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Sample records for addis ababa hospitals

  1. Diabetes mellitus in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: admissions, complications and outcomes in a large referral hospital

    PubMed Central

    Harries, A. D.; Ade, S.; Tayler-Smith, K.; Ali, E.; Firdu, N.; Yifter, H.

    2015-01-01

    Setting: The Black Lion Referral Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Objective: To document indications for admission, complications and outcomes of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) admitted between 2010 and 2013. Design: A descriptive retrospective study using medical files. Results: Of 8048 admissions, 523 (6.5%) had DM; of these, 418 medical records were retrieved: 301 (72%) patients had type 2 and 104 (28%) type 1 disease, with male sex (62%) and older age (median age 60 years) being features of type 2 disease. Main admission diagnoses for type 2 disease were diabetic foot ulcer (39%) and cardiovascular disease (21%); for type 1 disease, it was diabetic ketoacidosis (62%). Hypertension, neuropathy, nephropathy, retinopathy and diabetic foot accounted for 85% of the 756 existing complications. Overall in-patient mortality was 21%. Of the 89 deaths, 77 occurred among patients with type 2 disease; the main indications for admission were diabetic foot ulcer/gangrene and cardiovascular disease. Conclusion: DM, especially type 2 DM, is an important cause of admission to Ethiopia’s largest referral hospital. Many patients had already developed disease-related complications at admission, and mortality was high. There is a need to improve awareness about and care for DM in Ethiopia. PMID:26400605

  2. Assessment of the health care waste generation rates and its management system in hospitals of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2011

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Healthcare waste management options are varying in Ethiopia. One of the first critical steps in the process of developing a reliable waste management plan requires a widespread understanding of the amount and the management system. This study aimed to assess the health care waste generation rate and its management system in some selected hospitals located in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods Six hospitals in Addis Ababa, (three private and three public), were selected using simple random sampling method for this work. Data was recorded by using an appropriately designed questionnaire, which was completed for the period of two months. The calculations were based on the weights of the health care wastes that were regularly generated in the selected hospitals over a one week period during the year 2011. Average generation indexes were determined in relation to certain important factors, like the type of hospitals (public vs private). Results The median waste generation rate was found to be varied from 0.361- 0.669 kg/patient/day, comprised of 58.69% non-hazardous and 41.31% hazardous wastes. The amount of waste generated was increased as the number of patients flow increased (rs=1). Public hospitals generated high proportion of total health care wastes (59.22%) in comparison with private hospitals (40.48%). The median waste generation rate was significantly vary between hospitals with Kruskal-Wallis test (X2=30.65, p=0.0001). The amount of waste was positively correlated with the number of patients (p < 0.05). The waste separation and treatment practices were very poor. Other alternatives for waste treatment rather than incineration such as a locally made autoclave should be evaluated and implemented. Conclusion These findings revealed that the management of health care waste at hospitals in Addis Ababa city was poor. PMID:23311573

  3. Patients satisfaction with laboratory services at antiretroviral therapy clinics in public hospitals, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that Ethiopia has scale up antiretroviral treatment (ART) program, little is known about the patient satisfaction with ART monitoring laboratory services in health facilities. We therefore aimed to assess patient satisfaction with laboratory services at ART clinics in public hospitals. Methods Hospital based, descriptive cross sectional study was conducted from October to November 2010 among clients attending in nine public hospitals ART clinics in Addis Ababa Ethiopia. Patients’ satisfaction towards laboratory services was assessed using exit interview structured questionnaire. Data were coded and entered using EPI info 2002 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, GA) and analyzed using SPSS version 15 software (SPSS INC, Chicago, IL, USA). Results A total of 406 clients were involved in the study. Of these 255(62.8%) were females. The overall satisfaction rate for ART monitoring laboratory services was (85.5%). Patients were satisfied with measures taken by health care providers to keep confidentiality and ability of the person drawing blood to answer question (98.3% and 96.3% respectively). Moreover, the finding of this study revealed, statistical significant associations between the overall patients’ satisfaction with waiting time to get blood drawing service, availability of ordered laboratory tests and waiting time to get laboratory result with (p < 0.05). Patients receiving blood drawing service less than 30 minute were 7.59 times (95% CI AOR: 3.92–14.70) to be more satisfied with ART monitoring laboratory services compared to those who underwent for more than 30 minutes. Conclusions Overall, the satisfaction survey showed, most respondents were satisfied with ART monitoring laboratory services. However, factors such as improving accessibility and availability of latrines should be taken into consideration in order to improve the overall satisfaction. PMID:22520145

  4. Infective endocarditis in Ethiopian children: a hospital based review of cases in Addis Ababa

    PubMed Central

    Moges, Tamirat; Gedlu, Etsegenet; Isaakidis, Petros; Kumar, Ajay; Van Den Berge, Rafael; Khogali, Mohammed; Mekasha, Amha; Hinderaker, Sven Gudmund

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Infective endocarditis is an infection of the endocardial lining of the heart mainly associated with congenital and rheumatic heart disease. Although it is a rare disease in children, it is associated with high morbidity and mortality; death due to infective endocarditis has been reported to be as high as 26% in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods This was a retrospective review of routinely collected data from patient records. Results A total of 40 children (71% female) with 41 episodes of infective endocarditis admitted to a general paediatric ward in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia between 2008 and 2013. Age ranged from 7 months to 14 years, with a median of 9 years (Inter quartile Range: 7-12 years). Rheumatic and congenital heart diseases were underlying risk factors in 49% and 51% of cases respectively. Congestive heart failure, systemic embolization and death occurred in 66%, 12% and 7.3% respectively. Death was associated with the occurrence of systemic embolization (P-value = 0.03). Conclusion Rheumatic heart disease was an important predisposing factor for infective endocarditis in Ethiopian children. Late presentations of cases were evidenced by high proportion of complications such as congestive heart failure. A low rate of clinically evident systemic embolization in this study may be a reflection of the diagnostic challenges. High proportion of prior antibiotic intake might explain the cause of significant BCNE. Preventive measures like primary and secondary prophylaxis of rheumatic fever may decrease the associated morbidity and mortality. Early detection and referral of cases, awareness creation about indiscriminate use of antimicrobials, and proper history taking and documentation of information recommended. PMID:26090033

  5. Pattern of Bacterial Pathogens and Their Susceptibility Isolated from Surgical Site Infections at Selected Referral Hospitals, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mulugeta, Gebru; Fentaw, Surafael; Mihret, Amete; Hassen, Mulu; Abebe, Engida

    2016-01-01

    Background. The emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens in hospitals is becoming a challenge for surgeons to treat hospital acquired infections. Objective. To determine bacterial pathogens and drug susceptibility isolated from surgical site infections at St. Paul Specialized Hospital Millennium Medical College and Yekatit 12 Referral Hospital Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted between October 2013 and March 2014 on 107 surgical site infected patients. Wound specimens were collected using sterile cotton swab and processed as per standard operative procedures in appropriate culture media; and susceptibility testing was done using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique. The data were analyzed by using SPSS version 20. Result. From a total of 107 swabs collected, 90 (84.1%) were culture positive and 104 organisms were isolated. E. coli (24 (23.1%)) was the most common organism isolated followed by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter species (23 (22.1%)). More than 58 (75%) of the Gram negative isolates showed multiple antibiotic resistance (resistance ≥ 5 drugs). Pan-antibiotic resistance was noted among 8 (34.8%) Acinetobacter species and 3 (12.5%) E. coli. This calls for abstinence from antibiotic abuse. Conclusion. Gram negative bacteria were the most important isolates accounting for 76 (73.1%). Ampicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin, cephazoline, and tetracycline showed resistance while gentamicin and ciprofloxacin were relatively effective antimicrobials. PMID:27446213

  6. Determinants of patient satisfaction with outpatient health services at public and private hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Woldie, Mirkuzie; Ololo, Shimeles

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Patients have explicit desires or requests for services when they visit hospitals. However, inadequate discovery of their needs may result in patient dissatisfaction. This study aimed to determine the levels and determinants of patient satisfaction with outpatient health services provided at public and private hospitals in Addis Ababa, Central Ethiopia. Methods A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted from 27 March to 30 April 2010. The study included 5 private and 5 public hospitals. Participants were selected using systematic random sampling. A pre-tested and contextually prepared structured questionnaire was used to conduct interviews. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, factor analysis and multiple linear regressions were performed using computer software (SPSS 16.0). Results About 18.0% of the patients at the public hospitals were very satisfied whilst 47.9% were just satisfied with the corresponding proportions a bit higher at private hospitals. Self-judged health status, expectation about the services, perceived adequacy of consultation duration, perceived providers’ technical competency, perceived welcoming approach and perceived body signalling were determinants of satisfaction at both public and private hospitals. Conclusions Although patients at the private hospitals were more satisfied than those at the public hospitals with the health care they received, five of the predictors of patient satisfaction in this study were common to both settings. Thus, hospitals in both categories should work to improve the competencies of their employees, particularly health professionals, to win the interests of the clients and have a physical structure that better fits the expectations of the patients.

  7. Prospective Audit of Avoidable Factors in Institutional Stillbirths and Early Neonatal Deaths at Tikur Anbessa Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Demise, Asrat; Gebrehiwot, Yirgu; Worku, Bogale; Spector, Jonathan M

    2015-12-01

    Mortality audits are being used with increasing frequency to improve health outcomes by pinpointing precisely where deficiencies in clinical care exist. We conducted a prospective audit of stillbirths and early neonatal deaths at Tikur Anbessa Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, as part of a broader initiative to reduce perinatal mortality in the labor room and neonatal intensive care unit. Out of 1,225 deliveries that took place during the six-month study period, there were 30 stillbirths and 31 early neonatal deaths (PMR 50/1,000). A multi-disciplinary Audit Team was established and convened monthly to review standardized data collection forms that were completed for each death. It was determined that avoidable factors were present in 70% of perinatal deaths. Health worker-related factors were the most common avoidable factors identified (accounting for 84% of avoidable factors identified), followed by patient-related factors (11%) and administrative-related factors (5%). Based on the study findings, quality improvement programs that target gaps in care are being implemented on the hospital's labor room and in the neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:27337856

  8. Persistent diarrhoea: socio-demographic and clinical profile of 264 children seen at a referral hospital in Addis Ababa.

    PubMed

    Ketema, L; Lulseged, S

    1997-07-01

    Acute diarrhoea is a major public health problem in Ethiopian children under five years of age. Reports for other developing countries indicate that persistent diarrhoea is emerging as an important cause of mortality and morbidity in this age group. Little is, however, known about the extent of the condition in our setting. The socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of children with persistent diarrhoea seen at a teaching hospital in Addis Ababa over an 18-month period is presented. Of 5,762 children with all forms of diarrhoea seen during the study period 264 (5%) had persistent diarrhoea. Most of the children (83%) were below 18 months of age and the peak occurrence was between the ages of seven and 12 months. The majority (86%) of the patients had associated malnutrition and 83% of the infants under four months of age were either fully or partially weaned. Watery diarrhoea with no dehydration was the main clinical feature. Nearly 7% of the patients had dysentery. Average family income was low and parental literacy level seem to have had no effect. It is suggested that breastfeeding and appropriate weaning practices be strongly promoted. Further work is proposed in order to determine the magnitude of the problem and identify the risk factors associated with the disease, including the unfavourable child and family unit characteristics and care seeking behaviours. PMID:9558754

  9. Treatment of Adult Femoral Shaft Fractures Using the Perkins Traction at Addis Ababa Tikur Anbessa University Hospital: The Ethiopian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Bezabeh, Bahiru; Wamisho, Biruk L.; Coles, Maxime J.M.

    2012-01-01

    This is a prospective study to evaluate the efficacy of the Perkins traction in the treatment of adult femoral shaft fractures from October 1, 2007, to the present at the Black Lion Hospital in Addis Ababa University Hospital in Ethiopia. All femur fractures admitted to the hospital were reviewed and evaluated for treatment. Black Lion Hospital (Tikur Anbessa) is the university hospital in Addis Ababa and the highest tertiary teaching hospital in a country of 85 million inhabitants. A 67-bed orthopedic department offers the main ground for teaching to the undergraduate medical students. The hospital is also the pivotal center for the formation of the orthopedic residents. Patients from different parts of the country are referred to this institution for orthopedic care. A total of 68 adult (older than 16 years) patients with 69 femoral shaft fractures were considered for treatment during the study period. Consent was obtained and prospective treatment initiated. A standard Perkins traction was applied by an orthopedic team composed of consultants, orthopedic residents, physical therapists, and nurses. A protocol was developed for patients undergoing such traction. The physiotherapists will supervise all individual or group therapy sessions. Progressive knee range of motion to facilitate quadriceps and hamstring muscle strengthening exercises were implemented four times a day and recorded. Demographic information, fracture patterns, duration of traction, thigh circumference leg length discrepancy, and pin sites were routinely monitored and charted. Data were computerized and analyzed weekly, and appropriate adjustments were made accordingly. Clinical evidence of a competent callus and confirmation by radiographic studies will influence the cessation of traction to allow gait training with toe-touch crutch ambulation. Progress will be monitored during the following outpatient visits in the fracture clinic. A total of 68 consecutive patients with 69 femoral shaft

  10. Work-related stress and associated factors among nurses working in public hospitals of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Salilih, Selamawit Zewdu; Abajobir, Amanuel Alemu

    2014-08-01

    Work-related stress is a pattern of reactions to work demands unmatched to nurses' knowledge, skills, or abilities; these challenges exceed their ability to cope, resulting in burnout, turnover, and low quality patient care. An institution-based cross-sectional study of 343 nurses was conducted in public hospitals of Addis Ababa in 2012. Data were collected by pretested and self-administered questionnaires using a nursing stress scale. One hundred twenty-one (37.8%) (95% confidence interval: 34.3 to 39.1) nurses reported experiencing occupational stress. Significant associations were found between nurses' stress and gender, work shift, illness, marital status, and worksite or unit. Prevalence of work-related stress was higher than expected and opportunities exist for stake holders to design stress reduction and management programs for nurses. PMID:25101930

  11. Incidence of Road Traffic Injury and Associated Factors among Patients Visiting the Emergency Department of Tikur Anbessa Specialized Teaching Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tiruneh, Bewket Tadesse; Dachew, Berihun Assefa; Bifftu, Berhanu Boru

    2014-01-01

    Background. Road traffic injuries are a major public health issue. The problem is increasing in Africa. Objective. To assess the incidence of road traffic injury and associated factors among patients visiting the emergency department of Tikur Anbessa Specialized Teaching Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods. Institutional based cross-sectional study design was conducted. A total of 356 systematically selected study subjects were included in the study. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were performed to identify associated factors with road traffic injury. Odds ratios with 95% confidence interval were computed to determine the level of significance. Results. The incidence of road traffic injury in the emergency department of Tikur Anbessa Specialized Teaching Hospital was 36.8%. Being a farmer (AOR = 3.3; 95% CI = 1.06–10.13), conflict with family members (AOR = 7.7; 95% CI = 3.49–8.84), financial problem (AOR = 9.91; 95% CI = 4.79–6.48), psychological problem (AOR = 17.58; 95% CI = 7.70–12.14), and alcohol use (AOR = 2.98; 95% CI = 1.61–5.27) were independently associated with road traffic injury. Conclusion and Recommendation. In this study the incidence of road traffic injury was high. Alcohol is one of the most significant factors associated with Road Traffic Injury. Thus urgent education on the effect of alcohol is recommended. PMID:25165583

  12. High load of multi-drug resistant nosocomial neonatal pathogens carried by cockroaches in a neonatal intensive care unit at Tikur Anbessa specialized hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cockroaches have been described as potential vectors for various pathogens for decades; although studies from neonatal intensive care units are scarce. This study assessed the vector potential of cockroaches (identified as Blatella germanica) in a neonatal intensive care unit setup in Tikur Anbessa Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods A total of 400 Blatella germanica roaches were aseptically collected for five consecutive months. Standard laboratory procedures were used to process the samples. Results From the external and gut homogenates, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Citrobacter spp. Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter diversus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Providencia rettgeri, Klebsiella ozaenae, Enterobacter aeruginosa, Salmonella C1, Non Group A streptococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter spp. and Shigella flexneri were isolated. Multi-drug resistance was seen in all organisms. Resistance to up to all the 12 antimicrobials tested was observed in different pathogens. Conclusion Cockroaches could play a vector role for nosocomial infections in a neonatal intensive care unit and environmental control measures of these vectors is required to reduce the risk of infection. A high level of drug resistance pattern of the isolated pathogens was demonstrated. PMID:22958880

  13. Factors associated with place of death in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dying at home is highly prevalent in Africa partly due to lack of accessibility of modern health services. In turn, limited infrastructure and health care deliveries in Africa complicate access to health services. A weak infrastructure and limited health facilities with lower quality in Ethiopia resulted poor health service utilization and coverage, high morbidity and mortality rates. We examined whether people in Addis Ababa died in health facilities and investigated the basic factors associated with place of death. Methods We used verbal autopsy data of 4,776 adults (age>14 years) for the years 2006–2010 from the Addis Ababa Mortality Surveillance Program (AAMSP). The main data source of AAMSP is the burial surveillance from all cemeteries in Addis Ababa. We provide descriptive statistics of place of adult deaths and discussed their covariates using multivariate analyses. Results Only 28.7% died at health facilities, while the remaining died out of health facilities. There was an increase trend in the proportion of health facility deaths from 25.3% in 2006 to 32.5% in 2010. The risk of health facility death versus out of health facility deaths decreased with age. Compared with those who had no education educated people were more likely to die at health facilities. The chance of in health facility death was a little higher for females than males while religion, occupational status and ethnicity of the deceased had no any significance difference in place of death. Conclusion Both demographic and social factors determine where adults will die in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The majority of people in Addis Ababa died out of health facilities. The health system should also give special attention to the emerging non communicable diseases like cancer for effective treatment of patients. PMID:23530478

  14. Selected micronutrient levels and response to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) among HIV/AIDS patients attending a teaching Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Eshetu, Amare; Tsegaye, Aster; Petros, Beyene

    2014-12-01

    Poor micronutrient levels are associated with an increased risk of progression to AIDS and are also suggested to influence outcome of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), though existing data are inconclusive to support the latter. Few published data are available on micronutrient levels in Ethiopian HIV/AIDS patients taking HAART. The objective of the study was to determine the association of micronutrient levels and response to HAART (CD4(+) T cell count) among adult HIV/AIDS patients attending a teaching Hospital in Addis Ababa. CD4(+) T cell counts and micronutrient (retinol, zinc, and iron) levels for 171 subjects were determined using standard procedures. Some proportions of the study participants were found deficient for retinol (14.03 %), zinc (47.3 %), and iron (2.8 %). Patients who were deficient in retinol had a significantly lower median CD4(+) T cell counts (P = 0.002) compared to non-deficient subjects. Association of micronutrient quartiles with CD4+ T cell count was assessed using adjusted multivariate regression by taking quartile 4 as a reference category. Accordingly, patients who had retinol levels in quartile 4 had a significantly lower mean CD4(+) T cell count compared to quartile 3 (P = 0.02). The significantly higher CD4(+) T cell counts in patients who were non-deficient in retinol imply the role of retinol in improving the production of CD4(+) T cells. However, both lower and higher retinol levels were associated with suppressed immunity (CD4 < 200 cells/mm(3)), suggesting an adverse effect of higher retinol levels. Thus, retinol may be potentially harmful depending on the dose, emphasizing the need for optimized level of retinol in nutrient supplements in patients taking HAART. PMID:25256923

  15. Perceived Stigma and Associated Factors among People with Schizophrenia at Amanuel Mental Specialized Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Institution Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Bifftu, Berhanu Boru; Dachew, Berihun Assefa

    2014-01-01

    Background. While effective treatments are available for people with schizophrenia, presence of perceived stigma prevents them from accessing and receiving the help they need to get. Objectives. To assess the prevalence and associated factors of perceived stigma among people with schizophrenia attending the Outpatient Department of Amanuel Mental Specialized Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods. Institution based cross-sectional study design was conducted among 411 subjects using an Amharic version of the perceived devaluation and discrimination scale. Single population proportion formula was used to calculate sample size. Subjects were selected by systematic sampling techniques. Binary logistic regression and odds ratio with 95% confidence interval were used to identify the association factors of outcome variables. Results. A total of 411 subjects participated in the study giving a response rate of 97.4%. The prevalence of perceived stigma was found to be 83.5%. Education status (not able to read and write) (AOR = 2.64, 95% CI: 1.118, 6.227), difficulties of adherence to antipsychotic drug (AOR = 4.49, 95% CI: 2.309, 8.732), and duration of illness less than one year (AOR = 3.48, 95% CI: 2.238, 5.422) were factors associated with perceived stigma. Conclusion. Overall, the prevalence of perceived stigma was found to be high. Education status (not able to read and write), difficulties of adherence to antipsychotic medication, and duration of illness were factors associated with perceived stigma. Adherence to antipsychotic medication particularly during the early stage of the illness and strengthening the educational status of the participants were suggested in the clinical care setting. PMID:24967300

  16. Stigma against Tuberculosis Patients in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tadesse, Sebsibe

    2016-01-01

    Background Stigma attached to tuberculosis contributes to the limited effectiveness of current TB control approaches. However, there is a dearth of studies that explore the causes of stigma attached to tuberculosis and its effects on patients and tuberculosiscontrol programs in Ethiopia. Methods An institution-based qualitative study was conducted at St. Peter Tuberculosis Specialized Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia from July to August, 2015. Ten in-depth interviews and 6 key-informant interviews were carried out among tuberculosis patients and healthcare workers, respectively.The Open Code computer software package was used to analyze the data thematically. Results The study revealed that fear of infection and inappropriate health education messages by media were the main causes of tuberculosis stigma. The patients experienced isolation within their family and community, separation, and financial crisis. The stigma attached to tuberculosis may contribute to delayed healthcare seeking, poor treatment adherence, and poor prognosis. Conclusion Interventions thatreduce the stigma attached to tuberculosis should target on areas, such as creating community awareness, patient counseling on problem-solving and emotional skills, preparing culturally sensitive and scientifically sound media messages, providing financial support for the patients, and enhancing the qualities of the healthcare workers, such as empathy, concern, respect for the patient and cultural sensitivity. PMID:27054714

  17. Climate change induced risk analysis of Addis Ababa city (Ethiopia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalayer, Fatemeh; Herslund, Lise; Cavan, Gina; Printz, Andreas; Simonis, Ingo; Bucchignani, Edoardo; Jean-Baptiste, Nathalie; Hellevik, Siri; Fekade, Rebka; Nebebe, Alemu; Woldegerima, Tekle; Workalemahu, Liku; Workneh, Abraham; Yonas, Nebyou; Abebe Bekele, Essete; Yeshitela, Kumelachew

    2013-04-01

    CLUVA (CLimate change and Urban Vulnerability in Africa; http://www.cluva.eu/) is a 3 years project, funded by the European Commission in 2010. Its objective is to develop context-centered methods to assess vulnerability and increase knowledge on managing climate related risks and to estimate the impacts of climate changes in the next 40 years at urban scale in Africa. The project downscales IPCC climate projections to evaluate threats to selected African test cities; mainly floods, sea-level rise, droughts, heat waves, desertification. It also evaluates and links: social vulnerability; urban green structures and ecosystem services; urban-rural interfaces; vulnerability of urban built environment and lifelines; and related institutional and governance dimensions of adaptation. CLUVA combines assessment approaches to investigate how cities, communities and households can resist and cope with, as well as recover from climate induced hazards. This multi-scale and multi-disciplinary qualitative, quantitative and probabilistic approach of CLUVA is currently being applied to selected African test cities (Addis Ababa - Ethiopia; Dar es Salaam - Tanzania; Douala - Cameroun; Ouagadougou - Burkina Faso; St. Louis - Senegal). In particular, the poster will report on the progresses of the Addis Ababa case study. Addis Ababa, the largest city in Ethiopia, is exposed to heat waves, drought, and, more recently, to flash floods. Due to undulating topography, poor waste management and the absence of sustainable storm water management, Addis Ababa is prone to severe flood events during the rainy seasons. Metropolitan Addis Ababa is crossed by several small watercourses. Torrential rains, very common during the rainy season, cause a sudden rise in the flow of these water courses, inundating and damaging the settlements along their banks and affecting the livelihood of the local population. The combination of climate change and development pressures are expected to exacerbate the

  18. Bacteriological Profile and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern of Blood Culture Isolates among Septicemia Suspected Children in Selected Hospitals Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Negussie, Adugna; Mulugeta, Gebru; Bedru, Ahmed; Ali, Ibrahim; Shimeles, Damte; Lema, Tsehaynesh; Aseffa, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Background Blood stream infections are major cause of morbidity and mortality in children in developing countries. The emerging of causative agents and resistance to various antimicrobial agents are increased from time to time. The main aim of this study was to determine the bacterial agents and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns among children suspected of having septicemia. Methods A cross sectional study involved about 201 pediatric patients (≤ 12 years) was conducted from October 2011 to February 2012 at pediatric units of TikurAnbessa Specialized Hospital and Yekatit 12 Hospital. Standard procedure was followed for blood sample collection, isolate identifications and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Results Among 201 study subjects 110 (54.7%) were males. Majority 147 (73.1%) of them were neonates (≤ 28 days). The mean length of hospital stay before sampling was 4.29 days. Out of the 201 tested blood samples, blood cultures were positive in 56 (27.9%).Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria constituted 29(51.8%) and 26(46.4%), respectively. The most frequent pathogen found was Staphylococcus aureus 13 (23.2%), followed by Serratia marcescens 12(21.4%), CoNS 11(19.6%), klebsiella spp 9(16%) and Salmonella spp 3(5.4%). Majority of bacterial isolates showed high resistance to Ampicillin, Penicillin, Co-trimoxazole, Gentamicin and Tetracycline which commonly used in the study area. Conclusion Majority of the isolates were multidrug resistant. These higher percentages of multi-drug resistant emerged isolates urge us to take infection prevention measures and to conduct other large studies for appropriate empiric antibiotic choice. PMID:26997847

  19. Prevalence of Dermatophytic Infection and the Spectrum of Dermatophytes in Patients Attending a Tertiary Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Teklebirhan, Gebreabiezgi; Bitew, Adane

    2015-01-01

    Background. Dermatophytosis is common worldwide and continues to increase. Objective. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of dermatophytosis and the spectrum of ringworm fungi in patients attending a tertiary hospital. Methods. Samples were collected from 305 patients. A portion of each sample was examined microscopically and the remaining portion of each sample was cultured onto plates of Sabouraud's dextrose agar containing chloramphenicol with and without cycloheximide. Dermatophyte isolates were identified by studying macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of their colonies. Result. Of 305 samples, fungi were detected in 166 (54.4%) by KOH of which 95 were dermatophytes while 242 (79.4%) samples were culture positive of which 130 isolates were dermatophytes. Among dermatophyte isolates T. violaceum was the most common (37.7%) cause of infection. Tinea unguium was the predominant clinical manifestation accounting for 51.1% of the cases. Patients with age group 25-44 and 45-64 years were more affected. T. violaceum was the most common pathogen in tinea unguium and tinea capitis, whereas T. mentagrophytes was the most common pathogen in tinea pedis. Conclusion. Further intensive epidemiological studies of ring worm fungus induced dermatophytosis which have public health significance are needed. PMID:26448763

  20. Prevalence of Dermatophytic Infection and the Spectrum of Dermatophytes in Patients Attending a Tertiary Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Teklebirhan, Gebreabiezgi; Bitew, Adane

    2015-01-01

    Background. Dermatophytosis is common worldwide and continues to increase. Objective. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of dermatophytosis and the spectrum of ringworm fungi in patients attending a tertiary hospital. Methods. Samples were collected from 305 patients. A portion of each sample was examined microscopically and the remaining portion of each sample was cultured onto plates of Sabouraud's dextrose agar containing chloramphenicol with and without cycloheximide. Dermatophyte isolates were identified by studying macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of their colonies. Result. Of 305 samples, fungi were detected in 166 (54.4%) by KOH of which 95 were dermatophytes while 242 (79.4%) samples were culture positive of which 130 isolates were dermatophytes. Among dermatophyte isolates T. violaceum was the most common (37.7%) cause of infection. Tinea unguium was the predominant clinical manifestation accounting for 51.1% of the cases. Patients with age group 25–44 and 45–64 years were more affected. T. violaceum was the most common pathogen in tinea unguium and tinea capitis, whereas T. mentagrophytes was the most common pathogen in tinea pedis. Conclusion. Further intensive epidemiological studies of ring worm fungus induced dermatophytosis which have public health significance are needed. PMID:26448763

  1. Prevalence of Antipsychotic Polypharmacy and Associated Factors among Outpatients with Schizophrenia Attending Amanuel Mental Specialized Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tesfaye, Siranesh; Debencho, Nigussie; Kisi, Teresa; Tareke, Minale

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite recommendations by guidelines to avoid combinations of antipsychotics unless after multiple trials of antipsychotic monotherapy, it is quite a common practice to use combinations. This practice leads to unnecessary expenses and exposes the patient to severe drug adverse effects. Methods. An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted from April to May 2014. Systematic random sampling technique was used to select 423 study subjects. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify associated factors of antipsychotic polypharmacy among schizophrenia outpatients. Result. The overall prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy was found to be 28.2%. Extra pyramidal side effects (AOR = 2.80; 95% CI: 1.38, 5.71), repeated psychiatric hospitalization (AOR = 2.83; 95% CI: 1.45, 5.50), history of substance use (AOR = 2.82; 95% CI: 1.36, 5.88), longer duration of treatment (AOR = 2.10; 95% CI: 1.14, 3.87), and drug nonadherence (AOR = 1.84; 95% CI: 1.14, 2.98) were found to be significantly associated with antipsychotic polypharmacy. Conclusion. Prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy was found to be high among the current study participants. Individuals who had extra pyramidal side effects, admission, substance use, duration of treatment, and drug nonadherence were associated with antipsychotic polypharmacy. PMID:26904586

  2. Patterns of caesarean-section delivery in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mashalla, Yohana J.S.; Thupayagale-Tshweneagae, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Setting The study was conducted in Addis Ababa, the capital city of Ethiopia. Specifically, it was conducted in all healthcare facilities offering maternity and obstetric services. Objective The objective of the study was to explore the patterns of caesarean-section (CS) delivery in Addis Ababa. Methods A cross-sectional survey was carried out between December 2013 and January 2014. The population for the study were women aged between 15 and 19 years of age who had given birth in the last 1–3 years before the date of data collection. The Census and Survey Processing System software was used for data capturing and analysing both descriptive and inferential statistics using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20.0. Results Amongst the 835 women who delivered at health facilities, 19.2% had given birth by CS. The prevalence of CS based on medical indication was 91.3%. However, 6.9% of CS performed had no medical indication. Private health facilities performed more CSs than public health facilities, 41.1% and 11.7% respectfully. CS was high amongst women of higher socio-economic standing. Conclusion Overall, CS deliveries rate in Ethiopia is above the rate recommended by the World Health Organisation. Because socio-economic factors influence CS delivery, governments should play a key role in regulating performance of CSs in private institutions. PMID:27542289

  3. The burden of road traffic injuries in an emergency department in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Ali, E.; Tayler-Smith, K.; Hedt-Gauthier, B.; Silkondez, W.; Abebe, D.; Deressa, W.; Enquessilase, F.; Edwards, J. K.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: The emergency department (ED) of Zewditu Memorial Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Objective: To document the proportion, trend, characteristics and outcomes of road traffic injury (RTI) related ED admissions (⩾15 years) between 2014 and 2015. Design: A retrospective, cross-sectional study using routinely collected ED data. Results: Of 10 007 ED admissions, 779 (8%) were RTI cases; this proportion peaked in the month of January (11%). Medical records were available for 522 (67%) of these RTI cases. The median age was 28 years and 69% were males. The majority were pedestrians (69%) injured by an automobile (78%). On triage, 32% were classified as needing urgent/immediate intervention. Head injuries (20%) were the second most common injury after lower limb injuries (36%). ED outcomes were as follows: discharged (68%), hospitalised (17%), referred (17%) and died (1%). Among the 78 hospitalised cases, respectively 62% and 16% were admitted to the surgical and orthopaedic departments. Of 146 RTI cases with head injuries, 25% were hospitalised, of whom 82% were admitted to the surgical department. Conclusion: Our findings can guide policy makers in referral hospitals in improving the planning of hospital resources and the prioritisation of public health needs linked to further urban development. A comprehensive plan to prevent RTIs, particularly among pedestrians in Addis Ababa, is urgently needed. PMID:27358798

  4. Pacific SST influence on spring precipitation in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eden, J. M.; Widmann, M.; Wild, S.; Evans, G. R.; Hughes, J. G.

    2012-04-01

    In Ethiopia and other parts of East Africa, interannual variability of seasonal precipitation is dependent on variations in sea surface temperature (SST) and atmospheric circulation on both regional and global scales. The majority of research into large-scale atmospheric controls and predictability has focused on the heavier summer rains and the establishment of links to large-scale modes of climate variability such as ENSO. By contrast, relatively little work has focused on the potential for predictability of rainfall during the spring months, which is of great importance to much of southern Ethiopia. Additionally, failure of the spring rains may have important agricultural implications, particularly for crops requiring the full extent of the spring-summer growing season. Here, we analyse the links between Pacific SST and precipitation in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia for a century-long period (1900-2004). A tripole correlation pattern between spring precipitation and SST is found in the Pacific basin. We develop regression-based models to estimate spring precipitation from Pacific SST with a lead time of 2-3 months. When subject to a rigorous cross-validation, models based on principal component multiple linear regression (PC-MLR) calibrated on Pacific SST during December show good skill in reproducing observed temporal variability in Addis Ababa precipitation during February (r = 0.48) and March (r = 0.40), and the period spanning February to April (r = 0.44). Reconstructed precipitation is correlated with temperature and specific humidity in the surrounding region; estimates of heavy spring precipitation are associated with anomalously warm, moist conditions across the western Indian Ocean. Our findings suggest that inclusion of Pacific SST in predictive models may benefit drought forecasting across Ethiopia. The relationships identified provide a potential basis for forecasting models for spring rainfall and further analysis may focus on drought forecasting using ROC

  5. Indoor air pollution in slum neighbourhoods of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanbata, Habtamu; Asfaw, Araya; Kumie, Abera

    2014-06-01

    An estimated 95% of the population of Ethiopia uses traditional biomass fuels, such as wood, dung, charcoal, or crop residues, to meet household energy needs. As a result of the harmful smoke emitted from the combustion of biomass fuels, indoor air pollution is responsible for more than 50,000 deaths annually and causes nearly 5% of the burden of disease in Ethiopia. Very limited research on indoor air pollution and its health impacts exists in Ethiopia. This study was, therefore, undertaken to assess the magnitude of indoor air pollution from household fuel use in Addis Ababa, the capital city of Ethiopia. During January and February, 2012, the concentration of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in 59 households was measured using the University of California at Berkeley Particle Monitor (UCB PM). The raw data was analysed using Statistical Package of Social Science (SPSS version 20.0) software to determine variance between groups and descriptive statistics. The geometric mean of 24-h indoor PM2.5 concentration is approximately 818 μg m-3 (Standard deviation (SD = 3.61)). The highest 24-h geometric mean of PM2.5 concentration observed were 1134 μg m-3 (SD = 3.36), 637 μg m-3 (SD = 4.44), and 335 μg m-3 (SD = 2.51), respectively, in households using predominantly solid fuel, kerosene, and clean fuel. Although 24-h mean PM2.5 concentration between fuel types differed statistically (P < 0.05), post hoc pairwise comparison indicated no significant difference in mean concentration of PM2.5 between improved biomass stoves and traditional stoves (P > 0.05). The study revealed indoor air pollution is a major environmental and health hazard from home using biomass fuel in Addis Ababa. The use of clean fuels and efficient cooking stoves is recommended.

  6. A Comparative Study on the Practice of Continuous Assessment between Addis Ababa and Unity Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeleke, Aytaged Sisay

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the practice of continuous assessment at Unity University College and Addis Ababa University. It has also investigated constraints instructors say they have been facing in implementing continuous assessment. Students' attitudes about the practice of this assessment mode towards their course achievements were…

  7. The Practice of Student Assessment: The Case of College of Natural Science, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soromessa, Teshome

    2015-01-01

    This study attempted to assess the practice of student assessment in the College of Natural Science of Addis Ababa University, specifically aimed at investigating whether or not science instructors are well aware of test blue-print, general principles of evaluation and rule of test construction as anticipated in the new education and training…

  8. Isolation of Viable Toxoplasma gondii from Tissues and Feces of Cats from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cats are important in the epidemiology of Toxoplasma gondii because they are the only hosts that excrete environmentally resistant oocysts in feces. In the present study, hearts, serum, and feces from 36 feral cats from Addis Ababa area, Ethiopia were examined for T. gondii infection. Antibodies to ...

  9. The proximate determinants of the decline to below-replacement fertility in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Sibanda, Amson; Woubalem, Zewdu; Hogan, Dennis P; Lindstrom, David P

    2003-03-01

    Between 1990 and 2000, the total fertility rate (TFR) in Ethiopia declined moderately from 6.4 to 5.9 children per woman of reproductive age. During the same period, the TFR in the capital city of Addis Ababa declined from 3.1 to 1.9 children per woman. Even more striking than the magnitude of this decline is that it occurred in the absence of a strong and effective national family planning program. In this study, the components of this fertility decline are identified using the Bongaarts framework of the proximate determinants of fertility. The results of a decomposition analysis indicate that a decrease in the age-specific proportions of women who are married, followed by an increase in contraceptive use are the most important mechanisms by which fertility has declined in Addis Ababa. Poor employment prospects and relatively high housing costs are likely factors that encourage couples to delay marriage and reduce marital fertility. PMID:12772441

  10. Socioeconomic Status and Hypertension among Teachers and Bankers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Lemma, Seblewengel

    2016-01-01

    Background. The social and economic changes taking place in developing countries are influencing the pace at which hypertension and its risk factors are expanding. As opposed to the already established inverse association in developed nations, the association between socioeconomic status and hypertension in developing countries is poor and inconsistent. This study aims to determine the association between socioeconomic status and hypertension among teachers and bankers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods. This study is based on a cross-sectional study conducted to assess the prevalence of NCDs in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The study was undertaken among workers of the Commercial Bank of Ethiopia and teachers of public schools in 2010. Results. Majority of participants were teachers (70.3%). Most of the respondents (54.1%) earn an annual income between 15,000 ETB and 48,000 ETB, and 51.9% of them have educational status of first degree and above. Among the socioeconomic factors income was strongly associated with the odds of having hypertension (AOR: 2.17 with 95% CI: 1.58–2.98). Conclusions. Higher burden of hypertension is observed among teachers and bankers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Promotion of healthy behaviors and interventions that target higher income groups needs to be put in place. PMID:27313874

  11. Socioeconomic Status and Hypertension among Teachers and Bankers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Fikadu, Girma; Lemma, Seblewengel

    2016-01-01

    Background. The social and economic changes taking place in developing countries are influencing the pace at which hypertension and its risk factors are expanding. As opposed to the already established inverse association in developed nations, the association between socioeconomic status and hypertension in developing countries is poor and inconsistent. This study aims to determine the association between socioeconomic status and hypertension among teachers and bankers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods. This study is based on a cross-sectional study conducted to assess the prevalence of NCDs in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The study was undertaken among workers of the Commercial Bank of Ethiopia and teachers of public schools in 2010. Results. Majority of participants were teachers (70.3%). Most of the respondents (54.1%) earn an annual income between 15,000 ETB and 48,000 ETB, and 51.9% of them have educational status of first degree and above. Among the socioeconomic factors income was strongly associated with the odds of having hypertension (AOR: 2.17 with 95% CI: 1.58-2.98). Conclusions. Higher burden of hypertension is observed among teachers and bankers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Promotion of healthy behaviors and interventions that target higher income groups needs to be put in place. PMID:27313874

  12. Time to presentation, pattern and immediate health effects of alleged child sexual abuse at two tertiary hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Children are vulnerable to abuse and violence because their level of development makes them unable to protect themselves. Such adversities during early childhood may have a negative impact on the future lives of the victims. This study was done to determine the delay to hospital presentation, clinical manifestations and immediate health effects of child sexual abuse in two tertiary care hospitals in Ethiopia. Methods We reviewed records of all cases of child sexual and physical abuse between January 2011 and December 2012. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to test the presence and strength of association between time to reporting to hospital and, age and sex of the victim, place of residence and relation of the victim to the perpetrator. Odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals were generated. Significance was taken as p-value < 0.05. Results During the study period, we identified records of 275 children who were seen for alleged physical and sexual abuse; they accounted for 0.6% of the outpatient department (OPD) visits. The majority of the victims were cases of sexual abuse (97.3%) and most of them were female (75.7%). The mean age of the victims was 9.5 years (standard deviation (SD) = 4.2 years). The majority of the abusers were known to the victim (73.0%) and male (98.8%). Neighbors (38.95%), teachers (7.9%) and relatives (13.4%) were the most commonly reported perpetrators. The median length of time taken to present to hospital after the abuse incident was 4 days (range = 2 hours to 3 years). Male victims were 2.4 times more likely to have a delay of greater than one week to present to hospital (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR), 2.40; 95% Confidence interval (CI), 1.34-4.31; P-value = 0.002). Sexual abuse was associated with various immediate health effects, for example, hymenal tear, urinary tract infection and, perineal laceration or tear. Conclusion Presentation for care was often delayed. Male sex was

  13. Infection Control Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices among Healthcare Workers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tenna, Admasu; Stenehjem, Edward A.; Margoles, Lindsay; Kacha, Ermias; Blumberg, Henry M.; Kempker, Russell R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To better understand hospital infection control practices in Ethiopia. Design A cross-sectional evaluation of healthcare worker (HCW) knowledge, attitudes and practices about hand hygiene and tuberculosis (TB) infection control measures. Methods An anonymous, 76-item questionnaire was administered to HCWs at two university hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Knowledge items were scored as correct/incorrect. Attitude and practice items were assessed using a Likert scale. Results 261 surveys were completed by physicians (51%) and nurses (49%). Fifty-one percent of respondents were male; mean age was 30 years. While hand hygiene knowledge was fair, self-reported practice was suboptimal. Physicians reported performing hand hygiene 7% and 48% before and after patient contact, respectively. Barriers for performing hand hygiene included lack of hand hygiene agents (77%), sinks (30%), proper training (50%), and irritation and dryness (67%) caused by hand sanitizer made per WHO formulation. TB infection control knowledge was excellent (>90% correct). Most HCWs felt at high risk for occupational acquisition of TB (71%) and that proper TB infection control can prevent nosocomial transmission (92%). Only 12% of HCWs regularly wore a mask when caring for TB patients. Only 8% of HCWs reported masks were regularly available and 76% cited a lack of infrastructure to isolate suspected/known TB patients. Conclusions Training HCWs about the importance and proper practice of hand hygiene along with improving hand sanitizer options may improve patient safety. Additionally, enhanced infrastructure is needed to improve TB infection control practices and allay HCW concerns about acquiring TB in the hospital. PMID:24225614

  14. Modeling Urban Growth Spatial Dynamics: Case studies of Addis Ababa and Dar es Salaam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchta, Katja; Abo El Wafa, Hany; Printz, Andreas; Pauleit, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    Rapid urbanization, and consequently, the dramatic spatial expansion of mostly informal urban areas increases the vulnerability of African cities to the effects of climate change such as sea level rise, more frequent flooding, droughts and heat waves. The EU FP 7 funded project CLUVA (Climate Change and Urban Vulnerability in Africa, www.cluva.eu) aims to develop strategies for minimizing the risks of natural hazards caused by climate change and to improve the coping capacity of African cities. Green infrastructure may play a particular role in climate change adaptation by providing ecosystem services for flood protection, stormwater retention, heat island moderation and provision of food and fuel wood. In this context, a major challenge is to gain a better understanding of the spatial and temporal dynamics of the cities and how these impact on green infrastructure and hence their vulnerability. Urban growth scenarios for two African cities, namely Addis Ababa, Ethiopia and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, were developed based on a characterization of their urban morphology. A population growth driven - GIS based - disaggregation modeling approach was applied. Major impact factors influencing the urban dynamics were identified both from literature and interviews with local experts. Location based factors including proximity to road infrastructure and accessibility, and environmental factors including slope, surface and flood risk areas showed a particular impact on urban growth patterns. In Addis Ababa and Dar es Salaam, population density scenarios were modeled comparing two housing development strategies. Results showed that a densification scenario significantly decreases the loss of agricultural and green areas such as forests, bushland and sports grounds. In Dar es Salaam, the scenario of planned new settlements with a population density of max. 350 persons per hectare would lead until 2025 to a loss of agricultural land (-10.1%) and green areas (-6.6%). On the other

  15. Personal factors influencing patients' adherence to ART in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Negash, Tefera; Ehlers, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Our study attempted to identify personal (patient-related) factors influencing antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A quantitative, descriptive design was used. Structured interviews were conducted with 355 HIV-infected patients on ART. The findings revealed that stigma, discrimination, depression, and alcohol use negatively affected patients' ART adherence levels. However, patients' knowledge levels had no influence on their ART adherence levels, contrary to other researchers' reports. Addressing stigma and discrimination at community levels might enhance patients' abilities to take their medications in the presence of others. Health care professionals should be educated to diagnose and treat depression in patients during the early stages of ART administration. Patients who are nonadherent to ART should be counseled about potential alcohol abuse. Stigma-related challenges also need to be addressed. PMID:23465401

  16. Microbiological load and zoonotic agents in beef mortadella from Addis Ababa city supermarkets.

    PubMed

    Hiko, Adem; Ameni, Gobena; Langkabel, Nina; Fries, Reinhard

    2015-05-01

    Processing changes the meat ecosystem and, hence, has an impact on the microbiological load and quality of the product. Microbial contamination decreases shelf life and, if a pathogen is present, increases the risk of zoonoses in humans. The aim of this study was to assess the microbiological load, including zoonotic agents, in ready-to-eat beef mortadella from Ethiopian supermarkets. A total of 119 samples from 8 supermarkets in Addis Ababa City (Ethiopia) were examined for aerobic plate count, Enterobacteriaceae, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli. An overall mean of 4.0 log for aerobic plate count and 2.2 log for Enterobacteriaceae was observed. The Salmonella prevalence was 0.8%. An overall E. coli prevalence of 29% (range, 13 to 53%) was observed at individual supermarkets. PMID:25951405

  17. Performance of LED Fluorescence Microscopy for the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV Positive Individuals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Getachew, Konjit; Abebe, Tamrat; Kebede, Abebaw; Mihret, Adane; Melkamu, Getachew

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite its lower sensitivity, smear microscopy remains the main diagnostic method for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in resource-limited countries as TB culturing methods like LJ (Lowenstein-Jensen) are expensive to use as a routine base. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of LED-FM for the diagnosis of PTB in HIV positive individuals. Methods. Cross-sectional study was conducted in Zewditu Memorial Hospital and Teklehaimanot Health Center HIV/ART clinics in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Each sample was stained with ZN and Auramine O staining and examined with bright-field microscope and LED-FM microscope, respectively. LJ culture was used as a reference. Results. Out of 178 study participants, twenty-four (13.5%) patients were confirmed as positive for MTB with LJ culture. The yield of ZN microscopy and LED-FM in direct and concentrated sample was 3.9%, 8.4%, 6.2%, and 8.4%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of direct ZN microscopy were 29.2%, 100%, 100%, and 90.1%, respectively, and of LED-FM microscopy in direct sputum sample were 62.5%, 100%, 100%, and 94.5%, respectively. Conclusion. LED-FM has better sensitivity for the diagnosis of PTB in HIV positive individuals as compared to conventional ZN microscopy. LED-FM can be used as an alternative to conventional ZN microscopy. PMID:26688753

  18. Performance of LED Fluorescence Microscopy for the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV Positive Individuals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Getachew, Konjit; Abebe, Tamrat; Kebede, Abebaw; Mihret, Adane; Melkamu, Getachew

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite its lower sensitivity, smear microscopy remains the main diagnostic method for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in resource-limited countries as TB culturing methods like LJ (Lowenstein-Jensen) are expensive to use as a routine base. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of LED-FM for the diagnosis of PTB in HIV positive individuals. Methods. Cross-sectional study was conducted in Zewditu Memorial Hospital and Teklehaimanot Health Center HIV/ART clinics in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Each sample was stained with ZN and Auramine O staining and examined with bright-field microscope and LED-FM microscope, respectively. LJ culture was used as a reference. Results. Out of 178 study participants, twenty-four (13.5%) patients were confirmed as positive for MTB with LJ culture. The yield of ZN microscopy and LED-FM in direct and concentrated sample was 3.9%, 8.4%, 6.2%, and 8.4%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of direct ZN microscopy were 29.2%, 100%, 100%, and 90.1%, respectively, and of LED-FM microscopy in direct sputum sample were 62.5%, 100%, 100%, and 94.5%, respectively. Conclusion. LED-FM has better sensitivity for the diagnosis of PTB in HIV positive individuals as compared to conventional ZN microscopy. LED-FM can be used as an alternative to conventional ZN microscopy. PMID:26688753

  19. Private sector participation in solid waste collection in Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) by involving micro-enterprises.

    PubMed

    Tilaye, Mesfin; van Dijk, Meine Pieter

    2014-01-01

    Privatization of urban services focuses often on the involvement of foreign enterprises. This contribution deals with micro-privatization, the partial transfer of government responsibility for solid waste collection to micro-enterprises. It tries to shed light on whether the current private sector participation (PSP) of micro-enterprises in solid waste collection service is the best way to capture the expected advantages of private sector involvement. The article examines the relations of the micro-enterprises with beneficiaries and the public sector by focusing on the contract procedure, the tariff-setting process, the cost recovery mechanism and institutionalizing of market principles for micro-enterprises. The research was carried out using secondary and primary data sources. Primary data were collected through the interviewing of public sector officials at different levels, focus group discussions with community groups and micro-enterprises, and observation. A survey was conducted among 160 micro-enterprises in the city of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, using a standard questionnaire. What are some of the factors contributing to the results of PSP in Addis Ababa, the capital of Ethiopia? Policies at higher levels of government definitely produced an overall climate conducive to micro-privatization and recognized the need to develop micro-enterprises, but it is not clear what role the micro-enterprises are to play in solid waste management. New opportunities were created by formalization and taken up by communities and micro-enterprises. Coverage and waste collected both increased. The initiation and institutionalization of the formalization process was not without problems. The public sector over-stressed the autonomy of micro-enterprises. The fate of the micro-enterprises is largely determined by the reforms undertaken at local government level. The rapid changes in policies at the local level made waste-collecting micro-enterprises lose confidence and more dependent

  20. Prevalence and burden of primary headache disorders among a local community in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Headache disorders are the most common complaints worldwide. Migraine, tension type and cluster headaches account for majority of primary headaches and improvise a substantial burden on the individual, family or society at large. There is a scanty data on the prevalence of primary headaches in sub-Saharan Africa in general and Ethiopia in particular. Moreover there is no population based urban study in Ethiopia. The purpose of this study is to determine the prevalence and burden of primary headaches in local community in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods Cross-sectional sample survey was carried out in Addis Ketema sub city, Kebele 16/17/18 (local smallest administrative unit). Using systematic random sampling, data were collected by previously used headache questionnaire, over a period of 20 days. Results The study subjects were 231 of which 51.5% were males and 48.5% were females. The overall one year prevalence of primary headache disorders was 21.6% and that for migraine was 10%, migraine without aura 6.5% migraine with aura was 2.6% and probable migraine was 0.9%. The prevalence of tension type of headache was found to be 10.4%, frequent episodic tension type headache was 8.2% followed by infrequent tension type headache of 2.2%. The prevalence of cluster headache was 1.3%. The burden of primary headache disorders in terms of missing working, school or social activities was 68.0%. This was 78.3% for migraineurs and 66.7% for tension type headache. Majority 92.0% of primary headache cases were not using health services and 66.0% did not use any drug or medications during the acute attacks and none were using preventive therapy. Conclusion Prevalence and burden of primary headache disorders was substantial in this community. Health service utilization of the community for headache treatment was poor. PMID:23574933

  1. Oral health status, knowledge, attitudes and behaviours among marginalized children in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Delia; Aronson, Jane; Asgary, Ramin

    2016-06-01

    Data on oral health status in Ethiopia are scarce. We assessed the prevalence of dental decay and gum disease and oral health practices and its barriers. We performed a cross-sectional study using comprehensive questionnaires and oral examination of 132 children aged 6-15 years in Addis Ababa. Mean age was 10 years and 50% were females. A significant number of children were HIV positive and orphaned. Forty-eight percent did not brush teeth and 43% brushed only once daily. The majority consumed sugary food despite knowing its relationship with dental decay. Seventy-four percent had between 1 and 13 dental caries and 52% showed evidence of bleeding upon brushing. Seventy-eight percent did not clean between teeth and were more likely to consume sugary food (p < 0.05) with oral pain within past six months (p < 0.01). In logistic regression, bleeding upon brushing and caries were not predicted by age or gender. We provided oral health trainings with illustrative flip-book, games and interactive discussions. Marginalized children suffer from poor oral health. We recommend national oral health strategies, targeted health education tailored towards Ethiopian societal norms and resources, improving access to local preventive tools and provision of oral care by training community health workers in the World Health Organization basic oral care package. PMID:25713009

  2. Poverty, sexual experience and HIV vulnerability risks: evidence from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Sori, Assefa Tolera

    2012-11-01

    This study explores the relationship between poverty and vulnerability to HIV infection in Ethiopia using primary (quantitative and qualitative) and secondary data from two sub-cities of Addis Ababa. The data show that sexual experience is influenced by diverse factors such as age, gender, economic status and education level. Household economic status and migration explain the nature of sexual experience and level of vulnerability to HIV infection. Poor uneducated women in poor neighbourhoods are more likely to engage in risky sexual encounters despite awareness about the risk of HIV infection as they operate in an environment that provides the 'path of least resistance' (Lindegger & Wood, 1995, p. 7). This article argues that poverty provides a situation where early sexual initiation, 'transactional sex' and an inability to negotiate for safer sex are associated with low income, lack of education and increased vulnerability to HIV infection. This vulnerability is simultaneously contested and accepted as a commitment to even sacrifice one's life for the sake of one's loved ones. As a modest contribution to the 'structural violence' approach, which emphasizes social inequalities based on gender, class, ethnicity and race and inequalities in terms of exposure to risk and access to health care (Massé, 2007), this article challenges the 'African promiscuity' discourse, which 'does not permit policymakers to think beyond sex' (Stillwaggon, 2006, p. 156), and encourages researchers and policymakers to ask the right questions to understand the complexity of HIV/AIDS and seek solutions to the pandemic. PMID:22591828

  3. Prevalence and determinants of adolescent tobacco smoking in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Rudatsikira, Emmanuel; Abdo, Abdurahman; Muula, Adamson S

    2007-01-01

    Background Tobacco smoking is a growing public health problem in the developing world. There is paucity of data on smoking and predictors of smoking among school-going adolescents in most of sub-Saharan Africa. Hence, the aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of smoking and its associations among school-going adolescents in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods Data from the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) 2003 were used to determine smoking prevalence, determinants, attitudes to, and exposure to tobacco advertisements among adolescents. Results Of the 1868 respondents, 4.5% males and 1% females reported being current smokers (p < 0.01). Having smoking friends was strongly associated with smoking after controlling for age, gender, parental smoking status, and perception of risks of smoking (OR = 33; 95% CI [11.6, 95.6]). Male gender and having one or both smoking parents were associated with smoking. Perception that smoking is harmful was negatively associated with being a smoker (odds ratio 0.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.2–0.5) Conclusion Prevalence of smoking among adolescents in Ethiopia is lower than in many other African countries. There is however need to strengthen anti-tobacco messages especially among adolescents. PMID:17651482

  4. Seasonal fluctuations in the occurrence of enterotoxigenic bacteria and rotavirus in paediatric diarrhoea in Addis Ababa.

    PubMed

    Stintzing, G; Bäck, E; Tufvesson, B; Johnsson, T; Wadström, T; Habte, D

    1981-01-01

    This study (March 1977-February 1978) was performed at the Ethio-Swedish Pediatric Clinic, Addis Ababa, to determine whether there were any seasonal fluctuations in the occurrence of diarrhoea associated with enterotoxigenic enterobacteria (ETEB), rotavirus and two parasites (Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica).A total of 1161 children (962 patients and 199 controls) were investigated. ETEB were isolated in 12.2% of the patients and 4.5% of the controls, rotavirus in 27.8% and 8%, and parasites in 6.8% and 1%, respectively. There is a statistically significant difference in the isolation rates between patients and controls (P<0.001 for rotavirus, P<0.01 for ETEB and parasites). Rotavirus was most prevalent in the 7-12 months age group and ETEB during the second year of life, while parasites showed a continuous increase with age.Two peaks in the occurrence of ETEB were found during the year, the first in August (32.6%), the second in January (19.2%). Two peaks for rotavirus though not as distinct as for ETEB, were seen in June (42.7%) and November (36.4%). The isolation rate of parasites showed no consistent pattern during the year.This study suggests a seasonal occurrence of ETEB and rotavirus but with no apparent correlation to climatological factors. PMID:6266682

  5. Seasonal fluctuations in the occurrence of enterotoxigenic bacteria and rotavirus in paediatric diarrhoea in Addis Ababa

    PubMed Central

    Stintzing, G.; Bäck, E.; Tufvesson, B.; Johnsson, T.; Wadström, T.; Habte, D.

    1981-01-01

    This study (March 1977—February 1978) was performed at the Ethio-Swedish Pediatric Clinic, Addis Ababa, to determine whether there were any seasonal fluctuations in the occurrence of diarrhoea associated with enterotoxigenic enterobacteria (ETEB), rotavirus and two parasites (Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba histolytica). A total of 1161 children (962 patients and 199 controls) were investigated. ETEB were isolated in 12.2% of the patients and 4.5% of the controls, rotavirus in 27.8% and 8%, and parasites in 6.8% and 1%, respectively. There is a statistically significant difference in the isolation rates between patients and controls (P<0.001 for rotavirus, P<0.01 for ETEB and parasites). Rotavirus was most prevalent in the 7-12 months age group and ETEB during the second year of life, while parasites showed a continuous increase with age. Two peaks in the occurrence of ETEB were found during the year, the first in August (32.6%), the second in January (19.2%). Two peaks for rotavirus though not as distinct as for ETEB, were seen in June (42.7%) and November (36.4%). The isolation rate of parasites showed no consistent pattern during the year. This study suggests a seasonal occurrence of ETEB and rotavirus but with no apparent correlation to climatological factors. PMID:6266682

  6. Barriers and enablers in the management of tuberculosis treatment in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Sagbakken, Mette; Frich, Jan C; Bjune, Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    Background Non-adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment is an important barrier for TB control programs because incomplete treatment may result in prolonged infectiousness, drug resistance, relapse, and death. The aim of the present study is to explore enablers and barriers in the management of TB treatment during the first five months of treatment in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods Qualitative study which included 50 in-depth interviews and two focus groups with TB patients, their relatives and health personnel. Results We found that loss of employment or the possibility to work led to a chain of interrelated barriers for most TB patients. Daily treatment was time-consuming and physically demanding, and rigid routines at health clinics reinforced many of the emerging problems. Patients with limited access to financial or practical help from relatives or friends experienced that the total costs of attending treatment exceeded their available resources. This was a barrier to adherence already during early stages of treatment. A large group of patients still managed to continue treatment, mainly because relatives or community members provided food, encouragement and sometimes money for transport. Lack of income over time, combined with daily accumulating costs and other struggles, made patients vulnerable to interruption during later stages of treatment. Patients who were poor due to illness or slow progression, and who did not manage to restore their health and social status, were particularly vulnerable to non-adherence. Such patients lost access to essential financial and practical support over time, often because relatives and friends were financially and socially exhausted by supporting them. Conclusion Patients' ability to manage TB treatment is a product of dynamic processes, in which social and economic costs and other burdens change and interplay over time. Interventions to facilitate adherence to TB treatment needs to address both time-specific and local

  7. Rheumatic heart disease among school children in Addis Ababa City: awareness and adequacy of its prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Oli, K; Porteous, J

    1999-07-01

    One of the objectives of this large scale cross-sectional study of school children of the Addis Ababa city was to assess the status of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) prophylaxis among rheumatic heart disease patients identified during the survey. Awareness about the presence of the illness in those affected and reasons for poor coverage, when detected, were also assessed. Sixty of the 9388 school children surveyed were found to have rheumatic heart disease. On interviewing parents of the children with rheumatic heart disease, ten acknowledged being informed of their children's cardiac illness. Of these parents, 15% (or 9/60) had some idea that their children had heart disease related to some form of infection. However, only two of the nine (22%) children whose parents had some idea about their disease were on regular monthly benzathine penicillin prophylaxis in the previous 12 months preceding the interview. Three (33%) of the nine children had six or fewer injections in the 12 months preceding the interview. The remaining 4 parents (44%) reported that their children took treatment that included injections only at the time of initial diagnosis several years earlier and had not had any follow up since then. Their reasons for not seeking medical care for their children included lack of information on prophylaxis, inability to pay for the treatment and distance of the health facilities. The lack of awareness and the extremely low rate of regular prophylaxis, therefore, highlight the need for an urgent control programme that takes active case detection, treatment access and health education into consideration. PMID:11957312

  8. Trace metal distributions in the sediments of the Little Akaki River, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Akele, M L; Kelderman, P; Koning, C W; Irvine, K

    2016-07-01

    The levels and distribution of trace metals (Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb) at eleven water and sediment stations on the Little Akaki River (LAR) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, were determined. The binding forms of the metals in various geochemical fractions of the sediments were also quantified. The molar ratio of the sum of the simultaneously extractable metals (∑SEM) and acid-volatile sulphide (AVS)-as a measure for predicting metal-induced toxicity-was estimated. LAR trace levels in water for Cu, Zn, and, particularly Mn were, in most instances, higher than the recommended guidelines for healthy aquatic ecosystems. Total trace metal (TTM) contents in the LAR sediments at certain stations exceeded "threshold effect concentrations" and even "probable effect concentrations", especially in the cases of Zn, Cu, Ni, Pb, and at all stations for Mn. This became more apparent after applying "normalizations" to the relatively lower TTM adsorption capacities of coarse-grained, organic-poor sediments. Sequential extraction of the sediments showed that trace metals generally have a higher affinity for Fe-Mn oxide and organic matter/sulphidic fractions, followed by the residual fraction. Mn was relatively strongly bound to the exchangeable, carbonate bound fractions, whereas a large proportion of Cr was found in the residual fraction. The Σ[SEM]/[AVS] ratio pointed to potential metal-induced toxicity of sediments collected from seven out of the eleven stations. The results indicate that trace metal pollution pose risks to the health of ecosystems, and to human communities that use the river for a range of different purposes. PMID:27260529

  9. Comparison of GPS-TEC observations over Addis Ababa with IRI-2012 model predictions during 2010-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akala, A. O.; Somoye, E. O.; Adewale, A. O.; Ojutalayo, E. W.; Karia, S. P.; Idolor, R. O.; Okoh, D.; Doherty, P. H.

    2015-10-01

    This study presents Global Positioning System-Total Electron Content (GPS-TEC) observations over Addis Ababa (Lat: 9.03°N Lon: 38.77°E Mag. lat: 0.18°N) and an evaluation of the accuracy of International Reference Ionosphere-2012 (IRI-2012) model predictions during 2010-2013. Generally, on a diurnal scale, TEC recorded minimum values at 0400-0600 LT and maximum at 1400-1600 LT. Seasonally, TEC recorded maximum values during December solstice and September equinox, and minimum during June solstice. On a year-by-year basis, 2013 recorded the highest values of TEC for both the observed and the model measurements, while 2010 recorded the lowest, implying the solar activity dependence of TEC. Furthermore, we observed discrepancies in the comparison of the GPS-TEC measurements with those derived from IRI-2012 model, after the exclusion of the contributions of plasmaspheric electron content (PEC) from the GPS-observed TEC. All the three options of IRI-2012 model overestimated TEC during early morning and post-sunset hours. Comparatively, of the three options of IRI-2012 model, NeQuick appears to be the most accurate for TEC estimation over Addis Ababa, although at a very close performance capability with the IRI01 CORR option, while IRI2001 is the least accurate.

  10. Relation between Tenth Grade Students' Attitude and Components of Attitude in Algebra with Algebra Achievement of Addis Ababa Secondary Schools, Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atnafu, Mulugeta

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between the attitudes and components of attitude of the students towards algebra with their algebra achievements. The population for this study consists of all government tenth grade students and their mathematics teachers in Addis Ababa city administration. Sixteen tenth grade sections were…

  11. Perceived Principals' Leadership Styles and Faculty Job Satisfaction in Higher Theological Institutions of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: Is There a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamrat Zeleke, Frew

    2013-01-01

    The job satisfaction of higher education faculty can be affected by the kind of leadership style practiced by leaders of an institution. This study examined perceived principals' leadership styles related to faculty job satisfaction in Higher Theological Institutions of Addis Ababa (HTIAA), Ethiopia. Leadership style in this study was defined…

  12. Results from a pilot-scale air quality study in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etyemezian, V.; Tesfaye, M.; Yimer, A.; Chow, J. C.; Mesfin, D.; Nega, T.; Nikolich, G.; Watson, J. G.; Wondmagegn, M.

    Twenty-one samples were collected during the dry season (26 January-28 February 2004) at 12 sites in and around Addis Ababa, Ethiopia and analyzed for particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <10 μm (PM 10) mass and composition. Teflon-membrane filters were analyzed for PM 10 mass and concentrations of 40 elements. Quartz-fiber filters were analyzed for chloride, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium ions as well as elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) content. Measured 24-h PM 10 mass concentrations were <100 and 40 μg m -3 at urban and suburban sites, respectively. PM 10 lead concentrations were <0.1 μg m -3 for all samples collected, an important finding because the government of Ethiopia had stopped the distribution of leaded gasoline a few months prior to this study. Mass concentrations reconstructed from chemical composition indicated that 34-66% of the PM 10 mass was due to geologically derived material, probably owing to the widespread presence of unpaved roads and road shoulders. At urban sites, EC and OC compounds contributed between 31% and 60% of the measured PM 10 while at suburban sites carbon compounds contributed between 24% and 26%. Secondary sulfate aerosols were responsible for <10% of the reconstructed mass in urban areas but as much as 15% in suburban sites, where PM 10 mass concentrations were lower. Non-volatile particulate nitrate, a lower limit for atmospheric nitrate, constituted <5% and 7% of PM 10 at the urban and suburban sites, respectively. At seven of the 12 sites, real-time PM 10 mass, real-time carbon monoxide (CO), and instantaneous ozone (O 3) concentrations were measured with portable nephelometers, electrochemical analyzers, and indicator test sticks, respectively. Both PM 10 and CO concentrations exhibited daily maxima around 7:00 and secondary peaks in the late afternoon and evening, suggesting that those pollutants were emitted during periods associated with motor-vehicle traffic, food preparation, and heating of

  13. Comparing HIV prevalence estimates from prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission programme and the antenatal HIV surveillance in Addis Ababa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the absence of reliable data, antenatal HIV surveillance has been used to monitor the HIV epidemic since the late 1980s. Currently, routine data from Prevention of Mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) programmes are increasingly available. Evaluating whether the PMTCT programme reports provide comparable HIV prevalence estimates with the antenatal surveillance reports is important. In this study, we compared HIV prevalence estimates from routine PMTCT programme and antenatal surveillance in Addis Ababa with the aim to come up with evidence based recommendation. Methods Summary data were collected from PMTCT programmes and antenatal surveillance reports within the catchment of Addis Ababa. The PMTCT programme data were obtained from routine monthly reports from 2004 to 2009 and from published antenatal HIV surveillance reports from 2003 to 2009. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Results In Addis Ababa, PMTCT sites had increased from six in 2004 to 54 in 2009. The site expansion was accompanied by an increased number of women testing. There were marked increases in the rate of HIV testing following the introduction of routine opt-out HIV testing approach. Paralleling these increases, the HIV prevalence showed a steady decline from 10.0% in 2004 to 4.5% in 2009. There were five antenatal surveillance sites from 2003 to 2007 in Addis Ababa and they increased to seven by 2009. Four rounds of surveillance data from five sites showed a declining trend in HIV prevalence over the years. The overall antenatal surveillance data also showed that the HIV prevalence among antenatal attendees had declined from 12.4% in 2003 to 5.5% in 2009. The HIV prevalence estimates from PMTCT programme were 6.2% and 4.5% and from antenatal surveillance 6.1 and 5.5% in 2008 and 2009 respectively. Conclusions There were consistent HIV prevalence estimates from PMTCT programme and from antenatal surveillance reports. Both data sources showed a marked decline in

  14. Attitudes of undergraduate medical students of Addis Ababa University towards medical practice and migration, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The health care system of Ethiopia is facing a serious shortage of health workforce. While a number of strategies have been developed to improve the training and retention of medical doctors in the country, understanding the perceptions and attitudes of medical students towards their training, future practice and intent to migrate can contribute in addressing the problem. This study was carried out to assess the attitudes of Ethiopian medical students towards their training and future practice of medicine, and to identify factors associated with the intent to practice in rural or urban settings, or to migrate abroad. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in June 2009 among 600 medical students (Year I to Internship program) of the Faculty of Medicine at Addis Ababa University in Ethiopia. A pre-tested self-administered structured questionnaire was used for data collection. Descriptive statistics were used for data summarization and presentation. Degree of association was measured by Chi Square test, with significance level set at p < 0.05. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess associations. Results Only 20% of the students felt ‘excellent’ about studying medicine; followed by ‘very good’ (19%), ‘good’ (30%), ‘fair’ (21%) and ‘bad’ (11%). About 35% of respondents responded they felt the standard of medical education was below their expectation. Only 30% of the students said they would like to initially practice medicine in rural settings in Ethiopia. However, students with rural backgrounds were more likely than those with urban backgrounds to say they intended to practice medicine in rural areas (adjusted OR = 2.50, 95% CI = 1.18-5.26). Similarly, students in clinical training program preferred to practice medicine in rural areas compared to pre-clinical students (adjusted OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.12-2.99). About 53% of the students (57% males vs. 46% females, p = 0

  15. Poisonous milk and sinful mothers: the changing meaning of breastfeeding in the wake of the HIV epidemic in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Breastfeeding remains normative and vital for child survival in the developing world. However, knowledge of the risk of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) transmission through breastfeeding has brought to attention the controversy of whether breastfeeding can be safely practiced by HIV positive mothers. Prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) programs provide prevention services to HIV positive mothers including infant feeding counseling based on international guidelines. This study aimed at exploring infant feeding choices and how breastfeeding and the risk of HIV transmission through breastfeeding was interpreted among HIV positive mothers and their counselors in PMTCT programs in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods The study was conducted in the PMTCT clinics in two governmental hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, using qualitative interviews and participant observation. Twenty two HIV positive mothers and ten health professionals working in PMTCT clinics were interviewed. Results The study revealed that HIV positive mothers have developed an immense fear of breast milk which is out of proportion compared to the evidence of risk of transmission documented. The fear is expressed through avoidance of breastfeeding or, if no other choice is available, through an intense unease with the breastfeeding situation, and through expressions of sin, guilt, blame and regret. Health professionals working in the PMTCT programs seemed to largely share the fear of HIV positive mother's breast milk, and their anxiety was reflected in the counseling services they provided. Formula feeding was the preferred infant feeding method, and was chosen also by HIV positive women who had to beg in the streets for survival. Conclusions The fear of breast milk that seems to have developed among counselors and HIV positive mothers in the wake of the HIV epidemic may challenge a well established breastfeeding culture and calls for public health action. Based on strong evidence

  16. Is Climate Chang Responsible to Recent Urban Flooding in Devloping Cities in Africa? A Case study of Addis Ababa City, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moges, Semu; Raschid-Sally, Liqa; Gebremichael, Mekonnen

    2013-04-01

    Cities in Africa show extraordinary expansion of the built environment and imperviousness of the surface condition. Addis Ababa is a case in point, where over the priod of 1984 to 2002, the city asphalted area has increased from 4.72 sq.km (1984) to 27.7 sq.km (2002). Similarly the paved area has expanded five fold from the original 11.1 sq.km, whilst the built environment expanded from 60.1 to 212.7 sq.km. Using hydrological modeling, we demonstrated due to the surface condition change, runoff generation potential has shown significant increase from 28% (in 1984) to 45% (in 2002), showing over 60% change in the runoff volume. The changing condition of the surface is increasing anabtedly, worsening the flooding condition. Similarly, climate change study shows likely increase of precipitation in and around Addis Ababa by about 13 to 17% and comparative increase in flooding. Unlike many cities in Europe, cities in developing countries are confronted with impact emanating from climate change as well as surface condition change. The impact of flooding caused due to the expansion of built environment is found to be more significant in the short term that the climate change, however, the climate change may dominate the long term future of flooding pattern as cities mature towards 2050. Therefore, It is important to view the impacts expansion of built environment and climate change in tandem in future time horizon since the dominance of the impact is different in different temporal scale. In the case of Addis Ababa, we strongly present the following four suggesions: i) the city adminstration re-estabilish the abandoned flood and drainage department of the city as the main flood regulatory and management body working in tandem with Addis Ababa Roads Authority, Water Supply and Sanitation Authority and Urban Planning Authority; ii) The old design guidlines for palnning and design of urban drainage system is not working any more (assumed stationarity condition), we suggest

  17. Assessment of occupational injuries among Addis Ababa city municipal solid waste collectors: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Collection of household waste is a job which requires repeated heavy physical activities such as lifting, carrying, pulling, and pushing. Like many developing countries, in Ethiopia municipal solid waste is collected manually. Therefore, this study is aimed to assess the extent of occupational injuries and associated factors among solid waste collectors in Addis Ababa City. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 876 respondents sampled from 92 unions. A pre-tested structured questionnaire and observation check list were used to collect data. Crude odds ratio with 95% CI was computed to see the presence of association between selected independent variables and occupational injury. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was made to see the relative effect of independent variable on the dependent variable by controlling the effect of other variables. To maintain stability, only variables that have a p-value less than 0.30 in the binary logistic regression analysis were kept in the subsequent model. Enter method was used hierarchically. Results The response rate of this study was 97.9%. Female respondents accounted 71.2%. The median age of the study subjects was 33 year (with 52 inter quartile range). The overall occupational injury prevalence rate in the last 12 months was 383 (43.7%). Utilization of personal protective devices and family size in the household were statistically associated with injury. As compared to workers who used personal protective equipments while being on duty, odds of injury among workers not used personal protective equipments were 2.62 higher (AOR = 2.62, 95% CI: 1.48-4.63). As compared to those who had five and more children, odds of injuries among those who had 3-4 children was reduced by half (AOR = 0.52, 95% CI: 0.30-0.93). Conclusion The extent of occupational injuries among Addis Ababa city solid waste collectors is present in a level that needs immediate public health action. Implementation of

  18. Climate change induced heat wave hazard in eastern Africa: Dar Es Salaam (Tanzania) and Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, Paolo; Sellerino, Mariangela; Di Ruocco, Angela; Kombe, Wilbard; Yeshitela, Kumelachew

    2013-04-01

    Last decades, new records were set in the world for tornadoes, drought, wind, floods, wildfires and hot temperatures, testifying unusual weather and climate patterns with increasing frequency and intensity of extreme weather events. Extreme heat events are natural hazards affecting many regions in the world, nevertheless limited work has been done on the analysis and effects of extreme heat events in Africa, that is considered a continent particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change. In fact, the increase of temperature expected in the African continent during the 21st century is larger than the global mean warming, being about 3° to 4° C, about 1.5 times the global temperature increase (Christensen et al., 2007; Gualdi et al., 2012), with the subtropical regions projected to warm more than the tropical regions. Observations and downscaled model simulations (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 IPCC scenarios) are analyzed to describe heat wave characteristics in Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) and Addis Ababa (Ethiopia), spanning the last five decades as well as that projected for the 21st century. Observed data are daily maximum and minimum temperature collected in the period 1961-2011; downscaled model simulations span up to 2050. Heat waves are defined following a peak over threshold approach by statistical comparison to historical meteorological baselines (site dependent), using a fixed absolute threshold. Projected future warming in the Dar es Salaam and Addis Ababa shows a further increase in the heat waves parameters. Heat wave duration and hot days number are strictly correlated showing that the temperature rise could generate not only an increase of heat waves number but mainly a longer average duration, that can strongly affect the resilience capacity of the population, particularly the elder people. In fact, the impacts of heat waves on the society are determined also by temporal duration (Stephenson, 2008), in addition to their frequency, in fact the capacity of

  19. Personal, Social and Environmental Risk Factors of Problematic Gambling Among High School Adolescents in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Tariku A; Ruiter, Robert A C; Adal, Tamirie A

    2013-09-29

    Understanding risk factors of problematic gambling is prerequisite to effective intervention design to alleviate the negative consequences of gambling. This study explored the personal, social and environmental risk factors of problematic gambling in four high schools in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, among students (N = 422) ranging from 12 to 21 years of age. Results from the cross-sectional survey showed that personal feelings (e.g., self-esteem, false perceptions about winning, drug abuse), social factors (e.g., peer influence, parental gambling), and environmental factors (e.g., accessibility of gambling venues, advertisements) were significant correlates of problematic gambling. The study also revealed that men were more at risk for severe problematic gambling than females. Among the identified types of gambling activities, the most prevalent ones were playing cards followed by flipping coin and pool gambling while internet gambling was among the least reported gambling activities. By identifying personal, social and environmental correlates of risky gambling activities this study provides evidence-based information for the systematic design and evaluation of educational interventions to prevent problematic gambling in young people. PMID:24078303

  20. A matter of sexual confidence: young men's non-prescription use of Viagra in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Both, Rosalijn

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the non-prescription use of the sexual enhancement drug Viagra by young men in Addis Ababa. Data was collected through repeated in-depth interviews with 14 Viagra users - heterosexual men between the ages of 21 and 35 - and focus-group discussions with 21 male and 22 female university students. Study participants turned to Viagra to impress lovers, as a 'support mechanism' when feeling weak or tired, to counteract the effects of chewing the stimulant plant khat and to satisfy what they perceived as a psychological 'addiction'. More generally, young men used Viagra to quell anxieties about what they perceived as women's growing expectations about their sexual performance - informed by changing gender relations and sexual expectations, constructions of masculinity that emphasise sexual prowess, and a misreading of women's sexual desires largely fuelled by the emergence of pornography as a new standard for sexual performance. While some men gained sexual confidence by using Viagra, others - particularly those who used Viagra regularly - paradoxically experienced feelings of loss of manhood. PMID:26555512

  1. Inhalation Exposures to Particulate Matter and Carbon Monoxide during Ethiopian Coffee Ceremonies in Addis Ababa: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Keil, Chris; Kassa, Hailu; Brown, Alexander; Kumie, Abera; Tefera, Worku

    2010-01-01

    The unique Ethiopian cultural tradition of the coffee ceremony increases inhalation exposures to combustion byproducts. This pilot study evaluated exposures to particulate matter and carbon monoxide in ten Addis Ababa homes during coffee ceremonies. For coffee preparers the geometric mean (57 μg/m3) and median (72 μg/m3) contributions to an increase in a 24-hour time-weighted average exposure were above World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. At 40% of the study sites the contribution to the 24-hour average exposure was greater than twice the WHO guideline. Similar exposure increases existed for ceremony participants. Particulate matter concentrations may be related to the use of incense during the ceremony. In nearly all homes the WHO guideline for a 60-minute exposure to carbon monoxide was exceeded. Finding control measures to reduce these exposures will be challenging due to the deeply engrained nature of this cultural practice and the lack of availability of alternative fuels. PMID:20886061

  2. Personal, social and environmental risk factors of problematic gambling among high school adolescents in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Tariku A; Ruiter, Robert A C; Adal, Tamirie A

    2015-03-01

    Understanding risk factors of problematic gambling is prerequisite to effective intervention design to alleviate the negative consequences of gambling. This study explored the personal, social and environmental risk factors of problematic gambling in four high schools in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, among students (N = 422) ranging from 12 to 21 years of age. Results from the cross-sectional survey showed that personal feelings (e.g., self-esteem, false perceptions about winning, drug abuse), social factors (e.g., peer influence, parental gambling), and environmental factors (e.g., accessibility of gambling venues, advertisements) were significant correlates of problematic gambling. The study also revealed that men were more at risk for severe problematic gambling than females. Among the identified types of gambling activities, the most prevalent ones were playing cards followed by flipping coin and pool gambling while internet gambling was among the least reported gambling activities. By identifying personal, social and environmental correlates of risky gambling activities this study provides evidence-based information for the systematic design and evaluation of educational interventions to prevent problematic gambling in young people. PMID:25859576

  3. Use of treated wastewater for managed aquifer recharge in highly populated urban centers: a case study in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiye, Tamiru Alemayehu; Sulieman, Hameed; Ayalew, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Fast population growth and rapid industrialization, on one hand, and lack of sewerage network and poor living condition, on the other, have led to the deterioration of surface and ground water quality in the city of Addis Ababa. The urban wastewater is discharged largely into streams that drain the city. Only less than 3% join the wastewater treatment facilities. Due to sporadic rainfall that causes shortage in groundwater recharge, managed aquifer recharge (MAR) experiment was tested on soil column collected from Akaki Well Field which is located in the southern part of the city using water from the Big Akaki River that crosses the same well field and effluent from Kaliti Wastewater Treatment Plant. Water quality analysis for 17 different parameters was done for both the inflow and outflow water samples and soils were tested for electrical conductivity and cation exchange capacity. The results indicate improved water quality as a result of higher attenuation/filtration capacity of the vadose zone in the well field due to the presence of vertisols. The main geochemical processes that have acted in the soil column could be cation exchange, dissolution, precipitation, oxidation, nitrification, die off etc. that are responsible for the effectiveness of vadose zone for MAR.

  4. Assessment of laboratory logistics management information system practice for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in selected public health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Desale, Adino; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Nigatu, Alemayehu

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Logistics management information system for health commodities remained poorly implemented in most of developing countries. To assess the status of laboratory logistics management information system for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in public health facilities in Addis Ababa. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from September 2010-January 2011 at selected public health facilities. A stratified random sampling method was used to include a total of 43 facilities which, were investigated through quantitative methods using structured questionnaires interviews. Focus group discussion with the designated supply chain managers and key informant interviews were conducted for the qualitative method. Results There exists a well-designed logistics system for laboratory commodities with trained pharmacy personnel, distributed standard LMIS formats and established inventory control procedures. However, majority of laboratory professionals were not trained in LMIS. Majority of the facilities (60.5%) were stocked out for at least one ART monitoring and TB laboratory reagents and the highest stock out rate was for chemistry reagents. Expired ART monitoring laboratory commodities were found in 25 (73.5%) of facilities. Fifty percent (50%) of the assessed hospitals and 54% of health centers were currently using stock/bin cards for all HIV/AIDS and TB laboratory commodities in main pharmacy store, among these only 25% and 20.8% of them were updated with accurate information matching with the physical count done at the time of visit for hospitals and health centers respectively. Conclusion Even though there exists a well designed laboratory LMIS, keeping quality stock/bin cards and LMIS reports were very low. Key ART monitoring laboratory commodities were stock out at many facilities at the day of visit and during the past six months. Based on findings, training of laboratory personnel's managing laboratory commodities and keeping

  5. Food insecurity and mental health: Surprising trends among community health volunteers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia during the 2008 food crisis

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Kenneth C.; Hadley, Craig; Tesfaye, Fikru; Shifferaw, Selamawit

    2011-01-01

    The 2008 food crisis may have increased household food insecurity and caused distress among impoverished populations in low-income countries. Policy researchers have attempted to quantify the impact that a sharp rise in food prices might have on population wellbeing by asking what proportion of households would drop below conventional poverty lines given a set increase in prices. Our understanding of the impact of food crises can be extended by conducting micro-level ethnographic studies. This study examined self-reported household food insecurity (FI) and common mental disorders (CMD) among 110 community health AIDS care volunteers living in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia during the height of the 2008 food crisis. We used generalized estimating equations that account for associations between responses given by the same participants over 3 survey rounds during 2008, to model the longitudinal response profiles of FI, CMD symptoms, and socio-behavioral and micro-economic covariates. To help explain the patterns observed in the response profiles and regression results, we examine qualitative data that contextualize the cognition and reporting behavior of AIDS care volunteers, as well as potential observation biases inherent in longitudinal, community-based research. Our data show that food insecurity is highly prevalent, that is it associated with household economic factors, and that it is linked to mental health. Surprisingly, the volunteers in this urban sample did not report increasingly severe FI or CMD during the peak of the 2008 food crisis. This is a counter-intuitive result that would not be predicted in analyses of population-level data such as those used in econometrics simulations. But when these results are linked to real people in specific urban ecologies, they can improve our understanding of the psychosocial consequences of food price shocks. PMID:20189698

  6. Food insecurity and mental health: surprising trends among community health volunteers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia during the 2008 food crisis.

    PubMed

    Maes, Kenneth C; Hadley, Craig; Tesfaye, Fikru; Shifferaw, Selamawit

    2010-05-01

    The 2008 food crisis may have increased household food insecurity and caused distress among impoverished populations in low-income countries. Policy researchers have attempted to quantify the impact that a sharp rise in food prices might have on population wellbeing by asking what proportion of households would drop below conventional poverty lines given a set increase in prices. Our understanding of the impact of food crises can be extended by conducting micro-level ethnographic studies. This study examined self-reported household food insecurity (FI) and common mental disorders (CMD) among 110 community health AIDS care volunteers living in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia during the height of the 2008 food crisis. We used generalized estimating equations that account for associations between responses given by the same participants over 3 survey rounds during 2008, to model the longitudinal response profiles of FI, CMD symptoms, and socio-behavioral and micro-economic covariates. To help explain the patterns observed in the response profiles and regression results, we examine qualitative data that contextualize the cognition and reporting behavior of AIDS care volunteers, as well as potential observation biases inherent in longitudinal, community-based research. Our data show that food insecurity is highly prevalent, that is it associated with household economic factors, and that it is linked to mental health. Surprisingly, the volunteers in this urban sample did not report increasingly severe FI or CMD during the peak of the 2008 food crisis. This is a counter-intuitive result that would not be predicted in analyses of population-level data such as those used in econometrics simulations. But when these results are linked to real people in specific urban ecologies, they can improve our understanding of the psychosocial consequences of food price shocks. PMID:20189698

  7. Food insecurity among volunteer AIDS caregivers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia was highly prevalent but buffered from the 2008 food crisis.

    PubMed

    Maes, Kenneth C; Hadley, Craig; Tesfaye, Fikru; Shifferaw, Selamawit; Tesfaye, Yihenew Alemu

    2009-09-01

    Our objective in this study was to assess the validity and dependability of the Household Food Insecurity Access Scale (HFIAS), which was developed for international use, among community health volunteers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The HFIAS was translated into Amharic and subsequently tested for content and face validity. This was followed by a quantitative validation study based on a representative sample (n = 99) of female community volunteers (HIV/AIDS home-based caregivers), with whom the HFIAS was administered at 3 time points over the course of 2008, in the context of the local and global "food crisis." By pooling observations across data collection rounds and accounting for intra-individual correlation in repeated measures, we found that the HFIAS performed well according to standards in the field. We also observed slight amelioration in reported food insecurity (FI) status over time, which seems paradoxical given the increasing inaccessibility of food over the same time period due to inflating prices and disappearing food aid. We attempted to resolve this paradox by appealing to self-report-related phenomena that arise in the context of longitudinal study designs: 1) observation bias, in which respondents change their reports according to changing expectations of the observer-respondent relationship or change their behavior in ways that ameliorate FI after baseline self-reports; and 2) "response shift," in which respondents change their reports according to reassessment of internal standards of FI. Our results are important for the validation of FI tools and for the sustainability of community health programs reliant on volunteerism in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:19640968

  8. Health-related quality of life of HIV-infected adults receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in Addis Ababa.

    PubMed

    Mekuria, Legese A; Sprangers, Mirjam A G; Prins, Jan M; Yalew, Alemayehu W; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T

    2015-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is an important outcome measure among HIV-infected patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), but has not been studied extensively in resource-limited settings. Insight in the predictors or correlates of poor HRQoL may be helpful to identify patients most in need of additional support and to design appropriate interventions. A cross-sectional study was conducted between September 2012 and April 2013 in 10 healthcare facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Patients who were at least 6 months on cART were randomly selected and individual patient data were retrieved from medical records. HRQoL was measured by the WHOQoL-HIVBREF, depressive-symptoms by the Kessler-6 scale, and stigma by the Kalichman internalized AIDS-related stigma scale. Multivariate linear regression analysis was carried-out to examine associations between HRQoL and the other variables. A total of 664 patients (response-rate 95%) participated in the study. A higher level of depressive-symptoms was most strongly and consistently associated with a lower HRQoL, both in terms of the magnitude of the relationship and in the number of HRQoL domains associated with it. Also, a higher level of HIV-stigma was associated with a lower HRQoL except for the physical domain, while obtaining sufficient nutritious food and job opportunity were associated with a better HRQoL except for the spiritual and social domains, respectively. Demographics, clinical, and treatment characteristics yielded few significant associations with HRQoL. Our study findings suggest that interventions to improve HRQoL should focus on reducing depressive-symptoms and HIV-stigma, and on enhancing food security and job opportunity. PMID:25782603

  9. Concentration levels of metals in vegetables grown in soils irrigated with river water in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Weldegebriel, Yirgaalem; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh; Wondimu, Taddese

    2012-03-01

    Samples of vegetables, water and soil were collected from four vegetable farms in Addis Ababa to evaluate the extent and trend of metal accumulation in these systems and health risk concerns to consumers. Vegetable samples were digested in HNO(3) and HClO(4), soil samples in Aqua Regia and water samples were pre-concentrated with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) using the chelating agent ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC). All the samples were analyzed for Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Zn, Cd and Pb with flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The concentrations of Cd (0.12-1.13 mg kg(-1)) and Pb (0.11-0.89 mg kg(-1)) in the vegetables surpassed the maximum recommended levels. The total metal concentrations in soils were (mg kg(-1)): Cr, 9.9-22.8; Co, 28.0-47.3; Cu, 25.1-51.4, Mn, 1000-1054; Ni, 16.4-55.8; Zn, 146-149; Cd, 1.4-1.8 and Pb, 22.0-50.7. The trace metals Cd, Co, Cu, Mn and Ni in most of the water samples collected from Goffa, Kera and Akaki farms also surpassed irrigation water guideline limits, which might be a case for high accumulation of metals in the soils. However, the soil pH (6.5-7.6) and high cation exchange capacity (CEC), 38.41-50.18, coupled with high clay content, 37-51%, of the soil seemed to limit metal uptake by the vegetables. The physical parameters, pH (7.43-7.89) and electrical conductivity (0.33-1.54 dS/m) of irrigation waters measured at 25°C were found within the acceptable range. PMID:22062152

  10. Applying the theory of planned behaviour to explain HIV testing in antenatal settings in Addis Ababa - a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To facilitate access to the prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) services, HIV counselling and testing are offered routinely in antenatal care settings. Focusing a cohort of pregnant women attending public and private antenatal care facilities, this study applied an extended version of the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) to explain intended- and actual HIV testing. Methods A sequential exploratory mixed methods study was conducted in Addis Ababa in 2009. The study involved first time antenatal attendees from public- and private health care facilities. Three Focus Group Discussions were conducted to inform the TPB questionnaire. A total of 3033 women completed the baseline TPB interviews, including attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control and intention with respect to HIV testing, whereas 2928 completed actual HIV testing at follow up. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, Chi-square tests, Fisher's Exact tests, Internal consistency reliability, Pearson's correlation, Linear regression, Logistic regression and using Epidemiological indices. P-values < 0.05 was considered significant and 95% Confidence Interval (CI) was used for the odds ratio. Results The TPB explained 9.2% and 16.4% of the variance in intention among public- and private health facility attendees. Intention and perceived barriers explained 2.4% and external variables explained 7% of the total variance in HIV testing. Positive and negative predictive values of intention were 96% and 6% respectively. Across both groups, subjective norm explained a substantial amount of variance in intention, followed by attitudes. Women intended to test for HIV if they perceived social support and anticipated positive consequences following test performance. Type of counselling did not modify the link between intended and actual HIV testing. Conclusion The TPB explained substantial amount of variance in intention to test but was less sufficient in explaining

  11. Association of socioeconomic and behavioral factors with adult mortality: analysis of data from verbal autopsy in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Changes in socioeconomic status, lifestyle and behavioral factors among the urban population in Ethiopia is resulting in a shift in the causes of mortality. We used verbal autopsy data from 2006 to 2009 to measure the association of socioeconomic and behavioral factors with causes of mortality in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods A total of 49,309 deaths from burial surveillance were eligible for verbal autopsy for the years 2006 to 2009. Among these, 10% (4,931) were drawn randomly for verbal autopsy of which 91% (4,494) were adults of age ≥15 years. Verbal autopsies, used to identify causes of death and frequency of risk factors, were completed for 3,709 (83%) of the drawn sample. Results According to the results of the verbal autopsy, non-communicable diseases caused 1,915 (51%) of the total adult deaths, while communicable diseases and injuries caused 1,566 (42%) and 233 (6%) of the deaths respectively. Overall, frequent alcohol (12%) and tobacco consumption (7%) were highly prevalent among the deceased individuals; both because of communicable diseases (HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis) as well as due to non-communicable diseases (malignancy, cardiovascular and chronic liver diseases). HIV/AIDS (AOR = 2.14, 95% CI [1.52-3.00], p < 0.001) and chronic liver diseases (AOR = 3.09, 95% CI [1.95-4.89], p < 0.001) were significantly associated with frequent alcohol consumption, while tuberculosis was associated with both frequent alcohol (AOR = 1.61, 95% CI [1.15-2.24], p = 0.005) and tobacco consumption (AOR = 1.67, 95% CI [1.13-2.47], p < 0.010). Having low educational status, being female and being within the age range of 25 to 44 years were positively associated with HIV/AIDS related mortality. Individuals aged 45 years and above were 3 to 6 times more likely to have died due to cardiovascular diseases compared with those within the 15 to 24 years age group. Conclusion The findings from the analysis suggest that public health

  12. Urban food insecurity in the context of high food prices: a community based cross sectional study in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High food prices have emerged as a major global challenge, especially for poor and urban households in low-income countries such as Ethiopia. However, there is little empirical evidence on urban food security and how people living in urban areas are coping with sustained high food prices. This study aims to address this gap by investigating the food insecurity situation in urban Ethiopia -a country experiencing sustained high food prices, high rates of urban poverty, and a growing urban population. Methods A community based cross-sectional study was conducted from January 18 to February 14, 2012. A total of 550 households were selected from three sub-cities of Addis Ababa using three-stage sampling technique. Data were collected using questionnaire based interview with household heads. Items in the questionnaire include, among others, basic socioeconomic variables, dietary diversity and coping strategies. Food security status of households was assessed by a Household Food Insecurity Access Score. Data analysis was done using SPSS software and both univariate and bivariate analysis were done. Results The study found that 75% of households were food insecure and 23% were in a state of hunger. Households with higher food insecurity scores tend to have lower dietary diversity and are less likely to consume high quality diets. Reduction in meal size and shifting to poor quality/less expensive/food types were among the common coping strategies to high food price used by households. Household incomes, occupational and educational status of household heads were significant determinants of food security. Conclusion Food insecurity in Ethiopia is not only a rural problem. Urban food insecurity is a growing concern due to the toxic combination of high rates of urban poverty, high dependency of urban households on food supplied by the market, and fluctuating food prices. Household food insecurity was particularly high among low income households and those headed by

  13. Effectiveness of a multimodal hand hygiene campaign and obstacles to success in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hand hygiene is the cornerstone of infection control and reduces rates of healthcare associated infection. There are limited data evaluating hand hygiene adherence and hand hygiene campaign effect in resource-limited settings, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. This study assessed the impact of implementing a World Health Organization (WHO)-recommended multimodal hand hygiene campaign at a hospital in Ethiopia. Methods This study included a before-and-after assessment of health care worker (HCW) adherence with WHO hand hygiene guidelines. It was implemented in three phases: 1) baseline evaluation of hand hygiene adherence and hospital infrastructure; 2) intervention (distribution of commercial hand sanitizer and implementation of an abbreviated WHO-recommended multimodal hand hygiene campaign); and 3) post-intervention evaluation of HCW hand hygiene adherence. HCWs’ perceptions of the campaign and hand sanitizer tolerability were assessed through a survey performed in the post-intervention period. Results At baseline, hand washing materials were infrequently available, with only 20% of sinks having hand-washing materials. There was a significant increase in hand hygiene adherence among HCWs following implementation of a WHO multimodal hand hygiene program. Adherence increased from 2.1% at baseline (21 hand hygiene actions/1000 opportunities for hand hygiene) to 12.7% (127 hand hygiene actions /1000 opportunities for hand hygiene) after the implementation of the hand hygiene campaign (OR = 6.8, 95% CI 4.2-10.9). Hand hygiene rates significantly increased among all HCW types except attending physicians. Independent predictors of HCW hand hygiene compliance included performing hand hygiene in the post-intervention period (aOR = 5.7, 95% CI 3.5-9.3), in the emergency department (aOR = 4.9, 95% CI 2.8-8.6), during patient care that did not involve Attending Physician Rounds (aOR = 2.4, 95% CI 1.2-4.5), and after patient contact (aOR = 2

  14. Assessing the outcome of Strengthening Laboratory Management Towards Accreditation (SLMTA) on laboratory quality management system in city government of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Sisay, Abay; Mindaye, Tedla; Tesfaye, Abrham; Abera, Eyob; Desale, Adino

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Strengthening Laboratory Management Toward Accreditation (SLMTA) is a competency-based management training programme designed to bring about immediate and measurable laboratory improvement. The aim of this study is to assess the outcome of SLMTA on laboratory quality management system in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods The study used an Institutional based cross sectional study design that employed a secondary and primary data collection approach on the participated institution of medical laboratory in SLMTA. The study was conducted in Addis Ababa city government and the data was collected from February ‘April 2014 and data was entered in to EPI-data version 3.1 and was analyzed by SPSS version 20. Results The assessment finding indicate that there was a significant improvement in average scores (141.4; range of 65-196, 95%CI =86.275-115.5, p = 0.000) at final with 3 laboratories become 3 star, 6 laboratories were at 2 star, 11 were 1 star. Laboratory facilities respondents which thought getting adequate and timely manner mentorship were found 2.5 times more likely to get good success in the final score(AOR= 2.501, 95% CI= 1.109-4.602) than which did not get it. Conclusion At the end of SLMTA implementation,3 laboratories score 3 star, 6 laboratories were at 2 star, 11 were at 1 star. The most important contributing factor for not scoring star in the final outcome of SLMTA were not conducting their customer satisfaction survey, poor staff motivation, and lack of regular equipment service maintenance. Mentorship, onsite and offsite coaching and training activities had shown a great improvement on laboratory quality management system in most laboratories. PMID:26175805

  15. High Mortality from Blood Stream Infection in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Is Due to Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Seboxa, Teshale; Amogne, Wondwossen; Abebe, Workeabeba; Tsegaye, Tewodros; Azazh, Aklilu; Hailu, Workagegnehu; Fufa, Kebede; Grude, Nils; Henriksen, Thor-Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Background Managing blood stream infection in Africa is hampered by lack of bacteriological support needed for antimicrobial stewardship, and background data needed for empirical treatment. A combined pro- and retrospective approach was used to overcome thresholds in clinical research in Africa. Methods Outcome and characteristics including age, HIV infection, pancytopenia and bacteriological results were studied in 292 adult patients with two or more SIRS criteria using univariate and confirming multivariate logistic regression models. Expected randomly distributed resistance covariation was compared with observed co-resistance among gram-negative enteric bacteria in 92 paediatric blood culture isolates that had been harvested in the same hospital during the same period of time. Results Mortality was fivefold increased among patients with positive blood culture results [50.0% vs. 9.8%; OR 11.24 (4.38–25.88), p < 0.0001], and for this group of patients mortality was significantly associated with antimicrobial resistance [OR 23.28 (3.3–164.4), p = 0.002]. All 11 patients with Enterobacteriaceae resistant to 3rd. generation cephalosporins died. Eighty-nine patients had pancytopenia grade 3–4. Among patients with negative blood culture results, mortality was significantly associated with pancytopenia [OR 3.12 (1.32–7.39), p = 0.01]. HIV positivity was not associated with increased mortality. Antimicrobial resistance that concerned gram-negative enteric bacteria, regardless of species, was characterized by co-resistance between third generation cephalosporins, gentamicin, chloramphenicol, and co-trimoxazole. Conclusion Mortality was strongly associated with growth of bacteria resistant to empirical treatment, and these patients were dead or dying when bacteriological reports arrived. Because of co-resistance, alternative efficient antibiotics would not have been available in Ethiopia for 8/11 Enterobacteriaceae-infected patients with isolates resistant to third

  16. Turn-over rate of academic faculty at the College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University: a 20-year analysis (1991 to 2011)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Faculty turn-over affects both workers and organizations. Turnover of faculty and researchers is increasing alarmingly and costing the universities and the country at large. Fast turnover of health professionals from the health system and from academic institutions has recently received substantial attention from both academia and health sector managers. This paper calculates the faculty turnover rate at the College of Health Sciences of Addis Ababa University during the period of September 1991 to August 2011. Methods The study was conducted at the College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University. Retrospective analysis of employee records was done. All records of the faculty that were working in the College during the 20-year period, starting from September 1991 to August 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Data were collected from the employee records accessed from the College’s human resources database and supplemented by payroll sheets and different reports. A structured checklist was used to extract the required data from the database. The crude turnover rate for academic faculty was calculated. Results Within the 20-year period of September 1991 to August 2011, a total of 120 faculty members left. The overall turn-over rate was 92.8 %. The rate in the most recent five years (172 %) is 8.5 times higher than the rate for the first five years (20 %). The average retention period before the termination of an employment contract was 4.9 years. The top five departments where employment contracts were relatively higher include: Nursing 15 (15.6 %), Internal Medicine 12 (12.5%), Public Health 10 (10.4%), Pediatrics 9 (9.4%) and Surgery 9 (9.4%). About two thirds (66.6%) of the faculty who were leaving were at the ranks of assistant professorship and above. Conclusion This study revealed that outflow of faculty has been continuously increasing in the period reviewed. This implies that the College had been losing highly skilled professionals with

  17. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella isolated from lactating cows and in contact humans in dairy farms of Addis Ababa: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Salmonella are the major pathogenic bacteria in humans as well as in animals. Salmonella species are leading causes of acute gastroenteritis in several countries and salmonellosis remains an important public health problem worldwide, particularly in the developing countries. The situation is more aggravated by the ever increasing rate of antimicrobial resistance strains. Cattle have been implicated as a source of human infection with antimicrobial resistant Salmonella through direct contact with livestock and through the isolation of antimicrobial resistant Salmonella from raw milk, cheddar cheese, and hamburger meat traced to dairy farms. Despiite the presence of many studies on the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Salmonella in Ethiopia, nothing has been said on the degree of the situation among apparently healthy lactating cows and in contact humans. Hence this study was conducted to determine the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance pattern of Salmonella isolates from lactating cows and in contact humans in dairy farms of Addis Ababa. Methods a cross sectional study was conducted in Addis Ababa by collecting milk and faecal samples from lactating cows and stool samples from humans working in dairy farms. Samples were pre-enriched in buffered peptone water followed by selective enrichment using selenite cysteine and Rapaport-Vassilidis broths. Isolation and identification was made by inoculating the selectively enriched sample on to Xylose Lysine Deoxycholate agar followed by confirmation of presumptive colonies using different biochemical tests. The Kibry Bauer disk diffusion method was used for antimicrobial sensitivity testing. Results 10.7% (21/195) of cows and 13.6% (3/22) of the human subjects sheded Salmonella. 83% resistance to two or more antimicrobials and 100% resistance to ampicillin were observed. Most of the isolates were relatively sensitive to ciprofloxacin, cotrimoxazole, and chloramphenicol. Conclusion High

  18. Characterization of mycobacterium isolates from pulmomary tuberculosis suspected cases visiting Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory at Ethiopian Health and Nutrition Research Institute, Addis Ababa Ethiopia: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mathewos, Biniam; Kebede, Nigatu; Kassa, Tesfu; Mihret, Adane; Getahun, Muluwork

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize mycobacterium isolates from pulmomary tuberculosis suspected cases visiting National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory at Ethiopian Health and Nutrition Research Institute, for diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis from January 4 to February 22, 2010 with total samples of 263. Methods Sputum specimens were collected and processed; the deposits were cultured. For culturing Lowenstein Jensen medium (LJ) and Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (BACTEC MGIT 960) were used. Capilia Neo was used for detecting NTM isolates from isolates of BACTEC MGIT 960. In Armauer Hansen Research Institute, Addis Ababa Ethiopia, Deletion typing PCR method for species identification (from confirmed Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) isolates by Capilia Neo) was done. Results Out of 263 enrolled in the study, 124 and 117 of them were positive for mycobacterium growth by BACTEC MGIT 960 and LJ culture method, respectively. From BACTEC MGIT 960 positive media of 124 isolates, 117 were randomly taken to perform Capilia TB Neo test. From these 7 (6%) of them were found to be NTM and 110 (94%) were MTBC. From these 110 MTBC isolates, 81 of them were randomly taken and run by the deletion typing RD9 PCR method of molecular technique. Out of these 78 (96.3%) were found to be species of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 3 (3.7%) were found to be not in the MTBC. Regarding the types of methods of culture media, Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube (BACTEC MGIT 960) method was found to have excellent agreement (with kappa value of 0.78) with the routine method of LJ. Conclusions Pulmonary tuberculosis suspected cases visiting the National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory at EHNRI that were confirmed to be pulmonary tuberculosis are caused by the species of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, hence treatment regimen including pyrazinamide can be applied to the patients as the first choice in the study area in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. There is indication of the presence of NTM in

  19. Proceedings of the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET) Scientific Conference 17-22 November 2013 Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: plenaries and oral presentations

    PubMed Central

    Gitta, Sheba Nakacubo; Mwesiga, Allan; Kamadjeu, Raoul

    2015-01-01

    Biennially, trainees and graduates of Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programs (FELTPs) are presented with a platform to share investigations and projects undertaken during their two-year training in Applied Epidemiology. The African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET) Scientific Conference, is a perfect opportunity for public health professionals from various sectors and organizations to come together to discuss issues that impact on public health in Africa. This year's conference was organized by the Ethiopian Health and Nutrition Research Institute in collaboration with the Ethiopia Ministry of Health, Ethiopian Public Health Association (EPHA), Ethiopia Field Epidemiology Training Program (EFETP), Addis Ababa University (AAU), Training Programs in Epidemiology and Public Health Interventions Network (TEPHINET) and AFENET. Participants at this year's conference numbered 400 from over 20 countries including; Angola, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Indonesia, Kenya, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Yemen and Zimbabwe. The topics covered in the 144 oral presentations included: global health security, emergency response, public health informatics, vaccine preventable diseases, immunization, outbreak investigation, Millennium Development Goals, Non-Communicable Diseases, and public health surveillance. The theme for the 5th AFENET Scientific Conference was; “Addressing Public Health Priorities in Africa through FELTPs.” Previous AFENET Scientific conferences have been held in: Accra, Ghana (2005), Kampala, Uganda (2007), Mombasa, Kenya (2009) and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania (2011). PMID:26491534

  20. Reducing HIV-related risk and mental health problems through a client-centred psychosocial intervention for vulnerable adolescents in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Nrupa; Vu, Lung; Kay, Lynnette; Habtamu, Kassahun; Kalibala, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ethiopia is experiencing an increasingly urban HIV epidemic, alongside a rise in urban adolescent migration. Adolescent migrants are often confronted by unique social challenges, including living in a difficult environment, abuse and mental health problems. These issues can increase adolescents’ vulnerability to HIV and compromise their capacity to protect themselves and others from HIV. We piloted and assessed the effects of a targeted psychosocial intervention to reduce mental health problems and improve HIV-related outcomes among migrant adolescents in Addis Ababa. Methods A pre- and post-comparison design was used in a cohort of 576 female and 154 male migrant adolescents aged 15 to 18 years in Addis Ababa receiving services from two service delivery organizations, Biruh Tesfa and Retrak. We implemented a three-month client-centred, counsellor-delivered psychosocial intervention, based on findings from formative research among the same target population, to address participants’ increased vulnerability to HIV. The intervention package comprised individual, group and creative arts therapy counselling sessions. Key outcome indicators included anxiety, depression, aggressive behaviour, attention problems, social problems, knowledge of HIV, safer sex practices and use of sexual health services. Longitudinal data analysis (McNemar test and random effects regression) was used to assess changes over time in key indicators by gender. Results For females, aggressive behaviour decreased by 60% (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 0.4 (0.25 to 0.65)) and any mental health problem decreased by 50% (AOR: 0.5 (0.36 to 0.81)) from baseline to end line. In addition, knowledge of HIV increased by 60% (AOR: 1.6 (1.08 to 2.47)), knowledge of a place to test for HIV increased by 70% (AOR: 1.7 (1.12 to 2.51)) and HIV testing increased by 80% (AOR: 1.8 (1.13 to 2.97)). For males, HIV knowledge increased by 110% (AOR: 2.1 (1.1 to 3.94)), knowledge of a place to test for HIV

  1. Factors associated with HIV counseling and testing and correlations with sexual behavior of teachers in primary and secondary schools in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Menna, Takele; Ali, Ahmed; Worku, Alemayehu

    2015-01-01

    Background The HIV/AIDS pandemic is a global crisis that affects the lives of millions of people. Although HIV counseling and testing (HCT) serves as the entry point for HIV prevention, treatment, and care, it remains a low priority in many settings. The aim of this study, therefore, was to assess the factors associated with HCT and their correlation with the sexual behavior of primary and secondary school teachers in Addis Ababa. Methods A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted among primary and secondary school teachers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A multistage sampling technique was used to select a representative sample of 1,136 teachers. HCT and sexual health behavior-related data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Binary logistic regression was employed to examine the relationships between HCT, sociodemographics, and risky sexual behavior-related variables. Results Of the 1,136 eligible study participants, 1,034 (91.0%) teachers completed the self-administered anonymous questionnaire. The proportion of teachers who had ever tested for HIV was 739/1,034 (71.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 69.1–74.2). Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that being male (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.63; 95% CI 0.44–0.90) was associated with a 37% decrease in odds of being ever tested for HIV compared with being female. Married teachers were less likely to have had HIV testing (AOR 0.30; 95% CI 0.19–0.47) compared with unmarried teachers. Being aged ≥45 years (AOR 4.05; 95% CI 1.82–9.03), having high HCT-related knowledge (AOR 3.56; 95% CI 1.73–7.32), and having a perceived risk of HIV (AOR 1.43; 95% CI 1.04–1.96) were positively associated with HCT. Moreover, regarding the correlation of HCT with the sexual behavior of teachers, those teachers who never had HCT were more likely to have multiple sexual partners than those who had ever had HCT (AOR 1.85; 95% CI 1.08–3.15). In contrast, teachers who had ever been tested for

  2. Review paper on research ethics in Ethiopia: experiences and lessons learnt from Addis Ababa University College of Health Sciences 2007-2012.

    PubMed

    Feleke, Yeweyenhareg; Addissie, Adamu; Wamisho, Biruk L; Davey, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Health research in Ethiopia is increasing both in volume and type, accompanied with expansion of higher education and research since the past few years. This calls for a proportional competence in the governance of medical research ethics in Ethiopia in the respective research and higher learning institutes. The paper highlights the evolution and progress ofthe ethics review at Addis Ababa University - College of Health Sciences (AAU-CHS) in the given context of health research review system in Ethiopia. Reflections are made on the key lessons to be drawnfrom the formative experiences of the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and their implications to the Ethiopian health research review system. This article is a review paper based on review of published and un published documents on research ethics in Ethiopia and the AAU-CHS (2007-2012). Thematic summaries of review findings are presented in thematic areas - formation of ethics review and key factors in the evolution of ethics review and implications. The IRB at AAU-CHS has been pivotal in providing review and follow-up for important clinical studies in Ethiopia. It has been one of the first IRBs to get WHO/SIDCER recognition from Africa and Ethiopia. Important factors in the successes of the IRB among others included leadership commitment, its placement in institutional structure, and continued capacity building. Financial challenges and sustainability issues need to be addressed for the sustained gains registered so far. Similar factors are considered important for the new and younger IRBs within the emergent Universities and research centers in the country. PMID:25816496

  3. The status of medical laboratory towards of AFRO-WHO accreditation process in government and private health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mesfin, Eyob Abera; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Ashenafi, Aytenew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa (WHO AFRO) introduces a step wise incremental accreditation approach to improving quality of laboratory and it is a new initiative in Ethiopia and activities are performed for implementation of accreditation program. Methods Descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in 30 laboratory facilities including 6 laboratory sections to determine their status towards of accreditation using WHO AFRO accreditation checklist and 213 laboratory professionals were interviewed to assess their knowledge on quality system essentials and accreditation in Addis Ababa Ethiopia. Results Out of 30 laboratory facilities 1 private laboratory scored 156 (62%) points, which is the minimum required point for WHO accreditation and the least score was 32 (12.8%) points from government laboratory. The assessment finding from each section indicate that 2 Clinical chemistry (55.2% & 62.8%), 2 Hematology (55.2% & 62.8%), 2 Serology (55.2% & 62.8%), 2 Microbiology (55.2% & 62.4%), 1 Parasitology (62.8%) & 1 Urinalysis (61.6%) sections scored the minimum required point for WHO accreditation. The average score for government laboratories was 78.2 (31.2%) points, of these 6 laboratories were under accreditation process with 106.2 (42.5%) average score, while the private laboratories had 71.2 (28.5%) average score. Of 213 respondents 197 (92.5%) professionals had a knowledge on quality system essentials whereas 155 (72.8%) respondents on accreditation. Conclusion Although majority of the laboratory professionals had knowledge on quality system and accreditation, laboratories professionals were not able to practice the quality system properly and most of the laboratories had poor status towards the WHO accreditation process. Thus government as well as stakeholders should integrate accreditation program into planning and health policy. PMID:26889317

  4. Volunteer home-based HIV/AIDS care and food crisis in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: sustainability in the face of chronic food insecurity

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Kenneth C; Shifferaw, Selamawit; Hadley, Craig; Tesfaye, Fikru

    2011-01-01

    Low-income volunteers constitute a major part of AIDS care workforces in sub-Saharan Africa, yet little research has been conducted to determine how poverty and insecurity among volunteers impact their wellbeing and the sustainability of the AIDS treatment programmes they support. This paper presents longitudinal ethnographic and epidemiological research documenting how the 2008 food crisis in Addis Ababa affected AIDS care volunteers’ care relationships and motivations. Ethnographic results highlight the distress and demotivation that rising food costs created for caregivers by contributing to their own and their care recipients’ experiences of food insecurity and HIV-related stigmatization. Epidemiological results underscore a high prevalence of food insecurity (approximately 80%) even prior to the peak of food prices. Rising food prices over the 3 years prior to 2008, underemployment and household per capita incomes averaging less than US$1/day, likely contributed to the very high prevalence of food insecurity reported by caregivers in our sample. We also show that new volunteers recruited in early 2008 by one of the non-governmental organizations (NGOs) involved in this study were more likely to be dependants within their households, and that these participants reported lower rates of food insecurity and higher household income. While this shift in volunteer recruitment may help sustain volunteer care programmes in the face of widespread poverty and underemployment, food insecurity was still highly prevalent (58–71%) among this sub-group. Given the inability of the local NGOs that organize volunteers to address the challenge of food insecurity for programme sustainability, our results raise important policy questions regarding compensation for volunteers’ valuable labour and poverty reduction through public health sector job creation. PMID:20439347

  5. Volunteer home-based HIV/AIDS care and food crisis in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: sustainability in the face of chronic food insecurity.

    PubMed

    Maes, Kenneth C; Shifferaw, Selamawit; Hadley, Craig; Tesfaye, Fikru

    2011-01-01

    Low-income volunteers constitute a major part of AIDS care workforces in sub-Saharan Africa, yet little research has been conducted to determine how poverty and insecurity among volunteers impact their wellbeing and the sustainability of the AIDS treatment programmes they support. This paper presents longitudinal ethnographic and epidemiological research documenting how the 2008 food crisis in Addis Ababa affected AIDS care volunteers' care relationships and motivations. Ethnographic results highlight the distress and demotivation that rising food costs created for caregivers by contributing to their own and their care recipients' experiences of food insecurity and HIV-related stigmatization. Epidemiological results underscore a high prevalence of food insecurity (approximately 80%) even prior to the peak of food prices. Rising food prices over the 3 years prior to 2008, underemployment and household per capita incomes averaging less than US$1/day, likely contributed to the very high prevalence of food insecurity reported by caregivers in our sample. We also show that new volunteers recruited in early 2008 by one of the non-governmental organizations (NGOs) involved in this study were more likely to be dependants within their households, and that these participants reported lower rates of food insecurity and higher household income. While this shift in volunteer recruitment may help sustain volunteer care programmes in the face of widespread poverty and underemployment, food insecurity was still highly prevalent (58-71%) among this sub-group. Given the inability of the local NGOs that organize volunteers to address the challenge of food insecurity for programme sustainability, our results raise important policy questions regarding compensation for volunteers' valuable labour and poverty reduction through public health sector job creation. PMID:20439347

  6. Extent of dispensing prescription-only medications without a prescription in community drug retail outlets in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a simulated-patient study

    PubMed Central

    Erku, Daniel Asfaw; Mekuria, Abebe Basazn; Surur, Abdrrahman Shemsu; Gebresillassie, Begashaw Melaku

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was aimed at assessing the extent of dispensing prescription-only medications without a prescription in community drug retail outlets (CDROs) of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional observational study design was used to sample 31 pharmacies, 25 drug stores, and two rural drug vendors from August 11, 2015, to October 21, 2015, through a simple random sampling method. A simulated-patient method of visit was implemented to collect data. Requests of six tracer prescription-only medicines (amoxicillin + clavulanic acid capsule, amitriptyline, captopril, glibenclamide [also known as glyburide], omeprazole capsule, and sildenafil citrate) and upper respiratory tract infection were selected as the simulated clinical scenario. Results Amoxicillin–clavulanic acid capsule was dispensed when requested in 87.93% of the dispensaries. All of the CDROs dispensed omeprazole upon request. Sildenafil citrate (Viagra) was in stock in 96.55% of the CDROs, all of which issued the requested number of tablets without asking why or for whom the drug was needed. Amitriptyline, captopril, and glibenclamide (glyburide) were dispensed in 84.48%, 89.65%, and 87.93% of CDROs upon the provision of an empty container. Antibiotics were obtained from 75.86% of CDROs for presentation of upper respiratory tract infection symptoms. Among the dispensed antibiotics, the most common was amoxicillin (93.18%), followed by amoxicillin–clavulanic acid capsule (72.72%), and azithromycin (50%). Only 4.5% of the dispensaries asked about drug allergies, and 15.9% of the CDROs informed the simulated patient about the possible side effects of the drugs. Conclusion This study revealed a very high rate of dispensing of prescription-only medicines without a prescription. Antimicrobials and drugs for chronic diseases were obtained with ease from almost all of the randomly sampled CDROs. Putting good dispensing practice into effect and adhering to the existing national

  7. Predictors of HIV-test utilization in PMTCT among antenatal care attendees in government health centers: institution-based cross-sectional study using health belief model in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Workagegn, Fikremariam; Kiros, Getachew; Abebe, Lakew

    2015-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is the most dramatic epidemic of the century that has claimed over two decades more than 3 million deaths. Sub-Saharan Africa is heavily affected and accounts for nearly 70% of all cases. Mother-to-child transmission of HIV is responsible for 20% of all HIV transmissions. With no preventive interventions, 50% of HIV infections are transmitted from HIV-positive mothers to newborns. HIV-testing is central to prevent vertical transmission. Despite, awareness campaigns, prevention measures, and more recently, promotion of antiviral regimens, the prevalence of cases and deaths is still rising and the prevalence of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) voluntary counseling test (VCT) use remains low. This study identifies predictors and possible barriers of HIV-testing among antenatal care attendees based on the health belief model (HBM) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods The study was an institution-based cross-sectional survey conducted from September 1 to September 30, 2013. A total of 308 individuals were interviewed using structured questionnaires adopted and modified from similar studies. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews. A logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with HIV-test use. Results In spite of satisfactory knowledge on HIV/AIDS transmission, participants are still at high risk of contracting the infection, wherein only 51.8% tested for HIV; among the married, only 84.1% and among the gestational age of third trimester, 34.1% mothers tested for HIV. Based on the HBM, failure to use PMTCT-HIV-test was related to its perceived lack of net benefit (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =0.34, confidence interval [CI] [0.19–0.58], P<0.001), but interviewees with high perceived self-efficacy were 1.9 times more likely to use HIV-test (AOR =1.90, CI [1.09–3.33], P<0.05). Conclusion and recommendation This study identifies perceived

  8. Comparison of oral cholecystography (OCG) with real time ultrasonography in the diagnosis of cholelithiasis at the Tikur Anbessa Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tilahun, E; Whittaker, L R

    1990-01-01

    A prospective study of the accuracy of real time ultrasonography in the detection of gallstones was undertaken in 180 patients from February 1987 to February 1988. The ultrasound findings were compared with single dose oral cholecystography (OCG), and with the surgical findings where surgery was undertaken. Ultrasonography gave more accurate results than OCG, with an overall accuracy in the surgically proven patients of 97.1%, no false positive findings and a 2.9% false negative rate. OCG gave an accuracy of 80% with no false positive findings and a 20% false negative rate. Ultrasound was particularly valuable where there was non visualisation of the gall bladder at OCG, giving an overall accuracy of 93.3% in such patients. Ultrasonography is a non invasive, simple, safe and economic diagnostic test of high accuracy in the diagnosis of cholelithiasis and of particular benefit in those patients unsuited for OCG. PMID:2191856

  9. Obstructive jaundice in adult Ethiopians in a referral hospital.

    PubMed

    Bekele, Z; Yifru, A

    2000-10-01

    Forty-nine adult Ethiopians with obstructive jaundice were studied. Right upper quadrant pain was the main presenting complaint (89%). Most (94%) of the jaundiced patients had right upper quadrant tenderness. In 87% the obstruction was corroborated by ultrasonographic examination, but causal factors were identified in only 39%. Operative findings showed that choledocholithiasis (41%) and malignant conditions (22%) were the two important causes of obstructive jaundice among the adult patients seen at a referral hospital in Addis Ababa. The causes and the outcome of the different types of surgical procedures used in the management are discussed. PMID:11125501

  10. ADDIE: Perspectives in Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boling, Elizabeth; Easterling, Wylie V.; Hardre, Patricia L.; Howard, Craig D.; Roman, Tiffany Anne

    2011-01-01

    In an asynchronous forum responding to a prompt positing that ADDIE (analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation) might be used in teaching instructional design (ID) as a safety net for designers without native talent, instructors and practitioners of ID revealed mixed perspectives on the role of ADDIE in design. Critical theory…

  11. Teaching Children with Disabilities: ICTs in Bangkok and Addis Ababa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiemer, Margarita; Proyer, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper intends to explore the levels of availability and restrictions in relation to the use of ICTs (information and communication technologies) for educating children with disabilities in Thailand's and Ethiopia's capitals. Design/methodology/approach: In the course of an international research project, parents and teachers of…

  12. Searching for Addie: The Story behind a Famous Photograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winthrop, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a story behind the famous photograph of "Addie." Addie was a symbol of child labor reform. The author first saw the picture of Addie in the summer of 2002 at the Bennington Museum in Bennington, Vermont. Addie's picture was just one in an exhibit of child labor photographs taken by famed photographer Lewis Hine…

  13. A qualitative study of the experience of obstetric fistula survivors in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gebresilase, Yenenesh Tadesse

    2014-01-01

    Research on obstetric fistula has paid limited attention to the lived experiences of survivors. This qualitative study explored the evolution of survivors’ perceptions of their social relationships and health since developing this obstetric complication. In-depth interviews were conducted with eight survivors who were selected based on purposive and snowball sampling techniques. Thematic categorization and content analysis was used to analyze the data. The resultant themes included participants’ understanding of factors predisposing to fistula, challenges they encounter, their coping responses, and the meaning of their experiences. First, the participants had a common understanding of the factors that predisposed them to obstetric fistula. They mentioned poor knowledge about pregnancy, early marriage, cultural practices, and a delay in or lack of access to emergency obstetric care. Second, the participants suffered from powerlessness experienced during their childhood and married lives. They also faced prolonged obstructed labor, physical injury, emotional breakdown, depression, erosion of social capital, and loss of healthy years. Third, to control their negative emotions, participants reported isolating themselves, having suicidal thoughts, positive interpretation about the future, and avoidance. To obtain relief from their disease, the women used their family support, sold their properties, and oriented to reality. Fourth, the participants were struggling to keep going, to accept their changed reality, and to change their perspectives on life. In conclusion, obstetric fistula has significant physical, psychosocial, and emotional consequences. The study participants were not passive victims but rather active survivors of these challenges. Adequate support was not provided by their formal or informal support systems. To prevent and manage obstetric fistula successfully, there should be family-based interventions that improve access to and provision of emergency obstetric care. These initiatives should also ensure men’s participation, women’s empowerment, and the utilization of community-based institutions. PMID:25525395

  14. Heteronormativity and 'troubled' masculinities among men who have sex with men in Addis Ababa.

    PubMed

    Tadele, Getnet

    2011-04-01

    In most societies, heterosexuality is the dominant way of expressing sexuality and masculinity and those men outside of it are stigmatised and discriminated against. This paper explores the sexual lives of men who have sex with men and the personal and social conflicts that arise as they attempt to both live up to societal expectations and manage their sexual desires. It critically explores how an overriding heteronormativity structures and influences men's perception and understanding of sexuality and masculinity/femininity. The paper draws on data from 24 in-depth/life history interviews, one focus group discussion and ethnographic observation conducted between July 2006 and June 2007. The study reveals that powerful and dominating beliefs about heteronormativity and masculinity result in men who have sex with men dealing with a number of issues of personal conflict and contradiction resulting in uncertainty, resentment, ambivalence, worry and discomfort. Heteronormativity or the expectations of parents, community and society at large is far more influential on the sexuality of men who have sex with men than their own individual desires and needs. The paper concludes that there is little room for individuality for Ethiopian men who have sex with men with their sexual bodies 'belonging' to parents, families and to society at large. PMID:21246428

  15. Assessment of Sexual and Reproductive Health Status of Street Children in Addis Ababa

    PubMed Central

    Habtamu, Demelash; Adamu, Addisie

    2013-01-01

    Street children worldwide do not have the information, skills, health services, and support they need to go through sexual development during adolescence. This study is undertaken to systematically investigate the fit between street children's sexual and reproductive health needs and the existing services. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 422 street children and four service providers. About 72.5% of the respondents were sexually active during data collection and 84.3% of males and 85.7% of females tended to have multiple sexual partners. More than two-thirds (67.3%) of the participants had used at least one type of substance. History of substance use (OR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.42–4.56) and being on the street for the first one to three years (OR = 5.9; 95% CI = 1.41–7.22) increased the likelihood of having sexual activity. More than half (64.9%) of the street children did not attend any kind of sexual or reproductive health education programs. Lack of information on available services (26.5%) was the biggest barrier for utilization of local sexual and reproductive health services. From the individual interview with coordinator, the financial and networking problems were hindering the service delivery for street children. In conclusion, street children who are special high risk group have not been targeted and hence continue to remain vulnerable and lacking in sexual and reproductive health services and sexual health services are poorly advertised and delivered to them. PMID:26316958

  16. Variability of Quality of Life at Small Scales: Addis Ababa, Kirkos Sub-City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesfazghi, Elsa Sereke; Martinez, J. A.; Verplanke, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    Urban quality of life (QoL) is becoming a subject of urban research mainly for western and Asian countries. Such attention is due to an increasing awareness of the contribution of QoL studies in identifying intervention areas and in monitoring urban planning policies. However, most studies are carried out at city or country level that can average…

  17. Students Talk about Their HIV/AIDS Education Courses: A Case of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sambe, Mariam M.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to explore how Ethiopian high school students experienced the HIV/AIDS education programs offered in their schools. The project also examined gender differences in the way HIV/AIDS education was perceived and the implications for the instructional design of the programs. A total of 15 high school students (eight…

  18. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and other enteropathogens in paediatric diarrhoea in Addis Ababa.

    PubMed

    Stintzing, G; Möllby, R; Habte, D

    1982-03-01

    This study was performed during two weeks among 86 paediatric outpatients of poor socio-economic background. A control group comprised 60 healthy children. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) was the most common diarrhoeal agent isolated (26%). Strains of ETEC producing heat-labile (LT) only or LT and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxin were isolated from 11% each and ETEC producing ST only from 4% of the patients. ETEC was also found not infrequently among controls (10%). ETEC with O-antigens 78, 6 and 8 were shown to harbour colonization factors. Enterotoxigenic bacteria were found as contaminants in 5 of 24 feeding bottles investigated. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and Shigella species were isolated from 8% each and rotavirus from 24% of the patients. Twelve patients infected with ETEC only were compared to 66 patients not infected with ETEC. Patients infected with ETEC had a relatively mild disease and it was not possible by clinical findings to distinguish those patients infected with ETEC, LT and/or ST producing, carrying or not carrying colonization factors from those infected with other agents. This study underlines the need for extended studies of the clinical significance of ETEC infection in developing countries. PMID:6753473

  19. Assessment of Sexual and Reproductive Health Status of Street Children in Addis Ababa.

    PubMed

    Habtamu, Demelash; Adamu, Addisie

    2013-01-01

    Street children worldwide do not have the information, skills, health services, and support they need to go through sexual development during adolescence. This study is undertaken to systematically investigate the fit between street children's sexual and reproductive health needs and the existing services. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 422 street children and four service providers. About 72.5% of the respondents were sexually active during data collection and 84.3% of males and 85.7% of females tended to have multiple sexual partners. More than two-thirds (67.3%) of the participants had used at least one type of substance. History of substance use (OR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.42-4.56) and being on the street for the first one to three years (OR = 5.9; 95% CI = 1.41-7.22) increased the likelihood of having sexual activity. More than half (64.9%) of the street children did not attend any kind of sexual or reproductive health education programs. Lack of information on available services (26.5%) was the biggest barrier for utilization of local sexual and reproductive health services. From the individual interview with coordinator, the financial and networking problems were hindering the service delivery for street children. In conclusion, street children who are special high risk group have not been targeted and hence continue to remain vulnerable and lacking in sexual and reproductive health services and sexual health services are poorly advertised and delivered to them. PMID:26316958

  20. Augmenting the ADDIE Paradigm for Instructional Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ni, Xiaopeng; Branch, Robert Maribe

    2008-01-01

    The authors discuss topics appropriate for augmenting the ADDIE paradigm for instructional design. The topics selected are based on data from a study of working professionals who successfully completed an instructional design and technology certificate program and who identified related topics that they regarded as beneficial. The participants…

  1. In Search of the Elusive ADDIE Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molenda, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the origin of the ADDIE model of instructional design and concludes that the term came into use by word of mouth as a label for the whole family of systematic instructional development models. Examines the underlying ideas behind the acronym analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation. (Author/LRW)

  2. Modifying ADDIE: Incorporating New Technologies in Library Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Paul Clayton

    2014-01-01

    There are many instructional design theories to assist librarians in creating effective instructional modules for student learning. ADDIE is a generic instructional design model that has been in existence for more than 30 years and is known for its flexibility in application (Molenda, 2003). Using instructional design theories such as ADDIE helps…

  3. 24 CFR 92.604 - ADDI allocation formula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false ADDI allocation formula. 92.604 Section 92.604 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM American Dream Downpayment Initiative § 92.604 ADDI allocation formula. (a) General. HUD will...

  4. Assessment of client satisfaction in labor and delivery services at a maternity referral hospital in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Melese, Tadele; Gebrehiwot, Yirgu; Bisetegne, Daniel; Habte, Dereje

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients perception about service quality shapes their confidence with regard to use of the available health care facility. This study is aimed to assess the client`s satisfaction in a maternal health care setting. Methods This is an institution based cross sectional descriptive study. A total of 423 postpartum women were interviewed. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20 statistical package. Results The proportion of mothers who are completely satisfied with health care ranges between 2.4 to 21%. Pain control was the poorest source of satisfaction with 82% reporting dissatisfaction. Provider's communication with clients yielded complete satisfaction rates ranging between 0.7 to 26%. Inadequate information about the drug prescribed and explanation of procedures to be done to the client were found to be major causes of dissatisfaction. The complete satisfaction rate with environmental factor of the hospital was between 3.3 to 40.2%. Age of the client, educational status, income of the client and client's address away from Addis Ababa were found to be the predictors of client satisfaction. Provider's attitude and communication, as well as longer duration of stay in the ward were independent predictors of client satisfaction. Conclusion Pain management, client privacy and client provider communication need to be addressed to ensure the satisfaction of maternity clients. The clients need to be involved in the management of their own health problems. PMID:25018826

  5. Determinants of supply chain coordination of milk and dairy industries in Ethiopia: a case of Addis Ababa and its surroundings.

    PubMed

    Lemma, Habtamu Regassa; Singh, Rajwinder; Kaur, Navjot

    2015-01-01

    Coordination of different business activities among units becomes vital as organizations pay much attention to their core activities. Thus, their fruitfulness constantly relies on their capacity to coordinate their internal and external activities in the supply chain outside their own boundaries. Giving consideration to these obvious reasons, this paper aims to investigate the determinants of supply chain coordination of milk and dairy industries. The data were collected from 330 milk suppliers, processors, and retailers in the central part of Ethiopia. The structural equation modeling has been employed to develop the structural relationship between key constructs and measured variables. In total, 15 measured variables for coordination in the supply chain have been identified. These are further grouped into four factors namely, non-price coordination, price coordination, relationships and product development decision. It has been observed that the implementation of these factors could maximize the coordination linkage among supply chain members. Thus, dairy sectors should take the identified coordination factors into account in each of their business dealings. PMID:26405618

  6. Community Perception, Misconception, and Discord Regarding Prevention and Treatment of Infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Asgary, Ramin; Antony, Sheila; Grigoryan, Zoya; Aronson, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Approximately one million persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) live in Ethiopia. Socio-cultural factors influence prevention and treatment adherence. We applied a qualitative descriptive approach to evaluate community perception, knowledge, and the role of spiritual factors in regard to HIV. We conducted 14 focus groups with sampling of HIV+ and HIV– participants (n = 52) by using open-ended questions. We coded and analyzed data for major themes. There are misconceptions, including transmission via casual contact, and pervasive beliefs of holy water as a cure. Many HIV– participants believe treatment is ineffective or incompatible with holy water. Most HIV+ participants believe treatment and holy water can be taken together, but experienced either pressure to stop treatment or stigma when taking medications. Participants emphasized the role of spiritual leaders in directing and shaping community perspectives on HIV. Ongoing community education via local initiatives, nation-wide structural and environmental strategies, and efforts tailored toward Ethiopian society to reconcile treatment with faith are crucial. PMID:24218413

  7. Instructional Supervision and Its Relationship with Professional Development: Perception of Private and Government Secondary School Teachers in Addis Ababa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesfaw, T. A.; Hofman, R. H.

    2012-01-01

    (Purpose) The purpose of this study is to examine the existing perceptions and preferences of teachers toward instructional supervision, more specifically on the actual and ideal use of selected instructional supervisory approaches (such as clinical supervision, peer coaching, cognitive coaching, mentoring, reflective coaching, teaching…

  8. Co-Creating a Psychiatric Resident Program with Ethiopians, for Ethiopians, in Ethiopia: The Toronto Addis Ababa Psychiatry Project (TAAPP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alem, Atalay; Pain, Clare; Araya, Mesfin; Hodges, Brian D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Globalization in medical education often means a "brain drain" of desperately needed health professionals from low- to high-income countries. Despite the best intentions, partnerships that simply transport students to Western medical schools for training have shockingly low return rates. Ethiopia, for example, has sent hundreds of…

  9. Standardization Techniques for Grade-Inflation Problems at Higher Educational Institutions of Ethiopia: The Case of Addis Ababa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassahun, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) is a measure that is used to display the achievement of college students in Ethiopia. It also serves as a key yardstick in career and scholarship assessment. In recent time there has been a rapid massification of higher educational institutions (HEIs). Many academics believe that the expansion has increased a…

  10. Metals Exposures of Residents Living Near the Akaki River in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yard, Ellen; Bayleyegn, Tesfaye; Abebe, Almaz; Mekonnen, Andualem; Murphy, Matthew; Caldwell, Kathleen L.; Luce, Richard; Hunt, Danielle Rentz; Tesfaye, Kirubel; Abate, Moa; Assefa, Tsigereda; Abera, Firehiwot; Habte, Kifle; Chala, Feyissa; Lewis, Lauren; Kebede, Amha

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Akaki River in Ethiopia has been found to contain elevated levels of several metals. Our objectives were to characterize metals exposures of residents living near the Akaki River and to assess metal levels in their drinking water. Methods. In 2011, we conducted a cross-sectional study of 101 households in Akaki-Kality subcity (near the Akaki River) and 50 households in Yeka subcity (distant to the Akaki River). One willing adult in each household provided urine, blood, and drinking water sample. Results. Urinary molybdenum (p < 0.001), tungsten (p < 0.001), lead (p < 0.001), uranium (p < 0.001), and mercury (p = 0.049) were higher in Akaki-Kality participants compared to Yeka participants. Participants in both subcities had low urinary iodine; 45% met the World Health Organization (WHO) classification for being at risk of moderate iodine deficiency. In Yeka, 47% of households exceeded the WHO aesthetic-based reference value for manganese; in Akaki-Kality, only 2% of households exceeded this value (p < 0.001). There was no correlation between metals levels in water samples and clinical specimens. Conclusions. Most of the exposures found during this investigation seem unlikely to cause acute health effects based on known toxic thresholds. However, toxicity data for many of these metals are very limited. PMID:26681962

  11. Distance Education for Development. Proceedings of an International Seminar (Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, September 13-15, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakemulder, Jan R., Ed.

    An extensive final report of the proceedings of an international seminar on distance education in developing nations of Africa includes presented papers, discussion proceedings, and views of several participants. Contents include the following: notes on the origin of the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa's initiative in distance…

  12. Using ADDIE Model to Develop a Nursing Information System Training Program for New Graduate Nurse.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sheng-Chieh; Cheng, Yu-Chen; Chan, Pi-Tuan

    2016-01-01

    This study is to develop a nursing information system (NIS) training program, and takes a local community teaching hospital in Taiwan for example. We adopt the ADDIE model to develop our NIS training program. We preliminaries followed the framework of the model to design a NIS training program, and implement it for the newcomers' training of nursing information system. After training course, the self-efficacy report has a significant (p<.000) improved compare to pre-test, and 88% of participants passed the pragmatic exam. PMID:27332436

  13. Drug-related problems among medical ward patients in Jimma university specialized hospital, Southwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tigabu, Bereket Molla; Daba, Daniel; Habte, Belete

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The increasing number of available drugs and drug users, as well as more complex drug regimens led to more side effects and drug interactions and complicates follow-up. The objective of this study was to assess drug-related problems (DRPs) and associated factors in hospitalized patients. Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study design was employed. The study was conducted in Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Jimma, located in the south west of Addis Ababa. All patients who were admitted to the medical ward from February 2011 to March 2011 were included in the study. Data on sociodemographic variables, past medical history, drug history, current diagnosis, current medications, vital signs, and relevant laboratory data were collected using semi-structured questionnaire and data collection forms which were filling through patient interview and card review. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16 for windows. Descriptive statistics, cross-tabs, Chi-square, and logistic regression were utilized. Findings: Out of 257 study participants, 189 (73.5%) had DRPs and a total of 316 DRPs were identified. From the six classes of DRPs studied, 103 (32.6%) cases related to untreated indication or need additional drug therapy, and 49 (15.5%) cases related to high medication dosage. Unnecessary drug therapy in 49 (15.5%) cases, low medication dosage in 44 (13.9%) cases, and ineffective drug therapy in 42 (13.3%) cases were the other classes of problems identified. Noncompliance in 31 (9.8%) cases was the least prevalent DRP. Independent factors which predicted the occurrence of DRPs in the study population were sex, age, polypharmacy, and clinically significant potential drug-drug interactions. The prevalence of DRPs was substantially high (73.5%). Conclusion: Drug-related problems are common among medical ward patients. Indication-related problems, untreated indication and unnecessary drug therapy were the most common types of DRPs among patients of our

  14. Drug-related problems in medical wards of Tikur Anbessa specialized hospital, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Ayalew, Mohammed Biset; Megersa, Teshome Nedi; Mengistu, Yewondwossen Taddese

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of drug-related problems (DRPs), identify the most common drugs, and drug classes involved in DRPs as well as associated factors with the occurrence of DRPs. Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted on 225 patients admitted to medical wards of Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital, Addis Ababa from March to June 2014. Data regarding patient characteristics, medications, diagnosis, length of hospitalization, investigation, and laboratory results were collected using data abstraction forms through review of patients’ medical card and medication charts. Identified DRPs were recorded and classified using DRP registration forms. The possible intervention measures for the identified DRPs were proposed and communicated to either the physician or the patient. Data were entered into Epi Info 7 and analyzed using SPSS version 21 (IBM Corp. Released 2012, Armonk, NY: IBM Corp). Findings: DRPs were found in 52% of study subjects. A drug-drug interaction (48% of all DRPs) was the most common DRP followed by adverse drug reaction (23%). Anti-infectives and gastrointestinal medicines were commonly involved in DRPs. Drugs with the highest drug risk ratio were gentamycin, warfarin, nifedipine, and cimetidine. The number of drugs taken by the patient per day is an important risk factor for DRPs. Conclusion: DRPs are common among medical ward patients. Polypharmacy has a significant association with the occurrence of DRP. Drugs such as gentamycin, warfarin, nifedipine, and cimetidine have the highest probability of causing DRP. So, patients who are taking either of these drugs or polypharmacy should be closely assessed for identification and timely correction of DRPs. PMID:26645029

  15. Designing a Blended Course: Using ADDIE to Guide Instructional Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibley, Ike; Amaral, Katie E.; Shank, John D.; Shibley, Lisa R.

    2011-01-01

    The ADDIE (analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation) model was applied to help redesign a General Chemistry course to improve student success in the course. A team of six professionals spent 18 months and over 1,000 man-hours in the redesign. The resultant course is a blend of online and face-to-face instruction that utilizes…

  16. 24 CFR 92.604 - ADDI allocation formula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false ADDI allocation formula. 92.604 Section 92.604 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM American Dream Downpayment Initiative § 92.604...

  17. 24 CFR 92.604 - ADDI allocation formula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false ADDI allocation formula. 92.604 Section 92.604 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM American Dream Downpayment Initiative § 92.604...

  18. 24 CFR 92.604 - ADDI allocation formula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false ADDI allocation formula. 92.604 Section 92.604 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM American Dream Downpayment Initiative § 92.604...

  19. 24 CFR 92.604 - ADDI allocation formula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false ADDI allocation formula. 92.604 Section 92.604 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM American Dream Downpayment Initiative § 92.604...

  20. High prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in Ethiopian cats in Addis Ababa, coinfection, and a review of toxoplasmosis in humans and other animals in Ethiopia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii and Bartonella spp. are zoonotic pathogens of cats. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV), and Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLv) are related to Human Immunodeficiency Virus, and Human T-lymphotrophic Virus, respectively, and these viruses are immunosuppressive. In the present study, the p...

  1. Using Multimedia to Enhance Knowledge of Service Attitude in the Hospitality Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Chun Min

    2012-01-01

    Having used a quasi-experimental research model and the ADDIE (Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate) calibration method to gather and implement data, the researcher developed an interactive multimedia assisted learning (MAL) program promoting proper service attitudes in the hospitality industry. In order to gauge MAL program's…

  2. African Regional Symposium on Telematics for Development. Report and Recommendations = Colloque regional africain la telematique au service du developpement. Rapport et recommandations (Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, April 3-7, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Telecommunication Union, Geneva (Switzerland).

    The African Regional Symposium on Telematics for Development was organized in view of the special educational and communication needs of Africa in a time of accelerating change and development of information technologies. The symposium brought together more than 150 African specialists, and over 40 participants from other regions and development…

  3. Thomas Addis, MD (1881-1949): Scottish-American clinical laboratory researcher, social activist and pioneer of renal medicine.

    PubMed

    Boulton, Frank E

    2011-01-01

    Addis was born and educated in Edinburgh, from the University of which he graduated MB in 1905, and MD in 1908, in which year he also gained membership of Edinburgh's Royal College of Physicians. After researching disordered haemostasis associated with various clinical conditions, he spent over a year in Germany: in Berlin with Dr. E.L. Salkowski learning urinalysis and at Heidelberg under Ludolph von Krehl studying haemophilics. Back in Edinburgh he concluded that the ultimate cause of haemophilia was an 'anatomical defect in the molecule of prothrombin'. He was the first to monitor the effects on plasma clotting times of transfusion of anticoagulated blood into a haemophilic. In 1911 he was recruited by Ray Lyman Wilbur, the first dean of the Stanford University School of Medicine, to investigate metabolic disorders including jaundice, diabetes and ultimately chronic renal disease. In 1917 he described the 'urea ratio'--the mathematical and conceptual forerunner of clearance formulae--and over the next 30 years developed a combined clinical and laboratory service for patients with inexorably failing kidneys. He devised an effective, rational and individually based dietary treatment--some patients such as Linus Pauling, who presented in 1941 with marked nephrosis, responded completely. Addis' Calvinist upbringing gave him a strong sense of 'mission' which during the American Depression developed into support for poverty-stricken workers in America, and against the fascists in Spain. He died before the full development of the 'McCarthy Witch Hunts' of the 1950s, although many associates, including Robert Oppenheimer, were interrogated. PMID:21614781

  4. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  5. Student Teaching in Nonwestern Science Classrooms: Analysis of Views from Potential Participants in the Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engida, Temechegn

    2000-01-01

    Surveys the student teaching program for science teachers at the Addis Ababa University. Investigates student teachers' perspectives on the discrepancies between theoretical and experiential science teaching that they have acquired. (Contains 13 references.) (Author/YDS)

  6. The East African Training Initiative. A Model Training Program in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine for Low-Income Countries.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Charles B; Carter, E Jane; Braendli, Otto; Getaneh, Asqual; Schluger, Neil W

    2016-04-01

    Despite an extensive burden of lung disease in East Africa, there are remarkably few pulmonary physicians in the region and no pulmonary subspecialty training programs. We developed a unique training program for pulmonary medicine in Ethiopia. The East African Training Initiative (EATI) is a 2-year fellowship program at Tikur Anbessa (Black Lion) Specialized Teaching Hospital, the largest public hospital in Ethiopia and the teaching hospital for the Addis Ababa University School of Medicine. The first year is devoted to clinical care and procedural skills. Lectures, conferences, daily inpatient and outpatient rounds, and procedure supervision by visiting faculty provide the clinical knowledge foundation. In the second year, training in clinical research is added to ongoing clinical training. Before graduation, fellows must pass rigorous written and oral examinations and achieve high marks on faculty evaluations. Funding derives from several sources. Ethiopian trainees are paid by the Ethiopian Ministry of Health and the Addis Ababa University School of Medicine. The World Lung Foundation and the Swiss Lung Foundation supply travel and housing costs for visiting faculty, who receive no other stipend. The first two trainees graduated in January 2015, and a second class of three fellows completed training in January 2016. All five presented research abstracts at the annual meetings of the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease in 2014 and 2015. The EATI has successfully provided pulmonary medicine training in Ethiopia and has capacity for local leadership. We believe that EATI could be a model for other resource-limited countries. PMID:26991950

  7. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols. PMID

  8. Hospital Hints

    MedlinePlus

    ... Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology Division of Neuroscience FAQs Funding Opportunities Intramural Research Program Office of ... have to spend the night in the hospital. Learning more about what to expect and about people ...

  9. Hospital philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise. PMID:23614267

  10. [Laennec Hospital].

    PubMed

    Dauphin, A; Mazin-Deslandes, C

    2000-01-01

    When the Laennec Hospital of Paris closed, after 366 years of activities for the patients, the articles about the circumstances of the foundation and the main stapes of the institution which became an very famous university hospital it present the available information of the history of the apothecaries, of the "gagnants-maitrise", pharmacists and the pharmacy's interns who succeeded themselves to create and dispense the medicaments necessary to the patients hospitalized or welcomed in ambulatory. It describes the evolution of the places, of the material, of forms, of the organization, of the medicaments and of the missions of what became the Pharmacy department after the recent individualization of the biological analysis in the biochemistry. PMID:11625687

  11. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  12. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  13. Healthcare situation dismal, says government official. International (Ethiopia).

    PubMed

    1997-05-12

    According to Dr. Kebede Tadesse, Minister of Social and Administrative Affairs, as stated in a speech before the Consultative Group Meeting in Addis Ababa in December 1996, the health status of Ethiopia is one of the worst in the world because of "backward socio-economic development, poor environmental quality, high fertility rate, repeated natural and man-made disasters, and inadequate health services." An article in the April 11, 1997, Addis Tribune supports this claim by describing the horrific conditions found in a public hospital in Addis Ababa. Patients returned home to die because of the shortage of beds. Dr. Kebede gave the following statistics: the average daily per capita food intake is 1750 calories, 80% of that recommended; 5% of children show signs of wasting; 64% of children have stunted growth; 17% of pregnant and lactating women are anemic; the average national fertility rate is 6.1%; the percentage of AIDS cases per 100,000 people is 10.7; 18% of people have access to potable water; 14% of births are attended; 16% of people receive antenatal care; 40% of the population is immunized; 8% of the population receives family planning services; the infant mortality rate is 130/1000 live births; the maternal mortality rate is 500-700/100,000 live births; there is 1 physician per 33,333 Ethiopians; and the life expectancy at birth is 48 years. The article recommended the following "basic principles and guidelines" to improve the situation: 1) the population should be educated about good hygiene; 2) family planning should be popularized by the government; 3) the health budget should be increased to meet overall demand for health services and to target diseases such as malaria and tuberculosis; 4) private investment in health care is needed; 5) a safe drinking water supply must be made available; and 6) domestic conditions should be made favorable so that Ethiopian doctors educated abroad will return to practice in Ethiopia. PMID:12320872

  14. A clinico-epidemiological study of epidemic typhus in Africa.

    PubMed

    Perine, P L; Chandler, B P; Krause, D K; McCardle, P; Awoke, S; Habte-Gabr, E; Wisseman, C L; McDade, J E

    1992-05-01

    Epidemic, louse-borne typhus persists in the rugged, mountainous areas of Ethiopia and much of northeastern and central Africa as well as in the rural highlands of Central and South America, where the conditions of living favor the harboring of body lice and where antibiotic treatment and effective louse-control measures are unavailable. The historical significance and current epidemiology of typhus, including the reservoir of Rickettsia prowazekii in flying squirrels in the United States, are reviewed, and the clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and hospital course in the cases of 60 patients admitted with epidemic, louse-borne typhus to the St. Paul's Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, are described. Treatment of this disease with oral doxycycline, tetracycline, or chloramphenicol prevents complications and results in prompt resolution of symptoms. PMID:1600020

  15. Hospitals for sale.

    PubMed

    Costello, Michael M; West, Daniel J; Ramirez, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    The pace of hospital merger and acquisition activity reflects the economic theory of supply and demand: Publicly traded hospital companies, private equity funds, and large nonprofit hospital systems are investing capital to purchase and operate freestanding community hospitals at a time when many of those hospitals find themselves short of capital reserves and certain forms of management expertise. But the sale of those community hospitals also raises questions about the impact of absentee ownership on the communities which those hospitals serve. PMID:21864058

  16. Can hospitals compete on quality? Hospital competition.

    PubMed

    Sadat, Somayeh; Abouee-Mehrizi, Hossein; Carter, Michael W

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we consider two hospitals with different perceived quality of care competing to capture a fraction of the total market demand. Patients select the hospital that provides the highest utility, which is a function of price and the patient's perceived quality of life during their life expectancy. We consider a market with a single class of patients and show that depending on the market demand and perceived quality of care of the hospitals, patients may enjoy a positive utility. Moreover, hospitals share the market demand based on their perceived quality of care and capacity. We also show that in a monopoly market (a market with a single hospital) the optimal demand captured by the hospital is independent of the perceived quality of care. We investigate the effects of different parameters including the market demand, hospitals' capacities, and perceived quality of care on the fraction of the demand that each hospital captures using some numerical examples. PMID:25711185

  17. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... tends to be more serious than other lung infections because: People in the hospital are often very sick and cannot fight off ... prevent pneumonia. Most hospitals have programs to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

  18. Acute leukaemias in adult Ethiopians in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Shamebo, M

    1994-01-01

    Eighty-two consecutive cases of acute leukaemias in adult Ethiopians were admitted to the Tikur Anbessa (Black Lion) Hospital, a teaching and referral hospital in Addis Abeba, Ethiopia, from January 1982 to December 1992. These cases were studied to describe the clinical and haematological findings, response to therapy and prognosis. The age range was 13-78 (mean 29.6) years. The male to female ratio was 1.6:1. Acute myeloblastic (AML) and acute lymphoblastic (ALL) leukaemias occurred in 53.7% and 46.3%, respectively. The commonest symptoms were anaemia, fever and bleeding tendencies. The commonest signs were pallor, fever, sternal tenderness and purpura. Splenomegaly was more commonly seen in ALL patients. The haematological findings were anaemia (mean Hgb 6.35 g%), leucocytosis (mean WBC count 88,507/mm3) and thrombocytopenia (mean platelet count 31,700/mm3). Of the patients eligible for evaluation treated with chemotherapeutic agents, only 38.4% of ALL and 6.2% of AML achieved complete remission. Twenty-seven patients with ALL died from one day to 84 (median 1.0) months after diagnosis. Ten are lost to follow-up from two weeks to 36 (median 2.5) months, one is still alive 40 months after diagnosis. Thirty-nine of the AML patients died from one day to nine (median 0.3) months after diagnosis. Five are lost to follow-up from two weeks to two and a half (median 2.0) months. The causes of death were sepsis and bleeding, separately or in combination. Increasing numbers of acute leukaemia patients are being referred to this centre. Therefore, attempts should be made to equip it for the treatment of such cases. PMID:8187778

  19. Hospital Library Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    The objectives of a hospital are to improve patient care, while the objectives of a hospital library are to improve services to the staff which will support their efforts. This handbook dealing with hospital administration is designed to aid the librarian in either implementing a hospital library, or improving services in an existing medical…

  20. Measuring Rural Hospital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovice, Ira; Wholey, Douglas R.; Klingner, Jill; Knott, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    Increased interest in the measurement of hospital quality has been stimulated by accrediting bodies, purchaser coalitions, government agencies, and other entities. This paper examines quality measurement for hospitals in rural settings. We seek to identify rural hospital quality measures that reflect quality in all hospitals and that are sensitive…

  1. Hospital marketing revisited.

    PubMed

    Costello, M M

    1987-05-01

    With more hospitals embracing the marketing function in their organizational management over the past decade, hospital marketing can no longer be considered a fad. However, a review of hospital marketing efforts as reported in the professional literature indicates that hospitals must pay greater attention to the marketing mix elements of service, price and distribution channels as their programs mature. PMID:10283019

  2. Cystic echinococcosis amongst small ruminants and humans in central Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Assefa, Habtamu; Mulate, Belay; Nazir, Shahid; Alemayehu, Alula

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of cystic echinococcosis (CE) in small ruminants and humans in Addis Ababa, central Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study involving systematic random sampling was conducted to estimate the prevalence of CE in 512 small ruminants (262 sheep and 250 goats) slaughtered at Addis Ababa Abattoir Enterprise between October 2011 and March 2012. Hydatid cysts were identified macroscopically during postmortem examination and their fertility and viability were determined. CE was observed in 21 (8.02%) sheep and 17 (6.80%) goats. In sheep 13 (4.96%) of the lungs, 10 (3.81%) livers and 1 (0.381%) heart were found to be infected with hydatid cysts. Involvement of lung and liver in goats was found to be 10 (4.0%) and 8 (3.2%) respectively, with no cysts recorded in the heart. Of the total of 77 and 47 cysts encountered in sheep and goats, 33 (42.85%) and 15 (31.91%) respectively were fertile. Viability of protoscoleces from fertile cysts in sheep (29 [87.87%]) was higher than in goats (6 [40.0%]). For humans, retrospective analysis covering five years of case reports at two major hospitals in Addis Ababa between January 2008 and December 2012 showed that of the total of 25 840 patients admitted for ultrasound examination, 27 CE cases were registered, a prevalence of 0.1% and mean annual incidence rate of approximately 0.18 cases per 100 000 population. Liver was the major organ affected in humans (81.5% in affected patients) followed by spleen (11.1%) and kidney (7.4%). Logistic regression analysis showed that prevalence of CE varied significantly in relation to host age in the small ruminants (OR = 3.93, P < 0.05) as well as in humans (95% CI, R = 4.8). This epidemiological study confirms the importance of CE in small ruminants and humans in central Ethiopia, emphasising the need for integrated approaches to controlling this neglected preventable disease. PMID:26304166

  3. Financial management of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Speranzo, A J

    1984-05-01

    The effect of hospital reimbursement systems on the financial management of hospitals is briefly discussed, and the organization of hospital financial operations is reviewed. The implementation of Medicare prospective pricing will change the way in which hospital finances are managed. Health-care managers will be concerned with the profitability of product lines, or diagnosis-related groups, in future strategic planning efforts. The hospital's finance department consists of several traditional areas that exist in almost all financial organizations. The functions and interactions of these various areas are discussed in light of previous and current hospital reimbursement strategies. Staffing of the finance department and the duties of the hospital's chief financial officer are also described. The prospective pricing system of hospital reimbursement and increasing pressure from the business community to stem the rising costs of health care will produce changes in the medical and financial operations of the hospital industry over the next decade. PMID:6375357

  4. Hospital demand for physicians.

    PubMed

    Morrisey, M A; Jensen, G A

    1990-01-01

    This article develops a derived demand for physicians that is general enough to encompass physician control, simple profit maximization and hospital utility maximization models of the hospital. The analysis focuses on three special aspects of physician affiliations: the price of adding a physician to the staff is unobserved; the physician holds appointments at multiple hospitals, and physicians are not homogeneous. Using 1983 American Hospital Association data, a system of specialty-specific demand equations is estimated. The results are consistent with the model and suggest that physicians should be concerned about reduced access to hospitals, particularly as the stock of hospitals declines. PMID:10104050

  5. Hospitable Classrooms: Biblical Hospitality and Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper contributes to a Christian hermeneutic of special education by suggesting the biblical concept of hospitality as a necessary characteristic of classroom and school environments in which students with disabilities and other marginalized students can be effectively incorporated into the body of the classroom. Christian hospitality, seen…

  6. The application of hospitality elements in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziqi; Robson, Stephani; Hollis, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many hospital designs have taken inspiration from hotels, spurred by factors such as increased patient and family expectations and regulatory or financial incentives. Increasingly, research evidence suggests the value of enhancing the physical environment to foster healing and drive consumer decisions and perceptions of service quality. Although interest is increasing in the broader applicability of numerous hospitality concepts to the healthcare field, the focus of this article is design innovations, and the services that such innovations support, from the hospitality industry. To identify physical hotel design elements and associated operational features that have been used in the healthcare arena, a series of interviews with hospital and hotel design experts were conducted. Current examples and suggestions for future hospitality elements were also sought from the experts, academic journals, and news articles. Hospitality elements applied in existing hospitals that are addressed in this article include hotel-like rooms and decor; actual hotels incorporated into medical centers; hotel-quality food, room service, and dining facilities for families; welcoming lobbies and common spaces; hospitality-oriented customer service training; enhanced service offerings, including concierges; spas or therapy centers; hotel-style signage and way-finding tools; and entertainment features. Selected elements that have potential for future incorporation include executive lounges and/or communal lobbies with complimentary wireless Internet and refreshments, centralized controls for patients, and flexible furniture. Although the findings from this study underscore the need for more hospitality-like environments in hospitals, the investment decisions made by healthcare executives must be balanced with cost-effectiveness and the assurance that clinical excellence remains the top priority. PMID:23424818

  7. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  8. Surviving Your Child's Hospitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The parent of a young child who required major open heart surgery shares his suggestions for coping with a young child's hospitalization including parent visitation, relating to the hospital staff, getting answers to questions, and utilizing available services. (DB)

  9. Understanding your hospital bill

    MedlinePlus

    ... getting the help you need, consider hiring a medical-billing advocate. Advocates charge an hourly fee or a ... American Hospital Association. Hospital Billing and Collection ... 15, 2015. Family Doctor.org. Understanding your Medical Bills. ...

  10. Hospitals as health educators

    MedlinePlus

    ... than your local hospital. From health videos to yoga classes, many hospitals offer information families need to ... care and breastfeeding Parenting Baby sign language Baby yoga or massage Babysitting courses for teens Exercise classes ...

  11. 2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building (Building 90), administration and clinical hospital building (Building 88), and hospital building (Building 91) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers Western Branch, 4101 South Fourth Street, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

  12. AMHARIC BASIC COURSE, UNITS 1-50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OBOLENSKY, SERGE; AND OTHERS

    THE AMHARIC BASIC COURSE WAS DESIGNED TO TEACH THE AMHARIC LANGUAGE AS IT IS SPOKEN IN ADDIS ABABA, THE CAPITAL OF ETHIOPIA. ALTHOUGH OTHER SEMITIC LANGUAGES, AS WELL AS CUSHITIC LANGUAGES, ARE ALSO SPOKEN IN ETHIOPIA, AMHARIC IS THE PRESTIGE LANGUAGE AND IS OFFICIALLY USED IN GOVERNMENT, IN BUSINESS, FOR ALL INSTRUCTION IN GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS, AND…

  13. Providing Online Textbooks to the Developing World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Andrea L.

    2008-01-01

    Learning is valuable, but in Africa it is more than that: It is prohibitively expensive. In Ethiopia, where the per-capita income is about $100 a year, a single textbook at Addis Ababa University can cost $50. To get more textbooks to students in developing nations, two people are leading an ambitious project to produce and freely distribute 1,000…

  14. Partnerships in the Education System of Senegal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndiaye, Malick

    2006-01-01

    After gaining independence, at the Addis Ababa meeting (1961) most African countries, including Senegal, decided to develop their education systems. In 1980, a number of objectives were set out, including the democratization of primary education and universal sustainable schooling. According to its economic possibilities, its human resources and…

  15. Software Group Gets Online Textbooks to the Developing World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Andrea L.

    2007-01-01

    Learning is valuable, but in Africa it is more than that: It is prohibitively expensive. In Ethiopia, where the per-capita income is about $100 a year, a single textbook at Addis Ababa University can cost $50. In order to get more textbooks to students in developing nations, two people are leading an ambitious project to produce and freely…

  16. A Bayesian Performance Prediction Model for Mathematics Education: A Prototypical Approach for Effective Group Composition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekele, Rahel; McPherson, Maggie

    2011-01-01

    This research work presents a Bayesian Performance Prediction Model that was created in order to determine the strength of personality traits in predicting the level of mathematics performance of high school students in Addis Ababa. It is an automated tool that can be used to collect information from students for the purpose of effective group…

  17. The Prevalence of Mental Health Problems in Ethiopian Child Laborers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fekadu, Daniel; Alem, Atalay; Hagglof, Bruno

    2006-01-01

    Background: Child labor refers to a state when a child is involved in exploitative economical activities that are mentally, physically, and socially hazardous. There are no prevalence studies on the magnitude of psychiatric disorders among child laborers. Methods: A cross-sectional population survey was conducted in Addis Ababa using the…

  18. Recalled Test Anxiety in Relation to Achievement, in the Context of General Academic Self-Concept, Study Habits, Parental Involvement and Socio-Economic Status among Grade 6 Ethiopian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raju, P. Mohan; Asfaw, Abebech

    2009-01-01

    The study investigated the predictive nature of test anxiety on achievement in the presence of perceived general academic self-concept, study habits, parental involvement in children's learning and socio-economic status. From a population of 2482 Grade 6 students from seven government primary schools of a sub-city in Addis Ababa, 497 participants…

  19. Assessment of Challenges and Opportunity of Basketball Developments in Some Selected Regions in Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tufa, Gemechu Beker

    2015-01-01

    The intent of this study is to assess the challenges and Opportunity of Basketball development of in Some Selected Regions Ethiopia. The research made Addis Ababa, Oromia, Gambella and South Nation Nationality and People Regional States as the sites of this study. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches particularly a descriptive survey were…

  20. Distance Education in Entwicklungslandern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    German Foundation for International Development, Bonn (West Germany).

    Seminar and conference reports and working papers on distance education of adults, which reflect the experiences of many countries, are presented. Contents include the draft report of the 1979 International Seminar on Distance Education held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, which was jointly sponsored by the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa…

  1. African Flagship Universities: Their Neglected Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teferra, Damtew

    2016-01-01

    This study documents and analyzes the contributions of flagship universities in Africa in teaching, learning, graduates, and research productivity since their inception. On the basis of empirical evidence (from an ongoing study) on eleven "flagship" universities in Africa--Addis Ababa, Botswana, Cairo, Chiekh Anta Diop, Dar es Salaam,…

  2. The Delivery of Business Courses via the African Virtual University: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graber, Mark; Bolt, Susan

    2011-01-01

    In this case study the delivery of business courses as a result of the partnership between the African Virtual University (AVU) and Curtin University in Western Australia is described. From 2004 to 2008, degree and diploma business courses were delivered using WebCT in the four AVU partner locations: Addis Ababa University (Ethiopia), Kigali…

  3. Relationship between Instructional Supervision and Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tesfaw, Tadele Akalu; Hofman, Roelande H.

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine the existing perceptions of teachers toward instructional supervision in secondary schools of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. It also explore if there were differences between beginner and experienced teachers in their attitudes toward and satisfaction with supervisory practices and (possible) relationships…

  4. Technology in Ethiopian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szente, Judit

    2006-01-01

    A US Agency for International Development decided to start an educational project in Ethiopia. The project originated with Dr. James L. Hoot from the University of Buffalo in 2000. Since 2002, two primary schools in the capital, Addis Ababa, have received assistance to establish self-sustaining, technology-based learning environments for students…

  5. Hospital diversification strategy.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    To determine the impact of health system restructuring on the levels of hospital diversification and operating ratio this article analyzed 94 teaching hospitals and 94 community hospitals during the period 2008-2013. The 47 teaching hospitals are matched with 47 other teaching hospitals experiencing the same financial market position in 2008, but with different levels of preference for risk and diversification in their strategic plan. Covariates in the analysis included levels of hospital competition and the degree of local government planning (for example, highly regulated in New York, in contrast to Texas). Moreover, 47 nonteaching community hospitals are matched with 47 other community hospitals in 2008, having varying manager preferences for service-line diversification and risk. Diversification and operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as jointly dependent. Institutional diversification is found to yield better financial position, and the better operating profits provide the firm the wherewithal to diversify. Some services are in a growth phase, like bariatric weight-loss surgery and sleep disorder clinics. Hospital managers' preferences for risk/return potential were considered. An institution life cycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification, and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger. PMID:25223156

  6. Measuring Hospital Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Ruchlin, Hirsch S.; Leveson, Irving

    1974-01-01

    This study presents a comprehensive method for quantifying hospital output and estimating hospital productivity. A number of less comprehensive productivity measures that can be quantified from data available from regional third-party payers and from the American Hospital Association are also developed and evaluated as proxies for the comprehensive measure, which is based on local area data. Methods are discussed for estimating the necessary variables on a regional or national level. PMID:4461703

  7. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  8. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  9. Library Services in Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health and Social Security, London (England).

    The memorandum gives guidance to the provision and organization of library services at hospitals both for staff and for patients. It also draws attention to the assistance available from outside sources towards the development and maintenance of these services so hospital authorities may make the most effective use of the available facilities.…

  10. Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novachek, James

    The Northern Arizona Hospitality Education Program is an exemplary three-year project designed to help students, mainly Indian, obtain job skills and attitudes necessary for successful employment in the hospitality industry. Nine high schools from Apache, Coconino, and Navajo Counties participated in the project. Objectives included providing an…

  11. Handbook on Hospital Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prynne, T. A.

    Designed for both hospital personnel interested in television and audiovisual personnel entering the medical field, this handbook is a verbal and pictorial survey of what is being done with TV within the medical profession. After an introduction which answers technical questions about medical TV posed during the American Hospital Association's…

  12. Mental hospitals in India.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, K; Venugopal, D; Alimchandani, A K

    2000-04-01

    This review traces the history of the mental hospital movement, initially on the world stage, and later in India, in relation to advances in psychiatric care. Mental hospitals have played a significant role in the evolution of psychiatry to its present statusThe earliest hospital in India were established during the British colonial rule. They served as a means to isolate mentally ill persons from the societal mainstream and provide treatments that were in vogue at the time. Following India's independence, there has been a trend towards establishing general hospital psychiatry units and deinstitutionalization, while at the same time improving conditions in the existing mental hospitals.Since 1947, a series of workshops of superintendents was conducted to review the prevailing situations in mental hospitals and to propose recommendations to improve the same. Implementation of the Mental Health Act, 1987, and grovernmental focus upon mental hospital reform have paved way for a more specific and futuristic role for mental hospitals in planning psychiatric services for the new millenium, especially for severe mental illnesses. PMID:21407925

  13. [Music in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Bouteloup, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Occasional events, regular workshops, concerts, shows, artists in residence, cultural outings...Hospital does not necessarily have to be a place of silence and sadness. But this situation has not always been so straightforward as on the face of it, nothing is more incompatible with a hospital environment than music, which, by definition, is festive and noisy. PMID:20684389

  14. Hospitality services generate revenue.

    PubMed

    Bizouati, S

    1993-01-01

    An increasing number of hospitals are undertaking external revenue-generating activities to supplement their shrinking budgets. Written at the request of Leadership, this article outlines an example of a successful catering service -- a money-generating business that more Canadian hospitals could profitably consider. PMID:10127850

  15. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  16. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  17. Hospital efficiency and debt.

    PubMed

    Bernet, Patrick Michael; Rosko, Michael D; Valdmanis, Vivian G

    2008-01-01

    U.S. Hospitals rely heavily on debt financing to fund major capital investments. Hospital efficiency is at least partly determined by the amount and quality of plant and equipment it uses. As such, a hospital's access to debt and credit rating may be related to its efficiency. This study explores this relationship using a broad sample of hospitals and associated bond issuance histories. Employing stochastic frontier analysis (SFA), we measure cost inefficiency to gauge the impact of debt issuance and debt rating. We find that hospitals with recent bond issues were less inefficient. Although we do not find a perfectly linear relationship between debt rating and inefficiency, we have evidence that hints at such a relation. Finally, we find an increase in inefficiency in the years following bond issues, consistent with the possibility of a debt death spiral. PMID:21110482

  18. [Hospital medicine in Chile].

    PubMed

    Eymin, Gonzalo; Jaffer, Amir K

    2013-03-01

    After 15 years of development of Hospital Medicine in Chile, there are several benefits of this discipline. Among others, a reduction in the length of hospital stay, readmissions, costs, and improved medical teaching of students, residents and fellows have been observed. However, in South América there are only isolated groups dedicated to Hospital Medicine in Chile, Argentina and Brazil, with a rather slow growth. The unjustified fear of competition from sub specialists, and the fee for service system of payment in our environment may be important factors to understand this phenomenon. The aging of the population makes imperative to improve the safety of our patients and to optimize processes and resources within the hospital, to avoid squandering healthcare resources. The following is a detailed and evidence-based article, on how hospital medicine might benefit both the public and prívate healthcare systems in Chile. PMID:23900327

  19. Hospitality as an Environmental Metaphor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwood, Bert

    1991-01-01

    Compares stewardship and hospitality as they relate to the biosphere. Traces the origin of the word "hospitality," discusses cultural traditions of hospitality, and applies the concept of hospitality to the natural world. Considers forms of symbiosis in nature: commensals, mutualism, and parasitism. Hospitality promotes respect, humility, and…

  20. Philanthropy and hospital financing.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D G; Clement, J P; Wheeler, J R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study explores the relationships among donations to not-for-profit hospitals, the returns provided by these hospitals, and fund-raising efforts. It tests a model of hospital behavior and addresses an earlier debate regarding the supply price of donations. DATA SOURCES. The main data source is the California Office of Statewide Health Planning data tapes of hospital financial disclosure reports for fiscal years 1980/1981 through 1986/1987. Complete data were available for 160 hospitals. STUDY DESIGN. Three structural equations (donations, returns, and fund-raising) are estimated as a system using a fixed-effects, pooled cross-section, time-series least squares regression. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Estimation results reveal the expected positive relation between donations and returns. The reverse relation between returns and donations is insignificant. The estimated effect of fund-raising on donations is insignificantly different from zero, and the effect of donations on fund-raising is negative. Fund-raising and returns are negatively associated with one another. CONCLUSION. The empirical results presented here suggest a positive donations-returns relations and are consistent with a positive supply price for donations. Hospitals appear to view a trade-off between providing returns and soliciting donations, but donors do not respond equally to these two activities. Attempts to increase free cash flow through expansion of community returns or fund-raising activity, at least in the short run, are not likely to be highly successful financing strategies for many hospitals. PMID:8537223

  1. Hospitals' Internal Accountability

    PubMed Central

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  2. Hospitals' internal accountability.

    PubMed

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  3. Hospitalized Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... but can also be caused by fungi. Hospital construction. Hospital staff do everything they can to prevent ... patients staying at hospitals where there is ongoing construction or renovation. 5 This is thought to be ...

  4. Hospital Waste Management in Nonteaching Hospitals of Lucknow City, India

    PubMed Central

    Manar, Manish Kumar; Sahu, Krishna Kumar; Singh, Shivendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess hospital waste management in nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted on the staffs of nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow from September 2012 to March 2013. A total of eight hospitals were chosen as the study sample size. Simple random sampling technique was used for the selection of the nonteaching hospitals. A pre-structured and pre-tested interview questionnaire was used to collect necessary information regarding the hospitals and biomedical waste (BMW) management of the hospitals. The general information about the selected hospitals/employees of the hospitals was collected. Results: Mean hospital waste generated in the eight nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow was 0.56 kg/bed/day. About 50.5% of the hospitals did not have BMW department and colored dustbins. In 37.5% of the hospitals, there were no BMW records and segregation at source. Incinerator was used only by hospital A for treatment of BMW. Hospital G and hospital H had no facilities for BMW treatment. Conclusion: There is a need for appropriate training of staffs, strict implementation of rules, and continuous surveillance of the hospitals of Lucknow to improve the BMW management and handling practices. PMID:25657950

  5. Hospital financing in Norway.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, F

    1994-05-01

    The Norwegian block grant reform of 1980 replaced state reimbursements to hospitals by block grants allocated to counties according to objective criteria. The reform was accompanied by a general decentralization of budget authority to local level. The reform aimed to promote primary care, equalize the supply of health care across regions and give counties incentives to improve hospital efficiency. A decade later, the reform was reversed. The government has imposed restrictions which reduce the budget discretion of the counties and part of the block grant has been made dependent on the performance of the hospitals in the counties. The government has also issued a 'waiting-list guarantee' which states that patients who suffer from a serious disease are entitled to medical treatment within six months. This paper provides an overview of hospital financing in Norway during the last two decades and discusses why the block grant system did not fulfil the expectations of its architects. PMID:10136059

  6. Surgery, Hospitals, and Medications

    MedlinePlus

    Patient Education Sheet Sjögren’s, Surgery, Hospitals, and Medications The SSF thanks Lynn Petruzzi, RN, MSN, for this Patient Education Sheet. Educate your healthcare givers! • Tell your surgeon, ...

  7. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CAH Conditions of Participation . What are the location requirements for CAH status? Critical Access Hospitals must be ... clinic that does not meet the CAH distance requirements? As of January 1, 2008, all CAHs, including ...

  8. Understanding your hospital bill

    MedlinePlus

    ... to know whether your hospital charged a fair price. There are some web sites you can use ... zip code to find an average or estimated price in your area. www.healthcarebluebook.com www.fairhealth. ...

  9. Practice Hospital Bed Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bed? Todd says that there is no standard definition for hospital beds, a fact that consumers shopping ... in retail stores that don’t meet the definition of medical devices under the law, but which ...

  10. Hospital free cash flow.

    PubMed

    Kauer, R T; Silvers, J B

    1991-01-01

    Hospital managers may find it difficult to admit their investments have been suboptimal, but such investments often lead to poor returns and less future cash. Inappropriate use of free cash flow produces large transaction costs of exit. The relative efficiency of investor-owned and tax-exempt hospitals in the product market for hospital services is examined as the free cash flow theory is used to explore capital-market conditions of hospitals. Hypotheses concerning the current competitive conditions in the industry are set forth, and the implications of free cash flow for risk, capital-market efficiency, and the cost of capital to tax-exempt institution is compared to capital-market norms. PMID:1743965

  11. [Ryazan hospital--80 years].

    PubMed

    Klimov, A S; Gromov, M F

    2012-02-01

    In December 2011 marked 80 years of the founding of the Ryazan garrison hospital, originally housed in two buildings: "Redut housed"--a monument of architecture of the XVIII century and the former almshouses room "for the maimed in the war", was built in 1884 now Ryazan garrison hospital (from 2010--Branch No 6 FSI "in 1586 the district military hospital in the Western Military District", the Defense Ministry of Russia)--a multi-field medical preventive institution on the basis of which soldiers, military retirees, family members and military retirees from Ryazan, Moscow, Tambov regions are treated. Every year more than 7 thousand patients get treatment here. During the counterterrorism operations in Chechnya over 800 wounded were brought to the hospital from the battle area. PMID:22558855

  12. ["Working together" at hospital?].

    PubMed

    Divay, Sophie

    2015-02-01

    Working well together at hospital depends on several factors, on the level of a team as well as that of the ministry in charge of health. How can we encourage and promote cooperation between caregivers? If the hospital is the reflection of society as a whole, an analysis of the functioning of this universe provides a better understanding of the challenges and the missions of each player for the benefit of the patient. PMID:26144821

  13. Fast tracking hospital construction.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Hospital leaders should consider four factors in determining whether to fast track a hospital construction project: Expectations of project length, quality, and cost. Whether decisions can be made quickly as issues arise. Their own time commitment to the project, as well as that of architects, engineers, construction managers, and others. The extent to which they are willing to share with the design and construction teams how and why decisions are being made. PMID:23513759

  14. Management of Feedyard Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Fox, J T

    2015-11-01

    There are many considerations when managing feedyard hospitals. The type of hospital system must fit the facility design, the type of cattle fed at the feedyard, the crew that is employed by the feedyard, and the protocol established by the veterinarian. Ensuring the animals are well-cared for and have their basic needs met should be the priority of the feedyard personnel and the veterinarian maintaining the veterinarian-client-patient relationship with the feedyard. PMID:26210766

  15. Hospital air is sick.

    PubMed

    Brownson, K

    2000-11-01

    Indoor air quality has deteriorated so much since the 1970s oil shortage and subsequent energy-efficient construction of buildings that people are becoming seriously ill by just breathing the indoor air. This is a problem with all industrial buildings and hospital staff are at particular risk. There are various things that hospital managers from different departments can do to make the air safe for staff and patients to breathe. PMID:11185833

  16. Recurrent psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed Central

    Voineskos, G.; Denault, S.

    1978-01-01

    Undue emphasis has been placed on rising rates of readmission to psychiatric facilities. After a decade of preoccupation with discharge rates, readmission statistics have been singled out in the last 15 years as the key factor for assessing hospital effectiveness. A study of a group of patients at high risk for recurrent hospitalization revealed that these patients were characterized more by features relating to environmental supports than by diagnosis. The operational definition for recurrent hospitalization (five or more admissions during the 2-year period preceding the latest admission) was effective in identifying this group; this is the first reported instance in which the definition has specified a certain number of admissions within a time-limited period. The findings of this study, as well as of an analysis of case histories and consumer opinion, led to the design of a pilot program for persons undergoing recurrent hospitalization. Readmission statistics are useless or misleading as measures of hospital effectiveness and efficiency; what matters is the way the former patients function in the community after discharge. Rather than simply trying to reduce the readmission rate psychiatric facilities should be examining the types of persons who are hospitalized recurrently to develop programs aimed at improving the functioning of these people in the community. PMID:630483

  17. Hospital accreditation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C

    1998-01-01

    Health service accreditation systems have explicit standards for organisation against which the participating hospital assesses itself before a structured visit by outside "surveyors". They submit a written report back to the hospital with commendations and recommendations for development prior to a follow-up survey. Accreditation may be awarded for a fixed term or may be with held by an independent assessment Board if the hospital does not meet a defined threshold of standards. In Europe, some government and medical organisations initially distanced themselves from the pilot hospital wide programmes, arguing that they would cost too much and undermine management, or that they were irrelevant to clinical practice. But gradually it became obvious that accreditation worked for hospitals; purchasers and insurers saw its potential for quality and resource management; and professional bodies recognised the links between clinical training, practice and outcome and the environment in which health care is provided. If nothing else, it offered a multi-professional bridge between the existing numerous fragmented systems such as inspecting (statutory safety), visiting (professional training), and monitoring (service contracts). The introduction of accreditation appears to benefit hospitals in many different countries and health systems and provides a vehicle for integrated quality management which is visible to funding agencies, government and the public. Interest is growing within Europe. PMID:10179643

  18. Financing hospital disaster preparedness.

    PubMed

    De Lorenzo, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Disaster preparedness and response have gained increased attention in the United States as a result of terrorism and disaster threats. However, funding of hospital preparedness, especially surge capacity, has lagged behind other preparedness priorities. Only a small portion of the money allocated for national preparedness is directed toward health care, and hospitals receive very little of that. Under current policy, virtually the entire funding stream for hospital preparedness comes from general tax revenues. Medical payers (e.g., Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance) directly fund little, if any, of the current bill. Funding options to improve preparedness include increasing the current federal grants allocated to hospitals, using payer fees or a tax to subsidize preparedness, and financing other forms of expansion capability, such as mobile hospitals. Alternatively, the status quo of marginal preparedness can be maintained. In any event, achieving higher levels of preparedness likely will take the combined commitment of the hospital industry, public and private payers, and federal, state, and local governments. Ultimately, the costs of preparedness will be borne by the public in the form of taxes, higher healthcare costs, or through the acceptance of greater risk. PMID:18087914

  19. Hospital pharmacy in Canada.

    PubMed

    Bachynsky, J A

    1980-04-01

    The status of Canadian hospital pharmacy and the impact of national hospital insurance on its development are discussed. The provision of health care services for Canadians is shared by the federal and provincial governments. The federal government enacts protective and regulatory legislation, compiles health statistics, promotes research, and provides direct health care for those citizens for whom it is directly responsible. Each province is responsible for hospitals, the education and training of health care professionals, public health, and the financing and administration of health insurance for all its citizens. Largely because of line-item budget allocations and a bureaucratic tendency to equalize services for the whole population, funds for existing pharmaceutical services have been assured but the introduction of upgraded or innovative programs has been difficult to achieve. The result has been an even quality of health care services, including pharmacy, throughout the country and a deficiency in clinical pharmacy programs and the trained personnel to run them. The last decade has brought advances, however, as allocation methods have changed and both hospital and insurance administrators have recognized the patient benefits and cost effectiveness of many of the newer pharmacy programs. The main challenges facing Canadian hospital pharmacy are to upgrade clinical services and education and to improve managerial and bureaucratic competence among department directors. PMID:7377213

  20. Hospitals as interpretation systems.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J B; McDaniel, R R; Anderson, R A

    1991-01-01

    In this study of 162 hospitals, it was found that the chief executive officer's (CEO's) interpretation of strategic issues is related to the existing hospital strategy and the hospital's information processing structure. Strategy was related to interpretation in terms of the extent to which a given strategic issue was perceived as controllable or uncontrollable. Structure was related to the extent to which an issue was defined as positive or negative, was labeled as controllable or uncontrollable, and was perceived as leading to a gain or a loss. Together, strategy and structure accounted for a significant part of the variance in CEO interpretations of strategic events. The theoretical and managerial implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:1991677

  1. Hospital Prices Increase in California, Especially Among Hospitals in the Largest Multi-hospital Systems.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Glenn A; Fonkych, Katya

    2016-01-01

    A surge in hospital consolidation is fueling formation of ever larger multi-hospital systems throughout the United States. This article examines hospital prices in California over time with a focus on hospitals in the largest multi-hospital systems. Our data show that hospital prices in California grew substantially (+76% per hospital admission) across all hospitals and all services between 2004 and 2013 and that prices at hospitals that are members of the largest, multi-hospital systems grew substantially more (113%) than prices paid to all other California hospitals (70%). Prices were similar in both groups at the start of the period (approximately $9200 per admission). By the end of the period, prices at hospitals in the largest systems exceeded prices at other California hospitals by almost $4000 per patient admission. Our study findings are potentially useful to policy makers across the country for several reasons. Our data measure actual prices for a large sample of hospitals over a long period of time in California. California experienced its wave of consolidation much earlier than the rest of the country and as such our findings may provide some insights into what may happen across the United States from hospital consolidation including growth of large, multi-hospital systems now forming in the rest of the rest of the country. PMID:27284126

  2. Marketing the hospital library.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Many librarians do not see themselves as marketers, but marketing is an essential role for hospital librarians. Library work involves education, and there are parallels between marketing and education as described in this article. It is incumbent upon hospital librarians actively to pursue ways of reminding their customers about library services. This article reinforces the idea that marketing is an element in many of the things that librarians already do, and includes a list of suggested marketing strategies intended to remind administrators, physicians, and other customers that they have libraries in their organizations. PMID:15982957

  3. The influence of hospital integration on hospital financial performance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yang K; Stoskopf, Carleen H; Glover, Saundra H; Park, Eun C

    2004-01-01

    A clinical and functional integration strategy has a positive influence on increasing hospital revenue, and a solely functional integration strategy has a negative influence on increasing hospital expenses. Functional integration and clinical/functional integration strategies have a positive influence on hospital profit and the overall operations of the hospital. The mechanism of influence differs, however, based on the strategy used. Clinical/functional strategy has an impact on increasing hospital revenue, while functional integration strategy has an impact on reducing hospital expenses. Overall, the study shows that a functional integration strategy is more profitable than a clinical/functional integration strategy. PMID:15816230

  4. Hospital structure and consumer satisfaction.

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, G V

    1981-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between hospital structural characteristics and patient satisfaction with hospital care. Teaching hospitals and private hospitals were expected to receive higher ratings of patient satisfaction than were nonteaching and government-controlled hospitals, because they generally are reputed to be technologically superior. Results show that, in general, most patients are satisfied with their hospital stays, but they are clearly more dissatisfied with their stays in teaching hospitals. Although a number of other correlates of patient satisfaction with the hospital stay are identified, no measure succeeds in reducing to insignificance the strong relationship between teaching status and dissatisfaction. Some suggestions are made as to why teaching hospital receive relatively poor evaluations from their patients. PMID:7228714

  5. Introduction to hospital information systems.

    PubMed

    Vegoda, P R

    1987-01-01

    The phrase, 'hospital information system', is frequently used in discussions about the flow of information throughout a hospital with the assumption that everybody has the same concept in mind. Closer examination shows that this is not necessarily the case. The author draws on his experience as the Chief Information Officer at University Hospital at Stony Brook to define a hospital information system in terms of the implementation at Stony Brook. The University Hospital Information System at University Hospital (UHIS), has received international acclaim and was recently selected by the IBM Quarterly of Australia as the world leader in hospital information systems. This paper answers four questions: What is a hospital information system? How does a hospital information system work? How do you implement a hospital information system? After the system is operational, where do you go, e.g., critical care data management, physician's office management? University Hospital at Stony Brook is located on eastern Long Island and is the tertiary care referral hospital for approximately 1.4 million people. Nothing in the hospital happens without computers. Doctors, nurses, administrators and staff at all levels rely on the system daily. The system operates 24 hours per day, seven days per week. Access to the system is through 300 terminals and 128 printers throughout the hospital. In addition to the UHIS terminals, the critical care management system which is called Patient Data Management System, (PDMS), is available at over 90 ICU beds and in the operating rooms. PMID:3585130

  6. [The founding of Zemun Hospital].

    PubMed

    Milanović, Jasmina; Milenković, Sanja; Pavlović, Momcilo; Stojanović, Dragos

    2014-01-01

    This year Zemun Hospital--Clinical Hospital Center Zemun celebrates 230th anniversary of continuous work, thus becoming the oldest medical facility in Serbia.The exact date of the hospital founding has been often questioned in history. Various dates appeared in the literature, but the most frequent one was 25th of February 1784. Until now, the document which confirms this has never been published. This article represents the first official publication of the document which confirms that Zemun Hospital was indeed founded on this date. The first hospitals started emerging in Zemun when the town became a part of the Habsburg Monarchy. The first sanitary facility ever formed was the"Kontumac"--a quarantine established in 1730. Soon after, two more confessional hospitals were opened.The Serbian (Orthodox) Hospital was founded before 1769, whereas the German (Catholic) Hospital started working in 1758. Both hospitals were financed, amongst others, by the Town Hall--the Magistrate. In order to improve efficiency of these hospitals, a decision was made to merge them into a single City Hospital. It was founded on 25th February 1784, when the General Command ordered the Magistrate of Zemun to merge the financess of all existing hospitals and initiate the construction of a new building. Although financially united, the hospitals continued working in separate buildings over a certain period of time.The final, physical merging of these hospitals was completed in 1795. PMID:25233701

  7. Hospital restructuring and burnout.

    PubMed

    Greenglass, Esther R; Burke, Ronald J

    2002-01-01

    Increasingly, organizations are experiencing changes as a result of extensive downsizing, restructuring, and merging. In Canada, government-sponsored medicine has been affected as hospitals have merged or closed, reducing essential medical services and resulting in extensive job loss for hospital workers, particularly nurses. Hospital restructuring has also resulted in greater stress and job insecurity in nurses. The escalation of stressors has created burnout in nurses. This study examines predictors of burnout in nurses experiencing hospital restructuring using the MBI-General Survey which yields scores on three scales: Emotional exhaustion, Cynicism, and Professional efficacy. Multiple regressions were conducted where each burnout scale was the criterion and stressors (e.g., amount of work, use of generic workers to do nurses' work), restructuring effects, social support, and individual resources (e.g., control coping, self-efficacy, prior organizational commitment) were predictors. There were differences in the amount of variance accounted for in the burnout components by stressors and resources. Stressors contributed most to emotional exhaustion and least to professional efficacy. Individual resources were more likely to contribute to professional efficacy and least to emotional exhaustion. Stressors and resources accounted for approximately equal amounts of variance in cynicism. Three conclusions were drawn. First, present findings parallel others by showing that individual coping patterns contribute to professional efficacy. Second, emotional exhaustion was found to be the prototype of stress. Third, prior organizational commitment, self-efficacy, and control coping resulted in lower burnout. PMID:15137570

  8. Hospital Library Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    Although this handbook is addressed primarily to the hopital administrator, it contains material of interest to the librarian as well. Basic requirements for providing good library services to hospital staff are identified as: (1) well chosen and well trained manpower; (2) a current collection of information materials; and (3) appropriate space in…

  9. Responsible Hospitality. Prevention Updates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colthurst, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Responsible Hospitality (RH)--also called Responsible Beverage Service (RBS)--encompasses a variety of strategies for reducing risks associated with the sale and service of alcoholic beverages. RH programs have three goals: (1) to prevent illegal alcohol service to minors; (2) to reduce the likelihood of drinkers becoming intoxicated; and (3) to…

  10. Cost characteristics of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Smet, Mike

    2002-09-01

    Modern hospitals are complex multi-product organisations. The analysis of a hospital's production and/or cost structure should therefore use the appropriate techniques. Flexible functional forms based on the neo-classical theory of the firm seem to be most suitable. Using neo-classical cost functions implicitly assumes minimisation of (variable) costs given that input prices and outputs are exogenous. Local and global properties of flexible functional forms and short-run versus long-run equilibrium are further issues that require thorough investigation. In order to put the results based on econometric estimations of cost functions in the right perspective, it is important to keep these considerations in mind when using flexible functional forms. The more recent studies seem to agree that hospitals generally do not operate in their long-run equilibrium (they tend to over-invest in capital (capacity and equipment)) and that it is therefore appropriate to estimate a short-run variable cost function. However, few studies explicitly take into account the implicit assumptions and restrictions embedded in the models they use. An alternative method to explain differences in costs uses management accounting techniques to identify the cost drivers of overhead costs. Related issues such as cost-shifting and cost-adjusting behaviour of hospitals and the influence of market structure on competition, prices and costs are also discussed shortly. PMID:12220092

  11. Mechanical engineering in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wallington, J W

    1980-10-01

    The design of a modern hospital owes more to engineering than the layman may realize. In this context, many engineers are in the position of laymen, being unfamiliar with the multitude of services that lies behind the impressive facade of a modern hospital. In recent years medicine and surgery themselves have taken on many of the characteristics of a technology. This has required a matching development of the services both mechanical and electrical that are required in modern health care buildings. In medical terms, if the architectural features provide the 'skin' of the hospital, the mechanical and electrical engineering services provide the nerves and sinews. If we take as an example the recently completed Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, (Fig. 1), which cost 10 million pounds at current cost, the service network was responsible for about half the total cost. About 400 miles (643 km) of electrical wiring and more than 40 mile (64.5 km) of copper and steel piping were used to service 3000 separate rooms. This compares with percentages of between 18 and 25 per cent for other large buildings such as office blocks, hotels and sports complexes. PMID:10273268

  12. Peptic ulcer in hospital

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, H. Daintree

    1962-01-01

    This study corresponds to an estimated 142,250 admissions for peptic ulcer to the wards of National Health Service hospitals in England and Wales during the two years 1956 and 1957. It presents a picture of the incidence and mortality of complications and surgical treatment throughout England and Wales. PMID:14036965

  13. HOSPITAL FOOD NEEDS

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, R. G.

    1919-01-01

    There are eight classes of men in the military hospital including attendants, and for each class there should be a different dietary. Major Hoskins explains this, tells clearly the common sources of waste of food, notes the amount, and suggests lines of conservation. Imagesp435-a PMID:18010115

  14. [Leadership in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Schrappe, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Current concepts in leadership and governance on the level of supervisory board, management and departments are often considered as insufficient to cope with the profound structural change which actually takes place in the German health care system. While vertical and horizontal disconnecting is typical of the professional bureaucracy of hospitals, transition from functional to divisional structure further increases this risk. Accordingly, medical experts are oriented towards their professional peers and patient care on the one side; on the other side the management gets isolated and looses operative and strategic control. Several studies provide evidence for the relevance of role models to serve as agents of change, which are now developed into the concept of "Clinical Governance": evidence-based medicine, guidelines, continuous quality improvement, safety culture, resource accountability and organisational learning. The present situation makes it necessary to extend this conception, which focuses on the departmental level in an organisation with divisional features, to one of "Clinical Corporate Governance". This term, which also includes supervisory structures and the management board and is relevant for the total hospital and company, respectively, is based on the corporate governance concept. Inside the hospital, the management and the heads of the departments have to agree that (1) experts really need to be integrated into the decision process, and that (2) the outcomes of the entire hospital have to be regarded as equal or superior to the aims of a single department. The public image of the hospital should be one of a strong and reliable partner in health care and health care business on a local, regional and national level. Members of the supervisory board should clearly put corporate aspects above political and other implications and pay attention to personal independence from the leaders of the medical departments. PMID:19545081

  15. Hospital Library Development. Hospital Library Handbooks No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    Addressed to the administrator of the hospital as well as the librarian, this handbook covers aspects of library service policy and long-range planning. While hospitals of all sizes are discussed, a special effort is made to cover problems of small hospitals (17 to 100 beds) in sparsely-settled regions. Contents: The library as a clinical service,…

  16. The general NFP hospital model.

    PubMed

    Al-Amin, Mona

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the past 30 years, there has been a lot of controversy surrounding the proliferation of new forms of health care delivery organizations that challenge and compete with general NFP community hospitals. Traditionally, the health care system in the United States has been dominated by general NFP (NFP) voluntary hospitals. With the number of for-profit general hospitals, physician-owned specialty hospitals, and ambulatory surgical centers increasing, a question arises: “Why is the general NFP community hospital the dominant model?” In order to address this question, this paper reexamines the history of the hospital industry. By understanding how the “general NFP hospital” model emerged and dominated, we attempt to explain the current dominance of general NFP hospitals in the ever changing hospital industry in the United States. PMID:22324062

  17. Guide to Choosing a Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... the following and more: • Find hospitals by name, city, county, state, or ZIP code. • Check the results ... by the hospital name, or by ZIP Code, City, State or Territory, or County. • Select General Search, ...

  18. How hospitals approach price transparency.

    PubMed

    Houk, Scott; Cleverley, James O

    2014-09-01

    A survey of finance leaders found that hospitals with lower charges were more likely than other hospitals to emphasize making prices defensible rather than simply transparent. Finance leaders of hospitals with higher charges were more likely to express concern that price transparency would cause a reduction in hospital revenue by forcing them to lower charges. Those respondents said commercial payers likely will have to agree to renegotiate contracts for price transparency to be a financially viable proposition. PMID:25647890

  19. Product lines in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Weber, J R

    1986-01-01

    The findings presented in the case study demonstrate that financial analysis is only as valid as the assumptions it is based upon. The single most important task is the definition of the clinical product. All other associated data is suspect and can lead to serious errors in business decisions if the product is poorly defined. A comprehensive case mix system, integrated with other financial systems with flexible reporting capabilities is required. The hospital and physicians must be willing to invest the time and expense necessary to ensure that the data is reliable. The hospital must be prudent in determining what cost finding approach they will elect to use. Although the RCC method has some fundamental problems, care must be taken not to develop a cost system that will require a significant amount of effort to maintain. PMID:10311387

  20. [Homicide crimes in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Dürwald, W

    1993-02-01

    Report of some cases of willful homicide in hospitals of the former GDR. In no case the patient has wished his death. Besides compassion the cause of the homicide was a large carefully expense and in two cases the attempt to prove the incapability of the competent doctor. The patients were only means to an end. All the cases are discovered by the great number of obscure death. PMID:8438538

  1. Hospital successes and failures indicate change in hospital marketing.

    PubMed

    Krampf, R F; Miller, D W

    1993-01-01

    Marketing has become an essential management function for hospitals during the past decade. A number of changes have occurred in hospital marketing as they have progressed through the marketing adoption process. A survey of Hospital CEOs reporting hospital successes and failures in the area of marketing have recently placed emphasis on sales and advertising based upon marketing research programs thus indicating entrance into the "Integrated Tactical Marketing" phase. This study also indicates that a few hospitals have entered the "Strategic Marketing Orientation" phase while future plans reported by the CEOs provide evidence that this trend is likely to continue. PMID:10129242

  2. Hospitality in College Composition Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haswell, Janis; Haswell, Richard; Blalock, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    There has been little discussion of hospitality as a practice in college writing courses. Possible misuses of hospitality as an educational and ethical practice are explored, and three traditional and still tenable modes of hospitality are described and historicized: Homeric, Judeo-Christian, and nomadic. Application of these modes to…

  3. Before Hospitalization: A Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Beverly H.

    1974-01-01

    A tour of the hospital, a puppet show, and a discussion period afterwards over lemonade and cookies are all part of one hospital's efforts to prepare children and their families for the hospitalization, surgery, or other experiences young patients must undergo. (Author/CS)

  4. Hospitality Studies: Escaping the Tyranny?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lashley, Conrad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore current strands in hospitality management education and research, and suggest that future programs should reflect a more social science informed content. Design/methodology/approach: The paper reviews current research in hospitality management education and in the study of hospitality and…

  5. Childrens Hospital Inservice Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Joan

    A description is provided of a 15-month, in-service nursing education program at Childrens Hospital (Los Angeles, California). The first sections of the paper describe Childrens Hospital and provide a rationale for the hospital-based program. A listing of program goals and objectives is also provided, indicating that the curriculum is designed to…

  6. Library Hospitality: Some Preliminary Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric D. M.; Kazmer, Michelle M.

    2011-01-01

    Library scholars and practitioners have frequently reflected on the various factors that in combination make up a hospitable library, but there has been little theoretical synthesis of the notion of the library as a place of hospitality. The hospitality industry provides a rich vein of theoretical material from which to draw definitions of…

  7. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  8. Measuring comparative hospital performance.

    PubMed

    Griffith, John R; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Jelinek, Richard C

    2002-01-01

    Leading healthcare provider organizations now use a "balanced scorecard" of performance measures, expanding information reviewed at the governance level to include financial, customer, and internal performance information, as well as providing an opportunity to learn and grow to provide better strategic guidance. The approach, successfully used by other industries, uses competitor data and benchmarks to identify opportunities for improved mission achievement. This article evaluates one set of nine multidimensional hospital performance measures derived from Medicare reports (cash flow, asset turnover, mortality, complications, length of inpatient stay, cost per case, occupancy, change in occupancy, and percent of revenue from outpatient care). The study examines the content validity, reliability and sensitivity, validity of comparison, and independence and concludes that seven of the nine measures (all but the two occupancy measures) represent a potentially useful set for evaluating most U.S. hospitals. This set reflects correctable differences in performance between hospitals serving similar populations, that is, the measures reflect relative performance and identify opportunities to make the organization more successful. PMID:11836965

  9. [The hospital ship Jutlandia].

    PubMed

    Winge, M

    1996-01-01

    The Danish contribution to the United Nations action during the Korean War (1950-52) was the hospital ship "Jutlandia". The motorvessel Jutlandia - 8.500 tons - was built by the Nakskov Shipyard in 1934, and was rebuilt in three months at the same shipyard to a modern hospital ship with 300 beds, 3 operating theatres, a dental clinic, an x-ray department etc. The crew and the hospital staff consisted approximately each of 100 persons. Jutlandia sailed for Korea on Jan. 23. 1951 and the expedition ended in Copenhagen on Oct. 16. 1953. On the first two cruises the ship was stationed at Pusan. During the first period mostly as an "evacuation sick-bay" and during the second period the ship was opened for Korean military and civil patients, and extensive help was given to the local population on shore. While in Denmark between the second and third cruise a helicopter deck was installed and the operating theatre for neuro-surgery was changed to an opthalmic clinic. This time the ship was stationed at the Bay of Ichon so close to the front, that the wounded could be admitted directly from the advanced dressing stations. On the return journeys to Europe patients were sailed to their home countries. Commodore Kai Hammerich was in charge of the expedition and captain Christen Kondrup was in charge of the ship, throughout the whole expedition. PMID:11625136

  10. Mother-baby friendly hospital.

    PubMed

    Aragon-choudhury, P

    1996-01-01

    In Manila, the Philippines, the Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital has been a maternity hospital for 75 years. It averages 90 deliveries a day. Its fees are P200-P500 for a normal delivery and P800-P2000 for a cesarean section. Patients pay what they can and pay the balance when they can. The hospital provides a safe motherhood package that encompasses teaching responsible parenthood, prenatal care, labor, delivery, postpartum care, breast feeding, family planning, and child survival. In 1986, the hospital introduced innovative policies and procedures that promote, protect, and support breast feeding. It has a rooming-in policy that has saved the hospital P6.5 million so far. In the prenatal stage, hospital staff inform pregnant women that colostrum protects the newborn against infections, that suckling stimulates milk production, and that there is no basis to the claim of having insufficient breast milk. Sales representatives of milk substitutes are banned from the hospital. Staff confiscate milk bottles or formula. A lactation management team demonstrates breast feeding procedures. Mothers also receive support on the correct way of breast feeding from hospital staff, volunteers from the Catholic Women's League, consumer groups, and women lawyers. The hospital's policy is no breast milk, no discharge. This encourages mothers to motivate each other to express milk immediately after birth. The hospital has received numerous awards for its breast feeding promotion efforts. UNICEF has designated Fabella Hospital as a model of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. The hospital serves as the National Lactation Management Education Training Center. People from other developing countries have received training in lactation management here. The First Lady of the Philippines, the First Lady of the US, and the Queen of Spain have all visited the hospital. The hospital has also integrated its existing services into a women's health care center. PMID:12347466

  11. Hospital mergers and market overlap.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, G R; Jones, V G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To address two questions: What are the characteristics of hospitals that affect the likelihood of their being involved in a merger? What characteristics of particular pairs of hospitals affect the likelihood of the pair engaging in a merger? DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Hospitals in the 12 county region surrounding the San Francisco Bay during the period 1983 to 1992 were the focus of the study. Data were drawn from secondary sources, including the Lexis/Nexis database, the American Hospital Association, and the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development of the State of California. STUDY DESIGN: Seventeen hospital mergers during the study period were identified. A random sample of pairs of hospitals that did not merge was drawn to establish a statistically efficient control set. Models constructed from hypotheses regarding hospital and market characteristics believed to be related to merger likelihood were tested using logistic regression analysis. DATA COLLECTION: See Data Sources/Study Setting. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis shows that the likelihood of a merger between a particular pair of hospitals is positively related to the degree of market overlap that exists between them. Furthermore, market overlap and performance difference interact in their effect on merger likelihood. In an analysis of individual hospitals, conditions of rivalry, hospital market share, and hospital size were not found to influence the likelihood that a hospital will engage in a merger. CONCLUSIONS: Mergers between hospitals are not driven directly by considerations of market power or efficiency as much as by the existence of specific merger opportunities in the hospitals' local markets. Market overlap is a condition that enables a merger to occur, but other factors, such as the relative performance levels of the hospitals in question and their ownership and teaching status, also play a role in influencing the likelihood that a merger will in fact take place. PMID

  12. [Hospital infection--ethical aspects].

    PubMed

    Hossne, W S

    1995-01-01

    The author focuses the question of hospital infection, analysing the background on which the control committees were created. The hospital infection is discussed under bioethical principles and the Medical Ethics Code, examining the aspects related to the government, the Hospital Directorship, the Committee and the Control Service of Hospital Infection, and the assisting physician. A closer integration between the activities of the Program of Control of Hospital Infections and those of the Medical Ethics Committee is proposed, aiming at the patient and at the community, "targets of total medical attention". PMID:7550409

  13. Hospital Acquisitions Before Healthcare Reform.

    PubMed

    McCue, Michael J; Thompson, Jon M; Kim, Tae Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The hospital industry has experienced increased consolidation in the past 20 years. Since 2010, in particular, there has been a large rise in the number of hospital acquisitions, and observers have suggested this is due in part to the expected impact of federal healthcare reform legislation. This article reports on a study undertaken to identify the market, management, and financial factors affecting acute care, community hospitals acquired between 2010 and 2012. We identified 77 such hospitals and compared them to other acute care facilities. To assess how different factors were associated with acquisitions, the study used multiple logistic regressions whereby market factors were included first, followed by management and financial factors. Study findings show that acquired hospitals were located in markets with lower rates of preferred provider organization (PPO) penetration compared with nonacquired hospitals. Occupancy rate was found to be inversely related to acquisition rate; however, case-mix index was significantly and positively related to a hospital's being acquired. Financial factors negatively associated with a hospital's being acquired included age of plant and cash flow margin. In contrast to the findings from earlier studies of hospital acquisitions, our results showed that acquired hospitals possessed newer assets. However, similar to the findings of other studies, the cash flow margin of acquired hospitals was lower than that of nonacquired facilities. PMID:26554263

  14. [Success factors in hospital management].

    PubMed

    Heberer, M

    1998-12-01

    The hospital environment of most Western countries is currently undergoing dramatic changes. Competition among hospitals is increasing, and economic issues have become decisive factors for the allocation of medical care. Hospitals therefore require management tools to respond to these changes adequately. The balanced scorecard is a method of enabling development and implementation of a business strategy that equally respects the financial requirements, the needs of the customers, process development, and organizational learning. This method was used to derive generally valid success factors for hospital management based on an analysis of an academic hospital in Switzerland. Strategic management, the focus of medical services, customer orientation, and integration of professional groups across the hospital value chain were identified as success factors for hospital management. PMID:10023551

  15. In-Hospital Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Between 2.2% and 17% of all strokes have symptom onset during hospitalization in a patient originally admitted for another diagnosis or procedure. These in-hospital strokes represent a unique population with different risk factors, more mimics, and substantially worsened outcomes compared to community-onset strokes. The fact that these strokes manifest during the acute care hospitalization, in patients with higher rates of thrombolytic contraindications, creates distinct challenges for treatment. However, the best evidence suggests benefit to treating appropriately selected in-hospital ischemic strokes with thrombolysis. Evidence points toward a “quality gap” for in-hospital stroke with longer in-hospital delays to evaluation and treatment, lower rates of evaluation for etiology, and decreased adherence to consensus quality process measures of care. This quality gap for in-hospital stroke represents a focused opportunity for quality improvement. PMID:26288675

  16. Hospital mission and cost differences.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, E A

    1989-01-01

    The results show no significant differences on average length of stay, cost per patient day, or cost per admission among non-profit, government, and for-profit hospitals when controlling for bed capacities, occupancy rates, number of Medicare/Medicaid days, and hospitals without nurseries. For-profit hospital manhours per patient day were significantly lower than non-profit and government hospitals. This is an important finding because patient-care delivery is labor-intensive. A majority of for-profit hospitals do not have nurseries, which means that they should have more manhours per patient day. As indicated earlier, the manhours for hospitals with nurseries are higher than those for hospitals without nurseries. This indicates cost-cutting behavior on the part of a majority of for-profit hospitals. This method of limiting expenditures by decreasing labor costs associated with certain services is consistent with profit-maximization. The findings of this study with regard to cost differences among non-profit and for-profit hospitals contradict previous research. However, a recent study by Kralewski, Gifford and Porter (1988) noted that whereas ownership, when considered alone, differentiates hospitals, when evaluated within each community, most of the investor-owned and non-for-profit hospital differences disappear. Similar questions have been raised as to whether non-profit hospitals truly differ from for-profit hospitals (Pauly 1987). Caution needs to be exercised in attempting to extrapolate the findings of this study, because of the dynamic health care environment. Hospital ownership changes over time, reimbursement rules affect behavior, and internal factors in organizational operation affect outcomes. These should be considered in future studies exploring organizational mission and cost differences. PMID:10293600

  17. Simulation in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Proctor, T

    1996-01-01

    Health care costs continue to rise because increased demand for services and limited budgets put pressure on resources, however efficiently they may be used. Proposes discrete event simulation as an effective tool in the search for more efficient health care systems. Looks at the application of a desktop computer simulation package to model part of a hospital subsystem. The simulation package shows how efficiency might be improved by moderating available resources and times taken to complete tasks. Maintains that the principles expounded here are applicable to many different aspects of health care management. PMID:10161783

  18. Hospital board extramural services.

    PubMed

    Wright-St Clair, R E

    1981-12-23

    A hospital board has an obligation to provide services in the community but it is essential that those extramural services act in collaboration with and not in competition with all other services in the community. In particular, it is essential that we maintain the primacy of general practice and in return the general practitioner must accept full responsibility for the care of his patients in their homes, rehabilitation and encouraging the maximum possible independence on the part of the patients and their families must be the constant theme of the extramural services. PMID:6950292

  19. [Family and psychiatric hospitalization in a general hospital].

    PubMed

    de Mello, Rita Mello; Schneider, Jacó Fernando

    2011-06-01

    This study aims to identify the reasons that lead relatives to hospitalize patients in a psychiatric unit of a general hospital. It is a qualitative study based on Alfred Schutz' phenomenological sociology. Fourteen relatives, each with one family member hospitalized, were interviewed from August to October 2009. The guiding question of the phenomenological interview was "What do you expect from psychiatric hospitalization in a general hospital?". Phenomenological sociology was used to understand and interpret the interviews. Statements showed three concrete categories, that lead to the reasons for: treatment guidelines and continuity; prospects for improvement; ideas about normality. This research shows the experiences of relatives, contributing with mental health professionals' reflection about their actions and about the involvement of families in a general hospital's psychiatric unit. PMID:21987981

  20. Electronic Cigarettes on Hospital Campuses

    PubMed Central

    Meernik, Clare; Baker, Hannah M.; Paci, Karina; Fischer-Brown, Isaiah; Dunlap, Daniel; Goldstein, Adam O.

    2015-01-01

    Smoke and tobacco-free policies on hospital campuses have become more prevalent across the U.S. and Europe, de-normalizing smoking and reducing secondhand smoke exposure on hospital grounds. Concerns about the increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and the impact of such use on smoke and tobacco-free policies have arisen, but to date, no systematic data describes e-cigarette policies on hospital campuses. The study surveyed all hospitals in North Carolina (n = 121) to assess what proportion of hospitals have developed e-cigarette policies, how policies have been implemented and communicated, and what motivators and barriers have influenced the development of e-cigarette regulations. Seventy-five hospitals (62%) completed the survey. Over 80% of hospitals reported the existence of a policy regulating the use of e-cigarettes on campus and roughly half of the hospitals without a current e-cigarette policy are likely to develop one within the next year. Most e-cigarette policies have been incorporated into existing tobacco-free policies with few reported barriers, though effective communication of e-cigarette policies is lacking. The majority of hospitals strongly agree that e-cigarette use on campus should be prohibited for staff, patients, and visitors. Widespread incorporation of e-cigarette policies into existing hospital smoke and tobacco-free campus policies is feasible but needs communication to staff, patients, and visitors. PMID:26729142

  1. Design of paediatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Veronica

    2016-05-01

    The impact of healthcare environments on children and young people's (CYP) health and psychosocial wellbeing has attracted much attention in recent years. This sits within the realm of the political drive for enhanced awareness of the need to take account of the rights and voice of the child. Perhaps as a direct result of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, and recognition from evidence in adult population studies of the impact of healthcare environments on psychosocial healing, contemporary times have witnessed a discernible movement towards enhancing quality care by promoting child and adolescent-friendly hospital environments. The Council of Europe guidelines on child-friendly health care moved to place the rights and needs of children at the heart of health care. The Council acknowledges that the delivery of child-oriented services, which includes the notion of family-centred care, should be delivered in child and family friendly environments. However, knowledge about what constitutes a child-friendly healthcare environment from CYP's perspective is often lacking with hospital architectural blueprints predominantly designed around adult proxy-reported assumptions about the needs and desires of children. PMID:27214414

  2. Hospitals focus on physician relations.

    PubMed

    Rubright, R

    1987-09-01

    Many hospital administrators are shifting their marketing focus from consumers and referral agents to the hospital's attending physicians. These new comprehensive physician relations or retention programs are much broader than those implemented in the past and are used to build mutual exchanges between hospitals and physicians, sharpen the physicians' awareness of the hospital's most appealing attributes, compete with nearby hospitals that develop their own aggressive physician relations programs, and ensure a more promising financial picture for both parties. "Cutting-edge" physician relations plans in Catholic hospitals include the following: Marketing plans for the medical staff alone or with key medical staff sections; A strong physician data base; A physician referral system; A director of medical affairs; Practice enhancement and business assistance services; A young physicians section; Continuing marketing auditing and research into physicians' opinions, attitudes, and behavior patterns; Physician inclusion in all major programs, services, policies, and events; Programs for physician office staff; Marketing committees consisting of physicians. PMID:10283486

  3. Union Density and Hospital Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Koys, Daniel J; Martin, Wm Marty; LaVan, Helen; Katz, Marsha

    2015-01-01

    The authors address the hospital outcomes of patient satisfaction, healthcare quality, and net income per bed. They define union density as the percentage of a hospital's employees who are in unions, healthcare quality as its 30-day acute myocardial infraction (AMI; heart attack) mortality rate, and patient satisfaction as its overall Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems score. Using a random sample of 84 union and 84 nonunion hospitals from across the United States, multiple regression analyses show that union density is negatively related to patient satisfaction. Union density is not related to healthcare quality as measured by the AMI mortality rate or to net income per bed. This implies that unions per se are not good or bad for hospitals. The authors suggest that it is better for hospital administrators to take a Balanced Scorecard approach and be concerned about employee satisfaction, patient satisfaction, healthcare quality, and net income. PMID:26652043

  4. RFID solution benefits Cambridge hospital.

    PubMed

    James, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    Keeping track of thousands of pieces of equipment in a busy hospital environment is a considerable challenge, but, according to RFID tagging and asset tracking specialist, Harland Simon, RFID technology can make the task considerably simpler. Here Andrew James, the company's RFID sales manager, describes the positive benefits the technology has brought the Medical Equipment Library (MEL) at Addenbrooke's Hospital, one of the world's most famous teaching hospitals. PMID:24341115

  5. Cottage hospitals: an evident future.

    PubMed

    Davidson, N

    1980-05-23

    When Nick Davidson visited the Yeatman Cottage Hospital in Sherborne, Dorset, he found a beautiful country town with a history and a hospital with its roots in the past. It has grown to be not only part of the present, but a model for the future. As he toured Sherborne Abbey, in the process of restoration thanks to the public's generosity, he reflected on the town's other 'good cause'--the Yeatman Cottage Hospital. PMID:10297860

  6. IK Brunel's Crimean war hospital.

    PubMed

    Merridew, C G

    2014-07-01

    "Those wonderful huts…" (Florence Nightingale). This is the story of the British Civil Hospital, erected in 1855 at Renkioi on the south Dardanelles coast of Turkey. The spectacular hospital was a portable one designed by British engineer IK Brunel. It was his only health-related project, and it was known as a Civil Hospital because its staff were all civilians, despite its patients being military. PMID:25196954

  7. Lower Mortality in Magnet Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Kelly, Lesly A.; Smith, Herbert L.; Wu, Evan S.; Vanak, Jill M.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although there is evidence that hospitals recognized for nursing excellence—Magnet hospitals—are successful in attracting and retaining nurses, it is uncertain whether Magnet recognition is associated with better patient outcomes than non-Magnets, and if so why. Objectives To determine whether Magnet hospitals have lower risk-adjusted mortality and failure-to-rescue compared with non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the most likely explanations. Method and Study Design Analysis of linked patient, nurse, and hospital data on 56 Magnet and 508 non-Magnet hospitals. Logistic regression models were used to estimate differences in the odds of mortality and failure-to-rescue for surgical patients treated in Magnet versus non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the extent to which differences in outcomes can be explained by nursing after accounting for patient and hospital differences. Results Magnet hospitals had significantly better work environments and higher proportions of nurses with bachelor's degrees and specialty certification. These nursing factors explained much of the Magnet hospital effect on patient outcomes. However, patients treated in Magnet hospitals had 14% lower odds of mortality (odds ratio 0.86; 95% confidence interval, 0.76–0.98; P = 0.02) and 12% lower odds of failure-to-rescue (odds ratio 0.88; 95% confidence interval, 0.77–1.01; P = 0.07) while controlling for nursing factors as well as hospital and patient differences. Conclusions The lower mortality we find in Magnet hospitals is largely attributable to measured nursing characteristics but there is a mortality advantage above and beyond what we could measure. Magnet recognition identifies existing quality and stimulates further positive organizational behavior that improves patient outcomes. PMID:24022082

  8. Lower Mortality in Magnet Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Kelly, Lesly A.; Smith, Herbert L.; Wu, Evan S.; Vanak, Jill M.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although there is evidence that hospitals recognized for nursing excellence— Magnet hospitals—are successful in attracting and retaining nurses, it is uncertain whether Magnet recognition is associated with better patient outcomes than non-Magnets, and if so why. Objectives To determine whether Magnet hospitals have lower risk-adjusted mortality and failure-to-rescue compared to non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the most likely explanations. Method and Study Design Analysis of linked patient, nurse, and hospital data on 56 Magnet and 508 non-Magnet hospitals. Logistic regression models were used to estimate differences in the odds of mortality and failure-to-rescue for surgical patients treated in Magnet vs. non-Magnet hospitals, and to determine the extent to which differences in outcomes can be explained by nursing after accounting for patient and hospital differences. Results Magnet hospitals had significantly better work environments and higher proportions of nurses with bachelor’s degrees and specialty certification. These nursing factors explained much of the Magnet hospital effect on patient outcomes. However, patients treated in Magnet hospitals had 14% lower odds of mortality (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.76-0.98, p=0.02) and 12% lower odds of failure-to-rescue (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.77-1.01, p=0.07) while controlling for nursing factors as well as hospital and patient differences. Conclusions Magnet hospitals have lower mortality than is fully accounted for by measured characteristics of nursing. Magnet recognition likely both identifies existing quality and stimulates further positive organizational behavior that improves patient outcomes. PMID:23047129

  9. Wearing gloves in the hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Infection control - wearing gloves; Patient safety - wearing gloves; Personal protective equipment - wearing gloves; PPE - wearing gloves; Nosocomial infection - wearing gloves; Hospital acquired infection - wearing gloves

  10. Hunger: a hospital survey.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, E; Bernabo, L

    1992-01-01

    Patients at a New York City municipal hospital were surveyed in 1985 and 1989 to ascertain the extent of hunger and its possible correlates. Twenty-two percent (22%) of the 382 subjects in 1985 and 23% of the 332 subjects in 1989 experienced hunger. Hunger was related significantly to homelessness, social isolation and the physical inability to buy and/or prepare food. Between 1985 and 1989, there was a large increase in the use of institutional resources for food; a decline in reliance on Food Stamps; and an increase in household density. Inpatients were found to be poorer than outpatients, and to rely more heavily upon soup kitchens. Practice, policy and research implications are noted. PMID:1589827

  11. Practice and hospital economics.

    PubMed

    Senagore, Anthony J

    2006-08-01

    There has been a significant effort over the past 10 years to attempt to control the rate of increase in the cost of medical care. However, as is true of any economic system, there are multiple stakeholders involved and often competing motivations. The single largest source of medical inflation is the cost of pharmaceuticals; however, this topic is not directly discussed in this article Similarly, the cost of medical insurance products is not included as these issues cannot be directly addressed by physician behavior. The body of this discussion focuses on costs directly experienced by or potentially controlled by physicians. These areas include practice expense and margin and hospital direct costs and margin. It is essential for physicians to understand fully factors they can potentially control and areas they may be able to influence in this troubling era of cost containment. PMID:20011377

  12. Pre-hospital emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark H; Habig, Karel; Wright, Christopher; Hughes, Amy; Davies, Gareth; Imray, Chirstopher H E

    2015-12-19

    Pre-hospital care is emergency medical care given to patients before arrival in hospital after activation of emergency medical services. It traditionally incorporated a breadth of care from bystander resuscitation to statutory emergency medical services treatment and transfer. New concepts of care including community paramedicine, novel roles such as emergency care practitioners, and physician delivered pre-hospital emergency medicine are re-defining the scope of pre-hospital care. For severely ill or injured patients, acting quickly in the pre-hospital period is crucial with decisions and interventions greatly affecting outcomes. The transfer of skills and procedures from hospital care to pre-hospital medicine enables early advanced care across a range of disciplines. The variety of possible pathologies, challenges of environmental factors, and hazardous situations requires management that is tailored to the patient's clinical need and setting. Pre-hospital clinicians should be generalists with a broad understanding of medical, surgical, and trauma pathologies, who will often work from locally developed standard operating procedures, but who are able to revert to core principles. Pre-hospital emergency medicine consists of not only clinical care, but also logistics, rescue competencies, and scene management skills (especially in major incidents, which have their own set of management principles). Traditionally, research into the hyper-acute phase (the first hour) of disease has been difficult, largely because physicians are rarely present and issues of consent, transport expediency, and resourcing of research. However, the pre-hospital phase is acknowledged as a crucial period, when irreversible pathology and secondary injury to neuronal and cardiac tissue can be prevented. The development of pre-hospital emergency medicine into a sub-specialty in its own right should bring focus to this period of care. PMID:26738719

  13. Faculty Internships for Hospitality Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Christine; Hales, Jonathan A; Wiener, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Internships can help hospitality faculty build industry relationships while also ensuring the best and most current training for their students. Many hospitality organizations have structured faculty internships available or are willing to work with faculty to provide individualized internship opportunities. Career and technical educators in…

  14. Comparing Candidate Hospital Report Cards

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, T.L.; Rivenburgh, R.D.; Scovel, J.C.; White, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    We present graphical and analytical methods that focus on multivariate outlier detection applied to the hospital report cards data. No two methods agree which hospitals are unusually good or bad, so we also present ways to compare the agreement between two methods. We identify factors that have a significant impact on the scoring.

  15. Partners: group practices and hospitals.

    PubMed

    Schryver, D L

    1990-02-01

    Many hospital executives see the emergence of medical group practices as a threat to their autonomy. However, the degree of future success of hospitals and group practices may depend on their willingness and ability to develop common goals and strategies. PMID:10106349

  16. Latex in the Hospital Environment

    MedlinePlus

    LATEX in the Hospital Environment Updated Fall 2015 This list provides a guide to some of the most common objects containing latex and offers some ... remover–Sepha Pharm) 1 LATEX in the Hospital Environment (continued) Frequently contains LATEX OR/Infection Control masks, ...

  17. Management of the Hospital Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Alvis G.

    1976-01-01

    Hospital studies indicate the need for an environmental/sanitarian specialist for control of nosocomial infection and maintenance of a quality environment. The author recommends these requirements for certification as a hospital environmentalist: academic studies including toxicology, epidemiology, hygiene, management, and an internship in…

  18. Hospitality Management Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brotherton, Bob, Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Seven articles on hospitality management training discuss the following: computerized management games for restaurant manager training, work placement, real-life exercises, management information systems in hospitality degree programs, modular programming, service quality concepts in the curriculum, and General National Vocational Qualifications…

  19. Practicing Hospitality in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burwell, Rebecca; Huyser, Mackenzi

    2013-01-01

    This article explores pedagogical approaches to teaching students how to practice hospitality toward the other. Using case examples from the college classroom, the authors discuss the roots of Christian hospitality and educational theory on transformative learning to explore how students experience engaging with others after they have…

  20. Segmentation in local hospital markets.

    PubMed

    Dranove, D; White, W D; Wu, L

    1993-01-01

    This study examines evidence of market segmentation on the basis of patients' insurance status, demographic characteristics, and medical condition in selected local markets in California in the years 1983 and 1989. Substantial differences exist in the probability patients may be admitted to particular hospitals based on insurance coverage, particularly Medicaid, and race. Segmentation based on insurance and race is related to hospital characteristics, but not the characteristics of the hospital's community. Medicaid patients are more likely to go to hospitals with lower costs and fewer service offerings. Privately insured patients go to hospitals offering more services, although cost concerns are increasing. Hispanic patients also go to low-cost hospitals, ceteris paribus. Results indicate little evidence of segmentation based on medical condition in either 1983 or 1989, suggesting that "centers of excellence" have yet to play an important role in patient choice of hospital. The authors found that distance matters, and that patients prefer nearby hospitals, moreso for some medical conditions than others, in ways consistent with economic theories of consumer choice. PMID:8417270

  1. No place like the hospital.

    PubMed

    Gillick, Muriel R; Sabin, James E

    2011-10-01

    The gold standard for end-of-life care is home hospice. A case is presented in which a patient dying of irreversible small bowel obstruction from metastatic cancer insisted on remaining in the acute care hospital for care when alternative sites of care, including a skilled nursing facility and residential hospice, were available to her and covered by her health insurance plan. The ethical issues raised by this case are discussed from the perspective of the patient, the clinical team, the hospital, and the insurance company. Over the past decade, hospital-based palliative care consultation and general inpatient hospice care have sought to improve the quality of dying in the hospital. To the extent that such efforts have been successful, they may result in increasing demand for the hospital as the site for terminal care in the future. PMID:21889294

  2. Gynaecological referrals to Baragwanath Hospital.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, E; Ephraim, G; Kathawaroo, S

    1994-04-01

    Three hundred and fifty-nine consecutive referral letters to Baragwanath Hospital's gynaecological outpatients' department were analysed. Letters from private doctors contained significantly less clinical information than those from clinics. Only 11% of referring private doctors mentioned what treatment they had given patients before sending them to hospital. Soweto clinic nurses tended to include more information in their letters than clinic doctors. There were no significant differences in the number of appropriate referrals and incorrect diagnoses from private doctors, clinic doctors and clinic nurses respectively. The poor communication, especially between general practitioners and the hospital, is probably the result of overwork and lack of time. Hospital doctors should reply to well-written referral letters, and liaison between clinics and the hospital ought to be improved and expanded. PMID:7974041

  3. [In-hospital emergency management].

    PubMed

    Jantzen, Tanja; Fischer, Matthias; Müller, Michael P; Seewald, Stephan; Wnent, Jan; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten

    2013-06-01

    5-10% of in-hospital patients are affected by adverse events, 10% of these requiring CPR. Standardized in-hospital emergency management may improve results, including reduction of mortality, hospital stay and cost. Early warning scores and clinical care outreach teams may help to identify patients at risk and should be combined with standard operation procedure and consented alarm criteria. These teams of doctors and nurses should be called for all in hospital emergencies, providing high-end care and initiate ICU measures at bedside. In combination with standard means of documentation assessment and evaluation--including entry in specific registers--the quality of in-hospital emergency management and patient safety could be improved. PMID:23828085

  4. New directions in hospital governance.

    PubMed

    Shortell, S M

    1989-01-01

    This article suggests new directions for hospital governance to meet the demands of a rapidly changing health care environment. Board members must increasingly play roles as risk takers, strategic directors, experts, mentors, and evaluators. Lessons from other industries regarding risk taking, use of expertise, and streamlining decision making must be adapted to meet hospital needs. Recent data suggest that these needs may still differ by hospital ownership despite a convergence in investor-owned and not-for-profit corporate structures. The effectiveness of hospital boards in the future will depend on their ability to: (1) manage a diverse group of stakeholders; (2) involve physicians in the management and governance process; (3) meet the governance needs of multi-institutional systems and hospital restructuring; (4) meet the challenges of diversification and vertical integration; and (5) understand strategy formulation and implementation as interdependent and interrelated processes. PMID:10303235

  5. Studies of Total Electron Content variations at low-latitude stations within the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilian, Olatunbosun

    2016-07-01

    The total electron content (TEC) is an important parameter to monitor for possible space weather impacts. The radio waves that pass through the earth's ionosphere travel more slowly than their free space velocity due to group path delay of the ionosphere. This group path delay is directly proportional to the TEC of the ionosphere. Using dual frequency GPS receiver at low latitude stations of Ile-Ife (7.52oN, 4.28oE), Addis Ababa (9.04oN, 38.77oE) and Bangalore (13.03oE, 77.57oE), all located within 0 - 15oN of the equatorial anomaly region, the measurement of ionospheric TEC for 2012 has been carried out. The data from the three stations were used to study the diurnal, monthly and seasonal variations of TEC. The diurnal variations maximize between 10:00 - 16:00UT, 08:00 - 14:00UT and 06:00 - 12:00UT for Ile-Ife, Addis Ababa and Bangalore stations respectively. The diurnal variations showed wave-like pertubation during disturbed and quiet periods at Bangalore and Addis Ababa stations. The monthly average TEC variations showed that the month of March recorded the highest TEC value of ~59TECu at about 16:00UT in Ile-Ife station, while TEC at Addis Ababa and Bangalore maximize in October with ~72TECu and 65TECu at about 11:00UT and 09:00UT respectively. Seasonal variations showed that TEC maximizes during the equinoctial months and least in summer, over the three stations. Keywords: Total Electron Content, Equatorial Ionization Anomaly, Global Positioning System co-author:E.A. Ariyibi(Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria)

  6. Development aid: manna or myth?

    PubMed

    Horton, R

    2000-09-23

    In Ethiopia, obstetricians from Australia and New Zealand set up in 1975 the Addis Ababa Fistula Hospital to cater to women with fistula who were being turned away from local clinics. This kind of development assistance seems an ideal to be replicated--humane, skilled, practical, a mix of charitable and government aid, meeting an urgent clinical need, and enabling new knowledge to be passed on to locally trained doctors. However, the Fistula Hospital raises many troubling issues about its sustainability in a politically and economically unstable environment. It is important to recognize that the needs of Third World societies are completely different from their Western counterparts. Part of the problem lies in the unequal power relationship, availability of research funding, trained scientists, information, and equipment. Moreover, the highjacking of clinical and research agendas by Western organizations causes profound insult to the poor countries. Overall, it is noted that research is a significant means of achieving a sustainable health infrastructure. It is essential that development be viewed as a respectful dialogue and not the colonization of the imagination of other societies. Development, in this formulation, is not only development as freedom from deprivation and oppression but also the development of a common horizon or perspective. PMID:11009134

  7. Current views on liver diseases in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tsega, E

    1977-04-01

    The chief causes of liver disease in Ethiopia are reviewed, considering hospital data on admissions for hepatitis, cirrhosis, ascites and hepatoma. Liver diseases account for 11.4% of all medical admissions in 3 medical wards in Addis Ababa. The causes are viral hepatitis, post- hepatic and post necrotic and mixed cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Alcoholic cirrhosis is rare. Viral hepatitis with shivering, rigor and fever and elevated direct bilirubin levels are common in Ethiopians, especially in child-bearing women. The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is often associated with hepatitis. The disease may be transmitted by several species of mosquitoes, placental transmission, or feces, urine, saliva or semen. Blood products are not screened for hepatitis B. Cirrhosis is common, and causes significant mortality, usually from esophageal varices and hepatic coma. Chronic active hepatitis patients may live for a time, especially if they are near a hospital and are treated with steroids. In Ethiopia presenting symptoms for hepatoma are anorexia, weight loss, persistent, burning, right upper quadrant pain, and a hard, nodular, tender RUQ mass. Over 5% of malignancies seen are primary hepatocellular carcinomas. 50% have HBsAG, compared to 3.8% of controls. 65% have alpha-fetoglobulins. It is suggested that some viral hepatitis cases progress to cirrhosis, of which some go on to hepatocellular carcinoma. Herbal medicines, aflatoxins and other toxins may also contribute to liver disease. PMID:201462

  8. National survey of hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bruster, S.; Jarman, B.; Bosanquet, N.; Weston, D.; Erens, R.; Delbanco, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To survey patients' opinions of their experiences in hospital in order to produce data that can help managers and doctors to identify and solve problems. DESIGN--Random sample of 36 NHS hospitals, stratified by size of hospital (number of beds), area (north, midlands, south east, south west), and type of hospital (teaching or non-teaching, trust or directly managed). From each hospital a random sample of, on average, 143 patients was interviewed at home or the place of discharge two to four weeks after discharge by means of a structured questionnaire about their treatment in hospital. SUBJECTS--5150 randomly chosen NHS patients recently discharged from acute hospitals in England. Subjects had been patients on medical and surgical wards apart from paediatric, maternity, psychiatric, and geriatric wards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patients' responses to direct questions about preadmission procedures, admission, communication with staff, physical care, tests and operations, help from staff, pain management, and discharge planning. Patients' responses to general questions about their degree of satisfaction in hospitals. RESULTS--Problems were reported by patients, particularly with regard to communication with staff (56% (2824/5020) had not been given written or printed information); pain management (33% (1042/3162) of those suffering pain were in pain all or most of the time); and discharge planning (70% (3599/5124) had not been told about warning signs and 62% (3177/5119) had not been told when to resume normal activities). Hospitals failed to reach the standards of the Patient's Charter--for example, in explaining the treatment proposed and giving patients the option of not taking part in student training. Answers to questions about patient satisfaction were, however, highly positive but of little use to managers. CONCLUSIONS--This survey has highlighted several problems with treatment in NHS hospitals. Asking patients direct questions about what happened

  9. Physicians and foundation hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cooper, John; Black, Carol

    2003-01-01

    Foundation NHS Trusts will be constituted in the same way as Mutual Societies, and local people and patients will be invited to become subscribers. Subscribers will elect a board of governors who will appoint the non-executive directors of the Trusts. Foundation Trusts will be outside the performance management system, but will be subject to a regulator and to inspection. Contracts with commissioners will be legally enforceable. Issues discussed in the article include: financial borrowing; whether competition is being reintroduced; poaching staff; fears of a two-tier health service; fragmentation of the NHS; the impact on research and teaching; and the impact on the current 'target culture'. Local communities and patient groups may welcome involvement with their local hospitals, but special interest groups could be a danger. Foundation Trusts may bring back some of the better features of NHS Trusts as originally conceived, and offer better opportunities for clinicians to influence local policies and priorities. Fears of yet another organisational change are an important issue. Only time will tell whether the outcome will justify the effort the changes will involve. PMID:14703035

  10. The child in hospital*

    PubMed Central

    1955-01-01

    In 1951 the WHO Regional Office for Europe as a part of its long-term activities in child health initiated plans for a meeting between paediatricians and child psychiatrists, at which they could discuss their respective roles and the co-ordination of their work. Early in 1953 an ad hoc committee was called together to discuss the possibility of holding a conference which would delineate the role of the paediatrician in the management of psychosomatic and behaviour disorders in young children. This committee, consisting of leading specialists in paediatrics and child psychiatry, under the chairmanship of Professor R. Debré (France), felt that any wider conference should be devoted to considering more fully the inter-relation of somatic and psychological processes in sick children, the respective roles of paediatricians and child psychiatrists in their treatment, and the working relations between the different disciplines responsible for the care of children. In order to avoid diffusion of effort, and to arrive as far as possible at practical conclusions, the study group that was subsequently convened in Stockholm concentrated on one important aspect of child care—the child in hospital. PMID:14364192

  11. Appropriateness of hospital admissions in general hospitals in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Al-Tehewy, M; Shehad, E; Al Gaafary, M; Al-Houssiny, M; Nabih, D; Salem, B

    2009-01-01

    We measured the rate of inappropriate admissions, and associated factors, in 3 general hospitals in Egypt. A total of 1191 admissions were reviewed using the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol for adult patients and the Pediatric Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol for paediatric patients. Inappropriate admissions were 66.3% and 78.9% of admissions in the surgery departments of 2 hospitals compared with 1.9% in the 3rd hospital that followed a specific admission protocol for elective surgery. The paediatrics department had the lowest rates of inappropriate admissions in all hospitals (0%, 1.0% and 1.9%). On logistic regression analysis, the route of admission was the only factor significantly associated with inappropriate admissions in the departments of surgery, obstetrics/gynaecology and internal medicine. PMID:20214126

  12. Pesticide residues in drinking water and associated risk to consumers in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Mekonen, Seblework; Argaw, Roba; Simanesew, Aklilu; Houbraken, Michael; Senaeve, David; Ambelu, Argaw; Spanoghe, Pieter

    2016-11-01

    Access to safe and reliable drinking water is vital for a healthy population. However, surface water may be contaminated with pesticides because of the nearby agricultural areas as well as from household application. Water samples were collected from water sources in Jimma zone and Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The extraction and clean up of the samples were undertaken using liquid-solid and liquid-liquid methods. Human exposure was assessed by calculating the estimated daily intake (EDI) of pesticides in water and compared with the acceptable daily intake (ADI) and the acute reference dose (ARfD). The mean concentrations of 2,4-D, malathion, diazinon and fenpropimorph were 1.59-13.90 μg/l and 0.11-138 µg/l in Jimma and Addis Ababa water sources, respectively. The residue level of some of the pesticides were above the European drinking water guide line values, which is an indication of an illegal use of pesticides in the study areas. Concerning human health risk estimation, there was no acute risk (EDI < ARfD). However, chronic risks to human health were observed from exposure to diazinon and fenpropimorph (EDI > ADI) for Jimma and Addis Ababa populations, respectively. A comprehensive monitoring is required to reduce the level of pesticide residues in the water and to minimize particularly the long term human health risks. PMID:27501312

  13. The Status of Hospital Information Systems in Iranian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Jahanbakhsh, Maryam; Sharifi, Mohammed; Ayat, Masar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The area of e-Health is broad and has an excellent growth potential. An increasing number of experts believe that e-Health will fuel the next breakthroughs in health system improvements throughout the world, but there is frequent evidence of unsustainable use of e-Health systems in medical centres, particularly hospitals, for different reasons in different countries. Iran is also a developing country which is presently adopting this promising technology for its traditional healthcare delivery but there is not much information about the use of e-Health systems in its hospitals, and the weakness and opportunities of utilization of such Hospital Information Systems (HIS). Methods: For this research, a number of Hospitals from Isfahan, Iran, are selected using convenient sampling. E-health research professionals went there to observe their HIS and collect required data as a qualitative survey. The design of interview questions was based on the researchers’ experiences and knowledge in this area along with elementary interviews with experts on HIS utilization in hospitals. Results: Efficient administration of e-health implementation improves the quality of healthcare, reduces costs and medical errors, makes healthcare resources available to rural areas, etc. However, there are numerous issues affecting the successful utilization of e-health in Hospitals, such as a lack of a perfect HIS implementation plan and well-defined strategy, inadequate IT-security for the protection of e-health-related data, improper training and educational issues, legal challenges, privacy concerns, improper documentation of lessons learned, resistance to the application of new technologies, and finally a lack of recovery plan and disaster management. These results along with some informative stories are extracted from interview sessions to uncover associated challenges of HIS utilization in Iranian hospitals. Conclusion: The utilization of e-health in Iranian hospitals

  14. CDC Vital Signs: Hospital Actions Affect Breastfeeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips Hospital Actions Affect Breastfeeding Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... in many US hospitals do not fully support breastfeeding. Some of the Ten Steps on which hospitals ...

  15. Energy audits at 48 hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, E.

    1981-11-01

    Staff at the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) conducted energy audits at 48 hospitals in four states (New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee) between 1978 and 1980. Staff at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and ORAU developed and organized a computerized data base containing information from these audits. This paper describes the ORAU audit process; summarizes the data collected from these audits on hospital characteristics annual energy use, and the audit recommendations; and analyzes the audit data in terms of cost effectiveness, type of recommendations, and the relationship between potential energy saving and characteristics of the individual hospital.

  16. Preventable hospitalizations and socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Blustein, J; Hanson, K; Shea, S

    1998-01-01

    "Preventable" hospitalizations have been proposed as indicators of poor health plan performance. In this study of elderly Medicare beneficiaries, however, we found that preventable hospitalizations are also more common among elders of lower socioeconomic status (SES). The relationship persisted even when an up-to-date severity-of-illness adjustment system was used. To the extent that indicators of health plan "performance" reflect enrollees' characteristics, plans will be rewarded for marketing their services to wealthier, healthier, and better-educated patients. Further work is needed to clarify issues of accountability for preventable hospitalizations and other putative indices of health plan performance. PMID:9558796

  17. Hospital-based neuropsychological services.

    PubMed

    Sciara, A D

    1986-01-01

    Hospital-based neuropsychological services may provide the hospital with a new means of interfacing with the general medical community, especially neurologists and neurosurgeons. This could produce increased census through the evaluation and treatment of patients who may not have been referred to the psychiatric hospital previously. Additionally, it is a service that can be marketed to the legal community. The establishment of neuropsychological services is a relatively inexpensive project that requires little in the way of physical plant and personnel needs other than a qualified technician and neuropsychologist. PMID:10279536

  18. Potential for Hospital Based Corneal Retreival in Hassan District Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Melsakkare, Suresh Ramappa; Manipur, Sahana R.; Acharya, Pavana; Ramamurthy, Lakshmi Bomalapura

    2015-01-01

    Context In developing countries, corneal diseases are the second leading cause of blindness. This corneal blindness can be treated through corneal transplantation. Though the present infrastructure is strong enough to increase keratoplasty numbers at a required rate, India has largest corneal blind population in the world. So a constant supply of high quality donor corneal tissue is the key factor for reduction of prevalence of corneal blindness. Considering the magnitude of corneal blindness and shortage of donor cornea, there is a huge gap in the demand and supply. Aim To study the potential for hospital based retrieval of donor corneal tissue in Hassan district hospital after analysing the indicated and contraindicated causes of deaths, so that hospital corneal retrieval program in Hassan district hospital can be planned. Materials and Methods The cross-sectional, retrospective and record-based study included all hospital deaths with age group more than two years occurred during one year period (January 2014 to December 2014). Data regarding demographic profile, cause of death, treatment given and presence of any systemic diseases were collected. The causes of deaths which are contraindicated for the retrieval of corneas were analysed and noted. The contraindications were based on the NPCB guidelines for standard of eye banking in India 2009. Results Out of 855 deaths, number of deaths in males (565) was greater than females (290). Numbers of deaths were highest between 41-60 years age group (343). Deaths due to HIV, septicaemia, meningitis, encephalitis, disseminated malignancies were contraindicated for corneal retrieval. Corneas could be retrieved from 736 deaths out of 855. Potential for corneal retrieval in a period of one year in Hassan District hospital was 86%. Conclusion Hospital corneal retrieval program has got a great potential to bridge the gap between the need for the cornea and actually collected corneas which will contribute enormously in

  19. [General coordination of hospital activity].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Paz; Serra, José Antonio

    2005-03-01

    The present article describes the organizational and general coordination measures taken by the hospital management to attend the 325 victims who arrived at our hospital after the terrorist attack on the morning of 11 March. Firstly, we summarize the activity performed by the extra-hospital emergency services and the distribution of the victims in centers. Secondly, we describe in greater detail the interventions performed to initiate the External Emergency Action Plan in our hospital, the triage system and identification of patients who used it, as well as the resources in terms of beds, operating rooms and personnel that were used on that day. Lastly, by way of discussion, we provide a critical analysis of our interventions. PMID:15771833

  20. Wearing gloves in the hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Wearing gloves in the hospital helps prevent the spread of germs. This helps protect both patients and health care ... Gloves are called personal protective equipment (PPE). Other types of PPE are gowns, masks, and shoe and ...

  1. The hospital based staffing agency.

    PubMed

    Manion, J; Reid, S B

    1989-01-01

    Before a hospital considers creating an internal staffing agency, a detailed business plan must be developed. By addressing marketing and operational issues in advance, nurse executives can avoid unnecessary business problems. PMID:2586644

  2. Standards for hospital libraries 2002

    PubMed Central

    Gluck, Jeannine Cyr; Hassig, Robin Ackley; Balogh, Leeni; Bandy, Margaret; Doyle, Jacqueline Donaldson; Kronenfeld, Michael R.; Lindner, Katherine Lois; Murray, Kathleen; Petersen, JoAn; Rand, Debra C.

    2002-01-01

    The Medical Library Association's “Standards for Hospital Libraries 2002” have been developed as a guide for hospital administrators, librarians, and accrediting bodies to ensure that hospitals have the resources and services to effectively meet their needs for knowledge-based information. Specific requirements for knowledge-based information include that the library be a separate department with its own budget. Knowledge-based information in the library should be directed by a qualified librarian who functions as a department head and is a member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals. The standards define the role of the medical librarian and the links between knowledge-based information and other functions such as patient care, patient education, performance improvement, and education. In addition, the standards address the development and implementation of the knowledge-based information needs assessment and plans, the promotion and publicity of the knowledge-based information services, and the physical space and staffing requirements. The role, qualifications, and functions of a hospital library consultant are outlined. The health sciences library is positioned to play a key role in the hospital. The increasing use of the Internet and new information technologies by medical, nursing, and allied health staffs; patients; and the community require new strategies, strategic planning, allocation of adequate resources, and selection and evaluation of appropriate information resources and technologies. The Hospital Library Standards Committee has developed this document as a guideline to be used in facing these challenges. Editor's Note: The “Standards for Hospital Libraries 2002” were approved by the members of the Hospital Library Section during MLA '02 in Dallas, Texas. They were subsequently approved by Section Council and received final approval from the MLA Board of Directors in June 2002. They succeed the Standards for Hospital Libraries

  3. Obstetric Staffing in Small Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Chance, G.W.; Campbell, M.K.

    1992-01-01

    Responses from 82 of the 100 Ontario hospitals with fewer than 750 births annually showed that a sufficient number of general practice obstetricians are replacing those who leave. However, we found a worsening shortage of general practice anesthetists and specialists required for obstetric emergencies, which could threaten care in such hospitals. Implications for training programs, physician remuneration, pregnancy risk determination, and regionalized perinatal care are briefly discussed.

  4. Parenteral nutrition in hospital pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Katoue, Maram Gamal; Al-Taweel, Dalal; Matar, Kamal Mohamed; Kombian, Samuel B

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore parenteral nutrition (PN) practices in hospital pharmacies of Kuwait and identify potential avenues for quality improvement in this service. Design/methodology/approach - A descriptive, qualitative study about PN practices was conducted from June 2012 to February 2013 in Kuwait. Data were collected via in-depth semi-structured interviews with the head total parenteral nutrition (TPN) pharmacists at seven hospitals using a developed questionnaire. The questionnaire obtained information about the PN service at each hospital including the existence of nutritional support teams (NSTs), PN preparation practices, quality controls and guidelines/protocols. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed for content. Findings - Seven hospitals in Kuwait provided PN preparation service through TPN units within hospital pharmacies. Functional NSTs did not exist in any of these hospitals. All TPN units used paper-based standard PN order forms for requesting PN. The content of PN order forms and PN formulas labeling information were inconsistent across hospitals. Most of the prepared PN formulas were tailor-made and packed in single compartment bags. Quality controls used included gravimetric analysis and visual inspection of PN formulations, and less consistently reported periodic evaluation of the aseptic techniques. Six TPN units independently developed PN guidelines/protocols. Originality/value - This study revealed variations in many aspects of PN practices among the hospitals in Kuwait and provided recommendations to improve this service. Standardization of PN practices would enhance the quality of care provided to patients receiving PN and facilitate national monitoring. This can be accomplished through the involvement of healthcare professionals with expertise in nutrition support working within proactive NSTs. PMID:27298063

  5. Standards for hospital libraries 2002.

    PubMed

    Gluck, Jeannine Cyr; Hassig, Robin Ackley; Balogh, Leeni; Bandy, Margaret; Doyle, Jacqueline Donaldson; Kronenfeld, Michael R; Lindner, Katherine Lois; Murray, Kathleen; Petersen, JoAn; Rand, Debra C

    2002-10-01

    The Medical Library Association's "Standards for Hospital Libraries 2002" have been developed as a guide for hospital administrators, librarians, and accrediting bodies to ensure that hospitals have the resources and services to effectively meet their needs for knowledge-based information. Specific requirements for knowledge-based information include that the library be a separate department with its own budget. Knowledge-based information in the library should be directed by a qualified librarian who functions as a department head and is a member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals. The standards define the role of the medical librarian and the links between knowledge-based information and other functions such as patient care, patient education, performance improvement, and education. In addition, the standards address the development and implementation of the knowledge-based information needs assessment and plans, the promotion and publicity of the knowledge-based information services, and the physical space and staffing requirements. The role, qualifications, and functions of a hospital library consultant are outlined. The health sciences library is positioned to play a key role in the hospital. The increasing use of the Internet and new information technologies by medical, nursing, and allied health staffs; patients; and the community require new strategies, strategic planning, allocation of adequate resources, and selection and evaluation of appropriate information resources and technologies. The Hospital Library Standards Committee has developed this document as a guideline to be used in facing these challenges. PMID:12398254

  6. [Flexibility and safety in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Fara, G M; Barni, M

    2011-01-01

    The paper explains the reasons according to which the newly-planned hospitals must adopt the concept of advanced flexibility (structural, technological, organizational, diagnostic and therapeutic), in order to avoid the risk of being already obsolete at the moment of their opening, and this due to the fact that too much time elapses in this Country between the moment of planning a new hospital and the moment of the start of its activity. Flexibility is needed at different levels: at low or medium levels for what concerns administrative spaces and also patient rooms (except, in this latter case, when differential intensity of care is adopted); at advanced levelfor what concerns diagnostic and therapeutic areas, which must be rapidly adaptable to new solutions offered by advances in technology and organization. From a different standpoint, flexibility applies also to the fact that hospital must increasingly become a node of a large net including territorial health services: the latter devoted to take care of chronicity, while hospitals should concentrate on acute pathology. Of course the territory surrounding the hospital, through its outpatient service and consultories, is in charge also for first level diagnosy and therapy, leaving the hospital to more sophisticated activities. PMID:21770227

  7. Foodborne listeriosis acquired in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Silk, Benjamin J; McCoy, Morgan H; Iwamoto, Martha; Griffin, Patricia M

    2014-08-15

    Listeriosis is characterized by bacteremia or meningitis. We searched for listeriosis case series and outbreak investigations published in English by 2013, and assessed the strength of evidence for foodborne acquisition among patients who ate hospital food. We identified 30 reports from 13 countries. Among the case series, the median proportion of cases considered to be hospital-acquired was 25% (range, 9%-67%). The median number of outbreak-related illnesses considered to be hospital-acquired was 4.0 (range, 2-16). All patients were immunosuppressed in 18 of 24 (75%) reports with available data. Eight outbreak reports with strong evidence for foodborne acquisition in a hospital implicated sandwiches (3 reports), butter, precut celery, Camembert cheese, sausage, and tuna salad (1 report each). Foodborne acquisition of listeriosis among hospitalized patients is well documented internationally. The number of listeriosis cases could be reduced substantially by establishing hospital policies for safe food preparation for immunocompromised patients and by not serving them higher-risk foods. PMID:24846635

  8. Random output and hospital performance.

    PubMed

    Barros, Pedro Pita

    2003-11-01

    Many countries are under pressure to reform health care financing and delivery. Hospital care is one part of the health system that is under scrutiny. Private management initiatives are a possible way to increase efficiency in health care delivery. This motivates the interest in developing methodologies to assess hospital performance, recognizing hospitals as a different sort of firm. We present a simple way to describe hospital production: hospital output as a change in the distribution of survival probabilities. This output definition allows us to separate hospital production from patients' characteristics. The notion of "better performance" has a precise meaning: (first-order) stochastic dominance of a distribution of survival probabilities over another distribution. As an illustration, we compare, for an important DRG, private and public management and find that private management performs better, mainly in the range of high-survival probabilities. The measured performance difference cannot be attributed to input prices or to economies of scale and/or scope. It reflects pure technological and organisational differences. PMID:14686628

  9. Hospital network performance: a survey of hospital stakeholders' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bravi, F; Gibertoni, D; Marcon, A; Sicotte, C; Minvielle, E; Rucci, P; Angelastro, A; Carradori, T; Fantini, M P

    2013-02-01

    Hospital networks are an emerging organizational form designed to face the new challenges of public health systems. Although the benefits introduced by network models in terms of rationalization of resources are known, evidence about stakeholders' perspectives on hospital network performance from the literature is scanty. Using the Competing Values Framework of organizational effectiveness and its subsequent adaptation by Minvielle et al., we conducted in 2009 a survey in five hospitals of an Italian network for oncological care to examine and compare the views on hospital network performance of internal stakeholders (physicians, nurses and the administrative staff). 329 questionnaires exploring stakeholders' perspectives were completed, with a response rate of 65.8%. Using exploratory factor analysis of the 66 items of the questionnaire, we identified 4 factors, i.e. Centrality of relationships, Quality of care, Attractiveness/Reputation and Staff empowerment and Protection of workers' rights. 42 items were retained in the analysis. Factor scores proved to be high (mean score>8 on a 10-item scale), except for Attractiveness/Reputation (mean score 6.79), indicating that stakeholders attach a higher importance to relational and health care aspects. Comparison of factor scores among stakeholders did not reveal significant differences, suggesting a broadly shared view on hospital network performance. PMID:23201189

  10. Hospitality Language as a Professional Skill.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blue, George M.; Harun, Minah

    2003-01-01

    Argues that particular patterns of language are associated with host-guest interaction, and that this language, corresponding to the different stages of he arrival-departure hospitality cycle, may be termed "hospitality language." Investigates hospitality practices and defines hospitality language in the context of Great Britain and discusses…

  11. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital...

  12. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital...

  13. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital...

  14. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital...

  15. Baptist Hospital East conducts successful target marketing.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2003-01-01

    A targeted marketing program at Baptist Hospital East, Louisville, Ky., has worked successfully to strengthen the hospital's relationships with the employers and employees in the hospital's marketing area. Also, the program strengthens Baptist East's BaptistWorx occupational medicine program and complements the hospital's traditional advertising. PMID:12875166

  16. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital...

  17. HMO penetration: has it hurt public hospitals?

    PubMed

    Clement, J P; Grazier, K L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which health maintenance organization (HMO) penetration within the public hospitals' market area affects the financial performance and viability of these institutions, relative to private hospitals. Hospital- and market-specific measures are examined in a fully interacted model of over 2,300 hospitals in 321 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) in 1995. Although hospitals located in markets with higher HMO penetration have lower financial performance as reflected in revenues, expenses and operating margin, public hospitals are not more disadvantaged than other hospitals by managed care. PMID:11669291

  18. Regional Hospital Input Price Indexes

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Schendler, Carol Ellen; Anderson, Gerard

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the development of regional hospital input price indexes that is consistent with the general methodology used for the National Hospital Input Price Index. The feasibility of developing regional indexes was investigated because individuals inquired whether different regions experienced different rates of increase in hospital input prices. The regional indexes incorporate variations in cost-share weights (the amount an expense category contributes to total spending) associated with hospital type and location, and variations in the rate of input price increases for various regions. We found that between 1972 and 1979 none of the regional price indexes increased at average annual rates significantly different from the national rate. For the more recent period 1977 through 1979, the increase in one Census Region was significantly below the national rate. Further analyses indicated that variations in cost-share weights for various types of hospitals produced no substantial variations in the regional price indexes relative to the national index. We consider these findings preliminary because of limitations in the availability of current, relevant, and reliable data, especially for local area wage rate increases. PMID:10309557

  19. Biological risk among hospital housekeepers.

    PubMed

    Ream, Priscilla Santos Ferreira; Tipple, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; Barros, Dayane Xavier; Souza, Adenícia Custódia Silva; Pereira, Milca Severino

    2016-03-01

    Although not directly responsible for patient care, hospital housekeepers are still susceptible to accidents with biological material. The objectives of this study were to establish profile and frequency of accidents among hospital housekeepers, describe behaviors pre- and postaccident, and risk factors. This was a cross-sectional study with hospital housekeepers in Goiania, Brazil. Data were obtained from interviews and vaccination records. The observations were as follows: (1) participating workers: 94.3%; (2) incomplete hepatitis B vaccination: 1 in 3; and (3) accident rate: 26.5%, mostly percutaneous with hypodermic needles, and involved blood from an unknown source; roughly half occurred during waste management. Upon review, length of service less than 5 years, completed hepatitis B vaccination, and had been tested for anti-HBs (hepatitis B surface antigen) influenced frequency of accidents. These findings suggest that improper disposal of waste appears to enhance the risk to hospital housekeepers. All hospital workers should receive continued training with regard to waste management. PMID:25136771

  20. [Applications of the hospital statistics management system].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Hong; Ren, Yong; Liu, Jing; Li, You-Zhang; Ma, Xiao-Long; Jiao, Tao-Tao

    2008-01-01

    The Hospital Statistics Management System is built on an Office Automation Platform of Shandong provincial hospital system. Its workflow, role and popedom technologies are used to standardize and optimize the management program of statistics in the total quality control of hospital statistics. The system's applications have combined the office automation platform with the statistics management in a hospital and this provides a practical example of a modern hospital statistics management model. PMID:18438057

  1. Hospital, nurses team up to prevent readmissions.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    University Hospital in Newark, NJ, and the Visiting Nurses Association Health Group are working together to provide intensive case management to Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries and uninsured patients with multiple chronic conditions. Hospital case managers identify patient eligible for the program. Patient navigators employed by the VNA and funded by the hospital provide education while patients are in the hospital. Navigators visit the patients every day in the hospital and link them with primary care providers for follow up. PMID:23019700

  2. [Therapy costs at the hospital].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, R

    1990-02-01

    The inflation in hospital financing has fallen off. The new regulations brought in with the health reform law (Gesundheitsreformgesetz) could help to cut hospital running costs and lead to a more economical form of medical treatment. At present a prognosis of these cost reductions is not possible. The new list of charges for medical treatment (Bundespflegesatzverordnung) brought in by the government in 1986 also has helped in reducing expenditures. Especially the requirement for self-budgeting and performance-costing has lead to a reduced inflation rate in medical treatment costs. An effective control of medical treatment costs demands more management not only in administrative but also in medical areas as well. Improving hospital economy must not automatically lead to a reduction in the quality of the service provided. PMID:2316103

  3. Supra-tarsal injection of dexamethasone in the treatment of patients with refractory vernal keratoconjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Lisanework, Mulu

    2003-01-01

    The response to supratarsal injection of dexamethasone in severe refractory vernal keratoconjunctivitis was studied in 20 patients (14 males and 6 females) at the ophthalmology department of Menelik II Hospital, Addis Ababa in 1997. Majority of the patients were in the age range of 11-20 years with mean age of 14.6 years. Although all patients experienced relief of symptoms in the first 2 days of dexamethasone injection, symptoms recurred in the majority 16 (80%) of the patients. Cobble stone papillae and limbal signs disappeared in 2 (11%) and 5 (38%) of the patients respectively. Resolution of limbal form of the disease is more dramatic when compared to the palpebral form. This study showed that supratarsal injection of dexamethasone in severe vernal keratoconjunctivitis is effective in few, partially effective in some and ineffective in many of our patients. Further studies, particularly a randomized controlled trial is recommended prior to utilization of this new therapeutic modality as a standard form of treatment in Ethiopian patients. PMID:12764997

  4. 42 CFR 447.280 - Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals). 447.280 Section 447.280 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Swing-Bed Hospitals § 447.280 Hospital providers...

  5. Unsafe driving behaviors and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Van Tuinen, M

    1994-04-01

    The medical costs associated with motor vehicle crashes are difficult to measure. Most attempts have used crash data and cost data that are only indirectly related to each other or have followed patients in a few hospitals or trauma centers. These studies produce localized estimates or rough national estimates of limited use to policy makers. The result has been a dependence on more readily available mortality data, such as the Fatal Accident Reporting System, to guide automotive safety efforts. The limitations of mortality data and the increasing sophistication of medical care data bases have resulted in a strong interest in obtaining crash-linked morbidity data. Hence, in 1993, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) awarded the Missouri Department of Health and six other applicants grants to link automotive crash records to statewide ambulance trip, outpatient care, hospitalization and mortality records. By identifying an individual across multiple data sets, states would be able to determine directly the relationship of driver behaviors and crash characteristics to hospitalization rates and other medical outcomes. Examination of hospital pay source information would expose the toll of automotive crashes on public tax dollars. Having recently completed the record linkage phase of this project, Missouri Department of Health staff are beginning to analyze the impact of automotive crashes on health care costs in Missouri. In this report, three unsafe driving behaviors, failure to use a safety device (seatbelts and motorcycle helmets), driving under the influence of alcohol, and speeding, are related to the risk of hospitalization or death, hospital costs, and expected pay source. PMID:8202067

  6. [The future of hospitals and the hospitals in the future].

    PubMed

    Illés, S Tamás

    2016-07-01

    By the end of the 20th century the vertically organized hospitals formed into a closed hierarchical system, in which the healthcare supply significantly fragmented. The existing hospitals in the current organization are not prepared for the increase in longevity, nor for the high growth in the number of chronic and long-term illnesses and the multi-morbidity since they were not designed for extended carry treatments. The fast incorporation of high-tech and very expensive technologies into healthcare generates an economic crisis. Solving the supply and economic crisis at the same time cannot be achieved without changing the structure of hospitals. Future hospitals will be organized in a network, conducting special treatments according to disease profiles. According to present knowledge, this is the only structure that allows for economies in scale, the proper spending of the ever-shrinking resources, and to ensure the effective patient care required after the changing of disorder structures and patient corporate identities. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(28), 1099-1104. PMID:27397421

  7. Hospital-integrated PACS at the University Hospital of Geneva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Ligier, Yves; Hochstrasser, Denis; Scherrer, Jean-Raoul

    1991-07-01

    The PACS under development at the University Hospital of Geneva is a hospital-wide image management system for radiological as well as non-radiological medical images which is part of one of the widest hospital information systems (HIS) in Switzerland (Diogene system). It is based on a multi-vendor open architecture and a set of widely available industry standards, namely: Unix as the operating system, TCP-IP as network protocol and an SQL-based distributed database (INGRES) that handles both the PACS and the HIS. The PACS is based on a distributed architecture of servers of two types: the archive servers connected to the sources of images and equipped with large optical disk libraries (jukeboxes) and display servers distributed over the hospital. A standard image storage format was developed based on the ACR-NEMA standard. This file format (the PAPYRUS format) allows storage of sets of images as a sequence of ACR-NEMA messages in an 'encapsulated' file structure. In order to provide a more uniform user interface on a variety of different workstations, a common platform for image display and manipulation called OSIRIS is developed based on X-11 windowing system and OSF/Motif extension. Such a platform is designed to be portable to any computer running Unix and equipped with a graphic display system running X-11. Because this software is written in the object-oriented language C++, it is easily expandable and easily adaptable to different needs and requirements.

  8. Incompetence, treatment refusal, and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Beck, J C; Parry, J W

    1992-01-01

    Psychiatrists have proposed broadened commitment statues based on need for care and treatment, and under which judges have no role in deciding cases of treatment refusal. The mental health bar has consistently opposed these proposals on constitutional and common law grounds. The authors propose new commitment criteria based on incompetency to decide about hospitalization, and inability to live safely in freedom. The proposed standards would meet the Constitutional requirements, and would permit hospitalization and/or treatment for many persons who are in need but who now go without. The authors recognize that new commitment law without adequate clinical resources will not greatly improve patient care. PMID:1421557

  9. Optics activity for hospitalized children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargallo, Ana; Gómez-Varela, Ana I.; González-Nuñez, Hector; Delgado, Tamara; Almaguer, Citlalli; Cambronero, Ferran; Garcia-Sanchez, Angel; Flores-Arias, Maria T.

    2014-08-01

    USC-OSA is a student chapter whose objective is to bring Optics knowledge closer to the non-optics community. The activity developed at the Hospital school was one of the most important last year. It was consisted in a few Optics experiments and workshops with hospitalized children of different ages and pathologies. The experiments had to be adapted to their physical conditions with the aim of everyone could participate. We think this activity has several benefits including spreading Optics through children meanwhile they have fun and forget their illness for a while.

  10. Scope of heart failure hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Butler, Javed; Marti, Catherine; Pina, Ileana; DeFilippi, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The growing heart failure (HF) epidemic places an enormous clinical and economic burden on the health care system. The clinical and financial burden related to HF hospitalizations has led to great interest in both improving related outcomes and decreasing costs of care. Besides adhering to existing guidelines, newer approaches to managing these patients, both in terms of monitoring and developing novel therapeutic approaches, are needed. Significant opportunities exist to improve the outcomes for patients with HF, especially those who have been hospitalized. These efforts are even more important now that readmission rates for HF have quality and reimbursement implications. PMID:22891800

  11. Hospital and patient characteristics of uncompensated hospital care: policy implications.

    PubMed

    Saywell, R M; Zollinger, T W; Chu, D K; MacBeth, C A; Sechrist, M E

    1989-01-01

    For this study, a sample of 1,689 patients classified as "charity" and "bad debt" cases in 1986 were identified from 27 general acute care hospitals and one tertiary hospital in Indiana. Half of the hospitals were in rural areas and 57 percent were small (less than 150 beds). Most of the patients (87.2 percent) incurred uncompensated amounts under $2,500, and 40 percent of the cases were below $500. About 72 percent of the patients with uncompensated care were from the same county as the location of the hospital (range from 30.9% to 100.0%). The majority of the cases (79.4 percent) with over $5,000 in uncompensated care were treated in urban hospitals. The average age of these patients was 27.2 years. Fifty-four percent of the patients were single, 60.7 percent were female, and nearly all (83.0 percent) were discharged to home care. Only 44.6 percent of the patients with uncompensated care had no insurance; 46.8 percent had some form of commercial insurance which covered part of the charges for care. The most common diagnosis for these patients was pregnancy and childbirth (22.8 percent), with injury and poisoning second (10.7 percent). The cases with $5,000 or more in bad debt (about 4 percent of the cases) account for 28.3 percent of the total uncollected amount. Bad debt represents a cost of doing business. Any national effort to contain health care costs must address this problem. PMID:2738351

  12. Trends in Inpatient Hospital Deaths: National Hospital Discharge Survey, 2000-2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... Has the inpatient hospital death rate decreased for all patients and for those with selected first-listed ... 2010 differ from the length of stay for all hospitalizations? Inpatients who died in the hospital stayed ...

  13. Hospital autopsy: Endangered or extinct?

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Angus; Osborn, Michael; Nicholas, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the hospital autopsy rate for the UK in 2013. Methods A study of data from a ‘Freedom of Information’ request to all (n=186) acute NHS Trusts within England (n=160), NHS Boards in Scotland (n=14) and Wales (n=7) and Social Care Trusts in Northern Ireland (n=5). Hospital autopsy rates were calculated from the number of hospital autopsies performed in 2013 as a percentage of total inpatient deaths in the Trust that year. Results The UK response rate was 99% (n=184), yielding a mean autopsy rate of 0.69%. The mean rates were 0.51% (England), 2.13% (Scotland), 0.65% (Wales) and 0.46% (Northern Ireland). 23% (n=38) of all included respondents had a rate of 0% and 86% (n=143) a rate less than 1%. Conclusions The decline in hospital autopsy has continued relentlessly and, for better or for worse, the practice is on the verge of extinction in the UK. The study highlights to health professionals and policy makers the magnitude of this decline. Further research should investigate the impact of this on patient safety, clinical audit, public health and medical education. PMID:26076965

  14. Hospital Libraries in Patient's Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iroka, Luke A.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the positive effects of patient education, including the physician patient relationship, improvements in health status, and cost effectiveness. The status of hospital libraries in Nigeria is described, and suggestions for the implementation of patient education programs are made. (5 references) (CLB)

  15. Priority issues for hospital boards.

    PubMed

    Middleton, E George

    2005-01-01

    Governing a hospital or healthcare system is a difficult and demanding job. If done properly, the organization can operate well. If the board is inept or incompetent, the organization will suffer. In this article I discuss those functions of board governance that I think are among the most important, along with some recommendations for implementing them. PMID:15966534

  16. Bibliography for the Hospitality Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Elizabeth A.

    This annotated bibliography is a sample collection of reference materials in the hospitality industry suitable for a small academic library. It is assumed that the library has a general reference collection. Publication dates range from 1992-96, with two publication dates in the 1980s. No periodicals are included. The 41 reference materials are…

  17. Hospital Patients Are Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caffarella, Rosemary S.

    Patient education is recognized by health care providers and patients themselves as an important component of adequate health care for hospital patients. Through this informational process, patients receive information about specific health problems, learn the necessary competencies to deal with them, and develop accepting attitudes toward the…

  18. The Johns Hopkins Hospital Network

    PubMed Central

    Tolchin, Stephen G.; Barta, Wendy; Harkness, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins Hospital has initiated an ambitious program to apply modern technologies to the development of a new, comprehensive clinical information system. One component of this system is a networking technology for supporting the integration of diverse and functionally distinct information systems. This paper discusses the selection of the networking technology implemented at JHH, issues and problems, networking concepts, protocols and reliability.

  19. [Care outside the hospital walls].

    PubMed

    Rosani, Mara; Bruno, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity can benefit people suffering from mental disorders, on the condition however that it is closely supervised by caregivers. It enables patients and caregivers to leave the hospital, physically, as well as figuratively speaking, by offering another space in which the nurse-patient relationship can bear fruit. PMID:23631081

  20. What is your hospitality quotient?

    PubMed

    DeSilets, Lyn

    2015-03-01

    In addition to the behind-the-scenes work involved with planning and implementing continuing nursing education activities, there are additional ways we can enhance the learner's experience. This article presents ideas on how to improve your hospitality quotient. PMID:25723328

  1. Antidepressant adherence after psychiatric hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Zivin, Kara; Ganoczy, Dara; Pfeiffer, Paul N.; Miller, Erin M.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    Objective Depressed patients discharged from psychiatric hospitalizations face increased risks for adverse outcomes including suicide, yet antidepressant adherence rates during this high-risk period are unknown. Using Veterans Affairs (VA) data, we assessed antidepressant adherence and predictors of poor adherence among depressed veterans following psychiatric hospitalization. Method We identified VA patients nationwide with depressive disorders who had a psychiatric hospitalization between April 1, 1999 and September 30, 2003, received antidepressant medication, and had an outpatient appointment following discharge. We calculated medication possession ratios (MPRs), a measure of medication adherence, within three and six months following discharge. We assessed patient factors associated with having lower levels of adherence (MPRs <0.8) after discharge. Results 20,931 and 23,182 patients met criteria for three and six month MPRs. The mean three month MPR was 0.79 (s.d.=0.37). The mean six month MPR was 0.66 (s.d.=0.40). Patients with poorer adherence were male, younger, non-white, and had a substance abuse disorder, but were less likely to have PTSD or other anxiety disorders. Conclusion Poor antidepressant adherence is common among depressed patients after psychiatric hospitalization. Efforts to improve adherence at this time may be critical in improving the outcomes of these high-risk patients. PMID:19609666

  2. National Hospital Input Price Index

    PubMed Central

    Freeland, Mark S.; Anderson, Gerard; Schendler, Carol Ellen

    1979-01-01

    The national community hospital input price index presented here isolates the effects of prices of goods and services required to produce hospital care and measures the average percent change in prices for a fixed market basket of hospital inputs. Using the methodology described in this article, weights for various expenditure categories were estimated and proxy price variables associated with each were selected. The index is calculated for the historical period 1970 through 1978 and forecast for 1979 through 1981. During the historical period, the input price index increased an average of 8.0 percent a year, compared with an average rate of increase of 6.6 percent for overall consumer prices. For the period 1979 through 1981, the average annual increase is forecast at between 8.5 and 9.0 percent. Using the index to deflate growth in expenses, the level of real growth in expenditures per inpatient day (net service intensity growth) averaged 4.5 percent per year with considerable annual variation related to government and hospital industry policies. PMID:10309052

  3. Social Group Work in Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambler, Moses

    This literature review focuses on social group work in the hospital setting. The first section addresses the need for a holistic approach within a typology of illness, and discusses the social work role and intervention tasks required at different stages of illness, i.e., diagnosis, adaptation to long-term illness, and the ending of the illness…

  4. Hospitalization Type and Subsequent Severe Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Robert P.; Rogers, Mary A. M.; Langa, Kenneth M.; Iwashyna, Theodore J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Hospitalization is associated with microbiome perturbation (dysbiosis), and this perturbation is more severe in patients treated with antimicrobials. Objectives: To evaluate whether hospitalizations known to be associated with periods of microbiome perturbation are associated with increased risk of severe sepsis after hospital discharge. Methods: We studied participants in the U.S. Health and Retirement Study with linked Medicare claims (1998–2010). We measured whether three hospitalization types associated with increasing severity of probable dysbiosis (non–infection-related hospitalization, infection-related hospitalization, and hospitalization with Clostridium difficile infection [CDI]) were associated with increasing risk for severe sepsis in the 90 days after hospital discharge. We used two study designs: the first was a longitudinal design with between-person comparisons and the second was a self-controlled case series design using within-person comparison. Measurements and Main Results: We identified 43,095 hospitalizations among 10,996 Health and Retirement Study–Medicare participants. In the 90 days following non–infection-related hospitalization, infection-related hospitalization, and hospitalization with CDI, adjusted probabilities of subsequent admission for severe sepsis were 4.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.8–4.4%), 7.1% (95% CI, 6.6–7.6%), and 10.7% (95% CI, 7.7–13.8%), respectively. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) of severe sepsis was 3.3-fold greater during the 90 days after hospitalizations than during other observation periods. The IRR was 30% greater after an infection-related hospitalization versus a non–infection-related hospitalization. The IRR was 70% greater after a hospitalization with CDI than an infection-related hospitalization without CDI. Conclusions: There is a strong dose–response relationship between events known to result in dysbiosis and subsequent severe sepsis hospitalization that is not present

  5. Nursing: the hospital's competitive edge.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, F A; Preziosi, P

    1988-09-01

    The health care marketplace is becoming increasingly competitive. The hospital has a built-in marketing force with the nursing department, because nurses are in constant, direct contact with the customer. Nursing must identify the case mix profile of the community and focus the hospital product lines to meet community needs. The nursing department should decentralize, change, measure, and innovate the staff mix needed to operationalize these product lines. The development of nursing practice standards for the case mix will help to identify the staff mix needed and create systems to efficiently manage the product lines. Nursing management must become aware of cross-subsidization and downward skill substitution of nursing personnel. Nursing information systems must generate quality reports that invoke cost consciousness on the part of nursing staff. Quality assurance programs must become unit based and complete with frequent audits to correlate length of stay with nursing quality. Correlations must be determined between nursing productivity and case mix to determine the hospital's niche in the marketplace. The transformation of health care into a competitive business industry has created many opportunities for nursing. The health care industry's incentives for efficiency along with the decreasing demand for inpatient hospital services will be the forces driving health care toward a competitive marketplace. The hospital's nursing department should be strategically positioned to become accountable for increasing market share and enhancing quality patient outcomes. The focus has shifted from the theoretical to the tactical, which is a step in the right direction, particularly for nursing. Nursing, if strategically positioned, will not only thrive but will also excel in this chaotic environment by capturing the opportunities and being innovative. PMID:3047695

  6. Peptic ulcers: mortality and hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Riley, R

    1991-01-01

    This study analyzes data on peptic ulcer disease based on deaths for 1951-1988 and hospital separations for 1969-1988. The source of the data are mortality and morbidity statistics provided to Statistics Canada by the provinces. The age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for peptic ulcer disease decreased from 1951 to 1988 by 69.4% for men (8.5 to 2.6 per 100,000 population), and 31.8% for women (2.2 to 1.5). Separation rates from hospitals during 1969-1988 for peptic ulcer disease also decreased by 59.8% for men (242.7 to 97.6 per 100,000 population) and 35.6% for women (103.2 to 66.5). Age-specific rates for both mortality and hospital separations increased with age. Epidemiological studies indicate that the incidence of peptic ulcer disease is declining in the general population. The downward trends in mortality and hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease reflect this change in incidence, but additional factors probably contribute as well to this decline. Male rates for both mortality and hospital separations were much higher than female rates at the beginning of the study period; but toward the end, the gap between the sexes narrowed considerably, mainly because the male rates declined substantially while the female rates decline moderately. The slower decline in the rates for women may be related to such factors as the increasing labour force participation among women and the slower decline in the population of female smokers. PMID:1801957

  7. [Historical exploration of Acapulco hospitals, Guerrero, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo; Salcedo-Alvarez, Rey Arturo

    2006-01-01

    This study attempts to recount the history of the main hospitals of the port of Acapulco from colonial times until the end of the 20th century. The Augustine friars began hospital care at the end of the first part of the 16th century. Later, Bernardino Alvarez (1514?-1584), with the support of the Spanish crown, founded the first formal hospital in Acapulco called Hospital de Nuestra Señora de la Consolación (Our Lady of Consolation Hospital). During the 16th and 17th centuries, the sick were attended by friars, and by the end of the 19th century there were physicians and surgeons. From the end of the Independence War until the end of the 19th century, the port did not have any true hospital. The first degreed physicians and surgeons arrived and resided in Acapulco in 1920. In 1938, the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital) began providing services. It was replaced by the Hospital General de Acapulco (General Hospital of Acapulco). At the fourth decade of the past century the Cruz Roja (Red Cross) was created. In 1957 the hospital services of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS, Mexican Institute of Social Security), which was founded in 1963, was inaugurated with the Unidad Medico/Social (Medical and Social Unit) of the IMSS in Acapulco. This began the journey of modernity in Acapulco. In 1992, Hospital Regional Vicente Guerrero (Regional Hospital Vicente Guerrero) of the IMSS, initiated its services. In 1960, medical services for civil workers and their families were housed in the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital). Shortly afterwards, the Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE, Security and Social Services Institute for State Employees) had their own hospital. During the 20th century, Acapulco has added other hospital services to care for members of the navy and armed forces, as well as for those persons with financial resources for private care. PMID:17244509

  8. From cottage to community hospitals: Watlington Cottage Hospital and its regional context, 1874-2000.

    PubMed

    Hall, John

    2012-01-01

    The appearance in England from the 1850s of 'cottage hospitals' in considerable numbers constituted a new and distinctive form of hospital provision. The historiography of hospital care has emphasised the role of the large teaching hospitals, to the neglect of the smaller and general practitioner hospitals. This article inverts that attention, by examining their history and shift in function to 'community hospitals'within their regional setting in the period up to 2000. As the planning of hospitals on a regional basis began from the 1920s, the impact of NHS organisational and planning mechanisms on smaller hospitals is explored through case studies at two levels. The strategy for community hospitals of the Oxford NHS Region--one of the first Regions to formulate such a strategy--and the impact of that strategy on one hospital, Watlington Cottage Hospital, is critically examined through its existence from 1874 to 2000. PMID:23057181

  9. Medication safety during your hospital stay

    MedlinePlus

    ... your medicine. This prescription goes to the hospital pharmacy. The hospital pharmacist reads and fills the prescription. ... The pharmacy may receive some prescriptions by computer (electronic) and some that are handwritten. Electronic prescriptions are easier to ...

  10. Leaving the hospital - your discharge plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... patientinstructions/000867.htm Leaving the hospital - your discharge plan To use the sharing features on this page, ... once you leave. This is called a discharge plan. Your health care providers at the hospital will ...

  11. Hospital staffing adjustments under global budgeting.

    PubMed

    Lehner, L A; Burgess, J F; Stefos, T

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs operates a hospital system that distributes a national global budget to 159 hospital units. Over recent years, cost containment and downward budgetary pressures have affected hospital performance and the quality of care delivered in unknown ways. This article examines hospital staffing levels as potential performance measures. We first develop a regression model to estimate the number and types of clinical staff required to meet current inpatient workloads at VA medical centers. We are able to improve on previous analyses by employing better data on physicians and by evaluating the behavior of hospitals in consecutive years. Our findings provide managers of hospital systems with promising new approaches for comparing hospital production processes and more information on the effects of global budgeting on individual hospital staffing within systems. PMID:10153372

  12. Learning to speak up about hospital failures.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Dawne

    2016-08-17

    The recent Public Accounts Committee (PAC) report on discharging older people from acute hospitals in England revealed that rising numbers of patients are remaining in hospital when they are clinically ready to go home. PMID:27533395

  13. Market orientation and organizational culture in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Proenca, E J

    1996-01-01

    Hospitals have been advised to respond to environmental pressures by changing from a product to a market orientation. Such changes are difficult to accomplish because of the entrenched behaviors and attitudes of hospitals employees. This article proposes organizational cultures as the avenue to a market orientation. It describes the role of hospital culture as an antecedent to market orientation. It also suggests ways to develop and maintain a market-oriented culture in hospitals. PMID:10161845

  14. Positioning hospitals for improved access to capital.

    PubMed

    Ponton, Kevin T; Sandrick, Karen M

    2002-11-01

    Hospitals need to actively position themselves in the next 18 to 24 months to ensure continued access to financing. Hospitals need to shift their focus from investment income to operations. Hospitals should recognize the importance of balance-sheet liquidity to institutional investors. Not-for-profit hospitals should focus on both sides of the balance sheet. Healthcare executives need to develop effective leadership and investor-relations skills. PMID:12656030

  15. Current trends in hospital mergers and acquisitions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Thomas C; Werling, Krist A; Walker, Barton C; Burgdorfer, Rex J; Shields, J Jordan

    2012-03-01

    Healthcare reform will impact hospital consolidation in three key areas: Payment rates will decrease, indirectly encouraging consolidation by forcing hospitals to find new ways to reduce costs and increase negotiating clout with suppliers and payers. The cost of doing business will increase as hospitals spend more on compliance, technology, and physician employment. The ACO model will encourage hospital network formation by rewarding integrated healthcare systems that can reduce costs and improve quality. PMID:22420144

  16. Caritas Norwood Hospital: back from the brink.

    PubMed

    Guyon, Robert E

    2003-07-01

    Caritas Norwood Hospital and its affiliates went from $17 million in the red to a $4 million profit after implementing comprehensive financial and operational strategies, which included reengineering the revenue cycle, outsourcing some services, and focusing on the hospital's core business. External pressures were out of the hospital's control, but a comprehensive analysis identified many internal problems that the hospital had to resolve. The new management team also uncovered many undisclosed problems when it took the reins. PMID:12866153

  17. Salmonella isolation from hospital areas.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, R. W.; Price, T. H.; Joynson, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence of the presence of salmonellas in a paediatric ward, a special care baby unit, a maternity unit and a hospital kitchen was obtained by culture of sewer swabs, faeces and food samples. The survey was designed to cause as little administrative interference as possible. The technical aspects of the survey did not strain laboratory facilities. Minimal secondary spread of salmonella infection was experienced. PMID:390044

  18. Hospital safety: not child's play.

    PubMed

    Gips, Michael A

    2007-01-01

    With a main campus and other satellite facilities, Children's Mercy Hospitals & Clinics set out to revamp its access control program after 9-11. The revised program includes sign-in requirements, protocols for special restrictions, and attention to situations that might create a risk of contamination. It also employs additional controls at internal doors and uses CCTV for remote surveillance throughout. Last, the program included staff increases. PMID:17970452

  19. 42 CFR 412.534 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals. 412.534 Section 412.534 Public Health... Hospitals § 412.534 Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites... § 412.22(e)(2), or satellite facilities of long-term care hospitals that meet the criteria in §...

  20. 42 CFR 412.534 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals. 412.534 Section 412.534 Public Health... Hospitals § 412.534 Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites... § 412.22(e)(2), or satellite facilities of long-term care hospitals that meet the criteria in §...

  1. 42 CFR 412.534 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals. 412.534 Section 412.534 Public Health... Hospitals § 412.534 Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites... § 412.22(e)(2), or satellite facilities of long-term care hospitals that meet the criteria in §...

  2. 42 CFR 412.534 - Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hospitals within hospitals and satellites of long-term care hospitals. 412.534 Section 412.534 Public Health... Hospitals § 412.534 Special payment provisions for long-term care hospitals within hospitals and satellites... § 412.22(e)(2), or satellite facilities of long-term care hospitals that meet the criteria in §...

  3. Does marketing relate to hospital profitability?

    PubMed

    McDermott, D R; Franzak, F J; Little, M W

    1993-01-01

    The authors examine the relationship of hospitals' marketing activities--including the use of market intelligence activities, interfunctional coordination activities, and organizational responsiveness activities--to financial performance. The results suggest it would be valuable to hospital marketing managers to adopt a data-driven, proactive management style that incorporates a teamwork emphasis to improve their hospital's financial performance. PMID:10127061

  4. Lack of Comprehensive Outbreak Detection in Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Baker, Meghan A; Huang, Susan S; Letourneau, Alyssa R; Kaganov, Rebecca E; Peeples, Jennifer R; Drees, Marci; Platt, Richard; Yokoe, Deborah S

    2016-04-01

    Timely identification of outbreaks of hospital-associated infections is needed to implement control measures and minimize impact. Survey results from 33 hospitals indicated that most hospitals lacked a formal cluster definition and all targeted a very limited group of prespecified pathogens. Standardized, statistically based outbreak detection could greatly improve current practice. PMID:26996060

  5. 27 CFR 31.54 - Hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hospitals. 31.54 Section 31.54 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... Registration And/or Recordkeeping § 31.54 Hospitals. Hospitals and similar institutions furnishing liquors...

  6. Developing Marketing Strategies for University Teaching Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Daniel J.

    1980-01-01

    University teaching hospitals face increasing competition from community hospitals, expanding regulation of health care, consumerism, and a declining urban population base. New marketing strategies are seen as ways in which teaching hospitals can achieve better relationships with institutions, practitioners, and surrounding communities and…

  7. Future looks bleak for many Ontario hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Charlotte

    1995-01-01

    Ontario will soon begin to experience some of the hospital closures that are already well known in many other provinces. A recent report called for the closure of 12 hospitals in Metropolitan Toronto and a 13% cut in the number of hospital beds. Strong campaigns against some of the proposed closures are already being mounted.

  8. The risks of getting hospital discharge wrong.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    Hospital discharge remains a hot topic for all of us who work with older people. As the recent National Audit Office (NAO) 2016 report on discharging older patients from hospital rather bluntly put it: 'There are currently far too many older people in hospitals who do not need to be there.' PMID:27573940

  9. Financial Indicators for Critical Access Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pink, George H.; Holmes, G. Mark; D'Alpe, Cameron; Strunk, Lindsay A.; McGee, Patrick; Slifkin, Rebecca T.

    2006-01-01

    Context: There is a growing recognition of the need to measure and report hospital financial performance. However, there exists little comparative financial indicator data specifically for critical access hospitals (CAHs). CAHs differ from other hospitals on a number of dimensions that might affect appropriate indicators of performance, including…

  10. Children's psychological responses to hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Vessey, Judith A

    2003-01-01

    The data-based literature addressing children's psychological responses to hospitalization was reviewed using methods outlined by Cooper (1989). Using a developmental science perspective, early research was reviewed and a model of variables that contribute to children's responses was constructed. This model consists of three major foci, including maturational and cognitive variables (developmental level, experience, coping style), ecological variables (family and hospital milieu), and biological variables (inborn factors and pathophysiology). Coping serves as the overarching framework for examining these variables and their contributions to children's responses to hospitalization. A variety of theoretical perspectives from the social sciences have been used, with psychoanalytic and stress and adaptation theories predominating. The majority of the research used simple case study, descriptive, or pre- and post-test designs. Methodologic issues were common. Little qualitative work has been done. Future research directions call for studies to adopt new theoretical and empirical models that are methodologically rigorous and clinically relevant and that embrace the precepts of developmental science. PMID:12858697

  11. Hospital treatment of HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Ola, Samuel Olawale

    2006-12-01

    Treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in Nigeria has progressed from the stage of inactivity, unconcern, abandonment and neglect to the present stage of holistic care involving treatment of the infection with Highly Active Anti Retroviral Agents, complications of the disease and side effects of antiretroviral therapy as well as that of human behavioural responses towards the disease with hope and promising outcome. The goal of the treatment is to prolong the patient's life while maintaining the best possible quality of health and life. It is now a continuum of care between the hospital and the different sectors of the community. Hospital treatment of patients with HIV-AIDS is complex and yet a simple task if there is healthy interaction of the patients and health care providers in a milieu of well equipped hospital setting with available treatment facilities for proper management of diseases. Similarly, for the care to achieve its goal, it requires a joint participation of the community and the commitment of the government not only on curtailment of the reservoir of HIV infection by antiretroviral therapy but total eradication of diseases, poverty and ignorance in all its entirety. PMID:18050774

  12. Welfare standards in hospital mergers.

    PubMed

    Katona, Katalin; Canoy, Marcel

    2013-08-01

    There is a broad literature on the consequences of applying different welfare standards in merger control. Total welfare is usually defined as the sum of consumer and provider surplus, i.e., potential external effects are not considered. The general result is then that consumer welfare is a more restrictive standard than total welfare, which is advantageous in certain situations. This relationship between the two standards is not necessarily true when the merger has significant external effects. We model mergers on hospital markets and allow for not-profit-maximizing behavior of providers and mandatory health insurance. Mandatory health insurance detaches the financial and consumption side of health care markets, and the concept consumer in merger control becomes non-evident. Patients not visiting the merging hospitals still are affected by price changes through their insurance premiums. External financial effects emerge on not directly affected consumers. We show that applying a restricted interpretation of consumer (neglecting externality) in health care merger control can reverse the relation between the two standards; consumer welfare standard can be weaker than total welfare. Consequently, applying the wrong standard can lead to both clearing socially undesirable and to blocking socially desirable mergers. The possible negative consequences of applying a simple consumer welfare standard in merger control can be even stronger when hospitals maximize quality and put less weight on financial considerations. We also investigate the implications of these results for the practice of merger control. PMID:22688439

  13. Epsom General Hospital orthopaedic theatre.

    PubMed

    1992-11-01

    The Surrey Section of the London Branch held a very successful meeting on Wednesday 9th September 1992 at which Mr Stephen Kirby BSc, CEng, Director of Estates, gave a talk and tour of the new Private Ward Unit and Ultra Clean Ventilation Theatre at Epsom General Hospital. The new Northey Ward, is a result of the refurbishment of what was a 31 bed section of the Hospital Surgical Block on the 5th floor. The new Ward provides a total of 18 single bed Wards, each complete with bathroom/WC, the Unit also accommodates a 5 bed Day Ward. All the facilities provided are of extremely high standard, which given the very tight building programme, detailed elsewhere, is indicative of the dedication of both the Designers and Contractors who are congratulated on their achievement. With regard to the UCV Theatre the following information was prepared by Aidan Hardy who is a Project Engineer with Epsom General Hospital. We are delighted to be able to print this report for our readers. PMID:10122458

  14. [Hospital and environment: waste disposal].

    PubMed

    Faure, P; Rizzo Padoin, N

    2003-11-01

    Like all production units, hospitals produce waste and are responsible for waste disposal. Hospital waste is particular due to the environmental risks involved, particularly concerning infection, effluents, and radionucleide contamination. Management plans are required to meet environmental, hygiene and regulatory obligations and to define reference waste products. The first step is to optimize waste sorting, with proper definition of the different categories, adequate containers (collection stations, color-coded sacks), waste circuits, intermediate then central storage areas, and finally transfer to an incineration unit. Volume and delay to elimination must be carefully controlled. Elimination of drugs and related products is a second aspect: packaging, perfusion pouches, tubing, radiopharmaceutic agents. These later products are managed with non-sealed sources whose elimination depends on the radioactive period, requiring selective sorting and specific holding areas while radioactivity declines. Elimination of urine and excreta containing anti-cancer drugs or intravesical drugs, particularly coming from protected rooms using radioactive iodine is another aspect. There is also a marginal flow of unused or expired drugs. For a health establishment, elimination of drugs is not included as part of waste disposal. This requires establishing a specific circuit with selective sorting and carefully applied safety regulations. Market orders for collecting and handling hospital wastes must be implemented in compliance with the rules of Public Health Tenders. PMID:14639187

  15. 42 CFR 486.322 - Condition: Relationships with hospitals, critical access hospitals, and tissue banks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Relationships with hospitals, critical access hospitals, and tissue banks. 486.322 Section 486.322 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Measures § 486.322 Condition: Relationships with hospitals, critical access hospitals, and tissue banks....

  16. 42 CFR 419.20 - Hospitals subject to the hospital outpatient prospective payment system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospitals subject to the hospital outpatient..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM FOR HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT SERVICES Categories of Hospitals and Services Subject to and Excluded From the...

  17. 76 FR 67567 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Hospital Deductible and Hospital and Extended Care Services...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ...This notice announces the inpatient hospital deductible and the hospital and extended care services coinsurance amounts for services furnished in calendar year (CY) 2012 under Medicare's Hospital Insurance Program (Medicare Part A). The Medicare statute specifies the formulae used to determine these amounts. For CY 2012, the inpatient hospital deductible will be $1,156. The daily coinsurance......

  18. Comparison between a multi-pavilion hospital and a single pavilion hospital

    PubMed Central

    MLEŞNIŞE, MIHAI; BOCŞAN, IOAN STELIAN

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Defining and measuring hospital efficiency is a hard task, in spite of the agreement that hospitals need to be efficient. Thus, while research might focus on the relationship between costs and outcomes, measurements differ significantly across studies. The aim of the present study is to compare a multi-pavilion hospital with a single hospital from Cluj-Napoca, Romania. Methods Statistical and financial (effective expenses, salaries, drugs, materials, reagents, food) indicators were used to compare two hospitals from Cluj-Napoca: the Adults’ Clinical Hospital in Cluj-Napoca, and the Rehabilitation Hospital from Cluj-Napoca respectively. Data related to these indicators were collected at each hospital level, between 2004 and 2010. Results When investigating the expenses on medicine, data showed the two hospitals had similar values in 2004, 13.09% and 14.43% for the multi-pavilion hospital and single hospital, respectively. After 2004, the expenses started to drop simultaneously, being around 11% in 2006 and 2007 for both hospitals. The mortality rate was significantly different for the two hospitals. The multi-pavilion had a much higher mortality rate, when compared to the single hospital. From 2004 until 2007 a steady increase was observed for the multi-pavilion hospital, from 1.09 to 2.57 respectively. Conclusion The significant differences found between the two hospitals look being unavoidable, as long as they seem to stem from the hospitals’ ownership, their addressability and their targeted diseases and associated procedures. PMID:27547061

  19. Nursing Home Residents at Risk of Hospitalization and the Characteristics of Their Hospital Stays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murtaugh, Christopher M.; Freiman, Marc P.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of national medical data identified elderly nursing home residents with an elevated risk of hospitalization and the characteristics of their hospital stays. Findings indicate an elevated risk of hospitalization for residents diagnosed with one of several different primary diagnoses. Infections accounted for over 25% of hospital stays.…

  20. Massachusetts law gives hospitals energy incentives

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, L.

    1982-08-30

    A new law allowing hospitals to retain the difference between pre-paid insurer's rates over actual costs reverses a cost-cutting disincentive into a financial incentive for the Massachusetts General Hospital and the American Hospital Association. If hospital costs exceed the insurer's preset reimbursements, however, hospitals must make up the difference. The new law creates incentives for energy management and could serve as a model for other states if it proves effective. The federal government may apply the concept to the Medicare-Medicaid reimbursement formula. (DCK)

  1. Strategic management of Public Hospitals' medical services.

    PubMed

    Hao, Aimin; Yi, Tao; Li, Xia; Wei, Lei; Huang, Pei; Xu, Xinzhou; Yi, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of medical services provided by competing public hospitals is the primary consideration of the public in determining the selection of a specific hospital for treatment. The main objective of strategic planning is to improve the quality of public hospital medical services. This paper provides an introduction to the history, significance, principles and practices of public hospital medical service strategy, as well as advancing the opinion that public hospital service strategy must not merely aim to produce but actually result in the highest possible level of quality, convenience, efficiency and patient satisfaction. PMID:27273960

  2. Corporate visual identity: a case in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Alkibay, Sanem; Ozdogan, F Bahar; Ermec, Aysegul

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to present a perspective to better understand corporate identity through examining the perceptions of Turkish patients and develop a corporate visual identity scale. While there is no study related to corporate identity research on hospitals in Turkey as a developing country, understanding consumer's perceptions about corporate identity efforts of hospitals could provide different perspectives for recruiters. When the hospitals are considered in two different groups as university and state hospitals, the priority of the characteristics of corporate visual identity may change, whereas the top five characteristics remain the same for all the hospitals. PMID:19042532

  3. Hospital Closure and Insights into Patient Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Garg, N.; Husk, G.; Nguyen, T.; Onyile, A.; Echezona, S.; Kuperman, G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hospital closures are becoming increasingly common in the United States. Patients who received care at the closing hospitals must travel to different, often farther hospitals for care, and nearby remaining hospitals may have difficulty coping with a sudden influx of patients. Objectives Our objectives are to analyze the dispersion patterns of patients from a closing hospital and to correlate that with distance from the closing hospital for three specific visit types: emergency, inpatient, and ambulatory. Methods In this study, we used data from a health information exchange to track patients from Saint Vincent’s Medical Center, a hospital in New York City that closed in 2010, to determine where they received emergency, inpatient, and ambulatory care following the closure. Results We found that patients went to the next nearest hospital for their emergency and inpatient care, but ambulatory encounters did not correlate with distance. Discussion It is likely that patients followed their ambulatory providers as they transitioned to another hospital system. Additional work should be done to determine predictors of impact on nearby hospitals when another hospital in the community closes in order to better prepare for patient dispersion. PMID:25848422

  4. Hospital corporate restructuring and financial performance.

    PubMed

    Clement, J P; D'Aunno, T A; Poyzer, B L

    1993-11-01

    In the last decade, an important innovation in the organizational structure of acute care hospitals occurred. Many hospitals restructured by creating subsidiaries that segment assets or services into separate corporations. We know relatively little about the effects of such restructuring. This paper examines the association of restructuring with financial performance of not-for-profit hospital firms. The study uses data from all not-for-profit acute care hospital firms in Virginia, the only state for which the unique study data are available. We find that the consolidated financial performance of hospital firms is influenced by factors that affect the hospital's financial performance (i.e., payer-mix, staffing and service mix) but not the number or size of non-hospital subsidiaries. Future research should examine the effect of restructuring on other types of performance. PMID:8231338

  5. Hospital union election activity, 1974-85

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Edmund R.; Rakich, Jonathon S.

    1988-01-01

    This study, using National Labor Relations Board data and American Hospital Association data, reports on the status of union election activity in the hospital industry for a 65-month period, January 1980-May 1985, and contrasts it with earlier data for a similar 65-month time period (1974-79). Together these data provide a comprehensive overview of union election activity in non-Federal, nongovernment hospitals since the passage of the 1974 Nonprofit Hospital Amendments to the Taft-Hartley Act. The study analyzes union, election, hospital, and environmental characteristics. Comparisons over the two time periods show that, while union victory rates in hospital elections have remained constant, the total number of elections has declined dramatically in the hospital industry. PMID:10312518

  6. Costs of Physician-Hospital Integration

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Na-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Given that the enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 is expected to generate forces toward physician-hospital integration, this study examined an understudied, albeit important, area of costs incurred in physician-hospital integration. Such costs were analyzed through 24 semi-structured interviews with physicians and hospital administrators in a multiple-case, inductive study. Two extreme types of physician-hospital arrangements were examined: an employed model (ie, integrated salary model, a group of physicians integrated by a hospital system) and a private practice (ie, a physician or group of physicians who are independent of economic or policy control). Interviews noted that integration leads to 3 evident costs, namely, monitoring, coordination, and cooperation costs. Improving our understanding of the kinds of costs that are incurred after physician-hospital integration will help hospitals and physicians to avoid common failures after integration. PMID:26496300

  7. Costs of Physician-Hospital Integration.

    PubMed

    Cho, Na-Eun

    2015-10-01

    Given that the enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 is expected to generate forces toward physician-hospital integration, this study examined an understudied, albeit important, area of costs incurred in physician-hospital integration. Such costs were analyzed through 24 semi-structured interviews with physicians and hospital administrators in a multiple-case, inductive study. Two extreme types of physician-hospital arrangements were examined: an employed model (ie, integrated salary model, a group of physicians integrated by a hospital system) and a private practice (ie, a physician or group of physicians who are independent of economic or policy control). Interviews noted that integration leads to 3 evident costs, namely, monitoring, coordination, and cooperation costs. Improving our understanding of the kinds of costs that are incurred after physician-hospital integration will help hospitals and physicians to avoid common failures after integration. PMID:26496300

  8. Evolution of an active psychogeriatric day hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, S. E.; Carlson, S.

    1976-01-01

    A geriatric day hospital was established as part of the psychogeriatric unit of the Royal Ottawa Hospital. While initially this day hospital was integrated with day hospital programs of other units, it became apparent that a separate facility was desirable. The activities and programs of the psychogeriatric day hospital, run by one registered nurse, were integrated with those of the geriatric inpatient unit. It was found to be advantageous for inpatients and day hospital patients to share the same physical facilities. The majority of day hospital patients came from the inpatient unit; almost all had affective disorders. The emphasis was on reintegration into the community. During the 1st year of operation there were 75 patients in the program; only 3 needed admission to the inpatient unit and 1 was readmitted after discharge. PMID:991034

  9. Managing hospitals in turbulent times: do organizational changes improve hospital survival?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S Y; Alexander, J A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine (1) the degree to which organizational changes affected hospital survival; (2) whether core and peripheral organizational changes affected hospital survival differently; and (3) how simultaneous organizational changes affected hospital survival. DATA SOURCES: AHA Hospital Surveys, the Area Resource File, and the AHA Hospital Guides, Part B: Multihospital Systems. STUDY DESIGN: The study employed a longitudinal panel design. We followed changes in all community hospitals in the continental United States from 1981 through 1994. The dependent variable, hospital closure, was examined as a function of multiple changes in a hospital's core and peripheral structures as well as the hospital's organizational and environmental characteristics. Cox regression models were used to test the expectations that core changes increased closure risk while peripheral changes decreased such risk, and that simultaneous core and peripheral changes would lead to higher risk of closure. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Results indicated more peripheral than core changes in community hospitals. Overall, findings contradicted our expectations. Change in specialty, a core change, was beneficial for hospitals, because it reduced closure risk. The two most frequent peripheral changes, downsizing and leadership change, were positively associated with closure. Simultaneous organizational changes displayed a similar pattern: multiple core changes reduced closure risk, while multiple peripheral changes increased the risk. These patterns held regardless of the level of uncertainty in hospital environments. CONCLUSIONS: Organizational changes are not all beneficial for hospitals, suggesting that hospital leaders should be both cautious and selective in their efforts to turn their hospitals around. PMID:10536977

  10. Rural and Urban Hospitals' Role in Providing Inpatient Care, 2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC/NCHS, National Hospital Discharge Survey, 2010. How did rural hospital inpatients differ from urban hospital inpatients ... CDC/NCHS, National Hospital Discharge Survey, 2010. How did patients' first-listed diagnoses differ in rural and ...

  11. 1. Oblique view of Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building looking north ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Oblique view of Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building looking north from roof of 1960 high-rise hospital - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Hospital Building, Rixey Place, bounded by Williamson Drive, Holcomb Road, & The Circle, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  12. [Out-of-hospital births].

    PubMed

    Fernández Domínguez, N; Leal Gómez, E; García Lavandeira, S; Vázquez Rodríguez, M

    2016-01-01

    Childbirth is a physiological process and, as such, there should be limited assistance for the woman to ensure that it follows its natural process, avoiding any possible complication and, if they do appear, attempting to resolve them. Health personnel should try to achieve a balance between safety and the least possible outside assistance. The out-of-hospital delivery is considered an emergency as it happens unexpectedly, that is, without being previously planned. Given that it has to be treated outside the ideal conditions of a maternity ward, it is considered as an emergency. PMID:26006314

  13. Salisbury hospital's steam trap success.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    With the Carbon Reduction Commitment now fully in force, and the NHS tasked with achieving tough carbon emission reduction targets in line with both UK and EU mandates, healthcare estates teams across the country are seeking cost-effective ways to reduce energy consumption. Against this backdrop, Salisbury District Hospital has implemented a concerted energy-saving programme, key elements of which include replacing existing bucket steam traps with higher performing, lower maintenance, and more effective GEM venturi steam traps from Thermal Energy International (TEI), installing a new gas CHP engine, and looking into fitting a TEI condensate economiser system. PMID:21485315

  14. Supply Chain Coordination in Hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rego, Nazaré; de Sousa, Jorge Pinho

    This paper presents an innovative approach to support the definition of strategies for the design of alternative configurations of hospital supply chains. This approach was developed around a hybrid Tabu Search / Variable Neighbourhood Search metaheuristic, that uses several neighbourhood structures. The flexibility of the procedure allows its application to supply chains with different topologies and atypical cost characteristics. A preliminary computational experience shows the approach potential in solving large scale supply chain configuration problems. The future incorporation of this approach in a broader Decision Support System (DSS) will provide a tool that can significantly contribute to an increase of healthcare supply chains efficiency and encourage the establishment of collaborative partnerships between their members.

  15. Business Intelligence in Hospital Management.

    PubMed

    Escher, Achim; Hainc, Nicolin; Boll, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Business intelligence (BI) is a worthwhile investment, and will play a significant role in hospital management in the near future. Implementation of BI is challenging and requires resources, skills, and a strategy, but enables management to have easy access to relevant analysis of data and visualization of important key performance indicators (KPI). Modern BI applications will help to overcome shortages of common "hand-made" analysis, save time and money, and will enable even managers to do "self-service" analysis and reporting. PMID:27514111

  16. Bed bathing patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Downey, Lindsey; Lloyd, Hilary

    There are a number of circumstances that may affect an individual's ability to maintain personal hygiene. Hospitalised patients, and in particular those who are bedridden, may become dependent on nursing staff to carry out their hygiene needs. Assisting patients to maintain personal hygiene is a fundamental aspect of nursing care. However, it is a task often delegated to junior or newly qualified staff. This article focuses on the principles of bed bathing patients in hospital, correct procedure and the importance of maintaining patient dignity and respect in clinical practice. PMID:18543852

  17. Operating private hospitals in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Barcie, Joseph S

    2015-01-01

    Mexico is one of the richest countries in Latin America and over the last several decades there have been many changes in the healthcare delivery systems, from universal healthcare coverage for all Mexicans to the fast paced expansion of private healthcare. Like many countries, Mexico has both private and public health systems and hospital administrators are facing challenges on multiple fronts in addition to facing exciting new opportunities. In this article you will get a bird's eye view of this ever changing panorama. How the new growing middle class consumerism has impacted physicians, health insurance and private healthcare industry. PMID:26521381

  18. Hubble Systems Optimize Hospital Schedules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Don Rosenthal, a former Ames Research Center computer scientist who helped design the Hubble Space Telescope's scheduling software, co-founded Allocade Inc. of Menlo Park, California, in 2004. Allocade's OnCue software helps hospitals reclaim unused capacity and optimize constantly changing schedules for imaging procedures. After starting to use the software, one medical center soon reported noticeable improvements in efficiency, including a 12 percent increase in procedure volume, 35 percent reduction in staff overtime, and significant reductions in backlog and technician phone time. Allocade now offers versions for outpatient and inpatient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, interventional radiology, nuclear medicine, Positron Emission Tomography (PET), radiography, radiography-fluoroscopy, and mammography.

  19. Technical Efficiency of Hospitals in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    KAKEMAN, Edris; RAHIMI FORUSHANI, Abbas; DARGAHI, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, restriction on access and optimum use of resources is the main challenge of development in all organizations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the technical efficiency and its factors, influencing hospitals of Tehran. Methods: This research was a descriptive-analytical and retrospective study conducted in 2014–2015. Fifty two hospitals with public, private, and social security ownership type were selected for this study. The required data was collected by a researcher-made check list in 3 sections of background data, inputs and outputs. The data was analyzed by DEAP 1.0.2, and STATA-13 technique. Results: Seventeen (31/48) of hospitals had the efficiency score of 1 as the highest technical efficiency. The highest average score of efficiency was related to social security hospitals as 84.32, and then the public and private hospitals with the average of 84.29 and 79.64 respectively. Tobit regression results showed that the size, type of practice, and ownership of hospitals were effective on the degree of their technical efficiency. However, there was no significant correlation between teaching / non-teaching hospitals with technical efficiency. Conclusion: Establishment of competition system among hospitals, constitution of medium size hospitals and allocation of budget to hospitals based on national accreditation system are recommended. PMID:27252919

  20. The effect of hospital control strategies on physician satisfaction and physician-hospital conflict.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, L R; Andersen, R M; Shortell, S M

    1990-01-01

    This article examines several strategies that hospitals use to control their medical staffs. Such strategies include placing physicians on salary, developing exclusive hospital affiliations with physicians, and involving physicians in decision-making bodies. Using regression techniques, we investigate which hospitals are more likely to utilize these strategies and whether such strategies are effective in promoting physician-hospital integration. Contrary to our expectations, corporate hospital structures (e.g., for-profit hospitals, membership in multihospital systems) generally do not employ these strategies more often and oftentimes employ them less. There is also little evidence that control strategies are effective levers for increasing physician satisfaction or decreasing physician-hospital conflict. We suggest that control strategies are useful for purposes other than promoting physician-hospital integration. Finally, hospital ownership appears to exert the biggest effect on physician satisfaction and conflict. PMID:2380074

  1. Architecture for hospital information integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimiak, William J.; Janariz, Daniel L.; Martinez, Ralph

    1999-07-01

    The ongoing integration of hospital information systems (HIS) continues. Data storage systems, data networks and computers improve, data bases grow and health-care applications increase. Some computer operating systems continue to evolve and some fade. Health care delivery now depends on this computer-assisted environment. The result is the critical harmonization of the various hospital information systems becomes increasingly difficult. The purpose of this paper is to present an architecture for HIS integration that is computer-language-neutral and computer- hardware-neutral for the informatics applications. The proposed architecture builds upon the work done at the University of Arizona on middleware, the work of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association, and the American College of Radiology. It is a fresh approach to allowing applications engineers to access medical data easily and thus concentrates on the application techniques in which they are expert without struggling with medical information syntaxes. The HIS can be modeled using a hierarchy of information sub-systems thus facilitating its understanding. The architecture includes the resulting information model along with a strict but intuitive application programming interface, managed by CORBA. The CORBA requirement facilitates interoperability. It should also reduce software and hardware development times.

  2. Cardiology in a district hospital

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Michael; Huggett, Isabel

    1982-01-01

    During 1975-81 a non-invasive cardiac unit was established at St Peter's Hospital, Chertsey, a district hospital serving a population of 202 000. There was a progressive increase in outpatient referrals in cardiology, and in 1981 non-invasive investigations included 424 echocardiograms, 305 exercise electrocardiograms, 275 ambulatory electrocardiograms, and 147 thallium-201 studies. Between 1979 and 1981, 151 patients were admitted directly to major centres for further investigation; 74% of those with ischaemic heart disease and 68% of those with valvular heart disease subsequently underwent surgery, a ratio of investigation to surgery that is half the norm for the four metropolitan regions. Based on the 1981 figures, which were substantially above those for 1980, there is a need for a minimum of 270 open heart operations per million of the population including 180 vein bypass operations. This figure for bypass grafting is 230% higher than in the United Kingdom as a whole in 1978 and has substantial implications. PMID:6811004

  3. The politics of local hospital reform: a case study of hospital reorganization following the 2002 Norwegian hospital reform

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Norwegian hospital reform of 2002 was an attempt to make restructuring of hospitals easier by removing politicians from the decision-making processes. To facilitate changes seen as necessary but politically difficult, the central state took over ownership of the hospitals and stripped the county politicians of what had been their main responsibility for decades. This meant that decisions regarding hospital structure and organization were now being taken by professional administrators and not by politically elected representatives. The question raised here is whether this has had any effect on the speed of restructuring of the hospital sector. Method The empirical part is a case study of the restructuring process in Innlandet Hospital Trust (IHT), which was one of the largest enterprise established after the hospital reform and where the vision for restructuring was clearly set. Different sources of qualitative data are used in the analysis. These include interviews with key actors, observational data and document studies. Results The analysis demonstrates how the new professional leaders at first acted in accordance with the intentions of the hospital reform, but soon chose to avoid the more ambitious plans for restructuring the hospital structure and in fact reintroduced local politics into the decision-making process. The analysis further illustrates how local networks and engagement of political representatives from all levels of government complicated the decision-making process surrounding local structural reforms. Local political representatives teamed up with other actors and created powerful networks. At the same time, national politicians had incentives to involve themselves in the processes as supporters of the status quo. Conclusion Because of the incentives that faced political actors and the controversial nature of major hospital reforms, the removal of local politicians and the centralization of ownership did not necessarily facilitate

  4. The architecture of enterprise hospital information system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong; Li, Haomin; Zhao, Chenhui; An, Jiye

    2005-01-01

    Because of the complexity of the hospital environment, there exist a lot of medical information systems from different vendors with incompatible structures. In order to establish an enterprise hospital information system, the integration among these heterogeneous systems must be considered. Complete integration should cover three aspects: data integration, function integration and workflow integration. However most of the previous design of architecture did not accomplish such a complete integration. This article offers an architecture design of the enterprise hospital information system based on the concept of digital neural network system in hospital. It covers all three aspects of integration, and eventually achieves the target of one virtual data center with Enterprise Viewer for users of different roles. The initial implementation of the architecture in the 5-year Digital Hospital Project in Huzhou Central hospital of Zhejiang Province is also described. PMID:17281875

  5. Marketing strategy determinants in rural hospitals.

    PubMed

    Smith, H L; Haley, D; Piland, N F

    1993-01-01

    Rural hospitals confront an inauspicious environment due to changes in patient reimbursement and medical practice. Facing a situation of declining revenues, marketing presents an option for rural hospitals to adapt to the growing constraints. This paper analyzes the determinants of marketing strategy emphasis in rural hospitals. The conceptual model adopted in this study predicts that prior performance and contextual variables explain marketing strategy emphasis. The relationships are examined in a case study of rural New Mexico hospitals. Results suggest that prior performance and several contextual variables explain variations in marketing strategy emphasis. In particular, higher gross patient revenues are associated with more emphasis on television and radio advertising. Furthermore, rural New Mexico hospitals with high numbers of licensed beds and medical staff members, or that are affiliated with a chain organization, place greater emphasis on market research and market planning. The implications for marketing practice in rural hospitals are discussed. PMID:10135505

  6. Using HL7 in hospital staff assignments.

    PubMed

    Unluturk, Mehmet S

    2014-02-01

    Hospital staff assignments are the instructions that allocate the hospital staff members to the hospital beds. Currently, hospital administrators make the assignments without accessing the information regarding the occupancy of the hospital beds and the acuity of the patient. As a result, administrators cannot distinguish between occupied and unoccupied beds, and may therefore assign staff to unoccupied beds. This gives rise to uneven and inefficient staff assignments. In this paper, the hospital admission-discharge-transfer (ADT) system is employed both as a data source and an assignment device to create staff assignments. When the patient data is newly added or modified, the ADT system updates the assignment software client with the relevant data. Based on the relevant data, the assignment software client is able to construct staff assignments in a more efficient way. PMID:24480165

  7. [Development of green hospitals home and abroad].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yiju; Zeng, Na; Shen, Minxue; Sun, Zhenqiu

    2013-09-01

    Green hospital construction is a new challenge for medical industry after global sustainable development strategy was put forward. The core connotation of green hospital includes green building, green healthcare, patient safety, and doctor-patient harmony. Many countries have established green building evaluation system to deal with energy crisis. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), Green Guide for Health Care (GGHC) in the U.S., and Evaluation System for Green Hospital Building (CSUS/GBC 2-2011) in China have guiding significance for the development of green hospitals in China. The evaluation system of green hospitals home and abroad still focuses on green building, and establishment of suitable synthesis evaluation system of green hospitals in China needs further research. PMID:24071694

  8. Evaluation of Nigerian hospital meal carts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayodeji, Sesan P.; Adeyeri, Michael K.; Omoniyi, Olaoluwa

    2015-03-01

    Hospital meal carts are used to deliver meals, drugs and some other materials to patients in the hospital environment. These carts which are moved manually by operators, the health workers, mostly do not comply with ergonomics guidelines and physical requirements of the equipment users in terms of anthropometry data of the region thus increasing the risk of musculoskeletal disorder among the meal cart users. This study carried out ergonomic evaluation of the available meal carts in some western Nigeria hospitals. A well-structured questionnaire has two major segments: Operational survey and biomechanical survey, which were administered to the health workers using hospital meal carts in some hospitals in southwestern Nigeria, and physical assessment, which was undertaken to collect data for the ergonomic evaluation. The responses from the questionnaires show that some areas on the existing hospital meal carts are of concern to the users which need to be improved upon.

  9. All-Round Marketing Increases Hospital Popularity.

    PubMed

    Ziqi, Tao

    2015-06-01

    Xuzhou Center Hospital is in a competing medical market in Xuzhou city. This hospital has been dedicating to improve the medical skills and provide professional and individualized service to the patients in order to improve the patient's experience and increase the patient's satisfaction. On the other side, this hospital has provided an all-round marketing campaign to build up the social influence and public reputation through public-praise marketing, web marketing, media marketing, and scholar marketing. Besides, this hospital has been cooperating with foreign medical institutions and inviting foreign medical specialists to academic communication. With the combined effects of improving medical service and all-round marketing, the hospital's economic performance has been enhanced significantly and laid a solid foundation for its ambition to become the first-class hospital in Huaihai Economic Zone. PMID:25548007

  10. Soft Budget Constraints in Public Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wright, Donald J

    2016-05-01

    A soft budget constraint arises when a government is unable to commit to not 'bailout' a public hospital if the public hospital exhausts its budget before the end of the budget period. It is shown that if the political costs of a 'bailout' are relatively small, then the public hospital exhausts the welfare-maximising budget before the end of the budget period and a 'bailout' occurs. In anticipation, the government offers a budget to the public hospital that may be greater than or less than the welfare-maximising budget. In either case, the public hospital treats 'too many' elective patients before the 'bailout' and 'too few' after. The introduction of a private hospital reduces the size of any 'bailout' and increases welfare. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25740723

  11. CEO Compensation and Hospital Financial Performance

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Kristin L.; Sandoval, Guillermo A.; Brown, Adalsteinn D.; Pink, George H.

    2010-01-01

    Growing interest in pay-for-performance and the level of CEO pay raises questions about the link between performance and compensation in the health sector. This study compares the compensation of non-profit hospital Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) in Ontario, Canada to the three longest reported and most used measures of hospital financial performance. Our sample consisted of 132 CEOs from 92 hospitals between 1999 and 2006. Unbalanced panel data were analyzed using fixed effects regression. Results suggest that CEO compensation was largely unrelated to hospital financial performance. Inflation-adjusted salaries appeared to increase over time independent of hospital performance, and hospital size was positively correlated with CEO compensation. The apparent upward trend in salary despite some declines in financial performance challenges the fundamental assumption underlying this paper, that is, financial performance is likely linked to CEO compensation in Ontario. Further research is needed to understand long-term performance related to compensation incentives. PMID:19605619

  12. Psychiatrically hospitalized college students: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rosecan, A S; Goldberg, R L; Wise, T N

    1992-07-01

    This pilot study presents data on an underreported group: college students who require psychiatric hospitalization. Although the study is too small to sustain broad generalizations, the authors found indications of significant correlations between students' hospitalization and the academic cycle, substance abuse, and distance from home. It is hoped that other institutions will undertake similar studies of this group of students to provide a broader body of data from which to draw inferences regarding prevention, intervention, and psychiatric hospitalization. PMID:1506564

  13. [Hospital comparison--status quo and prospects].

    PubMed

    Betzler, M; Haun, P

    1998-12-01

    Hospitals are competing with each other for the limited financial resources available in the health care sector. Comparison of hospitals is legally required (BPf1V section 5) to improve financial efficiency in the health care sector and make competition between hospitals keener, while also objectivizing it. If comparison of the hospitals is really to enhance profitability or efficiency, and not just to reduce the prices for hospital stays regardless of quality, it must extend to far more than the global figures in the compilation summarizing performance and calculation and the hospital statistics (no. of cases, days of care, length of stay, case lump sums and special fees). Documentation of particular features of the patient population, the potentials of the hospital and description of the treatment processes yield valuable information on capacity and performance level. With rising costs, the danger is growing that the quality and risk dimension of the actual medical treatment will not be promoted with the same enthusiasm by those offering the service. Hospital audit does not only allow a check on the hospital's own situation with regard to performance, quality, efficiency and patient satisfaction, but can also provide a basis of structural planning. The fact is that all efforts made and steps taken by the responsible persons in the hospital to improve the quality of structures, processes and results can only be successful if they are also perceived by the patients, the doctors who refer them and the visitors. If hospital audit is restricted to the bed occupancy and the invoicing data, it is only realistic to expect cuts in performance level. This would be bad for the patient and, in view of the consequent costs, also for the overall costs in the health care sector. Against the backdrop of a future performance-related system of remuneration instead of the principle of covering one's own costs that has been in place hitherto, openness about treatment results gains

  14. Malicious deprivation of hospital staff privileges.

    PubMed

    Firestone, M H; Schur, R

    1986-01-01

    The growing problem of discrimination against physicians seeking hospital staff privileges may be met by various tort and contract actions against hospitals and medical staff members. In many jurisdictions, the obstacles presented by common-law and statutory immunities and the unavailability of judicial review for actions involving private hospitals pose formidable obstacles. However, the current trend in the courts would seem to be toward actionability. PMID:3312890

  15. Determinants of hospital utilization in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    van der Gaag, J; Rutten, F F; van Praag, B M

    1975-01-01

    Hospital use in the Netherlands is examined in a cross-section analysis of 1969 and 1971 data for 120 service regions. Elasticities of admissions with respect to bed supply and supply of general practitioners are calculated, and the substitutability of first level care (by general practitioners) for hospital care is considered. Substitution effects found indicate that the Dutch government's plan to reduce the ratio of hospital beds to population is feasible. PMID:1225868

  16. Communities and Hospitals: Social Capital, Community Accountability, and Service Provision in U.S. Community Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shoou-Yih D; Chen, Wendy L; Weiner, Bryan J

    2004-01-01

    Objectives The study related community social capital to the level of community accountability and provision of community-oriented services in U.S. community hospitals. Study Setting The sample included 1,383 community hospitals that participated in the 1997 American Hospital Association's (AHA) Hospital Annual and Governance Surveys. Data Sources (1) The 1997 AHA Annual Hospital Survey, (2) the 1997 AHA Hospital Governance Survey, (3) the DDB Needham Market Facts Survey, (4) the 1996 County Election Data File, and (5) the 1998 Area Resource File. Research Design The study used a mix of longitudinal and cross-sectional data. Key Findings We identified two distinct indicators of social capital—community participation and voting participation. Community accountability in hospitals was unrelated to either indicator. Hospitals' provision of community-oriented health services was negatively associated with community participation but unrelated with voting participation. The interaction between voting participation and community representation on hospital governance was positively associated with community accountability and provision of community-oriented health services. Conclusion Neither community participation nor voting participation was sufficient to influence hospital behavior. The positive finding associated with the interaction between voting participation and community representation on hospital governance underscored the importance of an active political culture in influencing hospital behavior, without which the installation of community representatives on hospital governance might be more symbolic than actually serving the health concerns of community residents. PMID:15333119

  17. Hospital Choice of Rural Medicare Beneficiaries: Patient, Hospital Attributes, and the Patient–Physician Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Wan-Tzu Connie; Porell, Frank W; Adams, E Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Objective To examine how patient and hospital attributes and the patient–physician relationship influence hospital choice of rural Medicare beneficiaries. Data Sources Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS), Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) Provider of Services (POS) file, American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey, and Medicare Hospital Service Area (HSA) files for 1994 and 1995. Study Design The study sample consisted of 1,702 hospitalizations of rural Medicare beneficiaries. McFadden's conditional logit model was used to analyze hospital choices of rural Medicare beneficiaries. The model included independent variables to control for patients' and hospitals' attributes and the distance to hospital alternatives. Principal Findings The empirical results show strong preferences of aged patients for closer hospitals and those of greater scale and service capacity. Patients with complex acute medical conditions and those with more resources were more likely to bypass their closest rural hospitals. Beneficiaries were more likely to bypass their closest rural hospital if they had no regular physician, had a shorter patient–physician tie, were dissatisfied with the availability of health care, and had a longer travel time to their physician's office. Conclusions The significant influences of patients' socioeconomic, health, and functional status, their satisfaction with and access to primary care, and their strong preferences for certain hospital attributes should inform federal program initiatives about the likely impacts of policy changes on hospital bypassing behavior. PMID:15533193

  18. Hospital Disaster Preparedness Tools: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Heidaranlu, Esmail; Ebadi, Abbas; Khankeh, Hamid Reza; Ardalan, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Evaluating hospital disaster preparedness is one the best ways for hospital accreditation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of outcome measure that offer the level of measurement, reliability and validity that are known as the ‘ psychometric properties’ of the current hospital disaster preparedness tools. Methods: In total, 140 studies were retrieved. Studies which had been published from 2000 to 2014 and had used hospital disaster preparedness tools were appraised by using the PRISMA guideline. The content quality and the quality of the psychometric properties of the retrieved tools were assessed by using the World Health Organization Criteria for Hospital Preparedness as well as the COSMIN criteria. Findings: Only 33 studies met the inclusion criteria. In total, eleven hospital disaster preparedness tools had been used in these 33 studies. These tools mainly focused on evaluating structural and non-structural aspects of hospital preparedness and paid little attention, if any, to the key functional aspect. Conclusion: Given the paramount importance of evaluating hospital disaster preparedness and the weaknesses of current preparedness evaluation tools, valid and reliable tools should be developed by using experts’ knowledge and experience through the processes of tool development and psychometric evaluation. Keywords: Hospital preparedness, Measurement tool, Disaster, Systematic review PMID:26425401

  19. Hospital-physician gainsharing in cardiology.

    PubMed

    Ketcham, Jonathan D; Furukawa, Michael F

    2008-01-01

    The Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General has approved a handful of gainsharing arrangements in which physicians receive cash payments for reducing hospital spending. Gainsharing might reduce costs by aligning hospital and physician incentives, but concerns remain about quality and access. We examine the effects of thirteen gainsharing programs on coronary stent patients. Compared to other hospitals, gainsharing hospitals reduced costs by 7.4 percent per patient, with 91 percent of the savings from lower prices and 9 percent from lower utilization. The available measures of access and quality suggest that neither was reduced, nor was access to drug-eluting stents before 2006. PMID:18474974

  20. Unions and hospitals: some unresolved issues.

    PubMed

    Adamache, K W; Sloan, F A

    1982-05-01

    This article investigates the impact of unions on the wages of hospital workers. Our OLS findings agree with previous OLS studies--unions increase registered nurses' (RNs) wages by five percent and by about eight to ten percent for other hospital workers. By contrast, we find (after correcting for selectivity bias in hospital unionization status) a direct union effect of about twenty percent on RN wages and in excess of thirty percent on wages of other hospital workers. While the results based on selectivity bias adjustments make us uneasy, we do not reject them out-of-hand. We also find indirect union effects (up to five percent) by other unionized occupations within a hospital and up to ten percent by other unionized hospitals in the local labor market. Prospective reimbursement programs have a negative impact on the wages of hospital workers but are only significant for non-unionized occupations. Our three empirical tests of monopsony all reject the view that monopsony is a factor in hospital wage-setting. Even considering the large union effects (based on selectivity bias adjustment), we conclude that unions have been a minor contributor to hospital cost inflation. PMID:10263950

  1. Hospital Contracts: Important Issues for Medical Groups.

    PubMed

    Rosolio, Charles E

    2016-01-01

    Relationships with hospitals and outpatient medical facilities have always been an important part of the business model for private medical practices. As healthcare delivery to patients has evolved in the United States (much of it driven by the new government mandates, regulations, and the Affordable Care Act), the delivery of such services is becoming more and more centered on the hospital or institutional setting, thus making contractual relationships with hospitals even more important for medical practices. As a natural outgrowth of this relationship, attention to hospital contracts is becoming more important. PMID:27039636

  2. Developing Financial Benchmarks for Critical Access Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Pink, George H.; Holmes, George M.; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Thompson, Roger E.

    2009-01-01

    This study developed and applied benchmarks for five indicators included in the CAH Financial Indicators Report, an annual, hospital-specific report distributed to all critical access hospitals (CAHs). An online survey of Chief Executive Officers and Chief Financial Officers was used to establish benchmarks. Indicator values for 2004, 2005, and 2006 were calculated for 421 CAHs and hospital performance was compared to the benchmarks. Although many hospitals performed better than benchmark on one indicator in 1 year, very few performed better than benchmark on all five indicators in all 3 years. The probability of performing better than benchmark differed among peer groups. PMID:19544935

  3. The changing power equation in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rayburn, J M; Rayburn, L G

    1997-01-01

    This research traces the origins, development, and reasons for change in the power equation in the U.S. hospitals between physicians, administrators and accountants. The paper contains three major sections: a review of the literature concerning authority, power, influence, and institutional theory; a review of the development of the power of professions, especially physicians, accounting and healthcare administrators, and the power equilibrium of a hospital; and, a discussion of the social policy implications of the power struggle. The basis for physicians' power derives from their legal ability to act on which others are dependent, such as choosing which hospital to admit patients, order tests and procedures for their patients. The Federal Government's prospective payment system and the hospitals' related case-mix accounting systems appear to influence the power structure in hospitals by redistributing that power. The basis of the accountants' power base is control of financial information. Accountants have a definite potential for influencing which departments receive financial resources and for what purpose. This moves hospital accountants into the power equation. The basis of the hospital administrators' power is their formal authority in the organization. Regardless of what actions federal government agencies, hospital accountants, or hospital administrators take, physicians are expected to remain the dominant factor in the power equation. Without major environmental changes to gain control of physician services, only insignificant results in cost containment will occur. PMID:10163913

  4. Recommendations for Using Barcode in Hospital Process

    PubMed Central

    Hachesu, Peyman Rezaei; Zyaei, Leila; Hassankhani, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lack of attention to the proper barcode using leads to lack of use or misuse in the hospitals. The present research aimed to investigate the requirements and barrier for using barcode technology and presenting suggestions to use it. Methods: The research is observational-descriptive. The data was collected using the designed checklist which its validity was assessed. This check list consists of two parts: “Requirements” and “barrier” of using the barcodes. Research community included 10 teaching hospitals and a class of 65 participants included people in the hospitals. The collected data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: Required changes of workflow processes in the hospital and compliance them with the hospital policy are such requirements that had been infringed in the 90 % of hospitals. Prioritization of some hospital processes for barcoding, system integration with Hospital Information system (HIS), training of staff and budgeting are requirements for the successful implementation which had been infringed in the 80% of hospitals. Dissatisfaction with the quality of barcode labels and lacks of adequate scanners both whit the rate of 100 %, and the lack of understanding of the necessary requirements for implementation of barcodes as 80% were the most important barrier. Conclusion: Integrate bar code system with clinical workflow should be considered. Lack of knowledge and understanding toward the infrastructure, inadequate staff training and technologic problems are considered as the greatest barriers. PMID:27482137

  5. Using Performance Data to Identify Preferred Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Meredith B; Landrum, Mary Beth; Meara, Ellen; Huskamp, Haiden A; Conti, Rena M; Keating, Nancy L

    2007-01-01

    Objective To explore the implications of current approaches used by health plans and purchasers to identify preferred hospitals for tiered networks using cost and quality information. Data Sources/Study Setting 2002 secondary data from WebMD Quality Services on hospital quality and costs in five markets (Boston, Miami, Phoenix, Seattle, and Syracuse). Study Design We compared four alternative tiering strategies that combine information on quality and cost to designate “preferred” (defined as ranking in the top quartile) hospitals. Within each market we identified the sets of hospitals designated preferred according to each strategy and examined the overlap in these sets across strategies. Principal Findings Compared with identifying preferred hospitals based on quality scores only, we found little overlap with the sets of hospitals that would be preferred based on cost scores only, cost scores after applying minimal quality standards, and an equally weighted quality and cost measure. The last two approaches, commonly used and intuitively appealing strategies to identify high-value hospitals, led to substantially different results. Conclusions The lack of agreement among alternative strategies to combine cost and quality data for ranking hospitals suggests the need for clear prioritization by payers and the application of more rigorous methods to identify high-value hospitals. PMID:17995555

  6. Recognition of dementia in hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Katie; Mezey, Mathy

    2008-01-01

    Many hospital patients with dementia have no documented dementia diagnosis. In some cases, this is because they have never been diagnosed. Recognition of Dementia in Hospitalized Older Adults proposes several approaches that hospital nurses can use to increase recognition of dementia. This article describes the Try This approaches, how to implement them, and how to incorporate them into a hospital's current admission procedures. For a free online video demonstrating the use of these approaches, go to http://links.lww.com/A216. PMID:18156858

  7. Hospitals should be exemplars of healthy workplaces.

    PubMed

    Russell, Lesley M; Anstey, Matthew H R; Wells, Susan

    2015-05-01

    As major employers and flagship health care organisations, hospitals can influence the norms of the communities they serve by adopting model policies and practices that promote the health of patients, visitors, employees, students and trainees. Hospitals must become healthy workplaces in every sense and extend their role to focus on health and wellness, not just illness. Reorienting hospital policies can: ensure the provision and stewardship of healthy, ecologically sound and sustainable environments; increase the focus on promoting health and prevention; foster interpersonal safety; and improve workplace safety. Such efforts deliver improvements in health outcomes and savings in hospital budgets. PMID:25929505

  8. The Legal Relationship of Doctor and Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Carlisle, John R.

    1983-01-01

    While doctors working in hospitals have usually been regarded as independent contractors, liable to the patient and for whom the hospital may not be held liable by the patient, some recent cases are beginning to change this assumption, especially where the case is an emergency giving the patient no choice of doctor but the one on duty at the time. These changes have particular implications for the insurance situation, since hospitals are entitled to sue someone on whose behalf they have been found vicariously negligent. As a condition of hospital privileges, they may require evidence of the doctor's insurance protection against legal action. PMID:21283286

  9. Developing a strategic marketing plan for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Dychtwald, K; Zitter, M

    1988-09-01

    The initial stages of developing a strategic marketing plan for hospitals are explored in this excerpt from the book, The Role of the Hospital in an Aging Society: A Blueprint for Action. The elderly have unique perceptual, cognitive, social, and psychological needs and preferences, and a marketing strategy for eldercare services must reflect these factors, as well as the financial role of third-party payers and the decision-making influence of families and physicians. Among the elements the hospital must address when developing a marketing strategy are market selection and segmentation, targeting markets with specific services, pricing, and positioning the hospital for a maximum share of the eldercare market. PMID:10302744

  10. Mission statements in Canadian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bart, Christopher K; Hupfer, Maureen

    2004-01-01

    One of the most popular management tools in the world, the mission statement also is subject to widespread criticism. In order to improve our understanding of the mission statement's strategic value and to provide actionable recommendations for healthcare organizations, the paper adopted a social constructionist perspective in a mission statement study conducted among Canadian hospital executives. The paper found seven factors underlying 23 possible mission statement content items. Four of these (grand inspiration, benefactors, competitive orientation and business definition) corresponded to the dimensions of dominant managerial logic proposed by von Krogh and Grand, and were positively related to various behavioral, financial performance and mission achievement measures. The findings indicate that not all mission statement components are created equal and that the recommendations of major strategy texts may require reconsideration where this particular institutional context is concerned. PMID:15366277

  11. Internationalization of multi hospital systems.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, C; Chandran, R; O'Hara, L

    1992-01-01

    Much like the manufacturing multinationals of yore, professional service establishments are now going abroad in large numbers. Two factors drive their expansion overseas--the increasing restrictions on their operations domestically, and the inviting opportunities in some of the global markets. A survey of multi hospital corporations both with and without experience in foreign markets was conducted regarding the expansion of their operations overseas. Examined were factors central to the decision-making process including: the various types of foreign health care systems; the entry strategies in penetrating foreign markets (fully owned, joint ventures, etc.); favorable factors and barriers considered in choosing foreign markets; the ability to transfer standardized systems from operations in the U.S.; and the profits from such operations. Respondents provided information regarding the above factors that are critical in determining an overseas expansion strategy. PMID:10122438

  12. [Hospital detention in tuberculosis control].

    PubMed

    Villalbí, Joan R; Rodríguez-Campos, Mònica; Orcau, Àngels; Espachs, M Àngels; Salamero, Marta; Maldonado, José; Caylà, Joan A

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the actions of public health services of the city of Barcelona to prevent tuberculosis transmission by noncompliant smear-positive patients by using the possibilities of Spanish Law 3/1986. The actions were based on a resolution of the health authorities on the need to locate such patients and to detain them in hospitals to provide treatment. This involved police cooperation, informing noncompliant patients, and requesting ratification from the Administrative Court. The article describes the process and the characteristics of the cases involved. Over nine years, from July 2006 to June 2015, the law was used in only twelve cases. The authors conclude that the criteria of prudence and proportionality were used in the application of the law, which resulted in the treatment of patients who posed a risk to their environment, reducing the transmission of infection. PMID:26832855

  13. Hospitals, market share, and consolidation.

    PubMed

    Cutler, David M; Scott Morton, Fiona

    2013-11-13

    A large reduction in use of inpatient care combined with the incentives in the Affordable Care Act is leading to significant consolidation in the hospital industry. What was once a set of independent hospitals having arms-length relationships with physicians and clinicians who provide ambulatory care is becoming a small number of locally integrated health systems, generally built around large, prestigious academic medical centers. The typical region in the United States has 3 to 5 consolidated health systems, spanning a wide range of care settings, and a smaller fringe of health care centers outside those systems. Consolidated health systems have advantages and drawbacks. The advantages include the ability to coordinate care across different practitioners and sites of care. Offsetting this is the potential for higher prices resulting from greater market power. Market power increases because it is difficult for insurers to bargain successfully with one of only a few health systems. Antitrust authorities are examining these consolidated systems as they form, but broad conclusions are difficult to draw because typically the creation of a system will generate both benefit and harm and each set of facts will be different. Moreover, the remedies traditionally used (eg, blocking the transaction or requiring that the parties divest assets) by antitrust authorities in cases of net harm are limited. For this reason, local governments may want to introduce new policies that help ensure consumers gain protection in the event of consolidation, such as insurance products that charge consumers more for high-priced clinicians and health care centers, bundling payments to clinicians and health care organizations to eliminate the incentives of big institutions to simply provide more care, and establishing area-specific price or spending targets. PMID:24219952

  14. Hospital prices and market structure in the hospital and insurance industries.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Asako S; Vogt, William B; Gaynor, Martin

    2010-10-01

    There has been substantial consolidation among health insurers and hospitals, recently, raising questions about the effects of this consolidation on the exercise of market power. We analyze the relationship between insurer and hospital market concentration and the prices of hospital services. We use a national US dataset containing transaction prices for health care services for over 11 million privately insured Americans. Using three years of panel data, we estimate how insurer and hospital market concentration are related to hospital prices, while controlling for unobserved market effects. We find that increases in insurance market concentration are significantly associated with decreases in hospital prices, whereas increases in hospital concentration are non-significantly associated with increases in prices. A hypothetical merger between two of five equally sized insurers is estimated to decrease hospital prices by 6.7%. PMID:20478106

  15. Hospitalization Happens: A Guide to Hospital Visits for Individuals with Memory Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Guide to Hospital Visits for Individuals with Memory Loss Hospital Emergencies: What You Can Do Now ... Institutes of Health U.S. Department of Health and Human Services December 2008 (Reprinted January 2013) Publication Date: ...

  16. The moral responsibility of the hospital.

    PubMed

    De George, R T

    1982-02-01

    The hospital has legal liability. Does it also have moral responsibility? Is it a moral agent, and if so in what sense? There are two issues involved, one conceptual and the other normative. The conceptual issue is whether a hospital can be morally responsible. If seen not only as a physical facility but as a formal organization, it can be said to act rationally, choose between alternatives, and affect human beings. It thus satisfies the criteria for moral responsibility, even though it is not a person. Though moral responsibility can be attributed intelligibly to a hospital, such responsibility can be assumed only by those within it who act for it. Such responsibility is agent responsibility and may be shared in a number of ways. Hospital responsibilities can be separated from the professional moral responsibility and the personal moral responsibility held by doctors, nurses, and others within a hospital. Assuming these three types of responsibility makes possible conflicts of responsibility for those who hold them. Normatively, the moral responsibility of the hospital is appropriately limited by its purpose and is primarily administrative. It has designatable moral responsibilities to its patients, doctors and nurses, and the public. These can be distinguished from the responsibilities of doctors and nurses to the public. The responsibility of a doctor on the hospital staff is different from the responsibility of a doctor who simply practices in the hospital; that of a staff nurse from that of a private nurse. The difference is in large part a function of the one sharing the responsibility of the hospital and the other not. An analysis of a hospital's moral responsibilities suggests structures appropriate to a hospital that wishes to meet its moral responsibilities. PMID:7086317

  17. Costs of surgical procedures in Indian hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Susmita; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Despite a growing volume of surgical procedures in low-income and middle-income countries, the costs of these procedures are not well understood. We estimated the costs of 12 surgical procedures commonly conducted in five different types of hospitals in India from the provider perspective, using a microcosting method. Design Cost and utilisation data were collected retrospectively from April 2010 to March 2011 to avoid seasonal variability. Setting For this study, we chose five hospitals of different types: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital and a 778-bed tertiary care teaching hospital based on their willingness to cooperate and data accessibility. The hospitals were from four states in India. The private, charitable and tertiary care hospitals serve urban populations, the district hospital serves a semiurban area and the private teaching hospital serves a rural population. Results Costs of conducting lower section caesarean section ranged from rupees 2469 to 41 087; hysterectomy rupees 4124 to 57 622 and appendectomy rupees 2421 to 3616 (US$1=rupees 52). We computed the costs of conducting lap and open cholecystectomy (rupees 27 732 and 44 142, respectively); hernia repair (rupees 13 204); external fixation (rupees 8406); intestinal obstruction (rupees 6406); amputation (rupees 5158); coronary artery bypass graft (rupees 177 141); craniotomy (rupees 75 982) and functional endoscopic sinus surgery (rupees 53 398). Conclusions Estimated costs are roughly comparable with rates of reimbursement provided by the Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY)—India's government-financed health insurance scheme that covers 32.4 million poor families. Results from this type of study can be used to set and revise the reimbursement rates. PMID:23794591

  18. The return of the heart hospital. A hospital that specializes in providing cardiovascular services can meet community needs but will compete with existing community hospitals for market share.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert B

    2002-10-01

    A hospital that provides cardiovascular services and embraces a heart-hospital brand and strategy can achieve competitive advantage. Providers that want to compete aggressively for cardiovascular services are developing a specialty-based carve-out strategy. A heart-hospital initiative can cannibalize revenues from a hospital's other programs and services. A successful heart-hospital strategy requires physician buy-in. A heart hospital needs a brand that customers will value. PMID:12373959

  19. 78 FR 50495 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... line FQHC Federally qualified health center FR Federal Register FTE Full-time equivalent FUH Follow-up... 42 CFR Parts 412, 413, 414, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care; Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal...

  20. 75 FR 50041 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ..., phone 1-800-743-3951. Electronic Access This Federal Register document is also available from the... CFR Parts 412, 413, 415, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Changes and FY2011...

  1. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Printing Office Web page at: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR . Free... 42 CFR Parts 412, 413, 424, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Fiscal...

  2. Physician participation in hospital strategic decision making: the effect of hospital strategy and decision content.

    PubMed Central

    Ashmos, D P; McDaniel, R R

    1991-01-01

    An exploratory study examined variation in the participation of physicians in hospital strategic decision making as a function of (1) strategic decision content or (2) hospital strategy, or both. The findings revealed that who participates is a function of decision content while how physicians participate is a function of decision content and the interaction of decision content and hospital strategy. PMID:1869445

  3. 76 FR 59263 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... care hospital quality measures. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In FR Doc. 2011-19719 of August 18, 2011 (76 FR 51476), the final rule entitled ``Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective... 9A. In Table 9C.--Hospitals Redesignated as Rural Under Section 1886(d)(8)(E) of the Act--FY 2012,...

  4. 42 CFR 412.101 - Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... adjustment for low-volume hospitals. 412.101 Section 412.101 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Inpatient Operating Costs § 412.101 Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume... payment to a qualifying hospital for the higher incremental costs associated with a low volume...

  5. 42 CFR 412.101 - Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... adjustment for low-volume hospitals. 412.101 Section 412.101 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Inpatient Operating Costs § 412.101 Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume... payment to a qualifying hospital for the higher incremental costs associated with a low volume...

  6. 42 CFR 412.101 - Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... adjustment for low-volume hospitals. 412.101 Section 412.101 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Inpatient Operating Costs § 412.101 Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume... payment to a qualifying hospital for the higher incremental costs associated with a low volume...

  7. 42 CFR 412.101 - Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... adjustment for low-volume hospitals. 412.101 Section 412.101 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Inpatient Operating Costs § 412.101 Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume... payment to a qualifying hospital for the higher incremental costs associated with a low volume...

  8. 42 CFR 412.101 - Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... adjustment for low-volume hospitals. 412.101 Section 412.101 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... Inpatient Operating Costs § 412.101 Special treatment: Inpatient hospital payment adjustment for low-volume... payment to a qualifying hospital for the higher incremental costs associated with a low volume...

  9. [In-vitro antibiotic resistance of hospital and non-hospital strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Ceddia, T; Marinucci, M C; Parravano, N

    1979-03-30

    The AA report about the resistence towards antibiotics of 42 stocks of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from hospitalized patients and of 18 stocks isolated from non hospitalized patients. The most active antibiotics are Gentamicine, Neomicine and Streptomicine. Interestingly towards Tobramicine no resistence has been detected. The stocks isolated from hospitalized patients have generally shown a higher resistence. PMID:121701

  10. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES... after October 1, 1997— (i) Separate governing body. The hospital has a governing body that is separate from the governing body of the hospital occupying space in the same building or on the same campus....

  11. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES... after October 1, 1997— (i) Separate governing body. The hospital has a governing body that is separate from the governing body of the hospital occupying space in the same building or on the same campus....

  12. Hospital management principles applicable to the veterinary teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Harris, Donna L; Lloyd, James W; Marrinan, Mike

    2004-01-01

    The Skills, Knowledge, Aptitude, and Attitude (SKA) Subcommittee of the National Commission on Veterinary Economic Issues (NCVEI) has identified the need for veterinary teaching hospitals (VTH) to be at the forefront of progressive business management to serve as a model for both students and practitioners to emulate. To provide a foundation for developing a model, this study reviewed pertinent literature applicable to the management of a VTH. Much of the literature relevant to VTH management relates to work completed for the human side of medicine (academic health centers, or AHCs) or to the private sector. This review explores management practices in strategic planning, financial management, human resource management, marketing, pricing, operations, and legal issues. It is concluded that strategic management is important to provide the foundation for success in the VTH. In addition, periodic financial reports are recommended, as are the development and use of benchmarks for financial management. Establishing positive, motivating human resource practices is also suggested, along with development of a marketing plan based on a clear understanding of VTH core competencies and the market's specific needs. PMID:15510343

  13. Reactions of salaried physicians to hospital decline.

    PubMed Central

    Lachman, R; Noy, S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To examine the Exit, Loyalty, Voice, and Neglect (ELVN) reactions of full-time salaried physicians to the decline of their employing hospital, and to explore factors possibly associated with the choice of reactions. DATA SOURCE. The study analyzes data collected in a larger survey of work attitudes of 703 hospital physicians, constituting a representative national sample of (every tenth) salaried hospital physicians in Israel. DATA COLLECTION. Data were collected through a self-administered mail questionnaire with return envelopes attached. STUDY DESIGN. A survey design was used. Survey questionnaires included composite measures of the ELVN reaction as well as of the main predictors of reaction choice: job satisfaction, hospital commitment, job investment, alternatives, tenure, and managerial and senior positions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. The reactions of salaried physicians to hospital decline include the whole range of ELVN reactions. The choice of each reaction was found associated with a different set of disposition, situation, and position predictors. CONCLUSIONS. The ELVN typology is relevant for examining physicians' reactions to hospital decline, which appear to extend beyond the simple stay/leave dichotomy commonly used. The reactions of Exit, Loyalty, Voice, and Neglect are different in nature, and appear to reflect the different sets of circumstances that salaried physicians may face. Implications of these results for coping with hospital decline, hospital-physician relationships, and integration strategies are discussed. PMID:8675438

  14. Towns breathe new life into closed hospitals.

    PubMed

    Greene, J

    1991-03-25

    Most of the time, when a hospital closes, it closes for good. But once in a while the community is shocked into realizing it has to support the local hospital and use it, or it won't be around when they want it. Modern Healthcare profiles some of these rebirths, some vigorous and others still struggling. PMID:10109657

  15. Funding of South Australian public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Moss, John

    2002-01-01

    Since the 1994-95 financial year, inpatient episodes of care in South Australian public hospitals have been funded according to their casemix. This paper describes the current funding system, sets it in some context and examines what can be established about hospital performance. PMID:11974955

  16. Managing hospital emergency power testing programs.

    PubMed

    Stymiest, D L

    1997-04-01

    All hospitals must have an emergency power testing program that includes generator load testing and emergency power supply system maintenance. This document examines a management program that uses lessons learned from an emergency power testing program to improve the hospital's facilities and training. PMID:10166993

  17. Hospitals as Centers for Consumer Health Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topper, Judith M.

    1978-01-01

    Hospitals are trying to make health information available to lay persons to increase their knowledge of the processes of health and disease. Specific programs cited include those based in hospital libraries. Findings of several studies evaluating program effectiveness are indicated, as well as directions for future research. (MBR)

  18. Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Susan S.

    This teacher's guide is the core publication of a series of instructional materials developed for the hospitality and tourism industry. It includes the entry-level competencies students will need to enter any of the occupational areas identified in the four cluster areas of the hospitality and tourism industry: lodging, food service, travel and…

  19. Implementing Patient Safety Initiatives in Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira; Tupper, Judith; Coburn, Andrew; Wakefield, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Implementation of patient safety initiatives can be costly in time and energy. Because of small volumes and limited resources, rural hospitals often are not included in nationally driven patient safety initiatives. This article describes the Tennessee Rural Hospital Patient Safety Demonstration project, whose goal was to strengthen capacity for…

  20. Rubicon crossed in acute hospital design?

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2008-06-01

    With construction work now underway on the new pound sterling 227 million PFI-funded Pembury Hospital near Tunbridge Wells in Kent, Jonathan Baillie talks to John Cooper of architects Anshen + Allen, who is convinced that this exciting new acute facility will become the first of a new generation of 100% single-bedroom hospitals in the UK. PMID:18655662

  1. Anaesthesia at the District Hospital. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Michael B.

    This practical manual is designed to help medical officers in small hospitals provide safe and effective anesthesia for patients. Intended for doctors with at least one year of postgraduate clinical experience, it describes anesthetic techniques suitable for use in hospitals with limited resources. Chapter 2 describes fundamental principles and…

  2. Capitalizing hidden values from hospital assets.

    PubMed

    Beith, Carsten; Vaughan, James

    2010-04-01

    Benefits from selling noncore assets include generating capital and freeing up management resources. Monetization transaction structures include sale, partnership, and strategic affiliation. A hospital that engages in such a transaction needs to ensure that the purchaser or joint venture partner will maintain the hospital's high standards of care and ethical principles. PMID:20358876

  3. Promoting Regional Disaster Preparedness among Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Janine C.; Kang, JungEun; Silenas, Rasa

    2008-01-01

    Context and Purpose: Rural communities face substantial risks of natural disasters but rural hospitals face multiple obstacles to preparedness. The objective was to create and implement a simple and effective training and planning exercise to assist individual rural hospitals to improve disaster preparedness, as well as to enhance regional…

  4. Psychiatric Hospitalization after Deliberate Self-Poisoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Gregory L.; Safranko, Ivan; Lewin, Terry J.; Whyte, Ian M.; Bryant, Jennifer L.

    2006-01-01

    The decision for psychiatric hospitalization after deliberate self-poisoning (DSP) is not well understood. This study, a longitudinal cohort study of 3,148 consecutive DSP patients found 920 (29.2%) subjects were referred for psychiatric hospitalization, 576 (18.3%) on involuntary basis. A logistic regression analysis showed increased risk for:…

  5. The Canadian Hospital Executive Simulation System (CHESS).

    PubMed

    Pink, G H; Knotts, U A; Parrish, L G; Shields, C A

    1991-01-01

    The Canadian Hospital Executive Simulation System (CHESS) is a computer-based management decision-making game designed specifically for Canadian hospital managers. The paper begins with an introduction on the development of business and health services industry-specific simulation games. An overview of CHESS is provided, along with a description of its development and a discussion of its educational benefits. PMID:10109530

  6. Customer satisfaction: a practical approach for hospitals.

    PubMed

    VanderVeen, L; Ritz, M

    1996-01-01

    A California hospital developed a program to better serve and satisfy its customers. This article details the hospital's plan to implement the program with the collection and use of data to measure success, promote staff accountability, and, ultimately, demonstrate improved customer satisfaction as measured by fewer complaints. The various activities initiated to promote staff education and recognize employees also are briefly addressed. PMID:10157248

  7. Speech and hearing services in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gerstman, H L

    1978-02-01

    Because professionals in treating communication disorders work with otolaryngologists, pediatricians, surgeons, radiologists, physiatrists, dental specialists, etc., the hospital is a logical base for these shared services. Structuring a communication disorders unit within the hospital requires identifying needs, setting objectives, and developing a program that has appropriate capital support. PMID:621073

  8. Survey search: the hospital as employer.

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    Employee pay and benefits have historically comprised at least half of hospitals' total operating expenses. The findings of two recent surveys of U.S. hospitals offer insights into what today's institutions (nonprofit and proprietary) are doing to contain employee costs through health benefits management and expansion of the role of the senior human resources executive. PMID:10284873

  9. The public hospital of the future.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Jeffrey D

    2003-09-01

    Public hospitals designed for the past are not changing rapidly enough to meet the needs of the future. Changing work practices, increased pressure on bed occupancy, and greater numbers of patients with complex diseases and comorbidities will determine the functions of future hospitals. To maximise the use of resources, hospital "down times" on weekends and public holidays will be a distant memory. Elective surgery will increase in the traditionally "quiet times", such as summer, and decrease in the busy winter period. The patient will be the focus of an efficient information flow, streamlining patient care in hospital and enhancing communication between hospitals and community-based health providers. General and specialty units will need to work more efficiently together, as general physicians take on the role of patient case managers for an increasing proportion of patients. Funding needs to be adequate, and system management should involve clinicians. Safety will be enshrined in hospital systems and procedures, as well as in the minds of hospital staff. If these changes are not implemented successfully, public hospitals will not survive in the future. PMID:12924972

  10. Youth Employment in the Hospitality Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, Bradley R.

    A study used data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth to analyze the long-term effects of hospitality industry employment on youth. The subsample extracted for the study included all youth who were aged 16-24 in 1980 and employed in the civilian sector for pay at any time in the year. Statistics indicated the hospitality sector was…

  11. Examining General Hospitals' Smoke-Free Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Marilyn V.; Harbison, Phillip Adam

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the level of smoke-free policies in general hospitals and the barriers faced in implementing restrictive policies banning smoking inside buildings and on surrounding grounds. Design/methodology/approach; A survey was developed to gather data on hospitals' current smoke-free policies, including the challenges…

  12. Neighborhood Transition and Mental Hospitalization Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhlin, Gregory L.

    1979-01-01

    Assesses the relationship of change in neighborhood ethnic composition and 1970 psychiatric hospitalization rates for persons born in Ireland, Germany, Poland, Austria, Hungary, the U.S.S.R., and Italy. Concludes that such neighborhood change was unrelated to psychiatric hospitalization rates of the foreign born. Discusses policy implications and…

  13. Hospital Organization, Administration and Wellness Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jeanne Hmura

    1984-01-01

    Hospital organization, administration and planning, and implementation program procedures are reviewed in this article. Hospitals and medical centers are changing their strategies in the area of wellness programming since they offer the appropriate facilities for these programs. Various types of wellness programs currently being promoted are…

  14. Future pension accounting changes: implications for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Weld, Tim; Klein, Gina

    2011-05-01

    Proposed rules in accounting for defined benefit plans may affect hospitals' statement of operations and affect the time, effort, and cost to comply with periodic financial reporting requirements. The new standard would require immediate recognition of the full amount of plan amendments in determining operating income. Hospitals should consider the role of pension plans in their compensation programs. PMID:21634266

  15. The Rehabilitation Hospital of the Pacific

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yarbrough, Charles R.

    1976-01-01

    The Rehabilitation Hospital of the Pacific (REHAB) is a highly-specialized medical hospital dedicated to the rehabilitation of the handicapped. Its primary concern is with the care of neurological, orthopedic, or cardiovascular conditions which result in physical impairment. Discusses its personnel, goals, and services. (Author/RK)

  16. Environmental Risk Factors in Hospital Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Daniel Z.; Resnik, Harvey L.P.; Holder-Perkins, Vicenzio

    2004-01-01

    Suicide of hospitalized patients is the most common sentinel event reviewed by The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. Shorter lengths of stay, sicker patients, and higher patient to staff ratios challenge the ability of the hospital to maintain safety. Risk factors associated with the physical environment of the…

  17. Hospital marketing and the Internet: revisited.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, C D; Fell, D

    1998-01-01

    In 1995 a study was conducted to explore the use of the Internet in hospital marketing. Use of the Internet has exploded since that study was published. This manuscript replicates the 1995 study and extends it by investigating several managerial and operational issues concerning the use of the Internet in hospital marketing. PMID:10339086

  18. Hospital pricing: cost shifting and competition.

    PubMed

    Morrisey, M A

    1993-05-01

    The issue of cost shifting has taken on enormous policy implications. It is estimated that unsponsored and undercompensated hospital costs--one measure of cost shifting--has totaled $21.5 billion in 1991. The health services research literature indicates that hospitals set different prices for different payers. However, the empirical evidence on hospitals' ability to raise prices to one payer to make up for unsponsored care or lower payments by other payers is mixed at best. No study has concluded that hospitals have raised prices to fully adjust for such actions. The extent of cost shifting is limited by the market. When a hospital has market power, it is able to set prices above marginal costs. However, when a buyer has enough patient/subscribers and a willingness to direct them to particular providers based on price considerations, hospitals have less flexibility in raising prices above costs. Thus, the extent of cost shifting is limited by the market. Cost shifting is not as easy as it may have been in the past because the nature of hospital and insurer competition has changed radically in the last decade. While hospital quality, services, and amenities still matter, some buyers are increasingly concerned about the price they pay. Evidence from studies of PPO and HMO negotiations with hospitals suggests that hospitals' market power is eroding, at least in some areas. In areas with relatively few hospital competitors and little PPO or HMO activity, Medicaid and Medicare price reductions and uncompensated care burdens will be partially absorbed by higher prices paid by private payers. In more price sensitive markets and in markets in which prices to private payers have risen to those commensurate with the market power of local hospitals, such cost shifting will not occur. A market-based approach in hospital pricing requires an explicit policy for the uninsured. In a competitive market, a hospital that traditionally cared for the uninsured by spending some of its

  19. Measuring hospital medical staff organizational structure.

    PubMed Central

    Shortell, S M; Getzen, T E

    1979-01-01

    Based on organization theory and the work of Roemer and Friedman, seven dimensions of hospital medical staff organization structure are proposed and examined. The data are based on a 1973 nationwide survey of hospital medical staffs conducted by the American Hospital Association. Factor analysis yielded six relatively independent dimensions supporting a multidimensional view of medical staff organization structure. The six dimensions include 1) Resource Capability, 2) Generalist Physician Contractual Orientation, 3) Communication/Control, 4) Local Staff Orientation, 5) Participation in Decision Making, and 6) Hospital-Based Physician Contractual Orientation. It is suggested that these dimensions can be used to develop an empirical typology of hospital medical staff organization structure and to investigate the relationship between medical staff organization and public policy issues related to cost containment and quality assurance. PMID:511580

  20. A multistage model of hospital bed requirements.

    PubMed Central

    Pendergast, J F; Vogel, W B

    1988-01-01

    This article presents a model for projecting future hospital bed requirements, based on clinical judgment and basic probability theory. Clinical judgment is used to define various categories of care, including a category for patients who are inappropriately hospitalized, for a large teaching hospital with a heavy indigent and psychiatric workload. Survey results and discharge abstract data are then used to calculate expected discharges and patient days for each clinical category. These expected discharges and patient days are converted into estimated bed requirements using a simple deterministic equation. Results of this multistage model are compared with the results obtained from exercising the simple deterministic equation alone. Because the multistage model removes patients from the hospital if they are deemed inappropriately placed, this model results in the projection of 5.1 percent fewer hospital beds than the simple deterministic equation alone. PMID:3403276

  1. Looking back 50 years in hospital administration.

    PubMed

    Graham, Ross; Sibbald, Shannon L

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare policy and hospital administration are dynamic and growing fields, oriented toward shaping the future. In an effort to understand where these fields have come from, as well as some of the re-occuring challenges faced, we conducted a retrospective analysis. Our research identified progress and major accomplishments, as well as issues that continue to challenge the field in five key areas: (1) the evolution of nursing, (2) funding and legislation, (3) hospital design, construction and technology, (4) patient care and infection control and (5) leadership. To explore these areas, a thematic content review was conducted on the 12 inaugural issues of Hospital Administration in Canada, a hospital administration periodical from 1962. All written content was reviewed, coded and categorized into major themes that represented the major hospital administration topics of 50 years ago. In this article, five prominent themes are explored and further illustrated using key stories and milestones from 1962. PMID:23107901

  2. Sterilization and contraceptive services in Catholic hospitals.

    PubMed

    O'Lane, J M

    1979-02-15

    Sterilization and contraceptive practices in United States Catholic hospitals were surveyed by anonymous mail questionnaires, obtaining a 57% response rate (340 of 598). Twenty per cent of the hospitals permitted medically indicated sterilization operations. Forty-seven per cent of those hospitals not allowing sterilization procedures reported that their medical staffs were interested in performing medically indicated sterilizations. The types of contraceptive services offered varied widely. The rhythm method was most frequently available, with oral contraceptives in second place; many hospitals did not provide any family-planning services; 13% utilized all types of contraception. The thesis is advanced that improvement in availability of sterilization and contraceptive services is a duty of hospital medical staffs. PMID:433994

  3. Patient Engagement in Hospital Fall Prevention.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Injurious falls are the most prevalent in-hospital adverse event, and hospitalized patients are at a greater risk of falling than the general population. Patient engagement in hospital fall prevention could be a possible approach to reducing falls and fall-related injuries. To engage patients, bedside nursing staff must first understand the concept of patient centeredness and then incorporate patient centeredness in clinical practice. Clinicians should move from being experts to being enablers. To conceptualize the knowledge gaps identified, a conceptual model was developed to guide future research and quality improvement efforts in hospital settings. This model could be used as a guide to advance nursing leadership in hospital fall prevention via promoting patient engagement (e.g., developing patient-centered fall prevention interventions with patients' input). PMID:26845821

  4. State hospital rate-setting revisited.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Graham

    2009-10-01

    In an attempt to control rapid growth in hospital costs, beginning in the mid-1970s several states implemented rate-setting programs to regulate hospital payments. In seven states, rate-setting was in effect for a substantial period of time (14 years or more). While most of these programs were discontinued by the mid-1990s, two are still active. In five of the seven states, the rates of increase in hospital costs were lower than the corresponding national rates during the periods in which the regulation programs were in place. Four of the states--Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, and New Jersey--had some of the lowest rates of hospital cost increases among all the states. This indicates that hospital rate regulation may be a useful approach in managing a major component of health care spending. PMID:20614649

  5. Socioeconomic Disparities and Influenza Hospitalizations, Tennessee, USA

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Chantel; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Mitchel, Edward; Schaffner, William

    2015-01-01

    We examined population-based surveillance data from the Tennessee Emerging Infections Program to determine whether neighborhood socioeconomic status was associated with influenza hospitalization rates. Hospitalization data collected during October 2007–April 2014 were geocoded (N = 1,743) and linked to neighborhood socioeconomic data. We calculated age-standardized annual incidence rates, relative index of inequality, and concentration curves for socioeconomic variables. Influenza hospitalizations increased with increased percentages of persons who lived in poverty, had female-headed households, lived in crowded households, and lived in population-dense areas. Influenza hospitalizations decreased with increased percentages of persons who were college educated, were employed, and had health insurance. Higher incidence of influenza hospitalization was also associated with lower neighborhood socioeconomic status when data were stratified by race. PMID:26292106

  6. Socioeconomic Disparities and Influenza Hospitalizations, Tennessee, USA.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Chantel; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Mitchel, Edward; Schaffner, William; Lindegren, Mary Lou

    2015-09-01

    We examined population-based surveillance data from the Tennessee Emerging Infections Program to determine whether neighborhood socioeconomic status was associated with influenza hospitalization rates. Hospitalization data collected during October 2007-April 2014 were geocoded (N = 1,743) and linked to neighborhood socioeconomic data. We calculated age-standardized annual incidence rates, relative index of inequality, and concentration curves for socioeconomic variables. Influenza hospitalizations increased with increased percentages of persons who lived in poverty, had female-headed households, lived in crowded households, and lived in population-dense areas. Influenza hospitalizations decreased with increased percentages of persons who were college educated, were employed, and had health insurance. Higher incidence of influenza hospitalization was also associated with lower neighborhood socioeconomic status when data were stratified by race. PMID:26292106

  7. Hospital utilization and expenditures in a Medicaid population

    PubMed Central

    Buczko, William

    1989-01-01

    Determinants of hospital utilization and expenditures are analyzed for Medicaid enrollees in the State Medicaid household sample portion of the National Medical Care Utilization and Expenditure Survey who were continuously enrolled throughout 1980. Health status measures were the best predictors of both the probability of hospitalization and total hospitalizations. Children covered by Aid to Families with Dependent Children were the Medicaid enrollees least likely to be hospitalized. Number of hospital days, surgery, and California residence directly increased hospital expenditures. Conditions responsible for hospitalization increased hospital expenditures indirectly by increasing the number of hospital days and the probability of surgery. PMID:10313353

  8. Ancon Hospital: an American Hospital during the construction of the Panama Canal, 1904-1914.

    PubMed

    Chaves-Carballo, E

    1999-10-01

    The control of yellow fever, malaria, and other tropical diseases was essential for the successful completion of the Panama Canal. COL William C. Gorgas, Chief Sanitary Officer, found Ancon Hospital quite satisfactory as a site from which to direct his sanitation efforts. Ancon Hospital played an important role during the period of the excavation of the canal (1904-1914). In 1928, Ancon Hospital was renamed Gorgas Hospital to commemorate this achievement. After more than a century of clinical and research activities in Panama, Ancon Hospital closed its doors in 1997. PMID:10544628

  9. 42 CFR 419.42 - Hospital election to reduce coinsurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hospital election to reduce coinsurance. 419.42... DEPARTMENT SERVICES Payments to Hospitals § 419.42 Hospital election to reduce coinsurance. (a) A hospital may elect to reduce coinsurance for any or all APC groups on a calendar year basis. A hospital may...

  10. 42 CFR 419.42 - Hospital election to reduce coinsurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hospital election to reduce coinsurance. 419.42... DEPARTMENT SERVICES Payments to Hospitals § 419.42 Hospital election to reduce coinsurance. (a) A hospital may elect to reduce coinsurance for any or all APC groups on a calendar year basis. A hospital may...

  11. 42 CFR 419.42 - Hospital election to reduce coinsurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hospital election to reduce coinsurance. 419.42... SERVICES Payments to Hospitals § 419.42 Hospital election to reduce coinsurance. (a) A hospital may elect to reduce coinsurance for any or all APC groups on a calendar year basis. A hospital may not elect...

  12. 42 CFR 419.42 - Hospital election to reduce coinsurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hospital election to reduce coinsurance. 419.42... DEPARTMENT SERVICES Payments to Hospitals § 419.42 Hospital election to reduce coinsurance. (a) A hospital may elect to reduce coinsurance for any or all APC groups on a calendar year basis. A hospital may...

  13. 42 CFR 409.83 - Inpatient hospital coinsurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient hospital coinsurance. 409.83 Section 409... MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Hospital Insurance Deductibles and Coinsurance § 409.83 Inpatient hospital coinsurance. (a) General provisions—(1) Inpatient hospital coinsurance is the...

  14. 42 CFR 409.82 - Inpatient hospital deductible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient hospital deductible. 409.82 Section 409... MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Hospital Insurance Deductibles and Coinsurance § 409.82 Inpatient hospital deductible. (a) General provisions—(1) The inpatient hospital deductible is a...

  15. 24 CFR 242.72 - Leasing of hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Leasing of hospital. 242.72 Section... INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS Miscellaneous Requirements § 242.72 Leasing of hospital. Leasing of a hospital in... facilities by state entities shall be considered on a case-by-case basis. Also, leasing of a hospital...

  16. 42 CFR 424.52 - Payment to a nonparticipating hospital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment to a nonparticipating hospital. 424.52... § 424.52 Payment to a nonparticipating hospital. Medicare pays a nonparticipating hospital for the... services furnished by a U.S. hospital, if the hospital has in effect an election to claim payment...

  17. 42 CFR 419.42 - Hospital election to reduce coinsurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital election to reduce coinsurance. 419.42... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM FOR HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT SERVICES Payments to Hospitals § 419.42 Hospital election to reduce coinsurance. (a) A hospital may...

  18. [Role of the surgeon in the hospital infections control committees].

    PubMed

    Akçay, Müfide Nuran; Kadanali, Ayten; Oztürk, Gürkan

    2003-10-01

    Hospital-acquired infections are the ones that develop within hospital stay or appear after discharge. These infections are associated with an increased rate of morbidity and mortality, longer hospital stay and higher hospital costs and Hospital Infections Control Committees have been founded to prevent it. In this review, we intended to investigate the role of the surgeon in this committee. PMID:14569476

  19. [Understanding nursing care in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Seferdjeli, Laurence; Terraneo, Fabienne

    2015-03-01

    In a context in which sanitary institutions have transparency obligations toward authorities and patients, quality management and best practices--defined according to scientific standards--have become major concerns with respect to in-house management. While protocols and prescriptions are necessary for orienting work, they don't apply by themselves. Given that these various documents provide standardized and stabilized work descriptions, they contribute to hide what workers effectively do in unstable and variable situations in which numerous, sometimes contradictory, elements need to be simultaneously considered. In the present work, we follow this claim held by the French ergonomics stream and we consider the serious and irreducible gap between "prescribed work" and "real effective work". Such an understanding based on research evidence appears more adapted to professional realities and provides (valued) resources in nursing education. Based on information collected in three work analysis studies conducted by our team in hospital settings, we deepen these notions and their implication for practice and education. PMID:26510343

  20. Acoustic pollution in hospital environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivera, J. M.; Rocha, L. A.; Rotger, V. I.; Herrera, M. C.

    2011-12-01

    There are many different services within a hospital. This means different types of noise which can be considered as acoustic pollution. Knowing that preterm infants exposed to high amounts of noise in the NICU are at a much higher risk because of their neurologic immaturity and physiologic instability, that excessive levels of noise also affect the persons and it can also impede some studies on patients, it was proposed to evaluate the Sound Pressure Level in some services of the Instituto de Maternidad, Tucumán, Argentina. There were evaluated the Level III NICU, the laundry service, a physical space destined for a service of evoked potential and a neonatal incubator under working conditions. The measurements were performed with a type II sonometer (CENTER 322) and it was also used an incubator analyzer (FLUKE INCU) for the incubator. The average values obtained were of 63.6 dBA for the NICU, 82.5dBA for the laundry room, 52.7 dBA for the evoked potential room and 62.8 dBA in the inside of the incubator under 64 dBA in the outside. The reports were documented in compliance with the appropriate standards.

  1. Distance learning for hospital managers.

    PubMed

    Whitener, L; Stevens, C; Cochran, K; Thompson, B G; Williams, M E

    1999-01-01

    Telemedicine technology enabled this class to meet. The Chapel Hill instructor could not have traveled to Scotland Neck for the classes, and the class members could not have taken time away from their jobs to travel to Chapel Hill. The technology allowed the participants to fit the classes into their schedules. For the group of managers at this small, isolated hospital, the experience of participating in a management class with an expert was a positive one. They were introduced to standard management practices, learned new skills, and formed a support group/team onsite. The students felt close to the leader, yet the physical distance made her an outsider in a way that encouraged frankness. The technology seemed to foster the best of both worlds--intimacy, yet physical distance and, thus, safety. These new managers were able to take part in a course that taught tangible skills for improving their job performance and, more important, afforded access to resources outside of Halifax County. They were able to step away from their daily routine and interact with outsiders and each other in new ways, without the stress and expense of travel. The results of this pilot study indicate that distance learning is feasible for courses of this kind. Staff burnout and turnover are chronic problems in rural facilities, with isolation contributing to job dissatisfaction. Distance learning offers exciting possibilities for addressing these problems in healthcare settings across the country. PMID:10847928

  2. Use of Smartphones in Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Thomairy, Noora Al; Mummaneni, Mounica; Alsalamah, Sami; Moussa, Nicole; Coustasse, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technology has begun to change the landscape of the medical profession, with more than two-thirds of physicians regularly using smartphones. Smartphones have allowed health care professionals and the general public to communicate more efficiently, collect data, and facilitate clinical decision making. The methodology for this study was a qualitative literature review following a systematic approach of smartphone use among physicians in hospitals. Fifty-one articles were selected for this study based on inclusion criteria. The findings were classified and described into 7 categories: use of smartphone in obstetrics, pediatrics, surgery, internal medicine, radiology, and dermatology, which were chosen based on the documented use of smartphone application in different health care practices. A last section of patient safety and issues with confidentiality is also described. This study suggests that smartphones have been playing an increasingly important role in health care. Medical professionals have become more dependent upon medical smartphone applications. However, concerns of patient safety and confidentiality will likely lead to increased oversight of mobile device use by regulatory agencies and accrediting bodies. PMID:26506291

  3. Additional funding mechanisms for Public Hospitals in Greece: the case of Chania Mental Health Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether the long term lease of public hospital owned land could be an additional financing mechanism for Greek public (mental) health hospitals. Methods We performed a financial analysis of the official 2008 data of a case - study hospital (Mental Health Hospital of Chania). We used a capital budgeting approach to investigate whether value is created for the public hospital by engaging its assets in a project for the development of a private renal dialysis Unit. Results The development of the private unit in hospital owned land is a good investment decision, as it generates high project Net Present Value and Internal Rate of Return. When the project commences generating operating cash flows, nearly €400.000 will be paid annually to the Mental Health Hospital of Chania as rent, thereby gradually decreasing the annual deficit of the hospital. Conclusions Revenue generated from the long term lease of public hospital land is crucial to gradually eliminate hospital deficit. The Ministry of Health should encourage similar forms of Public Private Partnerships in order to ensure the sustainability of public (mental) hospitals. PMID:21067580

  4. Hospital performance in multihospital systems: a comparative study of system and independent hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, J S

    1982-01-01

    Hospital costs and productivity in multihospital systems versus those of independent hospitals are a major source of debate among health care providers and researchers. Previous studies have shown system hospitals perform better than independent hospitals. The evidence, however, has been limited to only a few nonprofit systems. To help fill this research gap, approximately 100 system hospitals from 14 systems and 4 ownership types are compared with approximately 50 independent hospitals using cost and productivity data from one year. The results show that system hospitals realize both significantly higher cost and higher productivity levels, except for county-owned facilities which have lower costs and insignificantly different productivity levels. Factors that help explain these results are discussed and directions for further research are suggested. PMID:7152957

  5. [The Hospital Pharmacy Survey in Brazil: a proposal for hierarchical organization of hospital pharmaceutical services].

    PubMed

    Messeder, Ana Márcia; Osorio-de-Castro, Claudia Garcia Serpa; Camacho, Luiz Antonio Bastos

    2007-04-01

    This paper discusses the development of a methodological approach to classify hospital pharmacies according to their performance, measured by structure and process indicators. The method considers the influence exerted on performance by the level of care in the hospital and the interdependence among pharmaceutical activities. Algorithms for assessing performance of hospital pharmacies were constructed for each level of care. Different weights were used for core activities in the pharmacy and other specific activities, according to the level of care in the hospital where the respective service was provided. This methodology allowed classifying hospital pharmacies from best to worst, based on performance. Independently of level of care in the hospital, no hospital pharmacies were classified as high-performance, and more than 50% were classified as low-performance. PMID:17435881

  6. Differences among hospitals in Medicare patient mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Chassin, M R; Park, R E; Lohr, K N; Keesey, J; Brook, R H

    1989-01-01

    Using hospital discharge abstract data for fiscal year 1984 for all acute care hospitals treating Medicare patients (age greater than or equal to 65), we measured four mortality rates: inpatient deaths, deaths within 30 days after discharge, and deaths within two fixed periods following admission (30 days, and the 95th percentile length of stay for each condition). The metric of interest was the probability that a hospital would have as many deaths as it did (taking age, race, and sex into account). Differences among hospitals in inpatient death rates were large and significant (p less than .05) for 22 of 48 specific conditions studied and for all conditions together; among these 22 "high-variation" conditions, medical conditions accounted for far more deaths than did surgical conditions. We compared pairs of conditions in terms of hospital rankings by probability of observed numbers of inpatient deaths; we found relatively low correlations (Spearman correlation coefficients of 0.3 or lower) for most comparisons except between a few surgical conditions. When we compared different pairs of the four death measures on their rankings of hospitals by probabilities of the observed numbers of deaths, the correlations were moderate to high (Spearman correlation coefficients of 0.54 to 0.99). Hospitals with low probabilities of the number of observed deaths were not distributed randomly geographically; a small number of states had significantly more than their share of these hospitals (p less than .01). Information from hospital discharge abstract data is insufficient to determine the extent to which differences in severity of illness or quality of care account for this marked variability, so data on hospital death rates cannot now be used to draw inferences about quality of care. The magnitude of variability in death rates and the geographic clustering of facilities with low probabilities, however, both argue for further study of hospital death rates. These data may prove

  7. Japanese hospitals--culture and competition: a study of ten hospitals.

    PubMed

    Anbäcken, O

    1994-01-01

    Japanese health care is characterized by a pluralistic system with a high degree of private producers. Central government regulates the prices and the financing system. All citizens are covered by a mandatory employment-based health insurance operating on a non-profit basis. The consumer has a free choice of physician and hospital. A comparison between Japan, Sweden and some other countries shows significant dissimilarities in the length of stay, number of treatments per hospital bed and year and the staffing of hospitals. About 80 per cent of the hospitals and 94 per cent of the clinics are privately owned. The typical private hospital owned by a physician has less than 100 beds. In this paper, data collected (1992/93) in an empirical study of Japanese hospitals and their leadership is presented. Also discussed are the hospitals' style of management, tools and strategies for competition and competences--personal and formal skills required of the leadership in the hospital. There follows a study of ten hospitals, among which hospital directors and chief physicians were interviewed. Interviews are also made with key persons in the Ministry of Health and Welfare and other organizations in the health care field. The result is also analysed from a cultural perspective--'what kind of impact does the Japanese culture have on the health care organization?' and/or 'what kind of sub-culture is developed in the Japanese hospitals'. Some comparisons are made with Sweden, USA, Canada and Germany. The different roles of the professions in the hospital are included in the study as well as the incentives for different kinds of strategies--specialization, growing in size, investments in new equipment, different kind of ownership and hospitals. Another issue discussed is the attempt to uncover whether there is an implicit distribution of specialties--silent agreements between hospitals, etc. PMID:10137135

  8. Support for hospital-based HIV testing and counseling: a national survey of hospital marketing executives.

    PubMed Central

    Boscarino, J A; Steiber, S R

    1995-01-01

    Today, hospitals are involved extensively in social marketing and promotional activities. Recently, investigators from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated that routine testing of hospital patients for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) could identify more than 100,000 patients with previously unrecognized HIV infections. Several issues are assessed in this paper. These include hospital support for voluntary HIV testing and AIDS education and the impact that treating AIDS patients has on the hospital's image. Also tested is the hypothesis that certain hospitals, such as for-profit institutions and those outside the AIDS epicenters, would be less supportive of hospital-based AIDS intervention strategies. To assess these issues, a national random sample of 193 executives in charge of hospital marketing and public relations were surveyed between December 1992 and January 1993. The survey was part of an ongoing annual survey of hospitals and included questions about AIDS, health education, marketing, patient satisfaction, and hospital planning. Altogether, 12.4 percent of executives indicated their hospital had a reputation for treating AIDS patients. Among hospitals without an AIDS reputation, 34.1 percent believed developing one would be harmful to the hospital's image, in contrast to none in hospitals that had such a reputation (chi 2 = 11.676, df = 1, P = .0006). Although 16.6 percent did not know if large-scale HIV testing should be implemented, a near majority (47.7 percent) expressed some support. In addition, 15 percent reported that HIV-positive physicians on the hospital's medical staff should not be allowed to practice medicine, but 32.1 percent indicated that they should.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7638335

  9. Hospital Workers Disaster Management and Hospital Nonstructural: A Study in Bandar Abbas, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Lakbala, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A devastating earthquake is inevitable in the long term and likely in the near future in Iran. The objective of the study was to assess the knowledge of hospital staff to disaster management system in hospital and to determine nonstructural safety assessment in Shahid Mohammadi hospital in Bandar Abbas city of Iran. This hospital is the main referral hospital in Hormozgan province with a capacity of about 450 beds and the highest patient admissions. Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 on 200 healthcare workers at Shahid Mohammadi hospital, in the city of Bandar Abbas, Iran. This hospital is the main referral hospital in Hormozgan province and has a capacity of about 450 beds with highest numbers of patient admissions. Questionnaire and checklist used for assessing health workers knowledge and awareness towards disaster management and nonstructural safety this hospital. Results: This study found that knowledge, awareness, and disaster preparedness of hospital staff need continual reinforcement to improve self efficacy for disaster management. Equipping health care facilities at the time of natural disasters, especially earthquakes are of great importance all over the world, especially in Iran. This requires the national strategies and planning for all health facilities. Conclusion: It seems due to limitations of hospital beds, insufficient of personnel, and medical equipment, health care providers paid greater attention to this issue. Since this hospital is the only educational public hospital in the province, it is essential to pay much attention to the risk management not only to this hospital but at the national level to health facilities. PMID:26573039

  10. Epidemiology of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis in cats hospitalized in a veterinary teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Babyak, Jonathan M; Sharp, Claire R

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the epidemiology of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and sepsis in cats hospitalized in a veterinary teaching hospital. DESIGN Observational study. ANIMALS 246 client-owned cats. PROCEDURES During a 3-month period, daily treatment records were evaluated for all hospitalized cats. Information extracted included signalment, temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, diagnostic test results, diagnosis, duration of hospitalization, and outcome (survival or death). Cats were classified into 1 of 4 disease categories (sepsis [confirmed infection and SIRS], infection [confirmed infection without SIRS], noninfectious SIRS [SIRS without a confirmed infection], and no SIRS [no SIRS or infection]). RESULTS Of the 246 cats, 26 and 3 were hospitalized 2 and 3 times, respectively; thus, 275 hospitalizations were evaluated. When SIRS was defined as the presence of ≥ 2 of 4 SIRS criteria, 17 cats had sepsis, 16 had infections, 81 had noninfectious SIRS, and 161 were classified in the no SIRS category at hospital admission. The prevalence of sepsis at hospital admission was 6.2 cases/100 admissions. Four cats developed sepsis while hospitalized, resulting in a sepsis incidence rate of 1.5 cases/100 hospital admissions. Four of 17 cats with sepsis at hospital admission and 3 of 4 cats that developed sepsis while hospitalized died or were euthanized, resulting in a mortality rate of 33.3% for septic cats; 239 hospitalizations resulted in survival, 28 resulted in euthanasia, and 8 resulted in death. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that many hospitalized cats have evidence of SIRS and some have sepsis. In cats, sepsis is an important clinical entity with a high mortality rate. PMID:27308883

  11. The effects of hospital-physician integration strategies on hospital financial performance.

    PubMed Central

    Goes, J B; Zhan, C

    1995-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION. This study investigated the longitudinal relations between hospital financial performance outcomes and three hospital-physician integration strategies: physician involvement in hospital governance, hospital ownership by physicians, and the integration of hospital-physician financial relationships. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING. Using secondary data from the State of California, integration strategies in approximately 300 California short-term acute care hospitals were tracked over a ten-year period (1981-1990). STUDY DESIGN. The study used an archival design. Hospital performance was measured on three dimensions: operational profitability, occupancy, and costs. Thirteen control variables were used in the analyses: market competition, affluence, and rurality; hospital ownership; teaching costs and intensity; multihospital system membership; hospital size; outpatient service mix; patient volume case mix; Medicare and Medicaid intensity; and managed care intensity. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION. Financial and utilization data were obtained from the State of California, which requires annual hospital reports. A series of longitudinal regressions tested the hypotheses. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Considerable variation was found in the popularity of the three strategies and their ability to predict hospital performance outcomes. Physician involvement in hospital governance increased modestly from 1981-1990, while ownership and financial integration declined significantly. Physician governance was associated with greater occupancy and higher operating margins, while financial integration was related to lower hospital operating costs. Direct physician ownership, particularly in small hospitals, was associated with lower operating margins and higher costs. Subsample analyses indicate that implementation of the Medicare prospective payment system in 1983 had a major impact on these relationships, especially on the benefits of financial integration. CONCLUSIONS. The

  12. [Assistance to delivery according to hospital classification].

    PubMed

    Lopez-escobar, G; Daza-parada, L; Riano-gamboa, G; Fortney, J

    1979-06-01

    Between March and October 1977 40 urban Colombian hospitals participated in an evaluation of services given to women with high risk pregnancies. The purpose of the study was to find out whether high risk cases go to the more appropriate and better equipped hospitals. A total of 13,450 deliveries were observed at random, i.e. 8.3% of all deliveries in all 40 hospitals during the same time. Social, cultural, and clinical characteristics of mothers and infants were carefully recorded. It was found that Social Security hospitals had the lowest number of high risk patients, a moderate number of surgical interventions, and the lowest maternal and perinatal mortality rate. On the other hand, average size hospitals serviced a larger number of high risk patients, had the highest rate of surgical intervention and of perinatal mortality, and a moderate maternal mortality rate. University hospitals, with the highest concentration of high risk patients and with a moderate incidence of surgical interventions, had a moderate rate of perinatal mortality, and a high rate of maternal mortality. Obviously not all high risk patients were serviced by the best equipped hospitals and by the best prepared personnel, which resulted in a high rate of maternal-infant morbidity and mortality. It would be necessary to reorganize all available services in a more functional way, so that high risk patients can be assisted and treated in the most appropriate environment. PMID:12310258

  13. Disposable products in the hospital waste stream.

    PubMed Central

    Gilden, D. J.; Scissors, K. N.; Reuler, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    Use of disposable products in hospitals continues to increase despite limited landfill space and dwindling natural resources. We analyzed the use and disposal patterns of disposable hospital products to identify means of reducing noninfectious, nonhazardous hospital waste. In a 385-bed private teaching hospital, the 20 disposable products of which the greatest amounts (by weight) were purchased, were identified, and total hospital waste was tabulated. Samples of trash from three areas were sorted and weighed, and potential waste reductions from recycling and substituting reusable items were calculated. Business paper, trash liners, diapers, custom surgical packs, paper gowns, plastic suction bottles, and egg-crate pads were among the 20 top items and were analyzed individually. Data from sorted trash documented potential waste reductions through recycling and substitution of 78, 41, and 18 tonnes per year (1 tonne = 1,000 kg = 1.1 tons) from administration, the operating room, and adult wards, respectively (total hospital waste was 939 tonnes per year). We offer specific measures to substantially reduce nonhazardous hospital waste through substitution, minimization, and recycling of select disposable products. Images PMID:1595242

  14. Shift in power to hospital accountants.

    PubMed

    Rayburn, L G; Rayburn, J M

    1996-01-01

    With the introduction of the Prospective Payment System, hospital accountants' role changed from reimbursement maximizers to an important role in decision making. Faced with increased competition, many hospitals are installing financial controls. Many hospitals are engaging in promotion and health awareness campaigns and expanding their services to stabilize income and reduce the effects of a changing environment. Thus, hospitals operate in a more competitive environment with much uncertainty. When faced with uncertainty, organizations often believe that they must convince society that their existence is legitimate. Increasing specialization and organizational complexity in healthcare professions have made the expert important. Experts, such as the role assumed by hospital accountants, maintain power because the organization depends on them for their special skills and information. Scarce resources coupled with uncertainty move hospital accountants as experts into the power equation in the changing control of the U.S. healthcare system. Since accountants often serve as monitors of scarce resources, information about the resource allocation directly affects the distribution of power. This places hospital accountants in a critical role of assisting their institutions in adapting to a new environment. PMID:10164119

  15. Management of medical waste in Tanzanian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Manyele, S V; Anicetus, H

    2006-09-01

    A survey was conducted to study the existing medical waste management (MWM) systems in Tanzanian hospitals during a nationwide health-care waste management-training programme conducted from 2003 to 2005. The aim of the programme was to enable health workers to establish MWM systems in their health facilities aimed at improving infection prevention and control and occupational health aspects. During the training sessions, a questionnaire was prepared and circulated to collect information on the MWM practices existing in hospitals in eight regions of the Tanzania. The analysis showed that increased population and poor MWM systems as well as expanded use of disposables were the main reasons for increased medical wastes in hospitals. The main disposal methods comprised of open pit burning (50%) and burying (30%) of the waste. A large proportion (71%) of the hospitals used dust bins for transporting waste from generation points to incinerator without plastic bags. Most hospitals had low incineration capacity, with few of them having fire brick incinerators. Most of the respondents preferred on-site versus off-site waste incineration. Some hospitals were using untrained casual labourers in medical waste management and general cleanliness. The knowledge level in MWM issues was low among the health workers. It is concluded that hospital waste management in Tanzania is poor. There is need for proper training and management regarding awareness and practices of medical waste management to cover all carders of health workers in the country. PMID:18254511

  16. [University clinics in the competitive hospital market].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, C E; Möller, J; Hesslau, U; Bauer, M; Gabbert, T; Kremer, B

    2005-07-01

    In recent years Germany has faced a growing economization and competition among hospitals. To protect their interests hospitals have to operate similarly to other commercial businesses. Academic hospitals face difficult circumstances in this competition. They have to facilitate research and education activities which require additional financial and personnel resources but also provide maximum acute care treatment at all times. This causes additional disadvantages in terms of financial resources, compared to private hospital chains. Such examples of financial shortcomings have led to the privatization of academic research centres in Germany. An alternative strategy to privatization of academic acute care hospitals is the change of their legal status into a capital company or into a foundation, according to US experiences. Public private partnerships (PPPs) may also represent a potential alternative, as they have already produced a growing number of successful examples in the public sector in Germany. Academic acute care hospitals can also choose a strategic reorganization of their targets, similar to their privately held competitors in the market. Potential economies in scale may be achieved in areas such as medical treatment, research and personnel planning.However, it is vital that academic acute care hospitals start to act productively and also individually. This article provides a number of managerial pathways and options to maintain and strengthen operational competitiveness. PMID:15942750

  17. Trends and initiatives in hospital ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Burns, L A

    1982-05-01

    Changes in the financing and delivery of hospital ambulatory care are discussed. Ambulatory care encompasses a wide spectrum of clinical services provided to patients who are not confined overnight to an institutional bed as inpatients. There are a large and growing number of ways hospitals and physicians cooperate to provide ambulatory-care services. Technological advancements, which have spurred changes in other sectors of medicine, have also changed patterns of medical practice in ambulatory care. Some of the reasons why hospitals develop and expand ambulatory-care programs relate to the changing demand for health services, the shifting preferences of third-party payers and regulators, competitive influences, diversification of risk, and use of such programs as feeders for inpatient services and as teaching and research settings. Although outpatient revenues are a small portion of total hospital revenues, they are growing more rapidly than inpatient revenues. Changes in the health industry that offer opportunities to hospitals are described, such as the increasing physician supply and the formation of group practices, the climate of cost consciousness and price competition, and the trend toward new corporate structures for hospitals. These changes portend changes for hospital pharmacists and give them the opportunity to increase their clinical roles in providing ambulatory care. PMID:7081250

  18. [The hospital: reality and proposable future].

    PubMed

    Cardinale, A E; Torregrossa, M V

    2008-01-01

    In this work we run over hospital history from Middle ages to the present time. Hospitals were charitable institutions in fact they rise inside monasterys, churches or castles with an architecture in modum crucis as a symbolic expression of Christ crucifix. During Renaissance, new scientific Knowledges and the need of technical assistance in a suitable place, lead to a new kind of hospital included into the functional centres of the city were medical practice takes the places of spiritual assistance. In XVIII century hospital is like a "human diseases botanical garden" divided into departments with a circular structure in conformity with a functional model of control. To exceed the isolation of single room, rectangular rooms born with a radially arrangement. At the end of 700's born the pavilions structures typical of hospitals until half 900's when the "monobloc" take place. Today hospital becomes horizontal, include in the context of the city, with hall as a big hotel and with trading centres in accordance with Renzo Piano model and with a new vision of hospital as a welcome place were the patient is a guest to treat as a person of consequence. PMID:18590044

  19. Approaching hospital administration about adopting cooling technologies.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, Lisa L; Parham, William M; Pastores, Stephen M

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide intensivists with information and examples regarding cooling technology selection, cost assessment, adaptation, barriers, and presentation to hospital administrators. A review of medical and business literature was conducted using the following search terms: technology assessment, organizational innovation, intensive care, critical care, hospital administration, and presentation to administrators. General recommendations for intensivists are made for assessing cooling technology with descriptions of common new technology implementation stages. A study of 16 hospitals implementing a new cardiac surgery technology is described. A description of successful implementation of an induced hypothermia protocol by one of the authors is presented. Although knowledgeable about the applications of new technologies, including cooling technology, intensivists have little guidance or training on tactics to obtain a hospital administration's funding and support. Intensive care unit budgets are usually controlled by nonintensivists whose interests are neutral, at best, to the needs of intensivists. To rise to the top of the large pile of requisition requests, an intensivist's proposal must be well conceived and aligned with hospital administration's strategic goals. Intensivists must understand the hospital acquisition process and administrative structure and participate on high-level hospital committees. Using design thinking and strong leadership skills, the intensivist can marshal support from staff and administrators to successfully implement cooling technology. PMID:19535961

  20. Remote Antimicrobial Stewardship in Community Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Zachary H.; Nicolsen, Nicole C.; Allen, Nichole; Cook, Paul P.

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship has become standard practice at university medical centers, but the practice is more difficult to implement in remote community hospitals that lack infectious diseases trained practitioners. Starting in 2011, six community hospitals within the Vidant Health system began an antimicrobial stewardship program utilizing pharmacists who reviewed charts remotely from Vidant Medical Center. Pharmacists made recommendations within the electronic medical record (EMR) to streamline, discontinue, or switch antimicrobial agents. Totals of charts reviewed, recommendations made, recommendations accepted, and categories of intervention were recorded. Linear regression was utilized to measure changes in antimicrobial use over time. For the four larger hospitals, recommendations for changes were made in an average of 45 charts per month per hospital and physician acceptance of the pharmacists’ recommendations varied between 83% and 88%. There was no significant decrease in total antimicrobial use, but much of the use was outside of the stewardship program’s review. Quinolone use decreased by more than 50% in two of the four larger hospitals. Remote antimicrobial stewardship utilizing an EMR is feasible in community hospitals and is generally received favorably by physicians. As more community hospitals adopt EMRs, there is an opportunity to expand antimicrobial stewardship beyond the academic medical center. PMID:27025642