extract provides no added benefit to anaerobic performance.

    PubMed

    Islam, Hashim; Yorgason, Nick J; Hazell, Tom J

    2016-09-01

    The insulin response following carbohydrate ingestion enhances creatine transport into muscle. Cinnamon extract is promoted to have insulin-like effects, therefore this study examined if creatine co-ingestion with carbohydrates or cinnamon extract improved anaerobic capacity, muscular strength, and muscular endurance. Active young males (n = 25; 23.7 ± 2.5 y) were stratified into 3 groups: (1) creatine only (CRE); (2) creatine+ 70 g carbohydrate (CHO); or (3) creatine+ 500 mg cinnamon extract (CIN), based on anaerobic capacity (peak power·kg(-1)) and muscular strength at baseline. Three weeks of supplementation consisted of a 5 d loading phase (20 g/d) and a 16 d maintenance phase (5 g/d). Pre- and post-supplementation measures included a 30-s Wingate and a 30-s maximal running test (on a self-propelled treadmill) for anaerobic capacity. Muscular strength was measured as the one-repetition maximum 1-RM for chest, back, quadriceps, hamstrings, and leg press. Additional sets of the number of repetitions performed at 60% 1-RM until fatigue measured muscular endurance. All three groups significantly improved Wingate relative peak power (CRE: 15.4% P = .004; CHO: 14.6% P = .004; CIN: 15.7%, P = .003), and muscular strength for chest (CRE: 6.6% P < .001; CHO: 6.7% P < .001; CIN: 6.4% P < .001), back (CRE: 5.8% P < .001; CHO: 6.4% P < .001; CIN: 8.1% P < .001), and leg press (CRE: 11.7% P = .013; CHO: 10.0% P = .007; CIN: 17.3% P < .001). Only the CRE (10.4%, P = .021) and CIN (15.5%, P < .001) group improved total muscular endurance. No differences existed between groups post-supplementation. These findings demonstrate that three different methods of creatine ingestion lead to similar changes in anaerobic power, strength, and endurance. PMID:26313717

  11. Use of an autosampler for dynamic headspace extraction of volatile compounds from grains and effect of added water on the extraction.

    PubMed

    Ram, M S; Seitz, L M; Rengarajan, R

    1999-10-01

    An autosampler attached to a purge and trap instrument was used to aid routine analyses of grain samples for volatile compounds associated with off-odors. Trapped volatiles were transferred to a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer instrument for separation and detection. Dynamic extraction of volatiles from approximately 18 g of whole grain at 80 degrees C was accomplished by purging helium through a sample vial with a Teflon-lined septum on each end. The autosampler automatically added internal standard to the sample before purging began, which required the addition of 1 mL of water for complete transfer of the standard to the sample. The added water enhanced extraction of 1-octen-3-ol, 1-octen-3-one, and some other compounds from soybeans but not from starchy grains such as corn and wheat. Addition of a free radical scavenger, such as citric acid, greatly diminished the recovery of 1-octen-3-ol and 1-octen-3-one from soybeans. PMID:10552791

  12. Microwave, ultrasound, thermal treatments, and bead milling as intensification techniques for extraction of lipids from oleaginous Yarrowia lipolytica yeast for a biojetfuel application.

    PubMed

    Meullemiestre, Alice; Breil, Cassandra; Abert-Vian, Maryline; Chemat, Farid

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, two different ways of lipids extraction from Yarrowia lipolytica yeast were investigated in order to maximize the extraction yield. Firstly, various modern techniques of extraction including ultrasound, microwave, and bead milling were tested to intensify the efficiency of lipid recovery. Secondly, several pretreatments such as freezing/defrosting, cold drying, bead milling, and microwave prior two washing of mixture solvent of chloroform:methanol (1:2, v/v) were study to evaluate the impact on lipid recovery. All these treatments were compared to conventional maceration, in terms of lipids extraction yield and lipid composition analysis. The main result of this study is the large difference of lipid recovery among treatments and the alteration of lipids profile after microwave and ultrasound techniques. PMID:27017129

  13. Regulatory concerns associated with use of value-added recombinant proteins and peptides screened in hgh-throughput for expression in fuel ethanol yeast strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recombinant proteins expressed in animals have been a public concern as a risk to the consumer since the animals are genetically modified to obtain desired improvements (GMO animals). Similarly, various commercially valuable proteins or peptides expressed in fuel ethanol yeast strains under develop...

  14. Comparative proteomic analysis of the response to silver ions and yeast extract in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy root cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajun; Shen, Ye; Shen, Zhuo; Zhao, Le; Ning, Deli; Jiang, Chao; Zhao, Rong; Huang, Luqi

    2016-10-01

    Biotic and abiotic stresses can inhibit plant growth, resulting in losses of crop productivity. However, moderate adverse stress can promote the accumulation of valuable natural products in medicinal plants. Elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms thus might help optimize the variety of available plant medicinal materials and improve their quality. In this study, Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy root cultures were employed as an in vitro model of the Chinese herb Danshen. A comparative proteomic analysis using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS was performed. By comparing the gel images of groups exposed to the stress of yeast extract (YE) combined with Ag(+) and controls, 64 proteins were identified that showed significant changes in protein abundance for at least one time point after treatment. According to analysis based on the KEGG and related physiological experimental verification, it was found that YE and Ag(+) stress induced a burst of reactive oxygen species and activated the Ca(2+)/calmodulin signaling pathway. Expression of immune-suppressive proteins increased. Epidermal cells underwent programmed cell death. Energy metabolism was enhanced and carbon metabolism shifted to favor the production of secondary metabolites such as lignin, tanshinone and salvianolic acids. The tanshinone and salvianolic acids were deposited on the collapsed epidermal cells forming a physicochemical barrier. The defense proteins and these natural products together enhanced the stress resistance of the plants. Since higher levels of natural products represent good quality in medicinal materials, this study sheds new light on quality formation mechanisms of medicinal plants and will hopefully encourage further research on how the planting environment affects the efficacy of herbal medicines. PMID:27372730

  15. Synthesis of nanosized ZSM-5 zeolite using extracted silica from rice husk without adding any alumina source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, Zahra Ghasemi Laleh Vajheh; Younesi, Habibollah; Kazemian, Hossein

    2015-08-01

    The synthesis of analcime and nanosized ZSM-5 zeolites was carried out by a hydrothermal method with silica extracted from rice husk, available as an inexpensive local biowaste, and without the use of an extra alumina source. Amorphous silica (with 88 wt% of SiO2) was extracted from rice husk ash by a suitable alkali solution. The effects of crystallization temperature, time and SiO2/Al2O3 ratio of the initial system on the properties of final products were investigated. For the characterization of the synthesized product, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray techniques, Fourier transform infrared and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method were applied. Crystallinity percentages of analcime and nanosized ZSM-5 were 95.86 and 89.56, respectively, with specific surface area of 353.5 m2 g-1 for ZSM-5. The experimental results revealed that the synthesis of analcime and nanosized ZSM-5 zeolites was more practical with using silica extracted from inexpensive raw materials, while the whole crystallization process was accomplished without adding any alumina source during.

  16. Citric acid production from extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers by the genetically engineered yeast Yarrowia lipolytica strain 30 and purification of citric acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Fei; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2013-11-01

    In this study, citric acid production from extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers by the genetically engineered yeast Yarrowia lipolytica strain 30 was investigated. After the compositions of the extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers for citric acid production were optimized, the results showed that natural components of extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers without addition of any other components were suitable for citric acid production by the yeast strain. During 10 L fermentation using the extract containing 84.3 g L(-1) total sugars, 68.3 g L(-1) citric acid was produced and the yield of citric acid was 0.91 g g(-1) within 336 h. At the end of the fermentation, 9.2 g L(-1) of residual total sugar and 2.1 g L(-1) of reducing sugar were left in the fermented medium. At the same time, citric acid in the supernatant of the culture was purified. It was found that 67.2 % of the citric acid in the supernatant of the culture was recovered and purity of citric acid in the crystal was 96 %. PMID:23584740

  17. Formation of secretory vesicles in permeabilized cells: a salt extract from yeast membranes promotes budding of nascent secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network of endocrine cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, W L; Shields, D

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of secretory-vesicle formation from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) of endocrine cells is poorly understood. To identify cytosolic activities that facilitate the formation and fission of nascent secretory vesicles, we treated permeabilized pituitary GH3 cells with high salt to remove endogenous budding factors. Using this cell preparation, secretory-vesicle budding from the TGN required addition of exogenous cytosol and energy. Mammalian cytosols (GH3 cells and bovine brain) promoted post-TGN vesicle formation. Most significantly, a salt extract of membranes from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a cell lacking a regulated secretory pathway, stimulated secretory vesicle budding in the absence of mammalian cytosolic factors. These results demonstrate that the factors which promote secretory-vesicle release from the TGN are conserved between yeast and mammalian cells. PMID:8615761

  18. A Four-Hour Yeast Bioassay for the Direct Measure of Estrogenic Activity in Wastewater without Sample Extraction, Concentration, or Sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Balsiger, Heather A.; de la Torre, Roberto; Lee, Wen-Yee; Cox, Marc B.

    2010-01-01

    The assay described here represents an improved yeast bioassay that provides a rapid yet sensitive screening method for EDCs with very little hands-on time and without the need for sample preparation. Traditional receptor-mediated reporter assays in yeast were performed twelve to twenty four hours after ligand addition, used colorimetric substrates, and, in many cases, required high, non-physiological concentrations of ligand. With the advent of new chemiluminescent substrates a ligand-induced signal can be detected within thirty minutes using high picomolar to low nanomolar concentrations of estrogen. As a result of the sensitivity (EC50 for estradiol is ~ 0.7 nM) and the very short assay time (2-4 hours) environmental water samples can typically be assayed directly without sterilization, extraction, and concentration. Thus, these assays represent rapid and sensitive approaches for determining the presence of contaminants in environmental samples. As proof of principle, we directly assayed wastewater influent and effluent taken from a wastewater treatment plant in the El Paso, TX area for the presence of estrogenic activity. The data obtained in the four-hour yeast bioassay directly correlated with GC-mass spectrometry analysis of these same water samples. PMID:20074779

  19. Transcriptional activation of a geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase gene, GGPPS2, isolated from Scoparia dulcis by treatment with methyl jasmonate and yeast extract.

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Y; Mizuguchi, Y; Taura, F; Kurosaki, F

    2014-10-01

    A cDNA clone, designated SdGGPPS2, was isolated from young seedlings of Scoparia dulcis. The putative amino acid sequence of the translate of the gene showed high homology with geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase (GGPPS) from various plant sources, and the N-terminal residues exhibited the characteristics of chloroplast targeting sequence. An appreciable increase in the transcriptional level of SdGGPPS2 was observed by exposure of the leaf tissues of S. dulcis to methyl jasmonate, yeast extract or Ca(2+) ionophore A23187. In contrast, SdGGPPS1, a homologous GGPPS gene of the plant, showed no or only negligible change in the expression level upon treatment with these stimuli. The truncated protein heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli in which the putative targeting domain was deleted catalyzed the condensation of farnesyl diphosphate and isopentenyl diphosphate to liberate geranylgeranyl diphosphate. These results suggested that SdGGPPS2 plays physiological roles in methyl jasmonate and yeast extract-induced metabolism in the chloroplast of S. dulcis cells. PMID:25027024

  20. DNA extraction: an anthropologic aspect of bone remains from sixth- to seventh-century ad bone remains.

    PubMed

    Di Nunno, Nunzio; Saponetti, Sandro Sublimi; Scattarella, Vito; Emanuel, Patrizia; Baldassarra, Stefania Lonero; Volpe, Giuliano; Di Nunno, Cosimo

    2007-12-01

    In the archeological site of the early Christian Episcopal complex of Saint Peter, in Canosa di Puglia (Bari, Italy), during the operations of archaeological excavations, tombs were discovered. They were dated between the sixth and seventh centuries ad with carbon 14 methodology. Five skeletons were found in the 5 tombs: 28A: male individual, 43 years old. The height was 170 cm; the biomass was 65.7 kg. The analysis of the bones indicated several noteworthy pathologies, such as a number of hypoplasia lines of the enamel, the presence of Schmorl hernias on the first 2 lumbar vertebrae, and the outcome of subacromial impingement syndrome. 28E was a male individual, with a biologic age of death of between 44 and 60 years. The height was 177 cm. He had a posttraumatic fracture callus of the medial third of the clavicle, with an oblique fracture rima. 29B was a female individual, 44-49 years old. The height was 158.8 cm; the biomass was 64.8 kg. There was Wells bursitis on the ischial tuberosity on both sides. 29E was a male individual, 45-50 years old. The height was 169.47 cm; the biomass was 70.8 kg. The third and the fourth vertebrae showed Baastrup syndrome (compression of the vertebral spine). There were radiologic signs of deformity on the higher edge of the acetabula and results of frequent sprains of the ankles. 31A was a male individual, 47-54 years old. The height was 178.65 cm; the biomass was 81 kg. The vertebral index showed a heavy overloading in the thoracic lumbar region. There were bony formations under the periosteum on both on the higher and medium facets of the first metatarsus and on the higher and lateral facets of the fifth metatarsus on both sides. As the topography indicates, these small ossifications coincided with the contact points between the back of the foot and parts of the upper shoe. From the osseous remains, in particular from the teeth (central incisors), the DNA was extracted and typed to identify potential family ties among all the

  1. [Research status and prospect on hot water extract of Chlorella: the high value-added bioactive substance from Chlorella].

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xiuyuan; Huang, Yingming; Zhang, Daojing; Tao, Liming; Li, Yuanguang

    2015-01-01

    Chlorella is nutritious and has been used as a functional food much earlier than the other microalgae. C. pyrenoidosa, the potential microalgae which is currently cultured and developed for the new strategic industry of biofuels production and biological CO2 fixation, is a new resource food announced by the Ministry of Health of the People's Republic of China late 2012. Accumulation of high value-added substances in C. pyrenoidosa during the cultivation for lipid makes it possible to reduce the costs for C. pyrenoidosa-based biofuels production. Among these potential substances, hot water extract of Chlorella (CE), commercially known as "Chlorella growth factor", is the unique one that makes Chlorella more precious than the other algae, and the market price of CE is high. It is believed that CE is effective in growth promotion and immunoregulation. However, there is no systematic analysis on the research status of CE and its bioactivity. The present report summarized recent research progress of CE and its bioactivity. Generally, besides the main effect on immunoregulation and tumor inhibition, CE was efficient in improving metabolic syndrome, scavenging for free radicals, protecting against ultraviolet damage, chelating heavy metals, and protecting liver and bowel. Several major challenges in CE research as well as its prospects were also analysed in the present report. PMID:26021077

  2. Identification by mass spectrometry of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-separated proteins extracted from lager brewing yeast.

    PubMed

    Joubert, R; Strub, J M; Zugmeyer, S; Kobi, D; Carte, N; Van Dorsselaer, A; Boucherie, H; Jaquet-Guffreund, L

    2001-08-01

    As two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis allows the separation of several hundred proteins in a single gel, this technique has become an important tool for proteome studies and for investigating the cellular physiology. In order to take advantage of information provided by the comparison of proteome pictures, the mass spectrometry technique is the way chosen for a rapid and an accurate identification of proteins of interest. Unfortunately, in the case of industrial yeasts, due to the high level of complexity of their genome, the whole DNA sequence is not yet available and all encoded protein sequences are still unknown. Nevertheless, this study presents here 30 lager brewing yeast proteins newly identified with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and database searching against the protein sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The identified proteins of the industrial strain correspond to proteins which do not comigrate with known proteins of S. cerevisiae separated on 2-D gels. This study presents an application of the MS technique for the identification of industrial yeast proteins which are only homologous to the corresponding S. cerevisiae proteins. PMID:11565791

  3. Delipidation-based solid-phase extraction pretreatment technique for plasma broad-coverage metabolomic profiling to reveal the potential pathogenesis of yeast-induced fever in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhixin; Qin, Lingling; Guo, Mingxing; Gao, Shanshan; Zhang, Qingqing; Wang, Qing; Lu, Zhiwei; Zhao, Huizhen; Liu, Yuehong; Wang, Meiling; Fu, Shuang; Bai, Xu; Gao, Xiaoyan

    2016-07-01

    During the process of metabolomics profiling by using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with time-of flight mass spectrometry, blood sample pretreatment is a crucial step for biomarker discovery. Herein, in order to prevent the potential loss of metabolites and ion suppression phenomena caused by the proteins and phospholipids contained in blood fluids, a delipidation-based solid-phase extraction pretreatment technique for plasma broad-coverage metabolomic profiling was performed. This technique can be summarized as a single extraction, a single elution of solid-phase extraction plate, followed by four times measuring with electrospray ionization in positive and negative ion mode, respectively. This approach significantly increased the number of features detected in plasma, and 1572 features in positive mode and 1352 features in negative mode were detected, respectively. Besides, the stability and repeatability of the approach were greatly improved. For these advantages, the approach was employed to elucidate the potential pathogenesis of yeast-induced fever in rats. The biomarkers associated with the pathogenesis of fever were shown to be related to amino acids metabolism and lipid metabolism. The delipidation-based solid-phase extraction pretreatment approach can provide a useful tool to reveal the pathological mechanisms of such systemic pathological process. PMID:27173137

  4. Single-cell protein production from Jerusalem artichoke extract by a recently isolated marine yeast Cryptococcus aureus G7a and its nutritive analysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lingmei; Chi, Zhenming; Sheng, Jun; Ni, Xiumei; Wang, Lin

    2007-12-01

    After crude protein of the marine yeast strains maintained in this laboratory was estimated by the method of Kjehldahl, we found that the G7a strain which was identified to be a strain of Cryptococcus aureus according to the routine identification and molecular methods contained high level of protein and could grow on a wide range of carbon sources. The optimal medium for single-cell protein production was seawater containing 6.0 g of wet weight of Jerusalem artichoke extract per 100 ml of medium and 4.0 g of the hydrolysate of soybean meal per 100 ml of medium, while the optimal conditions for single-cell protein production were pH 5.0 and 28.0 degrees C. After fermentation for 56 h, 10.1 g of cell dry weight per liter of medium and 53.0 g of crude protein per 100 g of cell dry weight (5.4 g/l of medium) were achieved, leaving 0.05 g of reducing sugar per 100 ml of medium and 0.072 g of total sugar per 100 ml of medium total sugar in the fermented medium. The yeast strain only contained 2.1 g of nucleic acid per 100 g of cell dry weight, but its cells contained a large amount of C(16:0) (19.0%), C(18:0) (46.3%), and C(18:1) (33.3%) fatty acids and had a large amount of essential amino acids, especially lysine (12.6%) and leucine (9.1%), and vitamin C (2.2 mg per 100 g of cell dry weight). These results show that the new marine yeast strain was suitable for single-cell protein production. PMID:17929010

  5. Yeast Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotics, it can multiply and cause an infection. Yeast infections affect different parts of the body in different ways: Thrush is a yeast infection that causes white patches in your mouth Candida ...

  6. Polypeptide-dependent protein kinase from bakers' yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagita, Y; Abdel-Ghany, M; Raden, D; Nelson, N; Racker, E

    1987-01-01

    The purification and properties of a protein serine kinase (PK-P) extracted with Triton X-100 from membranes of bakers' yeast are described. The enzyme is virtually inactive unless either a histone or a heat-stable polypeptide from yeast membranes and Mg2+ are added. Other divalent cations substitute for Mg2+ poorly or not at all; most of them, including Mn2+, inhibit when added in the presence of 5 mM Mg2+. The enzyme is unstable but can be stabilized by addition of 0.1% Triton X-100 and 20% glycerol. The final preparation shows, on silver-stained electrophoresis gels, two major bands (Mr 41,000 and 35,000). According to gel filtration the molecular weight of the active protein is about 75,000. Of the two subunits, only the smaller one appears to be autophosphorylated. In addition to casein, the enzyme phosphorylates several proteins including the H+-ATPase (Mr 100,000) in the yeast plasma membrane. In order to demonstrate the phosphorylation of the ATPase (up to 0.9 equivalents), exposure of the latter to an acid phosphatase was required. Other phosphorylated proteins include mRNA cap-binding protein from mammalian erythrocytes and yeast, a glucocorticoid receptor protein, and a preparation of the guanine nucleotide-binding proteins Gi and Go from brain. A partial purification of a natural activator from yeast plasma membranes is described. Images PMID:3547402

  7. Gentamicin-Containing Peptone-Yeast Extract Medium for Cocultivation of Hartmannella vermiformis ATCC 50256 and Virulent Strains of Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Wadowsky, R. M.; Wang, L.; Laus, S.; Dowling, J. N.; Kuchta, J. M.; States, S. J.; Yee, R. B.

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the use of peptone-yeast extract (PY) medium, different strains of Hartmannella vermiformis, and gentamicin in a coculture system to improve the discrimination of virulent and avirulent strains of Legionella pneumophila. H. vermiformis ATCC 50256 was unique among four strains of H. vermiformis, in that it multiplied equally well in Medium 1034 and PY medium (Medium 1034 without fetal calf serum, folic acid, hemin, and yeast nucleic acid and with a 50% reduction of peptone). However, both a virulent strain of L. pneumophila and its avirulent derivative strain multiplied in cocultures when PY medium was used. The multiplication of this avirulent strain was greatly reduced by incorporating gentamicin (1 (mu)g/ml) into the cocultivation system. Five virulent-avirulent sets of L. pneumophila strains were then tested for multiplication in cocultures with H. vermiformis ATCC 50256 and the gentamicin-containing PY medium. Only the virulent strains multiplied. The modified cocultivation system can discriminate between virulent and avirulent strains of L. pneumophila. PMID:16535197

  8. Could yeast infections impair recovery from mental illness? A case study using micronutrients and olive leaf extract for the treatment of ADHD and depression.

    PubMed

    Rucklidge, Julia J

    2013-01-01

    Micronutrients are increasingly used to treat psychiatric disorders including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), mood disorders, stress, and anxiety. However, a number of factors influence optimal response and absorption of nutrients, including the health of the gut, particularly the presence of yeast infections, such as Candida. As part of a wider investigation into the impact of micronutrients on psychiatric symptoms, many participants who experienced a yeast infection during their treatment showed a diminished response to the micronutrients. One case was followed systematically over a period of 3 y with documentation of deterioration in psychiatric symptoms (ADHD and mood) when infected with Candida and then symptom improvement following successful treatment of the infection with olive leaf extract (OLE) and probiotics. This case outlines that micronutrient treatment might be severely compromised by infections such as Candida and may highlight the importance of gut health when treating psychiatric disorders with nutrients. Given the role that inflammation can play in absorption of nutrients, it was hypothesized that the infection was impairing absorption of the micronutrients. PMID:23784606

  9. Value-Added Processing of Peanut Skins: Antioxidant Capacity,Total Phenolics,and Procyanidin Content of Spray Dried Extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To explore a potential use for peanut skins as a functional food ingredient, milled skins were extracted with 70% ethanol, separated into a soluble extract and insoluble material by filtration, and spray dried with or without the addition of maltodextrin. Peanut skin extracts had high levels of proc...

  10. Value-Added Processing of Peanut Skins: Antioxidant Capacity, Total Phenolics, and Procyanidin Content of Spray Dried Extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To explore a potential use for peanut skins as a functional food ingredient, milled skins were extracted with 70% ethanol, separated into a soluble extract and insoluble material by filtration, and spray dried with or without the addition of maltodextrin. Peanut skin extracts had high levels of proc...

  11. Effect of increasing levels of seven tree species extracts added to a high concentrate diet on in vitro rumen gas output.

    PubMed

    Salem, Abdelfattah Z M; Kholif, Ahmed E; Elghandour, Mona M Y; Hernandez, Saul R; Domínguez-Vara, Ignacio A; Mellado, Miguel

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of increasing levels of extracts of Byrsonima crassifolia, Celtis pallida, Enterolobium cyclocarpum, Fraxinus excelsior, Ficus trigonata, Phoradendrom brevifolium and Prunus domestica on in vitro gas production (GP) and ruminal fermentation of a high concentrate diet. Plant extracts were prepared at 1 g dry matter (DM)/8 mL of solvent mixture (methanol : ethanol : water, 1:1:8) and added at levels of 0, 0.6, 1.2 and 1.8 mL/g DM of a high concentrate diet. In vitro GP was recorded at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h of incubation. Increasing addition of extracts linearly increased (P < 0.001), the GP24 , GP48 and GP72 (mL/g DM), and linearly decreased (P < 0.001), the discrete GP lag time. Moreover, increasing extract doses linearly increased (P < 0.001) the asymptotic GP and decreased (P < 0.001) the rate of GP. GP6 was not impacted by treatments and GP12 increased linearly (P = 0.01) with increasing addition of extracts. Rumen pH declined linearly (P < 0.05) with increasing doses of extracts added. As no interactions (P > 0.05) occurred between the extracts and doses, it could be conclude that all extracts positively modified rumen fermentation at doses of 1.2 to 1.8 mL extract/g diet DM. PMID:24796241

  12. Transcription of a Drosophila tRNAArg gene in yeast extract: 5'-flanking sequence dependence for transcription in a heterologous system.

    PubMed Central

    Schaack, J; Söll, D

    1985-01-01

    The Drosophila tRNA gene encoded on pArg is efficiently transcribed in extracts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but the efficiency is 5'-flanking sequence dependent: deletion to between positions -21 and -17 (relative to position +1 of the mature coding sequence) reduces transcription to a very low level. This demonstrates that requirement for wild-type 5'-flanking sequence exists in the case of a heterologous combination of a tRNA gene and transcription extract. Expression of pArg in vivo in S. cerevisiae is also dependent on the wild-type 5'-flanking sequence, but only with deletion to between -17 and -11 is the steady-state level of pArg transcripts reduced to near zero. The 5'-flanking sequence requirement in S. cerevisiae extract is similar to that found in Drosophila Kc cell extract. However, transcription kinetics distinguish S. cerevisiae extract from that of Drosophila Kc cells. tRNA genes added to S. cerevisiae extract exhibit a lag phase before initiation of active transcription, but this lag is much shorter and much less temperature dependent than is the lag phase in Drosophila Kc cell extract. Images PMID:3889849

  13. A yeast bioassay for direct measurement of thyroid hormone disrupting effects in water without sample extraction, concentration, or sterilization.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Ren, Shujuan; Han, Shaolun; Li, Na

    2014-04-01

    The present study introduces an improved yeast bioassay for rapid yet sensitive evaluation of thyroid hormone disruption at the level of thyroid receptor (TR) in environmental water samples. This assay does not require water sample preparation and thus requires very little hands-on time. Based on different β-galactosidase substrates, two modified bioassays, a colorimetric bioassay and a chemiluminescent bioassay, were developed. The compounds tested included the known thyroid hormone 3,3',5-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3), the specific TR antagonist amiodarone hydrochloride (AH) and phthalate esters (PAEs), which potentially disrupt thyroid hormone signaling. The EC50 values for T3 were similar to those previously obtained using a 96-well plate bioassay. TR antagonism by AH was studied in the presence of 2.5 × 10(-7)M T3, and the concentration producing 20% of the maximum effect (RIC20) for AH was 3.1 × 10(-7)M and 7.8 × 10(-9)M for the colorimetric bioassay and chemiluminescent bioassay, respectively. None of the tested PAEs induced β-galactosidase expression, but diethylhexyl phthalate, benzyl butyl phthalate and dibutyl phthalate demonstrated TR antagonism. Furthermore, water samples collected from Guanting reservoir in Beijing were evaluated. Although TR agonism was not observed, antagonism was detected in all water samples and is expressed as AH equivalents. The toxicology equivalent quantity values obtained by the chemiluminescent bioassay ranged from 21.2 ± 1.6 to 313.9 ± 28.8 μg L(-1) AH, and similar values were obtained for the colorimetric bioassay. The present study shows that the modified yeast bioassay can be used as a valuable tool for quantification of thyroid hormone disrupting effects in environmental water samples. PMID:24355165

  14. Antioxidative activities of mushroom (Flammulina velutipes) extract added to bigeye tuna meat: dose-dependent efficacy and comparison with other biological antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Bao, H N D; Ushio, H; Ohshima, T

    2009-03-01

    The ability of a hydrophilic extract prepared from edible mushroom (Flammulina velutipes) to stabilize fresh color of bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus) meat was evaluated to compare it with certain other antioxidants. The fresh color shelf life of bigeye tuna meats, to which were added as 1, 3, or 5 mL of mushroom extract to 100 g of minced bigeye tuna meat, prolonged duration of ice storage by more than 2, 4, and 6 d, respectively, in comparison with the control tuna meat without mushroom extract. The addition of 5 mL of mushroom extract to 100 g of minced bigeye tuna meat was more effective than adding ascorbic acid sodium salt (500 ppm) or alpha-tocopherol (500 ppm) with regard to oxidation of lipid in the tuna meat. The color changes significantly correlated with lipid oxidation as well as metmyoglobin formation in the tuna meat. These results clearly show that the mushroom extract is a potential antioxidant, which has the ability to stabilize fresh color of tuna meat during ice storage. PMID:19323731

  15. Influence of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria and enzymatic yeast extracts on the microbiological, biochemical and sensorial properties of Lben generic products.

    PubMed

    Mangia, Nicoletta P; Garau, Giovanni; Murgia, Marco A; Bennani, Abdelmajid; Deiana, Pietrino

    2014-05-01

    In this study we identified Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lc. lactis subsp. lactis biovar diacetylactis, Kluyveromices lactis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as the dominant microorganisms of traditional Moroccan acid-alcoholic fermented milk named Lben. The low pH (3·8±0·3), lactose (16·8±3·4 mg/l) and lactic acid (8·16±0·6 mg/l) content indicated that a strong fermentation occurred in the traditional product which was also characterised by the substantial presence of ethanol and typical volatile carbonyl compounds (i.e., acetoin, diacetyl and acetaldehyde). Microbiological analyses of experimental Lben manufactured with selected strains (isolated from the traditional product) of Lc. lactis subsp. lactis and Lc. lactis subsp. lactis biovar. diacetylactis alone (batch A) and in combination with enzymatic extract of a K. lactis strain (batch B) indicated a good effectiveness of the starters employed (∼1010 CFU/g of lactococci after 8 h of incubation) and a significant effect of the yeast enzyme extract on lactococci viability. Despite slight changes in the physicochemical characteristics of the two Lben during the 15 d storage period, volatile compounds (i.e. ethanol, acetaldehyde, diacetyl and acetoin) were consistently higher in batch B. Moreover, sensorial analysis performed after 15 d of storage, highlighted higher odour and flavour intensity, vegetable odour and viscosity in batch B while batch A displayed higher astringency. PMID:24642233

  16. Mutations in the membrane anchor of yeast cytochrome c1 compensate for the absence of Oxa1p and generate carbonate-extractable forms of cytochrome c1.

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, P; Lemaire, C; Bonnefoy, N; Brivet-Chevillotte, P; Dujardin, G

    1998-01-01

    Oxa1p is a mitochondrial inner membrane protein that is mainly required for the insertion/assembly of complex IV and ATP synthase and is functionally conserved in yeasts, humans, and plants. We have isolated several independent suppressors that compensate for the absence of Oxa1p. Molecular cloning and sequencing reveal that the suppressor mutations (CYT1-1 to -6) correspond to amino acid substitutions that are all located in the membrane anchor of cytochrome c1 and decrease the hydrophobicity of this anchor. Cytochrome c1 is a catalytic subunit of complex III, but the CYT1-1 mutation does not seem to affect the electron transfer activity. The double-mutant cyt1-1,164, which has a drastically reduced electron transfer activity, still retains the suppressor activity. Altogether, these results suggest that the suppressor function of cytochrome c1 is independent of its electron transfer activity. In addition to the membrane-bound cytochrome c1, carbonate-extractable forms accumulate in all the suppressor strains. We propose that these carbonate-extractable forms of cytochrome c1 are responsible for the suppressor function by preventing the degradation of the respiratory complex subunits that occur in the absence of Oxa1p. PMID:9755193

  17. Physical property change of FeOOH(AD){sub 1/4} during lithium insertion and extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamura, Kiyoshi; Sakaebe, Hikari; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Takehara, Zenichiro

    1996-09-01

    The physical state changes of amorphous FeOOH incorporating aniline derivatives [FeOOH(AD){sub 1/4}] in the course of discharge and charge cycling were studied using electron spin resonance (ESR). Two peaks were observed for the ESR signal of FeOOH(AD){sub 1/4}, which were related to the radicals in the aniline derivative and electron spin of the iron ions. The electron spin concentrations corresponding to these peaks were estimated from the ESR signals. In the first discharge and charge cycle, the electron spin concentration for iron ions changed irreversibly. However, the change in the electron spin concentration for iron ions was reversible for the second and subsequent discharge and charge cycles. These findings clearly show that the irreversible physical property changes for FeOOH(AD){sub 1/4} take place during the first discharge. The electron spin concentration for the aniline derivatives also changed with the oxidation or reduction of iron ions in FeOOH(AD){sub 1/4}. This result suggests the presence of an electronic interaction between aniline derivatives and iron ions in FeOOH(AD){sub 1/4}.

  18. Selective media for detecting and enumerating foodborne yeasts.

    PubMed

    Beuchat, L R

    1993-06-25

    No one medium is satisfactory for detecting, isolating and enumerating all yeasts in all foods. Antibiotic-supplemented media such as dichloran rose Bengal chloramphenicol agar, tryptone glucose yeast extract chloramphenicol agar, oxytetracycline glucose yeast extract agar and rose Bengal chloramphenicol agar are superior to acidified potato dextrose agar and other acidified media for enumeration of the vast majority of spoilage yeasts. Dichloran glycerol (18%) agar performs well for enumerating moderately xerotolerant yeasts. Malt extract yeast extract glucose (up to 60%) can be used for detecting and enumerating moderate and extreme xerophiles. These media also support the growth of moulds. Lysine agar, Schwarz differential agar and Lin's wild yeast differential agar are used by the brewing industry to differentiate wild yeasts from brewer's strains. Lysine agar is selective for apiculate yeasts and ethanol sulfite yeast extract agar is selective for Saccharomyces. Both have application in wineries. Modified molybdate agar can be used to selectively isolate yeasts from tropical fruits. Preservative-resistant yeasts can be detected on malt acetic agar. The recommended incubation temperature is 25 degrees C, but incubation time between plating and counting colonies ranges from 5 days for determination of general populations of yeasts to 10 days for more for xerotolerant yeasts. There is need for new and improved media for selectively isolating various groups, genera, species and strains of yeasts capable of growing only under specific environmental conditions in specific types of foods and beverages. PMID:8357752

  19. Value Added Processing of Peanut Meal: Enzymatic Hydrolysis to Improve Functional and Nutritional Properties of Water Soluble Extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Value added applications are needed for peanut meal, which is the high protein byproduct of commercial peanut oil production. Peanut meal dispersions were hydrolyzed with alcalase, flavourzyme and pepsin in an effort to improve functional and nutritional properties of the resulting water soluble ex...

  20. Oxygen requirements of yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Visser, W; Scheffers, W A; Batenburg-van der Vegte, W H; van Dijken, J P

    1990-01-01

    Type species of 75 yeast genera were examined for their ability to grow anaerobically in complex and mineral media. To define anaerobic conditions, we added a redox indicator, resazurin, to the media to determine low redox potentials. All strains tested were capable of fermenting glucose to ethanol in oxygen-limited shake-flask cultures, even those of species generally regarded as nonfermentative. However, only 23% of the yeast species tested grew under anaerobic conditions. A comparative study with a number of selected strains revealed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae stands out as a yeast capable of rapid growth at low redox potentials. Other yeasts, such as Torulaspora delbrueckii and Candida tropicalis, grew poorly mu max, 0.03 and 0.05 h-1, respectively) under anaerobic conditions in mineral medium supplemented with Tween 80 and ergosterol. The latter organisms grew rapidly under oxygen limitation and then displayed a high rate of alcoholic fermentation. It can be concluded that these yeasts have hitherto-unidentified oxygen requirements for growth. Images PMID:2082825

  1. Xuezhikang, Extract of Red Yeast Rice, Improved Abnormal Hemorheology, Suppressed Caveolin-1 and Increased eNOS Expression in Atherosclerotic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ya-Bing; Liu, Mei-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Background Xuezhikang is the extract of red yeast rice, which has been widely used for the management of atherosclerotic disease, but the molecular basis of its antiatherosclerotic effects has not yet been fully identified. Here we investigated the changes of eNOS in vascular endothelia and RBCs, eNOS regulatory factor Caveolin-1 in endothelia, and hemorheological parameters in atherosclerotic rats to explore the protective effects of Xuezhikang. Methodology/Principal Findings Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 12/group) group C, controls; group M, high-cholesterol diet (HCD) induced atherosclerotic models; group X, HCD+Xuezhikang; and group L, HCD +Lovastatin. In group X, Xuezhikang inhibited oxidative stress, down-regulated caveolin-1 in aorta wall (P<0.05), up-regulated eNOS expression in vascular endothelia and erythrocytes (P<0.05), increased NOx (nitrite and nitrate) in plasma and cGMP in erythrocyte plasma and aorta wall (P<0.05), increased erythrocyte deformation index (EDI), and decreased whole blood viscosity and plasma viscosity (P<0.05), with the improvement of arterial pathology. Conclusions/Significance Xuezhikang up-regulated eNOS expression in vascular endothelia and RBCs, increased plasma NOx and improved abnormal hemorheology in high cholesterol diet induced atherosclerotic rats. The elevated eNOS/NO and improved hemorheology may be beneficial to atherosclerotic disease. PMID:23675421

  2. Vasorelaxant Effect of 5'-Methylthioadenosine Obtained from Candida utilis Yeast Extract through the Suppression of Intracellular Ca(2+) Concentration in Isolated Rat Aorta.

    PubMed

    Kumrungsee, Thanutchaporn; Akiyama, Sayaka; Saiki, Tomomi; Omae, Masato; Hamasawa, Kazuhiro; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-05-01

    Our study is the first to demonstrate the vasorelaxant effect of Candida utilis yeast extract on rat aorta (EC50 of 7.2 ± 3.2 mg/mL). Among five identified compounds, 5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA) exhibited comparable vasorelaxant effect (EC50 of 190 ± 40 μM) with adenosine, a known vasodilator, on 1 μM phenylephrine (PE)-contracted Sprague-Dawley rat aortic rings. MTA induced vasorelaxation in an endothelium-independent manner and independent of the adenosine receptors. MTA reduced a CaCl2-induced vasocontraction stimulated by 1 μM PE, whereas the effect was abolished in a 60 mM KCl-induced vasocontraction. This indicates that MTA was not involved in the suppression of extracellular Ca(2+) influx. MTA significantly (P < 0.01) attenuated the PE-induced activation of calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMK II) in aortic rings and inhibited the phosphorylation of L-type Ca(2+) channel (VDCC). In conclusion, the underlying mechanism(s) of MTA-induced vasorelaxation involves the inhibition of Ca(2+)/CaMK II/VDCC phosphorylation pathway, resulting in the suppression of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in aortic rings. PMID:27066696

  3. Comparing the sugar profiles and primary structures of alkali-extracted water-soluble polysaccharides in cell wall between the yeast and mycelial phases from Tremella fuciformis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hanyu; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Juan; Zheng, Liesheng; Chen, Liguo; Ma, Aimin

    2016-05-01

    To gain insights into dimorphism, cell wall polysaccharides from Tremella fuciformis strains were obtained from alkali-extracted water-soluble fractions PTF-M38 (from the mycelial form), PTF-Y3 and PTF-Y8 (from the yeast form) of T. fuciformis strains were used to gain some insights into dimorphism study. Their chemical properties and structural features were investigated using gel permeation chromatography, gas chromatography, UV and IR spectrophotometry and Congo red binding reactions. The results indicated that the backbones of PTF-M38, PTF-Y3 and PTF-Y8 were configured with α-linkages with average molecular weights of 1.24, 1.08, and 1.19 kDa, respectively. PTF-M38 was mainly composed of xylose, mannose, glucose, and galactose in a ratio of 1:1.47:0.48:0.34, while PTF-Y3 and PTF-Y8 were mainly composed of xylose, mannose and glucose in a ratio of 1:1.65:4.06 and 1:1.21:0.44, respectively. The sugar profiles of PTF-M38, PTF-Y3 and PTF-Y8 were also established for further comparison. These profiles showed that all three polysaccharides contained the same sugars but in different ratios, and the carbon sources (xylose, mannose, glucose, and galactose) affected the sugar ratios within the polysaccharides. PMID:27095457

  4. Understanding the intracellular effects of yeast extract on the enhancement of Fc-fusion protein production in Chinese hamster ovary cell culture.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dongdong; Sun, Yating; Liu, Xuping; Liu, Jintao; Zhang, Xintao; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Haibin; Tan, Wen-Song; Fan, Li

    2015-10-01

    Yeast extract (YE), as a non-animal source additive for mammalian cell culture medium, has been widely used for manufacturing of therapeutic proteins. In the present study, one particular YE was found to have significantly improved the specific productivity (q p) of Fc-fusion protein in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cell culture. In order to elucidate the intracellular effects of YE on protein productivity, steps of the target protein synthesis process were investigated to unveil their variations caused by YE addition. Stepwise analysis on Fc-fusion protein synthesis process showed that YE enhanced Fc-fusion protein gene transcription with cell cycle arrest at G1 phase; mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway was activated to enhance the translation of Fc-fusion protein, and the block in post-translational steps of Fc-fusion protein was alleviated by YE addition as well. Our results revealed the responses of multiple protein production steps to the addition of YE and provided a practical guidance for the separation and application of active compounds from hydrolysates. PMID:26162671

  5. Mild alkali-pretreatment effectively extracts guaiacyl-rich lignin for high lignocellulose digestibility coupled with largely diminishing yeast fermentation inhibitors in Miscanthus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Si, Shengli; Hao, Bo; Zha, Yi; Wan, Can; Hong, Shufen; Kang, Yongbo; Jia, Jun; Zhang, Jing; Li, Meng; Zhao, Chunqiao; Tu, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Shiguang; Peng, Liangcai

    2014-10-01

    In this study, various alkali-pretreated lignocellulose enzymatic hydrolyses were evaluated by using three standard pairs of Miscanthus accessions that showed three distinct monolignol (G, S, H) compositions. Mfl26 samples with elevated G-levels exhibited significantly increased hexose yields of up to 1.61-fold compared to paired samples derived from enzymatic hydrolysis, whereas Msa29 samples with high H-levels displayed increased hexose yields of only up to 1.32-fold. In contrast, Mfl30 samples with elevated S-levels showed reduced hexose yields compared to the paired sample of 0.89-0.98 folds at p<0.01. Notably, only the G-rich biomass samples exhibited complete enzymatic hydrolysis under 4% NaOH pretreatment. Furthermore, the G-rich samples showed more effective extraction of lignin-hemicellulose complexes than the S- and H-rich samples upon NaOH pretreatment, resulting in large removal of lignin inhibitors to yeast fermentation. Therefore, this study proposes an optimal approach for minor genetic lignin modification towards cost-effective biomass process in Miscanthus. PMID:25079210

  6. An economic approach to efficient isotope labeling in insect cells using homemade 15N-, 13C- and 2H-labeled yeast extracts.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Christian; Isogai, Shin; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    Heterologous expression of proteins in insect cells is frequently used for crystallographic structural studies due to the high yields even for challenging proteins requiring the eukaryotic protein processing capabilities of the host. However for NMR studies, the need for isotope labeling poses extreme challenges in eukaryotic hosts. Here, we describe a robust method to achieve uniform protein (15)N and (13)C labeling of up to 90 % in baculovirus-infected insect cells. The approach is based on the production of labeled yeast extract, which is subsequently supplemented to insect cell growth media. The method also allows deuteration at levels of >60 % without decrease in expression yield. The economic implementation of the labeling procedures into a standard structural biology laboratory environment is described in a step-by-step protocol. Applications are demonstrated for a variety of NMR experiments using the Abelson kinase domain, GFP, and the beta-1 adrenergic receptor as examples. Deuterated expression of the latter provides spectra of very high quality of a eukaryotic G-protein coupled receptor. PMID:26070442

  7. Long-Term n-Caproic Acid Production from Yeast-Fermentation Beer in an Anaerobic Bioreactor with Continuous Product Extraction.

    PubMed

    Ge, Shijian; Usack, Joseph G; Spirito, Catherine M; Angenent, Largus T

    2015-07-01

    Multifunctional reactor microbiomes can elongate short-chain carboxylic acids (SCCAs) to medium-chain carboxylic acids (MCCAs), such as n-caproic acid. However, it is unclear whether this microbiome biotechnology platform is stable enough during long operating periods to consistently produce MCCAs. During a period of 550 days, we improved the operating conditions of an anaerobic bioreactor for the conversion of complex yeast-fermentation beer from the corn kernel-to-ethanol industry into primarily n-caproic acid. We incorporated and improved in-line, membrane liquid-liquid extraction to prevent inhibition due to undissociated MCCAs at a pH of 5.5 and circumvented the addition of methanogenic inhibitors. The microbiome accomplished several functions, including hydrolysis and acidogenesis of complex organic compounds and sugars into SCCAs, subsequent chain elongation with undistilled ethanol in beer, and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. The methane yield was 2.40 ± 0.52% based on COD and was limited by the availability of carbon dioxide. We achieved an average n-caproate production rate of 3.38 ± 0.42 g L(-1) d(-1) (7.52 ± 0.94 g COD L(-1) d(-1)) with an n-caproate yield of 70.3 ± 8.81% and an n-caproate/ethanol ratio of 1.19 ± 0.15 based on COD for a period of ∼55 days. The maximum production rate was achieved by increasing the organic loading rates in tandem with elevating the capacity of the extraction system and a change in the complex feedstock batch. PMID:25941741

  8. Helikaurolides A-D with a Diterpene-Sesquiterpene Skeleton from Supercritical Fluid Extracts of Helianthus annuus L. var. Arianna.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ascensión; Molinillo, José M G; Varela, Rosa M; Casas, Lourdes; Mantell, Casimiro; Martínez de la Ossa, Enrique J; Macías, Francisco A

    2015-10-01

    Four novel compounds (1-4) with an unprecedented skeleton that combines a sesquiterpene lactone and a kaurane diterpene acid were isolated from Helianthus annuus L. var. Arianna extract, which was obtained under supercritical conditions. The structures of 1-4 were elucidated by NMR and MS analyses. The biosynthetic routes involve sesquiterpene lactones and kauranic acid, both of which were previously isolated from this species. PMID:26368065

  9. Direct conversion of inulin and extract of tubers of Jerusalem artichoke into single cell oil by co-cultures of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa TJY15a and immobilized inulinase-producing yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Hai; Chi, Zhe; Zhang, Fang; Guo, Feng-Jun; Li, Mei; Song, Wei-Bo; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2011-05-01

    In this study, it was found that the immobilized inulinase-producing cells of Pichia guilliermondii M-30 could produce 169.3 U/ml of inulinase activity while the free cells of the same yeast strain only produced 124.3 U/ml of inulinase activity within 48 h. When the immobilized inulinase-producing yeast cells were co-cultivated with the free cells of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa TJY15a, R. mucilaginosa TJY15a could accumulate 53.2% oil from inulin in its cells and cell dry weight reached 12.2g/l. Under the similar conditions, R. mucilaginosa TJY15a could accumulate 55.4% (w/w) oil from the extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers in its cells and cell dry weight reached 12.8 g/l within 48 h. When the co-cultures were grown in 2l fermentor, R. mucilaginosa TJY15a could accumulate 56.6% (w/w) oil from the extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers in its cells and cell dry weight reached 19.6g/l within 48 h. Over 90.0% of the fatty acids from the yeast strain TJY15a grown in the extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers was C(16:0), C(18:1) and C(18:2), especially C(18:1) (50.6%). PMID:21411313

  10. Beta-glucan-depleted, glycopeptide-rich extracts from Brewer's and Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) lower interferon-gamma production by stimulated human blood cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Williams, Roderick; Dias, Daniel A; Jayasinghe, Nirupama; Roessner, Ute; Bennett, Louise E

    2016-04-15

    Regulation of the human immune system requires controlled pro- and anti-inflammatory responses for host defence against infection and disease states. Yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), as used in brewing and baking, are mostly known for ability to stimulate the human immune-system predominantly reflecting the pro-inflammatory cell wall β-glucans. However, in this study, using food-compatible processing methods, glycopeptide-enriched and β-glucan-depleted products were each prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeasts, which suppressed production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in human whole blood cell assay, signifying that anti-inflammatory factors are also present in yeast. Anti-inflammatory bioactivities of products prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeast were compared with the commercial yeast product, Epicor®. While unfractionated Epicor was inactive, the C18 resin-binding fractions of Brewer's and Baker's yeast products and Epicor dose-dependently lowered IFN-γ, demonstrating that Epicor also contained both pro-inflammatory (β-glucans) and anti-inflammatory components. Anti-inflammatory activity was attributed to C18 resin-binding species glyco-peptides in Epicor and experimental yeast products. This study demonstrated that pro- and anti-inflammatory factors could be resolved and enriched in yeasts by suitable processing, with potential to improve specific activities. PMID:26617014

  11. A new beta-glucosidase producing yeast for lower-cost cellulosic ethanol production from xylose-extracted corncob residues by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional cellulose-to-ethanol conversion by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF)requires enzymatic saccharification using both cellulase and ß-glucosidase allowing cellulose utilization by common ethanologenic yeast. Here we report a new yeast strain of Clavispora NRRL Y-50464 th...

  12. Counting Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bealer, Jonathan; Welton, Briana

    1998-01-01

    Describes changes to a traditional study of population in yeast colonies. Changes to the procedures include: (1) only one culture per student team; (2) cultures are inoculated only once; and (3) the same tube is sampled daily. (DDR)

  13. Flow cytometric detection of wild yeast in lager breweries.

    PubMed

    Jespersen, L; Lassen, S; Jakobsen, M

    1993-02-01

    A flow cytometric method for detection of wild yeast infections in breweries is reported. It is based on selective enrichment in Malt extract Yeast extract Glucose Peptone broth (MYGP) at 37 degrees C and in MYGP with 200 ppm CuSO4 at 25 degrees C, staining with a fluorochrome precursor and flow cytometry. In experiments with several types of wild yeast isolated from breweries and two different strains of lager yeast it has been possible to detect one wild yeast per 10(6) culture yeast after 48-72 h of incubation and, in some cases, after 24 h. PMID:8466805

  14. Medium modification to enhance the formation of bioactive metabolites in shake flask cultures of Antrodia cinnamomea by adding citrus peel extract.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan-Chiang; Ma, Te-Wei; Chuang, Ya-Ting

    2012-10-01

    Antrodia cinnamomea has recently become a well-known medicinal mushroom in Taiwan. Bioactive compounds found in A. cinnamomea include: polysaccharide, sesquiterpene lactone, steroids and triterpenoids. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of adding citrus peel extract to enhance the formation of bioactive metabolites in the submerged culture of A. cinnamomea. With the exception of grapefruit, citrus peel extracts tested were proved to be beneficial to mycelial growth and to the production of intracellular polysaccharide. Lemon was the most effective for enhancing bioactive metabolite production. With an addition of 2% (v/v), the mycelium biomass concentration and intracellular polysaccharide content rose from 11.96 g DW/L of the control and 123.6 mg/g DW to 21.96 g DW/L and 230.8 mg/g DW, respectively, on day 8. The production of triterpenoids also increased from 86.7 to 282.9 mg/L. Moreover, this study also demonstrates that although the addition of peel extract could cause the lengthening of the exponential phase and reduce the specific growth rate, the production rate of biomass, intracellular polysaccharide and triterpenoids was still enhanced significantly. PMID:22367480

  15. Microencapsulated jabuticaba (Myrciaria cauliflora) extract added to fresh sausage as natural dye with antioxidant and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Baldin, Juliana Cristina; Michelin, Euder Cesar; Polizer, Yana Jorge; Rodrigues, Isabela; de Godoy, Silvia Helena Seraphin; Fregonesi, Raul Pereira; Pires, Manoela Alves; Carvalho, Larissa Tátero; Fávaro-Trindade, Carmen Silvia; de Lima, César Gonçalves; Fernandes, Andrezza Maria; Trindade, Marco Antonio

    2016-08-01

    The aim was to evaluate the addition of microencapsulated jabuticaba extract (MJE) to fresh sausage as natural dye with antioxidant and antimicrobial activity. Fresh sausages without dye, with cochineal carmine and with addition of 2% and 4% MJE were evaluated for chemical, microbiological and sensory properties during 15days of refrigerated storage. TBARS values were lower (P<0.05) throughout the storage period in sausages with 2% and 4% MJE (below 0.1mg of malondialdehyde/kg sample) than in control and carmine treatments (from 0.3 to 0.6mg of malondialdehyde/kg sample). T2% and T4% also showed lower microbial counts on storage days 4 and 15 for APCs. The addition of 4% MJE negatively influenced (P<0.05) sensory color, texture and overall acceptance attributes. On the other hand, T2% presented similar (P>0.05) sensory acceptance to control and carmine treatments in most of the attributes evaluated except for a decrease in color. Thus, addition of 2% MJE to fresh sausage can be considered as a natural pigment ingredient. PMID:27016672

  16. Yeast Droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Baochi; Upadhyaya, Arpita; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Brenner, Michael

    2002-11-01

    It is well known that the Young's law and surface tension govern the shape of liquid droplets on solid surfaces. Here we address through experiments and theory the shape of growing aggregates of yeast on agar substrates, and assess whether these ideas still hold. Experiments are carried out on Baker's yeast, with different levels of expressions of an adhesive protein governing cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion. Changing either the agar concentration or the expression of this protein modifies the local contact angle of a yeast droplet. When the colony is small, the shape is a spherical cap with the contact angle obeying Young's law. However, above a critical volume this structure is unstable, and the droplet becomes nonspherical. We present a theoretical model where this instability is caused by bulk elastic effects. The model predicts that the transition depends on both volume and contact angle, in a manner quantitatively consistent with our experiments.

  17. Effect of Baechu Kimchi Added Ecklonia cava Extracts on High Glucose-induced Oxidative Stress in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Ah; Song, Yeong-Ok; Jang, Mi-Soon; Han, Ji-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction is considered to be a major cause of vascular complications in diabetes. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of a baechu kimchi added Ecklonia cava extract (BKE) against high glucose induced oxidative damage in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Treatment with a high concentration of glucose (30 mM) induced cytotoxicity, whereas treatment with BKE protected HUVECs from high glucose induced damage; by restoring cell viability. In addition, BKE reduced lipid peroxidation, intracellular reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide levels in a dose dependent manner. Treatment with high glucose concentrations also induced the overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2 and NF-κB proteins in HUVECs, but BKE treatment significantly reduced the overexpression of these proteins. These findings indicate that BKE may be a valuable treatment against high glucose-induced oxidative stress HUVECs. PMID:25320714

  18. Effect of Baechu Kimchi Added Ecklonia cava Extracts on High Glucose-induced Oxidative Stress in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Ah; Song, Yeong-Ok; Jang, Mi-Soon; Han, Ji-Sook

    2014-09-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction is considered to be a major cause of vascular complications in diabetes. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of a baechu kimchi added Ecklonia cava extract (BKE) against high glucose induced oxidative damage in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Treatment with a high concentration of glucose (30 mM) induced cytotoxicity, whereas treatment with BKE protected HUVECs from high glucose induced damage; by restoring cell viability. In addition, BKE reduced lipid peroxidation, intracellular reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide levels in a dose dependent manner. Treatment with high glucose concentrations also induced the overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2 and NF-κB proteins in HUVECs, but BKE treatment significantly reduced the overexpression of these proteins. These findings indicate that BKE may be a valuable treatment against high glucose-induced oxidative stress HUVECs. PMID:25320714

  19. Feasibility study of a cosmetic cream added with aqueous extract and oil from date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) fruit seed using experimental design.

    PubMed

    Lecheb, Fatma; Benamara, Salem

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the feasibility study of a cosmetic cream added with aqueous extract and oil from date (Phoenix dactylifera L.) fruit seed using experimental design. First, the mixture design was applied to optimize the cosmetic formula. The responses (dependent variables) were the spreadability (YSp) and viscosity (YVis), the factors (independent variables) being the weight proportions of the fatty phase (X1), the aqueous date seed extract (X2), and the beeswax (X3). Second, the cosmetic stability study was conducted by applying a full factorial design. Here, three responses were considered [spreadability (Sp), viscosity (Vis), and peroxide index (PI)], the independent variables being the concentration of the date seed oil (DSO) (x1), storage temperature (x2), and storage time (x3). Results showed that in the case of mixture design, the second-order polynomial equations correctly described experimental data. Globally, results show that there is a relatively wide composition range to ensure a suitable cosmetic cream from the point of view of Sp and Vis. Regarding the cosmetic stability, the storage time was found to be the most influential factor on both Vis and PI, which are considered here as indicators of physical and chemical stability of the emulsion, respectively. Finally, the elaborated and commercial cosmetics were compared in terms of pH, Sp, and centrifugation test (Ct). PMID:27125011

  20. Yeasts Diversity in Fermented Foods and Beverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamang, Jyoti Prakash; Fleet, Graham H.

    People across the world have learnt to culture and use the essential microorganisms for production of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages. A fermented food is produced either spontaneously or by adding mixed/pure starter culture(s). Yeasts are among the essential functional microorganisms encountered in many fermented foods, and are commercially used in production of baker's yeast, breads, wine, beer, cheese, etc. In Asia, moulds are predominant followed by amylolytic and alcohol-producing yeasts in the fermentation processes, whereas in Africa, Europe, Australia and America, fermented products are prepared exclusively using bacteria or bacteria-yeasts mixed cultures. This chapter would focus on the varieties of fermented foods and alcoholic beverages produced by yeasts, their microbiology and role in food fermentation, widely used commercial starters (pilot production, molecular aspects), production technology of some common commercial fermented foods and alcoholic beverages, toxicity and food safety using yeasts cultures and socio-economy

  1. Role of glucose signaling in yeast metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Dam, K. van

    1996-10-05

    The conversion of glucose to ethanol and carbon dioxide by yeast was the first biochemical pathway to be studied in detail. The initial observation that this process is catalyzed by an extract of yeast led to the discovery of enzymes and coenzymes and laid the foundation for modern biochemistry. In this article, knowledge concerning the relation between uptake of and signaling by glucose in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reviewed and compared to the analogous process in prokaryotes. It is concluded that (much) more fundamental knowledge concerning these processes is required before rational redesign of metabolic fluxes from glucose in yeast can be achieved.

  2. Pyrene degradation by yeasts and filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Romero, M Cristina; Salvioli, Mónica L; Cazau, M Cecilia; Arambarri, A M

    2002-01-01

    The saprotrophic soil fungi Fusarium solani (Mart.) Sacc., Cylindrocarpon didymum (Hartig) Wollenw, Penicillium variabile Sopp. and the yeasts Rhodotorula glutinis (Fresenius) Harrison and Rhodotorula minuta (Saito) Harrison were cultured in mineral medium with pyrene. The remaining pyrene concentrations were periodically determined during 20 incubation days, using HPLC. To assess the metabolism of pyrene degradation we added 0.1 microCi of [4,5,9,10] 14C-pyrene to each fungi culture and measured the radioactivity in the volatile organic substances, extractable, aqueous phase, biomass and 14CO2 fractions. The assays demonstrated that F. solani and R. glutinis metabolized pyrene as a sole source of carbon. Differences in their activities at the beginning of the cultures disappeared by the end of the experiment, when 32 and 37% of the original pyrene concentration was detected, for the soil fungi and yeasts, respectively. Among the filamentous fungi, F. solani was highly active and oxidized pyrene; moreover, small but significant degradation rates were observed in C. didymum and P. variahile cultures. An increase in the 14CO2 evolution was observed at the 17th day with cosubstrate. R. glutinis and R. minuta cultures showed similar ability to biotransform pyrene, and that 35% of the initial concentration was consumed at the end of the assay. The same results were obtained in the experiments with or without glucose as cosubstrate. PMID:11843531

  3. Evaluation of HS-SPME and ultrasonic solvent extraction for monitoring of plant flavours added by the bees to herbhoneys: traceability biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Kuś, Piotr Marek; Marijanović, Zvonimir; Jerković, Igor

    2015-01-01

    The volatile composition of 21 herbhoneys (HHs) of 7 different botanical origins was characterised for the first time. Ultrasound solvent extraction (USE) and headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by GC-FID/MS were successfully applied as complementary methods for monitoring the volatile plant flavours added by the bees. HHs showed significant compositional variability related to the botanical origin and compounds that could serve as traceability biomarkers were identified. The most important compounds with high abundance were (E,extract; H, headspace): caffeine (up to 68.7%, E) and trans-linalool oxide (up to 26.0%, H) in coffee HH, α-terpineol (up to 8.2%, E; 27.1%, H) and bornyl acetate (up to 3.1, E; 11.9%, H) in pine HH, thymol (up to 3.1%, E; 55.4%, H) in thyme HH. Hawthorn HH was characterised by the presence of herniarin (up to 13.4%, E) and lemon HH contained limonene (up to 1.6%, E; 33.2%, H). Other HHs (nettle and aloe) contained lower amounts of volatiles and their profiles were not specific. In all the HHs, methyl syringate was found and it was most abundant in thyme HH (up to 17.4%, E). The volatile fraction of HHs showed some substantial similarities and differences with the composition of herbs from which they derive. It confirms the selective bee-mediated transfer of phytochemicals, including known flavour-active volatiles into the final product, but also biotransformation of several compounds. Additionally, several similarities to the corresponding natural honeys were observed, but in general HHs exhibited less rich volatile profiles. PMID:26365314

  4. Transcriptional activators in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic transcription activation domains (ADs) are not well defined on the proteome scale. We systematicallly tested ∼6000 yeast proteins for transcriptional activity using a yeast one-hybrid system and identified 451 transcriptional activators. We then determined their transcription activation strength using fusions to the Gal4 DNA-binding domain and a His3 reporter gene which contained a promoter with a Gal4-binding site. Among the 132 strongest activators 32 are known transcription factors while another 35 have no known function. Although zinc fingers, helix–loop–helix domains and several other domains are highly overrepresented among the activators, only few contain characterized ADs. We also found some striking correlations: the stronger the activation activity, the more acidic, glutamine-rich, proline-rich or asparagine-rich the activators were. About 29% of the activators have been found previously to specifically interact with the transcription machinery, while 10% are known to be components of transcription regulatory complexes. Based on their transcriptional activity, localization and interaction patterns, at least six previously uncharacterized proteins are suggested to be bona fide transcriptional regulators (namely YFL049W, YJR070C, YDR520C, YGL066W/Sgf73, YKR064W and YCR082W/Ahc2). PMID:16464826

  5. Did Gause Have a Yeast Infection?

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Jonathon O; Porter, Alice H M; Montagnes, David J S

    2016-09-01

    We planned to develop predator-prey models using Paramecium and yeast, but they have not been empirically examined since work by Gause in the 1930s. Therefore, we evaluated if Paramecium aurelia ingests and grows on eight yeasts. Recognising that it ingested yeasts but could not grow, we assessed if it might grow on other yeasts, by empirically parameterising a predator-prey model that relies on ingestion, not growth. Simulations were compared to P. aurelia-yeast time-series data, from Gause. We hypothesised that if the model simulated predator-prey dynamics that mimicked the original data, then possibly P. aurelia could grow on yeast; simulations did not mimic the original data. Reviewing works by Gause exposed two issues: experiments were undoubtedly contaminated with bacteria, allowing growth on bacteria, not yeast; and the population cycle data cannot be considered a self-sustaining time series, as they were manipulated by adding yeast and ciliates. We conclude that past and future work should not rely on this system, for either empirical or theoretical evaluations. Finally, although we show that P. aurelia, P. caudatum, Euplotes patella, and Blepharisma sp. cannot grow on yeast, Tetrahymena pyriformis and Colpidium striatum can; these may provide models to explore predator-prey dynamics. PMID:27593699

  6. Production of Aromatic Plant Terpenoids in Recombinant Baker's Yeast.

    PubMed

    Emmerstorfer-Augustin, Anita; Pichler, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Plant terpenoids are high-value compounds broadly applied as food additives or fragrances in perfumes and cosmetics. Their biotechnological production in yeast offers an attractive alternative to extraction from plants. Here, we provide two optimized protocols for the production of the plant terpenoid trans-nootkatol with recombinant S. cerevisiae by either (I) converting externally added (+)-valencene with resting cells or (II) cultivating engineered self-sufficient production strains. By synthesis of the hydrophobic compounds in self-sufficient production cells, phase transfer issues can be avoided and the highly volatile products can be enriched in and easily purified from n-dodecane, which is added to the cell broth as second phase. PMID:26843167

  7. Structural, thermal, functional, antioxidant & antimicrobial properties of β-d-glucan extracted from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cereviseae)-Effect of γ-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asma Ashraf; Gani, Adil; Masoodi, F A; Amin, Furheen; Wani, Idrees Ahmed; Khanday, Firdous Ahmad; Gani, Asir

    2016-04-20

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of γ-irradiation (0, 5, 10, 20, 30 & 50kGy) on the structural, functional, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of yeast β-d-glucan. The samples were characterized by ATR-FTIR, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and the thermal properties were studied using DSC. There was a decrease in the average molecular weight of β-d-glucan as the irradiation dose increased. The functional properties of irradiated yeast β-d-glucan were largely influenced by the action of gamma radiation like swelling power and viscosity decreases with increase in the irradiation dose while as fat binding capacity, emulsifying properties, foaming properties and bile acid binding capacity shows an increasing trend. All the antioxidant properties carried out using six different assays increased significantly (p≤0.05) in a dose dependent manner. The antibacterial activity of yeast β-d-glucan also showed an increasing trend with increase in the irradiation dose from 5 to 50kDa. PMID:26876872

  8. Attempts to detect lycopersene formation in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, S. S.; Simpson, K. L.

    1968-01-01

    1. β-Ionone vapour has been shown to cause an increase in the more saturated carotenes and a decrease in the less saturated carotenes of Rhodotorula glutinis. Lycopersene (dihydrophytoene) has been proposed as a precursor to phytoene. Attempts were made to isolate lycopersene from β-ionone-treated cultures of R. glutinis. 2. Large samples of β-ionone-treated cultures were examined for the presence of lycopersene. Spots were detected on silicic acid plates that could not be differentiated from synthetic lycopersene on the basis of column and thin-layer chromatographic separations and staining techniques. The lycopersene-like substance could be obtained from non-treated pigmented yeast as well as baker's yeast. 3. An extraction of bacterial-grade yeast extract also yielded a lycopersene-like substance. The extracts of R. glutinis cells cultured on media not containing yeast extract did not contain the lycopersene-like compound. 4. No significant carbon was incorporated into the lycopersene zone from 14C-labelled mevalonate, acetate and glucose by R. glutinis and baker's yeast. 5. These results indicate that compounds may exist with chromatographic properties similar to lycopersene, but that lycopersene could not be detected in either a pigmented or a non-pigmented yeast. PMID:5753091

  9. Value Added?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UCLA IDEA, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Value added measures (VAM) uses changes in student test scores to determine how much "value" an individual teacher has "added" to student growth during the school year. Some policymakers, school districts, and educational advocates have applauded VAM as a straightforward measure of teacher effectiveness: the better a teacher, the better students…

  10. Exploring the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Protein Degradation Pathway in Yeast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Tamara J.; McWatters, Melissa K.; McQuade, Kristi L.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory investigating the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in yeast. In this exercise, the enzyme beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) is expressed in yeast under the control of a stress response promoter. Following exposure to heat stress to induce beta-gal expression, cycloheximide is added to halt…

  11. Vaginal Yeast Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Vaginal Yeast Infections KidsHealth > For Teens > Vaginal Yeast Infections Print ... side effect of taking antibiotics. What Is a Yeast Infection? A yeast infection is a common infection ...

  12. Effects of yeast subcomponent diet supplements on growth, stress resistance and immune response in Nile tilapia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeast cells contain glucan and mannan subcomponents which have been reported to boost immunity in several fish species. We prepared diets using a commercial feed supplemented with 4 different yeast or yeast subcomponents obtained from commercial sources. These were added at rates recommended by supp...

  13. Vaginal Yeast Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... t diagnose this condition by a person’s medical history and physical examination. They usually diagnose yeast infection by examining vaginal secretions under a microscope for evidence of yeast. Treatment Various antifungal vaginal ...

  14. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePlus

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts in the vagina , ...

  15. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePlus

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts in the ...

  16. Adding Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsini, Larry L.; Hudack, Lawrence R.; Zekan, Donald L.

    1999-01-01

    The value-added statement (VAS), relatively unknown in the United States, is used in financial reports by many European companies. Saint Bonaventure University (New York) has adapted a VAS to make it appropriate for not-for-profit universities by identifying stakeholder groups (students, faculty, administrators/support personnel, creditors, the…

  17. Single cell protein production from yacon extract using a highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant of the marine yeast Cryptococcus aureus G7a and its nutritive analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chun-Hai; Zhang, Tong; Chi, Zhen-Ming; Chi, Zhe; Li, Jing; Wang, Xiang-Hong

    2010-06-01

    The intracellular protein in the highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant can be easily released when they are incubated both in the low-osmolarity water and at the non-permissive temperature (usually 37 degrees C). After the mutant was grown in the yacon extract for 45 h, the crude protein content in the highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant Z114 was 59.1% and over 61% of the total protein could be released from the cells treated at 37 degrees C. The mutant cells grown in the yacon extract still contained high level of essential amino acids and other nutrients. This means that the yacon extract could be used as the medium for growth of the highly thermosensitive and permeable mutant which contained high content of crude protein. PMID:19727833

  18. A homologous cell-free system for studying protein translocation across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Brennwald, P; Wise, J A

    1994-02-01

    We report the development of a homologous in vitro assay system for analysing translocation of proteins across the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Our protocol for preparing an S. pombe extract capable of translating natural messenger RNAs was modified from a procedure previously used for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which cells are lysed in a bead-beater. However, we were unable to prepare fission yeast microsomes active in protein translocation using existing budding yeast protocols. Instead, our most efficient preparations were isolated by fractionating spheroplasts, followed by extensive washing and size exclusion chromatography of the crude membranes. Translocation of two ER-targeted proteins, pre-acid phosphatase from S. pombe and prepro-alpha-factor from S. cerevisiae, was monitored using two distinct assays. First, evidence that a fraction of both proteins was sequestered within membrane-enclosed vesicles was provided by resistance to exogenously added protease. Second, the protected fraction of each protein was converted to a higher molecular weight, glycosylated form; attachment of carbohydrate to the translocated proteins was confirmed by their ability to bind Concanavalin A-Sepharose. Finally, we examined whether proteins could be translocated across fission yeast microsomal membranes after their synthesis was complete. Our results indicate that S. cerevisiae prepro-alpha-factor can be post-translationally imported into the fission yeast ER, while S. pombe pre-acid phosphatase crosses the membrane only by a co-translational mechanism. PMID:8203158

  19. Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Xylose-extracted Corncob Residue by SSF Using Inhibitor- and Thermal-tolerant Yeast Clavispora NRRL Y-50339

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xylose-extracted corncob residue, a byproduct of the xylose-producing industry using corncobs, is an abundant potential energy resource for cellulosic ethanol production. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) is considered an ideal one-step process for conversion of lignocellulosic b...

  20. Intragroup Stigma Among Men Who Have Sex with Men: Data Extraction from Craigslist Ads in 11 Cities in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Vansia, Dhrutika; Stephenson, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Background Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) regularly experience homophobic discrimination and stigma. While previous research has examined homophobic and HIV-related intergroup stigma originating from non-MSM directed at MSM, less is known about intragroup stigma originating from within MSM communities. While some research has examined intragroup stigma, this research has focused mostly on HIV-related stigma. Intragroup stigma may have a unique influence on sexual risk-taking behaviors as it occurs between sexual partners. Online sexual networking venues provide a unique opportunity to examine this type of stigma. Objective The purpose of this study is to examine the presence and patterns of various types of intragroup stigma represented in Men Seeking Men Craigslist sex ads. Methods Data were collected from ads on Craigslist sites from 11 of the 12 US metropolitan statistical areas with the highest HIV/AIDS prevalence. Two categories of data were collected: self-reported characteristics of the authors and reported biases in the ads. Chi-square tests were used to examine patterns of biases across cities and author characteristics. Results Biases were rarely reported in the ads. The most commonly reported biases were against men who were not “disease and drug free (DDF),” representing stigma against men living with HIV or a sexually transmitted infection. Patterns in bias reporting occurred across cities and author characteristics. There were no variations based on race, but ageism (mostly against older men) varied based on the ad author’s age and self-reported DDF status; bias against feminine gender expression varied based on self-reported sexual orientation; bias against “fat” men varied by self-reported DDF status; bias against “ugly” men varied by a self-report of being good-looking; and bias against people who do not have a DDF status varied based on self-reported HIV status and self-reported DDF status. Conclusions

  1. Alcohol production from Jerusalem artichoke using yeasts with inulinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Guiraud, J.P.; Daurelles, J.; Galzy, P.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to show that yeasts with inulinase activity can be used to produce ethanol from the Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.). The results show that a fermentable extract can be easily obtained from the Jerusalem artichoke even under cold conditions. Yeasts with inulinase activity can be used to produce ethanol with good profitability. 19 refs.

  2. DIS in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albacete, Javier L.; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Taliotis, Anastasios

    2009-03-01

    We calculate the total cross section for the scattering of a quark-anti-quark dipole on a large nucleus at high energy for a strongly coupled N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory using AdS/CFT correspondence. We model the nucleus by a metric of a shock wave in AdS5. We then calculate the expectation value of the Wilson loop (the dipole) by finding the extrema of the Nambu-Goto action for an open string attached to the quark and antiquark lines of the loop in the background of an AdS5 shock wave. We find two physically meaningful extremal string configurations. For both solutions we obtain the forward scattering amplitude N for the quark dipole-nucleus scattering. We study the onset of unitarity with increasing center-of-mass energy and transverse size of the dipole: we observe that for both solutions the saturation scale Qs is independent of energy/Bjorken-x and depends on the atomic number of the nucleus as Qs˜A1/3. Finally we observe that while one of the solutions we found corresponds to the pomeron intercept of αP = 2 found earlier in the literature, when extended to higher energy or larger dipole sizes it violates the black disk limit. The other solution we found respects the black disk limit and yields the pomeron intercept of αP = 1.5. We thus conjecture that the right pomeron intercept in gauge theories at strong coupling may be αP = 1.5.

  3. Trends in the Breeding Population of Adélie Penguins in the Ross Sea, 1981–2012: A Coincidence of Climate and Resource Extraction Effects

    PubMed Central

    Lyver, Phil O’B.; Barron, Mandy; Barton, Kerry J.; Ainley, David G.; Pollard, Annie; Gordon, Shulamit; McNeill, Stephen; Ballard, Grant; Wilson, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the size of Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) colonies of the southern Ross Sea are among the longest biologic time series in the Antarctic. We present an assessment of recent annual variation and trends in abundance and growth rates of these colonies, adding to the published record not updated for more than two decades. High angle oblique aerial photographic surveys of colonies were acquired and penguins counted for the breeding seasons 1981–2012. In the last four years the numbers of Adélie penguins in the Ross and Beaufort Island colonies (southern Ross Sea metapopulation) reached their highest levels since aerial counts began in 1981. Results indicated that 855,625 pairs of Adélie penguins established breeding territories in the western Ross Sea, with just over a quarter (28%) of those in the southern portion, constituting a semi-isolated metapopulation (three colonies on Ross Island, one on nearby Beaufort Island). The southern population had a negative per capita growth rate of −0.019 during 1981–2000, followed by a positive per capita growth rate of 0.067 for 2001–2012. Colony growth rates for this metapopulation showed striking synchrony through time, indicating that large-scale factors influenced their annual growth. In contrast to the increased colony sizes in the southern population, the patterns of change among colonies of the northern Ross Sea were difficult to characterize. Trends were similar to southern colonies until the mid-1990s, after which the signal was lost owing to significantly reduced frequency of surveys. Both climate factors and recovery of whale populations likely played roles in the trends among southern colonies until 2000, after which depletion of another trophic competitor, the Antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus mawsoni), may explain the sharp increasing trend evident since then. PMID:24621601

  4. Trends in the breeding population of Adélie penguins in the Ross Sea, 1981-2012: a coincidence of climate and resource extraction effects.

    PubMed

    Lyver, Phil O'B; Barron, Mandy; Barton, Kerry J; Ainley, David G; Pollard, Annie; Gordon, Shulamit; McNeill, Stephen; Ballard, Grant; Wilson, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the size of Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) colonies of the southern Ross Sea are among the longest biologic time series in the Antarctic. We present an assessment of recent annual variation and trends in abundance and growth rates of these colonies, adding to the published record not updated for more than two decades. High angle oblique aerial photographic surveys of colonies were acquired and penguins counted for the breeding seasons 1981-2012. In the last four years the numbers of Adélie penguins in the Ross and Beaufort Island colonies (southern Ross Sea metapopulation) reached their highest levels since aerial counts began in 1981. Results indicated that 855,625 pairs of Adélie penguins established breeding territories in the western Ross Sea, with just over a quarter (28%) of those in the southern portion, constituting a semi-isolated metapopulation (three colonies on Ross Island, one on nearby Beaufort Island). The southern population had a negative per capita growth rate of -0.019 during 1981-2000, followed by a positive per capita growth rate of 0.067 for 2001-2012. Colony growth rates for this metapopulation showed striking synchrony through time, indicating that large-scale factors influenced their annual growth. In contrast to the increased colony sizes in the southern population, the patterns of change among colonies of the northern Ross Sea were difficult to characterize. Trends were similar to southern colonies until the mid-1990s, after which the signal was lost owing to significantly reduced frequency of surveys. Both climate factors and recovery of whale populations likely played roles in the trends among southern colonies until 2000, after which depletion of another trophic competitor, the Antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus mawsoni), may explain the sharp increasing trend evident since then. PMID:24621601

  5. Production of d-Mannitol and Glycerol by Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Toshiyuki

    1968-01-01

    D-Mannitol has not so far been known as a major product of sugar metabolism by yeasts. Three yeast strains, a newly isolated yeast from soy-sauce mash, Torulopsis versatilis, and T. anomala, were found to be good mannitol producers. Under optimal conditions, the isolate produced mannitol at good yield of 30% of the sugar consumed. Glucose, fructose, mannose, galactose, maltose, glycerol, and xylitol were suitable substrates for mannitol formation. High concentrations of yeast extract, Casamino Acids, NaCl, and KCl in media affected significantly the mannitol yield, whereas high levels of inorganic phosphate did not show any detrimental effect. PMID:5749751

  6. Determination of the presence of antioxidants deriving from sage and oregano extracts added to animal fat by means of assessment of the radical scavenging capacity by photochemiluminescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Vichi, S; Zitterl-Eglseer, K; Jugl, M; Franz, C

    2001-04-01

    Herbs and their extracts with antioxidant capacity could be used directly as stabilisers of fat and indirectly as feed additives, in order to improve quality and shelf-life of meat and fat-containing food. In this work a sensitive analytical method is proposed for determination of the antioxidant activity measured by photochemiluminescence (PCL) in lard stabilised with extracts of sage (Salvia officinalis L.) or oreganum (Origanum vulgare L.). A prior step of purification of fat samples is required, in order to separate and concentrate the phenolics from lipidic substances. The method was validated by determination of recovery rate and repeatability. In addition fat samples originating from pigs fed with feed additives of Salviae folium or Origani herba were analysed to investigate the supposed antioxidative effects, that could increase the shelf-life of meat products. In contrast with lard mixed with extracts of sage or oregano, back fat samples originating from pigs fed with feed additives of the same herbs didn't show a higher antioxidant activity than the control group. On the one hand it seems possible to keep perishable fat-containing food longer by an addition of an extract of sage or oregano due to their antioxidative properties, on the other hand administration of feed additives of dried herbs to pigs had no effect on quality and shelf-life of fat obtained from these animals. PMID:11379280

  7. New cultive medium for bioconversion of C5 fraction from sugarcane bagasse using rice bran extract

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Debora Danielle Virginio; Cândido, Elisangela de Jesus; de Arruda, Priscila Vaz; da Silva, Silvio Silvério; Felipe, Maria das Graças de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    The use of hemicellulosic hydrolysates in bioprocesses requires supplementation as to ensure the best fermentative performance of microorganisms. However, in light of conflicting data in the literature, it is necessary to establish an inexpensive and applicable medium for the development of bioprocesses. This paper evaluates the fermentative performance of Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis and Candida guilliermondii growth in sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysate supplemented with different nitrogen sources including rice bran extract, an important by-product of agroindustry and source of vitamins and amino acids. Experiments were carried out with hydrolysate supplemented with rice bran extract and (NH4)2SO4; peptone and yeast extract; (NH4)2SO4, peptone and yeast extract and non-supplemented hydrolysate as a control. S. stipitis produced only ethanol, while C. guilliermondii produced xylitol as the main product and ethanol as by-product. Maximum ethanol production by S. stipitis was observed when sugarcane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysate was supplemented with (NH4)2SO4, peptone and yeast extract. Differently, the maximum xylitol formation by C. guilliermondii was obtained by employing hydrolysate supplemented with (NH4)2SO4 and rice bran extract. Together, these findings indicate that: a) for both yeasts (NH4)2SO4 was required as an inorganic nitrogen source to supplement sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate; b) for S. stipitis, sugarcane hemicellulosic hydrolysate must be supplemented with peptone and yeast extract as organic nitrogen source; and: c) for C. guilliermondii, it must be supplemented with rice bran extract. The present study designed a fermentation medium employing hemicellulosic hydrolysate and provides a basis for studies about value-added products as ethanol and xylitol from lignocellulosic materials. PMID:25763056

  8. A comparison of the effects of different yeast products and antibiotic on broiler performance.

    PubMed

    Owens, B; McCracken, K J

    2007-02-01

    1. The objectives of this experiment were to compare the effects of different yeast products, with different nucleotide contents and inclusion rates, on broiler performance and to compare the effects to those observed with an antibiotic growth promoter. 2. Two experiments were carried out over two time replicates, one in individual wire cages and one in group pens. 3. Birds were given a diet based on a commercial formulation, which was split into 7 batches. One batch (C) contained no growth promoter and acted as a negative control, another (AV) contained the antibiotic growth promoter Avilomycin (5 g/tonne) and acted as the positive control. The other batches contained yeast extract 2012 at 100 g/tonne (Y21), yeast extract 2012 at 500 g/tonne (Y25), standard yeast 18 at 100 g/tonne (Y81), standard yeast 18 enriched in nucleotides at 100 g/tonne (Y8N1) and standard yeast 18 enriched in nucleotides at 500 g/tonne (Y8N5). 4. In the penned experiment, 280 Cobb broiler chicks (40 birds/treatment) were randomised to diet and pen position on day of hatch. Birds were fed ad libitum until slaughter at 28 d. Bird performance was monitored during the experimental period. 5. In the individual cage experiment, 63 Cobb broiler chicks (9 birds/treatment) were taken from the pens at 7 d of age and randomised to diet and cage position. Birds were fed ad libitum from d 7 to d 28. A 7-d excreta collection was carried out to determine apparent metabolisable energy (AME) content and nutrient digestibility between d 14 and d 21. Bird intake and weight were monitored weekly during the experimental period. At 28 d the birds were killed and viscosity of jejunal digesta supernatant was determined. 6. In the penned experiment, diet had no significant effect on dry matter intake (DMI), live weight gain (LWG) or gain:feed values during any individual week of the experiment or for the entire experimental period. In the caged experiment, DMI was numerically highest for birds fed Y25 diet over

  9. (Genetic engineering of yeasts for fermentation of xylose to ethanol). Progress report, April 1-October 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-03-31

    This progress report summarizes research on expression of xylose isomerase protein in S. cerevisiae, aggregation of xylose isomerase in yeast extracts, solubilization of yeast-made xylose isomerase, and disulfide bond content compared to the E. coli enzyme.

  10. DIS in AdS

    SciTech Connect

    Albacete, Javier L.; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Taliotis, Anastasios

    2009-03-23

    We calculate the total cross section for the scattering of a quark-anti-quark dipole on a large nucleus at high energy for a strongly coupled N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory using AdS/CFT correspondence. We model the nucleus by a metric of a shock wave in AdS{sub 5}. We then calculate the expectation value of the Wilson loop (the dipole) by finding the extrema of the Nambu-Goto action for an open string attached to the quark and antiquark lines of the loop in the background of an AdS{sub 5} shock wave. We find two physically meaningful extremal string configurations. For both solutions we obtain the forward scattering amplitude N for the quark dipole-nucleus scattering. We study the onset of unitarity with increasing center-of-mass energy and transverse size of the dipole: we observe that for both solutions the saturation scale Q{sub s} is independent of energy/Bjorken-x and depends on the atomic number of the nucleus as Q{sub s}{approx}A{sup 1/3}. Finally we observe that while one of the solutions we found corresponds to the pomeron intercept of {alpha}{sub P} = 2 found earlier in the literature, when extended to higher energy or larger dipole sizes it violates the black disk limit. The other solution we found respects the black disk limit and yields the pomeron intercept of {alpha}{sub P} = 1.5. We thus conjecture that the right pomeron intercept in gauge theories at strong coupling may be {alpha}{sub P} = 1.5.

  11. Studies on solvent extraction of iron(III) as a step for conversion of a waste effluent to a value added product.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Archana; Kumari, S; Sahu, K K

    2011-12-01

    Solvent extraction of iron(III) from actual sulphate waste pickle liquor was investigated using trialkylphosphine oxide diluted with kerosene. The waste pickle liquor was procured from a local company which deals with the manufacturing of pipes and tubes made of iron and steel. Various parameters were studied to optimise a suitable condition for the maximum extraction of iron. The composition of the aqueous feed used in the experiment was 60.88 g/L Fe(III), 53 g/L acid with traces of Cu, Ni and Co. An ambient extraction at 30 °C yielded acceptable kinetics and loading efficiency for 40% trialkylphosphine oxide with a saturated loading capacity of 51.85 g/L in four contacts at O/A ratio of 1/1 in a multiple contact mode. Iron from the loaded organic was stripped using various strippants such as distilled water, H(2)SO(4) and oxalic acid. Since only 32% of loaded Fe could be stripped with 2 M H(2)SO(4) in five contacts, further stripping was done with 5% oxalic acid which showed a very promising result. It was found that almost 100% of Fe(III) could be stripped out with 5% oxalic acid at O/A of 1/1 in five contacts. PMID:21862202

  12. Synthetic Yeast Cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Wenying; Burton, Justin

    2010-03-01

    Cooperation is wide-spread and has been postulated to drive major transitions in evolution. However, Darwinian selection favors ``cheaters'' that consume benefits without paying a fair cost. How did cooperation evolve against the threat of cheaters? To investigate the evolutionary trajectories of cooperation, we created a genetically tractable system that can be observed as it evolves from inception. The system consists of two engineered yeast strains -- a red-fluorescent strain that requires adenine and releases lysine and a yellow-fluorescent strain that requires lysine and releases adenine. Cells that consume but not supply metabolites would be cheaters. From the properties of two cooperating strains, we calculated and experimentally verified the minimal initial cell densities required for the viability of the cooperative system in the absence of exogenously added adenine and lysine. Strikingly, evolved cooperative systems were viable at 100-fold lower initial cell densities than their ancestors. We are investigating the nature and diversity of pro-cooperation changes, the dynamics of cooperator-cheater cocultures, and the effects of spatial environment on cooperation and cheating.

  13. Bubbling AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelli, Dario; Morales, Jose F.

    2005-02-01

    In the light of the recent Lin, Lunin, Maldacena (LLM) results, we investigate 1/2-BPS geometries in minimal (and next to minimal) supergravity in D = 6 dimensions. In the case of minimal supergravity, solutions are given by fibrations of a two-torus T2 specified by two harmonic functions. For a rectangular torus the two functions are related by a non-linear equation with rare solutions: AdS3 × S3, the pp-wave and the multi-center string. ``Bubbling'', i.e. superpositions of droplets, is accommodated by allowing the complex structure of the T2 to vary over the base. The analysis is repeated in the presence of a tensor multiplet and similar conclusions are reached, with generic solutions describing D1D5 (or their dual fundamental string-momentum) systems. In this framework, the profile of the dual fundamental string-momentum system is identified with the boundaries of the droplets in a two-dimensional plane.

  14. Effects of adding aqueous extract of Tribulus terrestris to diet on productive performance, egg quality characteristics, and blood biochemical parameters of laying hens reared under low ambient temperature (6.8 ± 3 °C).

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mohsen; Torki, Mehran

    2016-06-01

    A study was conducted using 144 laying hens to evaluate the effects of adding aqueous extract of Tribulus terrestris to diets on productive performance, egg quality traits, and some blood parameters of laying hens reared under cold stress condition (6.8 ± 3 °C). The birds were randomly assigned to each of four dietary treatments (C, T1, T2, and T3) with six replicate cages of six birds. Diet inclusion of aqueous extract of T. terrestris at the rate of 10, 20, and 30 ml/Lit offered to groups T1, T2, and T3, respectively, while group C served as the control diet with no addition. Feed intake (FI), feed conversion ratio (FCR), egg weight (EW), egg production (EP), and egg mass (EM) were evaluated during the 42-day trial period. The EP and EM increased, whereas FCR decreased (P < 0.001) in the hens fed the extract-included diet as compared to those fed the basal diet. The serum content of cholesterol decreased and the thickness of egg shell increased in the hens fed the T2 and T3 diet compared to those fed the basal diet. Overall from the results of the present experiment, it can be concluded that diet supplementation with aqueous extract of T. terrestris has beneficial effects on productive performance of laying hens reared under cold stress condition. PMID:26471188

  15. Effects of adding aqueous extract of Tribulus terrestris to diet on productive performance, egg quality characteristics, and blood biochemical parameters of laying hens reared under low ambient temperature (6.8 ± 3 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Mohsen; Torki, Mehran

    2015-10-01

    A study was conducted using 144 laying hens to evaluate the effects of adding aqueous extract of Tribulus terrestris to diets on productive performance, egg quality traits, and some blood parameters of laying hens reared under cold stress condition (6.8 ± 3 °C). The birds were randomly assigned to each of four dietary treatments (C, T1, T2, and T3) with six replicate cages of six birds. Diet inclusion of aqueous extract of T. terrestris at the rate of 10, 20, and 30 ml/Lit offered to groups T1, T2, and T3, respectively, while group C served as the control diet with no addition. Feed intake (FI), feed conversion ratio (FCR), egg weight (EW), egg production (EP), and egg mass (EM) were evaluated during the 42-day trial period. The EP and EM increased, whereas FCR decreased (P < 0.001) in the hens fed the extract-included diet as compared to those fed the basal diet. The serum content of cholesterol decreased and the thickness of egg shell increased in the hens fed the T2 and T3 diet compared to those fed the basal diet. Overall from the results of the present experiment, it can be concluded that diet supplementation with aqueous extract of T. terrestris has beneficial effects on productive performance of laying hens reared under cold stress condition.

  16. Effects of adding aqueous extract of Tribulus terrestris to diet on productive performance, egg quality characteristics, and blood biochemical parameters of laying hens reared under low ambient temperature (6.8 ± 3 °C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Mohsen; Torki, Mehran

    2016-06-01

    A study was conducted using 144 laying hens to evaluate the effects of adding aqueous extract of Tribulus terrestris to diets on productive performance, egg quality traits, and some blood parameters of laying hens reared under cold stress condition (6.8 ± 3 °C). The birds were randomly assigned to each of four dietary treatments (C, T1, T2, and T3) with six replicate cages of six birds. Diet inclusion of aqueous extract of T. terrestris at the rate of 10, 20, and 30 ml/Lit offered to groups T1, T2, and T3, respectively, while group C served as the control diet with no addition. Feed intake (FI), feed conversion ratio (FCR), egg weight (EW), egg production (EP), and egg mass (EM) were evaluated during the 42-day trial period. The EP and EM increased, whereas FCR decreased ( P < 0.001) in the hens fed the extract-included diet as compared to those fed the basal diet. The serum content of cholesterol decreased and the thickness of egg shell increased in the hens fed the T2 and T3 diet compared to those fed the basal diet. Overall from the results of the present experiment, it can be concluded that diet supplementation with aqueous extract of T. terrestris has beneficial effects on productive performance of laying hens reared under cold stress condition.

  17. Detailed ultraviolet asymptotics for AdS scalar field perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evnin, Oleg; Jai-akson, Puttarak

    2016-04-01

    We present a range of methods suitable for accurate evaluation of the leading asymptotics for integrals of products of Jacobi polynomials in limits when the degrees of some or all polynomials inside the integral become large. The structures in question have recently emerged in the context of effective descriptions of small amplitude perturbations in anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime. The limit of high degree polynomials corresponds in this situation to effective interactions involving extreme short-wavelength modes, whose dynamics is crucial for the turbulent instabilities that determine the ultimate fate of small AdS perturbations. We explicitly apply the relevant asymptotic techniques to the case of a self-interacting probe scalar field in AdS and extract a detailed form of the leading large degree behavior, including closed form analytic expressions for the numerical coefficients appearing in the asymptotics.

  18. Pexophagy in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Oku, Masahide; Sakai, Yasuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Pexophagy, selective degradation of peroxisomes via autophagy, is the main system for reducing organelle abundance. Elucidation of the molecular machinery of pexophagy has been pioneered in studies of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the methylotrophic yeasts Pichia pastoris and Hansenula polymorpha. Recent analyses using these yeasts have elucidated the molecular machineries of pexophagy, especially in terms of the interactions and modifications of the so-called adaptor proteins required for guiding autophagic membrane biogenesis on the organelle surface. Based on the recent findings, functional relevance of pexophagy and another autophagic pathway, mitophagy (selective autophagy of mitochondria), is discussed. We also discuss the physiological importance of pexophagy in these yeast systems. PMID:26409485

  19. Extraction of squalene as value-added product from the residual biomass of Schizochytrium mangrovei PQ6 during biodiesel producing process.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Minh Hien; Ha, Nguyen Cam; Thom, Le Thi; Tam, Luu Thi; Anh, Hoang Thi Lan; Thu, Ngo Thi Hoai; Hong, Dang Diem

    2014-12-01

    Today microalgae represent a viable alternative source of squalene for commercial application. The species Schizochytrium mangrovei, a heterotrophic microalga, has been widely studied and provides a high amount of squalene, polyunsaturated fatty acids and has good profiles for biodiesel production. Our work was aimed at examining the squalene contents in Vietnam's heterotrophic marine microalga S. mangrovei PQ6 biomass and residues of the biodiesel process from this strain. Thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods were successfully applied to the determination of squalene in S. mangrovei PQ6. The squalene content and production of S. mangrovei PQ6 reached 33.00 ± 0.02 and 33.04 ± 0.03 mg g(-1) of dry cell weight; and 0.992 g L(-1) and 1.019 g L(-1) in 30 and 150 L bioreactors, respectively after 96 h of fermentation. In addition, squalene was also detected in spent biomass (approximately 80.10 ± 0.03 mg g(-1) of spent biomass) from the S. mangrovei PQ6 biodiesel production process. The structure of squalene in residues of the biodiesel process was confirmed from its nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. The results obtained from our work suggest that there is tremendous potential in the exploitation of squalene as a value-added by-product besides biodiesel from S. mangrovei PQ6 to reduce biodiesel price. PMID:24973317

  20. A direct droplet digital PCR method for quantification of residual DNA in protein drugs produced in yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Musaddeq; Fantuzzo, Rebecca; Mercorelli, Suzanne; Cullen, Constance

    2016-05-10

    Yeast cells, in particular Pichia pastoris, are the host cell of choice for manufacturing several protein therapeutic agents in the biopharmaceutical industry. Host cell DNA is an impurity of such manufacturing process and the residual DNA after the purification process of the drug must be monitored to ensure drug purity and safety. Currently, real-time PCR (qPCR) based methods are widely employed for quantification of host residual DNA. At the same time the digital PCR technology is coming into prominence with promise of higher sensitivity. Here we report a method where the protein drug is directly added to the droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) reaction including yeast-specific primers and fluorescent-tagged probe and nanoliter-sized droplets are generated. The droplets are then subjected to PCR followed by analysis for fluorescence. This Pichia residual DNA direct ddPCR method for yeast can be used to test higher amount of drug compared to the corresponding qPCR method thereby increasing sensitivity, retaining high precision and accuracy and has a wide linear range of determination. The method has been successfully tested with three batches of a recombinant human IgG1-Fc-based drug (RP-1) and with commercially available human insulin, both manufactured in yeast cells. This method simplifies the residual DNA quantification protocol by eliminating DNA extraction or protease digestion and eliminates use of DNA standards in day-to-day running of the method. PMID:26896631

  1. Detection and identification of wild yeasts in lager breweries.

    PubMed

    van der Aa Kühle, A; Jespersen, L

    1998-09-01

    Wild yeasts were detected in 41 out of 101 brewery yeast samples investigated using six different selective principles. Malt extract, yeast extract, glucose, peptone (MYGP) agar supplemented with 195 ppm CuSO4 was found to be the most effective selective principle, detecting wild yeasts in 80% of the contaminated samples. Both Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces wild yeasts were detected on this medium. Lysine medium, crystal violet medium and incubation of non-selective media at 37 degrees C detected wild yeasts in 46-56% of the contaminated samples. On using actidione medium, only 20% of the wild yeasts were detected. The combined use of MYGP supplemented with 195 ppm CuSO4 and one of the other selective principles did not improve the recovery of the wild yeasts. The wild yeasts found consisted of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (57%), Pichia spp. (28%) and Candida spp. (15%). Using the API ID 32 C kit, 35 different assimilation profiles were obtained for the 124 wild yeast isolates investigated. All isolates were capable of glucose assimilation, whereas only 79% of the isolates assimilated saccharose, 75% maltose, 70% galactose, 65% raffinose and 65% lactate. Lactose, inositol, rhamnose and glucuronate were not assimilated by any of the isolates. The differences in assimilation pattern did not reflect any differences in recovery by the selective principles investigated. The majority of the wild yeast isolates investigated were capable of growth in wort and beer, indicating their possible role as spoilage organisms. The Sacch. cerevisiae isolates were found to be the most hazardous, with some isolates being capable of extensive growth in bottled beer within seventeen days at ambient temperature. PMID:9801196

  2. Effects of adding a concentrated pomegranate-residue extract to the ration of lactating cows on in vivo digestibility and profile of rumen bacterial population.

    PubMed

    Jami, E; Shabtay, A; Nikbachat, M; Yosef, E; Miron, J; Mizrahi, I

    2012-10-01

    This study characterizes the effects of concentrated pomegranate-peel extract (CPE) addition to the TMR at levels of 1, 2, or 4% on voluntary intake, in vivo digestibility, milk yield and composition, and profile of rumen bacterial and archaeal populations in lactating Holstein cows. Supplementation of CPE significantly affected the abundance of methanogenic archaea and specific ruminal bacterial species related to cellulolytic activities and soluble sugar and lactic acid fermentation, as revealed by real-time PCR quantification. Furthermore, CPE supplementation had a significant dose-dependent effect on the whole ruminal bacterial community, as determined by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis. These changes were accompanied by a significant increase in digestibility of dry matter, crude protein, and neutral detergent fiber, as well as milk and energy-corrected milk yields in cows fed the 4% CPE supplement. These results suggest that CPE supplementation significantly affects the rumen bacterial communities, which in turn may be related to a beneficial effect on dairy cow performance. PMID:22863105

  3. Effect of Yeast Hulls on Stuck and Sluggish Wine Fermentations: Importance of the Lipid Component

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Eeva; Ingledew, W. M.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of yeast hulls (yeast ghosts) on sluggish or stuck white wine fermentations was studied. The enhancing effect on yeast growth and fermentation rate displayed by the hulls was shown to be similar to the effect provided by lipid extract from the same hulls. Unsaturated fatty acids and sterols were incorporated into the yeast from lipid extracts during fermentation carried out under oxygen-limited conditions. Adsorption of toxic medium-chain fatty acid (decanoic acid) onto the yeast hulls took place through a dialysis membrane. However, when the hulls were placed inside a dialysis bag, the increase in yeast growth and fermentation rate seen when freely suspended hulls were used did not occur. Accordingly, the effect of yeast hulls in preventing stuck fermentations cannot be attributed only to the adsorption and consequent removal of medium-chain fatty acids from the juice. PMID:16347950

  4. High power density yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Rahul

    Microbial fuel cells leverage whole cell biocatalysis to convert the energy stored in energy-rich renewable biomolecules such as sugar, directly to electrical energy at high efficiencies. Advantages of the process include ambient temperature operation, operation in natural streams such as wastewater without the need to clean electrodes, minimal balance-of-plant requirements compared to conventional fuel cells, and environmentally friendly operation. These make the technology very attractive as portable power sources and waste-to-energy converters. The principal problem facing the technology is the low power densities compared to other conventional portable power sources such as batteries and traditional fuel cells. In this work we examined the yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cell and developed methods to increase the power density from such fuel cells. A combination of cyclic voltammetry and optical absorption measurements were used to establish significant adsorption of electron mediators by the microbes. Mediator adsorption was demonstrated to be an important limitation in achieving high power densities in yeast-catalyzed microbial fuel cells. Specifically, the power densities are low for the length of time mediator adsorption continues to occur. Once the mediator adsorption stops, the power densities increase. Rotating disk chronoamperometry was used to extract reaction rate information, and a simple kinetic expression was developed for the current observed in the anodic half-cell. Since the rate expression showed that the current was directly related to microbe concentration close to the electrode, methods to increase cell mass attached to the anode was investigated. Electrically biased electrodes were demonstrated to develop biofilm-like layers of the Baker's yeast with a high concentration of cells directly connected to the electrode. The increased cell mass did increase the power density 2 times compared to a non biofilm fuel cell, but the power density

  5. Optimized Affinity Capture of Yeast Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    LaCava, John; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Hakhverdyan, Zhanna; Rout, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe an affinity isolation protocol. It uses cryomilled yeast cell powder for producing cell extracts and antibody-conjugated paramagnetic beads for affinity capture. Guidelines for determining the optimal extraction solvent composition are provided. Captured proteins are eluted in a denaturing solvent (sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis sample buffer) for gel-based proteomic analyses. Although the procedures can be modified to use other sources of cell extract and other forms of affinity media, to date we have consistently obtained the best results with the method presented. PMID:27371596

  6. [Determination of riboflavin kinase activity in yeast].

    PubMed

    Shavlovsky, G M; Kashchenko, V E

    1975-01-01

    It is established that the main reason of the riboflavin kinase (RFK, EC 2.7.1.26) low specific activity in the cell-free extracts of the yeast Pichia guillermondii Wickerham ATCC 9058 is the presence of alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1), effectively destructing flaven mononucleotide. By chromatography of the cell-free extracts of P. guillermondii on DEAE-Sephadex A-50, CM-Sphadex C-50, CM-cellulose, Sephadexes G-75 and G-100 RFK and alkaline phosphatase may be separated completely. Any of these procedures results in a several times increase of the RFK activity as compared with the initial preparation. One failed to obtain a similar effect by fractionation of the extracts with amminium sulphate and by hydroxylapatite chromatography. A simple method is developed for determining the activity of RFK in the cell-free extracts of yeast on the basis of negative adsorption of this enzyme on DEAE-Sephadex A-50. A selective inhibition of alkaline phosphatase by ions Be2+ and F- yields a less satisfactory result. The data are presented on the PFK activity of certain species of flavinogenic (Pichia guillermondii, Torulopsis camdida) and non-flavinogenic (Pichia ohmeri, Candida utilis, Saccharomyces cervisiae) yeast. PMID:174262

  7. A yeast transcription system for the 5S rRNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    van Keulen, H; Thomas, D Y

    1982-01-01

    A cell-free extract of yeast nuclei that can specifically transcribe cloned yeast 5S rRNA genes has been developed. Optima for transcription of 5S rDNA were determined and conditions of extract preparation leading to reproducible activities and specificities established. The major in vitro product has the same size and oligonucleotide composition as in vivo 5S rRNA. The in vitro transcription extract does not transcribe yeast tRNA genes. The extract does increase the transcription of tRNA genes packaged in chromatin. Images PMID:7145700

  8. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing

  9. Yeast Biomass Production in Brewery's Spent Grains Hemicellulosic Hydrolyzate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Luís C.; Carvalheiro, Florbela; Lopes, Sónia; Neves, Ines; Gírio, Francisco M.

    Yeast single-cell protein and yeast extract, in particular, are two products which have many feed, food, pharmaceutical, and biotechnological applications. However, many of these applications are limited by their market price. Specifically, the yeast extract requirements for culture media are one of the major technical hurdles to be overcome for the development of low-cost fermentation routes for several top value chemicals in a biorefinery framework. A potential biotechnical solution is the production of yeast biomass from the hemicellulosic fraction stream. The growth of three pentose-assimilating yeast cell factories, Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces marxianus, and Pichia stipitis was compared using non-detoxified brewery's spent grains hemicellulosic hydrolyzate supplemented with mineral nutrients. The yeasts exhibited different specific growth rates, biomass productivities, and yields being D. hansenii as the yeast species that presented the best performance, assimilating all sugars and noteworthy consuming most of the hydrolyzate inhibitors. Under optimized conditions, D. hansenii displayed a maximum specific growth rate, biomass yield, and productivity of 0.34 h-1, 0.61 g g-1, and 0.56 g 1-1 h-1, respectively. The nutritional profile of D. hansenii was thoroughly evaluated, and it compares favorably to others reported in literature. It contains considerable amounts of some essential amino acids and a high ratio of unsaturated over saturated fatty acids.

  10. Forces in yeast flocculation

    PubMed Central

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Flos, Marta Abellán; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2014-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (“flocculation”) is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding. PMID:25515338

  11. Forces in yeast flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (``flocculation'') is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  12. A method for the determination of the cellular phosphorylation potential and glycolytic intermediates in yeast.

    PubMed

    Wallace, P G; Pedler, S M; Wallace, J C; Berry, M N

    1994-11-01

    A method is described for rapidly quenching metabolism in yeast and extracting metabolites for analysis. The saponin digitonin is used to permeabilize the yeast cell membrane, in conjunction with perchloric acid (PCA) to quench metabolism and extract metabolites. Using this digitonin-PCA quench and extraction procedure, we have determined ATP concentrations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the range 2.89-3.39 mM, [ATP]/[ADP] ratios of 4.5-6.6, and phosphorylation potentials of 48.7-49.9 kJ.mol-1. A direct comparison with the currently accepted freeze/grind PCA/thaw procedure for extraction of yeast cell metabolites shows that essentially the same values are obtained by both techniques. The digitonin-PCA quench extraction method, used in conjunction with automated enzymatic analyses of metabolites, allows rapid extraction and analysis of large numbers of samples and metabolites and hence permits detailed investigations of intermediary metabolism in yeast. PMID:7864365

  13. Comparison of six DNA extraction methods for recovery of fungal DNA as assessed by quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Fredricks, David N; Smith, Caitlin; Meier, Amalia

    2005-10-01

    The detection of fungal pathogens in clinical samples by PCR requires the use of extraction methods that efficiently lyse fungal cells and recover DNA suitable for amplification. We used quantitative PCR assays to measure the recovery of DNA from two important fungal pathogens subjected to six DNA extraction methods. Aspergillus fumigatus conidia or Candida albicans yeast cells were added to bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and subjected to DNA extraction in order to assess the recovery of DNA from a defined number of fungal propagules. In order to simulate hyphal growth in tissue, Aspergillus fumigatus conidia were allowed to form mycelia in tissue culture media and then harvested for DNA extraction. Differences among the DNA yields from the six extraction methods were highly significant (P<0.0001) in each of the three experimental systems. An extraction method based on enzymatic lysis of fungal cell walls (yeast cell lysis plus the use of GNOME kits) produced high levels of fungal DNA with Candida albicans but low levels of fungal DNA with Aspergillus fumigatus conidia or hyphae. Extraction methods employing mechanical agitation with beads produced the highest yields with Aspergillus hyphae. The Master Pure yeast method produced high levels of DNA from C. albicans but only moderate yields from A. fumigatus. A reagent from one extraction method was contaminated with fungal DNA, including DNA from Aspergillus and Candida species. In conclusion, the six extraction methods produce markedly differing yields of fungal DNA and thus can significantly affect the results of fungal PCR assays. No single extraction method was optimal for all organisms. PMID:16207973

  14. Polarised black holes in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Miguel S.; Greenspan, Lauren; Oliveira, Miguel; Penedones, João; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-06-01

    We consider solutions in Einstein-Maxwell theory with a negative cosmological constant that asymptote to global AdS 4 with conformal boundary {S}2× {{{R}}}t. At the sphere at infinity we turn on a space-dependent electrostatic potential, which does not destroy the asymptotic AdS behaviour. For simplicity we focus on the case of a dipolar electrostatic potential. We find two new geometries: (i) an AdS soliton that includes the full backreaction of the electric field on the AdS geometry; (ii) a polarised neutral black hole that is deformed by the electric field, accumulating opposite charges in each hemisphere. For both geometries we study boundary data such as the charge density and the stress tensor. For the black hole we also study the horizon charge density and area, and further verify a Smarr formula. Then we consider this system at finite temperature and compute the Gibbs free energy for both AdS soliton and black hole phases. The corresponding phase diagram generalizes the Hawking-Page phase transition. The AdS soliton dominates the low temperature phase and the black hole the high temperature phase, with a critical temperature that decreases as the external electric field increases. Finally, we consider the simple case of a free charged scalar field on {S}2× {{{R}}}t with conformal coupling. For a field in the SU(N ) adjoint representation we compare the phase diagram with the above gravitational system.

  15. Mapping Yeast Transcriptional Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Timothy R.; de Boer, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    The term “transcriptional network” refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face. For most yeast TFs, data have been collected on their sequence preferences, in vivo promoter occupancy, and gene expression profiles in deletion mutants. These systematic studies have led to the identification of new regulators of numerous cellular functions and shed light on the overall organization of yeast gene regulation. However, many yeast TFs appear to be inactive under standard laboratory growth conditions, and many of the available data were collected using techniques that have since been improved. Perhaps as a consequence, comprehensive and accurate mapping among TF sequence preferences, promoter binding, and gene expression remains an open challenge. We propose that the time is ripe for renewed systematic efforts toward a complete mapping of yeast transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. PMID:24018767

  16. Yeasts in spa establishments.

    PubMed

    Svorcová, L

    1982-05-01

    It was investigated occurrence of yeasts on bathsurfaces, in sauna rooms, in swimming and therapeutic pool water. The number of yeasts decreased depending on patients age, if the rooms were furnished with bath. The lowest contamination was found after bath of 40-60 years-old women. In the saunas were yeasts not found on the upper benches with temperature above 55 degrees C. Much higher counts on lower benches and wood mats with temperature 35-40 degrees C, on basin walls and bottom-up to 10(4)-10(6)/100 cm2. It was isolated 172 yeast strains. The occurrence of some selected strains is given in Table 7, with the toxic effect of disinfectants. The most strains were resistant to Peracetic acid and Chloramin B. Since most of the isolated and determinated strains were found in contaminated environment or during various diseases, the yeasts of the genus Cryptococcus, Candida, Rhodotorula, Torulopsis and Metschnikowia should not occur in bath establishment, and should be classified among indicators of contamination of environment including water. PMID:7124167

  17. Yeast killer systems.

    PubMed Central

    Magliani, W; Conti, S; Gerloni, M; Bertolotti, D; Polonelli, L

    1997-01-01

    The killer phenomenon in yeasts has been revealed to be a multicentric model for molecular biologists, virologists, phytopathologists, epidemiologists, industrial and medical microbiologists, mycologists, and pharmacologists. The surprisingly widespread occurrence of the killer phenomenon among taxonomically unrelated microorganisms, including prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, has engendered a new interest in its biological significance as well as its theoretical and practical applications. The search for therapeutic opportunities by using yeast killer systems has conceptually opened new avenues for the prevention and control of life-threatening fungal diseases through the idiotypic network that is apparently exploited by the immune system in the course of natural infections. In this review, the biology, ecology, epidemiology, therapeutics, serology, and idiotypy of yeast killer systems are discussed. PMID:9227858

  18. [Fructose transporter in yeasts].

    PubMed

    Lazar, Zbigniew; Dobrowolski, Adam; Robak, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Study of hexoses transporter started with discovery of galactose permease in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Glucose, fructose and mannose assimilation is assumed by numerous proteins encoded by different genes. To date over 20 hexoses transporters, belonging to Sugar Porter family and to Major Facilitator Superfamily, were known. Genome sequence analysis of Candida glabrata, Kluyveromyces lactis, Yarrowia lipolytica, S. cerevisaie and Debaryomyces hansenii reveled potential presence of 17-48 sugar porter proteins. Glucose transporters in S. cerevisiae have been already characterized. In this paper, hexoses transporters, responsible for assimilation of fructose by cells, are presented and compared. Fructose specific transporter are described for yeasts: Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, Zygosaccharomyces bailli, K. lactis, Saccharomyces pastorianus, S. cerevisiae winemaking strain and for fungus Botritys cinerea and human (Glut5p). Among six yeasts transporters, five are fructose specific, acting by facilitated diffusion or proton symport. Yeasts monosaccharides transporter studies allow understanding of sugars uptake and metabolism important aspects, even in higher eukaryotes cells. PMID:25033548

  19. Evolutionary history of Ascomyceteous Yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts are important for many industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 20 ascomyceteous yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina. A comp...

  20. Genetics of Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querol, Amparo; Fernández-Espinar, M. Teresa; Belloch, Carmela

    The use of yeasts in biotechnology processes dates back to ancient days. Before 7000 BC, beer was produced in Sumeria. Wine was made in Assyria in 3500 BC, and ancient Rome had over 250 bakeries, which were making leavened bread by 100 BC. And milk has been made into Kefyr and Koumiss in Asia for many centuries (Demain, Phaff, & Kurtzman, 1999). However, the importance of yeast in the food and beverage industries was only realized about 1860, when their role in food manufacturing became evident.

  1. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric; Suominen, Pirkko

    2010-12-07

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains. ##STR00001##

  2. Preparation and performance of immobilized yeast cells in columns containing no inert carrier. [Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, H.Y.; Chiang, L.C.; Yang, C.M.; Chen, L.F.; Tsao, G.T.

    1983-02-01

    Schizosaccharomyes pombe was cultivated in a medium of glucose (10 g/l), malt extract (3 g/l), yeast extract (3 g/l), and bactopeptone (5 g/l) to form flocs. More than 95% of the cell population were flocculated. Variation in glucose concentration (from 10 to 11 g/l) did not affect flocculation. Yeast extract helped induce flocculation. Application of the immobilized yeast for the continuous production of ethanol was tested in a column reactor. Soft yeast flocs (50-200 mesh) underwent morphological changes to heavy particles (0.1-9.3 cm diameter) after continuously being fed with fresh substrates in the column. Productivity as high as 87 g EtOH/l/hour was obtained when a 150 g/l glucose medium was fed. The performance of this yeast reactor was stable over a two-month period. The ethanol yield was 97% of the theoretical maximum based upon glucose consumed. (Refs. 16).

  3. Microbiological Characteristics and Physiological Functionality of New Records of Yeasts from Wild Flowers in Yokjido, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Se-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Two new yeast records, Cryptococcus adeliensis YJ19-2 and Cryptococcus uzbekistanensis YJ10-4 were screened from 60 yeasts strains that were isolated and identified from wild flowers in Yokjido, Gyeongsangnam-do, Korea. The morphological and cultural characteristics of the newly recorded yeasts and the physiological functionalities of the supernatants and cell-free extracts obtained from their cultures were investigated. The two newly recorded yeasts did not form ascospores and pseudomycelia. They also grew well in yeast extract-peptone-dextrose broth. C. uzbekistanensis YJ10-4 grew in a vitamin-free medium and was also tolerant to sugar and salt. Antihypertensive angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of the supernatant from C. adeliensis YJ19-2 was high (71.8%) and its cell-free extract also showed very high (81.2%) antidiabetic á-glucosidase inhibitory activity. PMID:25071392

  4. Conversion of pentoses by yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, C.S.; Claypool, T.A.; Maun, C.M.; Mccracken, L.D.; Tsao, G.T.; Ueng, P.P.

    1983-01-01

    The utilization and conversion of D-xylose, D-xyulose, L-arabinose, and xylitol by yeast strains have been investigated with the following results: 1) The majority of yeasts tested utilize D-xylose and produce polyols, ethanol, and organic acids. The type and amount of products formed varies with the yeast strains used. The most commonly detected product is xylitol. 2) The majority of yeasts tested utilize D-xylulose aerobically and fermentatively to produce ethanol, xylitol D-arabitol, and organic acids. The type and amount of products varies depending upon the yeast strains used. 3) Xylitol is a poor carbon and energy source for most yeasts tested. Some yeast strains produce small amounts of ethanol from xylitol. 4) Most yeast strains utilize L-arabinose, and L-arabitol is the common product. Small amounts of ethanol are also produced by some yeast strains. 5) Of the four substrates examined, D-xylulose was the preferred substrate, followed by D-xylose, L-arabinose, and xylitol. 6) Mutant yeast strains that exhibit different metabolic product patterns can be induced and isolated from Candida sp. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and other yeasts. These mutant strains can be used for ethanol production from D-xylose as well as for the study of metabolic regulation of pentose utilization in yeasts.

  5. Fast and sensitive detection of genetically modified yeasts in wine.

    PubMed

    León, Carlos; García-Cañas, Virginia; González, Ramón; Morales, Pilar; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2011-10-21

    In this work, a novel screening methodology based on the combined use of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and capillary gel electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence (CGE-LIF) is developed for the fast and sensitive detection of genetically modified yeasts in wine. As model, a recombinant EKD-13 Saccaromyces cerevisiae strain was selected and different wines were prepared using either recombinant or conventional yeasts. Special emphasis is put on the yeast DNA extraction step, exploring different commercial and non-commercial methods, in order to overcome the important difficulty of obtaining amplifiable DNA from wine samples. To unequivocally detect the transgenic yeast, two specific segments of the transgenic construction were amplified. In addition, a third primer pair was used as amplification control to confirm the quality of the yeast DNA obtained from the extraction step. CGE-LIF provides high sensitivity, good analysis speed and impressive resolution of DNA fragments, making this technique very convenient to optimize multiplex PCR parameters and to analyze the amplified DNA fragments. Thus, the CGE-LIF method provided %RSD values for DNA migration times lower than 0.82% (n=10) with the same capillary and lower than 1.92% (n=15) with three different capillaries, allowing the adequate size determination of the PCR products with an error lower than 4% compared to the theoretically expected. The whole method developed in this work requires less than one working day and grants the sensitive detection of transgenic yeasts in wine samples. PMID:21296357

  6. Increasing alcohol yield by selected yeast fermentation of sweet sorghum. I. Evaluation of yeast strains for ethanol production

    SciTech Connect

    de Mancilha, I.M.; Pearson, A.M.; Waller, J.; Hogaboam, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    A study was conducted for the purpose of evaluating and selecting yeast strains for their ability to produce ethanol using sweet sorghum juice as the substrate. Stalks of sweet sorghum were obtained by cutting off the tops and stripping away the leaves. Fermentation media were prepared by diluting or adding dextrose to the sorghum juice to give a sugar concentration of either 10% (w/v) or 20% (w/v). All yeast strains were first tested in 10% (w/v) total sugar medium. Those strains showing more than 90% sugar conversion efficiency were further tested in 20% (w/v) total sugar medium. Active cultures for inoculation were prepared by growing the yeast strains on the fermentation medium (10% (w/v) total sugar) for 24 h. Then the cultures were added to the fermentation media at a rate of 2%.

  7. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otabe, E. S.; Kuroki, S.; Nikawa, J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ooba, T.; Kiso, K.; Hayashi, H.

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 ±0.2 x 106/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, ρ, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by ρ = ρo exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  8. Opportunistic Pathogenic Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Uma

    Advances in medical research, made during the last few decades, have improved the prophylactic, diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities for variety of infections/diseases. However, many of the prophylactic and therapeutic procedures have been seen in many instances to exact a price of host-vulnerability to an expanding group of opportunistic pathogens and yeasts are one of the important members in it. Fortunately amongst the vast majority of yeasts present in nature only few are considered to have the capability to cause infections when certain opportunities predisposes and these are termed as ‘opportunistic pathogenic yeasts.’ However, the term ‘pathogenic’ is quite tricky, as it depends of various factors of the host, the ‘bug’ and the environment to manifest the clinical infection. The borderline is expanding. In the present century with unprecedented increase in number of immune-compromised host in various disciplines of health care settings, where any yeast, which has the capability to grow at 37 ° C (normal body temperature of human), can be pathogenic and cause infection in particular situation

  9. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2014-09-23

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  10. L-arabinose fermenting yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Min; Singh, Arjun; Suominen, Pirkko; Knoshaug, Eric; Franden, Mary Ann; Jarvis, Eric

    2013-02-12

    An L-arabinose utilizing yeast strain is provided for the production of ethanol by introducing and expressing bacterial araA, araB and araD genes. L-arabinose transporters are also introduced into the yeast to enhance the uptake of arabinose. The yeast carries additional genomic mutations enabling it to consume L-arabinose, even as the only carbon source, and to produce ethanol. A yeast strain engineered to metabolize arabinose through a novel pathway is also disclosed. Methods of producing ethanol include utilizing these modified yeast strains.

  11. Intracellular accumulation of ethanol in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Loueiro, V.; Ferreira, H.G.

    1983-09-01

    Ethanol produced in the course of a batch fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae or added from the outside, affects adversely the specific rate of growth of the yeast population, its viability, its specific rate of fermentation, and the specific rates of the uptake of sugar and amino acids. The underlying mechanisms are many and include irreversible denaturation and hyperbolic noncompetitive inhibition of glycolytic enzymes, the exponential noncompetitive inhibition of glucose, maltose, and ammonium transport, the depression of the optimum and the maximum temperature for growth, the increase of the minimum temperature for growth, and the enhancement of thermal death and petite mutation. Nagodawithana and Steinkraus reported that added ethanol was less toxic for S. cerevisiae than ethanol produced by the yeast. The death rates were lower in the presence of added ethanol than those measured at similar external ethanol concentrations endogenously produced. They proposed that, due to an unbalance between the rates of production and the net outflux of ethanol, there would be an intracellular accumulation of ethanol which in turn would explain the apparently greater inhibitory potency of endogenously produced ethanol present in the medium. This hypothesis was supported by the findings of several authors who reported that the intracellular concentration of ethanol, in the course of batch fermentation, is much higher than its concentration in the extracellular medium. The present work is an attempt to clarify this matter. (Refs. 32).

  12. Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Léger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Videlier, Mathieu; Camadro, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Label-free bottom-up shotgun MS-based proteomics is an extremely powerful and simple tool to provide high quality quantitative analyses of the yeast proteome with only microgram amounts of total protein. Although the experimental design of this approach is rather straightforward and does not require the modification of growth conditions, proteins or peptides, several factors must be taken into account to benefit fully from the power of this method. Key factors include the choice of an appropriate method for the preparation of protein extracts, careful evaluation of the instrument design and available analytical capabilities, the choice of the quantification method (intensity-based vs. spectral count), and the proper manipulation of the selected quantification algorithm. The elaboration of this robust workflow for data acquisition, processing, and analysis provides unprecedented insight into the dynamics of the yeast proteome. PMID:26483028

  13. Smeared antibranes polarise in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautason, Fridrik Freyr; Truijen, Brecht; Van Riet, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    In the recent literature it has been questioned whether the local backreaction of antibranes in flux throats can induce a perturbative brane-flux decay. Most evidence for this can be gathered for D6 branes and D p branes smeared over 6 - p compact directions, in line with the absence of finite temperature solutions for these cases. The solutions in the literature have flat worldvolume geometries and non-compact transversal spaces. In this paper we consider what happens when the worldvolume is AdS and the transversal space is compact. We show that in these circumstances brane polarisation smoothens out the flux singularity, which is an indication that brane-flux decay is prevented. This is consistent with the fact that the cosmological constant would be less negative after brane-flux decay. Our results extend recent results on AdS7 solutions from D6 branes to AdS p+1 solutions from D p branes. We show that supersymmetry of the AdS solutions depend on p non-trivially.

  14. AdS orbifolds and Penrose limits

    SciTech Connect

    Alishahiha, Mohsen; Sheikh-Jabbari, Mohammad M.; Tatar, Radu

    2002-12-09

    In this paper we study the Penrose limit of AdS{sub 5} orbifolds. The orbifold can be either in the pure spatial directions or space and time directions. For the AdS{sub 5}/{Lambda} x S{sup 5} spatial orbifold we observe that after the Penrose limit we obtain the same result as the Penrose limit of AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 5}/{Lambda}. We identify the corresponding BMN operators in terms of operators of the gauge theory on R x S{sup 3}/{Lambda}. The semi-classical description of rotating strings in these backgrounds have also been studied. For the spatial AdS orbifold we show that in the quadratic order the obtained action for the fluctuations is the same as that in S{sup 5} orbifold, however, the higher loop correction can distinguish between two cases.

  15. New yeast study finds strength in numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, J.

    1996-06-07

    This article reports on the debate about whether the modern industrial society is producing hormonelike pollutants that can interfere with human reproductions, including pesticides, the plastic ingredient bisphenol-A and some polychlorinated biphenyls. A recent article has added fuel to the debate by presenting results that indicate a mixture of two weakly estrogenic chemicals can be far more potent than individual compounds, using a screening system based on genetically engineered yeast cells. The debate may need to be taken into account by a USEPA advisory panel now being formed to come up with in vitro tests to screen for environmental estrogens.

  16. Binding kinetics of magnetic nanoparticles on latex beads and yeast cells studied by magnetorelaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberbeck, Dietmar; Bergemann, Christian; Hartwig, Stefan; Steinhoff, Uwe; Trahms, Lutz

    2005-03-01

    The ion exchange mediated binding of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) to modified latex spheres and yeast cells was quantified using magnetorelaxometry. By fitting subsequently recorded relaxation curves, the kinetics of the binding reactions was extracted. The signal of MNP with weak ion exchanger groups bound to latex and yeast cells scales linearly with the concentration of latex beads or yeast cells whereas that of MNP with strong ion exchanger groups is proportional to the square root of concentration. The binding of the latter leads to a much stronger aggregation of yeast cells than the former MNP.

  17. Extracellular Polysaccharides Produced by Yeasts and Yeast-Like Fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bogaert, Inge N. A.; de Maeseneire, Sofie L.; Vandamme, Erick J.

    Several yeasts and yeast-like fungi are known to produce extracellular polysaccharides. Most of these contain D-mannose, either alone or in combination with other sugars or phosphate. A large chemical and structural variability is found between yeast species and even among different strains. The types of polymers that are synthesized can be chemically characterized as mannans, glucans, phosphoman-nans, galactomannans, glucomannans and glucuronoxylomannans. Despite these differences, almost all of the yeast exopolysaccharides display some sort of biological activity. Some of them have already applications in chemistry, pharmacy, cosmetics or as probiotic. Furthermore, some yeast exopolysaccharides, such as pullulan, exhibit specific physico-chemical and rheological properties, making them useful in a wide range of technical applications. A survey is given here of the production, the characteristics and the application potential of currently well studied yeast extracellular polysaccharides.

  18. Iron toxicity in yeast.

    PubMed

    Wiśnicka, R; Krzepiłko, A; Wawryn, J; Biliński, T

    1997-01-01

    It has been found that yeast cells are sensitive to iron overload only when grown on glucose as a carbon source. Effective concentration of ferrous iron is much higher than that found in natural environments. Effects of ferrous iron are strictly oxygen dependent, what suggest that the formation of hydroxyl radicals in the Fenton reaction is a cause of the toxicity. Respiratory deficiency and pretreatment of cells with antimycin A prevent toxic effects in the late exponential phase of growth, whereas uncouplers and 2mM magnesium salts completely protect even the most vulnerable exponential cells. Generally, toxic effects correlate with the ability of cells to take up this metal. The results presented suggest that during ferrous iron overload iron is transported through the unspecific divalent cation uptake system which is known in fungi. The data suggest that recently described high and low affinity systems of iron uptake in yeast are the only source of iron in natural environments. PMID:9516981

  19. Water Transport in Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Farzana; Prista, Catarina; Madeira, Ana; Moura, Teresa; Loureiro-Dias, Maria C; Soveral, Graça

    2016-01-01

    Water moves across membranes through the lipid bilayer and through aquaporins, in this case in a regulated manner. Aquaporins belong to the MIP superfamily and two subfamilies are represented in yeasts: orthodox aquaporins considered to be specific water channels and aquaglyceroporins (heterodox aquaporins). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, four aquaporin isoforms were identified, two of which are genetically close to orthodox aquaporins (ScAqy1 and ScAqy2) and the other two are more closely related to the aquaglyceroporins (ScFps1 and ScAqy3). Advances in the establishment of water channels structure are reviewed in this chapter in relation with the mechanisms of selectivity, conductance and gating. Aquaporins are important for key aspects of yeast physiology. They have been shown to be involved in sporulation, rapid freeze-thaw tolerance, osmo-sensitivity, and modulation of cell surface properties and colony morphology, although the underlying exact mechanisms are still unknown. PMID:26721272

  20. [Technology for the whole utilization of brewer's yeast in food industry].

    PubMed

    Otero, M A; Cabello, A; Vasallo, M C; García, L; López, J

    2000-12-01

    A flexible scheme for the fractionation of brewer's yeast was developed. The procedure allows the production of different products such as: dry yeast flakes, dry yeast pills, yeast-extract based table sauce, yeast protein concentrates and soy-like sauce. The investment required for the processing of one ton per day is below 2 million dollars with an overall profitability higher than 53%. Investment is recovered in 0.75 years. The production of food ingredients from yeast upgrades its biomass about 25 fold. Present procedure is compared with other biomass fractionation processes taking into account the utilization of all technological streams where the process becomes environmentally friendly since effluent production significantly lower than similar technologies. PMID:11464667

  1. Alcohol production from Jerusalem artichoke using yeasts with inulinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Guiraud, J.P.; Daurelles, J.; Galzy, P.

    1981-07-01

    The obtaining of a fermentable extract from Jerusalem artichoke is simple. Yeasts with inulinase activity can be used to produce ethanol with good profitability. This method makes it possible to obtain 25 to 65 hl ethanol/ha with by-products usable as feed. (Refs. 19).

  2. Immunoprecipitation and Characterization of Membrane Protein Complexes from Yeast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parra-Belky, Karlett; McCulloch, Kathryn; Wick, Nicole; Shircliff, Rebecca; Croft, Nicolas; Margalef, Katrina; Brown, Jamie; Crabill, Todd; Jankord, Ryan; Waldo, Eric

    2005-01-01

    In this undergraduate biochemistry laboratory experiment, the vacuolar ATPase protein complex is purified from yeast cell extracts by doing immunoprecipitations under nondenaturing conditions. Immunoprecipitations are performed using monoclonal antibodies to facilitate data interpretation, and subunits are separated on the basis of their molecular…

  3. Production of alcohol from Jerusalem artichokes by yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Duvnjak, Z.; Kosaric, N.; Kliza, S.; Hayes, D.

    1982-11-01

    Various yeasts such as several strains of Saccharomyces diastaticus, S. cerevisiae, and Kluyveromyces fragilis were investigated for their ability to ferment the carbohydrates from Jerusalem artichokes to alcohol. Juice extracted from the artichokes was used as the fermentation substrate with and without prior hydrolysis of the carbohydrates. Fermentation was also carried out with raw artichokes without prior juice extraction. Results indicate that this raw material has good potential for fuel alcohol production by fermentation. (Refs. 15).

  4. Design and construction of two yeast shuttle vectors containing human procollagen genes expression cassette for expression in yeast.

    PubMed

    Abdemami, Baharak; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Shahreza, Hossein Khanahmad; Ghavami, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant proteins in the human body. Their main function is to provide structural and mechanical support for the tissues, but they are also involved in a number of other biological functions including cell attachment, migration and differentiation. Collagens and gelatins are widely used in pharmaceutical and medical applications. Every year, more than 50,000 tons of collagen and gelatin are used in medical applications. These materials may have some viral and prion impurity and/or stimulate allergic response in human body. Therefore, scientists have produced human collagen in recombinant systems. In this study we have constructed two yeast shuttle vectors containing human procollagen genes expression cassette for expression in yeast. Total RNA was extracted from human skin fibroblast cell line, and cDNA synthesis was done by oligo dt. Then gene fragments were amplified from the cDNA with the necessary changes by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Finally they were cloned in yeast vector pPICZαA containing regulatory sequences for expressing and secreting the polypeptide product. Two yeast shuttle vectors containing human COL1A1 and COL1A2 expression cassettes were created. Final constructs were confirmed by enzymatic digestion, PCR of desired fragment and sequencing. The yeast shuttle vectors containing human COL1A1 and COL1A2 can be transferred into the yeast in the later stages to determine the scale of expression. PMID:23407617

  5. Evaluation of the ability of partially autolyzed yeast and Grobiotic-A to improve disease resistance in rainbow trout.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the ability of partially autolyzed yeast and Grobiotic-A to improve immune response and disease resistance in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Experimental diets were prepared by adding partially autolyzed yeast or Grobiotic-A to a practical trout diet at the manufacturer-recommended ...

  6. Effects of Yeast Oligosaccharide Diet Supplements on Growth and Disease Resistance in Juvenile Nile Tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercially available yeast, and yeast subcomponents consisting mainly of beta-glucan or oligosaccharide feed additives, were added to diets of juvenile (12-18g) Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) at rates recommended by suppliers. Three experiments followed a basic protocol with varied rates of...

  7. Antimicrobial activity of Epilobium spp. extracts.

    PubMed

    Battinelli, L; Tita, B; Evandri, M G; Mazzanti, G

    2001-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of the Epilobium angustifolium, E. hirsutum, E. palustre, E. tetragonum and E. rosmarinifolium ethanolic extracts was studied in vitro on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The cytotoxicity of the extracts was also evaluated using the Artemia salina test. All the extracts showed antimicrobial activity in a range of concentrations between 10 and 650 microgml of dry extract. E. angustifolium and E. rosmarinifolium had the most broad spectrum of action inhibiting bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The extracts were devoid of toxicity on Artemia salina within the range of antimicrobial concentrations, suggesting that the action is selective on microorganisms. PMID:11482755

  8. Genomics and the making of yeast biodiversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts are unicellular fungi that do not form fruiting bodies. Although the yeast lifestyle has evolved multiple times, most known species belong to the subphylum Saccharomycotina (syn. Hemiascomycota, hereafter yeasts). This diverse group includes the premier eukaryotic model system, Saccharomyces ...

  9. The AdS particle [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subir

    2005-09-01

    In this Letter we have considered a relativistic Nambu-Goto model for a particle in AdS metric. With appropriate gauge choice to fix the reparameterization invariance, we recover the previously discussed [S. Ghosh, P. Pal, Phys. Lett. B 618 (2005) 243, arxiv:hep-th/0502192] "exotic oscillator". The Snyder algebra and subsequently the κ-Minkowski spacetime are also derived. Lastly we comment on the impossibility of constructing a non-commutative spacetime in the context of open string where only a curved target space is introduced.

  10. Probing crunching AdS cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S. Prem; Vaganov, Vladislav

    2016-02-01

    Holographic gravity duals of deformations of CFTs formulated on de Sitter spacetime contain FRW geometries behind a horizon, with cosmological big crunch singularities. Using a specific analytically tractable solution within a particular single scalar truncation of {N}=8 supergravity on AdS4, we first probe such crunching cosmologies with spacelike radial geodesics that compute spatially antipodal correlators of large dimension boundary operators. At late times, the geodesics lie on the FRW slice of maximal expansion behind the horizon. The late time two-point functions factorise, and when transformed to the Einstein static universe, they exhibit a temporal non-analyticity determined by the maximal value of the scale factor ã max. Radial geodesics connecting antipodal points necessarily have de Sitter energy Ɛ ≲ ã max, while geodesics with Ɛ > ã max terminate at the crunch, the two categories of geodesics being separated by the maximal expansion slice. The spacelike crunch singularity is curved "outward" in the Penrose diagram for the deformed AdS backgrounds, and thus geodesic limits of the antipodal correlators do not directly probe the crunch. Beyond the geodesic limit, we point out that the scalar wave equation, analytically continued into the FRW patch, has a potential which is singular at the crunch along with complex WKB turning points in the vicinity of the FRW crunch. We then argue that the frequency space Green's function has a branch point determined by ã max which corresponds to the lowest quasinormal frequency.

  11. New and emerging yeast pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Hazen, K C

    1995-01-01

    The most common yeast species that act as agents of human disease are Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, and Cryptococcus neoformans. The incidence of infections by other yeasts has increased during the past decade. The most evident emerging pathogens are Malassezia furfur, Trichosporon beigelii, Rhodotorula species, Hansenula anomala, Candida lusitaniae, and Candida krusei. Organisms once considered environmental contaminants or only industrially important, such as Candida utilis and Candida lipolytica, have now been implicated as agents of fungemia, onychomycosis, and systemic disease. The unusual yeasts primarily infect immunocompromised patients, newborns, and the elderly. The role of central venous catheter removal and antifungal therapy in patient management is controversial. The antibiograms of the unusual yeasts range from resistant to the most recent azoles and amphotericin B to highly susceptible to all antifungal agents. Current routine methods for yeast identification may be insufficient to identify the unusual yeasts within 2 days after isolation. The recognition of unusual yeasts as agents of sometimes life-threatening infection and their unpredictable antifungal susceptibilities increase the burden on the clinical mycology laboratory to pursue complete species identification and MIC determinations. Given the current and evolving medical practices for management of seriously ill patients, further evaluations of the clinically important data about these yeasts are needed. PMID:8665465

  12. Phage and Yeast Display.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jared; Marasco, Wayne A

    2015-02-01

    Despite the availability of antimicrobial drugs, the continued development of microbial resistance--established through escape mutations and the emergence of resistant strains--limits their clinical utility. The discovery of novel, therapeutic, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) offers viable clinical alternatives in the treatment and prophylaxis of infectious diseases. Human mAb-based therapies are typically nontoxic in patients and demonstrate high specificity for the intended microbial target. This specificity prevents negative impacts on the patient microbiome and avoids driving the resistance of nontarget species. The in vitro selection of human antibody fragment libraries displayed on phage or yeast surfaces represents a group of well-established technologies capable of generating human mAbs. The advantage of these forms of microbial display is the large repertoire of human antibody fragments present during a single selection campaign. Furthermore, the in vitro selection environments of microbial surface display allow for the rapid isolation of antibodies--and their encoding genes--against infectious pathogens and their toxins that are impractical within in vivo systems, such as murine hybridomas. This article focuses on the technologies of phage display and yeast display, as these strategies relate to the discovery of human mAbs for the treatment and vaccine development of infectious diseases. PMID:26104550

  13. Eighteen new oleaginous yeast species.

    PubMed

    Garay, Luis A; Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Cajka, Tomas; Chandra, Idelia; Shi, Sandy; Lin, Ting; German, J Bruce; Fiehn, Oliver; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L

    2016-07-01

    Of 1600 known species of yeasts, about 70 are known to be oleaginous, defined as being able to accumulate over 20 % intracellular lipids. These yeasts have value for fundamental and applied research. A survey of yeasts from the Phaff Yeast Culture Collection, University of California Davis was performed to identify additional oleaginous species within the Basidiomycota phylum. Fifty-nine strains belonging to 34 species were grown in lipid inducing media, and total cell mass, lipid yield and triacylglycerol profiles were determined. Thirty-two species accumulated at least 20 % lipid and 25 species accumulated over 40 % lipid by dry weight. Eighteen of these species were not previously reported to be oleaginous. Triacylglycerol profiles were suitable for biodiesel production. These results greatly expand the number of known oleaginous yeast species, and reveal the wealth of natural diversity of triacylglycerol profiles within wild-type oleaginous Basidiomycetes. PMID:27072563

  14. Yeasts in table olive processing: desirable or spoilage microorganisms?

    PubMed

    Arroyo-López, F N; Romero-Gil, V; Bautista-Gallego, J; Rodríguez-Gómez, F; Jiménez-Díaz, R; García-García, P; Querol, A; Garrido-Fernández, A

    2012-11-01

    Yeasts are unicellular eukaryotic microorganisms isolated from many foods, and are commonly found in table olive processing where they can play a double role. On one hand, these microorganisms can produce spoilage of fruits due to the production of bad odours and flavours, the accumulation of CO(2) leading to swollen containers, the clouding of brines, the softening of fruits and the degradation of lactic acid, which is especially harmful during table olive storage and packaging. But on the other hand, fortunately, yeasts also possess desirable biochemical activities (lipase, esterase, β-glucosidase, catalase, production of killer factors, etc.) with important technological applications in this fermented vegetable. Recently, the probiotic potential of olive yeasts has begun to be evaluated because many species are able to resist the passage through the gastrointestinal tract and show beneficial effects on the host. In this way, yeasts may improve consumers' health by decreasing cholesterol levels, inhibiting pathogens, degrading non assimilated compounds, producing antioxidants and vitamins, adhering to intestinal cells or by maintaining epithelial barrier integrity. Many yeast species, usually also found in table olive processing, such as Wicherhamomyces anomalus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia membranifaciens and Kluyveromyces lactis, have been reported to exhibit some of these properties. Thus, the selection of the most appropriate strains to be used as starters, alone or in combination with lactic acid bacteria, is a promising research line to develop in a near future which might improve the added value of the commercialized product. PMID:23141644

  15. Oxygen requirements of yeasts. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae; Candida tropicalis

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, W.; Scheffers, W.A.; Batenburg-Van Der Vegte, W.H.; Van Dijken, J.P. )

    1990-12-01

    Type species of 75 yeast genera were examined for their ability to grow anaerobically in complex and mineral media. To define anaerobic conditions, we added a redox indicator, resazurin, to the media to determine low redox potentials. All strains tested were capable of fermenting glucose to ethanol in oxygen-limited shake-flask cultures, even those of species generally regarded as nonfermentative. However, only 23% of the yeast species tested grew under anaerobic conditions. A comparative study with a number of selected strains revealed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae stands out as a yeast capable of rapid growth at low redox potentials. Other yeasts, such as Torulaspora delbrueckii and Candida tropicalis, grew poorly ({mu}{sub max}, 0.03 and 0.05 h{sup {minus}1}, respectively) under anaerobic conditions in mineral medium supplemented with Tween 80 and ergosterol. The latter organisms grew rapidly under oxygen limitation and then displayed a high rate of alcoholic fermentation. It can be concluded that these yeasts have hitherto-unidentified oxygen requirements for growth.

  16. Significant quantities of the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase are present in the cell wall of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Motshwene, Precious; Brandt, Wolf; Lindsey, George

    2003-01-01

    NaOH was used to extract proteins from the cell walls of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This treatment was shown not to disrupt yeast cells, as NaOH-extracted cells displayed a normal morphology upon electron microscopy. Moreover, extracted and untreated cells had qualitatively similar protein contents upon disruption. When yeast was grown in the presence of 1 M mannitol, two proteins were found to be present at an elevated concentration in the cell wall. These were found to be the late-embryogenic-abundant-like protein heat-shock protein 12 and the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase. The presence of phosphoglycerate mutase in the cell wall was confirmed by immunocytochemical analysis. Not only was the phosphoglycerate mutase in the yeast cell wall found to be active, but whole yeast cells were also able to convert 3-phosphoglycerate in the medium into ethanol, provided that the necessary cofactors were present. PMID:12238949

  17. AdS5×S(5) mirror model as a string sigma model.

    PubMed

    Arutyunov, Gleb; van Tongeren, Stijn J

    2014-12-31

    Doing a double Wick rotation in the world sheet theory of the light cone AdS5×S(5) superstring results in an inequivalent, so-called mirror theory that plays a central role in the field of integrability in the AdS-CFT correspondence. We show that this mirror theory can be interpreted as the light cone theory of a free string on a different background. This background is related to dS5×H(5) by a double T-duality, and has hidden supersymmetry. The geometry can also be extracted from an integrable deformation of the AdS5×S(5) sigma model, and we prove the observed mirror duality of these deformed models at the bosonic level as a byproduct. While we focus on AdS5×S(5), our results apply more generally. PMID:25615306

  18. Leica ADS40 Sensor for Coastal Multispectral Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, John C.

    2007-01-01

    The Leica ADS40 Sensor as it is used for coastal multispectral imaging is presented. The contents include: 1) Project Area Overview; 2) Leica ADS40 Sensor; 3) Focal Plate Arrangements; 4) Trichroid Filter; 5) Gradient Correction; 6) Image Acquisition; 7) Remote Sensing and ADS40; 8) Band comparisons of Satellite and Airborne Sensors; 9) Impervious Surface Extraction; and 10) Impervious Surface Details.

  19. [Study of animal viruses in yeast].

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Yuko

    2006-06-01

    Yeast is often considered to be a model eukaryotic organism, in a manner analogous to E. coli as a model prokaryotic organism. Yeast has been extensively characterized and the genomes completely sequenced. Despite the small genome size, yeast displays most of features of higher eukaryotes. The facts that most of cellular machinery is conserved among different eukaryotes and that the powerful technologies of genetics and molecular biology are available have made yeast model eukaryotic cells in biological and biomedical sciences including virology. Cumulative data indicate that yeast can be a host for animal viruses. I briefly describe yeast gene expression and review viral replication in yeast. Great discovery include complete replication of animal viruses and production of virus-like particle vaccines in yeast. Current studies on yeast focus on identification of host factors and machinery used for viral replication. The studies are based on traditional yeast genetics and genome-wide identification using a complete set of yeast deletion strains. PMID:17038807

  20. AdS3: the NHEK generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Heurtier, Lucien; Puhm, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    It was argued in [1] that the five-dimensional near-horizon extremal Kerr (NHEK) geometry can be embedded in String Theory as the infrared region of an infinite family of non-supersymmetric geometries that have D1, D5, momentum and KK monopole charges. We show that there exists a method to embed these geometries into asymptotically- {AdS}_3× {S}^3/{{Z}}_N solutions, and hence to obtain infinite families of flows whose infrared is NHEK. This indicates that the CFT dual to the NHEK geometry is the IR fixed point of a Renormalization Group flow from a known local UV CFT and opens the door to its explicit construction.

  1. Recycling microbial lipid production wastes to cultivate oleaginous yeasts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaobing; Jin, Guojie; Gong, Zhiwei; Shen, Hongwei; Bai, Fengwu; Zhao, Zongbao Kent

    2015-01-01

    To reduce wastes and the costs of microbial lipid production, it is imperative to recycle resources, including spent cell mass, mineral nutrients and water. In the present study, lipid production by the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides was used as a model system to demonstrate resources recycling. It was found that the hydrolysates of spent cell mass were good media to support cell growth of various oleaginous yeasts. When serial repitching experiments were performed using 70g/L glucose and the hydrolysates alone as nutrients, it produced 16.6, 14.6 and 12.9g/L lipids, for three successive cycles, while lipid titre remained almost constant when spent water was also recycled. The cell mass hydrolysates could be used as equivalents to the mixture of yeast extract and peptone to support lipid production from corn stalk hydrolysates. Our results showed efficient recycling of lipid production wastes and should be helpful to advance microbial lipid technology. PMID:25459808

  2. Shadows, currents, and AdS fields

    SciTech Connect

    Metsaev, R. R.

    2008-11-15

    Conformal totally symmetric arbitrary spin currents and shadow fields in flat space-time of dimension greater than or equal to four are studied. A gauge invariant formulation for such currents and shadow fields is developed. Gauge symmetries are realized by involving the Stueckelberg fields. A realization of global conformal boost symmetries is obtained. Gauge invariant differential constraints for currents and shadow fields are obtained. AdS/CFT correspondence for currents and shadow fields and the respective normalizable and non-normalizable solutions of massless totally symmetric arbitrary spin AdS fields are studied. The bulk fields are considered in a modified de Donder gauge that leads to decoupled equations of motion. We demonstrate that leftover on shell gauge symmetries of bulk fields correspond to gauge symmetries of boundary currents and shadow fields, while the modified de Donder gauge conditions for bulk fields correspond to differential constraints for boundary conformal currents and shadow fields. Breaking conformal symmetries, we find interrelations between the gauge invariant formulation of the currents and shadow fields, and the gauge invariant formulation of massive fields.

  3. A Comparison of the Beneficial Effects of Live and Heat-Inactivated Baker's Yeast on Nile Tilapia: Suggestions on the Role and Function of the Secretory Metabolites Released from the Yeast.

    PubMed

    Ran, Chao; Huang, Lu; Liu, Zhi; Xu, Li; Yang, Yalin; Tacon, Philippe; Auclair, Eric; Zhou, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Yeast is frequently used as a probiotic in aquaculture with the potential to substitute for antibiotics. In this study, the involvement and extent to which the viability of yeast cells and thus the secretory metabolites released from the yeast contribute to effects of baker's yeast was investigated in Nile tilapia. No yeast, live yeast or heat-inactivated baker's yeast were added to basal diets high in fishmeal and low in soybean (diet A) or low in fishmeal and high in soybean (diet B), which were fed to fish for 8 weeks. Growth, feed utilization, gut microvilli morphology, and expressions of hsp70 and inflammation-related cytokines in the intestine and head kidney were assessed. Intestinal microbiota was investigated using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Gut alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity was measured after challenging the fish with Aeromonas hydrophila. Results showed that live yeast significantly improved FBW and WG (P < 0.05), and tended to improve FCR (P = 0.06) of fish compared to the control (no yeast). No significant differences were observed between inactivated yeast and control. Live yeast improved gut microvilli length (P < 0.001) and density (P < 0.05) while inactivated yeast did not. The hsp70 expression level in both the intestine and head kidney of fish was significantly reduced by live yeast (P < 0.05) but not inactivated yeast. Live yeast but not inactivated yeast reduced intestinal expression of tnfα (P < 0.05), tgfβ (P < 0.05 under diet A) and il1β (P = 0.08). Intestinal Lactococcus spp. numbers were enriched by both live and inactivated yeast. Lastly, both live and inactivated yeast reduced the gut AKP activity compared to the control (P < 0.001), indicating protection of the host against infection by A. hydrophila. In conclusion, secretory metabolites did not play major roles in the growth promotion and disease protection effects of yeast. Nevertheless, secretory metabolites were the major contributing factor towards improved gut

  4. A Comparison of the Beneficial Effects of Live and Heat-Inactivated Baker’s Yeast on Nile Tilapia: Suggestions on the Role and Function of the Secretory Metabolites Released from the Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Xu, Li; Yang, Yalin; Tacon, Philippe; Auclair, Eric; Zhou, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Yeast is frequently used as a probiotic in aquaculture with the potential to substitute for antibiotics. In this study, the involvement and extent to which the viability of yeast cells and thus the secretory metabolites released from the yeast contribute to effects of baker’s yeast was investigated in Nile tilapia. No yeast, live yeast or heat-inactivated baker’s yeast were added to basal diets high in fishmeal and low in soybean (diet A) or low in fishmeal and high in soybean (diet B), which were fed to fish for 8 weeks. Growth, feed utilization, gut microvilli morphology, and expressions of hsp70 and inflammation-related cytokines in the intestine and head kidney were assessed. Intestinal microbiota was investigated using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Gut alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity was measured after challenging the fish with Aeromonas hydrophila. Results showed that live yeast significantly improved FBW and WG (P < 0.05), and tended to improve FCR (P = 0.06) of fish compared to the control (no yeast). No significant differences were observed between inactivated yeast and control. Live yeast improved gut microvilli length (P < 0.001) and density (P < 0.05) while inactivated yeast did not. The hsp70 expression level in both the intestine and head kidney of fish was significantly reduced by live yeast (P < 0.05) but not inactivated yeast. Live yeast but not inactivated yeast reduced intestinal expression of tnfα (P < 0.05), tgfβ (P < 0.05 under diet A) and il1β (P = 0.08). Intestinal Lactococcus spp. numbers were enriched by both live and inactivated yeast. Lastly, both live and inactivated yeast reduced the gut AKP activity compared to the control (P < 0.001), indicating protection of the host against infection by A. hydrophila. In conclusion, secretory metabolites did not play major roles in the growth promotion and disease protection effects of yeast. Nevertheless, secretory metabolites were the major contributing factor towards improved gut

  5. Islands of stability and recurrence times in AdS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Stephen R.; Maillard, Antoine; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.

    2015-10-01

    We study the stability of anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime to spherically symmetric perturbations of a real scalar field in general relativity. Further, we work within the context of the "two time framework" (TTF) approximation, which describes the leading nonlinear effects for small amplitude perturbations, and is therefore suitable for studying the weakly turbulent instability of AdS—including both collapsing and noncollapsing solutions. We have previously identified a class of quasiperiodic (QP) solutions to the TTF equations, and in this paper we analyze their stability. We show that there exist several families of QP solutions that are stable to linear order, and we argue that these solutions represent islands of stability in TTF. We extract the eigenmodes of small oscillations about QP solutions, and we use them to predict approximate recurrence times for generic noncollapsing initial data in the full (non-TTF) system. Alternatively, when sufficient energy is driven to high-frequency modes, as occurs for initial data far from a QP solution, the TTF description breaks down as an approximation to the full system. Depending on the higher order dynamics of the full system, this often signals an imminent collapse to a black hole.

  6. Isolation and Identification of Yeasts from Wild Flowers Collected around Jangseong Lake in Jeollanam-do, Republic of Korea, and Characterization of the Unrecorded Yeast Bullera coprosmaensis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang-Min; Hyun, Se-Hee; Lee, Hyang Burm; Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Ha-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Several types of yeasts were isolated from wild flowers around Jangseong Lake in Jeollanam-do, Republic of Korea and identified by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the PCR amplicons for the D1/D2 variable domain of the 26S ribosomal DNA using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analysis. In total, 60 strains from 18 species were isolated, and Pseudozyma spp. (27 strains), which included Pseudozyma rugulosa (7 strains) and Pseudozyma aphidis (6 strains), was dominant species. Among the 60 strains, Bullera coprosmaensis JS00600 represented a newly recorded yeast strain in Korea, and its microbiological characteristics were investigated. The yeast cell has an oval-shaped morphology measuring 1.4 × 1.7 µm in size. Bullera coprosmaensis JS00600 is an asporous yeast that exhibits no pseudomycelium formation. It grew well in vitamin-free medium as well as in yeast extract-malt extract broth and yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) broth, and it is halotolerant growing in 10% NaCl-containing YPD broth. PMID:26539042

  7. Isolation and Identification of Yeasts from Wild Flowers Collected around Jangseong Lake in Jeollanam-do, Republic of Korea, and Characterization of the Unrecorded Yeast Bullera coprosmaensis.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang-Min; Hyun, Se-Hee; Lee, Hyang Burm; Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Ha-Kun; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2015-09-01

    Several types of yeasts were isolated from wild flowers around Jangseong Lake in Jeollanam-do, Republic of Korea and identified by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the PCR amplicons for the D1/D2 variable domain of the 26S ribosomal DNA using Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analysis. In total, 60 strains from 18 species were isolated, and Pseudozyma spp. (27 strains), which included Pseudozyma rugulosa (7 strains) and Pseudozyma aphidis (6 strains), was dominant species. Among the 60 strains, Bullera coprosmaensis JS00600 represented a newly recorded yeast strain in Korea, and its microbiological characteristics were investigated. The yeast cell has an oval-shaped morphology measuring 1.4 × 1.7 µm in size. Bullera coprosmaensis JS00600 is an asporous yeast that exhibits no pseudomycelium formation. It grew well in vitamin-free medium as well as in yeast extract-malt extract broth and yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) broth, and it is halotolerant growing in 10% NaCl-containing YPD broth. PMID:26539042

  8. Yeast identification in floral nectar of Mimulus aurantiacus (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyauk, C.; Belisle, M.; Fukami, T.

    2009-12-01

    Nectar is such a sugar-rich resource that serves as a natural habitat in which microbes thrive. As a result, yeasts arrive to nectar on the bodies of pollinators such as hummingbirds and bees. Yeasts use the sugar in nectar for their own needs when introduced. This research focuses on the identification of different types of yeast that are found in the nectar of Mimulus aurantiacus (commonly known as sticky monkey-flower). Unopened Mimulus aurantiacus flower buds were tagged at Jasper Ridge and bagged three days later. Floral nectar was then extracted and plated on potato dextrose agar. Colonies on the plates were isolated and DNA was extracted from each sample using QIAGEN DNeasy Plant Mini Kit. The DNA was amplified through PCR and ran through gel electrophoresis. The PCR product was used to clone the nectar samples into an E.coli vector. Finally, a phylogenetic tree was created by BLAST searching sequences in GenBank using the Internal Transcribed Space (ITS) locus. It was found that 18 of the 50 identified species were Candida magnifica, 14 was Candida rancensis, 6 were Crytococcus albidus and there were 3 or less of the following: Starmella bombicola, Candida floricola, Aureobasidium pullulans, Pichia kluyvera, Metschnikowa cibodaserisis, Rhodotorua colostri, and Malassezia globosa. The low diversity of the yeast could have been due to several factors: time of collection, demographics of Jasper Ridge, low variety of pollinators, and sugar concentration of the nectar. The results of this study serve as a necessary first step for a recently started research project on ecological interactions between plants, pollinators, and nectar-living yeast. More generally, this research studies the use of the nectar-living yeast community as a natural microcosm for addressing basic questions about the role of dispersal and competitive and facilitative interactions in ecological succession.

  9. Analysis of Arabidopsis glutathione-transferases in yeast.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Matthias P; Kanawati, Basem; Fekete, Agnes; Kowalski, Natalie; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Grill, Erwin

    2013-07-01

    The genome of Arabidopsis thaliana encodes 54 functional glutathione transferases (GSTs), classified in seven clades. Although plant GSTs have been implicated in the detoxification of xenobiotics, such as herbicides, extensive redundancy within this large gene family impedes a functional analysis in planta. In this study, a GST-deficient yeast strain was established as a system for analyzing plant GSTs that allows screening for GST substrates and identifying substrate preferences within the plant GST family. To this end, five yeast genes encoding GSTs and GST-related proteins were simultaneously disrupted. The resulting yeast quintuple mutant showed a strongly reduced conjugation of the GST substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and 4-chloro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-Cl). Consistently, the quintuple mutant was hypersensitive to CDNB, and this phenotype was complemented by the inducible expression of Arabidopsis GSTs. The conjugating activity of the plant GSTs was assessed by in vitro enzymatic assays and via analysis of exposed yeast cells. The formation of glutathione adducts with dinitrobenzene was unequivocally verified by stable isotope labeling and subsequent accurate ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry (ICR-FTMS). Analysis of Arabidopsis GSTs encompassing six clades and 42 members demonstrated functional expression in yeast by using CDNB and NBD-Cl as model substrates. Subsequently, the established yeast system was explored for its potential to screen the Arabidopsis GST family for conjugation of the fungicide anilazine. Thirty Arabidopsis GSTs were identified that conferred increased levels of glutathionylated anilazine. Efficient anilazine conjugation was observed in the presence of the phi, tau, and theta clade GSTs including AtGSTF2, AtGSTF4, AtGSTF6, AtGSTF8, AtGSTF10, and AtGSTT2, none of which had previously been known to contribute to fungicide detoxification. ICR-FTMS analysis of yeast extracts allowed the simultaneous detection and

  10. Interaction Between Yeasts and Zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Raffaele De; Walker, Graeme

    Zinc is an essential trace element in biological systems. For example, it acts as a cellular membrane stabiliser, plays a critical role in gene expression and genome modification and activates nearly 300 enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase. The present chapter will be focused on the influence of zinc on cell physiology of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with special regard to the uptake and subsequent utilisation of this metal. Zinc uptake by yeast is metabolism-dependent, with most of the available zinc translocated very quickly into the vacuole. At cell division, zinc is distributed from mother to daughter cells and this effectively lowers the individual cellular zinc concentration, which may become zinc depleted at the onset of the fermentation. Zinc influences yeast fermentative performance and examples will be provided relating to brewing and wine fermentations. Industrial yeasts are subjected to several stresses that may impair fermentation performance. Such stresses may also impact on yeast cell zinc homeostasis. This chapter will discuss the practical implications for the correct management of zinc bioavailability for yeast-based biotechnologies aimed at improving yeast growth, viability, fermentation performance and resistance to environmental stresses

  11. Lager Yeast Comes of Age

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic fermentations have accompanied human civilizations throughout our history. Lager yeasts have a several-century-long tradition of providing fresh beer with clean taste. The yeast strains used for lager beer fermentation have long been recognized as hybrids between two Saccharomyces species. We summarize the initial findings on this hybrid nature, the genomics/transcriptomics of lager yeasts, and established targets of strain improvements. Next-generation sequencing has provided fast access to yeast genomes. Its use in population genomics has uncovered many more hybridization events within Saccharomyces species, so that lager yeast hybrids are no longer the exception from the rule. These findings have led us to propose network evolution within Saccharomyces species. This “web of life” recognizes the ability of closely related species to exchange DNA and thus drain from a combined gene pool rather than be limited to a gene pool restricted by speciation. Within the domesticated lager yeasts, two groups, the Saaz and Frohberg groups, can be distinguished based on fermentation characteristics. Recent evidence suggests that these groups share an evolutionary history. We thus propose to refer to the Saaz group as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and to the Frohberg group as Saccharomyces pastorianus based on their distinct genomes. New insight into the hybrid nature of lager yeast will provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:25084862

  12. Yeasts: From genetics to biotechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, S.; Poli, G.; Siman-Tov, R.B.

    1995-12-31

    Yeasts have been known and used in food and alcoholic fermentations ever since the Neolithic Age. In more recent times, on the basis of their peculiar features and history, yeasts have become very important experimental models in both microbiological and genetic research, as well as the main characters in many fermentative production processes. In the last 40 years, advances in molecular biology and genetic engineering have made possible not only the genetic selection of organisms, but also the genetic modification of some of them, especially the simplest of them, such as bacteria and yeasts. These discoveries have led to the availability of new yeast strains fit to fulfill requests of industrial production and fermentation. Moreover, genetically modified and transformed yeasts have been constructed that are able to produce large amounts of biologically active proteins and enzymes. Thus, recombinant yeasts make it easier to produce drugs, biologically active products, diagnostics, and vaccines, by inexpensive and relatively simple techniques. Yeasts are going to become more and more important in the {open_quotes}biotechnological revolution{close_quotes} by virtue of both their features and their very long and safe use in human nutrition and industry. 175 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Fission yeast septation

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Juan C. G.; Ramos, Mariona; Osumi, Masako; Pérez, Pilar; Ribas, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In animal cells cytokinesis relies on the contraction of an actomyosin ring that pulls the plasma membrane to create a cleavage furrow, whose ingression finally divides the mother cell into two daughter cells. Fungal cells are surrounded by a tough and flexible structure called cell wall, which is considered to be the functional equivalent of the extracellular matrix in animal cells. Therefore, in addition to cleavage furrow ingression, fungal cytokinesis also requires the centripetal formation of a septum wall structure that develops between the dividing cells, whose genesis must be strictly coordinated with both the actomyosin ring closure and plasma membrane ingression. Here we briefly review what is known about the septum structure and composition in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the recent progress about the relationship between septum biosynthesis and actomyosin ring constriction, and the importance of the septum and ring in the steady progression of the cleavage furrow. PMID:27574536

  14. Fission yeast septation.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Juan C G; Ramos, Mariona; Osumi, Masako; Pérez, Pilar; Ribas, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    In animal cells cytokinesis relies on the contraction of an actomyosin ring that pulls the plasma membrane to create a cleavage furrow, whose ingression finally divides the mother cell into two daughter cells. Fungal cells are surrounded by a tough and flexible structure called cell wall, which is considered to be the functional equivalent of the extracellular matrix in animal cells. Therefore, in addition to cleavage furrow ingression, fungal cytokinesis also requires the centripetal formation of a septum wall structure that develops between the dividing cells, whose genesis must be strictly coordinated with both the actomyosin ring closure and plasma membrane ingression. Here we briefly review what is known about the septum structure and composition in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the recent progress about the relationship between septum biosynthesis and actomyosin ring constriction, and the importance of the septum and ring in the steady progression of the cleavage furrow. PMID:27574536

  15. Table wine from tropical fruits utilizing natural yeast isolates.

    PubMed

    Baidya, Dipak; Chakraborty, Ivi; Saha, Jayanta

    2016-03-01

    An attempt was made to utilize few widely available tropical fruits to develop wine with the objective of comparing the fermentation efficiency (along with progress in fermentation) of two efficient yeast isolates with commercially available strain. Fruit wine from juices of fully ripe mango, jackfruit and pineapple alone and in blended combinations of all three fruit juice (2: 1: 2) was prepared using two different yeasts (Y4 and Y7) isolated from natural plain date palm juice and one standard Saccharomyces cerevisiae (MTCC-170) collected from IMTECH, Chandigar. Juices were extracted by using pectinase enzyme at 0.15-0.20 % of pulp. Changes in °Brix, titratable acid content, pH, total viable yeast count were recorded and rate of fermentation, sugar use efficiency were determined at every 24-hour interval up to the completion (6 days after inoculation) of fermentation. Considering all the quality parameter as well as fermentation efficiency, yeast isolate Y7 was found superior followed by Y4 as fermenting agent and pineapple juice as sole substrate found to be the most suitable medium for production of wine followed by fruit juice blending. In interpreting the efficacy of fruit and yeast in combination, pineapple juice inoculated with Y7 found to be the best in reducing the degree Brix to its lowest from initial 24 degree. PMID:27570291

  16. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  17. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  18. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  19. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida...

  20. 21 CFR 172.896 - Dried yeasts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dried yeasts. 172.896 Section 172.896 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.896 Dried yeasts. Dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces fragilis) and dried torula yeast (Candida utilis) may be safely used in food provided the total folic...

  1. Optical trapping and surgery of living yeast cells using a single laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Jun; Bautista, Godofredo; Smith, Nicholas; Fujita, Katsumasa; Daria, Vincent Ricardo

    2008-10-01

    We present optical trapping and surgery of living yeast cells using two operational modes of a single laser. We used a focused laser beam operating in continuous-wave mode for noninvasive optical trapping and manipulation of single yeast cell. We verified that such operational mode of the laser does not cause any destructive effect on yeast cell wall. By changing the operation of the laser to femtosecond-pulsed mode, we show that a tightly focused beam dissects the yeast cell walls via nonlinear absorption. Lastly, using the combined technique of optical microsurgery and trapping, we demonstrate intracellular organelle extraction and manipulation from a yeast cell. The technique established here will be useful as an efficient method for both surgery and manipulation of living cells using a single laser beam.

  2. Marine yeast isolation and industrial application

    PubMed Central

    Zaky, Abdelrahman Saleh; Tucker, Gregory A; Daw, Zakaria Yehia; Du, Chenyu

    2014-01-01

    Over the last century, terrestrial yeasts have been widely used in various industries, such as baking, brewing, wine, bioethanol and pharmaceutical protein production. However, only little attention has been given to marine yeasts. Recent research showed that marine yeasts have several unique and promising features over the terrestrial yeasts, for example higher osmosis tolerance, higher special chemical productivity and production of industrial enzymes. These indicate that marine yeasts have great potential to be applied in various industries. This review gathers the most recent techniques used for marine yeast isolation as well as the latest applications of marine yeast in bioethanol, pharmaceutical and enzyme production fields. PMID:24738708

  3. Global metabolite analysis of yeast: evaluation of sample preparation methods.

    PubMed

    Villas-Bôas, Silas G; Højer-Pedersen, Jesper; Akesson, Mats; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-10-30

    Sample preparation is considered one of the limiting steps in microbial metabolome analysis. Eukaryotes and prokaryotes behave very differently during the several steps of classical sample preparation methods for analysis of metabolites. Even within the eukaryote kingdom there is a vast diversity of cell structures that make it imprudent to blindly adopt protocols that were designed for a specific group of microorganisms. We have therefore reviewed and evaluated the whole sample preparation procedures for analysis of yeast metabolites. Our focus has been on the current needs in metabolome analysis, which is the analysis of a large number of metabolites with very diverse chemical and physical properties. This work reports the leakage of intracellular metabolites observed during quenching yeast cells with cold methanol solution, the efficacy of six different methods for the extraction of intracellular metabolites, and the losses noticed during sample concentration by lyophilization and solvent evaporation. A more reliable procedure is suggested for quenching yeast cells with cold methanol solution, followed by extraction of intracellular metabolites by pure methanol. The method can be combined with reduced pressure solvent evaporation and therefore represents an attractive sample preparation procedure for high-throughput metabolome analysis of yeasts. PMID:16240456

  4. The Yeast Sphingolipid Signaling Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Montefusco, David J.; Matmati, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are recognized as signaling mediators in a growing number of pathways, and represent potential targets to address many diseases. The study of sphingolipid signaling in yeast has created a number of breakthroughs in the field, and has the potential to lead future advances. The aim of this article is to provide an inclusive view of two major frontiers in yeast sphingolipid signaling. In the first section, several key studies in the field of sphingolipidomics are consolidated to create a yeast sphingolipidome that ranks nearly all known sphingolipid species by their level in a resting yeast cell. The second section presents an overview of most known phenotypes identified for sphingolipid gene mutants, presented with the intention of illuminating not yet discovered connections outside and inside of the field. PMID:24220500

  5. Growth and manipulation of yeast.

    PubMed

    Treco, D A; Reynolds, A; Lundblad, V

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes preparation of selected media for growing yeast and also discusses strain storage and revival. Protocols are provided for the assay of beta-galactosidase in liquid culture and for transformation using lithium acetate. PMID:18429086

  6. Stepwise assembly of initiation proteins at budding yeast replication origins in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Seki, Takashi; Diffley, John F. X.

    2000-01-01

    The initiation of DNA replication in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs in two sequential and mutually exclusive steps. Prereplicative complexes (pre-RCs) containing origin recognition complex (ORC), Cdc6p, and the MCM2–7 proteins assemble only under conditions of low cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activity during G1, whereas origin activation is driven by the increase in Cdk activity at the end of G1. As a first step toward the reconstitution of this two-step process in vitro, we describe a system in which extracts prepared from G1-arrested cells promote sequential assembly of ORC, Cdc6p, and MCM2–7 proteins onto exogenously added origin-containing DNA. This reaction requires an intact ARS consensus sequence and requires ATP for two distinct steps. Extracts from cells arrested in mitosis also can support the binding of ORC but are unable to load either Cdc6p or MCM2–7 proteins. This system should be useful for studying the mechanism and regulation of pre-RC assembly. PMID:11121019

  7. ADS pilot program Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauson, J.; Heuser, J.

    1981-01-01

    The Applications Data Service (ADS) is a system based on an electronic data communications network which will permit scientists to share the data stored in data bases at universities and at government and private installations. It is designed to allow users to readily locate and access high quality, timely data from multiple sources. The ADS Pilot program objectives and the current plans for accomplishing those objectives are described.

  8. Effects of Selenium on Morphological Changes in Candida utilis ATCC 9950 Yeast Cells.

    PubMed

    Kieliszek, Marek; Błażejak, Stanisław; Bzducha-Wróbel, Anna; Kurcz, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the results of microscopic examinations of the yeast cells cultured in yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) media supplemented with sodium selenite(IV). The analysis of the morphological changes in yeast cells aimed to determine whether the selected selenium doses and culturing time may affect this element accumulation in yeast cell structures in a form of inorganic or organic compounds, as a result of detoxification processes. The range of characteristic morphological changes in yeasts cultivated in experimental media with sodium selenite(IV) was observed, including cell shrinkage and cytoplasm thickening of the changes within vacuole structure. The processes of vacuole disintegration were observed in aging yeast cells in culturing medium, which may indicate the presence of so-called ghost cells lacking intracellular organelles The changes occurring in the morphology of yeasts cultured in media supplemented with sodium selenite were typical for stationary phase of yeast growth. From detailed microscopic observations, larger surface area of the cell (6.03 μm(2)) and yeast vacuole (2.17 μm(2)) were noticed after 24-h culturing in the medium with selenium of 20 mg Se(4+)/L. The coefficient of shape of the yeast cells cultured in media enriched with sodium selenite as well as in the control YPD medium ranged from 1.02 to 1.22. Elongation of cultivation time (up to 48 and 72 h) in the media supplemented with sodium selenite caused a reduction in the surface area of the yeast cell and vacuole due to detoxification processes. PMID:26166197

  9. Vacuoles of Candida yeast as a specialized niche for Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Siavoshi, Farideh; Saniee, Parastoo

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) are resistant to hostile gastric environments and antibiotic therapy, reflecting the possibility that they are protected by an ecological niche, such as inside the vacuoles of human epithelial and immune cells. Candida yeast may also provide such an alternative niche, as fluorescently labeled H. pylori were observed as fast-moving and viable bacterium-like bodies inside the vacuoles of gastric, oral, vaginal and foodborne Candida yeasts. In addition, H. pylori-specific genes and proteins were detected in samples extracted from these yeasts. The H. pylori present within these yeasts produce peroxiredoxin and thiol peroxidase, providing the ability to detoxify oxygen metabolites formed in immune cells. Furthermore, these bacteria produce urease and VacA, two virulence determinants of H. pylori that influence phago-lysosome fusion and bacterial survival in macrophages. Microscopic observations of H. pylori cells in new generations of yeasts along with amplification of H. pylori-specific genes from consecutive generations indicate that new yeasts can inherit the intracellular H. pylori as part of their vacuolar content. Accordingly, it is proposed that yeast vacuoles serve as a sophisticated niche that protects H. pylori against the environmental stresses and provides essential nutrients, including ergosterol, for its growth and multiplication. This intracellular establishment inside the yeast vacuole likely occurred long ago, leading to the adaptation of H. pylori to persist in phagocytic cells. The presence of these bacteria within yeasts, including foodborne yeasts, along with the vertical transmission of yeasts from mother to neonate, provide explanations for the persistence and propagation of H. pylori in the human population. This Topic Highlight reviews and discusses recent evidence regarding the evolutionary adaptation of H. pylori to thrive in host cell vacuoles. PMID:24833856

  10. Yeast Associated with the Ambrosia Beetle, Platypus koryoensis, the Pest of Oak Trees in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Yeo Hong; Suh, Dong Yeon; Yoo, Hun Dal; Oh, Man Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Oak tree death caused by symbiosis of an ambrosia beetle, Platypus koryoensis, and an ophiostomatoid filamentous fungus, Raffaelea quercus-mongolicae, has been a nationwide problem in Korea since 2004. In this study, we surveyed the yeast species associated with P. koryoensis to better understand the diversity of fungal associates of the beetle pest. In 2009, a total of 195 yeast isolates were sampled from larvae and adult beetles (female and male) of P. koryoensis in Cheonan, Goyang, and Paju; 8 species were identified by based on their morphological, biochemical and molecular analyses. Meyerozyma guilliermondii and Candida kashinagacola were found to be the two dominant species. Among the 8 species, Candida homilentoma was a newly recorded yeast species in Korea, and thus, its mycological characteristics were described. The P. koryoensis symbiont R. quercusmongolicae did not show extracelluar CM-cellulase, xylanase and avicelase activity that are responsible for degradation of wood structure; however, C. kashinagacola and M. guilliermondii did show the three extracellular enzymatic activities. Extracelluar CM-cellulase activity was also found in Ambrosiozyma sp., C. homilentoma, C. kashinagacola, and Candida sp. Extracelluar pectinase activity was detected in Ambrosiozyma sp., C. homilentoma, Candida sp., and M. guilliermondii. All the 8 yeast species displayed compatible relationships with R. quercus-mongolicae when they were co-cultivated on yeast extract-malt extract plates. Overall, our results demonstrated that P. koryoensis carries the yeast species as a symbiotic fungal associate. This is first report of yeast diversity associated with P. koryoensis. PMID:26839506

  11. Yeast Associated with the Ambrosia Beetle, Platypus koryoensis, the Pest of Oak Trees in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yeo Hong; Suh, Dong Yeon; Yoo, Hun Dal; Oh, Man Hwan; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2015-12-01

    Oak tree death caused by symbiosis of an ambrosia beetle, Platypus koryoensis, and an ophiostomatoid filamentous fungus, Raffaelea quercus-mongolicae, has been a nationwide problem in Korea since 2004. In this study, we surveyed the yeast species associated with P. koryoensis to better understand the diversity of fungal associates of the beetle pest. In 2009, a total of 195 yeast isolates were sampled from larvae and adult beetles (female and male) of P. koryoensis in Cheonan, Goyang, and Paju; 8 species were identified by based on their morphological, biochemical and molecular analyses. Meyerozyma guilliermondii and Candida kashinagacola were found to be the two dominant species. Among the 8 species, Candida homilentoma was a newly recorded yeast species in Korea, and thus, its mycological characteristics were described. The P. koryoensis symbiont R. quercusmongolicae did not show extracelluar CM-cellulase, xylanase and avicelase activity that are responsible for degradation of wood structure; however, C. kashinagacola and M. guilliermondii did show the three extracellular enzymatic activities. Extracelluar CM-cellulase activity was also found in Ambrosiozyma sp., C. homilentoma, C. kashinagacola, and Candida sp. Extracelluar pectinase activity was detected in Ambrosiozyma sp., C. homilentoma, Candida sp., and M. guilliermondii. All the 8 yeast species displayed compatible relationships with R. quercus-mongolicae when they were co-cultivated on yeast extract-malt extract plates. Overall, our results demonstrated that P. koryoensis carries the yeast species as a symbiotic fungal associate. This is first report of yeast diversity associated with P. koryoensis. PMID:26839506

  12. Biotechnological Applications of Dimorphic Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doiphode, N.; Joshi, C.; Ghormade, V.; Deshpande, M. V.

    The dimorphic yeasts have the equilibrium between spherical growth (budding) and polarized (hyphal or pseudohyphal tip elongation) which can be triggered by change in the environmental conditions. The reversible growth phenomenon has made dimorphic yeasts as an useful model to understand fungal evolution and fungal differentiation, in general. In nature dimorphism is clearly evident in plant and animal fungal pathogens, which survive and most importantly proliferate in the respective hosts. However, number of organisms with no known pathogenic behaviour also show such a transition, which can be exploited for the technological applications due to their different biochemical make up under different morphologies. For instance, chitin and chitosan production using dimorphic Saccharomyces, Mucor, Rhizopus and Benjaminiella, oil degradation and biotransformation with yeast-form of Yarrowia species, bioremediation of organic pollutants, exopolysac-charide production by yeast-phase of Aureobasidium pullulans, to name a few. Myrothecium verrucaria can be used for seed dressing in its yeast form and it produces a mycolytic enzyme complex in its hyphal-form for the biocontrol of fungal pathogens, while Beauveria bassiana and other entomopathogens kill the insect pest by producing yeast- like cells in the insect body. The form-specific expression of protease, chitinase, lipase, ornithine decarboxylase, glutamate dehydrogenases, etc. make Benjaminiella poitrasii, Basidiobolus sp., and Mucor rouxii strains important in bioremediation, nanobiotechnology, fungal evolution and other areas.

  13. The ADS All Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Alyssa

    We will create the first interactive sky map of astronomers' understanding of the Universe over time. We will accomplish this goal by turning the NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS), widely known for its unrivaled value as a literature resource, into a data resource. GIS and GPS systems have made it commonplace to see and explore information about goings-on on Earth in the context of maps and timelines. Our proposal shows an example of a program that lets a user explore which countries have been mentioned in the New York Times, on what dates, and in what kinds of articles. By analogy, the goal of our project is to enable this kind of exploration-on the sky-for the full corpus of astrophysical literature available through ADS. Our group's expertise and collaborations uniquely position us to create this interactive sky map of the literature, which we call the "ADS All-Sky Survey." To create this survey, here are the principal steps we need to follow. First, by analogy to "geotagging," we will "astrotag," the ADS literature. Many "astrotags" effectively already exist, thanks to curation efforts at both CDS and NED. These efforts have created links to "source" positions on the sky associated with each of the millions of articles in the ADS. Our collaboration with ADS and CDS will let us automatically extract astrotags for all existing and future ADS holdings. The new ADS Labs, which our group helps to develop, includes the ability for researchers to filter article search results using a variety of "facets" (e.g. sources, keywords, authors, observatories, etc.). Using only extracted astrotags and facets, we can create functionality like what is described in the Times example above: we can offer a map of the density of positions' "mentions" on the sky, filterable by the properties of those mentions. Using this map, researchers will be able to interactively, visually, discover what regions have been studied for what reasons, at what times, and by whom. Second, where

  14. Production of torularhodin, torulene, and β-carotene by Rhodotorula yeasts.

    PubMed

    Moliné, Martín; Libkind, Diego; van Broock, María

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts of the genera Rhodotorula are able to synthesize different pigments of high economic value like β-carotene, torulene, and torularhodin, and therefore represent a biotechnologically interesting group of yeasts. However, the low production rate of pigment in these microorganisms limits its industrial application. Here we describe some strategies to obtain hyperpigmented mutants of Rhodotorula mucilaginosa by means of ultraviolet-B radiation, the procedures for total carotenoids extraction and quantification, and a method for identification of each pigment. PMID:22711133

  15. Riboneogenesis in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Clasquin, Michelle F.; Melamud, Eugene; Singer, Alexander; Gooding, Jessica R.; Xu, Xiaohui; Dong, Aiping; Cui, Hong; Campagna, Shawn R.; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Caudy, Amy A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Gluconeogenesis converts three carbon units into glucose. Here we identify an analogous pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for converting three carbon units into ribose, a component of nucleic acids and nucleotides. This riboneogenic pathway involves the enzyme sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase (SHB17), whose activity was identified based on accumulation of sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphate in the corresponding knockout strain. We determined the crystal structure of Shb17 in complex with sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphate, and found that the sugar is bound in the closed furan form in the active site. Like fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphate is produced by aldolase, in this case from erythrose 4-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate. Hydrolysis of sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphate by SHB17 provides an energetically favorable input to the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway to drive ribose production. Flux through SHB17 is enhanced under conditions when ribose demand is high relative to demand for NADPH, including during ribosome biogenesis in metabolically synchronized yeast cells. Thus, riboneogenesis provides a thermodynamically-driven route of ribose production uncoupled from formation of NADPH. PMID:21663798

  16. Yeast Mitochondrial Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Mathilde; Darzacq, Xavier; Devaux, Frederic; Singer, Robert H.; Jacq, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Although 30 years ago it was strongly suggested that some cytoplasmic ribosomes are bound to the surface of yeast mitochondria, the mechanisms and the raison d’ětre of this process are not understood. For instance, it is not perfectly known which of the several hundred nuclearly encoded genes have to be translated to the mitochondrial vicinity to guide the import of the corresponding proteins. One can take advantage of several modern methods to address a number of aspects of the site-specific translation process of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) coding for proteins imported into mitochondria. Three complementary approaches are presented to analyze the spatial distribution of mRNAs coding for proteins imported into mitochondria. Starting from biochemical purifications of mitochondria-bound polysomes, we describe a genomewide approach to classify all the cellular mRNAs according to their physical proximity with mitochondria; we also present real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction monitoring of mRNA distribution to provide a quantified description of this localization. Finally, a fluorescence microscopy approach on a single living cell is described to visualize the in vivo localization of mRNAs involved in mitochondria biogenesis. PMID:18314748

  17. Metabolic regulation of yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, A.

    1982-12-01

    Metabolic regulation which is based on endogeneous and exogeneous process variables which may act constantly or time dependently on the living cell is discussed. The observed phenomena of the regulation are the result of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. These parameters are identified. Ethanol is accumulated as an intermediate product and the synthesis of biomass is reduced. This regulatory effect of glucose is used for the aerobic production of ethanol. Very high production rates are thereby obtained. Understanding of the regulation mechanism of the glucose effect has improved. In addition to catabolite repression, several other mechanisms of enzyme regulation have been described, that are mostly governed by exogeneous factors. Glucose also affects the control of respiration in a third class of yeasts which are unable to make use of ethanol as a substrate for growth. This is due to the lack of any anaplerotic activity. As a consequence, diauxic growth behavior is reduced to a one-stage growth with a drastically reduced cell yield. The pulse chemostat technique, a systematic approach for medium design is developed and medium supplements that are essential for metabolic control are identified.

  18. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF RUTHENIUM

    DOEpatents

    Hyman, H.H.; Leader, G.R.

    1959-07-14

    The separation of rathenium from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction is described. According to the invention, a nitrite selected from the group consisting of alkali nitrite and alkaline earth nitrite in an equimolecular quantity with regard to the quantity of rathenium present is added to an aqueous solution containing ruthenium tetrantrate to form a ruthenium complex. Adding an organic solvent such as ethyl ether to the resulting mixture selectively extracts the rathenium complex.

  19. Microbial production of value-added nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Guleria, Sanjay; Koffas, Mattheos A G; Yan, Yajun

    2016-02-01

    Nutraceuticals are important natural bioactive compounds that confer health-promoting and medical benefits to humans. Globally growing demands for value-added nutraceuticals for prevention and treatment of human diseases have rendered nutraceuticals a multi-billion dollar market. However, supply limitations and extraction difficulties from natural sources such as plants, animals or fungi, restrict the large-scale use of nutraceuticals. Metabolic engineering via microbial production platforms has been advanced as an eco-friendly alternative approach for production of value-added nutraceuticals from simple carbon sources. Microbial platforms like the most widely used Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been engineered as versatile cell factories for production of diverse and complex value-added chemicals such as phytochemicals, prebiotics, polysaccaharides and poly amino acids. This review highlights the recent progresses in biological production of value-added nutraceuticals via metabolic engineering approaches. PMID:26716360

  20. How to bake a brain: yeast as a model neuron.

    PubMed

    Sarto-Jackson, Isabella; Tomaska, Lubomir

    2016-05-01

    More than 30 years ago Dan Koshland published an inspirational essay presenting the bacterium as a model neuron (Koshland, Trends Neurosci 6:133-137, 1983). In the article he argued that there are several similarities between neurons and bacterial cells in "how signals are processed within a cell or how this processing machinery can be modified to produce plasticity". He then explored the bacterial chemosensory system to emphasize its attributes that are analogous to information processing in neurons. In this review, we wish to expand Koshland's original idea by adding the yeast cell to the list of useful models of a neuron. The fact that yeasts and neurons are specialized versions of the eukaryotic cell sharing all principal components sets the stage for a grand evolutionary tinkering where these components are employed in qualitatively different tasks, but following analogous molecular logic. By way of example, we argue that evolutionarily conserved key components involved in polarization processes (from budding or mating in Saccharomyces cervisiae to neurite outgrowth or spinogenesis in neurons) are shared between yeast and neurons. This orthologous conservation of modules makes S. cervisiae an excellent model organism to investigate neurobiological questions. We substantiate this claim by providing examples of yeast models used for studying neurological diseases. PMID:26782173

  1. Reconstitution and Characterization of Budding Yeast γ-Tubulin Complex

    PubMed Central

    Vinh, Dani B.N.; Kern, Joshua W.; Hancock, William O.; Howard, Jonathon; Davis, Trisha N.

    2002-01-01

    Nucleation of microtubules is central to assembly of the mitotic spindle, which is required for each cell division. γ-Tubulin is a universal component essential for microtubule nucleation from centrosomes. To elucidate the mechanism of microtubule nucleation in budding yeast we reconstituted and characterized the yeast γ-tubulin complex (Tub4p complex) produced in insect cells. The recombinant complex has the same sedimentation coefficient (11.6 S) as the native complex in yeast cell extracts and contains one molecule of Spc97p, one molecule of Spc98p, and two molecules of Tub4p. The reconstituted Tub4p complex binds preformed microtubules and has a low nucleating activity, allowing us to begin a detailed analysis of conditions that enhance this nucleating activity. We tested whether binding of the recombinant Tub4p complex to the spindle pole body docking protein Spc110p affects its nucleating activity. The solubility of recombinant Spc110p in insect cells is improved by coexpression with yeast calmodulin (Cmd1p). The Spc110p/Cmd1p complex has a small sedimentation coefficient (4.2 S) and a large Stokes radius (14.3 nm), indicative of an elongated structure. The Tub4p complex binds Spc110p/Cmd1p via Spc98p and the Kd for binding is 150 nM. The low nucleation activity of the Tub4p complex is not enhanced when it is bound to Spc110p/Cmd1p, suggesting that it requires additional components or modifications to achieve robust activity. Finally, we report the identification of a large 22 S Tub4p complex in yeast extract that contains multimers of Spc97p similar to γ-tubulin ring complexes found in higher eukaryotic cells. PMID:11950928

  2. Yeast Genetics and Biotechnological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Saroj; Baranwal, Richa

    Yeast can be recognized as one of the very important groups of microorganisms on account of its extensive use in the fermentation industry and as a basic eukaryotic model cellular system. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been extensively used to elucidate the genetics and regulation of several key functions in the cell such as cell mating, electron transport chain, protein trafficking, cell cycle events and others. Even before the genome sequence of the yeast was out, the structural organization and function of several of its genes was known. With the availability of the origin of replication from the 2 μm plasmid and the development of transformation system, it became the host of choice for expression of a number of important proteins. A large number of episomal and integrative shuttle vectors are available for expression of mammalian proteins. The latest developments in genomics and micro-array technology have allowed investigations of individual gene function by site-specific deletion method. The application of metabolic profiling has also assisted in understanding the cellular network operating in this yeast. This chapter is aimed at reviewing the use of this system as an experimental tool for conducting classical genetics. Various vector systems available, foreign genes expressed and the limitations as a host will be discussed. Finally, the use of various yeast enzymes in biotechnology sector will be reviewed.

  3. Innovations Without Added Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cereghino, Edward

    1974-01-01

    There is no question that we are in a tight money market, and schools are among the first institutions to feel the squeeze. Therefore, when a plan is offered that provides for innovations without added costs, its something worth noting. (Editor)

  4. What Value "Value Added"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Two quantitative measures of school performance are currently used, the average points score (APS) at Key Stage 2 and value-added (VA), which measures the rate of academic improvement between Key Stage 1 and 2. These figures are used by parents and the Office for Standards in Education to make judgements and comparisons. However, simple…

  5. Physical, functional and structural characterization of the cell wall fractions from baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Borchani, Chema; Fonteyn, Fabienne; Jamin, Guilhem; Paquot, Michel; Thonart, Philippe; Blecker, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    The yeast cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important source of β-d-glucan, a glucose homopolymer with many functional, nutritional and human health benefits. In the present study, the yeast cell wall fractionation process involving enzymatic treatments (savinase and lipolase enzymes) affected most of the physical and functional characteristics of extracted fractions. Thus, the fractionation process showed that β-d-glucan fraction F4 had significantly higher swelling power and fat binding capacity compared to other fractions (F1, F2 and F3). It also exhibited a viscosity of 652.12mPas and a high degree of brightness of extracted β-d-glucan fraction. Moreover, the fractionation process seemed to have an effect on structural and thermal properties of extracted fractions. Overall, results showed that yeast β-d-glucan had good potential for use as a prebiotic ingredient in food, as well as medicinal and pharmaceutical products. PMID:26471666

  6. Introducing ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Henneken, E.; Grant, C. S.; Kurtz, M. J.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Thompson, D. M.; Bohlen, E.; Murray, S. S.

    2011-05-01

    ADS Labs is a platform that ADS is introducing in order to test and receive feedback from the community on new technologies and prototype services. Currently, ADS Labs features a new interface for abstract searches, faceted filtering of results, visualization of co-authorship networks, article-level recommendations, and a full-text search service. The streamlined abstract search interface provides a simple, one-box search with options for ranking results based on a paper relevancy, freshness, number of citations, and downloads. In addition, it provides advanced rankings based on collaborative filtering techniques. The faceted filtering interface allows users to narrow search results based on a particular property or set of properties ("facets"), allowing users to manage large lists and explore the relationship between them. For any set or sub-set of records, the co-authorship network can be visualized in an interactive way, offering a view of the distribution of contributors and their inter-relationships. This provides an immediate way to detect groups and collaborations involved in a particular research field. For a majority of papers in Astronomy, our new interface will provide a list of related articles of potential interest. The recommendations are based on a number of factors, including text similarity, citations, and co-readership information. The new full-text search interface allows users to find all instances of particular words or phrases in the body of the articles in our full-text archive. This includes all of the scanned literature in ADS as well as a select portion of the current astronomical literature, including ApJ, ApJS, AJ, MNRAS, PASP, A&A, and soon additional content from Springer journals. Fulltext search results include a list of the matching papers as well as a list of "snippets" of text highlighting the context in which the search terms were found. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  7. A Highly Characterized Yeast Toolkit for Modular, Multipart Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael E; DeLoache, William C; Cervantes, Bernardo; Dueber, John E

    2015-09-18

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an increasingly attractive host for synthetic biology because of its long history in industrial fermentations. However, until recently, most synthetic biology systems have focused on bacteria. While there is a wealth of resources and literature about the biology of yeast, it can be daunting to navigate and extract the tools needed for engineering applications. Here we present a versatile engineering platform for yeast, which contains both a rapid, modular assembly method and a basic set of characterized parts. This platform provides a framework in which to create new designs, as well as data on promoters, terminators, degradation tags, and copy number to inform those designs. Additionally, we describe genome-editing tools for making modifications directly to the yeast chromosomes, which we find preferable to plasmids due to reduced variability in expression. With this toolkit, we strive to simplify the process of engineering yeast by standardizing the physical manipulations and suggesting best practices that together will enable more straightforward translation of materials and data from one group to another. Additionally, by relieving researchers of the burden of technical details, they can focus on higher-level aspects of experimental design. PMID:25871405

  8. Genomic evolution of the ascomycetous yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts are important for industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable metabolic and phylogenetic diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 16 ascomycete yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphr...

  9. PHYLOGENETICS OF SACCHAROMYCETALES, THE ASCOMYCETE YEASTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ascomycete yeasts (Phylum Ascomycota: Subphylum Saccharomycotina: Class Saccharomycetes: Order Saccharomycetales) comprise a monophyletic lineage with a single order of about 1000 known species. These yeasts live as saprobes, often in association with plants, animals, and their interfaces. A few s...

  10. Yeast Can Affect Behavior and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crook, William G.

    1984-01-01

    A pediatrician recounts his experiences in diagnosing and treating allergies to common yeast germs that may result in behavior and learning problems. He lists characteristics that may predispose children to yeast-connected health problems. (CL)

  11. Identification and characterization of antimicrobial activity in two yeast genera.

    PubMed Central

    Bilinski, C A; Innamorato, G; Stewart, G G

    1985-01-01

    A general screening test for the expression of antibacterial activity was performed on over 400 cultures belonging to 31 yeast genera. Of these cultures, only two, Kluyveromyces thermotolerans and Kloeckera apiculata, were found to produce zones of inhibition of bacterial growth on Diagnostic Sensitivity Test Agar medium supplemented with 0.002% methylene blue. Of nine bacteria used as test organisms, only Lactobacillus plantarum and Bacillus megaterium were inhibited. No antibacterial activity was evident against four gram-negative bacteria used in this study. Optimal activities were found to be expressed after yeasts were grown at pH 6. A requirement for cultivation in the presence of methylene blue added to culture media for the expression of apparent antibacterial activity was demonstrated. Images PMID:3937494

  12. Selection of a yeast strain for sweet sorghum fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Bowling, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    Seven natural and eight commercial yeast strains were tested for fermenting the high sugar content of sweet sorghum juice with a high yield of alcohol and a high pecentage utilization of the sugar within a ten day period. The sorghum juice pH was adjusted to range between 4 and 5. A comparison was made with and without an added nitrogen source. Fermentation temperatures were maintained at 27/sup 0/C. The American Type Culture Collection number 918, a Saccharomyces species fermented the sorghum juice at the 26 and 18 to 20 balling (brix). No yeast strain was found to ferment the 30 balling juice within a ten day period at 90% utilization.

  13. Biosurfactant-producing yeasts widely inhabit various vegetables and fruits.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Masaaki; Maruoka, Naruyuki; Furuta, Yoshifumi; Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2014-01-01

    The isolation of biosurfactant-producing yeasts from food materials was accomplished. By a combination of a new drop collapse method and thin-layer chromatography, 48 strains were selected as glycolipid biosurfactant producers from 347 strains, which were randomly isolated from various vegetables and fruits. Of the producers, 69% were obtained from vegetables of the Brassica family. Of the 48 producers, 15 strains gave relatively high yields of mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), and were identified as Pseudozyma yeasts. These strains produced MELs from olive oil at yields ranging from 8.5 to 24.3 g/L. The best yield coefficient reached 0.49 g/g as to the carbon sources added. Accordingly, MEL producers were isolated at high efficiency from various vegetables and fruits, indicating that biosurfactant producers are widely present in foods. The present results should facilitate their application in the food and related industries. PMID:25036844

  14. Yeast: A Research Organism for Teaching Genetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manney, Thomas R.; Manney, Monta L.

    1992-01-01

    Explains why laboratory strains of bakers yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are particularly suited for classroom science activities. Describes the sexual life cycle of yeast and the genetic system with visible mutations. Presents an overview of activities that can be done with yeast and gives a source for teachers to obtain more information. (PR)

  15. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  16. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  17. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  18. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  19. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  20. Comparative Evaluation of the BD Phoenix Yeast ID Panel and Remel RapID Yeast Plus System for Yeast Identification

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Michelle L.; Parajuli, Shobha; Deleon-Gonsalves, Raquel; Potula, Raghava; Truant, Allan L.

    2016-01-01

    Becton Dickinson Phoenix Yeast ID Panel was compared to the Remel RapID Yeast Plus System using 150 recent clinical yeast isolates and the API 20C AUX system to resolve discrepant results. The concordance rate between the Yeast ID Panel and the RapID Yeast Plus System (without arbitration) was 93.3% with 97.3% (146/150) and 95.3% (143/150) of the isolates correctly identified by the Becton Dickinson Phoenix and the Remel RapID, respectively, with arbitration. PMID:27366167

  1. Comparative Evaluation of the BD Phoenix Yeast ID Panel and Remel RapID Yeast Plus System for Yeast Identification.

    PubMed

    Grant, Michelle L; Parajuli, Shobha; Deleon-Gonsalves, Raquel; Potula, Raghava; Truant, Allan L

    2016-01-01

    Becton Dickinson Phoenix Yeast ID Panel was compared to the Remel RapID Yeast Plus System using 150 recent clinical yeast isolates and the API 20C AUX system to resolve discrepant results. The concordance rate between the Yeast ID Panel and the RapID Yeast Plus System (without arbitration) was 93.3% with 97.3% (146/150) and 95.3% (143/150) of the isolates correctly identified by the Becton Dickinson Phoenix and the Remel RapID, respectively, with arbitration. PMID:27366167

  2. TRAPPING FOR MEXICAN FRUIT FLY (DIPTERA: TEPHRITIDAE) WITH TORULA YEAST AND PROPYLENE GLYCOL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In south Texas, propylene glycol is added to the liquid bait (an aqueous slurry of torula yeast) in surveillance traps for exotic fruit flies to better preserve captured specimens. In a series of tests in Texas and Mexico, overall captures of Mexican fruit flies were roughly the same in traps with ...

  3. Yeast leavened banana-bread: formulation, processing, color and texture analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Banana powder (BP) was added to Hard Red Spring Wheat flour (HRSW) intended for yeast-leavened bread formulation. Five different formulations containing 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30% BP were prepared with varying amounts of base flour, while vital gluten was maintained at 25% in all blends. Based on the...

  4. Two Virasoro symmetries in stringy warped AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Guica, Monica; Rodriguez, Maria J.

    2014-12-01

    We study three-dimensional consistent truncations of type IIB supergravity which admit warped AdS3 solutions. These theories contain subsectors that have no bulk dynamics. We show that the symplectic form for these theories, when restricted to the non-dynamical subsectors, equals the symplectic form for pure Einstein gravity in AdS3. Consequently, for each consistent choice of boundary conditions in AdS3, we can define a consistent phase space in warped AdS3 with identical conserved charges. This way, we easily obtain a Virasoro × Virasoro asymptotic symmetry algebra in warped AdS3; two different types of Virasoro × Kač-Moody symmetries are also consistent alternatives.

  5. [Activities of some yeast flavogenic enzymes in situ].

    PubMed

    Logvinenko, E M; Trach, V M; Kashchenko, V E; Zakal'skiĭ, A E; Koltun, L V; Shavlovskiĭ, G M

    1977-09-01

    Effects of digitonin, dimethylsulfoxide and protamine sulfate on yeast Pichia guilliermondii were studied in order to produce cells with increased permeability and possessing the GTP-cyclohydrolase, riboflavinsynthetase and riboflavinkinase activities. The digitonin-treated cells exhibited a higher cyclohydrolase activity than the cell-free extracts; the activities of riboflavinsynthetase and riboflavinkinase in the cells and cell-free extracts were found to be similar. Treatment of cells with dimethylsulfoxide proved to be most effective to determine the activity of GTP-cyclohydrolase and also helpful to determine that of riboflavinsynthetase. Protamine sulfate had no effect on the cells of P. guilliermondii. The methods developed were used to determine the activities of GTP-cyclohydrolase, riboflavinsynthetase and riboflavinkinase in the cells of flavinogenic (P. guiller-mondii, Torulopsis candida) and non-flavinogenic (Candida utilis, Candida pulcherrima) yeasts grown in iron-rich and iron-deficient media. Derepression of riboflavinsynthetase and GTP-cyclohydrolase syntheses under conditions of Fe deficiency in the flavinogenic yeast cells confirmed previously made assumptions. PMID:199288

  6. Cytosolic Hsp60 Can Modulate Proteasome Activity in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Kalderon, Bella; Kogan, Gleb; Bubis, Ettel; Pines, Ophry

    2015-01-01

    Hsp60, an essential oligomeric molecular mitochondrial chaperone, has been subject to rigorous basic and clinical research. With yeast as a model system, we provide evidence for the ability of cytosolic yHsp60 to inhibit the yeast proteasome. (i) Following biological turnover of murine Bax (a proteasome substrate), we show that co-expression of cytosolic yHsp60 stabilizes Bax, enhances its association with mitochondria, and enhances its killing capacity. (ii) Expression of yHsp60 in the yeast cytosol (yHsp60c) inhibits degradation of a cytosolic protein ΔMTS-Aco1 tagged with the degron SL17 (a ubiquitin-proteasome substrate). (iii) Conditions under which Hsp60 accumulates in the cytosol (elevated Hsp60c or growth at 37 °C) correlate with reduced 20 S peptidase activity in proteasomes purified from cell extracts. (iv) Elevated yHsp60 in the cytosol correlate with accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins. (v) According to 20 S proteasome pulldown experiments, Hsp60 is physically associated with proteasomes in extracts of cells expressing Hsp60c or grown at 37 °C. Even mutant Hsp60 proteins, lacking chaperone activity, were still capable of proteasome inhibition. The results support the hypothesis that localization of Hsp60 to the cytosol may modulate proteasome activity according to cell need. PMID:25525272

  7. Expression of the Major Surface Antigen of Plasmodium knowlesi Sporozoites in Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Shobhona; Godson, G. Nigel

    1985-05-01

    The circumsporozoite protein, a surface antigen of the sporozoite stage of the monkey malarial parasite Plasmodium knowlesi, was expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using an expression vector containing the 5' regulatory region of the yeast alcohol dehydrogenase I gene. It was necessary to eliminate the entire 5' upstream region of the parasite DNA to obtain the expression of this protein. Only the circumsporozoite precursor protein was produced by the yeast transformants, as detected by immunoblotting. About 55 and 20 percent of the circumsporozoite protein produced in yeast was associated with the 25,000g and 150,000g particulate fractions, respectively. The protein could be solubilized in Triton X-100 and was stable in solubilized extracts.

  8. Protein Affinity Chromatography with Purified Yeast DNA Polymerase α Detects Proteins that Bind to DNA Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Jeff; Formosa, Tim

    1992-02-01

    We have overexpressed the POL1 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified the resulting DNA polymerase α polypeptide in an apparently intact form. We attached the purified DNA polymerase covalently to an agarose matrix and used this matrix to chromatograph extracts prepared from yeast cells. At least six proteins bound to the yeast DNA polymerase α matrix that did not bind to a control matrix. We speculate that these proteins might be DNA polymerase α accessory proteins. Consistent with this interpretation, one of the binding proteins, which we have named POB1 (polymerase one binding), is required for normal chromosome transmission. Mutations in this gene cause increased chromosome loss and an abnormal cell morphology, phenotypes that also occur in the presence of mutations in the yeast α or δ polymerase genes. These results suggest that the interactions detected by polymerase affinity chromatography are biologically relevant and may help to illuminate the architecture of the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery.

  9. TDP-43 toxicity in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Armakola, Maria; Hart, Michael P.; Gitler, Aaron D.

    2010-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an emerging tool for investigating the molecular pathways that underpin several human neurodegenerative disorders associated with protein misfolding. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating adult onset neurodegenerative disease primarily affecting motor neurons. The protein TDP-43 has recently been demonstrated to play an important role in the disease, however the mechanisms by which TDP-43 contributes to pathogenesis are unclear. To explore the mechanistic details that result in aberrant accumulation of TDP-43 and to discover potential strategies for therapeutic intervention, we employed a yeast TDP-43 proteinopathy model system. These studies allowed us to determine the regions of TDP-43 required for aggregation and toxicity and to define the effects of ALS-linked mutant forms of TDP-43. We have also been able to harness the power of yeast genetics to identify potent modifiers of TDP-43 toxicity using high-throughput yeast genetic screens. Here, we describe the methods and approaches that we have used in order to gain insight into TDP-43 biology and its role in disease. These approaches are readily adaptable to other neurodegenerative disease proteins. PMID:21115123

  10. Yeast as factory and factotum.

    PubMed

    Dixon, B

    2000-02-01

    After centuries of vigorous activity in making fine wines, beers and breads, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is now acquiring a rich new portfolio of skills, bestowed by genetic manipulation. As shown in a recent shop-window of research supported by the European Commission, yeasts will soon be benefiting industries as diverse as fish farming, pharmaceuticals and laundering. PMID:11190211

  11. Producing aglycons of ginsenosides in bakers' yeast

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhubo; Wang, Beibei; Liu, Yi; Shi, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Xianan; Liu, Tao; Huang, Luqi; Zhang, Xueli

    2014-01-01

    Ginsenosides are the primary bioactive components of ginseng, which is a popular medicinal plant that exhibits diverse pharmacological activities. Protopanaxadiol, protopanaxatriol and oleanolic acid are three basic aglycons of ginsenosides. Producing aglycons of ginsenosides in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was realized in this work and provides an alternative route compared to traditional extraction methods. Synthetic pathways of these three aglycons were constructed in S. cerevisiae by introducing β-amyrin synthase, oleanolic acid synthase, dammarenediol-II synthase, protopanaxadiol synthase, protopanaxatriol synthase and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase from different plants. In addition, a truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, squalene synthase and 2,3-oxidosqualene synthase genes were overexpressed to increase the precursor supply for improving aglycon production. Strain GY-1 was obtained, which produced 17.2 mg/L protopanaxadiol, 15.9 mg/L protopanaxatriol and 21.4 mg/L oleanolic acid. The yeast strains engineered in this work can serve as the basis for creating an alternative way for producing ginsenosides in place of extractions from plant sources. PMID:24424342

  12. Fermentation of levoglucosan with oleaginous yeasts for lipid production.

    PubMed

    Lian, Jieni; Garcia-Perez, Manuel; Chen, Shulin

    2013-04-01

    This paper reports the production of lipids from non-hydrolyzed levoglucosan (LG) by oleaginous yeasts Rhodosporidium toruloides and Rhodotorula glutinis. Enzyme activity tests of LG kinases from both yeasts indicated that the phosphorylation pathway of LG to glucose-6-phosphate existed. The highest enzyme activity obtained for R. glutinis was 0.22 U/mg of protein. The highest cell mass and lipid production by R. glutinis were 6.8 and 2.7 g/L, respectively from pure LG, and 3.3 and 0.78 g/L from a pyrolytic LG aqueous phase detoxified by ethyl acetate extraction, rotary evaporation and activated carbon. This corresponded to a lipid yield of 13.5 wt.% for pure LG and only 3.9 wt.% for LG in pyrolysis oil. PMID:23425586

  13. Leading Change, Adding Value.

    PubMed

    Evans, Nick

    2016-09-12

    Essential facts Leading Change, Adding Value is NHS England's new nursing and midwifery framework. It is designed to build on Compassion in Practice (CiP), which was published 3 years ago and set out the 6Cs: compassion, care, commitment, courage, competence and communication. CiP established the values at the heart of nursing and midwifery, while the new framework sets out how staff can help transform the health and care sectors to meet the aims of the NHS England's Five Year Forward View. PMID:27615573

  14. Single sample extraction and HPLC processing for quantification of NAD and NADH levels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Sporty, J; Kabir, M M; Turteltaub, K; Ognibene, T; Lin, S; Bench, G

    2008-01-10

    A robust redox extraction protocol for quantitative and reproducible metabolite isolation and recovery has been developed for simultaneous measurement of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its reduced form, NADH, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following culture in liquid media, approximately 10{sup 8} yeast cells were harvested by centrifugation and then lysed under non-oxidizing conditions by bead blasting in ice-cold, nitrogen-saturated 50-mM ammonium acetate. To enable protein denaturation, ice cold nitrogen-saturated CH{sub 3}CN + 50-mM ammonium acetate (3:1; v:v) was added to the cell lysates. After sample centrifugation to pellet precipitated proteins, organic solvent removal was performed on supernatants by chloroform extraction. The remaining aqueous phase was dried and resuspended in 50-mM ammonium acetate. NAD and NADH were separated by HPLC and quantified using UV-VIS absorbance detection. Applicability of this procedure for quantifying NAD and NADH levels was evaluated by culturing yeast under normal (2% glucose) and calorie restricted (0.5% glucose) conditions. NAD and NADH contents are similar to previously reported levels in yeast obtained using enzymatic assays performed separately on acid (for NAD) and alkali (for NADH) extracts. Results demonstrate that it is possible to perform a single preparation to reliably and robustly quantitate both NAD and NADH contents in the same sample. Robustness of the protocol suggests it will be (1) applicable to quantification of these metabolites in mammalian and bacterial cell cultures; and (2) amenable to isotope labeling strategies to determine the relative contribution of specific metabolic pathways to total NAD and NADH levels in cell cultures.

  15. An AIF orthologue regulates apoptosis in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wissing, Silke; Ludovico, Paula; Herker, Eva; Büttner, Sabrina; Engelhardt, Silvia M.; Decker, Thorsten; Link, Alexander; Proksch, Astrid; Rodrigues, Fernando; Corte-Real, Manuela; Fröhlich, Kai-Uwe; Manns, Joachim; Candé, Céline; Sigrist, Stephan J.; Kroemer, Guido; Madeo, Frank

    2004-01-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), a key regulator of cell death, is essential for normal mammalian development and participates in pathological apoptosis. The proapoptotic nature of AIF and its mode of action are controversial. Here, we show that the yeast AIF homologue Ynr074cp controls yeast apoptosis. Similar to mammalian AIF, Ynr074cp is located in mitochondria and translocates to the nucleus of yeast cells in response to apoptotic stimuli. Purified Ynr074cp degrades yeast nuclei and plasmid DNA. YNR074C disruption rescues yeast cells from oxygen stress and delays age-induced apoptosis. Conversely, overexpression of Ynr074cp strongly stimulates apoptotic cell death induced by hydrogen peroxide and this effect is attenuated by disruption of cyclophilin A or the yeast caspase YCA1. We conclude that Ynr074cp is a cell death effector in yeast and rename it AIF-1 (Aif1p, gene AIF1). PMID:15381687

  16. Dirac operator on fuzzy AdS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhri, Hossein; Imaanpur, Ali

    2003-03-01

    In this article we construct the chirality and Dirac operators on noncommutative AdS2. We also derive the discrete spectrum of the Dirac operator which is important in the study of the spectral triple associated to AdS2. It is shown that the degeneracy of the spectrum present in the commutative AdS2 is lifted in the noncommutative case. The way we construct the chirality operator is suggestive of how to introduce the projector operators of the corresponding projective modules on this space.

  17. An xp model on AdS2 spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Vilaplana, Javier; Sierra, Germán

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we formulate the xp model on the AdS2 spacetime. We find that the spectrum of the Hamiltonian has positive and negative eigenvalues, whose absolute values are given by a harmonic oscillator spectrum, which in turn coincides with that of a massive Dirac fermion in AdS2. We extend this result to generic xp models which are shown to be equivalent to a massive Dirac fermion on spacetimes whose metric depend of the xp Hamiltonian. Finally, we construct the generators of the isometry group SO(2,1) of the AdS2 spacetime, and discuss the relation with conformal quantum mechanics.

  18. Use of bimolecular fluorescence complementation in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Skarp, Kari-Pekka; Zhao, Xueqiang; Weber, Marion; Jantti, Jussi

    2008-01-01

    Visualization of protein-protein interactions in vivo offers a powerful tool to resolve spatial and temporal aspects of cellular functions. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) makes use of nonfluorescent fragments of green fluorescent protein or its variants that are added as "tags" to target proteins under study. Only upon target protein interaction is a fluorescent protein complex assembled and the site of interaction can be monitored by microscopy. In this chapter, we describe the method and tools for use of BiFC in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:19066026

  19. Adsorption of ochratoxin A from grape juice by yeast cells immobilised in calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Farbo, Maria Grazia; Urgeghe, Pietro Paolo; Fiori, Stefano; Marceddu, Salvatore; Jaoua, Samir; Migheli, Quirico

    2016-01-18

    Grape juice can be easily contaminated with ochratoxin A (OTA), one of the known mycotoxins with the greatest public health significance. Among the different approaches to decontaminate juice from this mycotoxin, microbiological methods proved efficient, inexpensive and safe, particularly the use of yeast or yeast products. To ascertain whether immobilisation of the yeast biomass would lead to successful decontamination, alginate beads encapsulating Candida intermedia yeast cells were used in our experiments to evaluate their OTA-biosorption efficacy. Magnetic calcium alginate beads were also prepared by adding magnetite in the formulation to allow fast removal from the aqueous solution with a magnet. Calcium alginate beads were added to commercial grape juice spiked with 20 μg/kg OTA and after 48 h of incubation a significant reduction (>80%), of the total OTA content was achieved, while in the subsequent phases (72-120 h) OTA was slowly released into the grape juice by alginate beads. Biosorption properties of alginate-yeast beads were tested in a prototype bioreactor consisting in a glass chromatography column packed with beads, where juice amended with OTA was slowly flowed downstream. The adoption of an interconnected scaled-up bioreactor as an efficient and safe tool to remove traces of OTA from liquid matrices is discussed. PMID:26485316

  20. An evaluation study of different methods for the production of β-D-glucan from yeast biomass.

    PubMed

    Varelas, Vassileios; Liouni, Maria; Calokerinos, Antony C; Nerantzis, Elias T

    2016-01-01

    β-Glucan is a proven beneficial and valuable molecule for human and animal health systems. It can be incorporated as an ingredient in various functional foods and beverages. β-Glucan has been isolated from various biological sources, fungi, mushrooms, algae, plants, and bacteria. The yeast cell wall comprises a suitable target for the extraction and purification of β-glucan. Although there are various extraction techniques, significant differences are observed as the technique used affects the final yield and purity, molecular weight, biological activity, solubility, quality, and other biological and functional properties of the extracted β-glucan. The aim of this review is the evaluation of different extraction methods for the production of β-glucan from yeast biomass. Furthermore, the use of industrial spent yeast waste from breweries and the wine industry for biotechnological β-glucan production and the concept of green wineries and breweries are discussed. PMID:26190751

  1. The Antiproton Decelerator: AD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maury, S.; Baird, S.; Berlin, D.; Boillot, J.; Bosser, J.; Brouet, M.; Buttkus, J.; Caspers, F.; Chohan, V.; Dekkers, D.; Eriksson, T.; Garoby, R.; Giannini, R.; Gröbner, O.; Gruber, J.; Hemery, J. Y.; Koziol, H.; Maccaferri, R.; Metzger, C.; Metzmacher, K.; Möhl, D.; Mulder, H.; Paoluzzi, M.; Pedersen, F.; Riunaud, J. P.; Serre, C.; Simon, D. J.; Tranquille, G.; Tuyn, J.; Williams, B.

    1997-05-01

    A simplified scheme for the provision of antiprotons at 100 MeV/c in fast extraction mode is described. It uses the existing antiproton production target and the modified Antiproton Collector ring in their present location. The physics programme is largely based on capturing and storing antiprotons in Penning traps for the production and spectroscopy of antihydrogen. The machine modifications necessary to deliver batches of 10^7 antiprotons every minute at 100 MeV/c are described and details of the machine layout are given.

  2. URANIUM EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Harrington, C.D.; Opie, J.V.

    1958-07-01

    The recovery of uranium values from uranium ore such as pitchblende is described. The ore is first dissolved in nitric acid, and a water soluble nitrate is added as a salting out agent. The resulting feed solution is then contacted with diethyl ether, whereby the bulk of the uranyl nitrate and a portion of the impurities are taken up by the ether. This acid ether extract is then separated from the aqueous raffinate, and contacted with water causing back extractioa of the uranyl nitrate and impurities into the water to form a crude liquor. After separation from the ether extract, this crude liquor is heated to about 118 deg C to obtain molten uranyl nitrate hexahydratc. After being slightly cooled the uranyl nitrate hexahydrate is contacted with acid free diethyl ether whereby the bulk of the uranyl nitrate is dissolved into the ethcr to form a neutral ether solution while most of the impurities remain in the aqueous waste. After separation from the aqueous waste, the resultant ether solution is washed with about l0% of its volume of water to free it of any dissolved impurities and is then contacted with at least one half its volume of water whereby the uranyl nitrate is extracted into the water to form an aqueous product solution.

  3. ADS Development in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    Accelerator driven nuclear transmutation system has been pursued to have a clue to the solution of high-level radioactive waste management. The concept consists of super conducting linac, sub-critical reactor and the beam window. Reference model is set up to 800MW thermal power by using 1.5GeV proton beams with considerations multi-factors such as core criticality. Materials damage is simulated by high-energy particle transport codes and so on. Recent achievement on irradiation materials experiment is stated and the differences are pointed out if core burn-up is considered or not. Heat balance in tank-type ADS indicates the temperature conditions of steam generator, the beam widow and cladding materials. Lead-bismuth eutectics demonstration has been conducted. Corrosion depth rate was shown by experiments.

  4. Supersymmetric warped AdS in extended topologically massive supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deger, N. S.; Kaya, A.; Samtleben, H.; Sezgin, E.

    2014-07-01

    We determine the most general form of off-shell N=(1,1) supergravity field configurations in three dimensions by requiring that at least one off-shell Killing spinor exists. We then impose the field equations of the topologically massive off-shell supergravity and find a class of solutions whose properties crucially depend on the norm of the auxiliary vector field. These are spacelike-squashed and timelike-stretched AdS3 for the spacelike and timelike norms, respectively. At the transition point where the norm vanishes, the solution is null warped AdS3. This occurs when the coefficient of the Lorentz-Chern-Simons term is related to the AdS radius by μℓ=2. We find that the spacelike-squashed AdS3 can be modded out by a suitable discrete subgroup of the isometry group, yielding an extremal black hole solution which avoids closed timelike curves.

  5. Effect of sodium chloride on bakers' yeast growing in gelatin

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, C.J.; Tanner, R.D.; Malaney, G.W.

    1982-04-01

    In recent years, industrial fermentation researchers have shifted their attention from liquid to solid and semisolid culture conditions. We converted liquid cultures to the semisolid mode by adding high levels of gelatin. Previous studies on liquid cultures have revealed the inhibitory activity of mineral salts, such as NaCl, on the fermentation of sugars by yeasts. We made a kinetic study of the effects of 1 to 5% (wt/vol) NaCl on the alcoholic fermentations of glucose by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a growth medium containing 16% gelatin. Our results showed that the effect of high salt content on semisolid culture is essentially the same as the effect on liquid culture; i.e., as the salt content increased, the following occurred: (i) the growth of yeasts decreased, (ii) the lag period of the yeast biomass curve lengthened, (iii) the sugar intake was lowered, (iv) the yield of ethanol was reduced and (v) the production of glycerol was increased. We observed a new relationship correlating the area of kinetic hysteresis with ethanol production rate, acetaldehyde concentration, and the initial NaCl concentration. (Refs. 20).

  6. Characterization of the cellular antigens of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeast form.

    PubMed Central

    Casotto, M

    1990-01-01

    Antigenic components of the yeast extract of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Linder 2511 cultured for 3, 8, 20, 30, and 60 days were examined by the Western blot (immunoblot) technique. The 3-day extract was chosen for characterization of the antigenic components because its stability did not vary with time and it contained all antigens identified by patient sera. Antibodies to cross-reacting antigens of P. brasiliensis extracts were detected in sera from patients with histoplasmosis, candidiasis, and aspergillosis. The 58-, 57-, 21-, and 16-kilodalton (kDa) antigens were specific for P. brasiliensis, while the 48- and 45-kDa antigens were specific for paracoccidioidomycosis. The Western blot technique is a useful tool for the diagnosis of disease and revealed heterogeneity in the responses of patient sera. The combination of the 58-, 57-, and 45-kDa proteins confirmed a diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis (87% of the cases). Images PMID:2380351

  7. Mycotoxins - prevention and decontamination by yeasts.

    PubMed

    Pfliegler, Walter P; Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Pócsi, István

    2015-07-01

    The application of yeasts has great potential in reducing the economic damage caused by toxigenic fungi in the agriculture. Some yeasts may act as biocontrol agents inhibiting the growth of filamentous fungi. These species may also gain importance in the preservation of agricultural products and in the reduction of their mycotoxin contamination, yet the extent of mycotoxin production in the presence of biocontrol agents is relatively less understood. The application of yeasts in various technological processes may have a direct inhibitory effect on the toxin production of certain molds, which is independent of their growth suppressing effect. Furthermore, several yeast species are capable of accumulating mycotoxins from agricultural products, thereby effectively decontaminating them. Probiotic yeasts or products containing yeast cell wall are also applied to counteract mycotoxicosis in livestock. Several yeast strains are also able to degrade toxins to less-toxic or even non-toxic substances. This intensively researched field would greatly benefit from a deeper knowledge on the genetic and molecular basis of toxin degradation. Moreover, yeasts and their biotechnologically important enzymes may exhibit sensitivity to certain mycotoxins, thereby mounting a considerable problem for the biotechnological industry. It is noted that yeasts are generally regarded as safe; however, there are reports of toxin degrading species that may cause human fungal infections. The aspects of yeast-mycotoxin relations with a brief consideration of strain improvement strategies and genetic modification for improved detoxifying properties and/or mycotoxin resistance are reviewed here. PMID:25682759

  8. Biological Activities of Tetrodotoxin-Producing Enterococcus faecium AD1 Isolated from Puffer Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tu Hoang Khue; Nguyen, Huu Ngoc; Nghe, Dat Van; Nguyen, Kim Hoang

    2015-01-01

    Puffer fishes were collected from the central sea in Vietnam from spring to summer season. The eggs were incubated in MRS broth that was used to test the toxicity in mice and isolate the lactic acid bacteria community that could produce tetrodotoxin (TTX). Thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance lipid chromatography (HPLC) were used to detect and quantify TTX. As a result, Enterococcus faecium AD1 which was identified by biochemical test and 16S rRNA analysis could produce TTX 0.3 mg/mL when cultured in MRS broth. The bacterium was optimized for TTX production and gave 0.18 mg/mL, 0.07 mg/mL, and 0.15 mg/mL in media prepared from the meat-washing water of freshwater fishes (Pangasius bocourti, Oreochromis sp.) and sea fish (Auxis thazard), respectively, that are also hopeful to answer some poisoning cases related to eating fishes. Enterococcus faecium also showed the wide antimicrobial activities on yeast, Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. Extracted exopolysaccharide (EPS) that reacted with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl to give IC50 at 5 mg/mL equaled 11 mg/mL ascorbic acid which could show effects on Hela-6 and Hep G2 using sulforhodamine B test. Enterococcus faecium can be claimed as a promising source in tetrodotoxin and biological compounds. PMID:26380310

  9. Biological Activities of Tetrodotoxin-Producing Enterococcus faecium AD1 Isolated from Puffer Fishes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tu Hoang Khue; Nguyen, Huu Ngoc; Nghe, Dat Van; Nguyen, Kim Hoang

    2015-01-01

    Puffer fishes were collected from the central sea in Vietnam from spring to summer season. The eggs were incubated in MRS broth that was used to test the toxicity in mice and isolate the lactic acid bacteria community that could produce tetrodotoxin (TTX). Thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance lipid chromatography (HPLC) were used to detect and quantify TTX. As a result, Enterococcus faecium AD1 which was identified by biochemical test and 16S rRNA analysis could produce TTX 0.3 mg/mL when cultured in MRS broth. The bacterium was optimized for TTX production and gave 0.18 mg/mL, 0.07 mg/mL, and 0.15 mg/mL in media prepared from the meat-washing water of freshwater fishes (Pangasius bocourti, Oreochromis sp.) and sea fish (Auxis thazard), respectively, that are also hopeful to answer some poisoning cases related to eating fishes. Enterococcus faecium also showed the wide antimicrobial activities on yeast, Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. Extracted exopolysaccharide (EPS) that reacted with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl to give IC50 at 5 mg/mL equaled 11 mg/mL ascorbic acid which could show effects on Hela-6 and Hep G2 using sulforhodamine B test. Enterococcus faecium can be claimed as a promising source in tetrodotoxin and biological compounds. PMID:26380310

  10. Effects of a spoilage yeast from silage on in vitro ruminal fermentation.

    PubMed

    Santos, M C; Lock, A L; Mechor, G D; Kung, L

    2015-04-01

    Feeding silages with high concentrations of yeasts from aerobic spoilage is often implicated as a cause of poor animal performance on dairies. Our objective was to determine if a commonly found spoilage yeast, isolated from silage, had the potential to alter in vitro ruminal fermentations. A single colony of Issatchenkia orientalis, isolated from high-moisture corn, was grown in selective medium. The yeast culture was purified and added to in vitro culture tubes containing a total mixed ration (43% concentrate, 43% corn silage, 11% alfalfa haylage, and 3% alfalfa hay on a dry matter basis), buffer, and ruminal fluid to achieve added theoretical final concentrations of 0 (CTR), 4.40 (low yeast; LY), 6.40 (medium yeast; MY), and 8.40 (high yeast; HY) log10 cfu of yeast/mL of in vitro fluid. Seven separate tubes were prepared for each treatment and each time point and incubated for 12 and 24h at 39 °C. At the end of the incubation period, samples were analyzed for pH, yeast number, neutral detergent fiber (NDF) digestibility, volatile fatty acids (VFA), and fatty acids (FA). We found that total viable yeast counts decreased for all treatments in in vitro incubations but were still relatively high (5.3 log10 cfu of yeasts/mL) for HY after 24h of incubation. Addition of HY resulted in a lower pH and higher concentration of total VFA in culture fluid compared with other treatments. Moreover, additions of MY and HY decreased in vitro NDF digestibility compared with CTR, and the effect was greatest for HY. Overall, the biohydrogenation of dietary unsaturated FA was not altered by addition of I. orientalis and decreased over time with an increase in the accumulation of saturated FA, especially palmitic and stearic acids. We conclude that addition of I. orientalis, especially at high levels, has the potential to reduce in vitro NDF digestion and alter other aspects of ruminal fermentations. PMID:25622865

  11. Application of temperature gradient gel electrophoresis to the study of yeast diversity in the estuary of the Tagus river, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Gadanho, Mário; Sampaio, José Paulo

    2004-12-01

    Temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) was employed for the assessment of yeast diversity in the estuary of the Tagus river (Portugal). The molecular detection of yeasts was carried out directly from water samples and, in parallel, a cultivation approach by means of an enrichment step was employed. A nested PCR was employed to obtain a fungal amplicon containing the D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene. For identification the TGGE bands were extracted, re-amplified, and sequenced. Fourteen fungal taxa were detected and all except one were yeasts. Most yeast sequences corresponded to members of the Ascomycota and only three belonged to the Basidiomycota. Five yeasts (four ascomycetes and one basidiomycete) could not be identified to the species level due to the uniqueness of their sequences. The number of species detected after enrichment was higher than the number of taxa found using the direct detection method. This suggests that some yeast populations are present in densities that are below the detection threshold of the method. With respect to the analysis of the yeast community structure, our results indicate that the dominant populations belong to Debaryomyces hansenii, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Cryptococcus longus, and to an uncultured basidiomycetous yeast phylogenetically close to Cr. longus. The combined analysis of direct detection and cultivation approaches indicates a similar community structure at the two sampled sites since nine species were present at both localities. PMID:15556087

  12. Yeast diversity in hypersaline habitats.

    PubMed

    Butinar, L; Santos, S; Spencer-Martins, I; Oren, A; Gunde-Cimerman, N

    2005-03-15

    Thus far it has been considered that hypersaline natural brines which are subjected to extreme solar heating, do not contain non-melanized yeast populations. Nevertheless we have isolated yeasts in eight different salterns worldwide, as well as from the Dead Sea, Enriquillo Lake (Dominican Republic) and the Great Salt Lake (Utah). Among the isolates obtained from hypersaline waters, Pichia guilliermondii, Debaryomyces hansenii, Yarrowia lipolytica and Candida parapsilosis are known contaminants of low water activity food, whereas Rhodosporidium sphaerocarpum, R. babjevae, Rhodotorula laryngis, Trichosporon mucoides, and a new species resembling C. glabrata were not known for their halotolerance and were identified for the first time in hypersaline habitats. Moreover, the ascomycetous yeast Metschnikowia bicuspidata, known to be a parasite of the brine shrimp, was isolated as a free-living form from the Great Salt Lake brine. In water rich in magnesium chloride (bitterns) from the La Trinitat salterns (Spain), two new species provisionally named C. atmosphaerica - like and P. philogaea - like were discovered. PMID:15766773

  13. A small-scale method for quantitation of carotenoids in bacteria and yeasts.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Philipp; Surmann, Peter; Vallentin, Gerald; Fuhrmann, Herbert

    2007-07-01

    Microbial carotenoids are difficult to extract because of their embedding into a compact matrix and prominent sensitivity to degradation. Especially for carotenoid analysis of bacteria and yeasts, there is lack of information about capability, precision and recovery of the method used. Accordingly, we investigated feasibility, throughput and validity of a new small-scale method using Micrococcus luteus and Rhodotorula glutinis for testing purposes. For disintegration and extraction, we combined primarily mild techniques: enzymatically we used combinations of lysozyme and lipase for bacteria as well as lyticase and lipase for yeasts. Additional mechanical treatment included sonication and freeze-thawing cycles. Chemical treatment with dimethylsulfoxide was applied for yeasts only. For extraction we used a methanol-chloroform mixture stabilized efficiently with butylated hydroxytoluene and alpha-tocopherol. Separation of compounds was achieved with HPLC, applying a binary methanol/tert-butyl methyl ether gradient on a polymer reversed C30 phase. Substances of interest were detected and identified applying a photodiode-array (PDA) and carotenoids quantitated as all-trans-beta-carotene equivalents. For evaluation of recovery and reproducibility of the extraction method, we used beta-8'-apo-carotenal as internal standard. The method provides a sensitive tool for the determination of carotenoids from bacteria and yeasts and also for small changes in carotenoid spectrum of a single species. Corequisite large experiments are facilitated by the high throughput of the method. PMID:17509707

  14. Conversion of SPORL pretreated Douglas fir forest residues into microbial lipids with oleaginous yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Douglas fir is the dominant commercial tree grown in the United States. In this study Douglas fir residue was converted to single cell oils using oleaginous yeasts. Monosaccharides were extracted from the woody biomass by pretreating with sulfite and dilute sulfuric acid (SPORL process) and hydrol...

  15. Cytotoxic monacolins from red yeast rice, a Chinese medicine and food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seven new monacolins, monacolins Q-S (1-3), a,ß-dehydromonacolin S (4), 3a-hydroxy-3,5-dihydromonacolin L (5), 3ß-hydroxy-3,5-dihydromonacolin L (6), and a,ß-hydromonacolin Q (7) were isolated and characterized from the methanol extract of red yeast rice. In addition, six known monacolins, a,ß-dehyd...

  16. Conversion of SPORL pretreated Douglas-fir forest residues into microbial lipids with oleaginous yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Douglas fir is the dominant commercial tree grown in the United States. In this study Douglas fir residue was converted to single cell oils using oleaginous yeasts. Monosaccharides were extracted from the woody biomass by pretreating with sulfite and dilute sulfuric acid (SPORL process) and hydrol...

  17. Angular and spectrally resolved investigations of yeast cells by light scattering microscopy and goniometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, Julian; Müller, Dennis; Nothelfer, Steffen; Kienle, Alwin

    2015-07-01

    Spectrally and angular resolved light scattering from yeast cells was studied with a scattering microscope and a goniometer. Different cell models were investigated with help of analytical solutions of Maxwell's equations. It was found that extraction of precise morphological and optical cellular properties from the measured scattering patterns and phase functions requires more sophisticated cell models than standard Mie theory.

  18. Identification of impact odorants in Bordeaux red grape juice, in the commercial yeast used for its fermentation, and in the produced wine.

    PubMed

    Kotseridis, Y; Baumes, R

    2000-02-01

    The aroma extract dilution analysis method was used to detect the impact odorants of Bordeaux Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot wines extracts, as well as those of the extracts of the corresponding Cabernet Sauvignon juice and dry yeasts used for its fermentation. The wines and the yeasts were extracted using dichloromethane, and the juice was extracted using Amberlite XAD-2. Structural identification of the impact odorants using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and atomic emission detection (sulfur acquisition) was achieved after enrichment of these extracts by silica gel and Affi-Gel 501 chromatography. The same odorants (with the exception of dimethyl sulfide among 48) were detected in both wine extracts, with about the same flavor dilution (FD) factors. The 18 impact odorants detected in the Cabernet Sauvignon juice and dry yeast extracts were also found in the wine extracts. The odorants with the highest FD factors were 3-(methylsulfanyl)propanal, (E,Z)-nona-2, 6-dienal, and decanal in the juice extract, 2-methyl-3-sulfanylfuran, 3-(methylsulfanyl)propanal, 2-/3-methylbutanoic acids, and phenylethanal in the dry yeast extract, and 2-/3-methylbutanols, 2-phenylethanol, 2-methyl-3-sulfanylfuran, acetic acid, 3-(methylsulfanyl)propanal, 2-/3-methylbutanoic acids, beta-damascenone, 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, Furaneol, and homofuraneol in the wine extracts. Determination of the odor thresholds of some of these impact odorants was carried out. PMID:10691647

  19. Immobilization of yeast cells on hydrogel carriers obtained by radiation-induced polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Lu Zhao; Carenza, Mario; Kaetsu, Isao; Kumakura, Minoru; Yoshida, Masaru; Fujimura, Takashi

    Polymer hydrogels were obtained by radiation-induced copolymerization at -78°C of aqueous solutions of acrylic and methacrylic esters. The matrices were characterized by equilibrium water content measurements, by optical microscopy observations and by scanning electron microscopy analysis. Yeast cells were immobilized on these hydrogels and the ethanol productivity by batch fermentation was determined. Matrix hydrophilicity and porosity were found to deeply influence the adhesion of yeast cells and, hence, the ethanol productivity. The latter as well as other physico-chemical properties were also affected by the presence of a crosslinking agent added in small amounts to the polymerizing mixture.

  20. Single sample extraction protocol for the quantification of NAD and NADH redox states in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sporty, Jennifer L.; Kabir, Md. Mohiuddin; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Ognibene, Ted; Lin, Su-Ju; Bench, Graham

    2009-01-01

    A robust redox extraction protocol for quantitative and reproducible metabolite isolation and recovery has been developed for simultaneous measurement of nicotin-amide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its reduced form, NADH, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following culture in liquid media, yeast cells were harvested by centrifugation and then lysed under nonoxidizing conditions by bead blasting in ice-cold, nitrogen-saturated 50 mM ammonium acetate. To enable protein denaturation, ice cold nitrogen-saturated CH3CN/50 mM ammonium acetate (3:1 v/v) was added to the cell lysates. Chloroform extractions were performed on supernatants to remove organic solvent. Samples were lyophilized and resuspended in 50 mM ammonium acetate. NAD and NADH were separated by HPLC and quantified using UV–Vis absorbance detection. NAD and NADH levels were evaluated in yeast grown under normal (2% glucose) and calorie restricted (0.5% glucose) conditions. Results demonstrate that it is possible to perform a single preparation to reliably and robustly quantitate both NAD and NADH contents in the same sample. Robustness of the protocol suggests it will be (i) applicable to quantification of these metabolites in other cell cultures; and (ii) amenable to isotope labeling strategies to determine the relative contribution of specific metabolic pathways to total NAD and NADH levels in cell cultures. PMID:18763242

  1. Single sample extraction protocol for the quantification of NAD and NADH redox states in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sporty, Jennifer L; Kabir, Md Mohiuddin; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Ognibene, Ted; Lin, Su-Ju; Bench, Graham

    2008-10-01

    A robust redox extraction protocol for quantitative and reproducible metabolite isolation and recovery has been developed for simultaneous measurement of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and its reduced form, NADH, from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following culture in liquid media, yeast cells were harvested by centrifugation and then lysed under nonoxidizing conditions by bead blasting in ice-cold, nitrogen-saturated 50 mM ammonium acetate. To enable protein denaturation, ice cold nitrogen-saturated CH(3)CN/50 mM ammonium acetate (3:1 v/v) was added to the cell lysates. Chloroform extractions were performed on supernatants to remove organic solvent. Samples were lyophilized and resuspended in 50 mM ammonium acetate. NAD and NADH were separated by HPLC and quantified using UV-Vis absorbance detection. NAD and NADH levels were evaluated in yeast grown under normal (2% glucose) and calorie restricted (0.5% glucose) conditions. Results demonstrate that it is possible to perform a single preparation to reliably and robustly quantitate both NAD and NADH contents in the same sample. Robustness of the protocol suggests it will be (i) applicable to quantification of these metabolites in other cell cultures; and (ii) amenable to isotope labeling strategies to determine the relative contribution of specific metabolic pathways to total NAD and NADH levels in cell cultures. PMID:18763242

  2. Uncoupling reproduction from metabolism extends chronological lifespan in yeast.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Saisubramanian; Kruckeberg, Arthur L; Schmidt, Karen H; Kroll, Evgueny; Hamilton, Morgan; McInnerney, Kate; Summers, Ryan; Taylor, Timothy; Rosenzweig, Frank

    2014-04-15

    Studies of replicative and chronological lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have advanced understanding of longevity in all eukaryotes. Chronological lifespan in this species is defined as the age-dependent viability of nondividing cells. To date this parameter has only been estimated under calorie restriction, mimicked by starvation. Because postmitotic cells in higher eukaryotes often do not starve, we developed a model yeast system to study cells as they age in the absence of calorie restriction. Yeast cells were encapsulated in a matrix consisting of calcium alginate to form ∼3 mm beads that were packed into bioreactors and fed ad libitum. Under these conditions cells ceased to divide, became heat shock and zymolyase resistant, yet retained high fermentative capacity. Over the course of 17 d, immobilized yeast cells maintained >95% viability, whereas the viability of starving, freely suspended (planktonic) cells decreased to <10%. Immobilized cells exhibited a stable pattern of gene expression that differed markedly from growing or starving planktonic cells, highly expressing genes in glycolysis, cell wall remodeling, and stress resistance, but decreasing transcription of genes in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and genes that regulate the cell cycle, including master cyclins CDC28 and CLN1. Stress resistance transcription factor MSN4 and its upstream effector RIM15 are conspicuously up-regulated in the immobilized state, and an immobilized rim15 knockout strain fails to exhibit the long-lived, growth-arrested phenotype, suggesting that altered regulation of the Rim15-mediated nutrient-sensing pathway plays an important role in extending yeast chronological lifespan under calorie-unrestricted conditions. PMID:24706810

  3. Isolation and screening of yeasts that ferment D-xylose directly to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, J.N.; Ireland, R.S.; Margaritis, A.; Lachance, M.A.

    1985-12-01

    Natural habitats of yeasts were examined for the presence of strains able to produce ethanol from D-xylose. Black knots, insect frass, and tree exudates were screened by enrichment in liquid D-xylose-yeast extract medium. These and each D-xylose-assimilating yeast in a collection from cactus fruits and Drosophila spp. were tested for alcohol production from this sugar. Among the 412 isolates examined, 36 produced more than 1 g of ethanol liter/sup -1/ from 20 g of D-xylose liter/sup -1/, all under aerated conditions. Closer examination of the strains indicated that their time courses of D-xylose fermentation followed different patterns. Some strains produced more biomass than ethanol, and among these, ethanol may or may not be assimilated rapidly after depletion of D-xylose. Others produced more ethanol than biomass, but all catabolized ethanol after carbohydrate exhaustion. Ethanol production appeared best at low pH values and under mild aeration. Possible correlations between the nutritional profiles of the yeasts and their ability to produce ethanol from D-xylose were explored by multivariate analysis. D-Xylose appeared slightly better utilized by yeasts which rate poorly in terms of fermentation. The fermentation of D-glucose had no bearing on D-xylose fermentation. No specific nutritional trait could discriminate well between better D-xylose fermentors and other yeasts.

  4. Isolation and Screening of Yeasts That Ferment d-Xylose Directly to Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, J. N.; Ireland, R. S.; Margaritis, A.; Lachance, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Natural habitats of yeasts were examined for the presence of strains able to produce ethanol from d-xylose. Black knots, insect frass, and tree exudates were screened by enrichment in liquid d-xylose-yeast extract medium. These and each d-xylose-assimilating yeast in a collection from cactus fruits and Drosophila spp. were tested for alcohol production from this sugar. Among the 412 isolates examined, 36 produced more than 1 g of ethanol liter−1 from 20 g of d-xylose liter−1, all under aerated conditions. Closer examination of the strains indicated that their time courses of d-xylose fermentation followed different patterns. Some strains produced more biomass than ethanol, and among these, ethanol may or may not be assimilated rapidly after depletion of d-xylose. Others produced more ethanol than biomass, but all catabolized ethanol after carbohydrate exhaustion. Ethanol production appeared best at low pH values and under mild aeration. Possible correlations between the nutritional profiles of the yeasts and their ability to produce ethanol from d-xylose were explored by multivariate analysis. d-Xylose appeared slightly better utilized by yeasts which rate poorly in terms of fermentation. The fermentation of d-glucose had no bearing on d-xylose fermentation. No specific nutritional trait could discriminate well between better d-xylose fermentors and other yeasts. PMID:16346947

  5. Yeasts and circumcision in the male.

    PubMed

    Davidson, F

    1977-04-01

    Sixty-six circumcised men and 69 uncircumcised men, both heterosexual and homosexual, had specimens taken from the coronal sulcus and meatus of the penis. Yeasts were isolated at similar rates in both the circumcised (14%) and uncircumcised (17%) men. The circumcised men had significantly fewer symptoms (P = 0-0058). Therefore the female partners of both circumcised and uncircumcised men are exposed to similar rates of yeast infection despite the absence of symptoms in circumcised men. Eighty per cent of the female contacts of yeast-positive men had yeast infection while 32% of the contacts of yeast-negative men were affected. This difference was statistically significant (0-05 greater than P greater than 0-025). Men with non-specific genital infection seemed more likely to carry yeasts than men with gonorrhoea or normal men. PMID:322822

  6. Value Added in English Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Andrew; McCormack, Tanya; Evans, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Value-added indicators are now a central part of school accountability in England, and value-added information is routinely used in school improvement at both the national and the local levels. This article describes the value-added models that are being used in the academic year 2007-8 by schools, parents, school inspectors, and other…

  7. Per aspirin ad astra...

    PubMed

    Hartung, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Taking the 110th anniversary of marketing of aspirin as starting point, the almost scary toxicological profile of aspirin is contrasted with its actual use experience. The author concludes that we are lucky that, in 1899, there was no regulatory toxicology. Adding, for the purpose of this article, a fourth R to the Three Rs, i.e. Realism, three reality-checks are carried out. The first one comes to the conclusion that the tools of toxicology are hardly adequate for the challenges ahead. The second one concludes that, specifically, the implementation of the EU REACH system is not feasible with these tools, mainly with regard to throughput. The third one challenges the belief that classical alternative methods, i.e. replacing animal test-based tools one by one, is actually leading to a new toxicology - it appears to change only patches of the patchwork, but not to overcome any inherent limitations other than ethical ones. The perspective lies in the Toxicology for the 21st Century initiatives, which aim to create a new approach from the scratch, by an evidence-based toxicology and a global "Human Toxicology Programme". PMID:20105011

  8. An indirect assay for volatile compound production in yeast strains

    PubMed Central

    Ravasio, Davide; Walther, Andrea; Trost, Kajetan; Vrhovsek, Urska; Wendland, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Traditional flavor analysis relies on gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods. Here we describe an indirect method coupling volatile compound formation to an ARO9-promoter-LacZ reporter gene. The resulting β-galactosidase activity correlated well with headspace solid phase micro extraction (HS/SPME) GC-MS data, particularly with respect to the formation of rose flavor. This tool enables large-scale screening of yeast strains and their progeny to identify the most flavor active strains. PMID:24424137

  9. Yeast makes whey into edible oil

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-19

    Researchers from Iowa State University have found that after the ultrafiltration of whey, the remaining liquid can make an excellent growth medium for yeast. The yeast can efficiently convert nutrients in the whey into an edible oil. As much as 65% of the dry weight of the yeast cells is edible oil. The fermentation is also reported to reduce the organic material in the whey liquid about 90% thereby alleviating a pollution problem.

  10. Yeasts in floral nectar: a quantitative survey

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Carlos M.; de Vega, Clara; Canto, Azucena; Pozo, María I.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims One peculiarity of floral nectar that remains relatively unexplored from an ecological perspective is its role as a natural habitat for micro-organisms. This study assesses the frequency of occurrence and abundance of yeast cells in floral nectar of insect-pollinated plants from three contrasting plant communities on two continents. Possible correlations between interspecific differences in yeast incidence and pollinator composition are also explored. Methods The study was conducted at three widely separated areas, two in the Iberian Peninsula (Spain) and one in the Yucatán Peninsula (Mexico). Floral nectar samples from 130 species (37–63 species per region) in 44 families were examined microscopically for the presence of yeast cells. For one of the Spanish sites, the relationship across species between incidence of yeasts in nectar and the proportion of flowers visited by each of five major pollinator categories was also investigated. Key Results Yeasts occurred regularly in the floral nectar of many species, where they sometimes reached extraordinary densities (up to 4 × 105 cells mm−3). Depending on the region, between 32 and 44 % of all nectar samples contained yeasts. Yeast cell densities in the order of 104 cells mm−3 were commonplace, and densities >105 cells mm−3 were not rare. About one-fifth of species at each site had mean yeast cell densities >104 cells mm−3. Across species, yeast frequency and abundance were directly correlated with the proportion of floral visits by bumble-bees, and inversely with the proportion of visits by solitary bees. Conclusions Incorporating nectar yeasts into the scenario of plant–pollinator interactions opens up a number of intriguing avenues for research. In addition, with yeasts being as ubiquitous and abundant in floral nectars as revealed by this study, and given their astounding metabolic versatility, studies focusing on nectar chemical features should carefully control for the presence

  11. Architecture of a yeast U6 RNA gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Eschenlauer, J B; Kaiser, M W; Gerlach, V L; Brow, D A

    1993-01-01

    The promoters of vertebrate and yeast U6 small nuclear RNA genes are structurally dissimilar, although both are recognized by RNA polymerase III. Vertebrate U6 RNA genes have exclusively upstream promoters, while the U6 RNA gene from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SNR6) has internal and downstream promoter elements that match the tRNA gene intragenic A- and B-block elements, respectively. Substitution of the SNR6 A or B block greatly diminished U6 RNA accumulation in vivo, and a subcellular extract competent for RNA polymerase III transcription generated nearly identical DNase I protection patterns over the SNR6 downstream B block and a tRNA gene intragenic B block. We conclude that the SNR6 promoter is functionally similar to tRNA gene promoters, although the effects of extragenic deletion mutations suggest that the downstream location of the SNR6 B block imposes unique positional constraints on its function. Both vertebrate and yeast U6 RNA genes have an upstream TATA box element not normally found in tRNA genes. Substitution of the SNR6 TATA box altered the site of transcription initiation in vivo, while substitution of sequences further upstream had no effect on SNR6 transcription. We present a model for the SNR6 transcription complex that explains these results in terms of their effects on the binding of transcription initiation factor TFIIIB. Images PMID:8474459

  12. Molecular Genetic Tools and Techniques in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Murray, Johanne M; Watson, Adam T; Carr, Antony M

    2016-01-01

    The molecular genetic tools used in fission yeast have generally been adapted from methods and approaches developed for use in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Initially, the molecular genetics of Schizosaccharomyces pombe was developed to aid gene identification, but it is now applied extensively to the analysis of gene function and the manipulation of noncoding sequences that affect chromosome dynamics. Much current research using fission yeast thus relies on the basic processes of introducing DNA into the organism and the extraction of DNA for subsequent analysis. Targeted integration into specific genomic loci is often used to create site-specific mutants or changes to noncoding regulatory elements for subsequent phenotypic analysis. It is also regularly used to introduce additional sequences that generate tagged proteins or to create strains in which the levels of wild-type protein can be manipulated through transcriptional regulation and/or protein degradation. Here, we draw together a collection of core molecular genetic techniques that underpin much of modern research using S. pombe We summarize the most useful methods that are routinely used and provide guidance, learned from experience, for the successful application of these methods. PMID:27140925

  13. Evaluation of Automated Yeast Identification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinnis, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    One hundred and nine teleomorphic and anamorphic yeast isolates representing approximately 30 taxa were used to evaluate the accuracy of the Biolog yeast identification system. Isolates derived from nomenclatural types, environmental, and clinica isolates of known identity were tested in the Biolog system. Of the isolates tested, 81 were in the Biolog database. The system correctly identified 40, incorrectly identified 29, and was unable to identify 12. Of the 28 isolates not in the database, 18 were given names, whereas 10 were not. The Biolog yeast identification system is inadequate for the identification of yeasts originating from the environment during space program activities.

  14. Supergravity at the boundary of AdS supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amsel, Aaron J.; Compère, Geoffrey

    2009-04-01

    We give a general analysis of AdS boundary conditions for spin-3/2 Rarita-Schwinger fields and investigate boundary conditions preserving supersymmetry for a graviton multiplet in AdS4. Linear Rarita-Schwinger fields in AdSd are shown to admit mixed Dirichlet-Neumann boundary conditions when their mass is in the range 0≤|m|<1/2lAdS. We also demonstrate that mixed boundary conditions are allowed for larger masses when the inner product is “renormalized” accordingly with the action. We then use the results obtained for |m|=1/lAdS to explore supersymmetric boundary conditions for N=1 AdS4 supergravity in which the metric and Rarita-Schwinger fields are fluctuating at the boundary. We classify boundary conditions that preserve boundary supersymmetry or superconformal symmetry. Under the AdS/CFT dictionary, Neumann boundary conditions in d=4 supergravity correspond to gauging the superconformal group of the three-dimensional CFT describing M2-branes, while N=1 supersymmetric mixed boundary conditions couple the CFT to N=1 superconformal topologically massive gravity.

  15. Novel Structural Features in Candida albicans Hyphal Glucan Provide a Basis for Differential Innate Immune Recognition of Hyphae Versus Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Lowman, Douglas W.; Greene, Rachel R.; Bearden, Daniel W.; Kruppa, Michael D.; Pottier, Max; Monteiro, Mario A.; Soldatov, Dmitriy V.; Ensley, Harry E.; Cheng, Shih-Chin; Netea, Mihai G.; Williams, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system differentially recognizes Candida albicans yeast and hyphae. It is not clear how the innate immune system effectively discriminates between yeast and hyphal forms of C. albicans. Glucans are major components of the fungal cell wall and key fungal pathogen-associated molecular patterns. C. albicans yeast glucan has been characterized; however, little is known about glucan structure in C. albicans hyphae. Using an extraction procedure that minimizes degradation of the native structure, we extracted glucans from C. albicans hyphal cell walls. 1H NMR data analysis revealed that, when compared with reference (1→3,1→6) β-linked glucans and C. albicans yeast glucan, hyphal glucan has a unique cyclical or “closed chain” structure that is not found in yeast glucan. GC/MS analyses showed a high abundance of 3- and 6-linked glucose units when compared with yeast β-glucan. In addition to the expected (1→3), (1→6), and 3,6 linkages, we also identified a 2,3 linkage that has not been reported previously in C. albicans. Hyphal glucan induced robust immune responses in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and macrophages via a Dectin-1-dependent mechanism. In contrast, C. albicans yeast glucan was a much less potent stimulus. We also demonstrated the capacity of C. albicans hyphal glucan, but not yeast glucan, to induce IL-1β processing and secretion. This finding provides important evidence for understanding the immune discrimination between colonization and invasion at the mucosal level. When taken together, these data provide a structural basis for differential innate immune recognition of C. albicans yeast versus hyphae. PMID:24344127

  16. Asymptotically AdS spacetimes with a timelike Kasner singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jie

    2016-07-01

    Exact solutions to Einstein's equations for holographic models are presented and studied. The IR geometry has a timelike cousin of the Kasner singularity, which is the less generic case of the BKL (Belinski-Khalatnikov-Lifshitz) singularity, and the UV is asymptotically AdS. This solution describes a holographic RG flow between them. The solution's appearance is an interpolation between the planar AdS black hole and the AdS soliton. The causality constraint is always satisfied. The entanglement entropy and Wilson loops are discussed. The boundary condition for the current-current correlation function and the Laplacian in the IR is examined. There is no infalling wave in the IR, but instead, there is a normalizable solution in the IR. In a special case, a hyperscaling-violating geometry is obtained after a dimensional reduction.

  17. All AdS7 solutions of type II supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apruzzi, Fabio; Fazzi, Marco; Rosa, Dario; Tomasiello, Alessandro

    2014-04-01

    In M-theory, the only AdS7 supersymmetric solutions are AdS7 × S 4 and its orbifolds. In this paper, we find and classify new supersymmetric solutions of the type AdS7 × M 3 in type II supergravity. While in IIB none exist, in IIA with Romans mass (which does not lift to M-theory) there are many new ones. We use a pure spinor approach reminiscent of generalized complex geometry. Without the need for any Ansatz, the system determines uniquely the form of the metric and fluxes, up to solving a system of ODEs. Namely, the metric on M 3 is that of an S 2 fibered over an interval; this is consistent with the Sp(1) R-symmetry of the holographically dual (1,0) theory. By including D8 brane sources, one can numerically obtain regular solutions, where topologically M 3 ≅ S 3.

  18. Worldsheet scattering in AdS3/CFT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundin, Per; Wulff, Linus

    2013-07-01

    We confront the recently proposed exact S-matrices for AdS 3/ CFT 2 with direct worldsheet calculations. Utilizing the BMN and Near Flat Space (NFS) expansions for strings on AdS 3 × S 3 × S 3 × S 1 and AdS 3 × S 3 × T 4 we compute both tree-level and one-loop scattering amplitudes. Up to some minor issues we find nice agreement in the tree-level sector. At the one-loop level however we find that certain non-zero tree-level processes, which are not visible in the exact solution, contribute, via the optical theorem, and give an apparent mismatch for certain amplitudes. Furthermore we find that a proposed one-loop modification of the dressing phase correctly reproduces the worldsheet calculation while the standard Hernandez-Lopez phase does not. We also compute several massless to massless processes.

  19. New massive gravity and AdS(4) counterterms.

    PubMed

    Jatkar, Dileep P; Sinha, Aninda

    2011-04-29

    We show that the recently proposed Dirac-Born-Infeld extension of new massive gravity emerges naturally as a counterterm in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter space (AdS(4)). The resulting on-shell Euclidean action is independent of the cutoff at zero temperature. We also find that the same choice of counterterm gives the usual area law for the AdS(4) Schwarzschild black hole entropy in a cutoff-independent manner. The parameter values of the resulting counterterm action correspond to a c=0 theory in the context of the duality between AdS(3) gravity and two-dimensional conformal field theory. We rewrite this theory in terms of the gauge field that is used to recast 3D gravity as a Chern-Simons theory. PMID:21635026

  20. Harvesting freshwater Chlorella vulgaris with flocculant derived from spent brewer's yeast.

    PubMed

    Prochazkova, Gita; Kastanek, Petr; Branyik, Tomas

    2015-02-01

    One of the key bottlenecks of the economically viable production of low added value microalgal products (food supplements, feed, biofuels) is the harvesting of cells from diluted culture medium. The main goals of this work were to prepare a novel flocculation agent based on spent brewer's yeast, a brewery by-product, and to test its harvesting efficiency on freshwater Chlorella vulgaris in different environments. The yeast was first autolyzed/hydrolyzed and subsequently chemically modified with 2-chloro-N,N-diethylethylamine hydrochloride (DEAE). Second, optimal dosage of modified spent yeast (MSY) flocculant for harvesting C. vulgaris was determined in culture media of various compositions. It was found that the absence of phosphorus ions decreased (0.4 mg MSY/g biomass), while the presence of algogenic organic matter (AOM) increased (51 mg MSY/g biomass) the required dosage of flocculant as compared to complete mineral medium with phosphorus and without AOM (12 mg MSY/g biomass). PMID:25479390

  1. Drosophila Regulate Yeast Density and Increase Yeast Community Similarity in a Natural Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Stamps, Judy A.; Yang, Louie H.; Morales, Vanessa M.; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster adults and larvae, but especially larvae, had profound effects on the densities and community structure of yeasts that developed in banana fruits. Pieces of fruit exposed to adult female flies previously fed fly-conditioned bananas developed higher yeast densities than pieces of the same fruits that were not exposed to flies, supporting previous suggestions that adult Drosophila vector yeasts to new substrates. However, larvae alone had dramatic effects on yeast density and species composition. When yeast densities were compared in pieces of the same fruits assigned to different treatments, fruits that developed low yeast densities in the absence of flies developed significantly higher yeast densities when exposed to larvae. Across all of the fruits, larvae regulated yeast densities within narrow limits, as compared to a much wider range of yeast densities that developed in pieces of the same fruits not exposed to flies. Larvae also affected yeast species composition, dramatically reducing species diversity across fruits, reducing variation in yeast communities from one fruit to the next (beta diversity), and encouraging the consistent development of a yeast community composed of three species of yeast (Candida californica, C. zemplinina, and Pichia kluvyeri), all of which were palatable to larvae. Larvae excreted viable cells of these three yeast species in their fecal pools, and discouraged the growth of filamentous fungi, processes which may have contributed to their effects on the yeast communities in banana fruits. These and other findings suggest that D. melanogaster adults and their larval offspring together engage in ‘niche construction’, facilitating a predictable microbial environment in the fruit substrates in which the larvae live and develop. PMID:22860093

  2. YMDB: the Yeast Metabolome Database.

    PubMed

    Jewison, Timothy; Knox, Craig; Neveu, Vanessa; Djoumbou, Yannick; Guo, An Chi; Lee, Jacqueline; Liu, Philip; Mandal, Rupasri; Krishnamurthy, Ram; Sinelnikov, Igor; Wilson, Michael; Wishart, David S

    2012-01-01

    The Yeast Metabolome Database (YMDB, http://www.ymdb.ca) is a richly annotated 'metabolomic' database containing detailed information about the metabolome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Modeled closely after the Human Metabolome Database, the YMDB contains >2000 metabolites with links to 995 different genes/proteins, including enzymes and transporters. The information in YMDB has been gathered from hundreds of books, journal articles and electronic databases. In addition to its comprehensive literature-derived data, the YMDB also contains an extensive collection of experimental intracellular and extracellular metabolite concentration data compiled from detailed Mass Spectrometry (MS) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) metabolomic analyses performed in our lab. This is further supplemented with thousands of NMR and MS spectra collected on pure, reference yeast metabolites. Each metabolite entry in the YMDB contains an average of 80 separate data fields including comprehensive compound description, names and synonyms, structural information, physico-chemical data, reference NMR and MS spectra, intracellular/extracellular concentrations, growth conditions and substrates, pathway information, enzyme data, gene/protein sequence data, as well as numerous hyperlinks to images, references and other public databases. Extensive searching, relational querying and data browsing tools are also provided that support text, chemical structure, spectral, molecular weight and gene/protein sequence queries. Because of S. cervesiae's importance as a model organism for biologists and as a biofactory for industry, we believe this kind of database could have considerable appeal not only to metabolomics researchers, but also to yeast biologists, systems biologists, the industrial fermentation industry, as well as the beer, wine and spirit industry. PMID:22064855

  3. Functional interaction of yeast elongation factor 3 with yeast ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Chakraburtty, K

    1999-01-01

    Elongation factor 3 (EF-3) is a unique and essential requirement of the fungal translational apparatus. EF-3 is a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 116,000. EF-3 is required by yeast ribosomes for in vitro translation and for in vivo growth. The protein stimulates the binding of EF-1 alpha :GTP:aa-tRNA ternary complex to the ribosomal A-site by facilitating release of deacylated-tRNA from the E-site. The reaction requires ATP hydrolysis. EF-3 contains two ATP-binding sequence motifs (NBS). NBSI is sufficient for the intrinsic ATPase function. NBSII is essential for ribosome-stimulated activity. By limited proteolysis, EF-3 was divided into two distinct functional domains. The N-terminal domain lacking the highly charged lysine blocks failed to bind ribosomes and was inactive in the ribosome-stimulated ATPase activity. The C-terminally derived lysine-rich fragment showed strong binding to yeast ribosomes. The purported S5 homology region of EF-3 at the N-terminal end has been reported to interact with 18S ribosomal RNA. We postulate that EF-3 contacts rRNA and/or protein(s) through the C-terminal end. Removal of these residues severely weakens its interaction mediated possibly through the N-terminal domain of the protein. PMID:10216951

  4. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of Agave tequilana fructans by Kluyveromyces marxianus yeasts for bioethanol and tequila production.

    PubMed

    Flores, Jose-Axel; Gschaedler, Anne; Amaya-Delgado, Lorena; Herrera-López, Enrique J; Arellano, Melchor; Arrizon, Javier

    2013-10-01

    Agave tequilana fructans (ATF) constitute a substrate for bioethanol and tequila industries. As Kluyveromyces marxianus produces specific fructanases for ATF hydrolysis, as well as ethanol, it can perform simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. In this work, fifteen K. marxianus yeasts were evaluated to develop inoculums with fructanase activity on ATF. These inoculums were added to an ATF medium for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. All the yeasts, showed exo-fructanhydrolase activity with different substrate specificities. The yeast with highest fructanase activity in the inoculums showed the lowest ethanol production level (20 g/l). Five K. marxianus strains were the most suitable for the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of ATF. The volatile compounds composition was evaluated at the end of fermentation, and a high diversity was observed between yeasts, nevertheless all of them produced high levels of isobutyl alcohol. The simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of ATF with K. marxianus strains has potential for industrial application. PMID:23941710

  5. Phases of global AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Pallab; Krishnan, Chethan; Subramanian, P. N. Bala

    2016-06-01

    We study the phases of gravity coupled to a charged scalar and gauge field in an asymptotically Anti-de Sitter spacetime ( AdS 4) in the grand canonical ensemble. For the conformally coupled scalar, an intricate phase diagram is charted out between the four relevant solutions: global AdS, boson star, Reissner-Nordstrom black hole and the hairy black hole. The nature of the phase diagram undergoes qualitative changes as the charge of the scalar is changed, which we discuss. We also discuss the new features that arise in the extremal limit.

  6. Experimental evolution in budding yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    I will discuss our progress in analyzing evolution in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We take two basic approaches. The first is to try and examine quantitative aspects of evolution, for example by determining how the rate of evolution depends on the mutation rate and the population size or asking whether the rate of mutation is uniform throughout the genome. The second is to try to evolve qualitatively novel, cell biologically interesting phenotypes and track the mutations that are responsible for the phenotype. Our efforts include trying to alter cell morphology, evolve multicellularity, and produce a biological oscillator.

  7. Cell size control in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jonathan J.; Ewald, Jennifer C.; Skotheim, Jan M.

    2012-01-01

    Cell size is an important adaptive trait that influences nearly all aspects of cellular physiology. Despite extensive characterization of the cell cycle regulatory network, the molecular mechanismscoupling growth to division, and thereby controlling cell size, have remained elusive. Recent workin yeast has reinvigorated the size control field and suggested provocative mechanisms forthe distinct functions of setting and sensing cell size. Further examination of size sensing models based on spatial gradients and molecular titration, coupled with elucidation of the pathways responsible for nutrient-modulated target size, may reveal the fundamental principles of eukaryotic cell size control. PMID:22575477

  8. [Production of plant-derived natural products in yeast cells - A review].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Dai, Zhubo; Zhang, Xueli

    2016-03-01

    Plant-derived natural products (PNPs) have been widely used in pharmaceutical and nutritional fields. So far, the main method to produce PNPs is extracting them from their original plants, however, there remains lots of problems. With the concept of synthetic biology, construction of yeast cell factories for production of PNPs provides an alternative way. In this review, we will focus on PNPs' market and application, research progress for production of artemisinin, research progress for production of terpenes, alkaloids and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFAs) and recent technology development to give a brief introduction of construction of yeast cells for production of PNPs. PMID:27382793

  9. Stable maintenance of plasmid in continuous culture of yeast under non-selective conditions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, J C; Mukherjee, K J

    2001-01-01

    A recombinant yeast plasmid containing the gene for beta-galactosidase was tested for stability in a host auxotrophic for leucine. Plasmid loss was studied at different dilution rates in continuous culture under selective as well as non-selective conditions. It was observed that the instability of the culture was higher at low dilution rates in selective medium, while the pattern was reversed when complex non-selective medium was used, with plasmid-containing cells competing effectively with plasmid-free cells at low dilution rates. This was attributed to a low residual yeast extract concentration in the medium at low dilution rates. Since yeast extract was the sole source of leucine, this limited the growth of plasmid-free cells, which were auxotrophic for leucine. Growth rate studies also indicated a competitive advantage of the plasmid-containing cells over the plasmid-free cells at low yeast extract concentrations in semi-defined medium. Using the above data, a modified continuous culture was run using non-selective medium at a low dilution rate of 0.05 h(-1). This resulted in stable coexistence of plasmid-containing and plasmid-free cells and hence sustained expression of beta-galactosidase at approximately 330 OD420l(-1) h(-1) throughout the period of cultivation (134 h). PMID:16233104

  10. The forecaster's added value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, M.; Milelli, M.

    2009-09-01

    skill scores of two competitive forecast. It is important to underline that the conclusions refer to the analysis of the Piemonte operational alert system, so they cannot be directly taken as universally true. But we think that some of the main lessons that can be derived from this study could be useful for the meteorological community. In details, the main conclusions are the following: - despite the overall improvement in global scale and the fact that the resolution of the limited area models has increased considerably over recent years, the QPF produced by the meteorological models involved in this study has not improved enough to allow its direct use, that is, the subjective HQPF continues to offer the best performance; - in the forecast process, the step where humans have the largest added value with respect to mathematical models, is the communication. In fact the human characterisation and communication of the forecast uncertainty to end users cannot be replaced by any computer code; - eventually, although there is no novelty in this study, we would like to show that the correct application of appropriated statistical techniques permits a better definition and quantification of the errors and, mostly important, allows a correct (unbiased) communication between forecasters and decision makers.

  11. Prevention of Yeast Spoilage in Feed and Food by the Yeast Mycocin HMK

    PubMed Central

    Lowes, K. F.; Shearman, C. A.; Payne, J.; MacKenzie, D.; Archer, D. B.; Merry, R. J.; Gasson, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    The yeast Williopsis mrakii produces a mycocin or yeast killer toxin designated HMK; this toxin exhibits high thermal stability, high pH stability, and a broad spectrum of activity against other yeasts. We describe construction of a synthetic gene for mycocin HMK and heterologous expression of this toxin in Aspergillus niger. Mycocin HMK was fused to a glucoamylase protein carrier, which resulted in secretion of biologically active mycocin into the culture media. A partial purification protocol was developed, and a comparison with native W. mrakii mycocin showed that the heterologously expressed mycocin had similar physiological properties and an almost identical spectrum of biological activity against a number of yeasts isolated from silage and yoghurt. Two food and feed production systems prone to yeast spoilage were used as models to assess the ability of mycocin HMK to act as a biocontrol agent. The onset of aerobic spoilage in mature maize silage was delayed by application of A. niger mycocin HMK on opening because the toxin inhibited growth of the indigenous spoilage yeasts. This helped maintain both higher lactic acid levels and a lower pH. In yoghurt spiked with dairy spoilage yeasts, A. niger mycocin HMK was active at all of the storage temperatures tested at which yeast growth occurred, and there was no resurgence of resistant yeasts. The higher the yeast growth rate, the more effective the killing action of the mycocin. Thus, mycocin HMK has potential applications in controlling both silage spoilage and yoghurt spoilage caused by yeasts. PMID:10698773

  12. Comparative genomics of biotechnologically important yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is used in the vast majority of the world’s bioprocesses, and its economic significance is unchallenged. It, however, represents only a small slice of yeast physiological diversity. Many other yeasts, are used in lesser known, but commercially important processes that take ...

  13. Fermentation studies using Saccharomyces diastaticus yeast strains

    SciTech Connect

    Erratt, J.A.; Stewart, G.G.

    1981-01-01

    The yeast species, Saccharomyces diastaticus, has the ability to ferment starch and dextrin, because of the extracellular enzyme, glucoamylase, which hydrolyzes the starch/dextrin to glucose. A number of nonallelic genes--DEX 1, DEX 2, and dextrinase B which is allelic to STA 3--have been isolated, which impart to the yeast the ability to ferment dextrin. Various diploid yeast strains were constructed, each being either heterozygous or homozygous for the individual dextrinase genes. Using 12 (sup 0) plato hopped wort (30% corn adjunct) under agitated conditions, the fermentation rates of the various diploid yeast strains were monitored. A gene-dosage effect was exhibited by yeast strains containing DEX 1 or DEX 2, however, not with yeast strains containing dextrinase B (STA 3). The fermentation and growth rates and extents were determined under static conditions at 14.4 C and 21 C. With all yeast strains containing the dextrinase genes, both fermentation and growth were increased at the higher incubation temperature. Using 30-liter fermentors, beer was produced with the various yeast strains containing the dextrinase genes and the physical and organoleptic characteristics of the products were determined. The concentration of glucose in the beer was found to increase during a 3-mo storage period at 21 C, indicating that the glucoamylase from Saccharomyces diastaticus is not inactivated by pasteurization. (Refs. 36).

  14. Definition, classification and nomenclature of the yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This submission includes sections for the Preface, Use of this Book, Table of Contents and a chapter entitled Definition, classification and nomenclature of the yeasts, which are to be published in The Yeasts, A Taxonomic Study, 5th edition. This book has been prepared by a team of international ex...

  15. The wine and beer yeast Dekkera bruxellensis

    PubMed Central

    Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Dashko, Sofia; Ishchuk, Olena P; Piškur, Jure

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the non-conventional yeast Dekkera bruxellensis has been gaining more and more attention in the food industry and academic research. This yeast species is a distant relative of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is especially known for two important characteristics: on the one hand, it is considered to be one of the main spoilage organisms in the wine and bioethanol industry; on the other hand, it is 'indispensable' as a contributor to the flavour profile of Belgium lambic and gueuze beers. Additionally, it adds to the characteristic aromatic properties of some red wines. Recently this yeast has also become a model for the study of yeast evolution. In this review we focus on the recently developed molecular and genetic tools, such as complete genome sequencing and transformation, to study and manipulate this yeast. We also focus on the areas that are particularly well explored in this yeast, such as the synthesis of off-flavours, yeast detection methods, carbon metabolism and evolutionary history. © 2014 The Authors. Yeast published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24932634

  16. Yeast: An Experimental Organism for Modern Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Botstein, David; Fink, Gerald R.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the applicability and advantages of using yeasts as popular and ideal model systems for studying and understanding eukaryotic biology at the cellular and molecular levels. Cites experimental tractability and the cooperative tradition of the research community of yeast biologists as reasons for this success. (RT)

  17. Mystery cloud of AD 536

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    The possible cause of the densest and most persistent dry fog on record, which was observed in Europe and the Middle East during AD 536 and 537, is discussed. The fog's long duration toward the south and the high sulfuric acid signal detected in Greenland in ice cores dated around AD 540 support the theory that the fog was due to the explosion of the Rabaul volcano, the occurrence of which has been dated at about AD 540 by the radiocarbon method.

  18. Accelerating the Discovery of Biologically Active Small Molecules Using a High-Throughput Yeast Halo Assay#

    PubMed Central

    Gassner, Nadine C.; Tamble, Craig M.; Bock, Jonathan E.; Cotton, Naomi; White, Kimberly N.; Tenney, Karen; St. Onge, Robert P.; Proctor, Michael J.; Giaever, Guri; Davis, Ronald W.; Crews, Phillip; Holman, Theodore R.; Lokey, R. Scott

    2008-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a powerful model system for the study of basic eukaryotic cell biology, has been used increasingly as a screening tool for the identification of bioactive small molecules. We have developed a novel yeast toxicity screen that is easily automated and compatible with high-throughput screening robotics. The new screen is quantitative and allows inhibitory potencies to be determined, since the diffusion of the sample provides a concentration gradient and a corresponding toxicity halo. The efficacy of this new screen was illustrated by testing materials including 3,104 compounds from the NCI libraries, 167 marine sponge crude extracts, and 149 crude marine-derived fungal extracts. There were 46 active compounds among the NCI set. One very active extract was selected for bioactivity-guided fractionation resulting in the identification of crambescidin 800 as a potent antifungal agent. PMID:17291044

  19. YCRD: Yeast Combinatorial Regulation Database

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Sheng; Hsieh, Yen-Chen; Lai, Fu-Jou

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the precise transcriptional control of gene expression is typically achieved through combinatorial regulation using cooperative transcription factors (TFs). Therefore, a database which provides regulatory associations between cooperative TFs and their target genes is helpful for biologists to study the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Because there is no such kind of databases in the public domain, this prompts us to construct a database, called Yeast Combinatorial Regulation Database (YCRD), which deposits 434,197 regulatory associations between 2535 cooperative TF pairs and 6243 genes. The comprehensive collection of more than 2500 cooperative TF pairs was retrieved from 17 existing algorithms in the literature. The target genes of a cooperative TF pair (e.g. TF1-TF2) are defined as the common target genes of TF1 and TF2, where a TF’s experimentally validated target genes were downloaded from YEASTRACT database. In YCRD, users can (i) search the target genes of a cooperative TF pair of interest, (ii) search the cooperative TF pairs which regulate a gene of interest and (iii) identify important cooperative TF pairs which regulate a given set of genes. We believe that YCRD will be a valuable resource for yeast biologists to study combinatorial regulation of gene expression. YCRD is available at http://cosbi.ee.ncku.edu.tw/YCRD/ or http://cosbi2.ee.ncku.edu.tw/YCRD/. PMID:27392072

  20. Growing Yeast into Cylindrical Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Vulin, Clément; Di Meglio, Jean-Marc; Lindner, Ariel B.; Daerr, Adrian; Murray, Andrew; Hersen, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms often form complex multicellular assemblies such as biofilms and colonies. Understanding the interplay between assembly expansion, metabolic yield, and nutrient diffusion within a freely growing colony remains a challenge. Most available data on microorganisms are from planktonic cultures, due to the lack of experimental tools to control the growth of multicellular assemblies. Here, we propose a method to constrain the growth of yeast colonies into simple geometric shapes such as cylinders. To this end, we designed a simple, versatile culture system to control the location of nutrient delivery below a growing colony. Under such culture conditions, yeast colonies grow vertically and only at the locations where nutrients are delivered. Colonies increase in height at a steady growth rate that is inversely proportional to the cylinder radius. We show that the vertical growth rate of cylindrical colonies is not defined by the single-cell division rate, but rather by the colony metabolic yield. This contrasts with cells in liquid culture, in which the single-cell division rate is the only parameter that defines the population growth rate. This method also provides a direct, simple method to estimate the metabolic yield of a colony. Our study further demonstrates the importance of the shape of colonies on setting their expansion. We anticipate that our approach will be a starting point for elaborate studies of the population dynamics, evolution, and ecology of microbial colonies in complex landscapes. PMID:24853750

  1. AdS Branes from Partial Breaking of Superconformal Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, E.A.

    2005-10-01

    It is shown how the static-gauge world-volume superfield actions of diverse superbranes on the AdS{sub d+1} superbackgrounds can be systematically derived from nonlinear realizations of the appropriate AdS supersymmetries. The latter are treated as superconformal symmetries of flat Minkowski superspaces of the bosonic dimension d. Examples include the N = 1 AdS{sub 4} supermembrane, which is associated with the 1/2 partial breaking of the OSp(1|4) supersymmetry down to the N = 1, d = 3 Poincare supersymmetry, and the T-duality related L3-brane on AdS{sub 5} and scalar 3-brane on AdS{sub 5} x S{sup 1}, which are associated with two different patterns of 1/2 breaking of the SU(2, 2|1) supersymmetry. Another (closely related) topic is the AdS/CFT equivalence transformation. It maps the world-volume actions of the codimension-one AdS{sub d+1} (super)branes onto the actions of the appropriate Minkowski (super)conformal field theories in the dimension d.

  2. Yeast community survey in the Tagus estuary.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, João M G C F

    2005-07-01

    The yeast community in the waters of the Tagus estuary, Portugal, was followed for over a year in order to assess its dynamics. Yeast occurrence and incidence were measured and this information was related to relevant environmental data. Yeast occurrence did not seem to depend upon tides, but river discharge had a dramatic impact both on the density and diversity of the community. The occurrence of some yeasts was partially correlated with faecal pollution indicators. Yeast isolates were characterized by microsatellite primed PCR (MSP-PCR) fingerprinting and rRNA gene sequencing. The principal species found were Candida catenulata, C. intermedia, C. parapsilosis, Clavispora lusitaniae, Debaryomyces hansenii, Pichia guilliermondii, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Rhodosporidium diobovatum. The incidence of these species was evaluated against the environmental context of the samples and the current knowledge about the substrates from which they are usually isolated. PMID:16329949

  3. Yeasts that utilize lactose in sweet whey

    SciTech Connect

    Gholson, J.H.; Gough, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Since processing costs are usually higher for whey than for other available food or feed nutrients, only about one-third of whey produced in the US is used by food and feed industries. As a result whey disposal costs are a problem. Further; when whey is disposed of through municipal sewerage systems, the lactose present is changed by bacteria to lactic acid which tends to act as a preservative and retards further oxidation of whey constituents. This article describes a method of utilizing lactose-fermenting yeasts to produce large quantities of yeast cells, single-cell protein. Kluveromyces fragilis was found to be the most effective yeast species and the yeast cells produced could be used as a natural food or feed additive. Results of this study determined that certain methods and yeast strains could reduce whey-related pollution and thus help reduce costs of whey disposal.

  4. Neutron Activation Analysis for the Demonstration of Amphibolite Rock-Weathering Activity of a Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rades-Rohkohl, E.; Hirsch, P.; Fränzle, O.

    1979-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis was employed in a survey of weathering abilities of rock surface microorganisms. A yeast isolated from an amphibolite of a megalithic grave was found actively to concentrate, in media and in or on cells, iron and other elements when grown in the presence of ground rock. This was demonstrated by comparing a spectrum of neutron-activated amphibolite powder (particle size, 50 to 100 μm) with the spectra of neutron-activated, lyophilized yeast cells which had grown with or without amphibolite powder added to different media. The most active yeast (IFAM 1171) did not only solubilize Fe from the rock powder, but significant amounts of Co, Eu, Yb, Ca, Ba, Sc, Lu, Cr, Th, and U were also mobilized. The latter two elements occurred as natural radioactive isotopes in this amphibolite. When the yeast cells were grown with neutron-activated amphibolite, the cells contained the same elements. Furthermore, the growth medium contained Fe, Co, and Eu which had been solubilized from the amphibolite. This indicates the presence, in this yeast strain, of active rockweathering abilities as well as of uptake mechanisms for solubilized rock components. PMID:16345472

  5. Pretreatment of chemically-synthesized Aβ42 affects its biological activity in yeast.

    PubMed

    Porzoor, Afsaneh; Caine, Joanne M; Macreadie, Ian G

    2014-01-01

    The tendency of amyloid β (Aβ42) peptide to misfold and aggregate into insoluble amyloid fibrils in Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been well documented. Accumulation of Aβ42 fibrils has been correlated with abnormal apoptosis and unscheduled cell division which can also trigger the death of neuronal cells, while oligomers can also exhibit similar activities. While investigations using chemically-synthesized Aβ42 peptide have become common practice, there appear to be differences in outcomes from different preparations. In order to resolve this inconsistency, we report 2 separate methods of preparing chemically-synthesized Aβ42 and we examined their effects in yeast. Hexafluoroisopropanol pretreatment caused toxicity while, ammonium hydroxide treated Aβ42 induced cell proliferation in both C. glabrata and S. cerevisiae. The hexafluoroisopropanol prepared Aβ42 had greater tendency to form amyloid on yeast cells as determined by thioflavin T staining followed by flow cytometry and microscopy. Both quiescent and non-quiescent cells were analyzed by these methods of peptide preparation. Non-quiescent cells were susceptible to the toxicity of Aβ42 compared with quiescent cells (p < 0.005). These data explain the discrepancy in the previous publications about the effects of chemically-synthesized Aβ42 on yeast cells. The effect of Aβ42 on yeast cells was independent of the size of the peptide aggregates. However, the Aβ42 pretreatment determined whether the molecular conformation of peptide resulted in proliferation or toxicity in yeast based assays. PMID:25495906

  6. Improved synchronous light scattering method for measuring baker's yeast biomass using thickened suspensions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Guo, Xiangfeng; Jia, Lihua; Ding, Ying

    2013-08-01

    Measuring yeast biomass is important in the processes of microbial fermentations. It has been demonstrated that synchronous light scattering (SLS) signals could be applied for the quantification of model bioparticles such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, an improved synchronous light scattering method was developed for yeast biomass estimation. The settlement of yeast cells during SLS signals measuring process was studied, and hydrolysis anionic polyacrylamide was added into yeast suspensions to increase the stability of the cells in liquid environment. By simultaneously scanning both the excitation and emission monochromators of a common spectrofluorometer with same starting excitation and emission wavelength (namely, ∆λ = 0), the SLS intensity was found to be proportional to the yeast concentration in the range from 0 to 4.9 × 10(6) cell/mL (R (2) = 0.9907), the detection limit is 8.1 × 10(3) cell/mL. The developed method exhibited good stability and sensitivity in the recovery test and growth curve drawing process, demonstrating the potential of the method in practical application of biomass estimation. PMID:23529355

  7. Fuel ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke stalks using different yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.; Bajpai, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    The inulin-type sugars present in the stalks of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) were extracted with hot water and were used as a substrate to produce fuel EtOH. Seven different yeasts were used to obtain batch kinetic data. The medium consisted of stalk extract from Jerusalem artichoke containing 7.3% total sugars, supplemented with 0.01% oleic acid, 0.01% corn steep liquor, and 0.05% Tween 80. All batch fermentations were carried out in a 1-L bioreactor at 35 degrees and pH 4.6, and the following parameters were measured as a function of time: total sugars, EtOH and biomass concentration, maximum specific growth rate, and biomass and EtOH yields. The best EtOH producer was Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 which gave an EtOH-to-sugar yield 97% of the theoretical maximum value, with almost 100% sugar utilization.

  8. AdS5 backgrounds with 24 supersymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, S.; Gutowski, J.; Papadopoulos, G.

    2016-06-01

    We prove a non-existence theorem for smooth AdS 5 solutions with connected, compact without boundary internal space that preserve strictly 24 supersymmetries. In particular, we show that D = 11 supergravity does not admit such solutions, and that all such solutions of IIB supergravity are locally isometric to the AdS 5 × S 5 maximally supersymmetric background. Furthermore, we prove that (massive) IIA supergravity also does not admit such solutions, provided that the homogeneity conjecture for massive IIA supergravity is valid. In the context of AdS/CFT these results imply that if gravitational duals for strictly mathcal{N}=3 superconformal theories in 4-dimensions exist, they are either singular or their internal spaces are not compact.

  9. Entanglement temperature and perturbed AdS3 geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, G. C.; Caravan, B.

    2016-06-01

    Generalizing the first law of thermodynamics, the increase in entropy density δ S (x ) of a conformal field theory (CFT) is proportional to the increase in energy density, δ E (x ) , of a subsystem divided by a spatially dependent entanglement temperature, TE(x ) , a fixed parameter determined by the geometry of the subsystem, crossing over to thermodynamic temperature at high temperatures. In this paper we derive a generalization of the thermodynamic Clausius relation, showing that deformations of the CFT by marginal operators are associated with spatial temperature variations, δ TE(x ) , and spatial energy correlations play the role of specific heat. Using AdS/CFT duality we develop a relationship between a perturbation in the local entanglement temperature of the CFT and the perturbation of the bulk AdS metric. In two dimensions, we demonstrate a method through which direct diagonalizations of the boundary quantum theory may be used to construct geometric perturbations of AdS3 .

  10. Biocontrol of Penicillium nordicum Growth and Ochratoxin A Production by Native Yeasts of Dry Cured Ham

    PubMed Central

    Virgili, Roberta; Simoncini, Nicoletta; Toscani, Tania; Camardo Leggieri, Marco; Formenti, Silvia; Battilani, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Twelve yeast strains isolated from the surface of Italian typical dry-cured hams, belonging to D. hansenii, D. maramus, C. famata, C. zeylanoides and H. burtonii species, and previously selected for their ability to grow in dry-cured ham-like substrates, were screened for antagonistic activity against a toxigenic strain of P. nordicum and inhibition of ochratoxin A (OTA) biosynthesis. On average, yeast inhibitory activity was lowered by increasing fungal inoculum and enhanced by NaCl presence. In the assay conditions, H. burtonii and C. zeylanoides were the most effective, both in inhibiting P. nordicum growth and OTA production. D. hansenii was the species with the lowest inhibitory activity, especially in the absence of salt. OTA production dropped from the range < LOD − 5000 ppb in P. nordicum control plates to the range < LOD − 200 ppb in yeast-added plates. OTA production increased in the presence of NaCl in P. nordicum control plates, while salt enhanced inhibition against OTA production in yeast-added plates. PMID:22474567

  11. The Effect of Proanthocyanidins on Growth and Alcoholic Fermentation of Wine Yeast under Copper Stress.

    PubMed

    Jia, Bo; Liu, Xingyan; Zhan, Jicheng; Li, Jingyuan; Huang, Weidong

    2015-06-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) derived from the grape skin, as well as from grape seeds, grape stems, are an important group of polyphenols in wine. The aim of this study was to understand the effect of PAs (0.1, 1.0 g/L) on growth and alcoholic fermentation of 2 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (commercial strain FREDDO and newly selected strain BH8) during copper-stress fermentation, using a simple model fermentation system. Our results showed that both PAs and Cu(2+) could pose significant inhibition effects on the growth of yeast cells, CO2 release, sugar consumption, and ethanol production during the initial phase of the fermentation. Compared to PAs, Cu(2+) performed more obvious inhibition on the yeast growth and fermentation. However, adding 1.0 g/L PAs increased in the vitality and metabolism activity of yeast cells at the mid-exponential phase of fermentation in the mediums with no copper and 0.1 mM Cu(2+) added, shortened the period of wine fermentation, and decreased the copper residues. It indicated that PAs could improve the ability of wine yeast to resist detrimental effects under copper-stress fermentation condition, maintaining cells metabolic activity, and fermentation could be controlled by manipulating PAs supplementation. PMID:25943145

  12. Real-Time Quantitative PCR (QPCR) and Reverse Transcription-QPCR for Detection and Enumeration of Total Yeasts in Wine▿

    PubMed Central

    Hierro, Núria; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio; González, Ángel; Mas, Albert; Guillamón, Jose M.

    2006-01-01

    Real-time PCR, or quantitative PCR (QPCR), has been developed to rapidly detect and quantify the total number of yeasts in wine without culturing. Universal yeast primers were designed from the variable D1/D2 domains of the 26S rRNA gene. These primers showed good specificity with all the wine yeasts tested, and they did not amplify the most representative wine species of acetic acid bacteria and lactic acid bacteria. Numerous standard curves were constructed with different strains and species grown in yeast extract-peptone-dextrose medium or incubated in wine. The small standard errors with these replicas proved that the assay is reproducible and highly robust. This technique was validated with artificially contaminated and natural wine samples. We also performed a reverse transcription-QPCR (RT-QPCR) assay from rRNA for total viable yeast quantification. This technique had a low detection limit and was more accurate than QPCR because the dead cells were not quantified. As far as we know, this is the first time that RT-QPCR has been performed to quantify viable yeasts from rRNA. RT-QPCR is a rapid and accurate technique for enumerating yeasts during industrial wine fermentation and controlling the risk of wine spoilage. PMID:17088381

  13. Stabilization of cucurbitacin E-glycoside, a feeding stimulant for diabroticite beetles, extracted from bitter Hawkesbury watermelon

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Phyllis A.W.; Blackburn, Michael; Schroder, Robert F.W.; Matsuo, Koharto; Li, Betty W.

    2002-01-01

    Cucurbitacins are feeding stimulants for diabroticite beetles, including corn rootworms and cucumber beetles, which can be added to a bait containing an insecticide thereby reducing the levels of other insecticide treatments needed to control these pests. One of them, cucurbitacin E-glycoside, is water soluble and easily processed from mutant bitter Hawkesbury watermelons (BHW) that express elevated levels of cucurbitacin. Storage of BHW extract at room temperature resulted in a 92% reduction of cucurbitacin E-glycoside over two months, while refrigeration or freezing resulted in a 60% loss of the active ingredient during this time. The loss of the active ingredient was correlated with an increase in BHW extract pH from 5 to greater than 9. The increase in pH of the BHW extracts at room temperature appeared to be due to the growth of certain bacteria, especially Bacillus spp. In refrigerated extracts, the pH remained relatively constant, and bacterial growth was dominated by bacteria such as Lactobacilli. An alternative to refrigeration is concentration of BHW extract. One means of concentration is spray drying, but the high sugar content of the BHW extract (20mg/ml glucose, 40mg/ml fructose) makes this technique impractical. Fermentation of the BHW extract by the yeast, Saccharomyces boulardii, eliminated the sugars and did not raise the pH nor alter the cucurbitacin E-glycoside content of the extract. Elimination of the sugars by fermentation produced an extract that could be successfully spray dried. BHW extract fermented by S. boulardii produced a higher level of feeding stimulation for spotted cucumber beetles in laboratory choice tests. When applied to cucumbers, there was no difference in control of spotted and striped cucumber beetles between baits of fresh or fermented juices combined with the same insecticide. PMID:15455053

  14. Purification and lipid-layer crystallization of yeast RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A M; Darst, S A; Feaver, W J; Thompson, N E; Burgess, R R; Kornberg, R D

    1990-01-01

    Yeast RNA polymerase II was purified to homogeneity by a rapid procedure involving immunoaffinity chromatography. The purified enzyme contained 10 subunits, as reported for conventional preparations, but with no detectable proteolysis of the largest subunit. In assays of initiation of transcription at the yeast CYC1 promoter, the enzyme complemented the deficiency of an extract from a strain that produces a temperature-sensitive polymerase II. Mammalian RNA polymerase II was inactive in this initiation assay. The purified yeast enzyme formed two-dimensional crystals on positively charged lipid layers, as previously found for Escherichia coli RNA polymerase holoenzyme. Image analysis of electron micrographs of crystals in negative stain, which diffracted to about 30-A resolution, showed protein densities of dimensions consistent with those of single polymerase molecules. Images PMID:2179949

  15. Image processing and classification algorithm for yeast cell morphology in a microfluidic chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang Yu, Bo; Elbuken, Caglar; Ren, Carolyn L.; Huissoon, Jan P.

    2011-06-01

    The study of yeast cell morphology requires consistent identification of cell cycle phases based on cell bud size. A computer-based image processing algorithm is designed to automatically classify microscopic images of yeast cells in a microfluidic channel environment. The images were enhanced to reduce background noise, and a robust segmentation algorithm is developed to extract geometrical features including compactness, axis ratio, and bud size. The features are then used for classification, and the accuracy of various machine-learning classifiers is compared. The linear support vector machine, distance-based classification, and k-nearest-neighbor algorithm were the classifiers used in this experiment. The performance of the system under various illumination and focusing conditions were also tested. The results suggest it is possible to automatically classify yeast cells based on their morphological characteristics with noisy and low-contrast images.

  16. Improving energetics of triacylglyceride extraction from wet oleaginous microbes.

    PubMed

    Willis, Robert M; McCurdy, Alex T; Ogborn, Mariah K; Wahlen, Bradley D; Quinn, Jason C; Pease, Leonard F; Seefeldt, Lance C

    2014-09-01

    Oleaginous microbes can upgrade carbon to lipids, which can be used as a feedstock to produce renewable replacements for petroleum-based compounds. Efficient extraction of lipids from oleaginous microbes typically involves dewatering and drying of the biomass. Problematically, drying often requires an amount of energy approaching that available from the cells. Here, we report an approach for the high efficiency extraction of triacylglycerides (TAG) from wet oleaginous microbes, bypassing the drying process. Solvent candidates for extraction of wet oleaginous biomass were identified using ASPEN's databases to determine an activity based selectivity coefficient. Optimal extraction conditions were determined which resulted in >91% extraction of TAG from yeast, bacteria, and microalgae. Experimental data was integrated into system models to evaluate the energetics of the processes compared to traditional extraction methods. The net energy ratio (NER) of a traditional dry solvent extraction is 0.84, whereas the approach presented here has a NER of 0.34 for yeast. PMID:25000397

  17. Lorentzian AdS geometries, wormholes, and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Raul E.; Silva, Guillermo A.; Botta Cantcheff, Marcelo

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the structure of two-point functions for the quantum field theory dual to an asymptotically Lorentzian Anti de Sitter (AdS) wormhole. The bulk geometry is a solution of five-dimensional second-order Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity and causally connects two asymptotically AdS spacetimes. We revisit the Gubser-Klebanov-Polyakov-Witten prescription for computing two-point correlation functions for dual quantum field theories operators O in Lorentzian signature and we propose to express the bulk fields in terms of the independent boundary values {phi}{sub 0}{sup {+-}} at each of the two asymptotic AdS regions; along the way we exhibit how the ambiguity of normalizable modes in the bulk, related to initial and final states, show up in the computations. The independent boundary values are interpreted as sources for dual operators O{sup {+-}} and we argue that, apart from the possibility of entanglement, there exists a coupling between the degrees of freedom living at each boundary. The AdS{sub 1+1} geometry is also discussed in view of its similar boundary structure. Based on the analysis, we propose a very simple geometric criterion to distinguish coupling from entanglement effects among two sets of degrees of freedom associated with each of the disconnected parts of the boundary.

  18. Self-dual warped AdS3 black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Ning, Bo

    2010-12-01

    We study a new class of solutions of three-dimensional topological massive gravity. These solutions can be taken as nonextremal black holes, with their extremal counterparts being discrete quotients of spacelike warped AdS3 along the U(1)L isometry. We study the thermodynamics of these black holes and show that the first law is satisfied. We also show that for consistent boundary conditions, the asymptotic symmetry generators form only one copy of the Virasoro algebra with central charge cL=(4νℓ)/(G(ν2+3)), with which the Cardy formula reproduces the black hole entropy. We compute the real-time correlators of scalar perturbations and find a perfect match with the dual conformal field theory (CFT) predictions. Our study provides a novel example of warped AdS/CFT correspondence: the self-dual warped AdS3 black hole is dual to a CFT with nonvanishing left central charge. Moreover, our investigation suggests that the quantum topological massive gravity asymptotic to the same spacelike warped AdS3 in different consistent ways may be dual to different two-dimensional CFTs.

  19. ADS 2.0: New Architecture, API and Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyla, R.; Accomazzi, A.; Holachek, A.; Grant, C. S.; Elliott, J.; Henneken, E. A.; Thompson, D. M.; Kurtz, M. J.; Murray, S. S.; Sudilovsky, V.

    2015-09-01

    The ADS platform is undergoing the biggest rewrite of its 20-year history. While several components have been added to its architecture over the past couple of years, this talk will concentrate on the underpinnings of ADS's search layer and its API. To illustrate the design of the components in the new system, we will show how the new ADS user interface is built exclusively on top of the API using RESTful web services. Taking one step further, we will discuss how we plan to expose the treasure trove of information hosted by ADS (10 million records and fulltext for much of the Astronomy and Physics refereed literature) to partners interested in using this API. This will provide you (and your intelligent applications) with access to ADS's underlying data to enable the extraction of new knowledge and the ingestion of these results back into the ADS. Using this framework, researchers could run controlled experiments with content extraction, machine learning, natural language processing, etc. In this talk, we will discuss what is already implemented, what will be available soon, and where we are going next.

  20. Utilization of waste products of dehydrated onion industry for production of fodder yeast by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ghonaim, S A; Abou-Zeid, A A; Abd El-Fattah, A F; Farid, M A

    1980-01-01

    One strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was selected from different yeasts, isolated from black strap molasses. This microorganism was cultivated on seven fermentation media for the production of protein. Medium I exhibited the highest potentiality for formation of protein. Therefore strain 1 of S. cerevisiae and medium I were used for further studies in the formation of protein. Factors controlling production of protein were explored. The required incubation period for the fermentation process was 72 hrs, while the initial pH value of the medium was 6.0. Sucrose supported the microorganism for higher production of protein (40.96%), while the best concentration of sucrose was shown to be 10.0 g/l. The best inorganic and organic nitrogen sources for protein formation were (NH4)2HPO4, (NH4)3PO4 and yeast extract, respectively. The best concentrations of (NH4)2HPO4 and yeast extract, supporting protein formation, were 5.0 g/l and 10.0 g/l, respectively. Addition of MgSO4, ZnSO4, ferrous ammonium sulphate, copper sulphate, biotin, Ca-pantothenate, thiamine, pyridoxine, and inositol to the synthetic medium did not markedly influence high level of protein formation. Glutamic acid was the best amino acid, supporting protein formation by S. cerevisiae. Onion juice was found to be a good medium, after deletion of inhibitory volatile sulphur organic compounds, for the production of protein by S. cerevisiae. Addition of (NH4)2HPO4 to the best concentration of onion juice assisted the onion medium in production of fodder yeast, containing high level of protein. Addition of MgSO4 to onion juice and (NH4)2HPO4 did not increase the total nitrogen of the biomass. Fodder yeast, produced by onion juice medium, contained more valuable ingredients than fodder yeast, produced by synthetic medium. PMID:6990654

  1. Accelerating Yeast Prion Biology using Droplet Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ung, Lloyd; Rotem, Assaf; Jarosz, Daniel; Datta, Manoshi; Lindquist, Susan; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    Prions are infectious proteins in a misfolded form, that can induce normal proteins to take the misfolded state. Yeast prions are relevant, as a model of human prion diseases, and interesting from an evolutionary standpoint. Prions may also be a form of epigenetic inheritance, which allow yeast to adapt to stressful conditions at rates exceeding those of random mutations and propagate that adaptation to their offspring. Encapsulation of yeast in droplet microfluidic devices enables high-throughput measurements with single cell resolution, which would not be feasible using bulk methods. Millions of populations of yeast can be screened to obtain reliable measurements of prion induction and loss rates. The population dynamics of clonal yeast, when a fraction of the cells are prion expressing, can be elucidated. Furthermore, the mechanism by which certain strains of bacteria induce yeast to express prions in the wild can be deduced. Integrating the disparate fields of prion biology and droplet microfluidics reveals a more complete picture of how prions may be more than just diseases and play a functional role in yeast.

  2. The wine and beer yeast Dekkera bruxellensis.

    PubMed

    Schifferdecker, Anna Judith; Dashko, Sofia; Ishchuk, Olena P; Piškur, Jure

    2014-09-01

    Recently, the non-conventional yeast Dekkera bruxellensis has been gaining more and more attention in the food industry and academic research. This yeast species is a distant relative of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is especially known for two important characteristics: on the one hand, it is considered to be one of the main spoilage organisms in the wine and bioethanol industry; on the other hand, it is 'indispensable' as a contributor to the flavour profile of Belgium lambic and gueuze beers. Additionally, it adds to the characteristic aromatic properties of some red wines. Recently this yeast has also become a model for the study of yeast evolution. In this review we focus on the recently developed molecular and genetic tools, such as complete genome sequencing and transformation, to study and manipulate this yeast. We also focus on the areas that are particularly well explored in this yeast, such as the synthesis of off-flavours, yeast detection methods, carbon metabolism and evolutionary history. PMID:24932634

  3. Genomics and the making of yeast biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Hittinger, Chris Todd; Rokas, Antonis; Bai, Feng-Yan; Boekhout, Teun; Gonçalves, Paula; Jeffries, Thomas W; Kominek, Jacek; Lachance, Marc-André; Libkind, Diego; Rosa, Carlos A; Sampaio, José Paulo; Kurtzman, Cletus P

    2015-12-01

    Yeasts are unicellular fungi that do not form fruiting bodies. Although the yeast lifestyle has evolved multiple times, most known species belong to the subphylum Saccharomycotina (syn. Hemiascomycota, hereafter yeasts). This diverse group includes the premier eukaryotic model system, Saccharomyces cerevisiae; the common human commensal and opportunistic pathogen, Candida albicans; and over 1000 other known species (with more continuing to be discovered). Yeasts are found in every biome and continent and are more genetically diverse than angiosperms or chordates. Ease of culture, simple life cycles, and small genomes (∼10-20Mbp) have made yeasts exceptional models for molecular genetics, biotechnology, and evolutionary genomics. Here we discuss recent developments in understanding the genomic underpinnings of the making of yeast biodiversity, comparing and contrasting natural and human-associated evolutionary processes. Only a tiny fraction of yeast biodiversity and metabolic capabilities has been tapped by industry and science. Expanding the taxonomic breadth of deep genomic investigations will further illuminate how genome function evolves to encode their diverse metabolisms and ecologies. PMID:26649756

  4. Overview of fission yeast septation.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Pilar; Cortés, Juan C G; Martín-García, Rebeca; Ribas, Juan C

    2016-09-01

    Cytokinesis is the final process of the vegetative cycle, which divides a cell into two independent daughter cells once mitosis is completed. In fungi, as in animal cells, cytokinesis requires the formation of a cleavage furrow originated by constriction of an actomyosin ring which is connected to the plasma membrane and causes its invagination. Additionally, because fungal cells have a polysaccharide cell wall outside the plasma membrane, cytokinesis requires the formation of a septum coincident with the membrane ingression. Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a unicellular, rod-shaped fungus that has become a popular model organism for the study of actomyosin ring formation and constriction during cell division. Here we review the current knowledge of the septation and separation processes in this fungus, as well as recent advances in understanding the functional interaction between the transmembrane enzymes that build the septum and the actomyosin ring proteins. PMID:27155541

  5. Rheologically interesting polysaccharides from yeasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Nelson, G. A.; Cathey, C. A.; Fuller, G. G.

    1989-01-01

    We have examined the relationships between primary, secondary, and tertiary structures of polysaccharides exhibiting the rheological property of friction (drag) reduction in turbulent flows. We found an example of an exopolysaccharide from the yeast Cryptococcus laurentii that possessed high molecular weight but exhibited lower than expected drag reducing activity. Earlier correlations by Hoyt showing that beta 1 --> 3, beta 2 --> 4, and alpha 1 --> 3 linkages in polysaccharides favored drag reduction were expanded to include correlations to secondary structure. The effect of sidechains in a series of gellan gums was shown to be related to sidechain length and position. Disruption of secondary structure in drag reducing polysaccharides reduced drag reducing activity for some but not all exopolysaccharides. The polymer from C. laurentii was shown to be more stable than xanthan gum and other exopolysaccharides under the most vigorous of denaturing conditions. We also showed a direct relationship between extensional viscosity measurements and the drag reducing coefficient for four exopolysaccharides.

  6. MAP kinase dynamics in yeast.

    PubMed

    van Drogen, F; Peter, M

    2001-09-01

    MAP kinase pathways play key roles in cellular responses towards extracellular signals. In several cases, the three core kinases interact with a scaffold molecule, but the function of these scaffolds is poorly understood. They have been proposed to contribute to signal specificity, signal amplification, or subcellular localization of MAP kinases. Several MAP kinases translocate to the nucleus in response to their activation, suggesting that nuclear transport may provide a regulatory mechanism. Here we describe new applications for Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) and Fluorescence Loss In Photobleaching (FLIP), to study dynamic translocations of MAPKs between different subcellular compartments. We have used these methods to measure the nuclear/cytoplasmic dynamics of several yeast MAP kinases, and in particular to address the role of scaffold proteins for MAP-kinase signaling. PMID:11730324

  7. Engineering alcohol tolerance in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Felix H.; Ghaderi, Adel; Fink, Gerald R.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol toxicity in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae limits titer and productivity in the industrial production of transportation bioethanol. We show that strengthening the opposing potassium and proton electrochemical membrane gradients is a mechanism that enhances general resistance to multiple alcohols. Elevation of extracellular potassium and pH physically bolster these gradients, increasing tolerance to higher alcohols and ethanol fermentation in commercial and laboratory strains (including a xylose-fermenting strain) under industrial-like conditions. Production per cell remains largely unchanged with improvements deriving from heightened population viability. Likewise, up-regulation of the potassium and proton pumps in the laboratory strain enhances performance to levels exceeding industrial strains. Although genetically complex, alcohol tolerance can thus be dominated by a single cellular process, one controlled by a major physicochemical component but amenable to biological augmentation. PMID:25278607

  8. Studying Protein Ubiquitylation in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Hovsepian, Junie; Becuwe, Michel; Kleifeld, Oded; Glickman, Michael H; Léon, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitylation is a reversible posttranslational modification that is critical for most, if not all, cellular processes and essential for viability. Ubiquitin conjugates to substrate proteins either as a single moiety (monoubiquitylation) or as polymers composed of ubiquitin molecules linked to each other with various topologies and structures (polyubiquitylation). This contributes to an elaborate ubiquitin code that is decrypted by specific ubiquitin-binding proteins. Indeed, these different types of ubiquitylation have different functional outcomes, notably affecting the stability of the substrate, its interactions, its activity, or its subcellular localization. In this chapter, we describe protocols to determine whether a protein is ubiquitylated, to identify the site that is ubiquitylated, and provide direction to study the topology of the ubiquitin modification, in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:27613031

  9. Modeling competition between yeast strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gee, Maarten; van Mourik, Hilda; de Visser, Arjan; Molenaar, Jaap

    2016-04-01

    We investigate toxin interference competition between S. cerevisiae colonies grown on a solid medium. In vivo experiments show that the outcome of this competition depends strongly on nutrient availability and cell densities. Here we present a new model for S. cerevisiae colonies, calculating the local height and composition of the colonies. The model simulates yeast colonies that show a good fit to experimental data. Simulations of colonies that start out with a homogeneous mixture of toxin producing and toxin sensitive cells can display remarkable pattern formation, depending on the initial ratio of the strains. Simulations in which the toxin producing and toxin sensitive species start at nearby positions clearly show that toxin production is advantageous.

  10. Spoilage of vacuum-packed beef by the yeast Kazachstania psychrophila.

    PubMed

    Kabisch, Jan; Erl-Höning, Constanze; Wenning, Mareike; Böhnlein, Christina; Gareis, Manfred; Pichner, Rohtraud

    2016-02-01

    A survey of the psychrotolerant yeast microbiota of vacuum-packed beef was conducted between 2010 and 2012. Chilled vacuum-packed beef (n = 50) sampled from 15 different producers was found to have a mean psychrotolerant yeast count of 3.76 log cfu per cm(2). During this assessment, a recently described yeast named Kazachstania psychrophila was shown to be associated with this product. In order to gain basic knowledge about the spoilage potential of K. psychrophila in vacuum-packed beef, challenge studies were performed and the survival of three different K. psychrophila strains was analyzed during storage of artificially contaminated beef. Beef samples were inoculated with the yeasts at a contamination level of 2 log cfu per cm(2). Survival and growth of K. psychrophila strains was monitored on malt extract agar at regular intervals over 84 days. Kazachstania levels rapidly increased about 5 log units within 16 days under chill conditions (4 °C). Gas bubbles were observed after 16 days, while discoloration and production of off-flavors became evident after 42 days in inoculated samples. This study demonstrates for the first time, that the psychrotolerant yeast K. psychrophila is a dominant spoilage microorganism of vacuum-packed beef products stored at low temperatures, causing sensory defects which result in reduced shelf life, and consequently in considerable economic losses. PMID:26678125

  11. Production of bioactive ginsenosides Rh2 and Rg3 by metabolically engineered yeasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pingping; Wei, Yongjun; Fan, Yun; Liu, Qunfang; Wei, Wei; Yang, Chengshuai; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Guoping; Yue, Jianmin; Yan, Xing; Zhou, Zhihua

    2015-05-01

    Ginsenosides Rh2 and Rg3 represent promising candidates for cancer prevention and therapy and have low toxicity. However, the concentrations of Rh2 and Rg3 are extremely low in the bioactive constituents (triterpene saponins) of ginseng. Despite the available heterologous biosynthesis of their aglycone (protopanaxadiol, PPD) in yeast, production of Rh2 and Rg3 by a synthetic biology approach was hindered by the absence of bioparts to glucosylate the C3 hydroxyl of PPD. In this study, two UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs) were cloned and identified from Panax ginseng. UGTPg45 selectively transfers a glucose moiety to the C3 hydroxyl of PPD and its ginsenosides. UGTPg29 selectively transfers a glucose moiety to the C3 glucose of Rh2 to form a 1-2-glycosidic bond. Based on the two UGTs and a yeast chassis to produce PPD, yeast cell factories were built to produce Rh2 and/or Rg3 from glucose. The turnover number (kcat) of UGTPg29 was more than 2500-fold that of UGTPg45, which might explain the higher Rg3 yield than that of Rh2 in the yeast cell factories. Building yeast cell factories to produce Rh2 or Rg3 from simple sugars by microbial fermentation provides an alternative approach to replace the traditional method of extracting ginsenosides from Panax plants. PMID:25769286

  12. Electropositively charged filters for the recovery of yeasts and bacteria from beverages.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D S

    1988-07-01

    The ability of electropositively charged filters to recover yeasts and lactic acid bacteria from a variety of beverages was evaluated. Filtration through 'Zeta plus', grade O5S, filters recovered nearly all of the yeast contaminants from table wines, sherry and port. Recovery of yeasts from cream liqueurs and egg-based beverages was also good but it was not possible to filter drinks containing orange juice, even through filters with nominal pore sizes of 2 to 10 micron. Lactic acid bacteria proved more difficult to recover than yeasts, even though smaller pore-sized filters (1 to 4 micron) were employed. However, a sufficiently high percentage of bacteria were recovered to justify use of these filters for quality assurance. The advantage of concentrating contaminants by using charged filters, and the influence of product composition on the efficiency of microbial adsorption are discussed. The growth of wine-spoiling yeasts and lactic acid bacteria were not inhibited by water- or ethanol-soluble extracts of the filter material. PMID:3209514

  13. Optimum production and characterization of an acid protease from marine yeast Metschnikowia reukaufii W6b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Peng, Ying; Wang, Xianghong; Chi, Zhenming

    2010-12-01

    The marine yeast strain W6b isolated from sediment of the South China Sea was found to produce a cell-bound acid protease. The crude acid protease produced by this marine yeast showed the highest activity at pH 3.5 and 40 °C. The optimal pH and temperature for the crude acid protease were in agreement with those for acid protease produced by the terrestrial yeasts. The optimal medium of the acid protease production was seawater containing 1.0% glucose, 1.5% casein, and 0.5% yeast extract, and the optimal cultivation conditions of the acid protease production were pH 4.0, a temperature of 25 °C and a shaking speed of 140 rmin-1. Under the optimal conditions, 72.5 UmL-1 of acid protease activity could be obtained in cell suspension within 48 h of fermentation at shake flask level. The acid protease production was induced by high-molecular-weight nitrogen sources and repressed by low-molecular-weight nitrogen sources. Skimmed-milk-clotting test showed that the crude acid protease from the cell suspension of the yeast W6b had high skimmed milk coagulability. The acid protease produced by M. reukaufii W6b may have highly potential applications in cheese, food and fermentation industries.

  14. Hydrothermal treatment of oleaginous yeast for the recovery of free fatty acids for use in advanced biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Gonzalez, Isabel; Parashar, Archana; Bressler, David C

    2014-10-10

    Microbial oils hold great potential as a suitable feedstock for the renewable production of biofuels. Specifically, the use of oleaginous yeasts offers several advantages related to cultivation and quality of lipid products. However, one of the major bottlenecks for large-scale production of yeast oils is found in the lipid extraction process. This work investigated the hydrothermal treatment of oleaginous yeast for hydrolysis and lipid extraction resulting in fatty acids used for biofuel production. The oleaginous yeast, Cryptococcus curvatus, was grown in 5 L bioreactors and the biomass slurry with 53±4% lipid content (dry weight basis) was treated at 280 °C for 1h with an initial pressure of 500 psi in batch stainless steel reactors. The hydrolysis product was separated and each of the resulting streams was further characterized. The hexane soluble fraction contained fatty acids from the hydrolysis of yeast triacylglycerides, and was low in nitrogen and minerals and could be directly integrated as feedstock into pyrolysis processing to produce biofuels. The proposed hydrothermal treatment addresses some current technological bottlenecks associated with traditional methodologies such as dewatering, oil extraction and co-product utilization. It also enhances the feasibility of using microbial biomass for production of renewable fuels and chemicals. PMID:25034431

  15. Warped AdS3/dipole-CFT duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    String theory contains solutions with {{SL}}( {{2},{R}} ){{R}} × {{U}}{( {1} )_L} -invariant warped AdS3 (WAdS3) factors arising as continuous deformations of ordinary AdS3 factors. We propose that some of these are holographically dual to the IR limits of nonlocal dipole-deformed 2D D-brane gauge theories, referred to as "dipole CFTs". Neither the bulk nor boundary theories are currently well-understood, and consequences of the proposed duality for both sides is investigated. The bulk entropy-area law suggests that dipole CFTs have (at large N) a high-energy density of states which does not depend on the deformation parameter. Putting the boundary theory on a spatial circle leads to closed timelike curves in the bulk, suggesting a relation of the latter to dipole-type nonlocality.

  16. New boundary conditions for AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Song, Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    New chiral boundary conditions are found for quantum gravity with matter on AdS3. The associated asymptotic symmetry group is generated by a single right-moving U(1) Kac-Moody-Virasoro algebra with {c_R}={3ℓ}/2G . The Kac-Moody zero mode generates global left-moving translations and equals, for a BTZ black hole, the sum of the total mass and spin. The level is positive about the global vacuum and negative in the black hole sector, corresponding to ergosphere formation. Realizations arising in Chern-Simons gravity and string theory are analyzed. The new boundary conditions are shown to naturally arise for warped AdS3 in the limit that the warp parameter is taken to zero.

  17. Observing quantum gravity in asymptotically AdS space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelyanov, Slava

    2015-12-01

    The question is studied of whether an observer can discover quantum gravity in the semiclassical regime. It is shown that it is indeed possible to probe a certain quantum gravity effect by employing an appropriately designed detector. The effect is related to the possibility of having topologically inequivalent geometries in the path-integral approach at the same time. A conformal field theory (CFT) state which is expected to describe the eternal anti-de Sitter (AdS) black hole in the large-N limit is discussed. It is argued under certain assumptions that the black hole boundary should be merely a patch of the entire AdS boundary. This leads then to a conclusion that that CFT state is the ordinary CFT vacuum restricted to that patch. If existent, the bulk CFT operators can behave as the ordinary semiclassical quantum field theory in the large-N limit in the weak sense.

  18. Semiclassical Virasoro blocks from AdS3 gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijano, Eliot; Kraus, Per; Perlmutter, Eric; Snively, River

    2015-12-01

    We present a unified framework for the holographic computation of Virasoro conformal blocks at large central charge. In particular, we provide bulk constructions that correctly reproduce all semiclassical Virasoro blocks that are known explicitly from conformal field theory computations. The results revolve around the use of geodesic Witten diagrams, recently introduced in [1], evaluated in locally AdS3 geometries generated by backreaction of heavy operators. We also provide an alternative computation of the heavy-light semiclassical block — in which two external operators become parametrically heavy — as a certain scattering process involving higher spin gauge fields in AdS3; this approach highlights the chiral nature of Virasoro blocks. These techniques may be systematically extended to compute corrections to these blocks and to interpolate amongst the different semiclassical regimes.

  19. Yeast cell-surface expression of chitosanase from Paenibacillus fukuinensis.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Takeshi; Isogawa, Danya; Takagi, Madoka; Kato-Murai, Michiko; Kimoto, Hisashi; Kusaoke, Hideo; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Suye, Shin-Ichiro

    2007-11-01

    To produce chitoorigosaccharides using chitosan, we attempted to construct Paenibacillus fukuinensis chitosanase-displaying yeast cells as a whole-cell biocatalyst through yeast cell-surface engineering. The localization of the chitosanase on the yeast cell surface was confirmed by immunofluorescence labeling of cells. The chitosanase activity of the constructed yeast was investigated by halo assay and the dinitrosalicylic acid method. PMID:17986777

  20. 21 CFR 172.325 - Bakers yeast protein.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bakers yeast protein. 172.325 Section 172.325 Food... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.325 Bakers yeast protein. Bakers yeast protein may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Bakers yeast protein is...

  1. 21 CFR 172.325 - Bakers yeast protein.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Bakers yeast protein. 172.325 Section 172.325 Food... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.325 Bakers yeast protein. Bakers yeast protein may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Bakers yeast protein is...

  2. 21 CFR 172.325 - Bakers yeast protein.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bakers yeast protein. 172.325 Section 172.325 Food... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.325 Bakers yeast protein. Bakers yeast protein may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Bakers yeast protein is...

  3. 21 CFR 172.325 - Bakers yeast protein.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bakers yeast protein. 172.325 Section 172.325 Food... Additives § 172.325 Bakers yeast protein. Bakers yeast protein may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Bakers yeast protein is the insoluble proteinaceous material...

  4. 21 CFR 172.325 - Bakers yeast protein.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bakers yeast protein. 172.325 Section 172.325 Food... Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.325 Bakers yeast protein. Bakers yeast protein may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Bakers yeast protein is...

  5. Alday-Maldacena Duality and AdS Plateau Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.

    A short summary of approximate approach to the study of minimal surfaces in AdS, based on solving Nambu-Goto equations iteratively. Today, after partial denunciation of the BDS conjecture, this looks like the only constructive approach to understanding the ways of its possible modification and thus to saving the Alday-Maldacena duality. Numerous open technical problems are explicitly formulated throughout the text.

  6. Enzyme-based glucose delivery as a high content screening tool in yeast-based whole-cell biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Grimm, T; Grimm, M; Klat, R; Neubauer, A; Palela, M; Neubauer, P

    2012-05-01

    The influence of glucose release on growth and biotransformation of yeasts was examined by using the medium EnBase® Flo in shake flasks. The medium contains a polysaccharide acting as substrate, which is degraded to glucose by the addition of an enzyme. In the present paper, this medium was adapted for the cultivation of yeasts by increasing the complex components (booster) and the enzyme concentrations to guarantee a higher glucose release rate. Important changes were an increase of the complex component booster to 10-15% and an increased glucose release by increasing the enzyme content to 15 U L(-1). The 20 yeasts investigated in the present work showed an improvement of growth and biomass production when cultivated with the EnBase medium in comparison to yeast extract dextrose (YED) medium. Values of optical densities (OD(600)) of approximately 40 AU (corresponding to over 60 g L(-1) wet cell weight) were achieved for all 20 yeast strains tested. During the following screening of the yeasts in whole-cell biotransformation, an improvement of the conversion for 19 out of the 20 yeasts cultivated with the EnBase Flo medium could be observed. The biomass from the EnBase Flo cultivation showed a higher conversion activity in the reduction of 2-butanone to (R/S)-2-butanol. The enantioselectivity (ee) of 15 yeast strains showed an improvement by using the EnBase medium. The number of yeasts with an ee >97% increased from zero with YED to six with EnBase medium. Thus, the use of a glucose release cultivation strategy in the screening process for transformation approaches provides significant benefits compared to standard batch approaches. PMID:22258642

  7. Efforts to make and apply humanized yeast

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Jon M.; Young, Jonathan H.; Kachroo, Aashiq H.

    2016-01-01

    Despite a billion years of divergent evolution, the baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has long proven to be an invaluable model organism for studying human biology. Given its tractability and ease of genetic manipulation, along with extensive genetic conservation with humans, it is perhaps no surprise that researchers have been able to expand its utility by expressing human proteins in yeast, or by humanizing specific yeast amino acids, proteins or even entire pathways. These methods are increasingly being scaled in throughput, further enabling the detailed investigation of human biology and disease-specific variations of human genes in a simplified model organism. PMID:26462863

  8. Efforts to make and apply humanized yeast.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Jon M; Young, Jonathan H; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Marcotte, Edward M

    2016-03-01

    Despite a billion years of divergent evolution, the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has long proven to be an invaluable model organism for studying human biology. Given its tractability and ease of genetic manipulation, along with extensive genetic conservation with humans, it is perhaps no surprise that researchers have been able to expand its utility by expressing human proteins in yeast, or by humanizing specific yeast amino acids, proteins or even entire pathways. These methods are increasingly being scaled in throughput, further enabling the detailed investigation of human biology and disease-specific variations of human genes in a simplified model organism. PMID:26462863

  9. Corning and Kroger turn whey to yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-16

    It is reported that Corning and Kroger intend to build a 35,000 sq. ft. plant in Winchester, Ky., that will turn whey into bakers' yeast. The plant will convert whey from Kroger's dairies into bakers' yeast, supplying about 60% of the yeast needed for nine Kroger bakeries. It will also produce syrups and whey protein concentrate for use in other food processing activities. In addition to making useful products, the project will convert the whey to glucose and galactose. The protein component of the whey will be concentrated and used in various foods and feeds.

  10. On information loss in AdS3/CFT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Li, Daliang; Wang, Junpu

    2016-05-01

    We discuss information loss from black hole physics in AdS3, focusing on two sharp signatures infecting CFT2 correlators at large central charge c: `forbidden singularities' arising from Euclidean-time periodicity due to the effective Hawking temperature, and late-time exponential decay in the Lorentzian region. We study an infinite class of examples where forbidden singularities can be resolved by non-perturbative effects at finite c, and we show that the resolution has certain universal features that also apply in the general case. Analytically continuing to the Lorentzian regime, we find that the non-perturbative effects that resolve forbidden singularities qualitatively change the behavior of correlators at times t ˜ S BH , the black hole entropy. This may resolve the exponential decay of correlators at late times in black hole backgrounds. By Borel resumming the 1 /c expansion of exact examples, we explicitly identify `information-restoring' effects from heavy states that should correspond to classical solutions in AdS3. Our results suggest a line of inquiry towards a more precise formulation of the gravitational path integral in AdS3.

  11. Supersymmetric giant graviton solutions in AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Gautam; Raju, Suvrat; Smedbäck, Mikael

    2008-02-01

    We parametrize all classical probe brane configurations that preserve four supersymmetries in (a) the extremal D1-D5 geometry, (b) the extremal D1-D5-P geometry, (c) the smooth D1-D5 solutions proposed by Lunin and Mathur, and (d) global AdS3×S3×T4/K3. These configurations consist of D1 branes, D5 branes, and bound states of D5 and D1 branes with the property that a particular Killing vector is tangent to the brane world volume at each point. We show that the supersymmetric sector of the D5-brane world volume theory may be analyzed in an effective 1+1 dimensional framework that places it on the same footing as D1 branes. In global AdS and the corresponding Lunin-Mathur solution, the solutions we describe are “bound” to the center of AdS for generic parameters and cannot escape to infinity. We show that these probes only exist on the submanifold of moduli space where the background BNS field and theta angle vanish. We quantize these probes in the near-horizon region of the extremal D1-D5 geometry and obtain the theory of long strings discussed by Seiberg and Witten.

  12. Production of Protein Complexes in Non-methylotrophic and Methylotrophic Yeasts : Nonmethylotrophic and Methylotrophic Yeasts.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Francisco J; López-Estepa, Miguel; Querol-García, Javier; Vega, M Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes can be produced in multimilligram quantities using nonmethylotrophic and methylotrophic yeasts such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Komagataella (Pichia) pastoris. Yeasts have distinct advantages as hosts for recombinant protein production owing to their cost efficiency, ease of cultivation and genetic manipulation, fast growth rates, capacity to introduce post-translational modifications, and high protein productivity (yield) of correctly folded protein products. Despite those advantages, yeasts have surprisingly lagged behind other eukaryotic hosts in their use for the production of multisubunit complexes. As our knowledge of the metabolic and genomic bottlenecks that yeast microorganisms face when overexpressing foreign proteins expands, new possibilities emerge for successfully engineering yeasts as superb expression hosts. In this chapter, we describe the current state of the art and discuss future possibilities for the development of yeast-based systems for the production of protein complexes. PMID:27165323

  13. In vitro evaluation of atmospheric particulate matter and sedimentation particles using yeast bioassay system.

    PubMed

    Mori, Taiki; Inudo, Makiko; Takao, Yuji; Koga, Minoru; Takemasa, Takehiro; Shinohara, Ryota; Arizono, Koji

    2007-01-01

    Little information on the evaluation of airborne particulate matter (APM) and sedimentation particles from subway stations is available. The thermal metamorphism of train wheels generating toxic particles in subway stations is a possibility. In this study, the toxicity and physiological effects of particles from subway stations were evaluated using a yeast bioassay system. Estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities of APM in APM extracts from subway stations were determined. No estrogenic activity was found in the APM fractions and their S9-activated APM samples. Sedimentation dust samples also showed no estrogen activity. In contrast, extracts from sedimentation dust samples showed antiestrogen activity. Marked yeast toxicity was observed in the samples extracted from sedimentation dust. Potent yeast toxicity was also found in the S9-activated extracts from sedimentation dust. The results suggest that sedimentation dust from a semiclosed area of a subway system has antiestrogen activity, although both the origin and generation system of this activity are uncertain. These pollutants in sedimentation dust may change to a more toxic form in vivo by S9 activation. PMID:17762843

  14. Yeast vectors and assays for expression of cloned genes.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, A; Lundblad, V; Dorris, D; Keaveney, M

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes some of the most commonly used yeast vectors, as well as the cloned yeast genes that form the basis for these plasmids. Yeast vectors can be grouped into five general classes, based on their mode of replication in yeast: YIp, YRp, YCp, YEp, and YLp plasmids. With the exception of the YLp plasmids (yeast linear plasmids), all of these plasmids can be maintained in E. coli as well as in S. cerevisiae and thus are referred to as shuttle vectors. The nomenclature of different classes of yeast vectors, as well as details about their mode of replication in yeast are discussed. PMID:18265101

  15. Use of several waste substrates for carotenoid-rich yeast biomass production.

    PubMed

    Marova, I; Carnecka, M; Halienova, A; Certik, M; Dvorakova, T; Haronikova, A

    2012-03-01

    Carotenoids are industrially significant pigments produced in many bacteria, fungi, and plants. Carotenoid biosynthesis in yeasts is involved in stress response mechanisms. Thus, controlled physiological and nutrition stress can be used for enhanced pigment production. Huge commercial demand for natural carotenoids has focused attention on developing of suitable biotechnological techniques including use of liquid waste substrates as carbon and/or nitrogen source. In this work several red yeast strains (Sporobolomyces roseus, Rhodotorula glutinis, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa) were enrolled into a comparative screening study. To increase the yield of these pigments at improved biomass production, several types of exogenous as well as nutrition stress were tested. Each strain was cultivated at optimal growth conditions and in medium with modified carbon and nitrogen sources. Synthetic media with addition of complex substrates (e.g. yeast extract) and vitamin mixtures as well as some waste materials (whey, potato extract) were used as nutrient sources. Peroxide and salt stress were applied too. The production of carotene enriched biomass was carried out in flasks as well as in laboratory fermentor. The best production of biomass was obtained in inorganic medium with yeast extract. In optimal conditions tested strains differ only slightly in biomass production. All strains were able to use most of waste substrates. Biomass and pigment production was more different according to substrate type. In laboratory fermentor better producers of enriched biomass were both Rhodotorula strains. The highest yields were obtained in R. glutinis CCY 20-2-26 cells cultivated on whey medium (cca 45 g per liter of biomass enriched by 46 mg/L of beta-carotene) and in R. mucilaginosa CCY 20-7-31 grown on potato medium and 5% salt (cca 30 g per liter of biomass enriched by 56 mg/L of beta-carotene). Such dried carotenoid-enriched red yeast biomass could be directly used in feed industry as

  16. Evaluation of the Uni-Yeast-Tek kit for the identification of medically important yeasts.

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, P I; Ahearn, D G

    1975-01-01

    The Uni-Yeast-Tek system, a commercially prepared kit and scheme for the rapid identification of medically important yeasts (Corning Medical), was evaluated in comparison with a conventional procedure in the identification of 623 yeasts. The system permitted the presumptive identification of 99.8% of 436 isolates representing 16 common species commonly isolated in the clinical laboratory. Correct biochemical and morphological analyses were obtained with 48 other species, but their specific identification required additional data. Images PMID:1102563

  17. Digestion of Yeasts and Beta-1,3-Glucanases in Mosquito Larvae: Physiological and Biochemical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Raquel Santos; Diaz-Albiter, Hector Manuel; Dillon, Vivian Maureen; Dillon, Rod J.; Genta, Fernando Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Aedes aegypti larvae ingest several kinds of microorganisms. In spite of studies regarding mosquito digestion, little is known about the nutritional utilization of ingested cells by larvae. We investigated the effects of using yeasts as the sole nutrient source for A. aegypti larvae. We also assessed the role of beta-1,3-glucanases in digestion of live yeast cells. Beta-1,3-glucanases are enzymes which hydrolyze the cell wall beta-1,3-glucan polyssacharide. Larvae were fed with cat food (controls), live or autoclaved Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and larval weight, time for pupation and adult emergence, larval and pupal mortality were measured. The presence of S. cerevisiae cells inside the larval gut was demonstrated by light microscopy. Beta-1,3-glucanase was measured in dissected larval samples. Viability assays were performed with live yeast cells and larval gut homogenates, with or without addition of competing beta-1,3-glucan. A. aegypti larvae fed with yeast cells were heavier at the 4th instar and showed complete development with normal mortality rates. Yeast cells were efficiently ingested by larvae and quickly killed (10% death in 2h, 100% in 48h). Larvae showed beta-1,3-glucanase in head, gut and rest of body. Gut beta-1,3-glucanase was not derived from ingested yeast cells. Gut and rest of body activity was not affected by the yeast diet, but head homogenates showed a lower activity in animals fed with autoclaved S. cerevisiae cells. The enzymatic lysis of live S. cerevisiae cells was demonstrated using gut homogenates, and this activity was abolished when excess beta-1,3-glucan was added to assays. These results show that live yeast cells are efficiently ingested and hydrolyzed by A. aegypti larvae, which are able to fully-develop on a diet based exclusively on these organisms. Beta-1,3-glucanase seems to be essential for yeast lytic activity of A. aegypti larvae, which possess significant amounts of these enzyme in all parts investigated. PMID

  18. A High-Throughput Yeast Halo Assay for Bioactive Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bray, Walter; Lokey, R Scott

    2016-01-01

    When a disk of filter paper is impregnated with a cytotoxic or cytostatic drug and added to solid medium seeded with yeast, a visible clear zone forms around the disk whose size depends on the concentration and potency of the drug. This is the traditional "halo" assay and provides a convenient, if low-throughput, read-out of biological activity that has been the mainstay of antifungal and antibiotic testing for decades. Here, we describe a protocol for a high-throughput version of the halo assay, which uses an array of 384 pins to deliver ∼200 nL of stock solutions from compound plates onto single-well plates seeded with yeast. Using a plate reader in the absorbance mode, the resulting halos can be quantified and the data archived in the form of flat files that can be connected to compound databases with standard software. This assay has the convenience associated with the visual readout of the traditional halo assay but uses far less material and can be automated to screen thousands of compounds per day. PMID:27587777

  19. Sebestenoids A-D, BACE1 inhibitors from Cordia sebestena

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jingqiu; Sorribas, Analia; Yoshida, Wesley Y.; Williams, Philip G.

    2010-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of an extract prepared from the fruits of Cordia sebestena has led to the isolation of sebestenoids A-D (1-4). The structures of these new phenylpropanoid esters were elucidated on the basis of extensive NMR experiments and mass spectroscopic measurements. Compounds 1-4 exhibited moderate inhibition of the aspartic protease BACE1. PMID:20952040

  20. Ribonuclease "XlaI," an activity from Xenopus laevis oocytes that excises intervening sequences from yeast transfer ribonucleic acid precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, A; de Paolis, A; Tocchini-Valentini, G P

    1981-01-01

    A ribonuclease (RNase) activity, RNase "XlaI," responsible for the excision of intervening sequences from two yeast transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) precursors, pre-tRNA(Tyr) and pre-tRNA(3Leu), has been purified 54-fold from nuclear extracts of Xenopus laevis oocytes. The RNase preparation is essentially free of contaminating RNase. A quantitative assay for RNase XlaI was developed, and the reaction products were characterized. RNase XlaI cleavage sites in the yeast tRNA precursors were identical to those made by yeast extracts (including 3'-phosphate and 5'-hydroxyl termini). Cleavage of pre-tRNA(3Leu) by RNase XlaI and subsequent ligation of the half-tRNA molecules do not require removal of the 5' leader or 3' trailer sequences. Images PMID:6765601

  1. 21 CFR 172.381 - Vitamin D2 bakers yeast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vitamin D2 bakers yeast. 172.381 Section 172.381... Additives § 172.381 Vitamin D2 bakers yeast. Vitamin D2 bakers yeast may be used safely in foods as a source...) Vitamin D2 bakers yeast is the substance produced by exposing bakers yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)...

  2. Bending AdS waves with new massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayón-Beato, Eloy; Giribet, Gaston; Hassaïne, Mokhtar

    2009-05-01

    We study AdS-waves in the three-dimensional new theory of massive gravity recently proposed by Bergshoeff, Hohm, and Townsend. The general configuration of this type is derived and shown to exhibit different branches, with different asymptotic behaviors. In particular, for the special fine tuning m2 = ±1/(2l2), solutions with logarithmic fall-off arise, while in the range m2 > -1/(2l2), spacetimes with Schrödinger isometry group are admitted as solutions. Spacetimes that are asymptotically AdS3, both for the Brown-Henneaux and for the weakened boundary conditions, are also identified. The metric function that characterizes the profile of the AdS-wave behaves as a massive excitation on the spacetime, with an effective mass given by meff2 = m2-1/(2l2). For the critical value m2 = -1/(2l2), the value of the effective mass precisely saturates the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound for the AdS3 space where the wave is propagating on. The analogies with the AdS-wave solutions of topologically massive gravity are also discussed. Besides, we consider the coupling of both massive deformations to Einstein gravity and find the exact configurations for the complete theory, discussing all the different branches exhaustively. One of the effects of introducing the Chern-Simons gravitational term is that of breaking the degeneracy in the effective mass of the generic modes of pure New Massive Gravity, producing a fine structure due to parity violation. Another effect is that the zoo of exact logarithmic specimens becomes considerably enlarged.

  3. ADS/CFT and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U. /SLAC

    2007-02-21

    The AdS/CFT correspondence between string theory in AdS space and conformal .eld theories in physical spacetime leads to an analytic, semi-classical model for strongly-coupled QCD which has scale invariance and dimensional counting at short distances and color confinement at large distances. Although QCD is not conformally invariant, one can nevertheless use the mathematical representation of the conformal group in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space to construct a first approximation to the theory. The AdS/CFT correspondence also provides insights into the inherently non-perturbative aspects of QCD, such as the orbital and radial spectra of hadrons and the form of hadronic wavefunctions. In particular, we show that there is an exact correspondence between the fifth-dimensional coordinate of AdS space z and a specific impact variable {zeta} which measures the separation of the quark and gluonic constituents within the hadron in ordinary space-time. This connection allows one to compute the analytic form of the frame-independent light-front wavefunctions, the fundamental entities which encode hadron properties and allow the computation of decay constants, form factors, and other exclusive scattering amplitudes. New relativistic lightfront equations in ordinary space-time are found which reproduce the results obtained using the 5-dimensional theory. The effective light-front equations possess remarkable algebraic structures and integrability properties. Since they are complete and orthonormal, the AdS/CFT model wavefunctions can also be used as a basis for the diagonalization of the full light-front QCD Hamiltonian, thus systematically improving the AdS/CFT approximation.

  4. Valuation of brewers spent yeast polysaccharides: a structural characterization approach.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Mariana; Coelho, Elisabete; Nunes, Alexandra; Brandão, Tiago; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2015-02-13

    Brewers spent yeast (BSY) is a by-product from beer industry that can be exploited as source of glucans and mannoproteins, with potential biological activities. In order to solubilize these carbohydrate-rich polymeric materials, a sequential extraction with hot water and alkaline solutions (0.1-8 M KOH) was performed. Mannoproteins were mainly (85%) extracted with 4 M KOH whereas glucans were extracted with 8 M KOH and in an amount that accounted only for 34% of total glucose. Final residue still accounted for 34% of the initial glucans and contained 98% of glucose. Cellulase and α-amylase treatments showed the presence of both α- and β-(1→4)-Glc linkages. To promote total solubilization of these insoluble glucans, the final residue was submitted to a partial acid hydrolysis. This work is the first report showing that the most abundant polysaccharides in BSY are polymers that contain structural features similar to cellulose, thus justifying their resistance to alkaline extractions, acid hydrolysis, and insolubility in water. PMID:25458292

  5. [Yeast Communities of Formica aquilonia Colonies].

    PubMed

    Maksimova, A; Glushakova, A M; Kachalkin, A V; Chernov, I Yu; Panteleeva, S N; Reznikova, Zh I

    2016-01-01

    Yeast abundance and species diversity in the colonies of Formica aquilonia ants in birch-pine forbs forest, Novosibirsk oblast, Russia, was studied. The average yeast number in the anthill material was 10³-10⁴CFU/g, reaching 10⁵ CFU/g in the hatching chambers. Typical litter species (Trichosporon monilfiforme and Cystofilobasidium capitatum) were predominant in soil and litter around the anthills. Apart from these species, ascomycete species of the family Debaryomycetaceae, Debaryomyces hansenii and Schwanniomyces vanrijiae, were predominant in the anthill material. Yeast population of the ants consisted exclusively of the members of these two species. Thus, highly specific yeast communities formed in the colonies of Formica aquilonia ants differ from the communities of surrounding soil. These differences are an instance of environment-forming activity of the ants. PMID:27301134

  6. Adenosine triphosphate inhibition of yeast trehalase.

    PubMed

    Panek, A D

    1969-09-01

    Yeast trehalase has been found to be inhibited non-competitively by adenosine triphosphate. Such a biological control could explain the accumulation of trehalose during the stationary phase of the growth curve. PMID:5370287

  7. Genomic Evolution of the Ascomycete Yeasts

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Robert; Haridas, Sajeet; Salamov, Asaf; Boundy-Mills, Kyria; Goker, Markus; Hittinger, Chris; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lopes, Mariana; Meir-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Rokas, Antonis; Rosa, Carlos; Scheuner, Carmen; Soares, Marco; Stielow, Benjamin; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Wolfe, Ken; Blackwell, Meredith; Kurtzman, Cletus; Grigoriev, Igor; Jeffries, Thomas

    2015-03-16

    Yeasts are important for industrial and biotechnological processes and show remarkable metabolic and phylogenetic diversity despite morphological similarities. We have sequenced the genomes of 16 ascomycete yeasts of taxonomic and industrial importance including members of Saccharomycotina and Taphrinomycotina. Phylogenetic analysis of these and previously published yeast genomes helped resolve the placement of species including Saitoella complicata, Babjeviella inositovora, Hyphopichia burtonii, and Metschnikowia bicuspidata. Moreover, we find that alternative nuclear codon usage, where CUG encodes serine instead of leucine, are monophyletic within the Saccharomycotina. Most of the yeasts have compact genomes with a large fraction of single exon genes, and a tendency towards more introns in early-diverging species. Analysis of enzyme phylogeny gives insights into the evolution of metabolic capabilities such as methanol utilization and assimilation of alternative carbon sources.

  8. Monitoring Air Quality with Leaf Yeasts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, D. H. S.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Proposes that leaf yeast serve as quick, inexpensive, and effective techniques for monitoring air quality. Outlines procedures and provides suggestions for data analysis. Includes results from sample school groups who employed this technique. (ML)

  9. Biorefining of by-product streams from sunflower-based biodiesel production plants for integrated synthesis of microbial oil and value-added co-products.

    PubMed

    Leiva-Candia, D E; Tsakona, S; Kopsahelis, N; García, I L; Papanikolaou, S; Dorado, M P; Koutinas, A A

    2015-08-01

    This study focuses on the valorisation of crude glycerol and sunflower meal (SFM) from conventional biodiesel production plants for the separation of value-added co-products (antioxidant-rich extracts and protein isolate) and for enhancing biodiesel production through microbial oil synthesis. Microbial oil production was evaluated using three oleaginous yeast strains (Rhodosporidium toruloides, Lipomyces starkeyi and Cryptococcus curvatus) cultivated on crude glycerol and nutrient-rich hydrolysates derived from either whole SFM or SFM fractions that remained after separation of value-added co-products. Fed-batch bioreactor cultures with R. toruloides led to the production of 37.4gL(-1) of total dry weight with a microbial oil content of 51.3% (ww(-1)) when a biorefinery concept based on SFM fractionation was employed. The estimated biodiesel properties conformed with the limits set by the EN 14214 and ASTM D 6751 standards. The estimated cold filter plugging point (7.3-8.6°C) of the lipids produced by R. toruloides is closer to that of biodiesel derived from palm oil. PMID:25930941

  10. Elicitation, an Effective Strategy for the Biotechnological Production of Bioactive High-Added Value Compounds in Plant Cell Factories.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Estrada, Karla; Vidal-Limon, Heriberto; Hidalgo, Diego; Moyano, Elisabeth; Golenioswki, Marta; Cusidó, Rosa M; Palazon, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Plant in vitro cultures represent an attractive and cost-effective alternative to classical approaches to plant secondary metabolite (PSM) production (the "Plant Cell Factory" concept). Among other advantages, they constitute the only sustainable and eco-friendly system to obtain complex chemical structures biosynthesized by rare or endangered plant species that resist domestication. For successful results, the biotechnological production of PSM requires an optimized system, for which elicitation has proved one of the most effective strategies. In plant cell cultures, an elicitor can be defined as a compound introduced in small concentrations to a living system to promote the biosynthesis of the target metabolite. Traditionally, elicitors have been classified in two types, abiotic or biotic, according to their chemical nature and exogenous or endogenous origin, and notably include yeast extract, methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid, vanadyl sulphate and chitosan. In this review, we summarize the enhancing effects of elicitors on the production of high-added value plant compounds such as taxanes, ginsenosides, aryltetralin lignans and other types of polyphenols, focusing particularly on the use of a new generation of elicitors such as coronatine and cyclodextrins. PMID:26848649

  11. Size and Structure of Yeast Chromosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Petes, Thomas D.; Byers, Breck; Fangman, Walton L.

    1973-01-01

    Electron microscopic analysis indicates that yeast nuclear DNA can be isolated as linear molecules ranging in size from 50 μm (1.2 × 108 daltons) to 355 μm (8.4 × 108 daltons). Analysis indicates the data is consistent with the hypothesis that each yeast chromosome contains a single, linear DNA duplex. Mitochondrial DNA molecules have a contour length of 21 ± 2 μm and are mostly linear. Images PMID:4594033

  12. Ultraviolet asymptotics and singular dynamics of AdS perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Vanhoof, Joris

    2015-10-01

    Important insights into the dynamics of spherically symmetric AdS-scalar field perturbations can be obtained by considering a simplified time-averaged theory accurately describing perturbations of amplitude ɛ on time-scales of order 1/ ɛ 2. The coefficients of the time-averaged equations are complicated expressions in terms of the AdS scalar field mode functions, which are in turn related to the Jacobi polynomials. We analyze the behavior of these coefficients for high frequency modes. The resulting asymptotics can be useful for understanding the properties of the finite-time singularity in solutions of the time-averaged theory recently reported in the literature. We highlight, in particular, the gauge dependence of this asymptotics, with respect to the two most commonly used gauges. The harsher growth of the coefficients at large frequencies in higher-dimensional AdS suggests strengthening of turbulent instabilities in higher dimensions. In the course of our derivations, we arrive at recursive relations for the coefficients of the time-averaged theory that are likely to be useful for evaluating them more efficiently in numerical simulations.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of extracts of three major plants from the Chihuahuan desert.

    PubMed

    Verástegui, M A; Sánchez, C A; Heredia, N L; García-Alvarado, J S

    1996-07-01

    Dilution methods were employed to determine the effect of ethanolic extracts of Agave lecheguilla Torr. (Agavaceae), Baccharis glutinosa Pers. (Compositae) and Larrea tridentata (DC.) Cov. (Zygophyllaceae) on growth of yeasts, molds and bacteria. The three extracts analyzed showed good antimicrobial activity against more than one organism. The minimal inhibitory concentration of the extracts was also determined. PMID:8771460

  14. Holographic cusped Wilson loops in q-deformed AdS5 × S5 spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Nan; Chen, Hui-Huang; Wu, Jun-Bao

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a minimal surface in q-deformed AdS5×S5 with a cusp boundary is studied in detail. This minimal surface is dual to a cusped Wilson loop in dual field theory. We find that the area of the minimal surface has both logarithmic squared divergence and logarithmic divergence. The logarithmic squared divergence cannot be removed by either Legendre transformation or the usual geometric subtraction. We further make an analytic continuation to the Minkowski signature, taking the limit such that the two edges of the cusp become light-like, and extract the anomalous dimension from the coefficient of the logarithmic divergence. This anomalous dimension goes back smoothly to the results in the undeformed case when we take the limit that the deformation parameter goes to zero. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11105154, 11222549, 11275207), K. C. Wong Education Foundation and Youth Innovation Promotion Association of CAS

  15. Flor Yeast: New Perspectives Beyond Wine Aging

    PubMed Central

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Moreno-Garcia, Jaime; Zara, Severino; Zara, Giacomo; Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Mauricio, Juan C.; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Coi, Anna L.; Bou Zeidan, Marc; Dequin, Sylvie; Moreno, Juan; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-01-01

    The most important dogma in white-wine production is the preservation of the wine aroma and the limitation of the oxidative action of oxygen. In contrast, the aging of Sherry and Sherry-like wines is an aerobic process that depends on the oxidative activity of flor strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Under depletion of nitrogen and fermentable carbon sources, these yeast produce aggregates of floating cells and form an air–liquid biofilm on the wine surface, which is also known as velum or flor. This behavior is due to genetic and metabolic peculiarities that differentiate flor yeast from other wine yeast. This review will focus first on the most updated data obtained through the analysis of flor yeast with -omic tools. Comparative genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics of flor and wine yeast strains are shedding new light on several features of these special yeast, and in particular, they have revealed the extent of proteome remodeling imposed by the biofilm life-style. Finally, new insights in terms of promotion and inhibition of biofilm formation through small molecules, amino acids, and di/tri-peptides, and novel possibilities for the exploitation of biofilm immobilization within a fungal hyphae framework, will be discussed. PMID:27148192

  16. Using fluorescence to study actomyosin in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2014-01-01

    This year marks the 30th anniversary of the first description of the cellular distribution of actin within a yeast cell. Since then advances in both molecular genetics and imaging technologies have ensured research within these simple model organisms has blazed a trail in the field of actomyosin research. Many yeast proteins and their functions are functionally conserved in human cells. This, combined with experimental speed, minimal cost and ease of use make the yeasts extremely attractive model organisms for researching diverse cellular processes, including those involving actomyosin. In this chapter, current state-of-the-art fluorescence methodologies being applied to yeast actomyosin research, together with an honest appraisal of their limitations, such as the pitfalls that should be considered when fluorescently labelling proteins interacting within a dynamic cytoskeleton, will be discussed. Papers describing the established techniques developed for yeast localisation studies will be highlighted. This will provide the reader with an informed overview of the arsenal of imaging techniques available to the yeast actomyosin researcher and encourage them to consider novel ways these simple unicellular eukaryotes could be used to address their own research questions. PMID:25096000

  17. Production of serpins using yeast expression systems.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, Philip A; Bird, Phillip I

    2004-02-01

    Serpins occupy a unique niche in the field of biology. As more of them are discovered, the need to produce sufficient quantities of each to aid experimental and therapeutic research increases. Yeast expression systems are well suited for the production of recombinant serpins. The genetics of many yeast species is well understood and readily manipulated to induce the targeted over-production of many different serpins. In addition, protease-deficient strains of certain species are available and a few species carry out post-translational modifications resembling those of humans. Yeasts are easy to grow and multiply readily in simple culture media hence the cost of production is low, while the scale of production can be small or large. The disadvantages are the inability of most yeast(s) to perform complex post-translational modifications and a lower product yield of secreted protein compared to intracellular protein production. However, for the intracellular production of serpins, in particular the clade B serpins that do not have complex post-translational modifications, yeast expression systems should be among the first systems considered. PMID:14698631

  18. Flor Yeast: New Perspectives Beyond Wine Aging.

    PubMed

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Moreno-Garcia, Jaime; Zara, Severino; Zara, Giacomo; Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Mauricio, Juan C; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Coi, Anna L; Bou Zeidan, Marc; Dequin, Sylvie; Moreno, Juan; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-01-01

    The most important dogma in white-wine production is the preservation of the wine aroma and the limitation of the oxidative action of oxygen. In contrast, the aging of Sherry and Sherry-like wines is an aerobic process that depends on the oxidative activity of flor strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Under depletion of nitrogen and fermentable carbon sources, these yeast produce aggregates of floating cells and form an air-liquid biofilm on the wine surface, which is also known as velum or flor. This behavior is due to genetic and metabolic peculiarities that differentiate flor yeast from other wine yeast. This review will focus first on the most updated data obtained through the analysis of flor yeast with -omic tools. Comparative genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics of flor and wine yeast strains are shedding new light on several features of these special yeast, and in particular, they have revealed the extent of proteome remodeling imposed by the biofilm life-style. Finally, new insights in terms of promotion and inhibition of biofilm formation through small molecules, amino acids, and di/tri-peptides, and novel possibilities for the exploitation of biofilm immobilization within a fungal hyphae framework, will be discussed. PMID:27148192

  19. Subcellular localization of the yeast proteome

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anuj; Agarwal, Seema; Heyman, John A.; Matson, Sandra; Heidtman, Matthew; Piccirillo, Stacy; Umansky, Lara; Drawid, Amar; Jansen, Ronald; Liu, Yang; Cheung, Kei-Hoi; Miller, Perry; Gerstein, Mark; Roeder, G. Shirleen; Snyder, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Protein localization data are a valuable information resource helpful in elucidating eukaryotic protein function. Here, we report the first proteome-scale analysis of protein localization within any eukaryote. Using directed topoisomerase I-mediated cloning strategies and genome-wide transposon mutagenesis, we have epitope-tagged 60% of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteome. By high-throughput immunolocalization of tagged gene products, we have determined the subcellular localization of 2744 yeast proteins. Extrapolating these data through a computational algorithm employing Bayesian formalism, we define the yeast localizome (the subcellular distribution of all 6100 yeast proteins). We estimate the yeast proteome to encompass ∼5100 soluble proteins and >1000 transmembrane proteins. Our results indicate that 47% of yeast proteins are cytoplasmic, 13% mitochondrial, 13% exocytic (including proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum and secretory vesicles), and 27% nuclear/nucleolar. A subset of nuclear proteins was further analyzed by immunolocalization using surface-spread preparations of meiotic chromosomes. Of these proteins, 38% were found associated with chromosomal DNA. As determined from phenotypic analyses of nuclear proteins, 34% are essential for spore viability—a percentage nearly twice as great as that observed for the proteome as a whole. In total, this study presents experimentally derived localization data for 955 proteins of previously unknown function: nearly half of all functionally uncharacterized proteins in yeast. To facilitate access to these data, we provide a searchable database featuring 2900 fluorescent micrographs at http://ygac.med.yale.edu. PMID:11914276

  20. The growth of solar radiated yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, T.

    1995-09-01

    This researcher plans to determine if solar radiation affects the growth of yeast. The irradiated yeast was obtained from a sample exposed in space during a Space Shuttle flight of September 9-20, 1994. Further, the control groups were held at: (1) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland; and (2) South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. The procedure used was based on the fact that yeast is most often used in consumable baked goods. Therefore, the yeast was incorporated into a basic Betty Crocker bread recipe. Data was collected by placing measured amounts of dough into sample containers with fifteen minute growth in height measurements collected and recorded. This researcher assumed the viability of yeast to be relative to its ability to produce carbon dioxide gas and cause the dough to rise. As all ingredients and surroundings were equal, this researcher assumed the yeast will produce the only significant difference in data collected. This researcher noted the approximate use date on all sample packages to be prior to arrival and experiment date. All dates equal, it was then assumed each would act in a similar manner of response. This assumption will allow for equally correct data collection.

  1. The growth of solar radiated yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Tyrone

    1995-01-01

    This researcher plans to determine if solar radiation affects the growth of yeast. The irradiated yeast was obtained from a sample exposed in space during a Space Shuttle flight of September 9-20, 1994. Further, the control groups were held at: (1) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland; and (2) South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. The procedure used was based on the fact that yeast is most often used in consumable baked goods. Therefore, the yeast was incorporated into a basic Betty Crocker bread recipe. Data was collected by placing measured amounts of dough into sample containers with fifteen minute growth in height measurements collected and recorded. This researcher assumed the viability of yeast to be relative to its ability to produce carbon dioxide gas and cause the dough to rise. As all ingredients and surroundings were equal, this researcher assumed the yeast will produce the only significant difference in data collected. This researcher noted the approximate use date on all sample packages to be prior to arrival and experiment date. All dates equal, it was then assumed each would act in a similar manner of response. This assumption will allow for equally correct data collection.

  2. Physiological and environmental control of yeast prions

    PubMed Central

    Chernova, Tatiana A.; Wilkinson, Keith D.; Chernoff, Yury O.

    2014-01-01

    Prions are self-perpetuating protein isoforms that cause fatal and incurable neurodegenerative disease in mammals. Recent evidence indicates that a majority of human proteins involved in amyloid and neural inclusion disorders possess at least some prion properties. In lower eukaryotes, such as yeast, prions act as epigenetic elements, which increase phenotypic diversity by altering a range of cellular processes. While some yeast prions are clearly pathogenic, it is also postulated that prion formation could be beneficial in variable environmental conditions. Yeast and mammalian prions have similar molecular properties. Crucial cellular factors and conditions influencing prion formation and propagation were uncovered in the yeast models. Stress-related chaperones, protein quality control deposits, degradation pathways and cytoskeletal networks control prion formation and propagation in yeast. Environmental stresses trigger prion formation and loss, supposedly acting via influencing intracellular concentrations of the prion-inducing proteins, and/or by localizing prionogenic proteins to the prion induction sites via heterologous ancillary helpers. Physiological and environmental modulation of yeast prions points to new opportunities for pharmacological intervention and/or prophylactic measures targeting general cellular systems rather than the properties of individual amyloids and prions. PMID:24236638

  3. Expression of Recombinant Proteins in the Methylotrophic Yeast Pichia pastoris

    PubMed Central

    Weidner, Maria; Taupp, Marcus; Hallam, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Protein expression in the microbial eukaryotic host Pichia pastoris offers the possibility to generate high amounts of recombinant protein in a fast and easy to use expression system. As a single-celled microorganism P. pastoris is easy to manipulate and grows rapidly on inexpensive media at high cell densities. Being a eukaryote, P. pastoris is able to perform many of the post-translational modifications performed by higher eukaryotic cells and the obtained recombinant proteins undergo protein folding, proteolytic processing, disulfide bond formation and glycosylation [1]. As a methylotrophic yeast P. pastoris is capable of metabolizing methanol as its sole carbon source. The strong promoter for alcohol oxidase, AOX1, is tightly regulated and induced by methanol and it is used for the expression of the gene of interest. Accordingly, the expression of the foreign protein can be induced by adding methanol to the growth medium [2; 3]. Another important advantage is the secretion of the recombinant protein into the growth medium, using a signal sequence to target the foreign protein to the secretory pathway of P. pastoris. With only low levels of endogenous protein secreted to the media by the yeast itself and no added proteins to the media, a heterologous protein builds the majority of the total protein in the medium and facilitates following protein purification steps [3; 4]. The vector used here (pPICZαA) contains the AOX1 promoter for tightly regulated, methanol-induced expression of the gene of interest; the α-factor secretion signal for secretion of the recombinant protein, a Zeocin resistance gene for selection in both E. coli and Pichia and a C-terminal peptide containing the c-myc epitope and a polyhistidine (6xHis) tag for detection and purification of a recombinant protein. We also show western blot analysis of the recombinant protein using the specific Anti-myc-HRP antibody recognizing the c-myc epitope on the parent vector. PMID:20186119

  4. Sugar-fermenting yeast as an organic source of carbon dioxide to attract the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Carbon dioxide (CO2) plays an important role in the host-seeking process of opportunistic, zoophilic and anthropophilic mosquito species and is, therefore, commonly added to mosquito sampling tools. The African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto is attracted to human volatiles augmented by CO2. This study investigated whether CO2, usually supplied from gas cylinders acquired from commercial industry, could be replaced by CO2 derived from fermenting yeast (yeast-produced CO2). Methods Trapping experiments were conducted in the laboratory, semi-field and field, with An. gambiae s.s. as the target species. MM-X traps were baited with volatiles produced by mixtures of yeast, sugar and water, prepared in 1.5, 5 or 25 L bottles. Catches were compared with traps baited with industrial CO2. The additional effect of human odours was also examined. In the laboratory and semi-field facility dual-choice experiments were conducted. The effect of traps baited with yeast-produced CO2 on the number of mosquitoes entering an African house was studied in the MalariaSphere. Carbon dioxide baited traps, placed outside human dwellings, were also tested in an African village setting. The laboratory and semi-field data were analysed by a χ2-test, the field data by GLM. In addition, CO2 concentrations produced by yeast-sugar solutions were measured over time. Results Traps baited with yeast-produced CO2 caught significantly more mosquitoes than unbaited traps (up to 34 h post mixing the ingredients) and also significantly more than traps baited with industrial CO2, both in the laboratory and semi-field. Adding yeast-produced CO2 to traps baited with human odour significantly increased trap catches. In the MalariaSphere, outdoor traps baited with yeast-produced or industrial CO2 + human odour reduced house entry of mosquitoes with a human host sleeping under a bed net indoors. Anopheles gambiae s.s. was not caught during the field trials. However, traps baited with

  5. [Evaluation of mass spectrometry: MALDI-TOF MS for fast and reliable yeast identification].

    PubMed

    Relloso, María S; Nievas, Jimena; Fares Taie, Santiago; Farquharson, Victoria; Mujica, María T; Romano, Vanesa; Zarate, Mariela S; Smayevsky, Jorgelina

    2015-01-01

    The matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry technique known as MALDI-TOF MS is a tool used for the identification of clinical pathogens by generating a protein spectrum that is unique for a given species. In this study we assessed the identification of clinical yeast isolates by MALDI-TOF MS in a university hospital from Argentina and compared two procedures for protein extraction: a rapid method and a procedure based on the manufacturer's recommendations. A short protein extraction procedure was applied in 100 isolates and the rate of correct identification at genus and species level was 98.0%. In addition, we analyzed 201 isolates, previously identified by conventional methods, using the methodology recommended by the manufacturer and there was 95.38% coincidence in the identification at species level. MALDI TOF MS showed to be a fast, simple and reliable tool for yeast identification. PMID:25882136

  6. Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase in yeast mitochondria - a general phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Nedeva, Trayana S; Petrova, Ventzislava Y; Zamfirova, Daniela R; Stephanova, Elena V; Kujumdzieva, Anna V

    2004-01-15

    Fermentative and respiratory yeast strains of genera Saccharomyces, Kluyveromyces, Pichia, Candida and Hansenula have been investigated for mitochondrial localization of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD). Pure mitochondrial fractions were obtained and the specific activities of Cu/Zn and Mn SODs were measured in comparison with those in the corresponding cell-free extracts. The Cu/Zn SOD: Mn SOD ratio in mitochondria and crude extracts was calculated and was considered a specific characteristic of all tested strains. Electrophoretical visualization of SOD patterns provided evidence for possible migration of cytosolic Cu/Zn SOD to mitochondria. The characteristic Cu/Zn SOD profile in mitochondria of all tested strains suggested its ubiquity within the fermentative and respiratory yeasts. PMID:14734161

  7. New Features in ADS Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Di Milia, G.; Luker, J.; Murray, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) has been working hard on updating its services and interfaces to better support our community's research needs. ADS Labs is a new interface built on the old tried-and-true ADS Abstract Databases, so all of ADS's content is available through it. In this presentation we highlight the new features that have been developed in ADS Labs over the last year: new recommendations, metrics, a citation tool and enhanced fulltext search. ADS Labs has long been providing article-level recommendations based on keyword similarity, co-readership and co-citation analysis of its corpus. We have now introduced personal recommendations, which provide a list of articles to be considered based on a individual user's readership history. A new metrics interface provides a summary of the basic impact indicators for a list of records. These include the total and normalized number of papers, citations, reads, and downloads. Also included are some of the popular indices such as the h, g and i10 index. The citation helper tool allows one to submit a set of records and obtain a list of top 10 papers which cite and/or are cited by papers in the original list (but which are not in it). The process closely resembles the network approach of establishing "friends of friends" via an analysis of the citation network. The full-text search service now covers more than 2.5 million documents, including all the major astronomy journals, as well as physics journals published by Springer, Elsevier, the American Physical Society, the American Geophysical Union, and all of the arXiv eprints. The full-text search interface interface allows users and librarians to dig deep and find words or phrases in the body of the indexed articles. ADS Labs is available at http://adslabs.org

  8. Evaluation of corn distillers dried grains with solubles and brewers yeast in diets for channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to examine the use of distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), ethanol extracted DDGS (EDDGS), and brewers yeast in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, diets. Diets containing these ingredients were compared with all-plant and fish meal control diets. Juvenile channel catfish ...

  9. The AdS central charge in string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troost, Jan

    2011-11-01

    We evaluate the vacuum expectation value of the central charge operator in string theory in an AdS3 vacuum. Our calculation provides a rare non-zero one-point function on a spherical worldsheet. The evaluation involves the regularization both of a worldsheet ultraviolet divergence (associated to the infinite volume of the conformal Killing group), and a space-time infrared divergence (corresponding to the infinite volume of space-time). The two divergences conspire to give a finite result, which is the classical general relativity value for the central charge, corrected in bosonic string theory by an infinite series of tree level higher derivative terms.

  10. Small black holes in global AdS spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokela, Niko; Pönni, Arttu; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-04-01

    We study the properties of two-point functions and quasinormal modes in a strongly coupled field theory holographically dual to a small black hole in global anti-de Sitter spacetime. Our results are seen to smoothly interpolate between known limits corresponding to large black holes and thermal AdS space, demonstrating that the Son-Starinets prescription works even when there is no black hole in the spacetime. Omitting issues related to the internal space, the results can be given a field theory interpretation in terms of the microcanonical ensemble, which provides access to energy densities forbidden in the canonical description.

  11. Entanglement entropy and duality in AdS4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakas, Ioannis; Pastras, Georgios

    2015-07-01

    Small variations of the entanglement entropy δS and the expectation value of the modular Hamiltonian δE are computed holographically for circular entangling curves in the boundary of AdS4, using gravitational perturbations with general boundary conditions in spherical coordinates. Agreement with the first law of thermodynamics, δS = δE, requires that the line element of the entangling curve remains constant. In this context, we also find a manifestation of electric-magnetic duality for the entanglement entropy and the corresponding modular Hamiltonian, following from the holographic energy-momentum/Cotton tensor duality.

  12. Fake gaps in AdS3/CFT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belin, Alexandre; Castro, Alejandra; Hung, Ling-Yan

    2015-11-01

    We discuss properties of interpolating geometries in three dimensional gravity in the presence of a chiral anomaly. This anomaly, which introduces an unbalance between left and right central charges, is protected under RG flows. For this simple reason it is impossible to gap a system with such an anomaly. Our goal is to discuss how holography captures this basic and robust feature. We demonstrate the absence of a mass gap by analysing the linearized spectrum and holographic entanglement entropy of these backgrounds in the context of AdS3/CFT2.

  13. Pure Spinors in AdS and Lie Algebra Cohomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Andrei

    2014-10-01

    We show that the BRST cohomology of the massless sector of the Type IIB superstring on AdS5 × S 5 can be described as the relative cohomology of an infinite-dimensional Lie superalgebra. We explain how the vertex operators of ghost number 1, which correspond to conserved currents, are described in this language. We also give some algebraic description of the ghost number 2 vertices, which appears to be new. We use this algebraic description to clarify the structure of the zero mode sector of the ghost number two states in flat space, and initiate the study of the vertices of the higher ghost number.

  14. Internal structure of charged AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Srijit; Sarkar, Sudipta; Virmani, Amitabh

    2016-06-01

    When an electrically charged black hole is perturbed, its inner horizon becomes a singularity, often referred to as the Poisson-Israel mass inflation singularity. Ori constructed a model of this phenomenon for asymptotically flat black holes, in which the metric can be determined explicitly in the mass inflation region. In this paper we implement the Ori model for charged AdS black holes. We find that the mass function inflates faster than the flat space case as the inner horizon is approached. Nevertheless, the mass inflation singularity is still a weak singularity: Although spacetime curvature becomes infinite, tidal distortions remain finite on physical objects attempting to cross it.

  15. Stimulation of delta-Aminolevulinic Acid Formation in Algal Extracts by Heterologous RNA.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, J D; Mayer, S M; Beale, S I

    1986-12-01

    Formation of the chlorophyll and heme precursor delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) from glutamate in soluble extracts of Chlorella vulgaris, Euglena gracilis, and Cyanidium caldarium was stimulated by addition of low molecular weight RNA derived from greening algae or plant tissue. Enzyme extracts were prepared for the ALA formation assay by high-speed centrifugation, partial RNA depletion, and gel filtration through Sephadex G-25. RNA was extracted from greening barley epicotyls, greening cucumber cotyledon chloroplasts, and growing cells of Chlorella, Euglena, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and Anacystis nidulans, freed of protein, and fractionated on DEAE-cellulose to yield an active component corresponding to the tRNA-containing fraction. RNA from homologous and heterologous species stimulated ALA formation when added to enzyme extracts, and the degree of stimulation was proportional to the amount of RNA added. Algal enzyme extracts were stimulated by algal RNAs interchangeably, with the exception of RNA prepared from aplastidic Euglena, which did not stimulate ALA production. RNA from greening cucumber cotyledon chloroplasts and greening barley epicotyls stimulated ALA formation in algal enzyme incubations. In contrast, tRNA from Escherichia coli, both nonspecific and glutamate-specific, as well as wheat germ, bovine liver, and yeast tRNA, failed to reconstitute ALA formation. Moreover, E. coli tRNA inhibited ALA formation by algal extracts, both in the presence and absence of added algal RNA. Chlorella extracts were capable of catalyzing aminoacyl bond formation between glutamate and both the activity reconstituting and nonreconstituting RNAs, indicating that the inability of some RNAs to stimulate ALA formation was not due to their inability to serve as glutamyl acceptors. The first step in the ALA-forming reaction sequence has been proposed to be activation of glutamate via aminoacyl bond formation with a specific tRNA, analogous to the first step in peptide bond

  16. Biotechnological production of carotenoids by yeasts: an overview

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, carotenoids are valuable molecules in different industries such as chemical, pharmaceutical, poultry, food and cosmetics. These pigments not only can act as vitamin A precursors, but also they have coloring and antioxidant properties, which have attracted the attention of the industries and researchers. The carotenoid production through chemical synthesis or extraction from plants is limited by low yields that results in high production costs. This leads to research of microbial production of carotenoids, as an alternative that has shown better yields than other aforementioned. In addition, the microbial production of carotenoids could be a better option about costs, looking for alternatives like the use of low-cost substrates as agro-industrials wastes. Yeasts have demonstrated to be carotenoid producer showing an important growing capacity in several agro-industrial wastes producing high levels of carotenoids. Agro-industrial wastes provide carbon and nitrogen source necessary, and others elements to carry out the microbial metabolism diminishing the production costs and avoiding pollution from these agro-industrial wastes to the environmental. Herein, we discuss the general and applied concepts regarding yeasts carotenoid production and the factors influencing carotenogenesis using agro-industrial wastes as low-cost substrates. PMID:24443802

  17. Introducing ADS 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomazzi, Alberto; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Grant, C. S.; Thompson, D.; Luker, J.; Chyla, R.; Murray, S. S.

    2014-01-01

    In the spring of 1993, the Smithsonian/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS) first launched its bibliographic search system. It was known then as the ADS Abstract Service, a component of the larger Astrophysics Data System effort which had developed an interoperable data system now seen as a precursor of the Virtual Observatory. As a result of the massive technological and sociological changes in the field of scholarly communication, the ADS is now completing the most ambitious technological upgrade in its twenty-year history. Code-named ADS 2.0, the new system features: an IT platform built on web and digital library standards; a new, extensible, industrial strength search engine; a public API with various access control capabilities; a set of applications supporting search, export, visualization, analysis; a collaborative, open source development model; and enhanced indexing of content which includes the full-text of astronomy and physics publications. The changes in the ADS platform affect all aspects of the system and its operations, including: the process through which data and metadata are harvested, curated and indexed; the interface and paradigm used for searching the database; and the follow-up analysis capabilities available to the users. This poster describes the choices behind the technical overhaul of the system, the technology stack used, and the opportunities which the upgrade is providing us with, namely gains in productivity and enhancements in our system capabilities.

  18. Production of inulinase from Kluyveromyces marxianus using dahlia tuber extract

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sumat Chand; Jain, P.C.; Kango, Naveen

    2012-01-01

    Various carbon sources were evaluated for production of inulinase by yeast, Kluyveromyces marxianus MTCC 3995. Highest inulinase activity was observed with Dahlia extract (25.3 nkat mL-1) as carbon source. The enzyme activity was 1.4 folds higher than that observed in media containing pure chicory inulin (17.8 nkat mL-1). The yeast showed good growth on a simple medium containing dahlia extract (20% w/v) and yeast extract (2%w/v) as carbon and nitrogen source respectively, in 96 h. at 28°C and 120 rpm. Lowest inulinase yield (4.8 nkat mL-1) was seen in the medium containing glucose as C-source. Although varied inulinase levels were noticed on different C- sources, Inulinase: Sucrase (I/S) ratios were noticed to be similar. Among various protein sources tested, yeast extract was found to be the best source followed by beef extract (17.9 nkat mL-1) and peptone (13.8 nkat mL-1). The enzyme was optimally active at pH (4.0) and 50°C. TLC analysis of end product revealed that inulinase hydrolyzed inulin exclusively into fructose. Results suggest that the dahlia extract induced exoinulinase synthesis in Kluyveromyces marxianus and can be utilized as a potential substrate for inulinase production. PMID:24031804

  19. Effects of Background Fluid on the Efficiency of Inactivating Yeast with Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Young-Hyo; Kim, Yong-Hee; Lee, Jin-Young; Shim, Gun-Bo; Uhm, Han-Sup; Park, Gyungsoon; Choi, Eun Ha

    2013-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure has been actively applied to sterilization. However, its efficiency for inactivating microorganisms often varies depending on microbial species and environments surrounding the microorganisms. We investigated the influence of environmental factors (surrounding media) on the efficiency of microbial inactivation by plasma using an eukaryotic model microbe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to elucidate the mechanisms for differential efficiency of sterilization by plasma. Yeast cells treated with plasma in water showed the most severe damage in viability and cell morphology as well as damage to membrane lipids, and genomic DNA. Cells in saline were less damaged compared to those in water, and those in YPD (Yeast extract, Peptone, Dextrose) were least impaired. HOG1 mitogen activated protein kinase was activated in cells exposed to plasma in water and saline. Inactivation of yeast cells in water and saline was due to the acidification of the solutions by plasma, but higher survival of yeast cells treated in saline may have resulted from the additional effect related to salt strength. Levels of hydroxyl radical (OH.) produced by plasma were the highest in water and the lowest in YPD. This may have resulted in differential inactivation of yeast cells in water, saline, and YPD by plasma. Taken together, our data suggest that the surrounding media (environment) can crucially affect the outcomes of yeast cell plasma treatment because plasma modulates vital properties of media, and the toxic nature of plasma can also be altered by the surrounding media. PMID:23799081

  20. Discussion of teleomorphic and anamorphic Ascomycetous yeasts and yeast-like taxa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relationship of ascomycetous yeasts with other members of the ascomycete fungi (Ascomycota) has been controversial for over 100 years. Because yeasts are morphologically simple, it was proposed that they represent primitive forms of ascomycetes (e.g., Guilliermond 1912). Alternatively, the ide...