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Sample records for addition angular distributions

  1. Phenomenology of preequilibrium angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Kalbach, C.; Mann, F.M.

    1980-05-01

    The systematics of continuum angular distributions from a wide variety of light ion nuclear reactions have been studied. To first order, the shape of the angular distributions have been found to depend only on the energy of the outgoing particle and on the division of the cross section into multi-step direct and multi-step compound parts. The angular distributions can be described in terms of Legendre polynomials with the reduced polynomial coefficients exhibiting a simple dependence on the outgoing particle energy. Two integer and four continuous parameters with universal values are needed to describe the coefficients for outgoing energies of 2 to 60 MeV in all the reaction types studied. This parameterization combined with a modified Griffin model computer code permits the calculation of double differential cross sections for light ion continuum reactions where no data is available.

  2. Calculated angular distributions of energetic atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merker, M.

    1975-01-01

    Calculated angular distributions of atmospheric leakage neutron fluxes from 19 MeV to 1 GeV are presented. Comparisons with the balloon measurements of Preszler et al. and Kanbach et al. are made and show substantial agreement, strengthening the belief in the importance of the CRAND (cosmic-ray albedo-neutron decay) contribution to the high-energy protons in the earth's inner radiation belt. The calculation is presented as a means for investigating features of atmospheric flux distributions.

  3. Angular distribution of laser ablation plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T.; Dabrowski, R.; Okamura, M.

    2010-05-23

    An expansion of a laser induced plasma is fundamental and important phenomena in a laser ion source. To understand the expanding direction, an array of Langmuir probes were employed. The chosen ion for the experiment was Ag{sup 1+} which was created by a second harmonics of a Nd-YAG laser. The obtained angular distribution was about {+-}10 degree. This result also indicates a proper positioning of a solenoid magnet which enhances ion beam current.

  4. Time-dependent photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangyang

    1999-09-01

    I show that the angular distribution of electrons photoionized from gas phase targets by short light pulses is time-dependent, when the orbital momentum composition of the photocurrent changes with excitation energy so evolves with the time of detection. A theory of time- dependent photoionization is outlined and general formulas of time-dependent photoelectron flux and angular distribution are given. Two general propagator methods suitable to describe the time-dependent photoionization and scattering processes are developed. The photoionization process is viewed as a local excitation followed by a half scattering. The local excitation process is solved theoretically in a small region around the target core. This approach has been generalized to describe the evolution of a wavepacket in an unbound system. An asymptotic propagator theorem is discovered and used to derive analytic expressions for asymptotic propagators. The origin of the time dependence is explored by parameterizing the time delay and orbital momentum coupling in a two channel model. K-shell photoionization of N2 and CO are calculated with this time- dependent photoionization theory, implemented using a multiple scattering model. Numerical results demonstrate that the time dependence of photoelectron angular distributions is a realistic effect.

  5. Quantum optimal control of photoelectron spectra and angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetz, R. Esteban; Karamatskou, Antonia; Santra, Robin; Koch, Christiane P.

    2016-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra and photoelectron angular distributions obtained in photoionization reveal important information on, e.g., charge transfer or hole coherence in the parent ion. Here we show that optimal control of the underlying quantum dynamics can be used to enhance desired features in the photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. To this end, we combine Krotov's method for optimal control theory with the time-dependent configuration interaction singles formalism and a splitting approach to calculate photoelectron spectra and angular distributions. The optimization target can account for specific desired properties in the photoelectron angular distribution alone, in the photoelectron spectrum, or in both. We demonstrate the method for hydrogen and then apply it to argon under strong XUV radiation, maximizing the difference of emission into the upper and lower hemispheres, in order to realize directed electron emission in the XUV regime.

  6. Orbital angular momentum in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Darryl J; Oesch, Denis W

    2011-11-21

    This is the second of two papers demonstrating that photons with orbital angular momentum can be created in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence. In the companion paper, it is shown that propagation through atmospheric turbulence can create non-trivial angular momentum. Here, we extend the result and demonstrate that this momentum is, at least in part, orbital angular momentum. Specifically, we demonstrate that branch points (in the language of the adaptive optic community) indicate the presence of photons with non-zero OAM. Furthermore, the conditions required to create photons with non-zero orbital angular momentum are ubiquitous. The repercussions of this statement are wide ranging and these are cursorily enumerated. PMID:22109489

  7. Orbital angular momentum in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Darryl J; Oesch, Denis W

    2011-11-21

    This is the second of two papers demonstrating that photons with orbital angular momentum can be created in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence. In the companion paper, it is shown that propagation through atmospheric turbulence can create non-trivial angular momentum. Here, we extend the result and demonstrate that this momentum is, at least in part, orbital angular momentum. Specifically, we demonstrate that branch points (in the language of the adaptive optic community) indicate the presence of photons with non-zero OAM. Furthermore, the conditions required to create photons with non-zero orbital angular momentum are ubiquitous. The repercussions of this statement are wide ranging and these are cursorily enumerated.

  8. Angular distributions for two-photon double ionization of lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, G. S. J.; Colgan, J.

    2012-08-01

    We present angular distributions for two-photon double ionization of lithium at photon energies of 50 eV (λ = 25 nm) and 59 eV (λ = 21 nm). The results are obtained from full-dimensional solution of the two-active-electron time-dependent Schrödinger equation using the time-dependent close-coupling method. We investigate two different double ionization mechanisms. First, we consider direct double ionization of the Li ground state following the absorption of two photons. Secondly, we consider an initial photoexcitation of the 1s2s2p doubly excited state, followed by photoionization of the 2s and 2p electrons. We find significant differences between the angular distributions obtained for these two distinct processes. We also compare the characteristics of the angular distributions for Li with those of other two-electron atoms.

  9. Angular distribution of photoelectrons from atomic oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. T.; Kennedy, D. J.; Starace, A. F.; Dill, D.

    1974-01-01

    The angular distribution of photoelectrons from atomic oxygen is investigated using Hartree-Fock (HF) wave functions. The correct formulation is used to compare HS and HF results. Agreement between these results is good and the HS calculations have been extended to atomic nitrogen and carbon as well.

  10. Systematical Analysis on Angular Distribution of Bremsstrahlung Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Otgooloi, B.; Enkhbat, N.

    2009-03-31

    The systematic analysis has been made the measurement results of the relative angular distribution of gamma quantium with 11 divide 16 MeV energy using experimental data of Ta, W, Cu, Mo and Ti targets with various radiating lengths thicknesses.

  11. Systematical Analysis on Angular Distribution of Bremsstrahlung Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otgooloi, B.; Enkhbat, N.

    2009-03-01

    The systematic analysis has been made the measurement results of the relative angular distribution of gamma quantium with 11÷16 MeV energy using experimental data of Ta, W, Cu, Mo and Ti targets with various radiating lengths thicknesses.

  12. Molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions Molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchese, Robert R.; Stolow, Albert

    2012-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoelectron measurements in molecular ionization continue to grow in importance due to their sensitivity to molecular dynamics combined with their avoidance of deleterious averaging over molecular orientation. This special issue contains only regularly refereed articles and provides an account of current experimental and theoretical studies of such molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions (MFPADs). Recent experimental activity in this field has been stimulated by advances in light sources such as x-ray free electron lasers, attosecond XUV laser pulses and phase-stable ultrashort strong laser fields. This effort is further amplified by recent developments in coincidence detection and molecular-frame alignment/orientation techniques. Beyond perturbative light-matter interactions, strong field processes such as tunnel ionization, above threshold ionization and rescattering phenomena such as high harmonic generation and laser-induced electron diffraction are beginning to probe molecular-frame photoelectron-molecule scattering dynamics. Theoretical developments are playing an equally important role in furthering molecular-frame photoelectron science. This issue contains several purely theoretical papers that aim to provide insight into possible schemes for using MFPADs in the study of molecular dynamics. Because the details of the electron-molecule scattering dynamics are important to the interpretation of experimental data, significant progress is made by a close collaboration between theory and experiment. There are a number of such contributions in this issue that combine theory and experiment to obtain a detailed understanding of the observed processes. One recurring theme is the use of measured MFPADs as probes of the molecular state and to uncover information about the dynamics of molecular systems. Contributions in this issue consider using MFPADs to investigate molecular geometry or the rotational, vibrational or electronic state of a

  13. Orbital angular momentum and generalized transverse momentum distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong; Liu, Keh-Fei; Yang, Yi-Bo

    2016-03-01

    We show that, when boosted to the infinite momentum frame, the quark and gluon orbital angular momentum operators defined in the nucleon spin sum rule of Chen et al. are the same as those whose matrix elements correspond to the moments of generalized transverse momentum distributions. This completes the connection between the infinite momentum limit of each term in that sum rule and experimentally measurable observables. We also show that these orbital angular momentum operators can be defined locally and discuss the strategies of calculating them in lattice QCD.

  14. Imaging the Earth's Interior: the Angular Distribution of Terrestrial Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Brian D.; Hochmuth, Kathrin A.

    2006-12-01

    Decays of radionuclides throughout the earth’s interior produce geothermal heat, but also are a source of antineutrinos; these geoneutrinos are now becoming observable in experiments such as KamLAND. The (angle-integrated) geoneutrino flux has been shown to provide a unique probe of geothermal heating due to decays, and an integral constraint on the distribution of radionuclides in the earth. In this paper, we calculate the angular distribution of geoneutrinos, which opens a window on the differential radial distribution of terrestrial radionuclides. We develop the general formalism for the neutrino angular distribution. We also present the inverse transformation which recovers the terrestrial radioisotope distribution given a measurement of the neutrino angular distribution. Thus, geoneutrinos not only allow a means to image the earth’s interior, but offer a direct measure of the radioactive earth, both revealing the earth’s inner structure as probed by radionuclides, and allowing a complete determination of the radioactive heat generation as a function of radius. Turning to specific models, we emphasize the very useful approximation in which the earth is modeled as a series of shells of uniform density. Using this multishell approximation, we present the geoneutrino angular distribution for the favored earth model which has been used to calculate the geoneutrino flux. In this model the neutrino generation is dominated by decays of potassium, uranium, and thorium in the earth’s mantle and crust; this leads to a very “peripheral” angular distribution, in which 2/3 of the neutrinos come from angles θ ≳ 60° away from the nadir. We note that a measurement of the neutrino intensity in peripheral directions leads to a strong lower limit to the central intensity. We briefly discuss the challenges facing experiments to measure the geoneutrino angular distribution. Currently available techniques using inverse beta decay of protons require a (for now

  15. Parton transverse momentum and orbital angular momentum distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Abha; Courtoy, Aurore; Engelhardt, Michael; Liuti, Simonetta

    2016-08-01

    The quark orbital angular momentum component of proton spin, Lq, can be defined in QCD as the integral of a Wigner phase space distribution weighting the cross product of the quark's transverse position and momentum. It can also be independently defined from the operator product expansion for the off-forward Compton amplitude in terms of a twist-three generalized parton distribution. We provide an explicit link between the two definitions, connecting them through their dependence on partonic intrinsic transverse momentum. Connecting the definitions provides the key for correlating direct experimental determinations of Lq and evaluations through lattice QCD calculations. The direct observation of quark orbital angular momentum does not require transverse spin polarization but can occur using longitudinally polarized targets.

  16. Angular distribution and atomic effects in condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.F.

    1981-11-01

    A general concept of condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy is that angular distribution and atomic effects in the photoemission intensity are determined by different mechanisms, the former being determined largely by ordering phenomena such as crystal momentum conservation and photoelectron diffraction while the latter are manifested in the total (angle-integrated) cross section. In this work, the physics of the photoemission process is investigated in several very different experiments to elucidate the mechanisms of, and correlation between, atomic and angular distribution effects. Theoretical models are discussed and the connection betweeen the two effects is clearly established. The remainder of this thesis, which describes experiments utilizing both angle-resolved and angle-integrated photoemission in conjunction with synchrotron radiation in the energy range 6 eV less than or equal to h ..nu.. less than or equal to 360 eV and laboratory sources, is divided into three parts.

  17. A Novel Microsensor for Measuring Angular Distribution of Radiative Intensity.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Thomas E; Pilorz, Stuart; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Bebout, Brad

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the design, construction and characterization of a novel type of light probe for measuring the angular radiance distribution of light fields. The differential acceptance angle (DAA) probe can resolve the directionality of a light field in environments with steep light gradients, such as microbial mats, without the need to remove, reorient, and reinsert the probe, a clear advantage over prior techniques. The probe consists of an inner irradiance sensor inside a concentric, moveable light-absorbing sheath. The radiative intensity in a specific zenith direction can be calculated by comparing the irradiance onto the sensor at different acceptance angles. We used this probe to measure the angular radiance distribution of two sample light fields, and observed good agreement with a conventional radiance probe. The DAA probe will aid researchers in understanding light transfer physics in dense microbial communities and expedite validation of numerical radiative transfer models for these environments. PMID:25763775

  18. Measurement of the Angular Distributions of Drell-Yan Dimuons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, Brandon; Fermilab E-906/SeaQuest Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The angular differential cross section for the Drell-Yan (DY) process can be parametrized by dσ/dΩ ~ 1 + λcos2 θ + μsin 2 θcosφ +ν/2sin2 θcos 2 φ , where λ, μ, and ν are the angular distribution parameters vs pT. θ and φ denote the polar and azimuthal angles, respectively for the positive lepton produced. The Lam-Tung relation, 1 - λ = 2 ν , was validated by Fermilab E-866 for proton induced Drell-Yan scattering; However pion induced DY shows a much stronger cos2 θ angular dependence and a violation of the Lam-Tung relation. In pion induced DY the antiquark is a valance quark, whereas in proton induced DY (in a forward acceptance spectrometer) it is a sea quark, so E-866 probed the antiquark sea of the nucleon. The SeaQuest experiment, also using proton induced DY, will improve on the measurement of the angular dependencies at a lower energy (120 GeV), taking advantage lower backgrounds and an increase in Drell-Yan cross section at lower energies. The Boer-Mulders correlates the quark correlates between the quark transverse spin and momentum. Improved data from SeaQuest will help determine the Boer-Mulders function. Funding for this work was provided in part by the U.S. DOE Office of Science.

  19. (e,2e) Angular Distributions and Energy Spectra in Cadmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, N. L. S.; Bauman, R. P.; Ross, K. J.; Wilson, M.

    1996-05-01

    Early angular distribution measurements on the Cd 4d^95s^25p ^3P1 autoionizing level( N.L.S. Martin and K.J. Ross, J. Phys. B 17), 4033 (1984). did not correspond with those expected from a single level of mixed ^3P+^1P character. An analysis indicated that the results were consistent with the combined angular distributions of the ^3P1 level and a previously unknown ^1D2 even parity autoionizing level at a slightly displaced ejected-electron energy. Recent (e,2e) energy spectra measurements( N.L.S. Martin, D.B. Thompson, R.P. Bauman, M. Wilson, Phys.Rev.A 50), 3878 (1994). that spanned the 4d^95s^25p energy region were interpreted with the help of ab initio structure and plane wave Born amplitude calculations. It was found that the experimental data could be modeled satisfactorily without including a ^1D2 level close to the ^3P1 level. We will present new calculations which reconcile these apparent contradictions between the angular distributions and energy spectra.

  20. Statistical mechanics of collisionless orbits. IV. Distribution of angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Liliya L. R.; Hjorth, Jens; Wojtak, Radosław E-mail: jens@dark-cosmology.dk

    2014-03-01

    It has been shown in previous work that DARKexp, which is a theoretically derived, maximum entropy, one shape parameter model for isotropic collisionless systems, provides very good fits to simulated and observed dark matter halos. Specifically, it fits the energy distribution, N(E), and the density profiles, including the central cusp. Here, we extend DARKexp N(E) to include the distribution in angular momentum, L {sup 2}, for spherically symmetric systems. First, we argue, based on theoretical, semi-analytical, and simulation results, that while dark matter halos are relaxed in energy, they are not nearly as relaxed in angular momentum, which precludes using maximum entropy to uniquely derive N(E, L {sup 2}). Instead, we require that when integrating N(E, L {sup 2}) over squared angular momenta one retrieves the DARKexp N(E). Starting with a general expression for N(E, L {sup 2}) we show how the distribution of particles in L {sup 2} is related to the shape of the velocity distribution function, VDF, and velocity anisotropy profile, β(r). We then demonstrate that astrophysically realistic halos, as judged by the VDF shape and β(r), must have linear or convex distributions in L {sup 2}, for each separate energy bin. The distribution in energy of the most bound particles must be nearly flat, and become more tilted in favor of radial orbits for less bound particles. These results are consistent with numerical simulations and represent an important step toward deriving the full distribution function for spherically symmetric dark matter halos.

  1. Accessing the quark orbital angular momentum with Wigner distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Lorce, Cedric

    2013-04-15

    The quark orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been recognized as an important piece of the proton spin puzzle. A lot of effort has been invested in trying to extract it quantitatively from the generalized parton distributions (GPDs) and the transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions (TMDs), which are accessed in high-energy processes and provide three-dimensional pictures of the nucleon. Recently, we have shown that it is more natural to access the quark OAM from the phase-space or Wigner distributions. We discuss the concept of Wigner distributions in the context of quantum field theory and show how they are related to the GPDs and the TMDs. We summarize the different definitions discussed in the literature for the quark OAM and show how they can in principle be extracted from the Wigner distributions.

  2. Singularity in the Laboratory Frame Angular Distribution Derived in Two-Body Scattering Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Frank; Norbury, John W.

    2009-01-01

    The laboratory (lab) frame angular distribution derived in two-body scattering theory exhibits a singularity at the maximum lab scattering angle. The singularity appears in the kinematic factor that transforms the centre of momentum (cm) angular distribution to the lab angular distribution. We show that it is caused in the transformation by the…

  3. Neutron angular distribution in plutonium-240 spontaneous fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcath, Matthew J.; Shin, Tony H.; Clarke, Shaun D.; Peerani, Paolo; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear safeguards applications require accurate fission models that exhibit prompt neutron anisotropy. In the laboratory reference frame, an anisotropic neutron angular distribution is observed because prompt fission neutrons carry momentum from fully accelerated fission fragments. A liquid organic scintillation detector array was used with pulse shape discrimination techniques to produce neutron-neutron cross-correlation time distributions and angular distributions from spontaneous fission in a 252Cf, a 0.84 g 240Pueff metal, and a 1.63 g 240Pueff metal sample. The effect of cross-talk, estimated with MCNPX-PoliMi simulations, is removed from neutron-neutron coincidences as a function of the angle between detector pairs. Fewer coincidences were observed at detector angles near 90°, relative to higher and lower detector angles. As light output threshold increases, the observed anisotropy increases due to spectral effects arising from fission fragment momentum transfer to emitted neutrons. Stronger anisotropy was observed in Cf-252 spontaneous fission prompt neutrons than in Pu-240 neutrons.

  4. Angular distribution of cosmic rays in the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Yu. I.

    2001-08-01

    Cosmic ray propagation in the interplanetary medium is considered on the basis of kinetic equation describing the scattering of charged particles by magnetic irregularities and their focusing by regular interplanetary magnetic field. The relationship between cosmic ray distribution function and parameters of particle scattering in the interplanetary medium is investigated. Obtained results are applied to the analyses of solar proton events and galactic cosmic ray anisotropy. 1 COSMIC RAY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION Angular distribution of energetic charged particles contains valuable information about particle scattering in the heliosphere and the geometry of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) (Bieber and Pomerantz, 1983; Beeck and Wibberenz,1986; Wibberenz and Green, 1988; Hatzky and Wibberenz, 1997). In the present paper the relationship between the distribution function of cosmic rays (CR) and parameters of particle scattering is investigated. The kinetic equation describing CR propagation in the interplanetary medium, can be written as (Earl,1981; Toptygin,1985) ∂f ∂t + vµ ∂f ∂z + v 2ζ (1 - µ2 ) ∂f ∂µ - ∂ ∂µ Dµµ ∂f ∂µ = Q, (1) where f is CR distribution function, Dµµ is the diffusion coefficient in angular space, µ = cos θ and θ is the pitch angle, ς is the focusing length, and z is a coordinate directed along regular magnetic field. The particle source is included in the right hand side of Eq(1). One can present the distribution function as a superposition of isotropic f0 and anisotropic δf(µ) components f(z, µ, t) = 1 2 f0(z, t) + δf(z, µ, t). (2) Assuming that the particle source Q is isotropic and subtracting from Eq.(1) averaged over µ equation, we obtain

  5. DISTRIBUTION OF ACCRETING GAS AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM ONTO CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigawa, Takayuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji; Machida, Masahiro N.

    2012-03-01

    We investigate gas accretion flow onto a circumplanetary disk from a protoplanetary disk in detail by using high-resolution three-dimensional nested-grid hydrodynamic simulations, in order to provide a basis of formation processes of satellites around giant planets. Based on detailed analyses of gas accretion flow, we find that most of gas accretion onto circumplanetary disks occurs nearly vertically toward the disk surface from high altitude, which generates a shock surface at several scale heights of the circumplanetary disk. The gas that has passed through the shock surface moves inward because its specific angular momentum is smaller than that of the local Keplerian rotation, while gas near the midplane in the protoplanetary disk cannot accrete to the circumplanetary disk. Gas near the midplane within the planet's Hill sphere spirals outward and escapes from the Hill sphere through the two Lagrangian points L{sub 1} and L{sub 2}. We also analyze fluxes of accreting mass and angular momentum in detail and find that the distributions of the fluxes onto the disk surface are well described by power-law functions and that a large fraction of gas accretion occurs at the outer region of the disk, i.e., at about 0.1 times the Hill radius. The nature of power-law functions indicates that, other than the outer edge, there is no specific radius where gas accretion is concentrated. These source functions of mass and angular momentum in the circumplanetary disk would provide us with useful constraints on the structure and evolution of the circumplanetary disk, which is important for satellite formation.

  6. Spin O decay angular distribution for interfering mesons in electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.; Gilfoyle, G.

    1994-04-01

    Self analyzing meson electroproduction experiments are currently being planned for the CEBAF CLAS detector. These experiments deduce the spin polarization of outgoing unstable spin s (?)0 mesons from their decay angular distribution, W({theta},{psi}). The large angular acceptance of the CLAS detector permits kinematic tracking of a sufficient number of these events to accurately determine electroproduction amplitudes from the deduced polarization. Maximum polarization information is obtained from W({theta},{psi}) for decay into spin 0 daughters. The helicity of the decaying meson is transferred to the daughter`s relative orbital angular momentum m-projection; none is {open_quotes}absorbed{close_quotes} into daughter helicities. The decaying meson`s helicity maximally appears in W({theta},{psi}). W({theta},{psi}) for spin 0 daughters has been derived for (1) vector meson electroproduction and (2) general interfering mesons produced by incident pions. This paper derives W({theta},{psi}) for electroproduction of two interfering mesons that decay into spin 0 daughters. An application is made to the case of interfering scalar and vector mesons. The derivation is an extension of work by Schil using the general decay formalism of Martin. The expressions can be easily extended to the case of N interfering mesons since interference occurs pairwise in the observable W ({theta},{psi}), a quadratic function of the meson amplitudes. The derivation uses the virtual photon density matrix of Schil which is transformed by a meson electroproduction transition operator, T. The resulting density matrix for the interfering mesons is then converted into a corresponding statistical tensor and contracted into the efficiency tensor for spin 0 daughters.

  7. The effect of angular dose distribution on the detection of microcalcifications in digital breast tomosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yue-Houng; Zhao, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Substantial effort has been devoted to the clinical development of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). DBT is a three-dimensional (3D) x-ray imaging modality that reconstructs a number of thin image slices parallel to a stationary detector plane. Preliminary clinical studies have shown that the removal of overlapping breast tissue reduces image clutter and increases detectability of large, low contrast lesions. However, some studies, as well as anecdotal evidence, suggested decreased conspicuity of small, high contrast objects such as microcalcifications. Several investigators have proposed alternative imaging methods for improving microcalcification detection by delivering half of the total dose to the central view in addition to a separate DBT scan. Preliminary observer studies found possible improvement by either viewing the central projection alone or combining all views with a reconstruction algorithm.Methods: In this paper, we developed a generalized imaging theory based on a cascaded linear-system model for DBT to calculate the effect of variable angular dose distribution on the 3D modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectrum (NPS). Using the ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), d′, as a figure-of-merit (FOM) for a signal embedded in a uniform background, we compared the detectability of objects with different sizes under different imaging conditions (e.g., angular dose distribution and reconstruction filters). Experimental investigation was conducted for three different angular dose schemes (ADS) using a Siemens NovationTOMO prototype unit.Results: Our results show excellent agreement between modeled and experimental measurements of 3D NPS with different angular dose distribution. The ideal observer detectability index for the detection of Gaussian objects with different angular dose distributions depends strongly on the applied reconstruction filter as well as the imaging task. For detection tasks of small calcifications

  8. Angular distributions in the decay B→K*l+l-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Saleem, M.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wang, L.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Gabareen, A. M.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Klose, V.; Kobel, M. J.; Lacker, H. M.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Santoro, V.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Nash, J. A.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Lepeltier, V.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, W. F.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; George, K. A.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Alwyn, K. E.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Koeneke, K.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; McLachlin, S. E.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Côté, D.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Biesiada, J.; Lau, Y. P.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Gioi, L. Li; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Roethel, W.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Esteve, L.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Miyashita, T. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2009-02-01

    We use a sample of 384×106 B Bmacr events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e- collider to study angular distributions in the rare decays B→K*ℓ+ℓ-, where ℓ+ℓ- is either e+e- or μ+μ-. For low dilepton invariant masses, mℓℓ<2.5GeV/c2, we measure a lepton forward-backward asymmetry AFB=0.24-0.23+0.18±0.05 and K* longitudinal polarization FL=0.35±0.16±0.04. For mℓℓ>3.2GeV/c2, we measure AFB=0.76-0.32+0.52±0.07 and FL=0.71-0.22+0.20±0.04.

  9. The distribution of mass and angular momentum in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Marochnik, L.S.; Mukhin, L.M.; Sagdeev, R.Z. )

    1989-01-01

    This book describes the contribution of the comets in the Oort cloud to the angular momentum of the solar system. Topics covered include: Nuclear mass of the new comets observed, Mass of the Oort cloud, Mass distribution in the solar system, Zone of comet formation, Angular momentum of the Oort cloud, and Angular momentum of the Hills cloud.

  10. Improving Student Understanding of Addition of Angular Momentum in Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Guangtian; Singh, Chandralekha

    2013-01-01

    We describe the difficulties advanced undergraduate and graduate students have with concepts related to addition of angular momentum in quantum mechanics. We also describe the development and implementation of a research-based learning tool, Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial (QuILT), to reduce these difficulties. The preliminary evaluation…

  11. Photoelectron angular distributions as a probe of anisotropic electron-ion interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, D.; Manson, S. T.; Starace, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    Expressions are given for atomic photoelectron angular distributions in LS coupling in which the role of anisotropic final state electron-ion interactions emerges explicitly. Calculations of photoelectron angular distributions for atomic sulfur are presented in which these anisotropic interactions produce clear deviations from the predictions of the Cooper-Zare model. Such effects are expected to be a general feature of photoelectron angular distributions for most open-shell atoms.

  12. Photoelectron angular distributions as a probe of anisotropic electron-ion interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, D.; Manson, S. T.; Starace, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    Expressions are given for atomic photoelectron angular distributions in LS coupling in which the role of anisotropic final state electron-ion interactions emerges explicitly. Calculations of photoelectron angular distributions for atomic sulfur are presented in which these anisotropic interactions produce pronounced deviations from the predictions of the Cooper-Zare model. Such effects are expected to be a general feature of photoelectron angular distributions for most open shell atoms.

  13. The Schiff angular bremsstrahlung distribution from composite media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. L.; Dalton, B.; Franich, R. D.

    2012-12-01

    The Schiff differential for the angular distribution of bremsstrahlung is widely employed, but calculations involving composite materials (i.e. compounds and mixtures) are often undertaken in a somewhat ad hoc fashion. In this work, we suggest an alternative approach to power-law estimates of the effective atomic number utilising Seltzer and Berger's combined approach in order to generate single-valued effective atomic numbers applicable over a large energy range (in the worst case deviation from constancy of about 2% between 10 keV and 1 GeV). Differences with power-law estimates of Z for composites are potentially significant, particularly for low-Z media such as biological or surrogate materials as relevant within the context of medical physics. As an example, soft tissue differs by >70% and cortical bone differs by >85%, while for high-Z composites such as a tungsten-rhenium alloy the difference is of the order of 1%. Use of the normalised Schiff formula for shape only does not exhibit strong Z dependence. Consequently, in such contexts the differences are negligible - the power-law approach overestimates the magnitude by 1.05% in the case of water and underestimates it by <0.1% for the high-Z alloys. The differences in the distribution are most pronounced for small angles and where the bremsstrahlung quanta are low energy.

  14. Small Deflection Energy Analyzer for Energy and Angular Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, Federico A.

    2009-01-01

    The development of the Small Deflection Energy Analyzer (SDEA) charged-particle spectrometer for energy and angle distributions responds to a longstanding need to measure the wind velocity vector in Earth s thermosphere, and to obtain the ion-drift vector in the ionosphere. The air and ions above 120 km are endowed with bulk velocities and temperatures just like air near the ground, but with separate spatial and temporal variations. It is important to understand these not only for study of the physics and chemistry of the Sun-Earth connection, but also for spacecraft orbit predictions, and communications through the ionosphere. The SDEA consists of a pair of parallel conducting plates separated by a small distance, with an entrance slit on one end, and an exit slit on the other. A voltage applied to these plates develops an electric field between the plates, and this field deflects ions passing through it. If an ion has too little energy, it will strike one of the plates. If it has too much, it will strike the back wall. An ion with the amount of energy being searched for will have its trajectory bent just enough to exit the back slit. The SDEA units are compact, rectangular, and operate with low voltages. The units can be built up into small arrays. These arrays could be used either to widen the field of view or to sharpen an existing one. This approach can also be used to obtain angular distributions in two planes simultaneously, thus cutting down the ion source power requirements in half. This geometry has enabled a new mass-spectrometer concept that can provide miniaturized mass spectrometers for use in industrial plants, air-pollution monitoring, and noxious-gas detection.

  15. Mass dependence of fragment angular distributions in the fission of 232Th and 236U induced by polarized photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiper, F.; Frommhold, Th.; Henkel, W.; Jung, A.; Kneissl, U.; Stock, R.

    1993-10-01

    Near-barrier fission of 232Th and 236U induced by linearly polarized photons has been investigated. The experiments have been carried out at the "off-axis" bremsstrahlung facility of the Giessen 65 MeV electron linac. Fragment angular, mass and energy distributions have been measured simultaneously allowing the investigation of correlations between these fragment characteristics. A consistent assignment of the quantum numbers Jπ and K for the fussion channels involved in the fission process is proposed. For the first time, the polar anisotropies and azimuthal asymmetries of the fission fragment angular distributions W( θ, φ) have been investigated as a function of the fragment masses. The results are discussed in the framework of the double-humped fission barrier concept and the so-called "multi-exit fission channel" model. Additionally, angular distributions of heavy and light fission fragments from photofission of 236U have been analyzed for a possible asymmetry with respect to θ = 90°.

  16. Vibrational branching ratios and photoelectron angular distributions in 5σ photoionisation of CO

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J. A.; Dill, Dan; Dehmer, Joseph L.

    1981-10-28

    Vibrationally resolved photoelectron angular distributions have been calculated for the 5σ photoionisation channel of CO using the multiple-scattering method. Vibrational branching ratios and vibrationally unresolved integrated cross sections and photoelectron angular distributions are also reported and compared with available measurements. Both angular distributions and branching ratios exhibit striking non-Franck-Condon behaviour caused primarily by the f-wave shape resonance in the sigma photoionisation continuum. Significant discrepancies between theory and experiment exist for the weaker vf=2,3 vibrational levels and interaction with nearby two-electron excitation is proposed as a likely cause.

  17. Modification of the photoelectron angular distribution through laser-induced continuum structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Takashi; Buica, Gabriela

    2005-01-01

    We theoretically investigate how the photoelectron angular distribution is altered by the introduction of a dressing laser. The physical mechanism underlying this alteration is the so-called laser-induced continuum structure; namely, a strong dressing laser induces quantum mechanical interference, the degree of which is different for different ionization channels. Therefore the branching ratio into different ionization channels changes as a function of laser detuning, and accordingly the photoelectron angular distribution is altered. After a general argument, we present specific theoretical results for the K atom, which indeed exhibit significant modification of the photoelectron angular distribution.

  18. Angular distributions for the electron-impact single ionization of sodium and magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, G. S. J.; Colgan, J.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2013-10-01

    We present angular distributions for the electron-impact single ionization of sodium and magnesium at intermediate incident electron energies. The results are obtained from a full-dimensionality solution of the two-active-electron time-dependent Schrödinger equation using the time-dependent close-coupling method. We compare calculated angular distributions with existing measurements. We find good overall agreement with measurements over a range of incident electron energies in both cases. We also calculate angular distributions for ejection configurations in which no measurements are currently available.

  19. Photofragment imaging of HNCO decomposition: Angular anisotropy and correlated distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sanov, A.; Droz-Georget, T.; Zyrianov, M.; Reisler, H.

    1997-05-01

    Photodissociation of jet-cooled isocyanic acid has been examined by photofragment ion imaging of H(D) from H(D)NCO and CO from HNCO, and by laser induced fluorescence (LIF) of NH(a{sup 1}{Delta}) from HNCO. Only modest recoil anisotropy is observed in the H+NCO channel at 243.1 nm ({beta}={minus}0.13{plus_minus}0.05), while the D+NCO channel at approximately the same wavelength reveals no anisotropy ({beta}=0.00{plus_minus}0.05), confirming that the dissociation of H(D)NCO from the opening of the H(D) channel proceeds via vibrational predissociation on the S{sub 0}({sup 1}A) surface. In contrast, substantial anisotropy ({beta}={minus}0.66{plus_minus}0.08) is observed in the NH(a{sup 1}{Delta})+CO channel at 230.1 nm, but this value can correspond to dissociation on either S{sub 0} or S{sub 1}. The photolysis region between 243 and 230 nm thus appears important in providing clues to the dissociation mechanism and the competition between different potential energy surfaces. At 217.6 nm, product state distributions exhibit clear dynamical biases. CO is produced in both {nu}=0 and {nu}=1, while NH(a{sup 1}{Delta}) distributions correlated with different rovibrational levels of CO, although different in shape, are always cold, consistent with the global NH distribution measured by LIF. The NH distributions indicate dissociation on S{sub 1}({sup 1}A{sup {prime}{prime}}), and can be described by Franck{endash}Condon mapping of transition state wave functions in the HNC bending coordinate without additional torque, implying little anisotropy in the potential along that coordinate. On the other hand, a larger torque is manifest in the CO rotational distribution. Although at 217.6 nm the dissociation is likely to be dominated by decomposition on S{sub 1}, competition with radiationless decay is still manifest. The NH(a{sup 1}{Delta})+CO dissociation threshold is determined at 42765{plus_minus}25cm{sup {minus}1}. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Effects of anisotropic electron-ion interactions in atomic photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, D.; Starace, A. F.; Manson, S. T.

    1975-01-01

    A summary of the angular momentum transfer formulation of the differential photoionization cross section is presented and photoionization amplitudes in LS coupling are considered. The application of the theoretical concepts and relations developed is illustrated with the aid of an example involving the calculation of the angular distribution of photoelectrons ionized from atomic sulfur according to a certain reaction. The investigation shows that anisotropic electron-ion interactions in atomic sulfur lead to measurable differences between photoelectron angular distribution asymmetry parameters corresponding to alternative ionic term levels.

  1. Interference in the angular distribution of photoelectrons in superimposed XUV and optical laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Düsterer, S.; Rading, L.; Johnsson, P.; Rouzée, A.; Hundertmark, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Radcliffe, P.; Meyer, M.; Kazansky, A. K.; Kabachnik, N. M.

    2013-08-01

    The angular distribution of photoelectrons ejected during the ionization of Ne atoms by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) free-electron laser radiation in the presence of an intense near infrared (NIR) dressing field was investigated experimentally and theoretically. A highly nonlinear process with absorption and emission of more than ten NIR photons results in the formation of numerous sidebands. The amplitude of the sidebands varies strongly with the emission angle and the angular distribution pattern reveals clear signatures of interferences between the different angular momenta for the outgoing electron in the multi-photon process. As a specific feature, the central photoelectron line is characterized at the highest NIR fields by an angular distribution, which is peaked perpendicularly to both the XUV and NIR polarization directions. Experimental results are reproduced by a theoretical model based on the strong field approximation.

  2. Investigating the hohlraum radiation properties through the angular distribution of the radiation temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Yang, D.; Song, P.; Zou, S.; Zhao, Y.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Guo, L.; Wang, F.; Zheng, W.; Gu, P.; Pei, W.; Zhu, S.; Jiang, S.; Ding, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The symmetric radiation drive is essential to the capsule implosion in the indirect drive fusion but is hard to achieve due to the non-uniform radiation distribution inside the hohlraum. In this work, the non-uniform radiation properties of both vacuum and gas-filled hohlraums are studied by investigating the angular distribution of the radiation temperature experimentally and numerically. It is found that the non-uniform radiation distribution inside the hohlraum induces the variation of the radiation temperature between different view angles. The simulations show that both the angular distribution of the radiation temperature and the hohlraum radiation distribution can be affected by the electron heat flux. The measured angular distribution of the radiation temperature is more consistent with the simulations when the electron heat flux limiter f e = 0.1 . Comparisons between the experiments and simulations further indicate that the x-ray emission of the blow-off plasma is overestimated in the simulations when it stagnates around the hohlraum axis. The axial position of the laser spot can also be estimated by the angular distribution of the radiation temperature due to their sensitive dependence. The inferred laser spot moves closer to the laser entrance hole in the gas-filled hohlraum than that in the vacuum hohlraum, consisting with the x-ray images taken from the framing camera. The angular distribution of the radiation temperature provides an effective way to investigate the hohlraum radiation properties and introduces more constraint to the numerical modeling of the hohlraum experiments.

  3. Mass-resolved angular distribution of fission products in the 20Ne+232Th reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, R.; Sodaye, S.; Sudarshan, K.; Guin, R.

    2013-08-01

    Mass-resolved angular distributions of fission product were measured in the 20Ne + 232Th reaction at Elab = 125.6 and 142.5 MeV using the recoil catcher technique followed by offline γ-ray spectrometry. Angular anisotropy was found to decrease with increasing asymmetry of mass division. Angular anisotropies of the fission products in the symmetric region were significantly higher compared to those calculated using the statistical saddle-point model. Experimental anisotropies could be explained after considering the contribution from pre-equilibrium fission. Use of barrier energies corresponding to different mass asymmetry values in the calculations could reasonably reproduce the mass dependence of angular anisotropies. The role of barrier energies in governing the angular anisotropy indicates that the mass dependence of anisotropy may possibly be a distinguishing feature of pre-equilibrium fission from quasifission, in which the composite system escapes into the exit channel without being captured inside the saddle point.

  4. Angular distribution of field emitted electrons from vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobucci, S.; Fratini, M.; Rizzo, A.; Scarinci, F.; Zhang, Y.; Mann, M.; Li, C.; Milne, W. I.; El Gomati, M. M.; Lagomarsino, S.; Stefani, G.

    2012-01-01

    Angular field emission (FE) properties of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays have been measured on samples grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and characterized by scanning electron microscope and I-V measurements. These properties determine the angular divergence of electron beams, a crucial parameter in order to obtain high brilliance FE based cathodes. From angular distributions of the electron beam transmitted through extraction grids of different mesh size and by using ray-tracing simulations, the maximum emission angle from carbon nanotube tips has been determined to be about ± 30° around the tube main axis.

  5. Angular distribution of ions and extreme ultraviolet emission in laser-produced tin droplet plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong; Wang, Xinbing; Duan, Lian; Lan, Hui; Chen, Ziqi; Zuo, Duluo; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-05-01

    Angular-resolved ion time-of-flight spectra as well as extreme ultraviolet radiation in laser-produced tin droplet plasma are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Tin droplets with a diameter of 150 μm are irradiated by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The ion time-of-flight spectra measured from the plasma formed by laser irradiation of the tin droplets are interpreted in terms of a theoretical elliptical Druyvesteyn distribution to deduce ion density distributions including kinetic temperatures of the plasma. The opacity of the plasma for extreme ultraviolet radiation is calculated based on the deduced ion densities and temperatures, and the angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is expressed as a function of the opacity using the Beer-Lambert law. Our results show that the calculated angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Energy spreading and angular distribution of a beam of electrons in molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, M. G.; Green, A. E. S.

    1975-01-01

    A Monte Carlo approach is used to obtain the energy spreading and angular distribution of initially monoenergetic and monodirectional beams of electron incident on a gas of molecular hydrogen. Several beams of primary electrons and the resultant secondaries are degraded in a step-by-step procedure which utilizes a detailed set of cross sections, together with reasonable approximations for the creation of secondary electrons. Particular attention is paid to the initial angular distribution of secondary electrons. An analytic function which characterizes current experimental differential cross-section data is used to provide realistic inputs into our calculations. The results for energy distribution as a function of distance and angular distribution at selected energies and distances are illustrated.

  7. Angular distribution of ions and extreme ultraviolet emission in laser-produced tin droplet plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hong; Duan, Lian; Lan, Hui; Wang, Xinbing Chen, Ziqi; Zuo, Duluo; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-05-21

    Angular-resolved ion time-of-flight spectra as well as extreme ultraviolet radiation in laser-produced tin droplet plasma are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Tin droplets with a diameter of 150 μm are irradiated by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The ion time-of-flight spectra measured from the plasma formed by laser irradiation of the tin droplets are interpreted in terms of a theoretical elliptical Druyvesteyn distribution to deduce ion density distributions including kinetic temperatures of the plasma. The opacity of the plasma for extreme ultraviolet radiation is calculated based on the deduced ion densities and temperatures, and the angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is expressed as a function of the opacity using the Beer–Lambert law. Our results show that the calculated angular distribution of extreme ultraviolet radiation is in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Calculation of reflectance distribution using angular spectrum convolution in mesh-based computer generated hologram.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Han-Ju; Park, Jae-Hyeung

    2016-08-22

    We propose a method to obtain a computer-generated hologram that renders reflectance distributions of individual mesh surfaces of three-dimensional objects. Unlike previous methods which find phase distribution inside each mesh, the proposed method performs convolution of angular spectrum of the mesh to obtain desired reflectance distribution. Manipulation in the angular spectrum domain enables its application to fully-analytic mesh based computer generated hologram, removing the necessity for resampling of the spatial frequency grid. It is also computationally inexpensive as the convolution can be performed efficiently using Fourier transform. In this paper, we present principle, error analysis, simulation, and experimental verification results of the proposed method.

  9. Product angular distributions in the ultraviolet photodissociation of N{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect

    McBane, George C.; Schinke, Reinhard

    2012-01-28

    The angular distribution of products from the ultraviolet photodissociation of nitrous oxide yielding O({sup 1}D) and N{sub 2}(X {Sigma}{sub g}{sup +1}) was investigated using classical trajectory calculations. The calculations modeled absorption only to the 2 {sup 1}A{sup '} electronic state but used surface-hopping techniques to model nonadiabatic transitions to the ground electronic state late in the dissociation. Observed values of the anisotropy parameter {beta}, which decrease as the product N{sub 2} rotational quantum number j increases, could be well reproduced. The relatively low observed {beta} values arise principally from nonaxial recoil due to the very strong bending forces present in the excited state. In the main part of the product rotational distribution near 203 nm, an unusual dynamical effect produces the decrease in {beta} with increasing j; nonaxial recoil effects remain approximately constant while higher j product molecules arise from parent molecules that had their transition dipole moments aligned more closely along the molecular axis. In both low and high j tails of the rotational distribution, the variations in {beta} with j are caused by changes in the extent of nonaxial recoil. In the high-j tail, additional torque present on the ground state potential energy surface following nonadiabatic transitions causes both the additional rotational excitation and the lower {beta} values.

  10. Angular distribution of atoms ejected by laser ablation of different metals

    SciTech Connect

    Konomi, I.; Motohiro, T.; Asaoka, T.

    2009-07-01

    Angular distributions of 13 different metals ejected by laser ablation using fourth harmonics (wavelength=266 nm) of neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser and a fluence close to near-threshold value (2.3 J/cm{sup 2}) have been investigated with a high angular resolution. The angular distribution which is characterized by the exponent n of cos{sup n} theta distribution showed very broad range of values between 3 and 24 for different metals. A simple relation that the exponent n is proportional to the square root of particle atomic weight as reported previously has not been observed. Instead, a general trend has been found that the metals with higher sublimation energy such as Ta and Zr show narrower angular distribution than those with lower sublimation energy such as Sn and In. While the sublimation energy of metals has a great influence on the angular distribution of ejected atoms, a simple consideration suggests that their thermal conductivity and specific heat have little effect on it.

  11. Cross Section Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Including Secondary Neutron Energy and Angular Distributions.

    1991-03-12

    Version 00 SUSD calculates sensitivity coefficients for one- and two-dimensional transport problems. Variance and standard deviation of detector responses or design parameters can be obtained using cross-section covariance matrices. In neutron transport problems, this code can perform sensitivity-uncertainty analysis for secondary angular distribution (SAD) or secondary energy distribution (SED).

  12. Nitrogen oxide abatement by distributed fuel addition

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, J.O.L.; Meraab, J.

    1988-03-25

    The purpose of this project is to develop techniques for nitrogen oxides abatement by distributed fuel addition. The major nitrogen oxide of interest is Nitric Oxide (NO), a precursor to premature forest damage and to acid rain. Recently interest has also been evoked with respect to an additional oxide of nitrogen, namely Nitrous Oxide (N{sub 2}O). Therefore, abatement measures for NO{sub x} are being investigated to determine their influence on N{sub 2}O as well. This report briefly describes the significance of N{sub 2}O emissions to the environment and the urgent need to develop techniques that can reduce emissions of both NO and N{sub 2}O. Reburning through distributed fuel addition may be an effective technique for NO{sub x} (mainly NO) emission control as described in the previous quarterly report. Reburning may also be effective in reducing N{sub 2}O levels. A technique for N{sub 2}O measurement by gas chromatography/electron capture detection was developed during this quarter, and is described in this report. This analysis technique will be used in the proposed experimental study to investigate the effectiveness of reburning on N{sub 2}O control.

  13. Dynamic approach to description of entrance channel effects in angular distributions of fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremenko, D. O.; Drozdov, V. A.; Fotina, O. V.; Platonov, S. Yu.; Yuminov, O. A.

    2016-07-01

    Background: It is well known that the anomalous behavior of angular anisotropies of fission fragments at sub- and near-barrier energies is associated with a memory of conditions in the entrance channel of the heavy-ion reactions, particularly, deformations and spins of colliding nuclei that determine the initial distributions for the components of the total angular momentum over the symmetry axis of the fissioning system and the beam axis. Purpose: We develop a new dynamic approach, which allows the description of the memory effects in the fission fragment angular distributions and provides new information on fusion and fission dynamics. Methods: The approach is based on the dynamic model of the fission fragment angular distributions which takes into account stochastic aspects of nuclear fission and thermal fluctuations for the tilting mode that is characterized by the projection of the total angular momentum onto the symmetry axis of the fissioning system. Another base of our approach is the quantum mechanical method to calculate the initial distributions over the components of the total angular momentum of the nuclear system immediately following complete fusion. Results: A method is suggested for calculating the initial distributions of the total angular momentum projection onto the symmetry axis for the nuclear systems formed in the reactions of complete fusion of deformed nuclei with spins. The angular distributions of fission fragments for the 16O+232Th,12C+235,236,238, and 13C+235U reactions have been analyzed within the dynamic approach over a range of sub- and above-barrier energies. The analysis allowed us to determine the relaxation time for the tilting mode and the fraction of fission events occurring in times not larger than the relaxation time for the tilting mode. Conclusions: It is shown that the memory effects play an important role in the formation of the angular distributions of fission fragments for the reactions induced by heavy ions. The

  14. Model-independent constraints on the shape parameters of dilepton angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faccioli, Pietro; Lourenço, Carlos; Seixas, João; Wöhri, Hermine K.

    2011-03-01

    The coefficients determining the dilepton decay angular distribution of vector particles obey certain positivity constraints and a rotation-invariant identity. These relations are a direct consequence of the covariance properties of angular momentum eigenstates and are independent of the production mechanism. The Lam-Tung relation can be derived as a particular case, simply recognizing that the Drell-Yan dilepton is always produced transversely polarized with respect to one or more quantization axes. The dilepton angular distribution continues to be characterized by a frame-independent identity also when the Lam-Tung relation is violated. Moreover, the violation can be easily characterized by measuring a one-dimensional distribution depending on one shape coefficient.

  15. Measurement of the angular distribution of neutron-proton scattering at 10 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.; Bateman, F.B.; Grimes, S.M.; Brient, C.E.; Massey, T.N.; Wasson, O.A.; Carlson, A.D.; Zhou, H.

    1995-12-31

    The relative angular distribution of neutrons scattered from protons was measured at an incident neutron energy of 10 MeV at the Ohio University Accelerator Laboratory. An array of 11 detector telescopes at laboratory angles of 0 to 60 degrees was used to detect recoil protons from neutron interactions with a CH{sub 2} (polypropylene) target. Data for 7 of these telescopes were obtained with one set of electronics and are presented here. These data, from 108 to 180 degrees for the center-of-mass scattering angles, have a small slope which agrees better with angular distributions predicted by the Arndt phase shifts than with the ENDF/B-VI angular distribution.

  16. Angular and Linear Velocity Estimation for a Re-Entry Vehicle Using Six Distributed Accelerometers: Theory, Simulation and Feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G

    2003-04-28

    This report describes a feasibility study. We are interested in calculating the angular and linear velocities of a re-entry vehicle using six acceleration signals from a distributed accelerometer inertial measurement unit (DAIMU). Earlier work showed that angular and linear velocity calculation using classic nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) solvers is not practically feasible, due to mathematical and numerical difficulties. This report demonstrates the theoretical feasibility of using model-based nonlinear state estimation techniques to obtain the angular and linear velocities in this problem. Practical numerical and calibration issues require additional work to resolve. We show that the six accelerometers in the DAIMU are not sufficient to provide observability, so additional measurements of the system states are required (e.g. from a Global Positioning System (GPS) unit). Given the constraint that our system cannot use GPS, we propose using the existing on-board 3-axis magnetometer to measure angular velocity. We further show that the six nonlinear ODE's for the vehicle kinematics can be decoupled into three ODE's in the angular velocity and three ODE's in the linear velocity. This allows us to formulate a three-state Gauss-Markov system model for the angular velocities, using the magnetometer signals in the measurement model. This re-formulated model is observable, allowing us to build an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) for estimating the angular velocities. Given the angular velocity estimates from the EKF, the three ODE's for the linear velocity become algebraic, and the linear velocity can be calculated by numerical integration. Thus, we do not need direct measurements of the linear velocity to provide observability, and the technique is mathematically feasible. Using a simulation example, we show that the estimator adds value over the numerical ODE solver in the presence of measurement noise. Calculating the velocities in the presence of

  17. Effect of the corrected ionization potential and spatial distribution on the angular and energy distribution in tunnel ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, V. M.; Miladinović, T. B.

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov theory, we consider the angular and energy distribution of outgoing electrons due to ionization by a circularly polarized electromagnetic field. A correction of the ground ionization potential by the ponderomotive and Stark shift is incorporated in both distributions. Spatial dependence is analyzed.

  18. Angular distribution in the dissociation of H2O by swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, R.; Stolterfoht, N.; Öhrn, Y.; Deumens, E.; Sabin, J. R.

    2006-05-01

    In this work, we present calculations of the angular distribution of the products of the dissociation of water molecules when bombarded with He^q+ for projectile energies between 1 and 5 keV. Here q=0,1,2 is the charge of the incoming ion. Our theoretical results are based on the Electron-Nuclear Dynamics formalism (END). We present results for the dissociation cross section, charge transfer cross section, the stopping cross section (nuclear and electronic) for the projectiles, and the angular distribution of He^q+, H, OH, and O. E. Deumens, A. Diz, R. Longo, and Y. "Ohrn, Rev. Mod. Phys. 66, 917 (1994).

  19. Angular distribution of Auger electrons due to 3d-shell ionization of krypton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1977-01-01

    Cross sections for electron impact ionization of krypton due to ejection of a 3rd shell electron have been calculated using screened hydrogenic and Hartree-Slater wave functions for target atom. While the total ionization cross sections in the two approximations are within 10% of each other, the Auger electron angular distribution, related to cross sections for specific magnetic quantum numbers of the 3rd electrons, is widely different in the two approximations. The angular distribution due to Hartree-Slater approximation is in excellent agreement with measurement. The physical reason for the discrepancies in the two approximations is explained.

  20. Angular distribution of Auger electrons due to 3d-shell impact ionization of krypton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidvar, K.

    1977-01-01

    Cross sections for electron impact ionization of krypton due to ejection of a 3d-shell electron have been calculated using screened hydrogenic and Hartree-Slater wavefunctions for the target atom. While the total ionization cross sections in the two approximations are within 10% of each other, the Auger electron angular distribution, related to cross sections for specific magnetic quantum numbers of the 3d electrons, are widely different in the two approximations. The angular distribution due to the Hartree-Slater approximation is in excellent agreement with measurement. The physical reason for the discrepancies in the two approximations is explained.

  1. Angular Distributions of Drell-Yan Dimuons at Fermilab E-906/SeaQuest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramson, Bryan; Fermilab E-906/SeaQuest Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions (PDF), fragmentation functions, and their necessary theoretical framework provide a rich foundation from which to build a more descriptive, quantitative understanding of QCD and hadron structure. Fortuitously, TMD sensitive analyses of leptonic angular distributions have been a fixture in Drell-Yan experiments since the π+W CERN NA-10 of the 1980's, with particular focus on the violation of the Lam-Tung relation through a non-zero cos (2 ϕ) modulation in the angular distributions of the final-state leptons. The cos (2 ϕ) modulation is sensitive to the correlation between the motion and spin of transversely polarized (anti)quarks within their encompassing unpolarized hadron, described by the Boer-Mulders TMD PDF. In the mid-1990's, Fermilab E-866/NuSea investigated angular distributions of p+p and p+d Drell-Yan and found that the relative strength of the cos (2 ϕ) modulation, as compared to pion-induced Drell-Yan, is reduced. Fermilab E-906/SeaQuest provides an ideal laboratory in which to measure the cos (2 ϕ) modulation at a higher target xBj than possible with E-866. Recent progress in the analysis of the angular distributions from SeaQuest Drell-Yan dimuons will be shown.

  2. Evolution of the angular distribution of laser-generated fast electrons due to resistive self-collimation

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A. P. L. Schmitz, H.

    2015-10-15

    The evolution of the angular distribution of laser-generated fast electrons propagating in dense plasmas is studied by 3D numerical simulations. As resistively generated magnetic fields can strongly influence and even pinch the fast electron beam, the question of the effect on the angular distribution is of considerable interest. It was conjectured that in the limit of strong collimation, there will only be minimal changes to the angular distribution, whereas the largest reduction in the angular distribution will occur where there is only modest pinching of the fast electron beam and the beam is able to expand considerably. The results of the numerical simulations indicate this conjecture.

  3. Angular distribution of molecular K-shell Auger electrons: Spectroscopy of photoabsorption anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, D.; Swanson, J.R.; Wallace, S.; Dehmer, J.L.

    1980-10-27

    The angular distribution of Auger electrons emitted in the decay of molecular K-shell vacancies created by photoabsorption is predicted to be a direct probe of the anisotropy of molecular photoabsorption. The sigma..--> pi.. discrete absorption of the sigma..-->..sigma f-wave shape resonance in N/sub 2/ and CO are given as examples.

  4. Relativistic effects on interchannel coupling in atomic photoionization: The photoelectron angular distribution of Xe 5s

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmers, O.; Manson, S. T.; Sant'Anna, M. M.; Focke, P.; Wang, H.; Sellin, I. A.; Lindle, D. W.

    2001-08-01

    Measurements of the photoelectron angular-distribution asymmetry parameter {beta} for Xe 5s photoionization have been performed in the 80--200 eV photon-energy region. The results show a substantial deviation from the nonrelativistic value of {beta}=2 and provide a clear signature of significant relativistic effects in interchannel coupling.

  5. Distinction between shadow and edge effects in heavy-ion elastic angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Silveira, R. da; Leclercq-Willain, Ch.

    2004-10-01

    We propose a model independent method which allows us to distinguish between shadow and edge or surface effects in the angular distributions of heavy-ion elastic scattering, showing regular patterns of marked oscillations. The method is illustrated with a few experimental results where this undulatory behavior is present.

  6. On the angular and energy distribution of solar neutrons generated in P-P reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efimov, Y. E.; Kocharov, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of high energy neutron generation in P-P reactions in the solar atmosphere is reconsidered. It is shown that the angular distribution of emitted neutrons is anisotropic and the energy spectrum of neutrons depends on the angle of neutron emission.

  7. Angular 21 cm power spectrum of a scaling distribution of cosmic string wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández, Oscar F.; Wang, Yi; Brandenberger, Robert; Fong, José E-mail: wangyi@physics.mcgill.ca E-mail: jose.fong@ens-lyon.fr

    2011-08-01

    Cosmic string wakes lead to a large signal in 21 cm redshift maps at redshifts larger than that corresponding to reionization. Here, we compute the angular power spectrum of 21 cm radiation as predicted by a scaling distribution of cosmic strings whose wakes have undergone shock heating.

  8. Quantum mechanical method of fragment's angular and energy distribution calculation for binary and ternary fission

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S. G. Titova, L. V.; Pen'kov, N. V.

    2006-08-15

    In the framework of quantum-mechanical fission theory, the method of calculation for partial fission width amplitudes and asymptotic behavior of the fissile nucleus wave function with strong channel coupling taken into account has been suggested. The method allows one to solve the calculation problem of angular and energy distribution countation for binary and ternary fission.

  9. Rapid Inversion of Angular Deflection Data for Certain Axisymmetric Refractive Index Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, R.; Greenberg, P. S.

    1994-01-01

    Certain functions useful for representing axisymmetric refractive-index distributions are shown to have exact solutions for Abel transformation of the resulting angular deflection data. An advantage of this procedure over direct numerical Abel inversion is that least-squares curve fitting is a smoothing process that reduces the noise sensitivity of the computation

  10. The two-dimensional angular momentum distribution in a protostellar core L1527

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyokane, Kazuhiro; Saito, Masao; Saigo, Kazuya; Kurono, Yasutaka

    2013-07-01

    In star formation at the early phase, angular momentum distribution of a natal core is crucial to determine the evolution of the core such as binary formation and disk formation. We have not yet fully understood the angular momentum distribution of such dense cores. We therefore mapped a 6 arcmin x6 arcmin region (0.2 pc x 0.2 pc) of the protostellar core L1527 in C18O(1-0) with 0.1 km/s resolution with the Nobeyama 45m Telescope in order to derive rotation properties. In the C18O(1-0) integrated intensity map, the emission distribution is centered on the protostar. We introduced a new method to calculate the two-dimensional specific angular momentum distribution of a core and derived the direction of the rotation axis as a function of the core radius. We found that the direction of the angular momentum vector changes from outside to inside and thus, we have confirmed that the dense core L1527 cannot be described by a single rotation axis. Since the inner rotational axis direction is especially important with formation and evolution of the inner rotating disk (Tobin+2013), we think that analysis of the two dimensional specific angular momentum distributions is required. Our method has advantages over the previous analysis of dense cores. First the linear or planar fitting of the line of sight velocity to derive a velocity gradient cannot detect change of the rotational axis (Goodman+1993, Ohashi+1997, and Caselli+2002). Second the position-velocity diagrams can distinguish between rigid-rotation or differential rotation of the core, but only the cut direction. (Belloch+2002). Indeed our analysis results agree with Tobin+2011 who firstly showed the different directions of the velocity gradient on between large- and small-scales.

  11. Helicity-dependent angular distributions in double-charged-pion photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen Strauch

    2003-05-01

    Two-pion photoproduction in the reaction {gamma}p {yields} p{pi}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} has been studied at Jefferson Lab Hall B using a circularly-polarized tagged photon beam in the energy range between 0.6 GeV and 2.3 GeV. Owing to the large angular acceptance of the CLAS detector, complete beam-helicity-dependent angular distributions of the final-state particles were measured. The large cross-section asymmetries exhibit strong sensitivity to the kinematics of the reaction and provide valuable information on the reaction dynamics. Preliminary results are presented.

  12. Instability in the dense supernova neutrino gas with flavor-dependent angular distributions.

    PubMed

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Serpico, Pasquale Dario

    2012-06-01

    The usual description of self-induced flavor conversions for neutrinos (ν's) in supernovae is based on the simplified assumption that all the ν's of the different species are emitted "half-isotropically" by a common neutrinosphere, in analogy to a blackbody emission. However, realistic supernova simulations show that ν angular distributions at decoupling are far from being half-isotropic and, above all, are flavor dependent. We show that flavor-dependent angular distributions may lead to crossing points in the angular spectra of different ν species (where F(ν(e))=F(ν(x)) and F(ν(e))=F(ν(x))) around which a new multiangle instability can develop. To characterize this effect, we carry out a linearized flavor stability analysis for different supernova neutrino angular distributions. We find that this instability can shift the onset of the flavor conversions toward low radii and produce a smearing of the splitting features found with trivial ν emission models. As a result the spectral differences among ν's of different flavors could be strongly reduced.

  13. Angular distribution of fusion products and x rays emitted by a small dense plasma focus machine

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, F.; Herrera, J. J. E.; Gamboa, Isabel; Rangel, J.; Golzarri, J. I.; Espinosa, G.

    2007-01-01

    Time integrated measurements of the angular distributions of fusion products and x rays in a small dense plasma focus machine are made inside the discharge chamber, using passive detectors. The machine is operated at 37 kV with a stored energy of 4.8 kJ and a deuterium filling pressure of 2.75 torr. Distributions of protons and neutrons are measured with CR-39 Lantrack registered nuclear track detectors, on 1.8x0.9 cm{sup 2} chips, 500 {mu}m thick. A set of detectors was placed on a semicircular Teflon registered holder, 13 cm away from the plasma column, and covered with 15 {mu}m Al filters, thus eliminating tritium and helium-3 ions, but not protons and neutrons. A second set was placed on the opposite side of the holder, eliminating protons. The angular distribution of x rays is also studied within the chamber with TLD-200 dosimeters. While the neutron angular distributions can be fitted by Gaussian curves mounted on constant pedestals and the proton distributions are strongly peaked, falling rapidly after {+-}40 deg. , the x-ray distributions show two maxima around the axis, presumably as a result of the collision of a collimated electron beam against the inner electrode, along the axis.

  14. On the non-uniform distribution of the angular elements of near-Earth objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JeongAhn, Youngmin; Malhotra, Renu

    2014-02-01

    We examine the angular distributions of near-Earth objects (NEOs) which are often regarded as uniform. The apparent distribution of the longitude of ascending node, Ω, is strongly affected by well-known seasonal effects in the discovery rate of NEOs. The deviation from the expected π-periodicity in the apparent distribution of Ω indicates that its intrinsic distribution is slightly enhanced along a mean direction, Ω‾=111°; approximately 53% of NEOs have Ω values within ±90° of Ω‾. We also find that each subgroup of NEOs (Amors, Apollos and Atens) has different observational selection effects which cause different non-uniformities in the apparent distributions of their arguments of perihelion ω, and longitudes of perihelion ϖ. For their intrinsic distributions, our analysis reveals that the Apollo asteroids have non-uniform ω due to secular dynamics associated with inclination-eccentricity-ω coupling, and the Amors’ ϖ distribution is peaked towards the secularly forced eccentricity vector. The Apollos’ ω distribution is axial, favoring values near 0° and 180°; the two quadrants centered at 0° and 180° account for 55% of the Apollos’ ω values. The Amors’ ϖ distribution peaks near ϖ‾=4°; 61% of Amors have ϖ within ±90° of this peak. We show that these modest but statistically significant deviations from uniform random distributions of angular elements are owed to planetary perturbations, primarily Jupiter’s. It is remarkable that this strongly chaotic population of minor planets reveals the presence of Jupiter in its angular distributions.

  15. Angular distributions of surface produced H{sup −} ions for reflection and desorption processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M. Kasuya, T.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2014-02-15

    A numerical simulation code, Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target, has been run to clarify the effects due to the incident angle of hydrogen flux onto surface collision cascade in the subsurface region of a Cs covered Mo plasma grid. The code has taken into account the threshold energy for negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ions to leave the surface. This modification has caused the shift of energy distribution functions of H{sup −} from that of hydrogen atoms leaving the surface. The results have shown that large incident angle of hydrogen particle tilt the angular distribution of reflection component, while it caused a small effect onto the angular distribution of desorption component. The reflection coefficient has increased, while the desorption yield has decreased for increased angle of incidence measured from the surface normal.

  16. Angular distributions of surface produced H(-) ions for reflection and desorption processes.

    PubMed

    Wada, M; Kasuya, T; Kenmotsu, T; Sasao, M

    2014-02-01

    A numerical simulation code, Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target, has been run to clarify the effects due to the incident angle of hydrogen flux onto surface collision cascade in the subsurface region of a Cs covered Mo plasma grid. The code has taken into account the threshold energy for negative hydrogen (H(-)) ions to leave the surface. This modification has caused the shift of energy distribution functions of H(-) from that of hydrogen atoms leaving the surface. The results have shown that large incident angle of hydrogen particle tilt the angular distribution of reflection component, while it caused a small effect onto the angular distribution of desorption component. The reflection coefficient has increased, while the desorption yield has decreased for increased angle of incidence measured from the surface normal.

  17. Influence of the initial angular distribution on strong-field molecular dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Youliang; Zeng, Shuo; Hernández, J. V.; Wang, Yujun; Esry, B. D.

    2016-08-01

    We study few-cycle, strong-field dissociation of aligned H2+ by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation including rotation. We examine the dependence of the final angular distribution, the kinetic energy release spectrum, and the total dissociation yield on the initial nuclear angular distribution. In particular, we look at the dependence on the relative angle θ0 between the laser polarization and the symmetry axis of a well-aligned initial distribution, as well as the dependence on the delay between the "pump" pulse that prepares the alignment and the few-cycle probe pulse. Surprisingly, we find the dissociation probability for θ0=90∘ can be appreciable even though the transitions involved are purely parallel. We therefore address the limits of the commonly held "ball-and-stick" picture for molecules in intense fields as well as the validity of the axial recoil approximation.

  18. SiON metrology using angular and energy distributions of photoelectrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasneem, G.; Tomastik, C.; Mroczyński, R.; Werner, W. S. M.

    2013-06-01

    Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS) is a useful tool for non-destructive in-depth analysis of near surface regions. However, the reconstruction of depth profile from ARXPS data is an ill-posed mathematical problem. Thus, the main goal of this work was to develop a new, iterative algorithm based on the least square fitting which allows to solve this problem. The depth profiles were restored by dividing sample in thin virtual box shaped layers each with a different concentration. To extract information on the depth distribution, this algorithm is based on the analysis of the angular peak intensities along with the inelastic background. In addition, the physically trivial constraint of atomic fractions adding up to unity was imposed. The model takes into account the effect of elastic scattering and anisotropy of the photoelectric cross section. To test the algorithm, experimental spectrum for SiON samples on Si substrate were measured with a Thermo Theta Probe electron spectrometer for off-normal emission angles in the range between 25° and 75°. A very good agreement was found between the measured spectra and obtained spectra from the algorithm.

  19. Angular distribution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on compacted lead ion selective membrane powers

    SciTech Connect

    Young, V.; McCaslin, P.C.

    1985-04-01

    Changes in the distribution of species in the near surface region of compacted lead ion selective membrane powders, as revealed by angular distribution XPS, are reported. Scanning electron micrographs of pellets pressed at pressures ranging from a low of 7 lb/in./sup 2/ to a high of 15,000 lb/in./sup 2/ reveal surfaces of almost undistorted, compacted spheres with an average diameter of 0.25 ..mu..m. For untreated membranes, angular distribution XPS reveals the stratification of the near surface region of the surface layer of spheres. Scanning electron micrographs of EDTA and HClO/sub 4/ treated pellets show that an erosion of the surfaces occurs and angular distribution XPS analysis reveals the stratification of the near surface region of the new surfaces. Profilometry has been used to measure the surface topography of the pellets, and the data have been used to assess the effect of roughness on XPS intensity ratios. 47 references, 8 figures, 4 tables.

  20. Angular distribution of Cherenkov radiation from relativistic heavy ions taking into account deceleration in the radiator

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanov, O. V. Fiks, E. I.; Pivovarov, Yu. L.

    2012-09-15

    Numerical methods are used to study the dependence of the structure and the width of the angular distribution of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation with a fixed wavelength in the vicinity of the Cherenkov cone on the radiator parameters (thickness and refractive index), as well as on the parameters of the relativistic heavy ion beam (charge and initial energy). The deceleration of relativistic heavy ions in the radiator, which decreases the velocity of ions, modifies the condition of structural interference of the waves emitted from various segments of the trajectory; as a result, a complex distribution of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation appears. The main quantity is the stopping power of a thin layer of the radiator (average loss of the ion energy), which is calculated by the Bethe-Bloch formula and using the SRIM code package. A simple formula is obtained to estimate the angular distribution width of Cherenkov radiation (with a fixed wavelength) from relativistic heavy ions taking into account the deceleration in the radiator. The measurement of this width can provide direct information on the charge of the ion that passes through the radiator, which extends the potentialities of Cherenkov detectors. The isotopic effect (dependence of the angular distribution of Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation on the ion mass) is also considered.

  1. Angular distribution of photoelectrons from atomic oxygen, nitrogen and carbon. [in upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. J.; Kennedy, D. J.; Starace, A. F.; Dill, D.

    1974-01-01

    The angular distributions of photoelectrons from atomic oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon are calculated. Both Hartree-Fock and Hartree-Slater (Herman-Skillman) wave functions are used for oxygen, and the agreement is excellent; thus only Hartree-Slater functions are used for carbon and nitrogen. The pitch-angle distribution of photoelectrons is discussed, and it is shown that previous approximations of energy-independent isotropic or sin squared theta distributions are at odds with the authors' results, which vary with energy. This variation with energy is discussed, as is the reliability of these calculations.

  2. Changes in polarization and angular distribution of scattered radiation during cloud formation.

    PubMed

    Harris, F S

    1969-01-01

    Changes in radiation scattering due to changes in droplet size distribution during development of stratus clouds have been calculated. The development model of Neiburger and Chien was used to give the droplet size distribution at various stages. Mie theory was used to calculate the angular variation for both parallel and perpendicular polarization of incident radiation at 0.4880 micro, 0.6328 micro, 3.50 micro, and 10.6 micro. The marked variations in the nature of the scattered radiation as the droplet size distribution varies with time indicate the measurement of radiation scattering may be a useful method of studying cloud formation processes.

  3. Neutron angular distribution in a plasma focus obtained using nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Mejía, F; Herrera, J J E; Rangel, J; Golzarri, J I; Espinosa, G

    2002-01-01

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) is a coaxial plasma gun in which a high-density, high-temperature plasma is obtained in a focused column for a few nanoseconds. When the filling gas is deuterium, neutrons can be obtained from fusion reactions. These are partially due to a beam of deuterons which are accelerated against the background hot plasma by large electric fields originating from plasma instabilities. Due to a beam-target effect, the angular distribution of the neutron emission is anisotropic, peaked in the forward direction along the axis of the gun. The purpose of this work is to illustrate the use of CR-39 nuclear track detectors as a diagnostic tool in the determination of the time-integrated neutron angular distribution. For the case studied in this work, neutron emission is found to have a 70% contribution from isotropic radiation and a 30% contribution from anisotropic radiation.

  4. Measurement of the angular distribution in anti-p p ---> psi(2S) ---> e+ e-

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrogiani, M.; Andreotti, M.; Argiro, S.; Bagnasco, S.; Baldini, W.; Bettoni, D.; Borreani, G.; Buzzo, A.; Calabrese, R.; Cester, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fan, X.; Garzoglio, G.; Gollwitzer, K.E.; Graham, M.; Hahn, A.; Hu, M.; Jin, S.; Joffe, D.; Kasper, J.; /Fermilab /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /Northwestern U. /UC, Irvine /Minnesota U.

    2004-12-01

    The authors present the first measurement of the angular distribution for the exclusive process {bar p}p {yields} {psi}(2S) {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} based on a sample of 6844 events collected by the Fermilab E835 experiment. They find that the angular distribution is well described by the expected functional form dN/d cos {theta}* {proportional_to} 1 + {lambda} cos{sup 2} {theta}*, where {theta}* is the angle between the antiproton and the electron in the center of mass frame, with {lambda} = 0.67 {+-} 0.15(stat.) {+-} 0.04(sys.). The measured value for {lambda} implies a small but non zero {psi}(2S) helicity 0 formation amplitude in {bar p}p, comparable to what is observed in J/{psi} decays to baryon pairs.

  5. Second order classical perturbation theory for atom surface scattering: Analysis of asymmetry in the angular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yun Pollak, Eli; Miret-Artés, Salvador

    2014-01-14

    A second order classical perturbation theory is developed and applied to elastic atom corrugated surface scattering. The resulting theory accounts for experimentally observed asymmetry in the final angular distributions. These include qualitative features, such as reduction of the asymmetry in the intensity of the rainbow peaks with increased incidence energy as well as the asymmetry in the location of the rainbow peaks with respect to the specular scattering angle. The theory is especially applicable to “soft” corrugated potentials. Expressions for the angular distribution are derived for the exponential repulsive and Morse potential models. The theory is implemented numerically to a simplified model of the scattering of an Ar atom from a LiF(100) surface.

  6. Angular distribution of products of ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bunakov, V. E. Kadmensky, S. G. Kadmensky, S. S.

    2008-11-15

    Within quantum fission theory, angular distributions of products originating from the ternary fission of nuclei that is induced by polarized cold and thermal neutrons are investigated on the basis of a non-evaporative mechanism of third-particle emission and a consistent description of fission-channel coupling. It is shown that the inclusion of Coriolis interaction both in the region of the discrete and in the region of the continuous spectrum of states of the system undergoing fission leads to T-odd correlations in the aforementioned angular distributions. The properties of the TRI and ROT effects discovered recently, which are due to the interference between the fission amplitudes of neutron resonances, are explored. The results obtained here are compared with their counterparts from classic calculations based on the trajectory method.

  7. Predicting photoemission intensities and angular distributions with real-time density-functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauth, M.; Kümmel, S.

    2016-02-01

    Photoemission spectroscopy is one of the most frequently used tools for characterizing the electronic structure of condensed matter systems. We discuss a scheme for simulating photoemission from finite systems based on time-dependent density-functional theory. It allows for the first-principles calculation of relative electron binding energies, ionization cross sections, and anisotropy parameters. We extract these photoemission spectroscopy observables from Kohn-Sham orbitals propagated in real time. We demonstrate that the approach is capable of estimating photoemission intensities, i.e., peak heights. It can also reliably predict the angular distribution of photoelectrons. For the example of benzene we contrast calculated angular distribution anisotropy parameters to experimental reference data. Self-interaction free Kohn-Sham theory yields meaningful outer valence single-particle states in the right energetic order. We discuss how to properly choose the complex absorbing potential that is used in the simulations.

  8. Near-threshold photoelectron angular distributions from two-photon resonant photoionization of He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, P.; Mihelič, A.; Bolognesi, P.; Žitnik, M.; Moise, A.; Richter, R.; Avaldi, L.

    2013-01-01

    Two-photon resonant photoionization of helium is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Ground state helium atoms are excited to the 1s4p, 1s5p and 1s6p 1P states by synchrotron radiation and ionized by a synchronized infrared pulsed picosecond laser. The photoelectron angular distributions of the emitted electrons are measured using a velocity map imaging (VMI) spectrometer. The measured asymmetry parameters of the angular distribution allow the phase differences and the ratios of the dipole matrix elements of the 1sɛs and 1sɛd channels to be determined. The experimental results agree with the calculated values obtained in a configuration-interaction calculation with a Coulomb-Sturmian basis set. The effects of the radiative decay of the intermediate state and the static electric field of the VMI spectrometer on the measurements are discussed.

  9. Sideways-peaked angular distributions in hadron-induced multifragmentation: Shock waves, geometry, or kinematics?

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, W.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Wang, G.; Bracken, D.S.; Cornell, E.; Ginger, D.S.; Viola, V.E.; Yoder, N.R.; Korteling, R.G.; Gimeno-Nogues, F.; Ramakrishnan, E.; Rowland, D.; Yennello, S.J.; Huang, R.; Lynch, W.G.; Tsang, M.B.; Xi, H.; Breuer, H.; Morley, K.B.; Gushue, S.; Remsberg, L.P.; Friedman, W.A.; Botvina, A.

    1998-07-01

    Exclusive studies of sideways-peaked angular distributions for intermediate-mass fragments (IMFs) produced in hadron-induced reactions have been performed with the Indiana silicon sphere (ISiS) detector array. The effect becomes prominent for beam momenta above about 10thinspGeV/c. Both the magnitude of the effect and the peak angle increase as a function of fragment multiplicity and charge. When gated on IMF kinetic energy, the angular distributions evolve from forward peaked to nearly isotropic as the fragment energy decreases. Fragment-fragment correlation studies show no evidence for a preferred angle that might signal a fast dynamic breakup mechanism. Moving-source and intranuclear cascade simulations suggest a possible kinematic origin arising from significant transverse momentum imparted to the recoil nucleus during the fast cascade. A two-step cascade and statistical multifragmentation calculation is consistent with the data. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Twofold symmetric angular distributions in multiphoton ionization with elliptically polarized light

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, S.; Trombetta, F.; Ferrante, G.

    1988-11-21

    The angular distributions of electrons in multiphoton multichannel ionization of hydrogen for the case of elliptically polarized laser light are calculated within a nonperturbative theoretical model taking into account the Coulomb interaction in the final state. It is found that the ellipticity of the radiation not only modifies the shape but also lowers the fourfold rotational symmetry occurring in linear polarization to a twofold one.

  11. Angular distribution of characteristic photons after radiative electron capture at strong central fields

    SciTech Connect

    Drukarev, E. G.; Ma, X.; Mikhailov, A. I.; Mikhailov, I. A.; Mokler, P. H.

    2006-08-15

    We investigate the difference in the angular distribution of Ly-{alpha}{sub 1} and K{alpha}{sub 1} photons from hydrogenlike and heliumlike ions of uranium after radiative electron capture to the L shell. The strong anisotropy in the former case is changed to a very small one in the latter case. Our calculations support the observation. The effect takes place even in the limiting case of noninteracting electrons, being caused by the Pauli principle.

  12. High energy angular distribution measurements of the exclusive deuteron photodisintegration reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Elaine Schulte; et. Al.

    2002-10-01

    The first complete measurements of the angular distributions of the two-body deuteron photodisintegration differential cross section at photon energies above 1.6 GeV were performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The results show a persistent forward-backward asymmetry up to Egamma = 2.4 GeV, the highest-energy measured in this experiment. The Hard Rescattering and the Quark-Gluon string models are in fair agreement with the results.

  13. Retrieving orbital angular momentum distribution of light with plasmonic vortex lens

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hailong; Dong, Jianji; Zhang, Jihua; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    We utilize a plasmonic vortex lens (PVL) to retrieve the orbital angular momentum (OAM) distribution of light. The OAM modes are coupled to the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) in the form of various Bessel functions respectively. By decomposing the interference pattern of SPPs into these Bessel functions, we can retrieve the relative amplitude and the relative phase of input OAM modes simultaneously. Our scheme shows advantage in integration and can measure hybrid OAM states by one measurement. PMID:27255406

  14. Inner engine shutdown from transitions in the angular momentum distribution in collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batta, Aldo; Lee, William H.

    2016-06-01

    For the collapsar scenario to be effective in the production of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), the infalling star's angular momentum J(r) must be larger than the critical angular momentum needed to form an accretion disc around a black hole (BH), namely Jcrit = 2rgc for a Schwarzschild BH. By means of 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, here we study the collapse and accretion on to BHs of spherical rotating envelopes, whose angular momentum distribution has transitions between supercritical (J > Jcrit) and subcritical (J < Jcrit) values. Contrary to results obtained in previous 2D hydrodynamical simulations, we find that a substantial amount of subcritical material fed to the accretion disc, lingers around long enough to contribute significantly to the energy loss rate. Increasing the amount of angular momentum in the subcritical material increases the time spent at the accretion disc, and only when the bulk of this subcritical material is accreted before it is replenished by a massive outermost supercritical shell, the inner engine experiences a shutdown. Once the muffled accretion disc is provided again with enough supercritical material, the shutdown will be over and a quiescent time in the long GRB produced afterwards could be observed.

  15. Angular Distribution of Charged Particles in the Atmosphere- Results of the ADAM Experiment on BEXUS 19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martensen, S.; Brudern, M.; Christiansen, F.; Koberle, M.; Trautwein, D.; Wraase, S.; Bottcher, S.; Burmeister, S.; Heber, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.

    2015-09-01

    Particle showers, which produce a large number of secondary particles, are generated by the interaction of high-energy cosmic ray particles with the Earth's atmosphere. The Team ADAM (Angular Distribution of charged partides - Atmosphere Measurement) has flown an experiment to measure the altitude- dependent angular distribution of secondary charged particles on a stratospheric balloon within the REXUS/BEXUS programme in October 2014. We designed a sensor head consisting of 16 planar silicon semi-conductor detectors (SSDs), which allowed us to determine the zenith-angle of individual particles by coincidence measurements. After a year of development and testing, on October 9th the instrument performed measurements for 4 hours in an altitude of 27 km in northern Sweden. In this contribution measurements performed during the flight in comparison to ones obtained on ground will be presented. On the one hand we focus on the count and dose rate profiles as functions of residual pressure, on the other hand we discuss the angular distribution below and above the PFOTZERMaximum.

  16. Angular momentum distribution during the collapse of primordial star-forming clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Jayanta

    2016-01-01

    It is generally believed that angular momentum is distributed during the gravitational collapse of the primordial star forming cloud. However, so far there has been little understanding of the exact details of the distribution. We use the modified version of the Gadget-2 code, a three-dimensional smoothed-particle hydrodynamics simulation, to follow the evolution of the collapsing gas in both idealized as well as more realistic minihalos. We find that, despite the lack of any initial turbulence and magnetic fields in the clouds the angular momentum profile follows the same characteristic power-law that has been reported in studies that employed fully self-consistent cosmological initial conditions. The fit of the power-law appears to be roughly constant regardless of the initial rotation of the cloud. We conclude that the specific angular momentum of the self-gravitating rotating gas in the primordial minihalos maintains a scaling relation with the gas mass as L ∝ M^{1.125}. We also discuss the plausible mechanisms for the power-law distribution.

  17. Angular distribution, kinetic energy distributions, and excitation functions of fast metastable oxygen fragments following electron impact of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misakian, M.; Mumma, M. J.; Faris, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    Dissociative excitation of CO2 by electron impact was studied using the methods of translational spectroscopy and angular distribution analysis. Earlier time of flight studies revealed two overlapping spectra, the slower of which was attributed to metastable CO(a3 pi) fragments. The fast peak is the focus of this study. Threshold energy, angular distribution, and improve time of flight measurements indicate that the fast peak actually consists of five overlapping features. The slowest of the five features is found to consist of metastable 0(5S) produced by predissociation of a sigma u + state of CO2 into 0(5S) + CO(a3 pi). Oxygen Rydberg fragments originating directly from a different sigma u + state are believed to make up the next fastest feature. Mechanisms for producing the three remaining features are discussed.

  18. Angular ion species distribution in droplet-based laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Andrea Z.; Gambino, Nadia; Rollinger, Bob; Abhari, Reza S.

    2015-01-21

    The angular distribution of the ion species generated from a laser irradiated droplet target is measured. The employed instrument was an electrostatic energy analyzer with differential pumping. Singly and doubly charged ions were detected at an argon ambient gas pressure of 2 × 10{sup −2} mbar. The amount of Sn{sup +} and Sn{sup 2+} and their kinetic energy is measured from 45° to 120° from the laser axis. Sn{sup +} expands approximately isotropically, and Sn{sup 2+} expansion is peaked towards the incoming laser radiation. The singly charged ion kinetic energy is close to constant over the measurement range, while it decreases by around 30% for Sn{sup 2+}. A calibrated model of the ion expansion that includes recombinations correctly predicts the mean ion charge distribution. The model is able to qualitatively estimate the influence of the laser wavelength on the mean ion charge distribution. The results show a more pronounced isotropic distribution for shorter wavelengths, and a more forward-peaked distribution for longer wavelengths. The ion charge distribution expected without the ambient gas is estimated through the measured ion kinetic energy. The presence of the ambient gas results in a decrease of the mean ion charge state and a decrease in angular anisotropy.

  19. High Purity Germanium Detectors and Angular Distribution of 2Al(p,g)28Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andre

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to study high purity germanium detector systems, and to calculate and compare absorption ratios of 27Al(p,g)28Si. Work with the germanium detector online array for gamma ray spectroscopy in nuclear astrophysics in the Nuclear Science Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame, also known as Georgina, including energy calibrations and work with software and hardware logic, provided the necessary background and experience with high purity germanium detectors and angular distribution of gamma rays. The knowledge taken from work with the Georgina detectors was then applied to the analysis of 27Al(p,g)28Si. Previous experimental data of 27Al(p,g)28Si was analyzed using the Ep = 1778.9 keV resonance. The data used was taken from a 2010 experiment completed in the Nuclear Science Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame using the 4MV KN particle accelerator. A 1977 paper by A. Anttila and J. Keinonen with analysis of the same reaction using the Ep = 992 keV resonance was used for the energy calibration and gamma energies. Peak fitting and background reduction of the spectra were completed using analysis software, jtek. Angular distribution ratios from a 56Co source were used for the normalization of the 27Al data. Angular dependent absorption factors were used to analyze the angular distribution of γ-rays from the 27Al beam target. With these absorption factors, relative gamma intensity measurements of 27Al(p,g)28Si were calculated.

  20. Energy and angular distributions of hyperthermal-energy Li{sup +} scattered from Cu(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Behringer, E.R.; McLean, J.G.; Cooper, B.H.

    1996-03-01

    We have measured the in-plane energy and angular distributions of scattered Li{sup +} ions that result when Li{sup +} ion beams with incident energies {ital E}{sub {ital i}}=100 and 400 eV impinge on Cu(001) with an incident angle {theta}{sub {ital i}}=65{degree} and along the {l_angle}100{r_angle} azimuth. By comparing the energy and angular distributions with those generated by classical trajectory simulations, we extract information about the ion-surface interaction potential. A model ion-surface potential consisting of a sum of Hartree-Fock pair potentials and an attractive term produces good agreement with the measured distributions at both incident energies, while the universal potential of Ziegler, Biersack, and Littmarck does so only for {ital E}{sub {ital i}} = 400 eV. Analysis of the simulated distributions enables us to correlate different types of scattering events with features of the measured distributions (e.g., rainbows) and so obtain a detailed understanding of the scattering of Li{sup +}, which is more complex than has been previously observed for heavier alkali ions (e.g., Na{sup +} and K{sup +}). We find that the energy loss of the Li{sup +} ions can be mostly accounted for by momentum transfer to the surface atoms and that inelastic losses are small but significant for this system at these incident energies. We also find that the thermal vibrations of the surface atoms have dramatic effects on the simulated energy and angular distributions. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  1. Study of the angular distributions of X-rays emitted following L3 ionization of gold atoms by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, I.; Sestric, G.; Ferguson, S.; Williams, S.

    2015-03-01

    Theoretical work suggests that when an atomic inner-shell vacancy with total angular momentum j greater than 1/2 is created by interaction with a photon or charged particle the vacancy will be aligned due to the magnetic sublevels of the ion having nonstatistical populations. The experiments we performed, testing this theory, involved measurements of the angular distributions of gold Lα, Lβ, and Ll X-rays at forward angles in the range 0 degrees to 25 degrees emitted after being bombarded with 15-keV electrons. After corrections for absorption of the characteristic X-rays within the gold target, our results suggest that the angular distributions of the Lα and Lβ X-rays are essentially isotropic, as no angular dependence was observed in our data outside of experimental uncertainties. However, the results of our experiments suggest that the angular distribution of the gold Ll X-rays may be weakly anisotropic.

  2. Final-state angular momentum distributions in charge transfer collisions at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgdörfer, Joachim

    1985-11-01

    We investigate the influence of different terms of the Born series on the final-state angular momentum ( l) distribution and the anisotropy of the captured electron. A variety of different l distributions depending on the projectile velocity v and the charge asymmetry {Z p}/{Z T} of the collision system can be found, revealing different underlying mechanisms for charge transfer. We compare the predictions of perturbation theories such as the first and second Born approximation, the continuum distorted wave (CDW) approximation and the post-collision interaction (PCI) model valid at high velocities with those of the "quasi-resonant over barrier" model of charge transfer valid at intermediate velocities.

  3. Angular distributions and polarization fractions of helium resonance radiation (n 1P - 1 1S) in the extreme ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.; Misakian, M.; Jackson, W. M.; Faris, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Angular intensity distributions of helium (n 1P - 1 1S) resonance photons with respect to the exciting electron beam are presented. The angular intensity distributions were measured at selected electron impact energies from 25 eV (near threshold) to 150 eV. Polarization fractions (Pi) were obtained by analyzing the data in terms of the theoretical relation between angular intensity distribution and Pi, i.e. Iota (theta) = Iota (90) (1 - Pi sq cos theta). The experimental values for Pi are compared with recent theoretical results and with previous experimental values for the (3 1P - 2 1S) transition.

  4. Angular anisotropy parameters and recoil-ion momentum distribution in two-photon double ionization of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, A. S.; Ivanov, I. A.; Bray, Igor

    2007-08-15

    We present convergent-close-coupling (CCC) calculations of the angular anisotropy parameters {beta}{sub 2},{beta}{sub 4} and the recoil ion momentum distribution d{sigma}/dp in two-photon double ionization (TPDI) of helium. In a stark contrast to single-photon double ionization (SPDI), where the {beta}{sub 2} parameter varies widely changing the angular distribution from isotropic to nearly dipole for slow and fast photoelectrons, respectively, the {beta} parameters for TPDI show very little change. The angular distribution of the recoil ion is fairly isotropic in TPDI as opposed to a strong alignment with the polarization of light in SPDI.

  5. Stochastic model of angular distributions of fragments originating from the fission of excited compound nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hiryanov, R. M.; Karpov, A. V.; Adeev, G. D.

    2008-08-15

    The anisotropy of angular distributions of fission fragments and the average multiplicity of prescission neutrons were calculated within a stochastic approach to fission dynamics on the basis of three-dimensional Langevin equations. This approach was combined with a Monte Carlo algorithm for the degree of freedom K (projection of the total angular momentum I onto the fission axis). The relaxation time {tau}{sub K} in the coordinate K was considered as a free parameter of the model; it was estimated on the basis of a fit to experimental data on the anisotropy of angular distributions. Specifically, the relaxation time {tau}{sub K} was estimated at 2 x 10{sup -21} s for the compound nuclei {sup 224}Th and {sup 225}Pa and at 4 x 10{sup -21} s for the heavier nuclei {sup 248}Cf, {sup 254}Fm, and {sup 264}Rf. The potential energy was calculated on the basis of the liquid-drop model with allowance for finiteness of the range of nuclear forces and for the diffuseness of the nuclear surface. A modified one-body viscosity mechanism featuring a coefficient k{sub s} that takes into account the reduction of the contribution from the wall formula was used to describe collective-energy dissipation. The coefficient k{sub s} was also treated as a free parameter and was estimated at 0.5 on the basis of a fit to experimental data on the average prescission multiplicity of neutrons.

  6. Measurement of angular distribution of sound emission from training projectiles in subsonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. I.; Parthasarathy, S. P.; Harstad, K. G.; Back, L. H.

    1986-01-01

    Training projectiles with nose ring cavities that produce intense whistles in stationary free-jet tests were shot in a relatively straight-line trajectory. A ground based microphone was used to obtain the angular distribution of sound intensity produced from the subsonically flying projectile. Data reduction required calculation of Doppler and attenuation factors which were determined based on a non-linear trajectory. Also, the directional sensitivity of the microphone was measured and used in the data reduction. Significant angular variation of sound intensity produced from the projectile was found which can be used to plot an intensity contour map on the ground. A full-scale field test confirmed the validity of the aeroacoustic concept of producing a relatively intense whistle from the projectile, and the usefulness of a real-time data acquisition system.

  7. Nitrogen oxide abatement by distributed fuel addition

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, J.O.L.; Mereb, J.B.

    1991-09-20

    Reburning is examined as a means of NO{sub x} destruction in a 17 kW down-fired pulverized coal combustor. In reburning, a secondary fuel is introduced downstream of the primary flame to produce a reducing zone, favorable to NO destruction, and air is introduced further downstream to complete the combustion. Emphasis is on natural gas reburning and a bituminous coal primary flame. A parametric examination of reburning employing a statistical experimental design, is conducted, complemented by detailed experiments. Mechanisms governing the inter-conversion of nitrogenous species in the fuel rich reburn zone is explored. The effect of reburning on N{sub 2}O emissions, the effect of primary flame mode (premixed and diffusion) and the effect of distributing the reburning fuel, are also investigated.

  8. Ion beam sputtering of Ti: Influence of process parameters on angular and energy distribution of sputtered and backscattered particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautenschläger, T.; Feder, R.; Neumann, H.; Rice, C.; Schubert, M.; Bundesmann, C.

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, the influence of ion energy and geometrical parameters onto the angular and energy distribution of secondary particles for sputtering a Ti target with Ar ions is investigated. The angular distribution of the particle flux of the sputtered Ti atoms was determined by the collection method, i.e. by growing Ti films and measuring their thickness. The formal description of the particle flux can be realized by dividing it into an isotropic and an anisotropic part. The experimental data show that increasing the ion energy or decreasing the ion incidence angle lead to an increase of the isotropic part, which is in good agreement with basic sputtering theory. The energy distribution of the secondary ions was measured using an energy-selective mass spectrometer. The energy distribution of the sputtered target ions shows a maximum at an energy between 10 eV and 20 eV followed by a decay proportional to E-n, which is in principle in accordance with Thompson's theory, followed by a high energetic tail. When the sum of incidence angle and emission angle is increased, the high-energetic tail expands to higher energies and an additional peak due to direct sputtering events may occur. In the case of backscattered primary Ar ions, a maximum at an energy between 5 eV and 10 eV appears and, depending on the scattering geometry, an additional broad peak at a higher energy due to direct scattering events is observed. The center energy of the additional structure shifts systematically to higher energies with decreasing scattering angle or increasing ion energy. The experimental results are compared to calculations based on simple elastic two-particle-interaction theory and to simulations done with the Monte Carlo code SDTrimSP. Both confirm in principle the experimental findings.

  9. New Statistical Results on the Angular Distribution of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Balazs, Lajos G.; Horvath, Istvan; Vavrek, Roland

    2008-05-22

    We presented the results of several statistical tests of the randomness in the angular sky-distribution of gamma-ray bursts in BATSE Catalog. Thirteen different tests were presented based on Voronoi tesselation, Minimal spanning tree and Multifractal spectrum for five classes (short1, short2, intermediate, long1, long2) of gamma-ray bursts, separately. The long1 and long2 classes are distributed randomly. The intermediate subclass, in accordance with the earlier results of the authors, is distributed non-randomly. Concerning the short subclass earlier statistical tests also suggested some departure from the random distribution, but not on a high enough confidence level. The new tests presented in this article suggest also non-randomness here.

  10. Angular Distributions of High-Mass Dilepton Production in Hadron Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    McClellan, Randall Evan

    2016-01-01

    λ has been performed, and the remaining difficulties in extracting ν have been evaluated. Although the results are not yet publishable, significant progress has been made in developing this very challenging angular distributions analysis. A simple scheme for correcting for the angular acceptances of the spectrometer, trigger, and reconstruction has been developed and demonstrated. A generally applicable correction for the kinematically-dependent, rate-dependent reconstruction efficiency has been developed and applied to all current analyses on SeaQuest data. This rate-dependence correction was the first major hurdle in the path to publication of many preliminary SeaQuest results. The last remaining major correction for all analyses, but especially important for the angular parameter extraction, is the full characterization, rate-dependence correction, and subtraction of the combinatoric background contribution to the reconstructed dimuon sample. Independently, an intuitive, kinematic derivation of the single-event definitions of the Drell-Yan angular parameters has been developed under the assumption of unpolarized annihilating quarks within unpolarized nuclei. At O(αs), where the quarks remain co-planar with the hadrons in the photon rest frame, this kinematic method reproduces the Lam-Tung relation and derives an additional equality for µ2, which is only interpretable for single-event parameters. This method has been extended to the case of quark non- coplanarity, and the coplanar equalities become inequalities. A new equality was discovered, which should be obeyed by single-event parameters even in the case of a non-coplanar quark axis. The non-coplanar parameter relations have been used to derive constraints on the experimentally accessible values of λ and ν. These constraints are compared with existing data and have been found consistent, except in the cases where significant contributions from non-zero Boer-Mulders functions are expected. Finally, the

  11. Multiple-scattering distributions and angular dependence of the energy loss of slow protons in copper and silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantero, E. D.; Lantschner, G. H.; Eckardt, J. C.; Lovey, F. C.; Arista, N. R.

    2010-04-01

    Measurements of angular distributions and of the angular dependence of the energy loss of 4-, 6-, and 9-keV protons transmitted through thin Cu and Ag polycrystalline foils are presented. By means of standard multiple-scattering model calculations it is found that a V(r)∝r-2.8 potential leads to significantly better fits of the angular distributions than the standard Thomas Fermi, Lenz-Jensen, or Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark potentials. A theoretical model for the angular dependence of the energy loss based on considering geometric effects on a frictional inelastic energy loss plus an angular-dependent elastic contribution and the effects of foil roughness reproduces the experimental data. This agrees with previous results in Au and Al, therefore extending the applicability of the model to other metallic elements.

  12. Theoretical study of asymmetric molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions for C 1s photoejection from CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Rescigno, Thomas N; Miyabe, S.; McCurdy, C.W.; Orel, A.E.

    2009-02-18

    We report the results of ab initio calculations of cross sections and molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions for C 1s ionization of CO2, and propose a mechanism for the recently observed asymmetry of those angular distributions with respect to the CO^+and O^+ions produced by subsequent Auger decay. The fixed-nuclei, photoionization amplitudes were constructed using variationally obtained electron-molecular ion scattering wave functions. We have also carried out electronic structure calculations which identify a dissociative state of the CO2^++ dication that is likely populated following Auger decay and which leads to O^+ + CO^+ fragment ions. We show that a proper accounting of vibrational motion in the computation of the photoelectron angular distributions, along with reasonable assumptions about the nuclear dissociation dynamics, gives results in good agreement with recent experimental observations. We also demonstrate that destructive interference between different partial waves accounts for sudden changes with photon energy in the observed angular distributions.

  13. Horizontal or vertical magnetic fields on the quiet Sun. Angular distributions and their height variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenflo, J. O.

    2013-07-01

    Different analyses of identical Hinode SOT/SP data of quiet-Sun magnetic fields have in the past led to contradictory answers to the question of whether the angular distribution of field vectors is preferentially horizontal or vertical. These answers have been obtained by combining the measured circular and linear polarizations in different ways to derive the field inclinations. A problem with these combinations is that the circular and linear polarizations scale with field strength in profoundly different ways. Here, we avoid these problems by using an entirely different approach that is based exclusively on the fundamental symmetry properties of the transverse Zeeman effect for observations away from the disk center without any dependence on the circular polarization. Systematic errors are suppressed by the application of a doubly differential technique with the 5247-5250 Å line pair for observations with the ZIMPOL-2 imaging polarimeter on the French THEMIS telescope on Tenerife. For the weakest, intranetwork-type magnetic fields, the angular distribution changes sign with the center-to-limb distance, being preferentially horizontal limbwards of μ (cosine of the heliocentric angle) = 0.2, while favoring the vertical direction inside this disk position. Since decreasing μ corresponds to increasing height of line formation, this finding implies that the intranetwork fields are more peaked around the vertical direction in the low to middle photosphere, while they are more horizontal in the upper photosphere. The angular distribution is however also found to become more vertical with increasing flux density. Thus, all facular points that we have observed have a strong preference for the vertical direction for all disk positions, including those all the way to the extreme limb. In terms of spatial averages weighted by the intrinsic magnetic energy density, these results are independent of telescope resolution.

  14. Angular and energy distributions of electrons produced in arbitrary biomaterials by proton impact.

    PubMed

    de Vera, Pablo; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Abril, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple method for obtaining reliable angular and energy distributions of electrons ejected from arbitrary condensed biomaterials by proton impact. Relying on a suitable description of the electronic excitation spectrum and a physically motivated relation between the ion and electron scattering angles, it yields cross sections in rather good agreement with experimental data in a broad range of ejection angles and energies, by only using as input the target composition and density. The versatility and simplicity of the method, which can be also extended to other charged particles, make it especially suited for obtaining ionization data for any complex biomaterial present in realistic cellular environments.

  15. Angular distribution of non-linear optical emission from spheroidal microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasparian, J.; Boutou, V.; Wolf, J.-P.; Pan, Y.-L.; Chang, R. K.

    2008-04-01

    We measured the angular distribution of the near-backward multiphoton-excited fluorescence emission by ellipsoidal-shaped, dye-doped ethanol microdroplets deformed perpendicularly to the direction of the incident laser beam. The high-intensity region in the backward direction is elongated in the same direction as the emitting microdroplet. Simulations based on ray tracing agree well with the experimental pattern and show that the droplet aspect ratio ϱ may be deduced from the fluorescence pattern of both oblate and prolate microparticles with ϱ varying from 0.9 to 1.3.

  16. Alpha-Particle Angular Distributions of At and Rn Isotopes and Their Relation to Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    NICOLE Collaboration and ISOLDE Collaboration

    1996-12-01

    We report on an extensive on-line nuclear orientation study of the angular distribution of {alpha} particles emitted in the favored decay of neutron deficient At and Rn nuclei near the {ital N}=126 shell closure. Surprisingly large anisotropies were observed, showing pronounced changes from one isotope to another. Comparing these data with several theoretical models shows that anisotropic {alpha} emission in favored decays from near-spherical nuclei can well be explained within the shell model, implying that it is mainly determined by the structure of the decaying nucleus. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. Pioneer 10 ultraviolet photometer observations of the Jovian hydrogen torus - The angular distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Judge, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The Pioneer 10 ultraviolet photometer observations of the Jovian hydrogen torus are analyzed to obtain the angular distribution. The cloud is asymmetric about Io, where the atoms presumably originate, with the greater density occurring in the trailing portion. A simple model which assumes Jeans escape from the atmosphere of Io is developed and compared to the observations. The results suggest that the exospheric temperature is high (approximately 3000 K) and that the ionization lifetime of the cloud atoms is approximately 100,000 sec.

  18. Angular and Energy Distributions of Electrons Produced in Arbitrary Biomaterials by Proton Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vera, Pablo; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Abril, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple method for obtaining reliable angular and energy distributions of electrons ejected from arbitrary condensed biomaterials by proton impact. Relying on a suitable description of the electronic excitation spectrum and a physically motivated relation between the ion and electron scattering angles, it yields cross sections in rather good agreement with experimental data in a broad range of ejection angles and energies, by only using as input the target composition and density. The versatility and simplicity of the method, which can be also extended to other charged particles, make it especially suited for obtaining ionization data for any complex biomaterial present in realistic cellular environments.

  19. Angular distribution of positrons in coherent pair production in deformed crystals.

    PubMed

    Parazian, V V

    2009-05-01

    We investigate the angular distribution of positrons in the coherent process electron-positron pair creation process by high-energy photons in a periodically deformed single crystal with a complex base. The formula for the corresponding differential cross section is derived for an arbitrary deformation field. The case is considered in detail when the photon enters into the crystal at small angles with respect to a crystallographic axis. The results of the numerical calculations are presented for SiO(2) and diamond single crystals and Moliere parameterization of the screened atomic potentials in the case of the deformation field generated by an acoustic wave of S-type.

  20. Angular distribution of neutrons from deuterated cluster explosions driven by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Buersgens, F; Madison, K W; Symes, D R; Hartke, R; Osterhoff, J; Grigsby, W; Dyer, G; Ditmire, T

    2006-07-01

    We have studied experimentally the angular distributions of fusion neutrons from plasmas of multi-keV ion temperature, created by 40 fs, multi-TW laser pulses in dense plumes of D2 and CD4 clusters. A slight anisotropy in the neutron emission is observed. We attribute this anisotropy to the fact that the differential cross section for DD fusion is anisotropic even at low collision energies, and this, coupled with the geometry of the gas jet target, leads to beam-target neutrons that are slightly directed. The qualitative features of this anisotropy are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Angular distribution of neutrons from deuterated cluster explosions driven by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buersgens, F.; Madison, K. W.; Symes, D. R.; Hartke, R.; Osterhoff, J.; Grigsby, W.; Dyer, G.; Ditmire, T.

    2006-07-01

    We have studied experimentally the angular distributions of fusion neutrons from plasmas of multi-keV ion temperature, created by 40fs , multi-TW laser pulses in dense plumes of D2 and CD4 clusters. A slight anisotropy in the neutron emission is observed. We attribute this anisotropy to the fact that the differential cross section for DD fusion is anisotropic even at low collision energies, and this, coupled with the geometry of the gas jet target, leads to beam-target neutrons that are slightly directed. The qualitative features of this anisotropy are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Angular distributions in J/{psi}({rho}{sup 0},{omega}) states near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2004-11-01

    A resonance X(3872), first observed in the decays B{yields}KX, has been seen to decay to J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} mass spectrum peaks near its kinematic upper limit, prompting speculation that the dipion system may be in a {rho}{sup 0}. The decay X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{omega} also has been observed. The reaction {gamma}{gamma}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} has been studied. Consequently, angular distributions in decays of J/{psi}({rho}{sup 0},{omega}) states near threshold are of interest, and results are presented.

  3. Finding probability distributions for electric field gradient components with inhomogeneous broadening in perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Tyler; Adams, Mike; Bunker, Austin; Hodges, Jeffery; Stufflebeam, Michael; Evenson, William; Matheson, Phil; Zacate, Matthew

    2009-10-01

    Materials contain defects, which affect crystal properties such as damping of the correlation signal,G2(t), in time and broadening of the frequency spectrum in perturbed angular correlation (PAC) experiments. We attribute this inhomogeneous broadening (IHB) to the random static defects that produce a distribution of electric field gradients (EFGs). Our goal is to find a relationship between the amount of broadening and the concentration of defects. After simulating the EFGs from random configurations of defects, we map our results from the Vzz-Vxx plane to a coordinate system optimized for the EFG distribution through a Czjzek transformation, followed by a conformal mapping. From histograms in this space, we can define probability distribution functions with parameters that vary according to defect concentration. This allows us to calculate the broadened G2(t) spectrum for any concentration, and, in reverse, identify concentrations given a broadened G2(t) spectrum.

  4. Fission Fragment Angular Distribution measurements of 235U and 238U at CERN n_TOF facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Durán, I.; Paradela, C.; Tarrío, D.; Leong, L. S.; Tassan-Got, L.; Audouin, L.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Barbagallo, M.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dressler, R.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Gurusamy, P.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Kivel, N.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Lampoudis, C.; Langer, C.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lo Meo, S.; Losito, R.; Mallick, A.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mastromarco, M.; Meaze, M.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondelaers, W.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plompen, A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Robles, M. S.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiß, C.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2016-03-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross sections of 238U and 235U are used as standards in the fast neutron region up to 200 MeV. A high accuracy of the standards is relevant to experimentally determine other neutron reaction cross sections. Therefore, the detection effciency should be corrected by using the angular distribution of the fission fragments (FFAD), which are barely known above 20 MeV. In addition, the angular distribution of the fragments produced in the fission of highly excited and deformed nuclei is an important observable to investigate the nuclear fission process. In order to measure the FFAD of neutron-induced reactions, a fission detection setup based on parallel-plate avalanche counters (PPACs) has been developed and successfully used at the CERN-n_TOF facility. In this work, we present the preliminary results on the analysis of new 235U(n,f) and 238U(n,f) data in the extended energy range up to 200 MeV compared to the existing experimental data.

  5. Estimation of aerosol columnar size distribution and optical thickness from the angular distribution of radiance exiting the atmosphere: simulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Gordon, H R

    1995-10-20

    We report the results of simulations in which an algorithm developed for estimation of aerosol optical properties from the angular distribution of radiance exiting the top of the atmosphere over the oceans [Appl. Opt. 33, 4042 (1994)] is combined with a technique for carrying out radiative transfer computations by synthesis of the radiance produced by individual components of the aerosol-size distribution [Appl. Opt. 33, 7088 (1994)], to estimate the aerosol-size distribution by retrieval of the total aerosol optical thickness and the mixing ratios for a set of candidate component aerosol-size distributions. The simulations suggest that in situations in which the true size-refractive-index distribution can actually be synthesized from a combination of the candidate components, excellent retrievals of the aerosol optical thickness and the component mixing ratios are possible. An exception is the presence of strongly absorbing aerosols. The angular distribution of radiance in a single spectral band does not appear to contain sufficient information to separate weakly from strongly absorbing aerosols. However, when two spectral bands are used in the algorithm, retrievals in the case of strongly absorbing aerosols are improved. When pseudodata were simulated with an aerosol-size distribution that differed in functional form from the candidate components, excellent retrievals were still obtained as long as the refractive indices of the actual aerosol model and the candidate components were similar. This underscores the importance of component candidates having realistic indices of refraction in the various size ranges for application of the method. The examples presented all focus on the multiangle imaging spectroradiometer; however, the results should be as valid for data obtained by the use of high-altitude airborne sensors. PMID:21060560

  6. Giant dipole resonance in 88Mo from phonon damping model strength functions averaged over temperature and angular momentum distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh Dang, N.; Ciemala, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.

    2013-05-01

    The line shapes of giant dipole resonance (GDR) in the decay of the compound nucleus 88Mo, which is formed after the fusion-evaporation reaction 48Ti + 40Ca at various excitation energies E* from 58 to 308 MeV, are generated by averaging the GDR strength functions predicted within the phonon damping model (PDM) using the empirical probabilities for temperature and angular momentum. The average strength functions are compared with the PDM strength functions calculated at the mean temperature and mean angular momentum, which are obtained by averaging the values of temperature and angular momentum using the same temperature and angular momentum probability distributions, respectively. It is seen that these two ways of generating the GDR linear line shape yield very similar results. It is also shown that the GDR width approaches a saturation at angular momentum J≥ 50 ℏ at T=4 MeV and at J≥ 70 ℏ at any T.

  7. Interpretation of angular distributions of Z-boson production at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jen-Chieh; Chang, Wen-Chen; McClellan, Randall Evan; Teryaev, Oleg

    2016-07-01

    High precision data of dilepton angular distributions in γ* / Z production were reported recently by the CMS Collaboration covering a broad range of the dilepton transverse momentum, qT, up to ∼ 300 GeV. Pronounced qT dependencies of the λ and ν parameters, characterizing the cos2 ⁡ θ and cos ⁡ 2 ϕ angular distributions, were found. Violation of the Lam-Tung relation was also clearly observed. We show that the qT dependence of λ allows a determination of the relative contributions of the q q bar annihilation versus the qG Compton process. The violation of the Lam-Tung relation is attributed to the presence of a non-zero component of the q - q bar axis in the direction normal to the "hadron plane" formed by the colliding hadrons. The magnitude of the violation of the Lam-Tung relation is shown to reflect the amount of this 'non-coplanarity". The observed qT dependencies of λ and ν from the CMS and the earlier CDF data can be well described using this approach.

  8. Angular Distributions of Fe/O From Wind: New Insight Into SEP Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Ng, C. K.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We examine the angular distributions of He, O, and Fe in large solar energetic particle (SEP) events measured on the Wind spacecraft. We report for the first time, that in a fixed velocity interval, Fe/O is often larger for particles flowing sunward along the magnetic field than for particles flowing outward from the Sun in many SEP events. This occurs because the anisotropy for O exceeds that for Fe, even though both species are streaming outward. There are no examples of events for which the outward Fe/O dominates. The behavior of Fe and O conflicts with the expectations of simple diffusion theory, that angular distributions should be independent of species. It also seems to conflict with the idea that energetic Fe scatters less than O of the same velocity. However, preliminary modeling suggests that the presence of a reflecting magnetic boundary beyond 1 AU, together with the increased scattering of O over Fe due to proton generated Alfven waves, can explain the direction and magnitude of the effect. These observations add a new dimension to the study of SEP transport.

  9. Angular distributions for electron-impact ionization of Na and Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, G. S. J.; Colgan, J.; Nixon, K. L.; Murray, A. J.; Pindzola, M. S.

    2013-09-01

    We present angular distributions for electron-impact single ionization of sodium and magnesium at intermediate electron impact energies. In this work, the time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC) method is used to solve the two-electron time-dependent Schrödinger equation in full dimensionality. The ionization process is treated as a two-active-electron process, where the two outgoing electrons move in the field of the frozen singly-charged ion. We compare calculated angular distributions with measurements taken over a range of intermediate electron impact energies, and in both coplanar symmetric and asymmetric geometries. Several new features are incorporated into the present TDCC approach, including a core orthogonalization at each time step to avoid unphysical de-excitation of the active electrons, an implicit time propagator, and a variable radial mesh. The latter is required to map out the inner atomic orbitals accurately, and the use of an implicit time propagator enables reasonably large time steps to be used.

  10. Search for Z' ---> e+ e- using dielectron mass and angular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2006-02-01

    The authors search Z{prime} bosons in dielectron events produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, using a 0.45 fb{sup -1} dataset accumulated with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. To identify the Z{prime} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} signal, both the dielectron invariant mass distribution and the angular distribution of the electron pair are used. No evidence of a signal is found, and 95% confidence level lower limits are set on the Z{prime} mass for several models. Limits are also placed on the mass and gauge coupling of a generic Z{prime}, as well as on the contact interaction mass scales for different helicity structure scenarios.

  11. Search for Z' --> e+ e- using dielectron mass and angular distribution.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cresciolo, F; Cruz, A; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-06-01

    We search for Z' bosons in dielectron events produced in pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV, using 0.45 fb(-1) of data accumulated with the Collider Detector at Fermilab II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. To identify the Z' --> e+ e- signal, both the dielectron invariant mass distribution and the angular distribution of the electron pair are used. No evidence of a signal is found, and 95% confidence level lower limits are set on the Z' mass for several models. Limits are also placed on the mass and gauge coupling of a generic Z', as well as on the contact-interaction mass scales for different helicity structure scenarios.

  12. Search for Z' --> e+ e- using dielectron mass and angular distribution.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cresciolo, F; Cruz, A; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraan, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Naganoma, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-06-01

    We search for Z' bosons in dielectron events produced in pp collisions at square root of s = 1.96 TeV, using 0.45 fb(-1) of data accumulated with the Collider Detector at Fermilab II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. To identify the Z' --> e+ e- signal, both the dielectron invariant mass distribution and the angular distribution of the electron pair are used. No evidence of a signal is found, and 95% confidence level lower limits are set on the Z' mass for several models. Limits are also placed on the mass and gauge coupling of a generic Z', as well as on the contact-interaction mass scales for different helicity structure scenarios. PMID:16803227

  13. First Results on Angular Distributions of Thermal Dileptons in Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Banicz, K.; Damjanovic, S.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.; Falco, A. de; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.

    2009-06-05

    The NA60 experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron has studied dimuon production in 158A GeV In-In collisions. The strong excess of pairs above the known sources found in the complete mass region 0.2angular distributions. Using the Collins-Soper reference frame, the structure function parameters {lambda}, {mu}, and {nu} are measured to be zero, and the projected distributions in polar and azimuth angles are found to be uniform. The absence of any polarization is consistent with the interpretation of the excess dimuons as thermal radiation from a randomized system.

  14. Atomic ionization by intense laser pulses of short duration: Photoelectron energy and angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Dondera, M.

    2010-11-15

    We introduce an adequate integral representation of the wave function in the asymptotic region, valid for the stage postinteraction between a one-electron atom and a laser pulse of short duration, as a superposition of divergent radial spherical waves. Starting with this representation, we derive analytic expressions for the energy and angular distributions of the photoelectrons and we show their connection with expressions used before in the literature. Using our results, we propose a method to extract the photoelectron distributions from the time dependence of the wave function at large distances. Numerical results illustrating the method are presented for the photoionization of hydrogenlike atoms from the ground state and several excited states by extreme ultraviolet pulses with a central wavelength of 13.3 nm and several intensities around the value I{sub 0}{approx_equal}3.51x10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}.

  15. Effect of transverse vibrations of fissile nuclei on the angular and spin distributions of low-energy fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunakov, V. E.; Kadmensky, S. G.; Lyubashevsky, D. E.

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that A. Bohr's classic theory of angular distributions of fragments originating from low-energy fission should be supplemented with quantum corrections based on the involvement of a superposition of a very large number of angular momenta L m in the description of the relative motion of fragments flying apart along the straight line coincidentwith the symmetry axis. It is revealed that quantum zero-point wriggling-type vibrations of the fissile system in the vicinity of its scission point are a source of these angular momenta and of high fragment spins observed experimentally.

  16. Installation for the study of the angular distribution of cosmic muons with super-high energies at large zenith angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borog, V. V.; Kirillov-Ugryumov, V. G.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Shestakov, V. V.

    1975-01-01

    An installation consisting of an ionization calorimeter and a counter hodoscope can be used to record cascade showers caused by the electromagnetic interactions of muons with superhigh energies in the cosmic ray horizontal flux. The direction of the muons is determined by a hodoscope consisting of 2196 counters. The information obtained makes it possible to restore the angular and energy distribution of the cosmic muons, which, in turn, makes it possible to determine the mechanism of their generation. The accuracy with which the angle of the passing particle is determined is discussed in detail in addition to the causes which can introduce distortions, such as shower accompaniment of neutrons, escape of shower electrons from the calorimeter, random coincidences, etc.

  17. A Model for Hydraulic Properties Based on Angular Pores with Lognormal Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durner, W.; Diamantopoulos, E.

    2014-12-01

    Soil water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity curves are mandatory for modeling water flow in soils. It is a common approach to measure few points of the water retention curve and to calculate the hydraulic conductivity curve by assuming that the soil can be represented as a bundle of capillary tubes. Both curves are then used to predict water flow at larger spatial scales. However, the predictive power of these curves is often very limited. This can be very easily illustrated if we measure the soil hydraulic properties (SHPs) for a drainage experiment and then use these properties to predict the water flow in the case of imbibition. Further complications arise from the incomplete wetting of water at the solid matrix which results in finite values of the contact angles between the solid-water-air interfaces. To address these problems we present a physically-based model for hysteretic SHPs. This model is based on bundles of angular pores. Hysteresis for individual pores is caused by (i) different snap-off pressures during filling and emptying of single angular pores and (ii) by different advancing and receding contact angles for fluids that are not perfectly wettable. We derive a model of hydraulic conductivity as a function of contact angle by assuming flow perpendicular to pore cross sections and present closed-form expressions for both the sample scale water retention and hydraulic conductivity function by assuming a log-normal statistical distribution of pore size. We tested the new model against drainage and imbibition experiments for various sandy materials which were conducted with various liquids of differing wettability. The model described both imbibition and drainage experiments very well by assuming a unique pore size distribution of the sample and a zero contact angle for the perfectly wetting liquid. Eventually, we see the possibility to relate the particle size distribution with a model which describes the SHPs.

  18. A new study of 25Mg 28Si angular distributions at MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caciolli, A.; Marchi, T.; Depalo, R.; Appannababu, S.; Blasi, N.; Broggini, C.; Cinausero, M.; Collazuol, G.; Degerlier, M.; Fabris, D.; Gramegna, F.; Leone, M.; Mastinu, P.; Menegazzo, R.; Montagnoli, G.; Rossi Alvarez, C.; Rigato, V.; Wieland, O.

    2014-09-01

    The observation of 26Al gives us the proof of active nucleosynthesis in the Milky Way. However the identification of the main producers of 26Al is still a matter of debate. Many sites have been proposed, but our poor knowledge of the nuclear processes involved introduces high uncertainties. In particular, the limited accuracy on the 25Mg 28Si reaction cross section has been identified as the main source of nuclear uncertainty in the production of 26Al in C/Ne explosive burning in massive stars, which has been suggested to be the main source of 26Al in the Galaxy. We studied this reaction through neutron spectroscopy at the CN Van de Graaff accelerator of the Legnaro National Laboratories. Thanks to this technique we are able to discriminate the events from possible contamination arising from parasitic reactions. In particular, we measured the neutron angular distributions at 5 different beam energies (between 3 and 5 MeV) in the - laboratory system angular range. The presented results disagree with the assumptions introduced in the analysis of a previous experiment.

  19. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Jet-like structures in photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Zhang, Jing-Tao; Ren, Xiang-He; Xu, Zhi-Zhan

    2009-11-01

    The photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) of hydrogen atoms in an intense laser field of linear polarization are studied using the S-matrix theory in the length gauge. The PADs show main lobes along the laser polarization and jet-like structures sticking from the waist of main lobes. Our previous prediction, based on a nonperturbative scattering theory of photoionization developed by Guo et al, showing that the number of jets on one side of PADs may increase by one, three, or other odd numbers and may decrease by one when one more photon is absorbed, is confirmed by this treatment. Within the strong-field approximation, good agreement is obtained between these two quite different treatments. We further study the influence of the Coulomb attraction to PADs, by taking a Coulomb-Volkov state as the continuum state of photoelectrons. We find that under the influence of the Coulomb attraction, the PADs change greatly but the predicted phenomena still appear. This study verifies that the jet-like structures have no relation with the angular momentum of photoelectrons.

  20. Measurements of the Angular Distributions in the Decays B→K(*)μ+μ- at CDF

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2012-02-01

    We reconstruct the decays B → K(*) µ+µ- and measure their angular distributions in pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.8 fb-1. The transverse polarization asymmetry AT(2) and the time-reversal-odd charge-and-parity asymmetry Aim are measured for the first time, together with the K* longitudinal polarization fraction FL and the µ on forward-backward asymmetry AFB, for the decays B0→K*0µ+µ- and B0→K*+µ+µ-. Our results are among the most accurate to date and consistent with those from other experiments.

  1. Calculation of photodetachment cross sections and photoelectron angular distributions of negative ions using density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Ning, Chuangang

    2015-10-01

    Recently, the development of photoelectron velocity map imaging makes it much easier to obtain the photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) experimentally. However, explanations of PADs are only qualitative in most cases, and very limited works have been reported on how to calculate PAD of anions. In the present work, we report a method using the density-functional-theory Kohn-Sham orbitals to calculate the photodetachment cross sections and the anisotropy parameter β. The spherical average over all random molecular orientation is calculated analytically. A program which can handle both the Gaussian type orbital and the Slater type orbital has been coded. The testing calculations on Li-, C-, O-, F-, CH-, OH-, NH2-, O2-, and S2- show that our method is an efficient way to calculate the photodetachment cross section and anisotropy parameter β for anions, thus promising for large systems.

  2. Optofluidic distributed feedback lasers with evanescent pumping: Reduced threshold and angular dispersion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karl, Markus; Whitworth, Guy L.; Schubert, Marcel; Dietrich, Christof P.; Samuel, Ifor D. W.; Turnbull, Graham A.; Gather, Malte C.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate an evanescently pumped water-based optofluidic distributed feedback (DFB) laser with a record low pump threshold of ETH=520 n J . The low threshold results from an optimized mode shape, which is achieved by a low refractive index substrate, and from the use of a mixed-order DFB grating. Investigating the photonic band structure via angular dispersion analysis both above and below lasing threshold allows us to measure the refractive index of the liquid gain layer and to determine the device parameters such as the waveguide core layer thickness. We show that it is possible to tailor the divergence of the lasing emission by varying the number of second order grating periods used for outcoupling.

  3. Photoelectron angular distributions from polarized Ne{sup *} atoms near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keeffe, P.; Bolognesi, P.; Mihelic, A.; Moise, A.; Richter, R.; Cautero, G.; Stebel, L.; Sergo, R.; Pravica, L.; Ovcharenko, E.; Decleva, P.; Avaldi, L.

    2010-11-15

    Photoelectron distributions of the polarized 2p{sup 5}3d Rydberg states of neon have been studied with a newly built velocity map imaging analyzer. The atoms were polarized by absorption of synchrotron radiation and ionized by an infrared laser. The asymmetry parameters {beta}{sub 2} and {beta}{sub 4} characterizing two-photon resonant ionization have been extracted from the measured images and compared with the results of a quantum defect treatment. To achieve a good theoretical description of the data, it is necessary to take into account the dependence of the dipole transition matrix elements and phases of the partial waves on the angular momentum quantum numbers pertaining to various continuum channels.

  4. Photoelectron angular distributions in bichromatic atomic ionization induced by circularly polarized VUV femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douguet, Nicolas; Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N.; Gryzlova, Elena V.; Staroselskaya, Ekaterina I.; Venzke, Joel; Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    We investigate two-pathway interferences between nonresonant one-photon and resonant two-photon ionization of atomic hydrogen. In particular, we analyze in detail the photoionization mediated by the fundamental frequency and the second harmonic of a femtosecond VUV pulse when the fundamental is tuned near an intermediate atomic state. Following our recent study [Phys. Rev. A 91, 063418 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.063418] of such effects with linearly polarized light, we analyze a similar situation with circularly polarized radiation. As a consequence of the richer structure in circularly polarized light, characterized by its right-handed or left-handed helicity, we present and discuss various important features associated with the photoelectron angular distribution.

  5. Monte Carlo calculation of the angular distribution of cosmic rays at flight altitudes.

    PubMed

    Battistoni, G; Ferrari, A; Pelliccioni, M; Villari, R

    2004-01-01

    The angular distribution of the secondary radiation produced by the galactic component of cosmic rays has been determined by simulating the penetration of the primary spectra in the Earth's atmosphere. The simulations have been carried out with the latest version of the FLUKA code. Particles have been scored at various altitudes according to their angle of incidence for some significant values of vertical cut-off rigidity and solar modulation parameter. The calculated results at typical cruise altitudes for a civil aircraft are presented. The data at 10.7 km have been fitted with simple mathematical equations. It has been demonstrated that the major contribution to the doses at aviation altitudes arises from downward-directed particles. The isotropic irradiation usually assumed for the evaluation of aircrew exposure could be a very poor approximation.

  6. Photoionization of He above the N =2 threshold. II. Angular distribution of photoelectrons and asymmetry parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, I.; Martin, F. )

    1992-04-01

    We report theoretical calculations for the {beta}{sub 2{ital p}}-asymmetry parameter in the photoionization of He(1{ital s}{sup 2}) above the {ital N}=2 ionization threshold. We use an extension of a method recently proposed (I. Sanchez and F. Martin, Phys. Rev. A 44, 7318 (1991)) that makes use of a Feshbach partitioning of the final-state wave function and an {ital L}{sup 2} representation of the coupled continuum states. Partial differential cross sections at emission angles 0{degree} and 90{degree} are also provided. Our results are in good agreement with the experimental data, thus showing the accuracy of the present method to study electron angular-distribution properties.

  7. Angular distributions in J / ψ → p p bar π0 (η) decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, V. F.; Milstein, A. I.; Salnikov, S. G.

    2016-09-01

    The differential decay rates of the processes J / ψ → p p bar π0 and J / ψ → p p bar η close to the p p bar threshold are calculated with the help of the N N bar optical potential. The same calculations are made for the decays of ψ (2 S). We use the potential which has been suggested to fit the cross sections of N N bar scattering together with N N bar and six pion production in e+e- annihilation close to the p p bar threshold. The p p bar invariant mass spectrum is in agreement with the available experimental data. The anisotropy of the angular distributions, which appears due to the tensor forces in the N N bar interaction, is predicted close to the p p bar threshold. This anisotropy is large enough to be investigated experimentally. Such measurements would allow one to check the accuracy of the model of N N bar interaction.

  8. Angular distribution of polarized light and its effect on light extraction efficiency in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinjuan; Ji, Cheng; Xiang, Yong; Kang, Xiangning; Shen, Bo; Yu, Tongjun

    2016-05-16

    Angular distribution of polarized light and its effect on light extraction efficiency (LEE) in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet (DUV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated in this paper. A united picture is presented to describe polarized light's emission and propagation processes. It is found that the electron-hole recombinations in AlGaN multiple quantum wells produce three kinds of angularly distributed polarized emissions and propagation process can change their intensity distributions. By investigation the change of angular distributions in 277nm and 215nm LEDs, this work reveals that LEE can be significantly enhanced by modulating the angular distributions of polarized light of DUV LEDs.

  9. Two-dimensional ion-imaging of fragment angular distributions after photolysis of state-selected and oriented triatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Teule, J. M.; Hilgeman, M. H.; Janssen, M. H. M.; Chandler, D. W.; Taatjes, C. A.; Stolte, S.

    1997-01-15

    Photodissociation experiments of state-selected and oriented triatomics are presented. Selective ionization using REMPI in combination with two-dimensional ion-imaging allows us to measure both the internal energy and angular distribution of the fragments. The dissociation of N{sub 2}O is studied using one laser around 204 nm for both the dissociation of the molecule and the ionization of the fragments. The angular distributions of O({sup 1}D) and N{sub 2}(J) are presented and implications of these results on the dissociation dynamics are discussed.

  10. Two-dimensional ion-imaging of fragment angular distributions after photolysis of state-selected and oriented triatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Teule, J.M.; Hilgeman, M.H.; Janssen, M.H.; Chandler, D.W.; Taatjes, C.A.; Stolte, S.

    1997-01-01

    Photodissociation experiments of state-selected and oriented triatomics are presented. Selective ionization using REMPI in combination with two-dimensional ion-imaging allows us to measure both the internal energy and angular distribution of the fragments. The dissociation of N{sub 2}O is studied using one laser around 204 nm for both the dissociation of the molecule and the ionization of the fragments. The angular distributions of O({sup 1}D) and N{sub 2}(J) are presented and implications of these results on the dissociation dynamics are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Numerical simulations of galaxy formation: Angular momentum distribution and phase space structure of galactic halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sanjib

    Within the past decade, the L CDM model has emerged as a standard paradigm of structure formation. While it has been very successful in explaining the structure of the Universe on large scales, on smaller (galactic) scales problems have surfaced. In this thesis, we investigate several of these problems in more detail. The thesis is organized as follows. In Chapter 1, we give a brief introduction about structure formation in the universe and discuss some of the problems being faced by the current CDM paradigm of galaxy formation. In Chapter 2, we analyze the angular momentum properties of virialized halos obtained from hydrodynamical simulations. We describe an analytical function that can be used to describe a wide variety of angular momentum distributions (AMDs), with just one parameter a. About 90-95% of halos turn out to have a < 1.3, while exponential disks in cosmological halos would require 1.3 < a < 1.6. This implies that a typical halo in simulations has an excess of low angular momentum material as compared to that of observed exponential disks, a result which is consistent with the findings of earlier works. In Chapter 3, we perform controlled numerical experiments of merging galactic halos in order to shed light on the results obtained in cosmological simulations. We explore the properties of shape parameter a of AMDs and the spin ratio l Gas /l DM in merger remnants and also their dependence on orbital parameters. We find that the shape parameter a is typically close to 1 for a wide range of orbital parameters, less than what is needed to form an exponential disk. The last chapter of the thesis (Chapter 4) is devoted to the analysis of phase space structure of dark matter halos. We first present a method to numerically estimate the densities of discretely sampled data based on a binary space partitioning tree. We implement an entropy-based node splitting criterion that results in a significant improvement in the estimation of densities compared to

  12. The Angular Distribution of Neutrons Scattered from Deuterium below 2 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nankov, N.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Kopecky, S.; Kozier, K. S.; Roubtsov, D.; Rao, R.; Beyer, R.; Grosse, E.; Hannaske, R.; Junghans, A. R.; Massarczyk, R.; Schwengner, R.; Yakorev, D.; Wagner, A.; Stanoiu, M.; Canton, L.; Nolte, R.; Röttger, S.; Beyer, J.; Svenne, J.

    2014-05-01

    Neutron elastic scattering measurements were carried out at the nELBE neutron time-of-flight facility at a 6 m flight path. Energies below 2 MeV were studied using a setup consisting of eight 6Li-glass detectors placed at nominal angles of 15∘ and 165∘ with respect to the incident neutron beam. A deuterated polyethylene sample with 99.999% enrichment in deuterium was used. These angles were chosen since an earlier study showed that the ratio of the differential cross section at these angles is the most sensitive to differences in evaluated files and model calculations. Accurate 165∘/15∘ angle ratios were obtained. Above 1 MeV these are somewhat larger than given by ENDF/B-VII. Simultaneously the early day experiments using a proportional counter to infer angular distributions from deuterium recoil pulse height distributions are being studied through a new experiment with such a device at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). At 500 keV this experiment favors ENDF/B-VII over JENDL-4.0, while at lower energies agreement with the data is similar.

  13. The mass and angular momentum distribution of simulated massive early-type galaxies to large radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xufen; Gerhard, Ortwin; Naab, Thorsten; Oser, Ludwig; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma; Hilz, Michael; Churazov, Eugene; Lyskova, Natalya

    2014-03-01

    We study the dark and luminous mass distributions, circular velocity curves (CVCs), line-of-sight kinematics and angular momenta for a sample of 42 cosmological zoom simulations of galaxies with stellar masses from 2.0 × 1010 to 3.4 × 1011 M⊙ h-1. Using a temporal smoothing technique, we are able to reach large radii. We find the following. The dark matter halo density profiles outside a few kpc follow simple power-law models, with flat dark matter CVCs for lower mass systems, and rising CVCs for high-mass haloes. The projected stellar density distributions at large radii can be fitted by Sérsic functions with n ≳ 10, larger than for typical early-type galaxies (ETGs). The massive systems have nearly flat total (luminous plus dark matter) CVCs at large radii, while the less massive systems have mildly decreasing CVCs. The slope of the circular velocity at large radii correlates with circular velocity itself. The dark matter fractions within the projected stellar half-mass radius Re are in the range 15-30 per cent and increase to 40-65 per cent at 5Re. Larger and more massive galaxies have higher dark matter fractions. The fractions and trends with mass and size are in agreement with observational estimates, even though the stellar-to-total mass ratio is ˜2-3 times higher than estimated for ETGs. The short axes of simulated galaxies and their host dark matter haloes are well aligned and their short-to-long axis ratios are correlated. The stellar root mean square velocity vrms(R) profiles are slowly declining, in agreement with planetary nebulae observations in the outer haloes of most ETGs. The line-of-sight velocity fields {bar{v}} show that rotation properties at small and large radii are correlated. Most radial profiles for the cumulative specific angular momentum parameter λ(R) are nearly

  14. Angular distribution of {alpha} particles from oriented {sup 253,254}Es and {sup 255}Fm nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Severijns, N.; Golovko, V.V.; Kraev, I.S.; Phalet, T.; Belyaev, A.A.; Lukhanin, A.A.; Noga, V.I.; Erzinkyan, A.L.; Parfenova, V.P.; Eversheim, P.-D.; Herzog, P.; Tramm, C.; Filimonov, V.T.; Toporov, Yu.G.; Zotov, E.; Gurevich, G.M.; Rusakov, A.V.; Vyachin, V.N.; Zakoucky, D.

    2005-04-01

    The anisotropy in the angular distribution of {alpha} particles from oriented {sup 253,254}Es and {sup 255}Fm nuclei, which are among the strongest deformed {alpha} emitters, was measured. Large {alpha} anisotropies have been observed for all three nuclei. The results are compared with calculations based on {alpha}-particle tunneling through a deformed Coulomb barrier.

  15. A remodelling metric for angular fibre distributions and its application to diseased carotid bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Creane, Arthur; Maher, Eoghan; Sultan, Sherif; Hynes, Niamh; Kelly, Daniel J; Lally, Caitríona

    2012-07-01

    Many soft biological tissues contain collagen fibres, which act as major load bearing constituents. The orientation and the dispersion of these fibres influence the macroscopic mechanical properties of the tissue and are therefore of importance in several areas of research including constitutive model development, tissue engineering and mechanobiology. Qualitative comparisons between these fibre architectures can be made using vector plots of mean orientations and contour plots of fibre dispersion but quantitative comparison cannot be achieved using these methods. We propose a 'remodelling metric' between two angular fibre distributions, which represents the mean rotational effort required to transform one into the other. It is an adaptation of the earth mover's distance, a similarity measure between two histograms/signatures used in image analysis, which represents the minimal cost of transforming one distribution into the other by moving distribution mass around. In this paper, its utility is demonstrated by considering the change in fibre architecture during a period of plaque growth in finite element models of the carotid bifurcation. The fibre architecture is predicted using a strain-based remodelling algorithm. We investigate the remodelling metric's potential as a clinical indicator of plaque vulnerability by comparing results between symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid bifurcations. Fibre remodelling was found to occur at regions of plaque burden. As plaque thickness increased, so did the remodelling metric. A measure of the total predicted fibre remodelling during plaque growth, TRM, was found to be higher in the symptomatic group than in the asymptomatic group. Furthermore, a measure of the total fibre remodelling per plaque size, TRM/TPB, was found to be significantly higher in the symptomatic vessels. The remodelling metric may prove to be a useful tool in other soft tissues and engineered scaffolds where fibre adaptation is also present. PMID:22086167

  16. On the Angular Distribution of Neutrons Protons and X-Rays from a Small Dense Plasma Focus Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, J.J.E.; Castillo, F.; Gamboa, I.; Rangel, R.; Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J. I.

    2006-01-05

    Time integrated measurements of the angular distributions of neutrons, protons and X-rays are made, inside the discharge chamber of the FN-II device, using passive detectors. A set of detectors was placed on a semi-circular Teflon registered holder, 13 cm. around the plasma column, and covered with 15 {mu}m Al filters, thus eliminating energetic ions from the expansion of the discharge, as well as tritium and helium-3 ions, but not protons and neutrons. A second set was placed on the opposite side of the holder, eliminating protons. It is found that the detectors on the upper side of the holder show two distinctively different distributions of track diameters. The distribution of the smaller ones, is sharper than that of the larger ones, and are presumably originated by a wide angle beam of protons. The distribution of the ones on the lower side of the holder, which can only be attributed to charged particles which result as a recoil of neutron collisions, are slightly shifted to larger diameters. The angular distribution of X-rays is also studied within the chamber with TLD-200 dosimeters. While the neutron and proton angular distributions can be fitted by single maximum distributions, the X-ray one shows two maxima around the axis.

  17. Efficient computation of the angularly resolved chord length distributions and lineal path functions in large microstructure datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, David M.; Niezgoda, Stephen R.; Kalidindi, Surya R.

    2016-10-01

    Chord length distributions (CLDs) and lineal path functions (LPFs) have been successfully utilized in prior literature as measures of the size and shape distributions of the important microscale constituents in the material system. Typically, these functions are parameterized only by line lengths, and thus calculated and derived independent of the angular orientation of the chord or line segment. We describe in this paper computationally efficient methods for estimating chord length distributions and lineal path functions for 2D (two dimensional) and 3D microstructure images defined on any number of arbitrary chord orientations. These so called fully angularly resolved distributions can be computed for over 1000 orientations on large microstructure images (5003 voxels) in minutes on modest hardware. We present these methods as new tools for characterizing microstructures in a statistically meaningful way.

  18. Isomer production ratios and the angular momentum distribution of fission fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetcu, I.; Talou, P.; Kawano, T.; Jandel, M.

    2013-10-01

    Latest generation fission experiments provide an excellent testing ground for theoretical models. In this contribution we compare the measurements for 235U(nth,f), obtained with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) calorimeter at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), with our full-scale simulation of the primary fragment de-excitation, using the recently developed cgmf code, based on a Monte Carlo implementation of the Hauser-Feshbach theoretical model. We compute the isomer ratios as a function of the initial angular momentum of the fission fragments, for which no direct information exists. Comparison with the available experimental data allows us to determine the initial spin distribution. We also study the dependence of the isomer ratio on the knowledge of the low-lying discrete spectrum input for nuclear fission reactions, finding a high degree of sensitivity. Finally, in the same Hauser-Feshbach approach, we calculate the isomer production ratio for thermal neutron capture on stable isotopes, where the initial conditions (spin, excitation energy, etc.) are well understood. We find that with the current parameters involved in Hauser-Feshbach calculations, we obtain up to a factor of 2 deviation from the measured isomer ratios.

  19. Random walk with nonuniform angular distribution biased by an external periodic pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharyya, Aranyak

    2016-11-01

    We studied the motion of a random walker in two dimensions with nonuniform angular distribution biased by an external periodic pulse. Here, we analytically calculated the mean square displacement (end-to-end distance of a walk after n time steps), without bias and with bias. We determined the average x-component of the final displacement of the walker. Interestingly, we noted that for a particular periodicity of the bias, this average x-component of the final displacement becomes approximately zero. The average y-component of the final displacement is found to be zero for any perodicity of the bias, and its reason can be attributed to the nature of the probability density function of the angle (subtended by the displacement vector with the x-axis). These analytical results are also supported by computer simulations. The present study may be thought of as a model for arresting the bacterial motion (along a preferred direction) by an external periodic bias. This article will be useful for undergraduate students of physics, statistics and biology as an example of an interdisciplinary approach to understand a way to control bacterial motion.

  20. Angular distribution of cosmological parameters as a probe of inhomogeneities: a kinematic parametrisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, C. Sofia; Basilakos, Spyros

    2016-08-01

    We use a kinematic parametrisation of the luminosity distance to measure the angular distribution on the sky of time derivatives of the scale factor, in particular the Hubble parameter H0, the deceleration parameter q0, and the jerk parameter j0. We apply a recently published method to complement probing the inhomogeneity of the large-scale structure by means of the inhomogeneity in the cosmic expansion. This parametrisation is independent of the cosmological equation of state, which renders it adequate to test interpretations of the cosmic acceleration alternative to the cosmological constant. For the same analytical toy model of an inhomogeneous ensemble of homogenous pixels, we derive the backreaction term in j0 due to the fluctuations of { H0,q0 } and measure it to be of order 10-2 times the corresponding average over the pixels in the absence of backreaction. In agreement with that computed using a ΛCDM parametrisation of the luminosity distance, the backreaction effect on q0 remains below the detection threshold. Although the backreaction effect on j0 is about ten times that on q0, it is also below the detection threshold. Hence backreaction remains unobservable both in q0 and in j0.

  1. Angular distribution of cosmological parameters as a probe of space-time inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, C. Sofia; Marques, Katrine

    2016-08-01

    We develop a method based on the angular distribution on the sky of cosmological parameters to probe the inhomogeneity of large-scale structure and cosmic acceleration. We demonstrate this method on the largest type Ia supernova (SN) data set available to date, as compiled by the Joint Light-curve Analysis (JLA) collaboration and, hence, consider the cosmological parameters that affect the luminosity distance. We divide the SN sample into equal surface area pixels and estimate the cosmological parameters that minimize the chi-square of the fit to the distance modulus in each pixel, hence producing maps of the cosmological parameters {ΩM,ΩΛ,H0} . In poorly sampled pixels, the measured fluctuations are mostly due to an inhomogeneous coverage of the sky by the SN surveys; in contrast, in well-sampled pixels, the measurements are robust enough to suggest a real fluctuation. We also measure the anisotropy of the parameters by computing the power spectrum of the corresponding maps of the parameters up to ℓ = 3. For an analytical toy model of an inhomogeneous ensemble of homogeneous pixels, we derive the backreaction term in the deceleration parameter due to the fluctuations of H0 across the sky and measure it to be of order 10-3 times the corresponding average over the pixels in the absence of backreaction. We conclude that, for the toy model considered, backreaction is not a viable dynamical mechanism to emulate cosmic acceleration.

  2. Modeling the Matrix of Articular Cartilage Using a Continuous Fiber Angular Distribution Predicts Many Observed Phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Rajan, Vikram; Chahine, Nadeen O.; Canal, Clare E.; Hung, Clark T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cartilage is a hydrated soft tissue whose solid matrix consists of negatively charged proteoglycans enmeshed within a fibrillar collagen network. Though many aspects of cartilage mechanics are well understood today, most notably in the context of porous media mechanics, there remain a number of responses observed experimentally whose prediction from theory has been challenging. Method of approach In this study the solid matrix of cartilage is modeled with a continuous fiber angular distribution, where fibers can only sustain tension, swelled by the osmotic pressure of a proteoglycan ground matrix. Results It is shown that this representation of cartilage can predict a number of observed phenomena in relation to the tissue’s equilibrium response to mechanical and osmotic loading, when flow-dependent and flow-independent viscoelastic effects have subsided. In particular, this model can predict the transition of Poisson’s ratio from very low values in compression (~0.02) to very high values in tension (~2.0). Most of these phenomena cannot be explained when using only three orthogonal fiber bundles to describe the tissue matrix, a common modeling assumption used to date. Conclusions The main picture emerging from this analysis is that the anisotropy of the fibrillar matrix of articular cartilage is intimately dependent on the mechanism of tensed fiber recruitment, in the manner suggested by our recent theoretical study (G. A. Ateshian. J Biomech Eng, 129(2):240-9, 2007). PMID:19449957

  3. Role of screening and angular distributions in resonant soft-x-ray emission of CO

    SciTech Connect

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K.

    1997-04-01

    In the present work the authors focus on two particular properties of resonant X-ray emission, namely core hole screening of the excited electron, and anisotropy caused by the polarization of the exciting synchrotron radiation. The screening of the core hole by the excited electron causes energy shifts and intensity variations in resonant spectra compared to the non-resonant case. The linear polarization of the synchrotron radiation and the dipole nature of the absorption process create a preferential alignment selection of the randomly oriented molecules in the case of resonant excitation, producing an anisotropy in the angular distribution of the emitted X-rays. The authors have chosen CO for this study because this molecule has previously served as a showcase for non-resonant X-ray emission, mapping the valence electronic structure differently according to the local selection rules. With the present work they take interest in how this characteristic feature of the spectroscopy is represented in the resonant case.

  4. Calculation of photodetachment cross sections and photoelectron angular distributions of negative ions using density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Ning, Chuangang

    2015-10-14

    Recently, the development of photoelectron velocity map imaging makes it much easier to obtain the photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) experimentally. However, explanations of PADs are only qualitative in most cases, and very limited works have been reported on how to calculate PAD of anions. In the present work, we report a method using the density-functional-theory Kohn-Sham orbitals to calculate the photodetachment cross sections and the anisotropy parameter β. The spherical average over all random molecular orientation is calculated analytically. A program which can handle both the Gaussian type orbital and the Slater type orbital has been coded. The testing calculations on Li{sup −}, C{sup −}, O{sup −}, F{sup −}, CH{sup −}, OH{sup −}, NH{sub 2}{sup −}, O{sub 2}{sup −}, and S{sub 2}{sup −} show that our method is an efficient way to calculate the photodetachment cross section and anisotropy parameter β for anions, thus promising for large systems.

  5. Measurements of partial cross sections and photoelectron angular distributions for the photodetachment of Fe- and Cu- at visible photon wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covington, A. M.; Duvvuri, Srividya S.; Emmons, E. D.; Kraus, R. G.; Williams, W. W.; Thompson, J. S.; Calabrese, D.; Carpenter, D. L.; Collier, R. D.; Kvale, T. J.; Davis, V. T.

    2007-02-01

    Photodetachment cross sections and the angular distributions of photoelectrons produced by the single-photon detachment of the transition metal negative ions Fe- and Cu- have been measured at four discrete photon wavelengths ranging from 457.9 to 647.1nm (2.71-1.92eV) using a crossed-beams laser photodetachment electron spectrometry (LPES) apparatus. Photodetachment cross sections were determined by comparing the photoelectron yields from the photodetachment of Fe- to those of Cu- and C- , which have known absolute photodetachment cross sections. Using the measured photodetachment cross sections, radiative electron attachment cross sections were calculated using the principle of detailed balance. Angular distributions were determined by measurements of laboratory frame, angle-, and energy-resolved photoelectrons as a function of the angle between the linear laser polarization vector and the momentum vector of the collected photoelectrons. Values of the asymmetry parameter have been determined by nonlinear least-squares fits to these angular distributions. The measured asymmetry parameters are compared to predictions of photodetachment models including Cooper and Zare’s dipole approximation theory [J. Cooper and R. N. Zare, J. Chem. Phys. 48, 942 (1968)], and the angular momentum transfer theory developed by Fano and Dill [Phys. Rev. A 6, 185 (1972)].

  6. Exclusive studies of angular distributions in GeV hadron-induced reactions with [sup 197]Au

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, W.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Wang, G.; Bracken, D.S.; Cornell, E.; Ginger, D.S.; Viola, V.E. ); Korteling, R.G. V5A I56); Morley, K.B. ); Huang, R.; Lynch, W.G.; Tsang, M.B.; Xi, H. ); Gimeno-Nogues, F.; Ramakrishnan, E.; Rowland, D.; Yennello, S.J. ); Breuer, H. ); Gushue, S.; Remsberg, L.P. ); Botvin

    1999-09-01

    Exclusive studies of angular distributions for intermediate-mass fragments (IMFs) produced in GeV hadron-induced reactions have been performed with the Indiana Silicon Sphere (ISiS) 4[pi] detector array. Special emphasis has been given to understanding the origin of sideways peaking, which becomes prominent in the angular distributions for beam momenta above about 10 GeV/c. Both the magnitude of the effect and the peak angle increase as a function of fragment multiplicity and charge. When gated on IMF kinetic energy, the angular distributions evolve from forward-peaked to near isotropy as the fragment kinetic energy decreases. Fragment-fragment angular-correlation analyses show no obvious evidence for a dynamic mechanism that might signal shock wave effects or the breakup of exotic geometric shapes such as bubbles or toroids. Moving-source and intranuclear cascade simulations suggest that the observed sideways peaking is of kinematic origin, arising from significant transverse momentum imparted to the heavy recoil nucleus during the fast cascade stage of the collision. A two-step cascade and statistical multifragmentation calculation is consistent with this assumption. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  7. Exclusive studies of angular distributions in GeV hadron-induced reactions with {sup 197}Au

    SciTech Connect

    Hsi, W.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Wang, G.; Bracken, D.S.; Cornell, E.; Ginger, D.S.; Viola, V.E.; Korteling, R.G.; Morley, K.B.; Huang, R.; Lynch, W.G.; Tsang, M.B.; Xi, H.; Gimeno-Nogues, F.; Ramakrishnan, E.; Rowland, D.; Yennello, S.J.; Breuer, H.; Gushue, S.; Remsberg, L.P.; Botvina, A.; Friedman, W.A.

    1999-09-01

    Exclusive studies of angular distributions for intermediate-mass fragments (IMFs) produced in GeV hadron-induced reactions have been performed with the Indiana Silicon Sphere (ISiS) 4{pi} detector array. Special emphasis has been given to understanding the origin of sideways peaking, which becomes prominent in the angular distributions for beam momenta above about 10 GeV/c. Both the magnitude of the effect and the peak angle increase as a function of fragment multiplicity and charge. When gated on IMF kinetic energy, the angular distributions evolve from forward-peaked to near isotropy as the fragment kinetic energy decreases. Fragment-fragment angular-correlation analyses show no obvious evidence for a dynamic mechanism that might signal shock wave effects or the breakup of exotic geometric shapes such as bubbles or toroids. Moving-source and intranuclear cascade simulations suggest that the observed sideways peaking is of kinematic origin, arising from significant transverse momentum imparted to the heavy recoil nucleus during the fast cascade stage of the collision. A two-step cascade and statistical multifragmentation calculation is consistent with this assumption. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Nondipole effects in the angular distribution of photoelectrons from the C K shell of the CO molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Hosaka, K.; Teramoto, T.; Adachi, J.; Yagishita, A.; Golovin, A. V.; Takahashi, M.; Watanabe, N.; Jahnke, T.; Weber, Th.; Schoeffler, M.; Schmidt, L.; Jagutzki, O.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Doerner, R.; Osipov, T.; Prior, M. H.; Landers, A. L.; Semenov, S. K.; Cherepkov, N. A.

    2006-02-15

    Measurements and calculations of a contribution of the nondipole terms in the angular distribution of photoelectrons from the C K shell of randomly oriented CO molecules are reported. In two sets of measurements, the angular distribution in the plane containing the photon polarization and the photon momentum vectors of linearly polarized radiation and the full three-dimensional photoelectron momentum distribution after absorption of circularly polarized light have been measured. Calculations have been performed in the relaxed core Hartree-Fock approximation with a fractional charge. Both theory and experiment show that the nondipole terms are very small in the photon energy region from the ionization threshold of the K shell up to about 70 eV above it.

  9. Angular Distribution of Particles Emerging from a Diffusive Region and its Implications for the Fleck-Canfield Random Walk Algorithm for Implicit Monte Carlo Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.A.

    2000-07-03

    We present various approximations for the angular distribution of particles emerging from an optically thick, purely isotropically scattering region into a vacuum. Our motivation is to use such a distribution for the Fleck-Canfield random walk method [1] for implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) [2] radiation transport problems. We demonstrate that the cosine distribution recommended in the original random walk paper [1] is a poor approximation to the angular distribution predicted by transport theory. Then we examine other approximations that more closely match the transport angular distribution.

  10. The angular distributions of ultraviolet spectral irradiance at different solar elevation angles under clear sky conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Hu, LiWen; Wang, Fang; Gao, YanYan; Zheng, Yang; Wang, Yu; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the angular distributions of UVA, UVB, and effective UV for erythema and vitamin D (vitD) synthesis, the UV spectral irradiances were measured at ten inclined angles (from 0° to 90°) and seven azimuths (from 0° to 180°) at solar elevation angle (SEA) that ranged from 18.8° to 80° in Shanghai (31.22° N, 121.55° E) under clear sky and the albedo of ground was 0.1. The results demonstrated that in the mean azimuths and with the back to the sun, the UVA, UVB, and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances increased with the inclined angles and an increase in SEA. When facing toward the sun at 0°-60° inclined angles, the UVA first increased and then decreased with an increase in SEA; at other inclined angles, the UVA increased with SEA. At 0°-40° inclined angles, the UVB and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances first increased and then decreased with an increase in SEA, and their maximums were achieved at SEA 68.7°; at other inclined angles, the above three irradiances increased with an increase in SEA. The maximum UVA, UVB, and erythemally and vitD-weighted irradiances were achieved at an 80° inclined angle at SEA 80° (the highest in our measurements); the cumulative exposure of the half day achieved the maximum at a 60° inclined angle, but not on the horizontal. This study provides support for the assessment of human skin sun exposure.

  11. Polarization Imaging over Sea Surface - A Method for Measurements of Stokes Components Angular Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freda, W.; Piskozub, J.; Toczek, H.

    2015-12-01

    This article describes a method for determining the angular distribution of light polarization over a roughened surface of the sea. Our method relies on measurements of the Stokes vector elements using a polarization imaging camera that operates using the Division of Focal Plane (DoFP) method. It uses special monochrome CCD array in which the neighbouring cells, instead of recording different colours (red green and blue), are equipped with micropolarizers of four directions (0, 45, 90 and 135 degrees). We combined the camera with a fish-eye lens of Field of View (FoV) > 180 deg. Such a large FoV allowed us to crop out the fragment of the frame along the circular horizon, showing a view covering all directions of the hemisphere. Because of complicated optical design of the fish-eye lens (light refraction on surfaces of parts of the lens) connected to the sensor we checked the accuracy of the measurement system. A method to determine the accuracy of measured polarization is based on comparison of the experimentally obtained rotation matrix with its theoretical form. Such a comparison showed that the maximum error of Stokes vector elements depended on zenith angle and reached as much as 24% for light coming from just above the horizon, but decreased rapidly with decreasing zenith angle to the value of 12% for the angles 10° off the edge of FoV. Moreover we present the preliminary results prepared over rough sea surface. These results include total intensity of light, Degree of Linear Polarization (DoLP) and their standard deviations. The results have been averaged over one thousand frames of a movie. These results indicate that the maximum polarization is observed near the reflection of the sun, and the signal coming from below the surface may be observed at zenith angles far from the vertical direction.

  12. Angular distribution of energetic argon ions emitted by a 90 kJ Filippov-type plasma focus

    SciTech Connect

    Pestehe, S. J.; Mohammadnejad, M.

    2015-02-15

    Characteristics of the energetic argon ions emitted by a 90 kJ Filippov-type plasma focus are studied by employing an array of Faraday cups. The Faraday cups are designed to minimize the secondary electron emission effects on their response. Angular distribution of the ions is measured, and the results indicate a highly anisotropic emission with a dip at the device axis and a local maximum at the angle of 7° with respect to the axis. It has been argued that this kind of anisotropic emission may be related to the surfatron acceleration mechanism and shown that this behavior is independent of the working gas pressure. It has been also demonstrated that this mechanism is responsible for the generation of MeV ions. Measuring the total ion number at different working gas pressures gives an optimum pressure of 0.3 Torr. In addition, the energy spectrum of ions is measured by taking into account of the ambient gas effects on the energy and charge of the ions. The current neutralization effect of electrons trapped in the ion beam as well as the effect of conducting boundaries surrounding the beam, on the detected signals are investigated.

  13. Measurement of Angular Distributions of Drell-Yan Dimuons in p+p Interactions at 800GeV/c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L. Y.; Peng, J. C.; Reimer, P. E.; Awes, T. C.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, C. N.; Bush, J. D.; Carey, T. A.; Chang, T. H.; Cooper, W. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garvey, G. T.; Geesaman, D. F.; Hawker, E. A.; He, X. C.; Isenhower, L. D.; Kaplan, D. M.; Kaufman, S. B.; Klinksiek, S. A.; Koetke, D. D.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, W. M.; Leitch, M. J.; Makins, N.; McGaughey, P. L.; Moss, J. M.; Mueller, B. A.; Nord, P. M.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, B. K.; Petitt, G.; Sadler, M. E.; Sondheim, W. E.; Stankus, P. W.; Thompson, T. N.; Towell, R. S.; Tribble, R. E.; Vasiliev, M. A.; Webb, J. C.; Willis, J. L.; Wise, D. K.; Young, G. R.

    2009-05-01

    We report a measurement of the angular distributions of Drell-Yan dimuons produced using an 800GeV/c proton beam on a hydrogen target. The polar and azimuthal angular distribution parameters have been extracted over the kinematic range 4.5angular distributions are similar to those of p+d, and both data sets are compared with models which attribute the cos⁡2ϕ distribution either to the presence of the transverse-momentum-dependent Boer-Mulders structure function h1⊥ or to QCD effects. The data indicate the need to include QCD effects before reliable information on the Boer-Mulders function can be extracted. The validity of the Lam-Tung relation in p+p Drell-Yan data is also tested.

  14. The angular distribution of solar wind ˜20-200 keV superhalo electrons at quiet times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liu; Wang, Linghua; Li, Gang; He, Jiansen; Salem, Chadi S.; Tu, Chuanyi; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Bale, Stuart D.

    2016-03-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the angular distribution of ˜20-200 keV superhalo electrons measured at 1 AU by the WIND 3DP instrument during quiet times from 1995 January through 2005 December. According to the interplanetary magnetic field, we re-bin the observed electron pitch angle distributions to obtain the differential flux, Jout (Jin), of electrons traveling outward from (inward toward) the Sun, and define the anisotropy of superhalo electrons as A =2/(Jo u t-Ji n) Jo u t+Ji n at a given energy. We found that for out in ˜96% of the selected quiet-time samples, superhalo electrons have isotropic angular distributions, while for ˜3% (˜1%) of quiet-time samples, superhalo electrons are outward-anisotropic (inward-anisotropic). All three groups of angular distributions show no correlation with the local solar wind plasma, interplanetary magnetic field and turbulence. Furthermore, the superhalo electron spectral index shows no correlation with the spectral index of local solar wind turbulence. These quiet-time superhalo electrons may be accelerated by nonthermal processes related to the solar wind source and strongly scattered/ reflected in the interplanetary medium, or could be formed due to the electron acceleration through the interplanetary medium.

  15. K-shell photoionization of CO: I. Angular distributions of photoelectrons from fixed-in-space molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoki, S.; Adachi, J.; Hikosaka, Y.; Ito, K.; Sano, M.; Soejima, K.; Yagishita, A.; Raseev, G.; Cherepkov, N. A.

    2000-10-01

    Angular distributions of photoelectrons from both C and O K-shells of the fixed-in-space CO molecule have been measured using the angle-resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence technique. The measurements have been performed at several photon energies from the ionization thresholds up to about 30 eV above them, where the σ* shape resonances occur. Experimental results are compared with the multiple-scattering calculations of Dill et al (1976 J. Chem. Phys. 65 3158) and with our new calculations in the relaxed-core Hartree-Fock approximation. Our calculations are in a better agreement with the experimental data though numerical discrepancies remain. The experimental angular distributions are fitted by the expansion in Legendre polynomials containing up to ten terms and the extracted parameters are compared with the corresponding theoretical values.

  16. Angular and charge state distributions of highly charged ions scattered during low energy surface-channeling interactions with Au(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, F.W.; Folkerts, L.; Schippers, S.

    1994-10-01

    The authors have measured scattered projectile angular and charge state distributions for 3.75 keV/amu O{sup q+} (3 {le} q {le} 8) and 1.2 keV/amu Ar{sup 1+} (3 {le} q {le} 14) ions grazingly incident along the [110] and [100] directions of a Au(110) single crystal target. Scattered projectile angular distribution characteristic of surface channeling are observed. For both incident species, the dominant scattered charge fraction is neutral, which varies only by a few percent as a function of incident charge state. Significant O{sup {minus}} formation is observed, which manifests a distinct velocity threshold. For incident Ar projectiles with open L-shells, the positive scattered charge fractions, while always less than about 10%, increase linearly with increasing number of initial L-shell vacancies.

  17. Search for quark compositeness in dijet angular distributions from pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-05-01

    A search for quark compositeness using dijet angular distributions from pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV is presented. The search has been carried out using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 inverse femtobarns, recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. Normalized dijet angular distributions have been measured for dijet invariant masses from 0.4 TeV to above 3 TeV and compared with a variety of contact interaction models, including those which take into account the effects of next-to-leading-order QCD corrections. The data are found to be in agreement with the predictions of perturbative QCD, and lower limits are obtained on the contact interaction scale, ranging from 7.5 up to 14.5 TeV at 95% confidence level.

  18. Pion production via proton synchrotron radiation in strong magnetic fields in relativistic field theory: Scaling relations and angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2016-06-01

    We study pion production by proton synchrotron radiation in the presence of a strong magnetic field when the Landau numbers of the initial and final protons are ni,f ∼104-105. We find in our relativistic field theory calculations that the pion decay width depends only on the field strength parameter which previously was only conjectured based upon semi-classical arguments. Moreover, we also find new results that the decay width satisfies a robust scaling relation, and that the polar angular distribution of emitted pion momenta is very narrow and can be easily obtained. This scaling implies that one can infer the decay width in more realistic magnetic fields of 1015 G, where ni,f ∼1012-1013, from the results for ni,f ∼104-105. The resultant pion intensity and angular distributions for realistic magnetic field strengths are presented and their physical implications discussed.

  19. Partial Photoionization Cross Sections and Angular Distributions for Double Excitation of Helium up to the N=13 Threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Czasch, A.; Schoeffler, M.; Hattass, M.; Schoessler, S.; Jahnke, T.; Weber, Th.; Staudte, A.; Titze, J.; Wimmer, C.; Kammer, S.; Weckenbrock, M.; Voss, S.; Grisenti, R.E.; Jagutzki, O.; Schmidt, L.Ph.H.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Doerner, R.; Rost, J.M.; Schneider, T.; Liu, C.-N.

    2005-12-09

    Partial photoionization cross sections {sigma}{sub N}(E{sub {gamma}}) and photoelectron angular distributions {beta}{sub N}(E{sub {gamma}}) were measured for the final ionic states He{sup +}(N>4) in the region between the N=8 and N=13 thresholds (E{sub {gamma}}>78.155 eV) using the cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy technique (COLTRIMS). Comparison of the experimental data with two independent sets of theoretical predictions reveals disagreement for the branching ratios to the various He{sub N}{sup +} states. The angular distributions just below the double ionization threshold suggest an excitation process for highly excited N states similar to the Wannier mechanism for double ionization.

  20. Angular distribution of hypersatellite and satellite radiation emitted after resonant transfer and excitation into U{sup 91+} ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zakowicz, S.; Harman, Z.; Gruen, N.; Scheid, W.

    2003-10-01

    In collisions of heavy few-electron projectile ions with light targets, an electron can be transferred from the target with the simultaneous excitation of a projectile electron. We study the angular distribution of deexcitation x rays following the resonant capture process. Our results are compared to experimental values of Ma et al. [Phys. Rev. A 68, 042712 (2003)] for collisions of U{sup 91+} ions with a hydrogen gas target.

  1. Rotational and angular distributions of NO products from NO-Rg(Rg = He, Ne, Ar) complex photodissociation

    DOE PAGES

    Heather L. Holmes-Ross; Hall, Gregory E.; Valenti, Rebecca J.; Yu, Hua -Gen; Lawrance, Warren D.

    2016-01-29

    In this study, we present the results of an investigation into the rotational and angular distributions of the NO A~ state fragment following photodissociation of the NO-He, NO-Ne and NO-Ar van der Waals complexed excited via the A~ ← X~ transition. For each complex the dissociation is probed for several values of Ea, the available energy above the dissociation threshold.

  2. Rotational and angular distributions of NO products from NO-Rg (Rg = He, Ne, Ar) complex photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes-Ross, Heather L.; Valenti, Rebecca J.; Yu, Hua-Gen; Hall, Gregory E.; Lawrance, Warren D.

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of an investigation into the rotational and angular distributions of the NO A ˜ state fragment following photodissociation of the NO-He, NO-Ne, and NO-Ar van der Waals complexes excited via the A ˜ ←X ˜ transition. For each complex, the dissociation is probed for several values of Ea, the available energy above the dissociation threshold. For NO-He, the Ea values probed were 59, 172, and 273 cm-1; for NO-Ne they were 50 and 166 cm-1; and for NO-Ar they were 44, 94, 194, and 423 cm-1. The NO A ˜ state rotational distributions arising from NO-He are cold, with most products in low angular momentum states. NO-Ne leads to broader NO rotational distributions but they do not extend to the maximum possible given the energy available. In the case of NO-Ar, the distributions extend to the maximum allowed at that energy and show the unusual shapes associated with the rotational rainbow effect reported in previous studies. This is the only complex for which a rotational rainbow effect is observed at the chosen Ea values. Product angular distributions have also been measured for the NO A ˜ photodissociation product for the three complexes. NO-He produces nearly isotropic fragments, but the anisotropy parameter, β, for NO-Ne and NO-Ar photofragments shows a surprising change in sign from negative to positive as Ea increases within the unstructured excitation profile. Franck-Condon selection of a broader distribution of geometries including more linear geometries at lower excitation energies and more T-shaped geometries at higher energies can account for the changing recoil anisotropy. Two-dimensional wavepacket calculations are reported to model the rotational state distributions and the bound-continuum absorption spectra.

  3. Angular distribution of light emission from compound-eye cornea with conformal fluorescent coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Miller, Amy E.; Pulsifer, Drew P.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2014-09-01

    The complex morphology of the apposition compound eyes of insects of many species provides them a wide angular field of view. This characteristic makes these eyes attractive for bioreplication as artificial sources of light. The cornea of a blowfly eye was conformally coated with a fluorescent thin film with the aim of achieving wide field-of-view emission. On illumination by shortwave-ultraviolet light, the conformally coated eye emitted visible light whose intensity showed a weaker angular dependence than a fluorescent thin film deposited on a flat surface.

  4. On angularly perturbed Laplace equations in the unit ball of IR{sup n+2} and their distributional boundary values

    SciTech Connect

    Massopust, P.R.

    1997-08-01

    All solutions of an in its angular coordinates continuously perturbed Laplace-Beltrami equation in the open unit ball IB{sup n+2} {contained_in} IR{sup n+2}, n {ge} 1, are characterized. Moreover, it is shown that such pertubations yield distributional boundary values which are different from, but algebraically and topologically equivalent to, the hyperfunctions of Lions & Magenes. This is different from the case of radially perturbed Laplace-Beltrami operators (cf. [7]) where one has stability of distributional boundary values under such perturbations.

  5. Angular distributions of photoelectrons and interatomic-Coulombic-decay electrons from helium dimers: Strong dependence on the internuclear distance

    SciTech Connect

    Havermeier, T.; Kreidi, K.; Wallauer, R.; Voss, S.; Schoeffler, M.; Schoessler, S.; Foucar, L.; Neumann, N.; Titze, J.; Sann, H.; Kuehnel, M.; Voigtsberger, J.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Doerner, R.; Jahnke, T.; Sisourat, N.; Schoellkopf, W.; Grisenti, R. E.

    2010-12-15

    In the present paper, we show that the absorption of a single photon can singly ionize both atoms of a helium dimer (He{sub 2}): ionization with simultaneous excitation of one atom followed by de-excitation via interatomic Coulombic decay leads to the ejection of an electron from each of the the two atoms of the dimer. Using the Cold Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy technique (COLTRIMS), we obtained angular distributions of these electrons in the laboratory frame and the molecular frame. We observe a pronounced variation of these distributions for different regions of kinetic-energy releases of the ions.

  6. Application of modified Twomey techniques to invert lidar angular scatter and solar extinction data for determining aerosol size distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, B. M.

    1977-01-01

    Polarization properties of the angularly scattered laser light from a volume of air are used to determine the size distribution of the aerosol particles within the volume by the use of appropriate inversion techniques. Similar techniques are employed to determine a mean size distribution of the particulates within a vertical column through the atmosphere from determinations of the aerosol optical depth as a function of wavelength. In both of these examples, a modification of an inversion technique originally described by Twomey has been employed. Details of this method are presented as well as results from actual measurements employing bistatic lidar and solar radiometer.

  7. Angular distributions in t t ¯H (H →b b ¯) reconstructed events at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amor dos Santos, S. P.; Araque, J. P.; Cantrill, R.; Castro, N. F.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Frederix, R.; Gonçalo, R.; Martins, R.; Santos, R.; Silva, J.; Onofre, A.; Peixoto, H.; Reigoto, A.

    2015-08-01

    The associated production of a Higgs boson and a top-quark pair, t t ¯ H , in proton-proton collisions is addressed in this paper for a center of mass energy of 13 TeV at the LHC. Dileptonic final states of t t ¯H events with two oppositely charged leptons and four jets from the decays t →b W+→b ℓ+νℓ , t ¯ →b ¯ W-→b ¯ ℓ-ν¯ ℓ and h →b b ¯ , are used. Signal events, generated with MadGraph5_aMC@NLO, are fully reconstructed by applying a kinematic fit. New angular distributions of the decay products as well as angular asymmetries are explored in order to improve discrimination of t t ¯H signal events over the dominant irreducible background contribution, t t ¯b b ¯. Even after the full kinematic fit reconstruction of the events, the proposed angular distributions and asymmetries are still quite different in the t t ¯H signal and the dominant background (t t ¯b b ¯).

  8. CFHTLenS and RCSLenS: Testing Photometric Redshift Distributions Using Angular Cross-Correlations with Spectroscopic Galaxy Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, A.; Heymans, C.; Blake, C.; Hildebrandt, H.; Duncan, C. A. J.; Erben, T.; Nakajima, R.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Viola, M.

    2016-09-01

    We determine the accuracy of galaxy redshift distributions as estimated from photometric redshift probability distributions p(z). Our method utilises measurements of the angular cross-correlation between photometric galaxies and an overlapping sample of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. We describe the redshift leakage from a galaxy photometric redshift bin j into a spectroscopic redshift bin i using the sum of the p(z) for the galaxies residing in bin j. We can then predict the angular cross-correlation between photometric and spectroscopic galaxies due to intrinsic galaxy clustering when i ≠ j as a function of the measured angular cross-correlation when i = j. We also account for enhanced clustering arising from lensing magnification using a halo model. The comparison of this prediction with the measured signal provides a consistency check on the validity of using the summed p(z) to determine galaxy redshift distributions in cosmological analyses, as advocated by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS). We present an analysis of the photometric redshifts measured by CFHTLenS, which overlaps the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We also analyse the Red-sequence Cluster Lensing Survey (RCSLenS), which overlaps both BOSS and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We find that the summed p(z) from both surveys are generally biased with respect to the true underlying distributions. If unaccounted for, this bias would lead to errors in cosmological parameter estimation from CFHTLenS by less than ˜4%. For photometric redshift bins which spatially overlap in 3-D with our spectroscopic sample, we determine redshift bias corrections which can be used in future cosmological analyses that rely on accurate galaxy redshift distributions.

  9. SU-E-I-44: Some Preliminary Analysis of Angular Distribution of X-Ray Scattered On Soft Tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ganezer, K; Krmar, M; Cvejic, Z; Rakic, S; Pajic, B

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The angular distribution of x-radiation scattered at small angles (up to 16 degrees) from several different animal soft tissue (skin, fat, muscle, retina, etc) were measured using standard equipment devoted to study of crystal structure which provides excellent geometry conditions of measurements. showed measurable differences for different tissues. In the simplest possible case when measured samples do not differ in structure (different concentration solutions) it can be seen that intensity of scattered radiation is decreasing function of the concentration and the peak of the maximum of scattering distribution depends on the concentration as well. Methods: An x-ray scattering profile usually consists of sharp diffraction peak; however some properties of the spatial profiles of scattered radiation as intensity, the peak position, height, area, FWHM, the ratio of peak heights, etc. Results: The data contained measurable differences for different tissues. In the simplest possible case when measured samples do not differ in structure (different concentration solutions) it can be seen that intensity of scattered radiation is decreasing function of the concentration and the peak of the maximum of scattering distribution depends on the concentration as well. Measurements of different samples in the very preliminary phase showed that simple biological material used in study showed slightly different scattering pattern, especially at higher angles (around 10degrees). Intensity of radiation scattered from same tissue type is very dependent on water content and several more parameters. Conclusion: This preliminary study using animal soft tissues on the angular distributions of scattered x-rays suggests that angular distributions of X-rays scattered off of soft tissues might be useful in distinguishing healthy tissue from malignant soft tissue.

  10. Optimal angular dose distribution to acquire 3D and extra 2D images for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Ye-Seul; Lee, Haeng-Hwa; Gang, Won-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung; Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, JaeGu

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the optimal non-uniform angular dose distribution to improve the quality of the 3D reconstructed images and to acquire extra 2D projection images. In this analysis, 7 acquisition sets were generated by using four different values for the number of projections (11, 15, 21, and 29) and total angular range (±14°, ±17.5°, ±21°, and ±24.5° ). For all acquisition sets, the zero-degree projection was used as the 2D image that was close to that of standard conventional mammography (CM). Exposures used were 50, 100, 150, and 200 mR for the zero-degree projection, and the remaining dose was distributed over the remaining projection angles. To quantitatively evaluate image quality, we computed the CNR (contrast-to-noise ratio) and the ASF (artifact spread function) for the same radiation dose. The results indicate that, for microcalcifications, acquisition sets with approximately 4 times higher exposure on the zero-degree projection than the average exposure for the remaining projection angles yielded higher CNR values and were 3% higher than the uniform distribution. However, very high dose concentrations toward the zero-degree projection may reduce the quality of the reconstructed images due to increasing noise in the peripheral views. The zero-degree projection of the non-uniform dose distribution offers a 2D image similar to that of standard CM, but with a significantly lower radiation dose. Therefore, we need to evaluate the diagnostic potential of extra 2D projection image when diagnose breast cancer by using 3D images with non-uniform angular dose distributions.

  11. Nonadiabatic tunnel ionization in strong circularly polarized laser fields: counterintuitive angular shifts in the photoelectron momentum distribution.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Lan, Pengfei; Xie, Hui; He, Mingrui; Zhu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Qingbin; Lu, Peixiang

    2015-11-01

    We perform time-dependent calculation of strong-field ionization of neon, initially prepared in 2p(-1) and 2p(+1) states, with intense near-circularly polarized laser pulses. By solving the three-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we find clear different offset angles of the maximum in the photoelectron momentum distribution in the polarization plane of the laser pulses for the two states. We provide clear interpretation that this different angular offset is linked to the sign of the magnetic quantum number, thus it can be used to map out the orbital angular momentum of the initial state. Our results provide a potential tool for studying orbital symmetry in atomic and molecular systems. PMID:26561149

  12. Angular distribution of polarized light and its effect on light extraction efficiency in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinjuan; Ji, Cheng; Xiang, Yong; Kang, Xiangning; Shen, Bo; Yu, Tongjun

    2016-05-16

    Angular distribution of polarized light and its effect on light extraction efficiency (LEE) in AlGaN deep-ultraviolet (DUV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are investigated in this paper. A united picture is presented to describe polarized light's emission and propagation processes. It is found that the electron-hole recombinations in AlGaN multiple quantum wells produce three kinds of angularly distributed polarized emissions and propagation process can change their intensity distributions. By investigation the change of angular distributions in 277nm and 215nm LEDs, this work reveals that LEE can be significantly enhanced by modulating the angular distributions of polarized light of DUV LEDs. PMID:27409966

  13. Investigation of Angular Distributions of Drell-Yan Dimuons in p+p and p+d Interactions with the E906/SeaQuest Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aidala, Christine; FNAL E906/SeaQuest Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    Striking cos 2 φ dependences in pion-induced Drell-Yan measurements were first observed in the 1980s, and proton- induced Drell-Yan measurements by the Fermilab E866 experiment on deuterium and hydrogen targets published in 2007 and 2009 reported smaller but non-zero azimuthal dependences of the Drell-Yan pairs. These azimuthal effects have been attributed to a correlation between the spin and transverse momentum of transversely polarized quarks within an unpolarized nucleon, parametrized by the Boer-Mulders transverse-momentum-dependent distribution function, with additional contributions from QCD effects. With data taking planned to start in the summer of 2011, the E906/SeaQuest experiment will use a 120 GeV/c proton beam extracted from the Fermilab Main Injector on liquid hydrogen and deuterium targets, extending the kinematic coverage of its predecessor experiment E866 to higher parton momentum fraction. Measurement of the dimuon angular distributions will also allow the Lam-Tung relation to be tested in an extended kinematic range compared to E866. The status of data taking and prospects for measurement of the angular distributions of Drell-Yan pairs will be presented.

  14. Simple approach to the angular momentum distribution in the ground states of many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.; Yoshinaga, N.

    2002-09-01

    We propose a simple approach to predict the angular momentum I ground state (I g.s.) probabilities of many-body systems that does not require the diagonalization of Hamiltonians with random interactions. This method is found to be applicable to all cases that have been discussed: even and odd fermion systems (both in single-j and many-j shells), and boson (both sd and sdg) systems. A simple relation for the highest angular momentum g.s. probability is found. Furthermore, it is suggested for the first time that the 0 g.s. dominance in boson systems and in even-fermion systems is given by two-body interactions with specific features.

  15. Effects of anisotropic electron-ion interactions in atomic photoelectron angular distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, D.; Starace, A. F.; Manson, S. T.

    1974-01-01

    The photoelectron asymmetry parameter beta in LS-coupling is obtained as an expansion into contributions from alternative angular momentum transfers j sub t. The physical significance of this expansion of beta is shown to be that: (1) the electric dipole interaction transfers to the atom a charcteristic single angular momentum j sub t = sub o, where sub o is the photoelectron's initial orbital momentum; and (2) angular momentum transfers indicate the presence of anisotropic interaction of the outgoing photoelectron with the residual ion. For open shell atoms the photoelectron-ion interaction is generally anisotropic; photoelectron phase shifts and electric dipole matrix elements depend on both the multiplet term of the residual ion and the total orbital momentum of the ion-photoelectron final state channel. Consequently beta depends on the term levels of the residual ion and contains contributions from all allowed values of j sub t. Numerical calculations of the asymmetry parameters and partial cross sections for photoionization of atomic sulfur are presented.

  16. Distribution of angular momentum transfers from (p , d) and (p , t) reactions in the high excitation energy continuum region of gadolinium nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarlow, Thomas; Beausang, Cornelius; Hughes, Richard; Ross, Timothy; Gell, Kristen; Vyas, Gargi

    2013-10-01

    The structure of even and odd Gd nuclei at low/moderate spins and up to high excitation energies in the vicinity of the N = 90 shape change region have been probed using the (p,t) and (p,d) reactions on even-even targets. The proton beam, at a beam energy of 25 MeV, was provided by the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Outgoing charged particles, between ~30 and 60 degrees, were detected by the STARS silicon telescope while coincident gamma-rays were detected with the clover Ge detectors of the Liberace Array. The measured angular distributions for outgoing deuterons and tritons are well reproduced by DWBA calculations for discrete low-lying states, whereas at higher excitations of (2 - 9) MeV the angular momentum distribution of the continuum region should be represented by a distribution of L-transfer values. The angular distribution of the continuum region has been investigated in the present work . Weighted linear combinations of calculated (DWBA) angular distributions for L-transfer values of ΔL = 0 to 6 ℏ are compared to the experimental angular distribution in a chi-square minimization technique to find the best fitting distribution of angular momentum transfers in gadolinium nuclei. Preliminary results will be presented.

  17. Mixed optical Cherenkov-Bremsstrahlung radiation in vicinity of the Cherenkov cone from relativistic heavy ions: Unusual dependence of the angular distribution width on the radiator thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkova, E. I.; Pivovarov, Yu. L.

    2016-07-01

    The Cherenkov radiation (ChR) angular distribution is usually described by the Tamm-Frank (TF) theory, which assumes that relativistic charged particle moves uniformly and rectilinearly in the optically transparent radiator. According to the TF theory, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the ChR angular distribution inversely depends on the radiator thickness. In the case of relativistic heavy ions (RHI) a slowing-down in the radiator may sufficiently change the angular distribution of optical radiation in vicinity of the Cherenkov cone, since there appears a mixed ChR-Bremsstrahlung radiation. As a result, there occurs a drastic transformation of the FWHM of optical radiation angular distribution in dependence on the radiator thickness: from inversely proportional (TF theory) to the linearly proportional one. In our paper we present the first analysis of this transformation taking account of the gradual velocity decrease of RHI penetrating through a radiator.

  18. Magnetization curves and probability angular distribution of the magnetization vector in Er2Fe14Si3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobh, Hala A.; Aly, Samy H.; Shabara, Reham M.; Yehia, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    Specific magnetic and magneto-thermal properties of Er2Fe14Si3, in the temperature range of 80-300 K, have been investigated using basic laws of classical statistical mechanics in a simple model. In this model, the constructed partition function was used to derive, and therefore calculate the temperature and/or field dependence of a host of physical properties. Examples of these properties are: the magnetization, magnetic heat capacity, magnetic susceptibility, probability angular distribution of the magnetization vector, and the associated angular dependence of energy. We highlight a correlation between the energy of the system, its magnetization behavior and the angular location of the magnetization vector. Our results show that Er2Fe14Si3 is an easy-axis system in the temperature range 80-114 K, but switches to an easy-plane system at T≥114 K. This transition is also supported by both of the temperature dependence of the magnetic heat capacity, which develops a peak at a temperature ~114 K, and the probability landscape which shows, in zero magnetic field, a prominent peak in the basal plane at T=113.5 K.

  19. Electrolyte distribution around two like-charged rods: Their effective attractive interaction and angular dependent charge reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Ángeles, Felipe; Odriozola, Gerardo; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2006-04-01

    A simple model for two like-charged parallel rods immersed in an electrolyte solution is considered. We derived the three point extension (TPE) of the hypernetted chain/mean spherical approximation (TPE-HNC/MSA) and Poisson-Boltzmann (TPE-PB) integral equations. We numerically solve these equations and compare them to our results of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The effective interaction force, FT, the charge distribution profiles, ρel(x,y), and the angular dependent integrated charge function, P(θ ), are calculated for this system. The analysis of FT is carried out in terms of the electrostatic and entropic (depletion) contributions, FE and FC. We studied several cases of monovalent and divalent electrolytes, for which the ionic size and concentration are varied. We find good qualitative agreement between TPE-HNC/MSA and MC in all the cases studied. The rod-rod force is found to be attractive when immersed in large size, monovalent or divalent electrolytes. In general, the TPE-PB has poor agreement with the MC. For large monovalent and divalent electrolytes, we find angular dependent charge reversal charge inversion and polarizability. We discuss the intimate relationship between this angular dependent charge reversal and rod-rod attraction.

  20. Complete angular distribution measurements of two-body deuteron photodisintegration between 0.5 and 3 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    M. Mirazita; F. Ronchetti; P. Rossi; E. De Sanctis; CLAS Collaboration

    2004-07-12

    Nearly complete angular distributions of the two-body deuteron photodisintegration differential cross section have been measured using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer detector and the tagged photon beam at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The data cover photon energies between 0.5 and 3.0 GeV and center-of-mass proton scattering angles 10{sup o}-160{sup o}. The data show a persistent forward-backward angle asymmetry over the explored energy range, and are well described by the nonperturbative quark gluon string model.

  1. A Markov Chain-based quantitative study of angular distribution of photons through turbid slabs via isotropic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuesong; Northrop, William F.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a quantitative approach to approximate multiple scattering through an isotropic turbid slab based on Markov Chain theorem. There is an increasing need to utilize multiple scattering for optical diagnostic purposes; however, existing methods are either inaccurate or computationally expensive. Here, we develop a novel Markov Chain approximation approach to solve multiple scattering angular distribution (AD) that can accurately calculate AD while significantly reducing computational cost compared to Monte Carlo simulation. We expect this work to stimulate ongoing multiple scattering research and deterministic reconstruction algorithm development with AD measurements.

  2. A measurement of the angular distribution of the diffuse optical transmittance of etched nuclear tracks in CR-39

    SciTech Connect

    Vázquez-López, C.; Zendejas-Leal, B. E.; Bogard, James S; Golzarri, J. I.; Espinosa Garcia, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a device to measure the angular distribution of the diffuse optical transmittance produced by etched nuclear tracks in polyallyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) detector. The device makes use of a stepper motor to move an array of four photodetectors around the sample in 1.8-degree steps. The integrated transmitted light was observed to increase monotonically with the etched track density in a range from zero to 2.8 x 10^5 per cm^2, using a neutron Am Be source.

  3. Dynamical Relativistic Effects in Photoionization: Spin-Orbit-Resolved Angular Distributions of Xenon 4d Photoelectrons near the Cooper Minimum

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Snell, G.; Hemmers, O.; Sant'Anna, M. M.; Sellin, I.; Berrah, N.; Lindle, D. W.; Deshmukh, P. C.; Haque, N.; Manson, S. T.

    2001-09-17

    Two decades ago, it was predicted [Y.S.Kim et al., Phys.Rev.Lett.46, 1326 (1981)] that relativistic effects should alter the dynamics of the photoionization process in the vicinity of Cooper minima. The present experimental and theoretical study of the angular distributions of Xe 4d{sub 3/2} and 4d{sub 5/2} photoelectrons demonstrates this effect for the first time. The results clearly imply that relativistic effects are likely to be important for intermediate-Z atoms at most energies.

  4. Partial cross sections and angular distributions of resonant and nonresonant valence photoemission of C{sub 60}

    SciTech Connect

    Korica, Sanja; Rolles, Daniel; Reinkoester, Axel; Viefhaus, Jens; Cvejanovic, Slobodan; Becker, Uwe; Langer, Burkhard

    2005-01-01

    We have performed high-resolution measurements of photoelectrons emitted from the valence shell of C{sub 60}, for both gas phase and solid state, in order to obtain branching ratios, partial cross sections, and the angular distribution anisotropy parameters of the two highest occupied molecular orbitals. The analysis is based on the Fourier transform of the cross-section oscillations and the results are corroborated by different theoretical models. In contrast to this good overall agreement between theory and experiment there is a striking disagreement with respect to predicted discrete resonance structures in the partial cross sections. Possible reasons for this behavior are discussed.

  5. Diagnosis of bubble evolution in laser-wakefield acceleration via angular distributions of betatron x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y.; Chen, L. M. Huang, K.; Yan, W. C.; Hafz, N. A. M.; Zhang, J.; Li, D. Z.; Dunn, J.; Sheng, Z. M.

    2014-10-20

    We present an indirect method to diagnose the electron beam behaviors and bubble dynamic evolution in a laser-wakefield accelerator. Four kinds of typical bubble dynamic evolution and, hence, electron beam behaviors observed in Particle-In-Cell simulations are identified correspondingly by simultaneous measurement of distinct angular distributions of the betatron radiation and electron beam energy spectra in experiment. The reconstruction of the bubble evolution may shed light on finding an effective way to better generate high-quality electron beams and enhanced betatron X-rays.

  6. Angular distribution of Xe 5s. -->. epsilonp photoelectrons: Disagreement between experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Fahlman, A.; Carlson, T.A.; Krause, M.O.

    1983-04-11

    The angular asymmetry parameter ..beta.. for the Xe 5s..-->..epsilonp photoelectrons has been studied with use of synchrotron radiation (h..nu.. = 28--65 eV). The present results show that the relativistic random-phase approximation theory does not satisfactorily describe the Xe 5s photoionization process close to the Cooper minimum and thus require a renewed theoretical approach. The 5s partial photoionization cross section was obtained over the same photon region and the results agree with experimental values found in the literature.

  7. Correlation of angular and lateral distributions of electrons in extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giller, Maria; Śmiałkowski, Andrzej; Legumina, Remigiusz

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to explain the weak correlation of the angular and lateral deflections of electrons in extensive air showers in the primary energy range 1016-1019 eV, when compared with that in some models of electron propagation. We derive analytical formulae for the correlation coefficient in the multiple scattering model with energy losses and show a strong role of the ionisation in diminishing the correlation. By considering a Heitler-like model of an electromagnetic cascade we show also that the presence of photons, parent to electrons, causes a decrease of the correlation, roughly explaining quantitatively the small correlation in air showers.

  8. Resonance and non-resonance effect of continuum states of 6Li on elastic scattering angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Camacho, A.

    2016-07-01

    CDCC calculations of elastic scattering angular distributions for reactions of the weakly bound projectile 6Li with targets 28Si and 58Ni at energies around the Coulomb barrier are presented. Special emphasis is given to account for the effect of couplings from 6Li resonance states l = 2, J π = 3+, 2+, 1+. Similarly, the effect produced by non-resonant state couplings is studied. The convergent calculations are carried out with global α-target and d-target interactions. The calculated elastic scattering angular distributions are in general in good agreement with the measurements for the systems considered in this work. It is found that the calculations with only resonance states are very similar to that with all couplings (resonance+non-resonance). So, the absence of these states have a strong effect on elastic scattering (non-resonance states calculation). It is shown that the effects increase as the collision energy increases. An interpretation of the strength of the different effects is given in terms of the polarization potentials that emerge from the different couplings.

  9. Pion production via proton synchrotron radiation in strong magnetic fields in relativistic field theory: Scaling relations and angular distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2016-03-26

    We study pion production by proton synchrotron radiation in the presence of a strong magnetic field when the Landau numbers of the initial and final protons are n(i, f) similar to 10(4)-10(5). We find in our relativistic field theory calculations that the pion decay width depends only on the field strength parameter which previously was only conjectured based upon semi-classical arguments. Moreover, we also find new results that the decay width satisfies a robust scaling relation, and that the polar angular distribution of emitted pion momenta is very narrow and can be easily obtained. This scaling implies that one canmore » infer the decay width in more realistic magnetic fields of 10(15) G, where n(i, f) similar to 10(12)-10(13), from the results for n(i, f) similar to 10(4)-10(5). The resultant pion intensity and angular distributions for realistic magnetic field strengths are presented and their physical implications discussed. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/). Funded by SCOAP(3).« less

  10. Charge state, angular distribution, and kinetic energy of ions from multicomponent-cathodes in vacuum arc devices

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, A. G. Savkin, K. P.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Frolova, V. P.; Barengolts, S. A.

    2014-12-07

    We present research results on vacuum arc plasma produced with multicomponent cathode made of several different elements. The ion mass-to-charge-state spectra of the plasmas were studied by time-of-flight spectrometry. The angular distributions of different ion species were measured, and the kinetic energy of their directed (streaming) motion was determined. It is shown that the fractional composition of ions of different cathode components in the plasma flow from the cathode spot closely matches the fractional content of these components in the composite cathode. The charge states of ions of the various cathode components are determined by the average electron temperature in the cathode spot plasma. The angular distribution of lower mass ions in the plasma from a multicomponent cathode is less isotropic and broader than for the plasma from a single-component cathode of the same light element. The directed kinetic energies of the ions of the different components for plasma from a multicomponent cathode are lower for lighter elements and greater for heavier elements compared to the ion directed energy for plasmas from single-component cathodes made of the same materials. The physical processes responsible for these changes in the ion charge states in multicomponent-cathode vacuum arc plasma are discussed.

  11. Photoelectron angular distributions for states of any mixed character: an experiment-friendly model for atomic, molecular, and cluster anions.

    PubMed

    Khuseynov, Dmitry; Blackstone, Christopher C; Culberson, Lori M; Sanov, Andrei

    2014-09-28

    We present a model for laboratory-frame photoelectron angular distributions in direct photodetachment from (in principle) any molecular orbital using linearly polarized light. A transparent mathematical approach is used to generalize the Cooper-Zare central-potential model to anionic states of any mixed character. In the limit of atomic-anion photodetachment, the model reproduces the Cooper-Zare formula. In the case of an initial orbital described as a superposition of s and p-type functions, the model yields the previously obtained s-p mixing formula. The formalism is further advanced using the Hanstorp approximation, whereas the relative scaling of the partial-wave cross-sections is assumed to follow the Wigner threshold law. The resulting model describes the energy dependence of photoelectron anisotropy for any atomic, molecular, or cluster anions, usually without requiring a direct calculation of the transition dipole matrix elements. As a benchmark case, we apply the p-d variant of the model to the experimental results for NO(-) photodetachment and show that the observed anisotropy trend is described well using physically meaningful values of the model parameters. Overall, the presented formalism delivers insight into the photodetachment process and affords a new quantitative strategy for analyzing the photoelectron angular distributions and characterizing mixed-character molecular orbitals using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of negative ions.

  12. Calculations of the anisotropy of the fission fragment angular distribution and neutron emission multiplicities prescission from Langevin dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jia Ying; Bao Jingdong

    2007-03-15

    The anisotropy of the fission fragment angular distribution defined at the saddle point and the neutron multiplicities emitted prior to scission for fissioning nuclei {sup 224}Th, {sup 229}Np, {sup 248}Cf, and {sup 254}Fm are calculated simultaneously by using a set of realistic coupled two-dimensional Langevin equations, where the (c,h,{alpha}=0) nuclear parametrization is employed. In comparison with the one-dimensional stochastic model without neck variation, our two-dimensional model produces results that are in better agreement with the experimental data, and the one-dimensional model is available only for low excitation energies. Indeed, to determine the temperature of the nucleus at the saddle point, we investigate the neutron emission during nucleus oscillation around the saddle point for different friction mechanisms. It is shown that the neutrons emitted during the saddle oscillation cause the temperature of a fissioning nuclear system at the saddle point to decrease and influence the fission fragment angular distribution.

  13. Photoelectron angular distributions for states of any mixed character: An experiment-friendly model for atomic, molecular, and cluster anions

    SciTech Connect

    Khuseynov, Dmitry; Blackstone, Christopher C.; Culberson, Lori M.; Sanov, Andrei

    2014-09-28

    We present a model for laboratory-frame photoelectron angular distributions in direct photodetachment from (in principle) any molecular orbital using linearly polarized light. A transparent mathematical approach is used to generalize the Cooper-Zare central-potential model to anionic states of any mixed character. In the limit of atomic-anion photodetachment, the model reproduces the Cooper-Zare formula. In the case of an initial orbital described as a superposition of s and p-type functions, the model yields the previously obtained s-p mixing formula. The formalism is further advanced using the Hanstorp approximation, whereas the relative scaling of the partial-wave cross-sections is assumed to follow the Wigner threshold law. The resulting model describes the energy dependence of photoelectron anisotropy for any atomic, molecular, or cluster anions, usually without requiring a direct calculation of the transition dipole matrix elements. As a benchmark case, we apply the p-d variant of the model to the experimental results for NO{sup −} photodetachment and show that the observed anisotropy trend is described well using physically meaningful values of the model parameters. Overall, the presented formalism delivers insight into the photodetachment process and affords a new quantitative strategy for analyzing the photoelectron angular distributions and characterizing mixed-character molecular orbitals using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of negative ions.

  14. Effect of the third π ∗ resonance on the angular distributions for electron-pyrimidine scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mašín, Zdeněk; Gorfinkiel, Jimena D.

    2016-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the effect of the well known third π∗ resonance on the angular behaviour of the elastic cross section in electron scattering from pyrimidine. This resonance, occurring approximately at 4.7 eV, is of mixed shape and core-excited character. Experimental and theoretical results show the presence of a peak/dip behaviour in this energy range, that is absent for other resonances. Our investigations show that the cause of the peak/dip is an interference of background p-wave to p-wave scattering amplitudes with the amplitudes for resonant scattering. The equivalent resonance in pyrazine shows the same behaviour and the effect is therefore likely to appear in other benzene-like molecules. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  15. ANALYSIS OF DISTRIBUTION FEEDER LOSSES DUE TO ADDITION OF DISTRIBUTED PHOTOVOLTAIC GENERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Singh, Ruchi

    2011-08-09

    Distributed generators (DG) are small scale power supplying sources owned by customers or utilities and scattered throughout the power system distribution network. Distributed generation can be both renewable and non-renewable. Addition of distributed generation is primarily to increase feeder capacity and to provide peak load reduction. However, this addition comes with several impacts on the distribution feeder. Several studies have shown that addition of DG leads to reduction of feeder loss. However, most of these studies have considered lumped load and distributed load models to analyze the effects on system losses, where the dynamic variation of load due to seasonal changes is ignored. It is very important for utilities to minimize the losses under all scenarios to decrease revenue losses, promote efficient asset utilization, and therefore, increase feeder capacity. This paper will investigate an IEEE 13-node feeder populated with photovoltaic generators on detailed residential houses with water heater, Heating Ventilation and Air conditioning (HVAC) units, lights, and other plug and convenience loads. An analysis of losses for different power system components, such as transformers, underground and overhead lines, and triplex lines, will be performed. The analysis will utilize different seasons and different solar penetration levels (15%, 30%).

  16. Free-space measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution protocol using decoy states with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Le; Zhao, Sheng-Mei; Gong, Long-Yan; Cheng, Wei-Wen

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol using orbital angular momentum (OAM) in free space links, named the OAM-MDI-QKD protocol. In the proposed protocol, the OAM states of photons, instead of polarization states, are used as the information carriers to avoid the reference frame alignment, the decoy-state is adopted to overcome the security loophole caused by the weak coherent pulse source, and the high efficient OAM-sorter is adopted as the measurement tool for Charlie to obtain the output OAM state. Here, Charlie may be an untrusted third party. The results show that the authorized users, Alice and Bob, could distill a secret key with Charlie’s successful measurements, and the key generation performance is slightly better than that of the polarization-based MDI-QKD protocol in the two-dimensional OAM cases. Simultaneously, Alice and Bob can reduce the number of flipping the bits in the secure key distillation. It is indicated that a higher key generation rate performance could be obtained by a high dimensional OAM-MDI-QKD protocol because of the unlimited degree of freedom on OAM states. Moreover, the results show that the key generation rate and the transmission distance will decrease as the growth of the strength of atmospheric turbulence (AT) and the link attenuation. In addition, the decoy states used in the proposed protocol can get a considerable good performance without the need for an ideal source. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61271238 and 61475075), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20123223110003), the Natural Science Research Foundation for Universities of Jiangsu Province of China (Grant No. 11KJA510002), the Open Research Fund of Key Laboratory of Broadband Wireless Communication and Sensor Network Technology, Ministry of Education, China (Grant No. NYKL2015011), and the

  17. Differences in forward angular light scattering distributions between M1 and M2 macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halaney, David L.; Zahedivash, Aydin; Phipps, Jennifer E.; Wang, Tianyi; Dwelle, Jordan; Saux, Claude Jourdan Le; Asmis, Reto; Milner, Thomas E.; Feldman, Marc D.

    2015-11-01

    The ability to distinguish macrophage subtypes noninvasively could have diagnostic potential in cancer, atherosclerosis, and diabetes, where polarized M1 and M2 macrophages play critical and often opposing roles. Current methods to distinguish macrophage subtypes rely on tissue biopsy. Optical imaging techniques based on light scattering are of interest as they can be translated into biopsy-free strategies. Because mitochondria are relatively strong subcellular light scattering centers, and M2 macrophages are known to have enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis compared to M1, we hypothesized that M1 and M2 macrophages may have different angular light scattering profiles. To test this, we developed an in vitro angle-resolved forward light scattering measurement system. We found that M1 and M2 macrophage monolayers scatter relatively unequal amounts of light in the forward direction between 1.6 deg and 3.2 deg with M2 forward scattering significantly more light than M1 at increasing angles. The ratio of forward scattering can be used to identify the polarization state of macrophage populations in culture.

  18. Differences in forward angular light scattering distributions between M1 and M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Halaney, David L; Zahedivash, Aydin; Phipps, Jennifer E; Wang, Tianyi; Dwelle, Jordan; Saux, Claude Jourdan Le; Asmis, Reto; Milner, Thomas E; Feldman, Marc D

    2015-11-01

    The ability to distinguish macrophage subtypes noninvasively could have diagnostic potential in cancer, atherosclerosis, and diabetes, where polarized M1 and M2 macrophages play critical and often opposing roles. Current methods to distinguish macrophage subtypes rely on tissue biopsy. Optical imaging techniques based on light scattering are of interest as they can be translated into biopsy-free strategies. Because mitochondria are relatively strong subcellular light scattering centers, and M2 macrophages are known to have enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis compared to M1, we hypothesized that M1 and M2 macrophages may have different angular light scattering profiles. To test this, we developed an in vitro angle-resolved forward light scattering measurement system. We found that M1 and M2 macrophage monolayers scatter relatively unequal amounts of light in the forward direction between 1.6 deg and 3.2 deg with M2 forward scattering significantly more light than M1 at increasing angles. The ratio of forward scattering can be used to identify the polarization state of macrophage populations in culture. PMID:26538329

  19. Angular distributions of electrons of energy E sub e greater than 0.06 MeV in the Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sentman, D. D.; Vanallen, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an angular distribution analysis of the electron intensity data recorded near Jupiter for the period from 26 November to 14 December 1973 are presented. The data were from three directional particle detectors with effective integral electron energy thresholds of 0.06, 0.55, and 5.0 Mev, respectively. It was found that the central core of the magnetosphere, within 12 Jupiter radii, is dominated by pitch angle distributions strongly peaked at alpha = 90 deg, while the region from 12 to 25 Jupiter radii shows bidirectional and approximately equal maxima at alpha = 0 and 180 deg. Bidirectional angular distributions in the magnetodisc out to the radius of the magnetopause strongly suggest quasi-trapping on closed field lines as the predominant situation. Substantial field aligned, unidirectional streaming was detected on only two occasions. No distinctive effects on angular distributions were discerned near the L-shells of satellites.

  20. Measurements of Branching Fractions and CP Asymmetries and Studies of Angular Distributions for B to phi phi K Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-15

    We present branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements as well as angular studies of B {yields} {phi}{phi}K decays using 464 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events collected by the BABAR experiment. The branching fractions are measured in the {phi}{phi} invariant mass range below the {eta}{sub c} resonance (m{sub {phi}{phi}} < 2.85 GeV). We find {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {phi}{phi}K{sup +}) = (5.6 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi}K{sup 0}) = (4.5 {+-} 0.8 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6}, where the first uncertaintiy is statistical and the second systematic. The measured direct CP asymmetries for the B{sup {+-}} decays are A{sub CP} = -0.10 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.02 below the {eta}{sub c} threshold (m{sub {phi}{phi}} < 2.85 GeV) and A{sub CP} = 0.09 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.02 in the {eta}{sub c} resonance region (m{sub {phi}{phi}} in [2.94,3.02] GeV). Angular distributions are consistent with J{sub P} = 0{sup -} in the {eta}{sub c} resonance region and favor J{sup P} = 0{sup +} below the {eta}{sub c} resonance.

  1. Angular distributions of 5eV atomic oxygen scattered from solid surfaces on the LDEF satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Peters, Palmer N.

    1992-01-01

    The angular distribution of 5eV atomic oxygen scattered off several smooth solid surfaces was measured by experiment A0114 which flew on board the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Target surfaces were silver, vitreous carbon, and lithium fluoride crystal. The apparatus was entirely passive. It used the property of silver surfaces to absorb oxygen atoms with high efficiency; the silver is converted to optically transmissive silver oxide. A collimated beam of oxygen atoms is allowed to fall on the target surface at some pre-set angle. Reflected atoms are then intercepted by a silver film placed so that it subtends a considerable solid angle from the primary beam impact on the target surface. The silver films are evaporated onto flexible optically-clear polycarbonate sheets which are scanned later to determine oxygen uptake. While the silver detector cannot measure atom velocity or energy, its physical configuration allows easy coverage of large angular space both in the beam-plane (that which includes the incident beam and the surface normal), and in the azimuthal plane of the target surface.

  2. On The Distribution Of Angular Orbital Elements Of Near-earth Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JeongAhn, Youngmin; Malhotra, R.

    2012-05-01

    The longitude of ascending node Ω and the argument of periapsis ω are expected to be randomly distributed for near-Earth objects (NEOs). However, the distribution of these angles for the Apollo, Amor and Aten subclasses, considered separately, shows some striking non-random features. We explain how these features arise due to observational biases. The distribution of Ω has maxima near 0 and 180° and is affected by observational difficulty due to the galactic plane at the opposition and other seasonal effects. The ω distributions of Aten and Amor subclasses have minima at 90° and 270° while Apollos have minima at 0 and 180°. This is explained by the greater detectability of NEOs at close approach to Earth. The longitude of perihelion Ω+ω also has a strongly non-random distribution that may be owed to actual dynamical effects. Understanding the distribution of unobserved NEOs will help to improve planning for the next generation of NEO surveys. A better understanding of the intrinsic distribution of NEOs is important for estimating the impact hazard at Earth; it is also important for understanding the impact history of the Moon and the terrestrial planets.

  3. The Angular Momentum Distribution and Baryon Content of Star-forming Galaxies at z ˜ 1-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Lang, P.; Tacconi, L. J.; Wisnioski, E.; Wuyts, S.; Bandara, K.; Beifiori, A.; Bender, R.; Brammer, G.; Chan, J.; Davies, R.; Dekel, A.; Fabricius, M.; Fossati, M.; Kulkarni, S.; Lutz, D.; Mendel, J. T.; Momcheva, I.; Nelson, E. J.; Naab, T.; Renzini, A.; Saglia, R.; Sharples, R. M.; Sternberg, A.; Wilman, D.; Wuyts, E.

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the angular momenta of massive star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at the peak of the cosmic star formation epoch (z ˜ 0.8-2.6). Our sample of ˜360 log(M */M ⊙) ˜ 9.3-11.8 SFGs is mainly based on the KMOS3D and SINS/zC-SINF surveys of Hα kinematics, and collectively provides a representative subset of the massive star-forming population. The inferred halo scale angular momentum distribution is broadly consistent with that theoretically predicted for their dark matter halos, in terms of mean spin parameter < λ > ˜ 0.037 and its dispersion (σ logλ ˜ 0.2). Spin parameters correlate with the disk radial scale and with their stellar surface density, but do not depend significantly on halo mass, stellar mass, or redshift. Our data thus support the long-standing assumption that on average, even at high redshifts, the specific angular momentum of disk galaxies reflects that of their dark matter halos (j d = j DM). The lack of correlation between λ × (j d /j DM) and the nuclear stellar density Σ*(1 kpc) favors a scenario where disk-internal angular momentum redistribution leads to “compaction” inside massive high-redshift disks. For our sample, the inferred average stellar to dark matter mass ratio is ˜2%, consistent with abundance matching results. Including the molecular gas, the total baryonic disk to dark matter mass ratio is ˜5% for halos near 1012 M ⊙, which corresponds to 31% of the cosmologically available baryons, implying that high-redshift disks are strongly baryon dominated. Based on observations obtained at the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO Programme IDs 075.A-0466, 076.A-0527, 079.A-0341, 080.A-0330, 080.A-0339, 080.A-0635, 081.B-0568, 081.A-0672, 082.A-0396, 183.A-0781, 087.A-0081, 088.A-0202, 088.A-0209, 091.A-0126, 092.A-0091, 093.A-0079, 094.A-0217, 095.A-0047, 096.A-0025).

  4. Above-threshold multiphoton detachment of H- by two-color laser fields: Angular distributions and partial rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, Dmitry A.; Wang, Jingyan; Chu, Shih-I.

    1995-06-01

    We present a general nonperturbative formalism and an efficient and accurate numerical technique for the study of the angular distributions and partial widths for multiphoton above-threshold detachment in two-color fields. The procedure is based on an extension of our recent paper [D. A. Telnov and S.-I Chu, Phys. Rev. A 50, 4099 (1994)] for one-color detachment, and the many-mode Floquet theory [T. S. Ho, S.-I Chu, and J. V. Tietz, Chem. Phys. Lett. 96, 464 (1983)]. The generalization of this procedure is performed for both cases of commensurable and incommensurable frequencies of the two-color fields. The procedure consists of the following elements: (i) Determination of the resonance wave function and complex quasienergy by means of the non-Hermitian Floquet Hamiltonian formalism. The Floquet Hamiltonian is discretized by the complex-scaling generalized pseudospectral technique recently developed [J. Wang, S.-I Chu, and C. Laughlin, Phys. Rev. A 50, 3208 (1994)]. (ii) Calculation of the angular distribution and partial widths based on an exact differential formula and a procedure for the rotation of the resonance wave function back to the real axis. The method is applied to a nonperturbative study of multiphoton above-threshold detachment of H- by 10.6-μm radiation and its third harmonic (the commensurable case). The results show strong dependence on the relative phase δ between the fundamental frequency field and its harmonic. For the intensities used in calculations (1010 W/cm2 for the fundamental frequency, 108 and 109 W/cm2 for the harmonic), the total rate has its maximum at δ=0 and minimum at δ=π. However, this tendency, though valid for the first several above-threshold peaks in the energy spectrum, is reversed for the higher-energy peaks. The energy spectrum for δ=π is broader, and the peak heights decrease more slowly compared to the case of δ=0. The strong phase dependence is also manifested in the angular distributions of the ejected electrons.

  5. Angular distribution of [ital K] Auger electrons ejected by highly charged ions interacting with an Al(111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Koehrbrueck, R.; Grether, M.; Spieler, A.; Stolterfoht, N. ); Page, R.; Saal, A.; Bleck-Neuhaus, J. )

    1994-08-01

    Secondary electron spectra of the H-like Ne[sup 9+] ion incident with impact energies of 135 eV up to 90 keV on a solid Al(111) surface were measured. The dependence of the [ital K] Auger electron yield on the angle of observation is studied in detail. It is found to be cosine like in case of the 90-keV Ne[sup 9+] ions and to be more and more isotropic at lower ion energies although a clear anisotropy remains. Information about the rates of the filling of the [ital L] and [ital K] shells inside the solid is obtained from a comparison of the measured angular distributions with the calculation of a two-step model for the successive filling of the [ital L] and [ital K] shells. The data show clear evidence for Auger electron emission from below the surface for ion energies as low as 135 eV.

  6. Ion energy and angular distributions onto polymer surfaces delivered by dielectric barrier discharge filaments in air: II. Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Kushner, Mark J.

    2011-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure streamers intersecting particles are of interest in the context of plasma aided combustion, where the particle may be a fuel aerosol droplet, or in sterilization of air, where the particle may be a bacterium. The ion energy and angular distributions (IEADs) incident on the particles, small curved dielectric surfaces, then in part determine the propensity for activating chemical reactions or, in the case of bacteria, the plasma's sterilization capability. In this paper, we discuss results from a computational investigation of IEADs on small particles (45 µm radius) produced by atmospheric pressure discharge. Streamers intersecting a particle momentarily generate a large sheath potential as the streamer passes by as the particle charges towards the plasma floating potential. During that time, ions of energies up to 3-10 eV can strike the particle. The permittivity of the particle and the streamer polarity in part determine the character of the IEAD.

  7. Ultra-low kinetic energy photoelectron angular distribution measurements in He and Ne using a Velocity Map Imaging spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, A. M.; Redt, E.; Hoenert, M.; Hoyos-Campo, L. M.; Rolles, D.; Berrah, N.; Aguilar, A.

    2009-11-01

    We present photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) in Helium and Neon for electrons with excess energies between 5 and 100 meV. These ultra-low kinetic energy PAD measurements were obtained with a modified Velocity Map Imaging spectrometer (VMI) and VUV light from the Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron radiation source. The efficiency and reliability of the spectrometer at this ultra-low kinetic energy range has been tested by determining the variation with energy of the asymmetry, β, parameter of photoelectrons from the s-shell direct ionization in Helium. For Neon, we determined the energy dependent asymmetry parameters across the "s" and "d" autoionizing resonances between the P3/2 and P1/2 ionic states. Furthermore, we measured the asymmetry parameter for photoelectrons produced from the n = 2 to n = 6 satellite states of He. These measurements were performed at values of excess kinetic energy previously unexplored.

  8. Sideband and Angular Distribution Oscillation of Photoelectrons Observed with XUV/IR 3D Momentum Imaging Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperl, A.; Rietz, H.; Schoenwald, M.; Fischer, A.; Simeonidis, K.; Ullrich, J.

    Noble gas atoms can be ionized by irradiation with an extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse train emitting electron wave packets. The attosecond pulse trains can be characterized by superimposing the XUV and its generating, fundamental IR field and considering the energy transfer to the electron wave packets as a function of time delay between both fields, resulting in oscillating energy-sidebands. The three-dimensional dynamics of the photoelectrons however can now be studied in more detail by combining the XUV light source with a Reaction Microscope. In this context we changed the polarisation of the XUV and the IR fields with respect to each other by 90{}^{circ }, detecting a remarkable change of the angular distribution of the sideband-photoelectrons.

  9. Gamma Ray Emission Tomography and Angular Correlation Measurements to Study the Distribution and Binding Site of Selenium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahni, Anwar

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The distribution of ^ {75}Se in tissue equivalent materials was investigated employing Gamma ray Emission Topography with a rectilinear scanner utilizing NaI(Tl) and BGO detectors. The reconstructed images, using Filtered Back Projection and Iterative techniques were presented in 2D colour and 3D representations. Using a lead collimator of aperture 1.5 x 20 mm and 70 length, the distribution of selenium with variation of volume and concentration was examined and clearly seen. Several corrections such as background, scattering, attenuation compensation and X-ray characteristic suppression, were performed to improve the quality of the images which was evaluated in terms of the fidelity factor. The possibility of quantifying an image was considered with regard to spatial resolution and least detectable concentration. The spatial resolution was measured using two small vials containing the same concentration of selenium, the value obtained was the same as the width of the collimator aperture. The value of the least detectable concentration of selenium however, was difficult to find, due to the many ambiguous factors involved. The binding site of selenium which is based on quadrupole interaction with the surrounding electric field, was investigated employing Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) experiments using NaI(Tl) and BaF_2 detectors. Using NaI(Tl) detectors, it was difficult to observe the perturbation, due to the poor time resolution. The BaF_2 detector according to the literature has a shorter light emission decay time constant (0.6 ns), suggested that a better time resolution than that found with the NaI(Tl) detectors could be obtained. A Perturbed Angular Correlation experiment employing BaF _2 detectors and a fast-slow coincidence system was set up. The time differential PAC of selenium in solution showed an unperturbed angular correlation pattern. The main problem is the very short half life of the

  10. Angular distribution of the bremsstrahlung emission during lower-hybrid current drive on PLT

    SciTech Connect

    von Goeler, S.; Stevens, J.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Chu, T.K.; Efthimion, P.; Fisch, N.; Hooke, W.; Hill, K.; Hosea, J.

    1985-06-01

    The bremsstrahlung emission from the PLT tokamak during lower-hybrid current drive has been measured as a function of angle between the magnetic field and the emission direction. The emission is peaked strongly in the forward direction, indicating a strong anisotropy of the electron-velocity distribution. The data demonstrate the existence of a nearly flat tail of the velocity distribution, which extends out to approximately 500 keV and which is interpreted as the plateau created by Landau damping of the lower-hybrid waves.

  11. Angular distribution of atoms emitted from a SrZrO{sub 3} target by laser ablation under different laser fluences and oxygen pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Konomi, I.; Motohiro, T.; Azuma, H.; Asaoka, T.; Nakazato, T.; Sato, E.; Shimizu, T.; Fujioka, S.; Sarukura, N.; Nishimura, H.

    2010-05-15

    Angular distributions of atoms emitted by laser ablation of perovskite-type oxide SrZrO{sub 3} have been investigated using electron probe microanalysis with wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy and charge-coupled device photography with an interference filter. Each constituent element has been analyzed as a two-modal distribution composed of a broad cos{sup m} {theta} distribution and a narrow cos{sup n} {theta} distribution. The exponent n characterizes the component of laser ablation while the exponent m characterizes that of thermal evaporation, where a larger n or m means a narrower angular distribution. In vacuum, O (n=6) showed a broader distribution than those of Sr (n=16) and Zr (n=17), and Sr{sup +} exhibited a spatial distribution similar to that of Sr. As the laser fluence was increased from 1.1 to 4.4 J/cm{sup 2}, the angular distribution of Sr became narrower. In the laser fluence range of 1.1-4.4 J/cm{sup 2}, broadening of the angular distribution of Sr was observed only at the fluence of 1.1 J/cm{sup 2} under the oxygen pressure of 10 Pa. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to estimate approximately the energy of emitted atoms, focusing on the broadening of the angular distribution under the oxygen pressure of 10 Pa. The energies of emitted atoms were estimated to be 1-20 eV for the laser fluence of 1.1 J/cm{sup 2}, and more than 100 eV for 2.2 and 4.4 J/cm{sup 2}.

  12. Measurements of the Angular Distributions of Muons from Υ Decays in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2012-04-11

    The angular distributions of muons from Υ(1S,2S,3S)→μ⁺μ⁻ decays are measured using data from pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb⁻¹ and collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. This analysis is the first to report the full angular distributions as functions of transverse momentum pT for Υ mesons in both the Collins-Soper and s-channel helicity frames. This is also the first measurement of the spin alignment of Υ(3S) mesons. Within the kinematic range of Υ rapidity |y|<0.6 and pT up to 40 GeV/c, the angular distributions are found to be nearlymore » isotropic.« less

  13. Measurements of the Angular Distributions of Muons from Υ Decays in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2012-04-11

    The angular distributions of muons from Υ(1S,2S,3S)→μ⁺μ⁻ decays are measured using data from pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.7 fb⁻¹ and collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. This analysis is the first to report the full angular distributions as functions of transverse momentum pT for Υ mesons in both the Collins-Soper and s-channel helicity frames. This is also the first measurement of the spin alignment of Υ(3S) mesons. Within the kinematic range of Υ rapidity |y|<0.6 and pT up to 40 GeV/c, the angular distributions are found to be nearly isotropic.

  14. Electron angular distribution in resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization of H{sub 2}{sup +} by ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Selstoe, S.; Palacios, A.; Fernandez, J.; Martin, F.

    2007-03-15

    We present a theoretical study of the electron angular distribution produced in resonance enhanced two-photon ionization of the H{sub 2}{sup +} molecular ion using ultrashort laser pulses. The method consists in solving the time dependent Schroedinger equation and includes all electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. Differential (in proton energy and electron emission solid angle) ionization probabilities have been evaluated for various photon energies, laser intensities, and pulse durations. We show that (1+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) leads to angular distributions significantly different from those produced in direct two-photon ionization. The REMPI process is observed even at photon energies not matching the energy difference between two electronic states in a perfect vertical transition. Interestingly, there is no trace of REMPI effects in the electron angular distribution when the fully differential probabilities are integrated over proton energy.

  15. Experimental and theoretical angular and translational energy distributions for the reaction CN+D{sub 2}{r_arrow}DCN+D

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Liu, K.; Schatz, G.C.; ter Horst, M.

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents new measurements of angular and translational energy distributions for the title reaction at a reagent kinetic energy of 5.8 kcal/mol, and compares them with the corresponding results from quasiclassical trajectory calculations based on an accurate global potential energy surface. The comparison of theory and experiment is generally good; however, the minor deviations that we find provide valuable information concerning errors in the potential energy surface. Both experiment and theory indicate that CN+D{sub 2} is a simple abstraction reaction, with predominantly backward-scattered angular distributions and about 37{percent} of the available energy ending up in product translation. Strong dependence of the calculated angular and translational energy distributions on reagent kinetic energy is noted. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Single particle momentum and angular distributions in hadron-hadron collisions at ultrahigh energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, T. T.; Chen, N. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The forward-backward charged multiplicity distribution (P n sub F, n sub B) of events in the 540 GeV antiproton-proton collider has been extensively studied by the UA5 Collaboration. It was pointed out that the distribution with respect to n = n sub F + n sub B satisfies approximate KNO scaling and that with respect to Z = n sub F - n sub B is binomial. The geometrical model of hadron-hadron collision interprets the large multiplicity fluctuation as due to the widely different nature of collisions at different impact parameters b. For a single impact parameter b, the collision in the geometrical model should exhibit stochastic behavior. This separation of the stochastic and nonstochastic (KNO) aspects of multiparticle production processes gives conceptually a lucid and attractive picture of such collisions, leading to the concept of partition temperature T sub p and the single particle momentum spectrum to be discussed in detail.

  17. Directional Stand-off Detection of Fast Neutrons and Gammas Using Angular Scattering Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier P. e.; Dioszegi, I.; Salwen, C.; Forman, L.

    2009-10-25

    We have investigated the response of a DoubleScatter Neutron Spectrometer (DSNS) for sources at long distances (gr than 200 meters). We find that an alternative method for analyzing double scatter data avoids some uncertainties introduced by amplitude measurements in plastic scintillators.Time of flight is used to discriminate between gamma and neutron events, and the kinematic distributions of scattering angles are assumed to apply. Non-relativistic neutrons are most likely to scatter at 45°, while gammas with energies greater than 2 MeV are most likely to be forward scattered. The distribution of scattering angles of fission neutrons arriving from a distant point source generates a 45° cone, which can be back-projected to give the source direction. At the same time, the distribution of Compton-scattered gammas has a maximum in the forward direction, and can be made narrower by selecting events that deposit minimal energy in the first scattering event. We have further determined that the shape of spontaneous fission neutron spectra at ranges gr than 110 m is still significantly different from thecosmic ray background.

  18. Angular distribution of polarized spontaneous emissions and its effect on light extraction behavior in InGaN-based light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Gangcheng; Chen, Xinjuan; Yu, Tongjun Lu, Huimin; Chen, Zhizhong; Kang, Xiangning; Wu, Jiejun; Zhang, Guoyi

    2014-03-07

    Angular intensity distributions of differently polarized light sources in multiple quantum wells (MQWs) and their effects on extraction behavior of spontaneous emission from light emitting diode (LED) chips have been studied. Theoretical calculation based on k·p approximation, ray tracing simulation and angular electroluminescence measurement were applied in this work. It is found that the electron-hole recombination in the InGaN MQWs produces a spherical distribution of an s-polarized source and a dumbbell-shaped p-polarized source. Light rays from different polarized sources experience different extraction processes, determining the polarization degree of electro-luminescence and extraction efficiency of LEDs.

  19. Additive chemistry and distributions in NTD photoresist thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thackeray, James; Hong, Chang-Young; Clark, Michael B.

    2016-03-01

    The lithographic performance of photoresists is a function of the vertical distribution of formulation components, such as photoacid generator (PAG) molecules, in photoresist thin films and how these components undergo chemical modification and migrate within the film during the lithography processing steps. This paper will discuss how GCIB-SIMS depth profiles were used to monitor the PAG and quencher base distributions before and after exposure and post-exposure bake processing steps for different PAG/photoresist formulations. The authors show that the use of surface active quencher in an NTD photoresist leads to better resist profiles, superior DOF and better OPC performance.

  20. The Angular Distribution of Quiet-time ~20-300 keV Superhalo Electrons in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L.; Wang, L.; He, J.; Tu, C. Y.; Pei, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The angular distribution of solar wind superhalo electrons carries important information on the electron acceleration location and scattering in the interplanetary medium. Here we present a comprehensive study of the angular distribution of ~20-300 keV superhalo electrons measured at 1 AU by the WIND 3DP instrument during quiet-time periods from 1995 January through 2013 December. For quiet-time intervals, we re-bin the observed electron pitch angle distributions into the outward-traveling and inward-traveling bins, according the direction of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The inward-outward anisotropy of superhalo electrons at energy E is defined as A = 2(fout - fin)/(fout + fin), where fout (fin) is the average flux of outward-traveling (inward-traveling) electrons. We find that among all the ~640 quiet-time intervals, ~5% have an A > 0.1 (referred to as "outward events"), ~5% have an A < -0.1 (referred to as "inward events"), and ~90% have an |A| ≤ 0.1 (referred to as "isotropic events"). Isotropic events show no clear correlation with solar wind parameters (nSW, Vsw and Tp), IMF and solar wind turbulence spectrum. Inward and outward events also have no association with the IMF and nSW. But the occurrence ratio of outward (inward) events over all the events, α, roughly decreases (increases) with increasing VSW. Moreover, for outward (inward) events, α roughly increases with ρe/ρTp, where ρTp is the solar wind thermal proton gyroradius that is related to the separation between the turbulence inertial and dissipation ranges. These results suggest that quite-time superhalo electrons are generally isotropic due to the wave-particle interaction in the interplanetary medium; outward-traveling (inward-traveling) superhalo electrons may come from the acceleration occurring beyond (within) 1 AU, probably by CIRs or turbulence. We will also present a case study of several quiet-time electron events with the anisotropy A increasing with the electron energy E.

  1. On Angular Momentum

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Schwinger, J.

    1952-01-26

    The commutation relations of an arbitrary angular momentum vector can be reduced to those of the harmonic oscillator. This provides a powerful method for constructing and developing the properties of angular momentum eigenvectors. In this paper many known theorems are derived in this way, and some new results obtained. Among the topics treated are the properties of the rotation matrices; the addition of two, three, and four angular momenta; and the theory of tensor operators.

  2. Periodicity property of relativistic Thomson scattering with application to exact calculations of angular and spectral distributions of the scattered field

    SciTech Connect

    Popa, Alexandru

    2011-08-15

    We prove that the analytical expression of the intensity of the relativistic Thomson scattered field for a system composed of an electron interacting with a plane electromagnetic field can be written in the form of a composite periodic function of only one variable, that is, the phase of the incident field. This property is proved without using any approximation in the most general case in which the field is elliptically polarized, the initial phase of the incident field and the initial velocity of the electron are taken into consideration, and the direction in which the radiation is scattered is arbitrary. This property leads to an exact method for calculating the angular and spectral distributions of the scattered field, which reveals a series of physical details of these distributions, such as their dependence on the components of the initial electron velocity. Since the phase of the field is a relativistic invariant, it follows that the periodicity property is also valid when the analysis is made in the inertial system in which the initial velocity of the electron is zero in the case of interactions between very intense electromagnetic fields and relativistic electrons. Consequently, the calculation method can be used for the evaluation of properties of backscattered hard radiations generated by this type of interaction. The theoretical evaluations presented in this paper are in good agreement with the experimental data from literature.

  3. The general behavior of NLO unintegrated parton distributions based on the single-scale evolution and the angular ordering constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinkhani, H.; Modarres, M.

    2011-01-01

    To overcome the complexity of generalized two hard scale (kt , μ) evolution equation, well known as the Ciafaloni, Catani, Fiorani and Marchesini (CCFM) evolution equations, and calculate the unintegrated parton distribution functions (UPDF), Kimber, Martin and Ryskin (KMR) proposed a procedure based on (i) the inclusion of single-scale (μ) only at the last step of evolution and (ii) the angular ordering constraint (AOC) on the DGLAP terms (the DGLAP collinear approximation), to bring the second scale, kt into the UPDF evolution equations. In this work we intend to use the MSTW2008 (Martin et al.) parton distribution functions (PDF) and try to calculate UPDF for various values of x (the longitudinal fraction of parton momentum), μ (the probe scale) and kt (the parton transverse momentum) to see the general behavior of three-dimensional UPDF at the NLO level up to the LHC working energy scales (μ2). It is shown that there exits some pronounced peaks for the three-dimensional UPDF (fa (x ,kt)) with respect to the two variables x and kt at various energies (μ). These peaks get larger and move to larger values of kt, as the energy (μ) is increased. We hope these peaks could be detected in the LHC experiments at CERN and other laboratories in the less exclusive processes.

  4. Angular Distribution of Tungsten Material and Ion Flux during Nanosecond Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, M. S.; Dogar, A. H.; Qayyum, A.; Abbasi, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten thin films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique on glass substrates placed at the angles of 0∘ to 70∘ with respect to the target surface normal. Rutherford backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) analysis of the films indicated that about 90% of tungsten material flux is distributed in a cone of 40∘ solid angle while about 54% of it lies even in a narrower cone of 10∘ solid angle. Significant diffusion of tungsten in glass substrate has been observed in the films deposited at smaller angles with respect to target surface normal. Time-of-flight (TOF) measurements performed using Langmuir probe indicated that the most probable ion energy decreases from about 600 to 91eV for variation of θ from 0∘ to 70∘. In general ion energy spread is quite large at all angles investigated here. The enhanced tungsten diffusion in glass substrate observed at smaller angles is most probably due to the higher ion energy and ion assisted recoil implantation of already deposited tungsten.

  5. Research relative to angular distribution of snow reflectance/snow cover characterization and microwave emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dozier, Jeff; Davis, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    Remote sensing has been applied in recent years to monitoring snow cover properties for applications in hydrologic and energy balance modeling. In addition, snow cover has been recently shown to exert a considerable local influence on weather variables. Of particular importance is the potential of sensors to provide data on the physical properties of snow with high spatial and temporal resolution. Visible and near-infrared measurements of upwelling radiance can be used to infer near-surface properties through the calculation of albedo. Microwave signals usually come from deeper within the snow pack and thus provide depth-integrated information, which can be measured through clouds and does not relay on solar illumination.Fundamental studies examining the influence of snow properties on signals from various parts of the electromagnetic spectrum continue in part because of the promise of new remote sensors with higher spectral and spatial accuracy. Information in the visible and near-infrared parts of the spectrum comprise nearly all available data with high spatial resolution. Current passive microwave sensors have poor spatial resolution and the data are problematic where the scenes consist of mixed landscape features, but they offer timely observations that are independent of cloud cover and solar illumination.

  6. Photoelectron angular distributions of H ionization in low energy regime: Comparison between different potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shu-Na; Liang, Hao; Peng, Liang-You; Jiang, Hong-Bing

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the low energy part of the photoelectron spectra in the tunneling ionization regime by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrdinger equation for different atomic potentials at various wavelengths. We find that the shift of the first above-threshold ionization (ATI) peak is closely related to the interferences between electron wave packets, which are controlled by the laser field and largely independent of the potential. By gradually changing the short-range potential to the long-range Coulomb potential, we show that the long-range potential’s effect is mainly to focus the electrons along the laser’s polarization and to generate the spider structure by enhancing the rescattering process with the parent ion. In addition, we find that the intermediate transitions and the Rydberg states have important influences on the number and the shape of the lobes near the threshold. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11322437 and 11574010) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB922402).

  7. Nitrogen oxide abatement by distributed fuel addition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, J.O.L.; Mereb, J.B.

    1991-09-20

    Reburning is examined as a means of NO{sub x} destruction in a 17 kW down-fired pulverized coal combustor. In reburning, a secondary fuel is introduced downstream of the primary flame to produce a reducing zone, favorable to NO destruction, and air is introduced further downstream to complete the combustion. Emphasis is on natural gas reburning and a bituminous coal primary flame. A parametric examination of reburning employing a statistical experimental design, is conducted, complemented by detailed experiments. Mechanisms governing the inter-conversion of nitrogenous species in the fuel rich reburn zone is explored. The effect of reburning on N{sub 2}O emissions, the effect of primary flame mode (premixed and diffusion) and the effect of distributing the reburning fuel, are also investigated.

  8. Improved reflection models of black hole accretion disks: Treating the angular distribution of X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    García, J.; Steiner, J. F.; McClintock, J. E.; Brenneman, L. E-mail: jsteiner@head.cfa.harvard.edu E-mail: lbrenneman@cfa.harvard.edu; and others

    2014-02-20

    X-ray reflection models are used to constrain the properties of the accretion disk, such as the degree of ionization of the gas and the elemental abundances. In combination with general relativistic ray tracing codes, additional parameters like the spin of the black hole and the inclination to the system can be determined. However, current reflection models used for such studies only provide angle-averaged solutions for the flux reflected at the surface of the disk. Moreover, the emission angle of the photons changes over the disk due to relativistic light bending. To overcome this simplification, we have constructed an angle-dependent reflection model with the XILLVER code and self-consistently connected it with the relativistic blurring code RELLINE. The new model, relxill, calculates the proper emission angle of the radiation at each point on the accretion disk and then takes the corresponding reflection spectrum into account. We show that the reflected spectra from illuminated disks follow a limb-brightening law highly dependent on the ionization of disk and yet different from the commonly assumed form I∝ln (1 + 1/μ). A detailed comparison with the angle-averaged model is carried out in order to determine the bias in the parameters obtained by fitting a typical relativistic reflection spectrum. These simulations reveal that although the spin and inclination are mildly affected, the Fe abundance can be overestimated by up to a factor of two when derived from angle-averaged models. The fit of the new model to the Suzaku observation of the Seyfert galaxy Ark 120 clearly shows a significant improvement in the constraint of the physical parameters, in particular by enhancing the accuracy in the inclination angle and the spin determinations.

  9. Modelling and experimental analysis of the angular distribution of the emitted light from the edge of luminescent solar concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parel, Thomas S.; Pistolas, Christos; Danos, Lefteris; Markvart, Tomas

    2015-04-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) have the potential to provide cheap solar electricity by significantly reducing the solar cell area. However, these devices are still at the research level and several aspects of their behaviour need investigation in order to improve efficiencies. Understanding how light is absorbed/emitted and concentrated to the edge of LSCs is required to design a high efficiency device as well as identifying and overcoming the various losses present. One strategy for investigating the photon absorption and transport in LSCs as well as pinpointing the sources of losses in these devices is to look at the luminescence escaping the LSC as a function of angle. This paper presents a new model that reveals the main features of the angular distribution of light escaping a LSC edge. We compare this model with experimental measurements and provide an assessment of non-ideal losses and identify which emission angles are affected most by these losses. We investigated experimentally the effects of the absorption profile of the chromophores and re-absorption on the photon flux travelling at different angles. The effect of back surface reflectors, commonly used to 'recycle lost photons', on the edge emission of LSCs has also been investigated in this work.

  10. Parameterization of the Angular Distribution of Gamma Rays Produced by P-P Interaction in Astronomical Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, Niklas; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-09-24

    We present the angular distribution of gamma rays produced by proton-proton interactions in parameterized formulae to facilitate calculations in astrophysical environments. The parameterization is derived from Monte Carlo simulations of the up-to-date proton-proton interaction model by Kamae et al. (2005) and its extension by Kamae et al. (2006). This model includes the logarithmically rising inelastic cross section, the diffraction dissociation process and Feynman scaling violation. The extension adds two baryon resonance contributions: one representing the {Delta}(1232) and the other representing multiple resonances around 1600 MeV/c{sup 2}. We demonstrate the use of the formulae by calculating the predicted gamma-ray spectrum for two different cases: the first is a pencil beam of protons following a power law and the second is a fanned proton jet with a Gaussian intensity profile impinging on the surrounding material. In both cases we find that the predicted gamma-ray spectrum to be dependent on the viewing angle.

  11. Reassessment of fission fragment angular distributions from continuum states in the context of transition-state theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Louis C.; Alexander, John M.

    1983-07-01

    Fission angular distributions have been studied for years and have been treated as classic examples of trasitions-state theory. Early work involving composite nuclei of relatively low excitation energy E ∗ (⪅35 MeV) and spin I (⪅25ħ) gave support to theory and delimited interesting properties of the transitions-state nuclei. More recent research on fusion fission and sequential fission after deeply inelastic reactions involves composite nuclei of much higher energies (⪅200 MeV) and spins (⪅100ħ). Extension of the basic ideas developed for low-spin nuclei requires detailed consideration of the role of these high spins and, in particular, the “spin window” for fussion. We have made empirical correlations of cross sections for evaporation residues and fission in order to get a description of this spin window. A systematic reanalysis has been made for fusion fission induced by H, He and heavier ions. Empirical correlations of K 20 (K 20 = {IeffT }/{h̷2}) are presented along with comparisons of Ieff to moments of inertia for saddle-point nuclei from the rotating liquid drop model. This model gives an excellent guide for the intermidiate spin zone (30⪅ I ⪅65), while strong shell and/or pairing effects are evident for excitations less than ⪅35 MeV. Observations of strong anisotropies for very high-spin systems signal the demise of certain approximation commonly made in the theory, and suggestions are made toward this end.

  12. Probing photoelectron angular distributions in molecules with polarization-controlled two-color above-threshold ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Torsten; Taïeb, Richard; Meyer, Michael; Wernet, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    We present polarization-controlled multiphoton two-color above-threshold ionization (TCATI) of molecules. The intensity modulations of valence photoelectron intensities of molecules arising from varying the relative orientation of the linear polarization vectors of femtosecond infrared (IR) and vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) radiation in TCATI of the highest occupied molecular orbitals of H2O , O2, and N2 are reported. The results on the molecular systems are compared to the 3 p photoionization of atomic Ar, which serves as a reference system. Modeling the large differences of the modulation amplitudes within the soft-photon approximation enables us to extract the one-photon-ionization anisotropy parameter β2. Accounting only for the first sideband due to two-photon TCATI by one VUV and one IR photon we find satisfactory agreement between experiment and simulation for H2O and O2. However, the model fails for N2 and possible reasons are discussed. We discuss that the described approach may represent an alternative way of determining photoelectron angular distributions from valence shells of molecules and indicate future directions for modeling TCATI of molecules.

  13. Investigation of ion energy and angular distributions at the wafer edge in rf capacitively coupled reactors using CFD-ACE+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhoj, Ananth; Roy, Abhra; Jain, Kunal; Xiong, Zhongmin

    2015-09-01

    Dual frequency capacitively coupled reactors are now commonly used in microelectronics fabrication. The extent of possible independent control of ion fluxes and ion energy and angular distribution (IEADs) by varying HF and LF signals is currently a topic of great interest. In this study, we report on investigations of IEADs in single and dual frequency CCPs, including the wafer edge refinement using CFD-ACE+. The current algorithms in CFD-ACE+ allow the determination of total power at the electrode or in the discharge. To account for the presence of two or more rf sources connected to a powered electrode, the existing numerical algorithms for power targeting were enhanced to track current at the electrode as a function of time, vary voltage and determine power as a function of frequency. The Monte Carlo transport module for heavy species in CFD-ACE+ was recently enhanced to compute IEADs in rf discharges. Results for the effect of varying power and pressure on IEADs were compared to semi-analytical models and data reported in Gahan et al.. The validated model was applied to investigate the effect of details of HF and LF signals on IEADs in Argon discharges.

  14. Measurements of partial cross sections and photoelectron angular distributions for the photodetachment of Fe{sup -} and Cu{sup -} at visible photon wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Covington, A. M.; Duvvuri, Srividya S.; Emmons, E. D.; Kraus, R. G.; Williams, W. W.; Thompson, J. S.; Calabrese, D.; Carpenter, D. L.; Collier, R. D.; Kvale, T. J.; Davis, V. T.

    2007-02-15

    Photodetachment cross sections and the angular distributions of photoelectrons produced by the single-photon detachment of the transition metal negative ions Fe{sup -} and Cu{sup -} have been measured at four discrete photon wavelengths ranging from 457.9 to 647.1 nm (2.71-1.92 eV) using a crossed-beams laser photodetachment electron spectrometry (LPES) apparatus. Photodetachment cross sections were determined by comparing the photoelectron yields from the photodetachment of Fe{sup -} to those of Cu{sup -} and C{sup -}, which have known absolute photodetachment cross sections. Using the measured photodetachment cross sections, radiative electron attachment cross sections were calculated using the principle of detailed balance. Angular distributions were determined by measurements of laboratory frame, angle-, and energy-resolved photoelectrons as a function of the angle between the linear laser polarization vector and the momentum vector of the collected photoelectrons. Values of the asymmetry parameter have been determined by nonlinear least-squares fits to these angular distributions. The measured asymmetry parameters are compared to predictions of photodetachment models including Cooper and Zare's dipole approximation theory [J. Cooper and R. N. Zare, J. Chem. Phys. 48, 942 (1968)], and the angular momentum transfer theory developed by Fano and Dill [Phys. Rev. A 6, 185 (1972)].

  15. Generalization of the Gaussian electrostatic model: Extension to arbitrary angular momentum, distributed multipoles, and speedup with reciprocal space methods

    PubMed Central

    Cisneros, G. Andrés; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Darden, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    The simulation of biological systems by means of current empirical force fields presents shortcomings due to their lack of accuracy, especially in the description of the nonbonded terms. We have previously introduced a force field based on density fitting termed the Gaussian electrostatic model-0 (GEM-0) J.-P. Piquemal et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 104101 (2006)] that improves the description of the nonbonded interactions. GEM-0 relies on density fitting methodology to reproduce each contribution of the constrained space orbital variation (CSOV) energy decomposition scheme, by expanding the electronic density of the molecule in s-type Gaussian functions centered at specific sites. In the present contribution we extend the Coulomb and exchange components of the force field to auxiliary basis sets of arbitrary angular momentum. Since the basis functions with higher angular momentum have directionality, a reference molecular frame (local frame) formalism is employed for the rotation of the fitted expansion coefficients. In all cases the intermolecular interaction energies are calculated by means of Hermite Gaussian functions using the McMurchie-Davidson [J. Comput. Phys. 26, 218 (1978)] recursion to calculate all the required integrals. Furthermore, the use of Hermite Gaussian functions allows a point multipole decomposition determination at each expansion site. Additionally, the issue of computational speed is investigated by reciprocal space based formalisms which include the particle mesh Ewald (PME) and fast Fourier-Poisson (FFP) methods. Frozen-core (Coulomb and exchange-repulsion) intermolecular interaction results for ten stationary points on the water dimer potential-energy surface, as well as a one-dimensional surface scan for the canonical water dimer, formamide, stacked benzene, and benzene water dimers, are presented. All results show reasonable agreement with the corresponding CSOV calculated reference contributions, around 0.1 and 0.15 kcal/mol error for

  16. Generalization of the Gaussian electrostatic model: extension to arbitrary angular momentum, distributed multipoles, and speedup with reciprocal space methods.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, G Andrés; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Darden, Thomas A

    2006-11-14

    The simulation of biological systems by means of current empirical force fields presents shortcomings due to their lack of accuracy, especially in the description of the nonbonded terms. We have previously introduced a force field based on density fitting termed the Gaussian electrostatic model-0 (GEM-0) J.-P. Piquemal et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 104101 (2006)] that improves the description of the nonbonded interactions. GEM-0 relies on density fitting methodology to reproduce each contribution of the constrained space orbital variation (CSOV) energy decomposition scheme, by expanding the electronic density of the molecule in s-type Gaussian functions centered at specific sites. In the present contribution we extend the Coulomb and exchange components of the force field to auxiliary basis sets of arbitrary angular momentum. Since the basis functions with higher angular momentum have directionality, a reference molecular frame (local frame) formalism is employed for the rotation of the fitted expansion coefficients. In all cases the intermolecular interaction energies are calculated by means of Hermite Gaussian functions using the McMurchie-Davidson [J. Comput. Phys. 26, 218 (1978)] recursion to calculate all the required integrals. Furthermore, the use of Hermite Gaussian functions allows a point multipole decomposition determination at each expansion site. Additionally, the issue of computational speed is investigated by reciprocal space based formalisms which include the particle mesh Ewald (PME) and fast Fourier-Poisson (FFP) methods. Frozen-core (Coulomb and exchange-repulsion) intermolecular interaction results for ten stationary points on the water dimer potential-energy surface, as well as a one-dimensional surface scan for the canonical water dimer, formamide, stacked benzene, and benzene water dimers, are presented. All results show reasonable agreement with the corresponding CSOV calculated reference contributions, around 0.1 and 0.15 kcal/mol error for

  17. Generalization of the Gaussian electrostatic model: Extension to arbitrary angular momentum, distributed multipoles, and speedup with reciprocal space methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisneros, G. Andrés; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Darden, Thomas A.

    2006-11-01

    The simulation of biological systems by means of current empirical force fields presents shortcomings due to their lack of accuracy, especially in the description of the nonbonded terms. We have previously introduced a force field based on density fitting termed the Gaussian electrostatic model-0 (GEM-0) J.-P. Piquemal et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 124, 104101 (2006)] that improves the description of the nonbonded interactions. GEM-0 relies on density fitting methodology to reproduce each contribution of the constrained space orbital variation (CSOV) energy decomposition scheme, by expanding the electronic density of the molecule in s-type Gaussian functions centered at specific sites. In the present contribution we extend the Coulomb and exchange components of the force field to auxiliary basis sets of arbitrary angular momentum. Since the basis functions with higher angular momentum have directionality, a reference molecular frame (local frame) formalism is employed for the rotation of the fitted expansion coefficients. In all cases the intermolecular interaction energies are calculated by means of Hermite Gaussian functions using the McMurchie-Davidson [J. Comput. Phys. 26, 218 (1978)] recursion to calculate all the required integrals. Furthermore, the use of Hermite Gaussian functions allows a point multipole decomposition determination at each expansion site. Additionally, the issue of computational speed is investigated by reciprocal space based formalisms which include the particle mesh Ewald (PME) and fast Fourier-Poisson (FFP) methods. Frozen-core (Coulomb and exchange-repulsion) intermolecular interaction results for ten stationary points on the water dimer potential-energy surface, as well as a one-dimensional surface scan for the canonical water dimer, formamide, stacked benzene, and benzene water dimers, are presented. All results show reasonable agreement with the corresponding CSOV calculated reference contributions, around 0.1 and 0.15kcal/mol error for

  18. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  19. Generalized helicity formalism, higher moments, and the B →KJK(→K π )ℓ1 ¯ ℓ2 angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratrex, James; Hopfer, Markus; Zwicky, Roman

    2016-03-01

    We generalize the Jacob-Wick helicity formalism, which applies to sequential decays, to effective field theories of rare decays of the type B →KJ K(→K π )ℓ¯1ℓ2. This is achieved by reinterpreting local interaction vertices b ¯ Γμ1…μn 's ℓ ¯ Γμ1…μnℓ as a coherent sum of 1 →2 processes mediated by particles whose spin ranges between zero and n . We illustrate the framework by deriving the full angular distributions for B ¯→K ¯ℓ1ℓ¯2 and B ¯→K¯*(→K ¯π )ℓ1ℓ¯2 for the complete dimension-six effective Hamiltonian for nonequal lepton masses. Amplitudes and decay rates are expressed in terms of Wigner rotation matrices, leading naturally to the method of moments in various forms. We discuss how higher-spin operators and QED corrections alter the standard angular distribution used throughout the literature, potentially leading to differences between the method of moments and the likelihood fits. We propose to diagnose these effects by assessing higher angular moments. These could be relevant in investigating the nature of the current LHCb anomalies in RK=B (B →K μ+μ-)/B (B →K e+e-) as well as angular observables in B →K*μ+μ-.

  20. Angular distribution of bremsstrahlung produced by electrons with initial energies in the range from 10 to 20 keV incident on thick Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Daniel; Cavness, Brandon; Williams, Scott

    2012-03-01

    Experimental results are presented comparing the intensities of the thick-target bremsstrahlung produced by electrons with initial energies ranging from 10 to 20 keV incident on Ag, measured at forward angles in the range of 0 to 55 degrees. When the data are corrected for attenuation due to photon absorption within the target, the results indicate that the detected radiation is distributed anisotropically only at photon energies k that are approximately equal to the initial energy of the incident electrons E0. The results of our experiments suggest that, as k/E0->0, the detected radiation essentially becomes isotropic due primarily to the scattering of electrons within the target. Comparison to the theory of Kissel et al. [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 28, 381 (1983)] suggests that the angular distribution of bremsstrahlung emitted by electrons incident on thick targets is similar to the angular distribution of bremsstrahlung emitted by electrons incident on free-atom targets only when k/E0 1. The experimental data also are in approximate agreement with the angular distribution predictions of the Monte Carlo program PENELOPE.

  1. Measurement of dijet angular distributions at square root(s) = 1.96 TeV and searches for quark compositeness and extra spatial dimensions.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De la Cruz-Burelo, E; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; 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    2009-11-01

    We present the first measurement of dijet angular distributions in pp collisions at square root(s) = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement is based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.7 fb(-1) collected with the D0 detector. Dijet angular distributions have been measured over a range of dijet masses, from 0.25 TeV to above 1.1 TeV. The data are in good agreement with the predictions of perturbative QCD and are used to constrain new physics models including quark compositeness, large extra dimensions, and TeV(-1) scale extra dimensions. For all models considered, we set the most stringent direct limits to date. PMID:20365918

  2. Search for New Phenomena in Dijet Angular Distributions in Proton-Proton Collisions at sqrt[s]=8 TeV Measured with the ATLAS Detector.

    PubMed

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    2015-06-01

    A search for new phenomena in LHC proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt[s]=8 TeV was performed with the ATLAS detector using an integrated luminosity of 17.3 fb^{-1}. The angular distributions are studied in events with at least two jets; the highest dijet mass observed is 5.5 TeV. All angular distributions are consistent with the predictions of the standard model. In a benchmark model of quark contact interactions, a compositeness scale below 8.1 TeV in a destructive interference scenario and 12.0 TeV in a constructive interference scenario is excluded at 95% C.L.; median expected limits are 8.9 TeV for the destructive interference scenario and 14.1 TeV for the constructive interference scenario. PMID:26196615

  3. Search for New Phenomena in Dijet Angular Distributions in Proton-Proton Collisions at s = 8 TeV Measured with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-06-04

    A search for new phenomena in LHC proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √s=8 TeV was performed with the ATLAS detector using an integrated luminosity of 17.3 fb⁻¹. The angular distributions are studied in events with at least two jets; the highest dijet mass observed is 5.5 TeV. All angular distributions are consistent with the predictions of the standard model. In a benchmark model of quark contact interactions, a compositeness scale below 8.1 TeV in a destructive interference scenario and 12.0 TeV in a constructive interference scenario is excluded at 95% C.L.; median expected limits are 8.9 TeV formore » the destructive interference scenario and 14.1 TeV for the constructive interference scenario.« less

  4. Angular distribution of 4.43-MeV γ-rays produced in inelastic scattering of 14.1-MeV neutrons by 12C nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Grozdanov, D. N.; Zontikov, A. O.; Kopach, Yu. N.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Ruskov, I. N.; Sadovsky, A. B.; Skoy, V. R.; Barmakov, Yu. N.; Bogolyubov, E. P.; Ryzhkov, V. I.; Yurkov, D. I.

    2016-07-01

    The work is devoted to measuring the angular distribution of 4.43-MeV γ-rays produced in inelastic scattering of 14.1-MeV neutrons by 12C nuclei. A portable ING-27 neutron generator (designed and fabricated at VNIIA, Moscow) with a built-in 64-pixel silicon α-detector was used as a source of tagged neutrons. The γ-rays of characteristic nuclear radiation from 12C were detected with a spectrometric system that consisted of 22 γ-detectors based on NaI(Tl) crystals arranged around the carbon target. The measured angular distribution of 4.43-MeV γ-rays is analyzed and compared with the results of other published experimental works.

  5. Search for New Phenomena in Dijet Angular Distributions in Proton-Proton Collisions at √{s }=8 TeV Measured with the ATLAS Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. 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A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van den Wollenberg, W.; van der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    A search for new phenomena in LHC proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=8 TeV was performed with the ATLAS detector using an integrated luminosity of 17.3 fb-1 . The angular distributions are studied in events with at least two jets; the highest dijet mass observed is 5.5 TeV. All angular distributions are consistent with the predictions of the standard model. In a benchmark model of quark contact interactions, a compositeness scale below 8.1 TeV in a destructive interference scenario and 12.0 TeV in a constructive interference scenario is excluded at 95% C.L.; median expected limits are 8.9 TeV for the destructive interference scenario and 14.1 TeV for the constructive interference scenario.

  6. Measurement of dijet angular distributions at sqrt{s}=1.96TeV and searches for quark compositeness and extra spatial dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, D0

    2009-06-01

    We present the first measurement of dijet angular distributions in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement is based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.7 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector. Dijet angular distributions have been measured over a range of dijet masses, from 0.25 TeV to above 1.1 TeV. The data are in good agreement with the predictions of perturbative QCD and are used to constrain new physics models including quark compositeness, large extra dimensions, and TeV{sup -1} scale extra dimensions. For all models considered, we set the most stringent direct limits to date.

  7. Off-resonance photoemission dynamics studied by recoil frame F1s and C1s photoelectron angular distributions of CH{sub 3}F

    SciTech Connect

    Stener, M. Decleva, P.; Mizuno, T.; Yagishita, A.; Yoshida, H.

    2014-01-28

    F1s and C1s photoelectron angular distributions are considered for CH{sub 3}F, a molecule which does not support any shape resonance. In spite of the absence of features in the photoionization cross section profile, the recoil frame photoelectron angular distributions (RFPADs) exhibits dramatic changes depending on both the photoelectron energy and polarization geometry. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations are also given to rationalize the photoionization dynamics. The RFPADs have been compared with the theoretical calculations, in order to assess the accuracy of the theoretical method and rationalize the experimental findings. The effect of finite acceptance angles for both ionic fragments and photoelectrons has been included in the calculations, as well as the effect of rotational averaging around the fragmentation axis. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, confirming the good quality of the calculated dynamical quantities (dipole moments and phase shifts)

  8. Top-of-Atmosphere Albedo Estimation from Angular Distribution Models using Scene Identification from Satellite Cloud Property Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, N. G.; Parol, F.; Buriez, J.-C.; Vanbauce, C.

    2000-01-01

    The next generation of Earth radiation budget satellite instruments will routinely merge estimates of global top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes with cloud properties. This information will offer many new opportunities for validating radiative transfer models and cloud parameterizations in climate models. In this study, five months of POLarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances (POLDER) 670 nm radiance measurements are considered in order to examine how satellite cloud property retrievals can be used to define empirical Angular Distribution Models (ADMs) for estimating top-of-atmosphere (TOA) albedo. ADMs are defined for 19 scene types defined by satellite retrievals of cloud fraction and cloud optical depth. Two approaches are used to define the ADM scene types: The first assumes there are no biases in the retrieved cloud properties and defines ADMs for fixed discrete intervals of cloud fraction and cloud optical depth (fixed-tau approach). The second approach involves the same cloud fraction intervals, but uses percentile intervals of cloud optical depth instead (percentile-tau approach). Albedos generated using these methods are compared with albedos inferred directly from the mean observed reflectance field. Albedos based on ADMs that assume cloud properties are unbiased (fixed-tau approach) show a strong systematic dependence on viewing geometry. This dependence becomes more pronounced with increasing solar zenith angle, reaching approximately equals 12% (relative) between near-nadir and oblique viewing zenith angles for solar zenith angles between 60 deg and 70 deg. The cause for this bias is shown to be due to biases in the cloud optical depth retrievals. In contrast, albedos based on ADMs built using percentile intervals of cloud optical depth (percentile-tau approach) show very little viewing zenith angle dependence and are in good agreement with albedos obtained by direct integration of the mean observed reflectance field (less than 1

  9. COMPONENTS OF LASER SYSTEMS AND PROCESSES OCCURRING IN THEM: Fast-response system for stabilization of the axis of the angular distribution of laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, E. G.; Glebova, S. N.; Pavlov, N. V.; Razhenkov, E. T.

    1988-09-01

    A fast-acting system for stabilization of the axis of the angular distribution of radiation from a continuous-flow CO2 laser is considered. The results of a simulation experiment are reported: they show that it is possible to suppress, by 24-28 dB, fluctuations of the position of the axis in the spectral range 0-20 Hz. This makes the proposed system a promising method for large-aperture laser beams.

  10. Angular distributions of absorbed dose of Bremsstrahlung and secondary electrons induced by 18-, 28- and 38-MeV electron beams in thick targets.

    PubMed

    Takada, Masashi; Kosako, Kazuaki; Oishi, Koji; Nakamura, Takashi; Sato, Kouichi; Kamiyama, Takashi; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki

    2013-03-01

    Angular distributions of absorbed dose of Bremsstrahlung photons and secondary electrons at a wide range of emission angles from 0 to 135°, were experimentally obtained using an ion chamber with a 0.6 cm(3) air volume covered with or without a build-up cap. The Bremsstrahlung photons and electrons were produced by 18-, 28- and 38-MeV electron beams bombarding tungsten, copper, aluminium and carbon targets. The absorbed doses were also calculated from simulated photon and electron energy spectra by multiplying simulated response functions of the ion chambers, simulated with the MCNPX code. Calculated-to-experimental (C/E) dose ratios obtained are from 0.70 to 1.57 for high-Z targets of W and Cu, from 15 to 135° and the C/E range from 0.6 to 1.4 at 0°; however, the values of C/E for low-Z targets of Al and C are from 0.5 to 1.8 from 0 to 135°. Angular distributions at the forward angles decrease with increasing angles; on the other hand, the angular distributions at the backward angles depend on the target species. The dependences of absorbed doses on electron energy and target thickness were compared between the measured and simulated results. The attenuation profiles of absorbed doses of Bremsstrahlung beams at 0, 30 and 135° were also measured.

  11. The VMI study on angular distribution of ejected electrons from Eu 4f76p1/26d autoionizing states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Shen, Li; Dong, Cheng; Dai, Chang-Jian

    2015-10-01

    The combination of a velocity mapping imaging technique and mathematical transformation is adopted to study the angular distribution of electrons ejected from the Eu 4f76p1/26d autoionizing states, which are excited with a three-step excitation scheme via different Eu 4f76s6d 8 DJ (J = 5/2, 7/2, and 9/2) intermediate states. In order to determine the energy dependence of angular distribution of the ejected electrons, the anisotropic parameters are measured in the spectral profile of the 6p1/26d autoionizing states by tuning the wavelength of the third-step laser across the ionic resonance lines of the Eu 6s+ → 6p+. The configuration interaction is discussed by comparing the angular distributions of ejected electrons from the different states. The present study reveals the profound variations of anisotropic parameters in the entire region of autoionization resonance, highlighting the complicated nature of the autoionization process for the lowest member of 6p1/26d autoionization series. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174218).

  12. Resonant structure of the 3d electron`s angular distribution in a free Mn{sup +}Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Amusia, M.Y.; Dolmatov, V.K.

    1995-08-01

    The 3d-electron angular anisotropy parameter of the free Mn{sup +} ion is calculated using the {open_quotes}spin-polarized{close_quotes} random-phase approximation with exchange. Strong resonance structure is discovered, which is due to interference with the powerful 3p {yields} 3d discrete excitation. The effect of the 3p {yields} 4s transition is also noticeable. The ordering of these respective resonances with phonon energy increase proved to be opposite in angular anisotropy parameter to that in 3d-photoionization cross section. A paper describing these results was published.

  13. Next-Generation Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Calculation from the CERES Instruments: Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, W.; Corbett, J.; Eitzen, Z.; Liang, L.

    2015-01-01

    The top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes are critical components to advancing our understanding of the Earth's radiative energy balance, radiative effects of clouds and aerosols, and climate feedback. The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments provide broadband shortwave and longwave radiance measurements. These radiances are converted to fluxes by using scene-type-dependent angular distribution models (ADMs). This paper describes the next-generation ADMs that are developed for Terra and Aqua using all available CERES rotating azimuth plane radiance measurements. Coincident cloud and aerosol retrievals, and radiance measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and meteorological parameters from Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) data assimilation version 5.4.1 are used to define scene type. CERES radiance measurements are stratified by scene type and by other parameters that are important for determining the anisotropy of the given scene type. Anisotropic factors are then defined either for discrete intervals of relevant parameters or as a continuous functions of combined parameters, depending on the scene type. Significant differences between the ADMs described in this paper and the existing ADMs are over clear-sky scene types and polar scene types. Over clear ocean, we developed a set of shortwave (SW) ADMs that explicitly account for aerosols. Over clear land, the SW ADMs are developed for every 1 latitude1 longitude region for every calendar month using a kernel-based bidirectional reflectance model. Over clear Antarctic scenes, SW ADMs are developed by accounting the effects of sastrugi on anisotropy. Over sea ice, a sea-ice brightness index is used to classify the scene type. Under cloudy conditions over all surface types, the longwave (LW) and window (WN) ADMs are developed by combining surface and cloud-top temperature, surface and cloud emissivity, cloud fraction, and precipitable water

  14. Numerical study of particle-size distributions retrieved from angular light-scattering data using an evolution strategy with the Fraunhofer approximation.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Ubera, Javier; Sánchez-Escobar, Juan Jaime; Aguilar, J Félix; Gale, David Michel

    2007-06-10

    An algorithm is presented based on an evolution strategy to retrieve a particle size distribution from angular light-scattering data. The analyzed intensity patterns are generated using the Mie theory, and the algorithm retrieves a series of known normal, gamma, and lognormal distributions by using the Fraunhofer approximation. The distributions scan the interval of modal size parameters 100 < or = alpha < or = 150. The numerical results show that the evolution strategy can be successfully applied to solve this kind of inverse problem, obtaining a more accurate solution than, for example, the Chin-Shifrin inversion method, and avoiding the use of a priori information concerning the domain of the distribution, commonly necessary for reconstructing the particle size distribution when this analytical inversion method is used.

  15. Combining near-field hyperspectral imaging and far-field spectral-angular distribution to develop mid-field white LED optical models with spatial color deviation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tsung-Xian; Lu, Tsung-Lin; Chen, Bo-Song

    2016-07-11

    The integration of spatial distribution of light intensity and color in the midfield is instrumental for LED optical design. On the basis of this rationale, we proposed an accurate and convenient method for developing white LED optical models. Near-field hyperspectral images and far-field spectral-angular distributions were integrated to illustrate changes in spatial light intensity and color distribution in the mid-field, to the exclusion of the absorption, conversion, and scattering of phosphors. The corresponding optical models were developed for three LED samples under different packaging conditions. Their normalized cross-correlation values for spatial light intensity and correlated-color-temperature distribution between simulation and measurement averaged as high as 0.995 and 0.99 respectively, which validated the accuracy and feasibility of the proposed method. PMID:27410897

  16. Next-Generation Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Calculation from CERES Instruments: Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, W.; Corbett, J.; Eitzen, Z.; Liang, L.

    2015-01-01

    Radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument are fundamental variables for understanding the Earth's energy balance and how it changes with time. TOA radiative fluxes are derived from the CERES radiance measurements using empirical angular distribution models (ADMs). This paper evaluates the accuracy of CERES TOA fluxes using direct integration and flux consistency tests. Direct integration tests show that the overall bias in regional monthly mean TOA shortwave (SW) flux is less than 0.2Wm(exp -2) and the RMSE is less than 1.1Wm(exp -2). The bias and RMSE are very similar between Terra and Aqua. The bias in regional monthly mean TOA LW fluxes is less than 0.5Wm(exp -2) and the RMSE is less than 0.8Wm(exp -)2 for both Terra and Aqua. The accuracy of the TOA instantaneous flux is assessed by performing tests using fluxes inverted from nadir- and oblique-viewing angles using CERES along-track observations and temporally and spatially matched MODIS observations, and using fluxes inverted from multi-angle MISR observations. The averaged TOA instantaneous SW flux uncertainties from these two tests are about 2.3% (1.9Wm(exp -2) over clear ocean, 1.6% (4.5Wm(exp -2) over clear land, and 2.0% (6.0Wm(exp -) over clear snow/ice; and are about 3.3% (9.0Wm(exp -2), 2.7% (8.4Wm(exp -2), and 3.7% (9.9Wm(exp -2) over ocean, land, and snow/ice under all-sky conditions. The TOA SW flux uncertainties are generally larger for thin broken clouds than for moderate and thick overcast clouds. The TOA instantaneous daytime LW flux uncertainties derived from the CERESMODIS test are 0.5% (1.5Wm(exp -2), 0.8% (2.4Wm(exp -2), and 0.7% (1.3Wm(exp -2) over clear ocean, land, and snow/ice; and are about 1.5% (3.5Wm(exp -2), 1.0% (2.9Wm(exp -2), and 1.1% (2.1Wm(exp -2) over ocean, land, and snow/ice under all-sky conditions. The TOA instantaneous nighttime LW flux uncertainties are about 0.5-1% (<2.0Wm(exp -2) for all

  17. Exploration of strong-field multiphoton double ionization, rescattering, and electron angular distribution of He atoms in intense long-wavelength laser fields: The coupled coherent-state approach

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Jing; Liu Xueshen; Chu, Shih-I

    2010-08-15

    We extend the coupled coherent-state (CCS) approach to simulate the strong-field ionization of helium atoms at long wavelengths. This approach uses a basis of trajectories guided by frozen Gaussian coherent states, sampled from a Monte Carlo distribution, as the initial states of the quantum time-dependent Schroedinger equations. The CCS trajectories move over averaged potentials, which can remove the Columbic singularities exactly. The low-energy structure is predicted by our CCS calculation and a ''rescattering'' event is clearly identified in the higher-energy regime. In addition, the nonsequential double ionization is also explored and the rescattering event can be identified as the major mechanism. Finally, we also study the electron angular distribution of helium. It is found that the maximum angle between the electron and electric field directions becomes smaller with increase in the laser intensity and wavelength.

  18. Additive and Interactive Effects on Response Time Distributions in Visual Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yap, Melvin J.; Balota, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Across 3 different word recognition tasks, distributional analyses were used to examine the joint effects of stimulus quality and word frequency on underlying response time distributions. Consistent with the extant literature, stimulus quality and word frequency produced additive effects in lexical decision, not only in the means but also in the…

  19. Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-01-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in…

  20. Auger resonant Raman spectroscopy used to study the angular distributions of the Xe 4d{sub 5/2} {yields} 6p decay spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, B.; Berrah, N.; Farhat, A.

    1997-04-01

    Auger resonant Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for studying the resonant Auger decay processes with a resolution narrower than the natural lifetime width of the initial inner-shell hole state. This effect has been used to analyze branching ratios of resonantly excited atoms and molecules. In this paper, the authors present results of a study of angular distributions of the spectator decay lines of Xe following 4d{sub 5/2}{r_arrow}6p excitation using the Auger resonant Raman effect and highly resolved photons from the Advanced Light Source (ALS).

  1. Vibrationally resolved photoelectron angular distributions for H2 in the range 17 eV<=hν<=39 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parr, A. C.; Hardis, J. E.; Southworth, S. H.; Feigerle, C. S.; Ferrett, T. A.; Holland, D. M. P.; Quinn, F. M.; Dobson, B. R.; West, J. B.; Marr, G. V.; Dehmer, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    Vibrationally resolved photoelectron angular distributions have been measured for photoionization of H2 over the range 17 eV<=hν<=39 eV using independent instrumentation at two synchro- tron radiation facilities. The present data greatly extend and add vibrational resolution to earlier variable-wavelength measurements. The average magnitude of the asymmetry parameter continues to lie lower than the best independent-electron calculations. Broad structure is observed for the first time, possibly indicating the effects of channel interaction with dissociative, doubly excited states of H2. Neither the average magnitude nor the gross wavelength-dependent structure vary strongly with the final vibrational channel.

  2. Spin fluctuation and local magnetism of isolated Fe impurities in Pd1-xVx alloys studied by time differential perturbed angular distribution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, S. K.; Srivastava, S. K.; Mishra, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    The magnetic moment and spin fluctuation temperature of isolated Fe impurity atoms in Pd1-xVx (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.15) alloys have been studied by time differential perturbed angular distribution (TDPAD) technique. With increasing V content in Pd matrix, a large non-linear reduction of the local magnetic moment accompanied with an exponential increase of the spin fluctuation temperature TSF has been observed. At and beyond x = 0.12, the Fe atoms are found to be nonmagnetic. As an important new feature, TSF is observed to vary quadratically with composition dependent changes in host spin polarization.

  3. Measurement of Dijet Angular Distributions and Search for Quark Compositeness in pp Collisions at $sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-05-01

    Dijet angular distributions are measured over a wide range of dijet invariant masses in pp collisions at s√ = 7 TeV, at the CERN LHC. The event sample, recorded with the CMS detector, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. The data are found to be in good agreement with the predictions of perturbative QCD, and yield no evidence of quark compositeness. With a modified frequentist approach, a lower limit on the contact interaction scale for left-handed quarks of Lambda = 5.6 TeV is obtained at the 95% confidence level.

  4. Angular distribution and multiplicity of backward hadrons in hFe interactions at 0.5-5.0 TeV energies (PION Experiment)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avakian, V. V.; Azarian, M. O.; Egiyan, K. S.; Mamidjanian, E. A.; Ohanian, G. Z.; Ter-Antonian, S. V.

    1985-01-01

    Based on the analysis of approximates 5 X 1000 events registered on the PION installation, data are obtained on the angular distribution and multiplicity of particles, flying back into the laboratory coordinate system (LCS) that are identified mainly as hadrons produced in the reactions of hFe yield h prime X type. The inclusively produced hadron energy is 200 MeV. The experimental data are compared to the results of the cumulative particle production in hA processes observed on accelerators at lower energies.

  5. Supernumerary rainbows in the angular distribution of scattered projectiles for grazing collisions of fast atoms with a LiF(001) surface.

    PubMed

    Schüller, A; Winter, H

    2008-03-01

    Fast atoms with keV energies are scattered under a grazing angle of incidence from a clean and flat LiF(001) surface. For scattering along low index azimuthal directions within the surface plane ("axial surface channeling") we observe pronounced peak structures in the angular distributions for scattered projectiles that are attributed to "supernumerary rainbows." This phenomenon can be understood in the framework of quantum scattering only and is observed here up to projectile energies of 20 keV. We demonstrate that the interaction potential and, in particular, its corrugation for fast atomic projectiles at surfaces can be derived with a high accuracy. PMID:18352749

  6. Many-body systems interacting via a two-body random ensemble. I. Angular momentum distribution in the ground states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.; Yoshinaga, N.

    2002-12-01

    In this paper we discuss in detail the P(I)’s, angular momentum I probabilities in the ground states, of many-body systems interacting via a two-body random ensemble (TBRE). In particular, we extensively apply an approach introduced in an earlier paper and compare the predicted P(I)’s with those obtained by diagonalizing a TBRE Hamiltonian. We begin with a few solvable cases, such as fermions in a small single-j shell and d boson systems, where elegant agreements between the predicted P(I)’s and those obtained by diagonalizing a TBRE Hamiltonian are achieved. We find that d boson systems systematically present counterexamples of angular momentum 0 ground state dominance when the number of d bosons is 6κ±1 with κ a natural number, which suggests that certain fundamental symmetry (say, time reversal invariance) of the Hamiltonian cannot ensure the occurrence of angular momentum 0 ground state dominance. Next, we apply the same approach to more complicated cases, such as even or odd number of fermions in a large single-j shell or a many-j shell, sd-boson or sdg-boson systems, etc. We find that the simple approach proposed in an earlier paper is also well applicable, and thus it is a universal approach. The numerical experiments provide a guideline to tell which interactions are essential to produce a sizable P(I) in a many-body system. This disproves a popular idea that the angular momentum 0 ground state (0 g.s.) dominance may be independent of two-body interactions. Some matrix elements which are useful to understand the observed regularities are given or addressed in detail. In this paper we also report a synchronous staggering between the 0 g.s. probabilities of even numbers of fermions in a single-j shells and j g.s. probabilities of odd numbers of fermions in a single-j shell when j is small. The low seniority chain of 0 g.s. using the same set of two-body interactions is confirmed, but it is noted that contribution to the total 0 g.s. probability

  7. Angular and internal state distributions of H2 (+) generated by (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of H2 using time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Perreault, William E; Mukherjee, Nandini; Zare, Richard N

    2016-06-01

    We report direct measurement of the anisotropy parameter β for the angular distribution of the photoelectron and photoion in (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization process of H2 X (1)Σg (+) (v = 0, J = 0) molecules through the intermediate H2 E,F (1)Σg (+) (v' = 0, J' = 0) level (λ = 201.684 nm) using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The time-of-flight spectra were recorded as the direction of polarization of the ionizing laser was varied with respect to the flight axis of the H2 molecular beam and were fitted to an angular distribution in an appropriately rotated coordinate system with the z-axis oriented along the time-of-flight axis. The anisotropy parameter β was found to be 1.72 ± 0.13 by fitting the time-of-flight spectra and agreed with previous measurements. Using secondary ionization with a delayed laser pulse of different wavelength, we also determined the vibrational energy distribution of the ions, showing that 98% ± 4% of the ions are generated in their ground vibrational state, in agreement with the calculated Franck-Condon factors between the H2 E,F (1)Σg (+) (v' = 0) and H2 (+) X (1)Σg (+) (v″) vibrational levels.

  8. Angular and energy distributions of fragment ions in dissociative double photoionization of acetylene molecules in the 31.9-50.0 eV photon energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcinelli, Stefano; Alagia, Michele; Farrar, James M.; Kalogerakis, Konstantinos S.; Pirani, Fernando; Richter, Robert; Schio, Luca; Stranges, Stefano; Rosi, Marzio; Vecchiocattivi, Franco

    2016-09-01

    The two-body dissociation reactions of the dication C2H2+2, initiated via double ionization of acetylene molecules by photons in the energy range 31.9-50.0 eV, have been studied by coupling photoelectron-photoion-photoion coincidence and ion imaging techniques. The angular distributions and kinetic energy of product ions, measured in the 31.9-50.0 eV energy range, exhibit significant differences for the three leading dissociation reactions with respect to a previous investigation carried out at a fixed energy of 39.0 eV, providing thus new information on the dynamical evolution of the system. The analysis of the results indicates that such dissociation reactions occur with a different mechanism. In particular, the symmetric dissociation in two CH+ ions is characterized by different dynamics, and the anisotropy of the angular distribution of ionic products increases with photon energy in a more pronounced way than the other two reactions. Moreover, the kinetic energy distribution of the symmetric dissociation reaction exhibits several components that change with photon energy. The new experimental findings cast light on the microscopic evolution of the system and can provide a laboratory reference for new theoretical calculations on specific features of the multidimensional potential energy surface, namely, the structure, energy and symmetry of dication states, the electronic state of dissociation products, energy barriers and their dependence on the geometry of the intermediate state.

  9. COEVOLUTION BETWEEN SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLES AND BULGES IS NOT VIA INTERNAL FEEDBACK REGULATION BUT BY RATIONED GAS SUPPLY DUE TO ANGULAR MOMENTUM DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cen, Renyue

    2015-05-20

    We reason that without physical fine-tuning, neither the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) nor the stellar bulges can self-regulate or inter-regulate by driving away already fallen cold gas to produce the observed correlation between them. We suggest an alternative scenario where the observed mass ratios of the SMBHs to bulges reflect the angular momentum distribution of infallen gas such that the mass reaching the stable accretion disk is a small fraction of that reaching the bulge region, averaged over the cosmological timescales. We test this scenario using high-resolution, large-scale cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, without active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback, assuming the angular momentum distribution of gas landing in the bulge region yields a Mestel disk that is supported by independent simulations resolving the Bondi radii of SMBHs. A mass ratio of 0.1%–0.3% between the very low angular momentum gas that free falls to the subparsec region to accrete to the SMBH and the overall star formation rate is found. This ratio is found to increase with increasing redshift to within a factor of ∼2, suggesting that the SMBH-to-bulge ratio is nearly redshift independent, with a modest increase with redshift, which is a testable prediction. Furthermore, the duty cycle of AGNs with high Eddington ratios is expected to increase significantly with redshift. Finally, while SMBHs and bulges are found to coevolve on ∼30–150 Myr timescales or longer, there is indication that on still smaller timescales, the SMBH accretion and star formation may be less correlated.

  10. Effects of macronutrient additions on nickel uptake and distribution in the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum donghaiense Lu.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hua-Sheng; Wang, Ming-Hua; Huang, Xu-Guang; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2009-06-01

    The influences of macronutrient additions on nickel (Ni) uptake and distribution in the subcellular structures and macromolecular components of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum donghaiense Lu were examined using a radioisotope tracer method. The results showed that nitrate addition enhanced the uptake of Ni by P. donghaiense, whereas phosphate addition inhibited Ni uptake at high-Ni concentration. Nitrate or phosphate addition significantly affected Ni distribution in the subcellular structures and components. The majority of Ni was found in the soluble substances (>70%) and in the proteins (55.0-79.6%) of the algal cells. Urea reduced the Ni content in the amino acid-carbohydrate but elevated its content in proteins, and shown significantly correlated with the protein content of the algal cells. Thus, nutrient enrichment could influence both metal uptake and its distribution in the subcellular structures and components of the phytoplankton, as well as its subsequent transfer in marine food chains. PMID:19217194

  11. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  12. Branching ratio and angular distribution of ejected electrons from Eu 4f76p1/2nd auto-ionizing states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao-Rui; Shen, Li; Zhang, Kai; Dai, Chang-Jian; Yang, Yu-Na

    2016-09-01

    The branching ratios of ions and the angular distributions of electrons ejected from the Eu 4f76p1/2nd auto-ionizing states are investigated with the velocity-map-imaging technique. To populate the above auto-ionizing states, the relevant bound Rydberg states have to be detected first. Two new bound Rydberg states are identified in the region between 41150 cm‑1 and 44580 cm‑1, from which auto-ionization spectra of the Eu 4f76p1/2nd states are observed with isolated core excitation method. With all preparations above, the branching ratios from the above auto-ionizing states to different final ionic states and the angular distributions of electrons ejected from these processes are measured systematically. Energy dependence of branching ratios and anisotropy parameters within the auto-ionization spectra are carefully analyzed, followed by a qualitative interpretation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174218).

  13. Photoelectron angular distributions as probes of cluster anion structure: I(-)·(H2O)2 and I(-)·(CH3CN)2.

    PubMed

    Mbaiwa, Foster; Holtgrewe, Nicholas; Dao, Diep Bich; Lasinski, Joshua; Mabbs, Richard

    2014-09-01

    The use of photoelectron angular distributions to provide structural details of cluster environments is investigated. Photoelectron spectra and angular distributions of I(-)·(H2O)2 and I(-)·(CH3CN)2 cluster anions are recorded over a range of photon energies. The anisotropy parameter (β) for electrons undergoes a sharp change (Δβmax) at photon energies close to a detachment channel threshold. I(-)·(H2O)2 results show the relationship between dipole moment and Δβmax to be similar to that observed in monosolvated I(-) detachment. The Δβmax of the 4.0 eV band in the I(-)·(CH3CN)2 photoelectron spectrum suggests a dipole moment of 5-6 D. This is consistent with predictions of a hydrogen bonded conformer of the I(-)·(CH3CN)2 cluster anion [Timerghazin, Q. K.; Nguyen, T. N.; Peslherbe, G. H. J. Chem. Phys. 2002, 116, 6867-6870].

  14. Combined linear polarization and angular distribution measurements of x-rays for precise determination of multipole-mixing in characteristic transitions of high-Z systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, G.; Bräuning, H.; Surzhykov, A.; Brandau, C.; Fritzsche, S.; Geyer, S.; Grisenti, R. E.; Hagmann, S.; Hahn, C.; Hess, R.; Hess, S.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kühnel, M.; Märtin, R.; Petridis, N.; Spillmann, U.; Trotsenko, S.; Winters, D. F. A.; Stöhlker, Th

    2015-07-01

    By applying novel-type position sensitive x-ray detectors as Compton polarimeters we recently performed a study of the linear polarization of Lyman-{{α }1} radiation following radiative electron capture into initially bare uranium ions. It was found that a model-independent determination of the ratio of the E1 and M2 transition amplitudes, and consequently of the corresponding transition rates, is feasible by combining the linear polarization data with a measurement of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation. In this work a detailed description of the underlying experimental technique for combined measurements of the linear polarization and the angular distribution of characteristic transitions in high-Z ions is presented. Special emphasis is given to the application of two, two-dimensional position-sensitive x-ray detectors for Compton polarimetry of hard x-rays. Moreover, we demonstrate the polarimeter efficiency of such detector systems can be significantly improved if events, where the charge is spread over neighboring segments, are reconstructed to be used in the polarization analysis.

  15. Branching ratio and angular distribution of ejected electrons from Eu 4f76p1/2nd auto-ionizing states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiao-Rui; Shen, Li; Zhang, Kai; Dai, Chang-Jian; Yang, Yu-Na

    2016-09-01

    The branching ratios of ions and the angular distributions of electrons ejected from the Eu 4f76p1/2nd auto-ionizing states are investigated with the velocity-map-imaging technique. To populate the above auto-ionizing states, the relevant bound Rydberg states have to be detected first. Two new bound Rydberg states are identified in the region between 41150 cm-1 and 44580 cm-1, from which auto-ionization spectra of the Eu 4f76p1/2nd states are observed with isolated core excitation method. With all preparations above, the branching ratios from the above auto-ionizing states to different final ionic states and the angular distributions of electrons ejected from these processes are measured systematically. Energy dependence of branching ratios and anisotropy parameters within the auto-ionization spectra are carefully analyzed, followed by a qualitative interpretation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174218).

  16. Fission fragment angular distributions in the reactions {sup 16}O+{sup 188}Os and {sup 28}Si+{sup 176}Yb

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, R.; Sudarshan, K.; Sharma, S. K.; Reddy, A. V. R.; Pujari, P. K.; Goswami, A.; Ramachandran, K.

    2009-06-15

    Fission fragment angular distributions have been measured in the reactions {sup 16}O+{sup 188}Os and {sup 28}Si+{sup 176}Yb to investigate the contribution from noncompound nucleus fission. Parameters for statistical model calculations were fixed using fission cross section data in the {sup 16}O+{sup 188}Os reaction. Experimental anisotropies were in reasonable agreement with those calculated using the statistical saddle point model for both reactions. The present results are also consistent with those of mass distribution studies in the fission of {sup 202}Po, formed in the reactions with varying entrance channel mass asymmetry. However, the present studies do not show a large fusion hindrance as reported in the pre-actinide region based on the measurement of evaporation residue cross section.

  17. Fission-fragment angular distributions and total kinetic energies for /sup 235/U(n,f) from. 18 to 8. 83 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, J.W.; Budtz-Joergensen, C.

    1982-01-01

    A gridded ion chamber was used to measure the fission fragment angular distribution and total kinetic energy for the /sup 235/U(n,f) reaction from 0.18 to 8.81 MeV neutron energy. The anisotropies are in generally good agreement with earlier measurements. The average total kinetic energy is approx. 0.2 MeV greater than the thermal value at neutron energies < 2 MeV and shows a sudden decrease of approx. 0.8 MeV between 4 and 5 MeV neutron energy, well below the (n, n'f) threshold. Possible causes of this decrease are a change in the mass distribution or decreased shell effects in the heavy fragment.

  18. Determination of the gluon distribution function of the nucleon using energy-energy angular pattern in deep-inelastic muon-deuteron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. R.; Aïd, S.; Anthony, P. L.; Baker, M. D.; Bartlett, J.; Bhatti, A. A.; Braun, H. M.; Busza, W.; Carroll, T. J.; Conrad, J. M.; Coutrakon, G.; Davisson, R.; Derado, I.; Dhawan, S. K.; Dougherty, W.; Dreyer, T.; Dziunikowska, K.; Eckardt, V.; Ecker, U.; Erdmann, M.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Gebauer, H. J.; Geesaman, D. F.; Gilman, R.; Green, M. C.; Haas, J.; Halliwell, C.; Hanlon, J.; Hantke, D.; Hughes, V. W.; Jackson, H. E.; Jancso, G.; Jansen, D. M.; Kaufman, S.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kirk, T.; Kobrak, H. G. E.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lord, J. J.; Lubatti, H. J.; McLeod, D.; Magill, S.; Malecki, P.; Manz, A.; Melanson, H.; Michael, D. G.; Mohr, W.; Montgomery, H. E.; Morfin, J. G.; Nickerson, R. B.; O'Day, S.; Olkiewicz, K.; Osborne, L.; Papavassiliou, V.; Pawlik, B.; Pipkin, F. M.; Ramberg, E. J.; Röser, A.; Ryan, J. J.; Salgado, C. W.; Salvarani, A.; Schellman, H.; Schmitt, M.; Schmitz, N.; Schüler, K. P.; Seyerlein, H. J.; Skuja, A.; Snow, G. A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Steinberg, P. H.; Stier, H. E.; Stopa, P.; Swanson, R. A.; Talaga, R.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trost, H. J.; Venkataramania, H.; Wilhelm, M.; Wilkes, J.; Wilson, Richard; Wittek, W.; Wolbers, S. A.; Zhao, T.

    1996-03-01

    We have used the energy-energy angular pattern of hadrons in inelastic muon-deuteron scattering to study perturbative QCD effects and to extract the gluon distribution function ηG( η) of the nucleon, where η is the fractional momentum carried by the gluon. The data were taken with the E665 spectrometer using the Fermilab Tevatron muon beam with a mean beam energy of 490 GeV. We present ηG( η) for 0.005< η<0.05 and at an average Q 2 of 8 GeV2 using this new technique. We find that ηG( η) in this region can be described by ηG( η) α ηλ with λ=-0.87±0.09( stat.)±{0.37/0.32}( sys.). We compare our results to expectations from various parametrizations of the parton distribution function and also to results from HERA.

  19. Angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakur, Asif; Sinatra, Taylor

    2013-12-01

    The gyroscope in a smartphone was employed in a physics laboratory setting to verify the conservation of angular momentum and the nonconservation of rotational kinetic energy. As is well-known, smartphones are ubiquitous on college campuses. These devices have a panoply of built-in sensors. This creates a unique opportunity for a new paradigm in the physics laboratory. Many traditional physics experiments can now be performed very conveniently in a pedagogically enlightening environment while simultaneously reducing the laboratory budget substantially by using student-owned smartphones.

  20. Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Terra Satellite. Part 1; Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, N. G.; Kato, S.; Loukachine, K.; Smith, N. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) provides coincident global cloud and aerosol properties together with reflected solar, emitted terrestrial longwave and infrared window radiative fluxes. These data are needed to improve our understanding and modeling of the interaction between clouds, aerosols and radiation at the top of the atmosphere, surface, and within the atmosphere. This paper describes the approach used to estimate top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes from instantaneous CERES radiance measurements on the Terra satellite. A key component involves the development of empirical angular distribution models (ADMs) that account for the angular dependence of Earth's radiation field at the TOA. The CERES Terra ADMs are developed using 24 months of CERES radiances, coincident cloud and aerosol retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and meteorological parameters from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMA0) s Goddard Earth Observing System DAS (GEOS-DAS V4.0.3) product. Scene information for the ADMs is from MODIS retrievals and GEOS-DAS V4.0.3 properties over ocean, land, desert and snow, for both clear and cloudy conditions. Because the CERES Terra ADMs are global, and far more CERES data is available on Terra than was available from CERES on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the methodology used to define CERES Terra ADMs is different in many respects from that used to develop CERES TRMM ADMs, particularly over snow/sea-ice, under cloudy conditions, and for clear scenes over land and desert.

  1. The Angular Momentum Distribution and Baryon Content of Star-forming Galaxies at z ˜ 1–3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.; Förster Schreiber, N. M.; Genzel, R.; Lang, P.; Tacconi, L. J.; Wisnioski, E.; Wuyts, S.; Bandara, K.; Beifiori, A.; Bender, R.; Brammer, G.; Chan, J.; Davies, R.; Dekel, A.; Fabricius, M.; Fossati, M.; Kulkarni, S.; Lutz, D.; Mendel, J. T.; Momcheva, I.; Nelson, E. J.; Naab, T.; Renzini, A.; Saglia, R.; Sharples, R. M.; Sternberg, A.; Wilman, D.; Wuyts, E.

    2016-08-01

    We analyze the angular momenta of massive star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at the peak of the cosmic star formation epoch (z ˜ 0.8–2.6). Our sample of ˜360 log(M */M ⊙) ˜ 9.3–11.8 SFGs is mainly based on the KMOS3D and SINS/zC-SINF surveys of Hα kinematics, and collectively provides a representative subset of the massive star-forming population. The inferred halo scale angular momentum distribution is broadly consistent with that theoretically predicted for their dark matter halos, in terms of mean spin parameter < λ > ˜ 0.037 and its dispersion (σ logλ ˜ 0.2). Spin parameters correlate with the disk radial scale and with their stellar surface density, but do not depend significantly on halo mass, stellar mass, or redshift. Our data thus support the long-standing assumption that on average, even at high redshifts, the specific angular momentum of disk galaxies reflects that of their dark matter halos (j d = j DM). The lack of correlation between λ × (j d /j DM) and the nuclear stellar density Σ*(1 kpc) favors a scenario where disk-internal angular momentum redistribution leads to “compaction” inside massive high-redshift disks. For our sample, the inferred average stellar to dark matter mass ratio is ˜2%, consistent with abundance matching results. Including the molecular gas, the total baryonic disk to dark matter mass ratio is ˜5% for halos near 1012 M ⊙, which corresponds to 31% of the cosmologically available baryons, implying that high-redshift disks are strongly baryon dominated. Based on observations obtained at the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO Programme IDs 075.A-0466, 076.A-0527, 079.A-0341, 080.A-0330, 080.A-0339, 080.A-0635, 081.B-0568, 081.A-0672, 082.A-0396, 183.A-0781, 087.A-0081, 088.A-0202, 088.A-0209, 091.A-0126, 092.A-0091, 093.A-0079, 094.A-0217, 095.A-0047, 096.A-0025).

  2. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkardt, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    Generalized parton distributions provide information on the distribution of quarks in impact parameter space. For transversely polarized nucleons, these impact parameter distributions are transversely distorted and this deviation from axial symmetry leads on average to a net transverse force from the spectators on the active quark in a DIS experiment. This force when acting along the whole trajectory of the active quark leads to transverse single-spin asymmetries. For a longitudinally polarized nucleon target, the transverse force implies a torque acting on the quark orbital angular momentum (OAM). The resulting change in OAM as the quark leaves the target equals the difference between the Jaffe-Manohar and Ji OAMs.

  3. Heteromodal conceptual processing in the angular gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Michael F.; Peelle, Jonathan E.; Cook, Philip A.; Grossman, Murray

    2013-01-01

    Concepts bind together the features commonly associated with objects and events to form networks in long-term semantic memory. These conceptual networks are the basis of human knowledge and underlie perception, imagination, and the ability to communicate about experiences and the contents of the environment. Although it is often assumed that this distributed semantic information is integrated in higher-level heteromodal association cortices, open questions remain about the role and anatomic basis of heteromodal representations in semantic memory. Here we used combined neuroimaging evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to characterize the cortical networks underlying concept representation. Using a lexical decision task, we examined the processing of concepts in four semantic categories that varied on their sensory-motor feature associations (sight, sound, manipulation, and abstract). We found that the angular gyrus was activated across all categories regardless of their modality-specific feature associations, consistent with a heteromodal account for the angular gyrus. Exploratory analyses suggested that categories with weighted sensory-motor features additionally recruited modality-specific association cortices. Furthermore, DTI tractography identified white matter tracts connecting these regions of modality-specific functional activation with the angular gyrus. These findings are consistent with a distributed semantic network that includes a heteromodal, integrative component in the angular gyrus in combination with sensory-motor feature representations in modality-specific association cortices. PMID:23333416

  4. Auger-electron angular distributions calculated without the two-step approximation: Calculation of angle-resolved resonant Auger spectra of C2 H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colle, Renato; Embriaco, Davide; Massini, Michol; Simonucci, Stefano; Taioli, Simone

    2004-10-01

    Analytic expressions for the direct, resonant, and interference contributions to the differential cross section of a resonant Auger process, produced by the inner-shell photoionization of a linear molecule either “fixed in space” or belonging to a gas of randomly oriented molecules, have been derived following Dill’s procedures [ Dill , Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 1393 (1980) ], but going beyond the two-step approximation. Angle-resolved Auger spectra of the C2H2 molecule measured on top of the C1s→π* resonance [ Kivimäki , J. Phys. B 30, 4279 (1997) ] have been calculated together with asymmetry parameters, analyzing also the different contributions to the electron angular distributions.

  5. A bi-directional charged particle telescope to observe flux, energy spectrum and angular distribution of relativistic and non-relativistic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, S. D.; Bhatnagar, S. P.; Kothari, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    A Charged Particle Telescope (CPT) was designed, fabricated and calibrated to make the following observations: (1) discrimination between various singly charged particles, e.g., electrons, muons and protons, in about 5 to 100 MeV energy range; (2) measurement of the flux and the energy of the charged particles incident to the telescope from two opposite directions and stopping in the telescope, thus obtaining flux and energy spectrum of downward and upward moving charged particles; and (3) measurement of the broad angular distribution of selected particles as a function of azimuthal angle. This telescope can be used to study low energy electron, muon and proton energy spectra. The experiment was flown in a high altitude balloon from Hyderabad, India, in December 1984. This same equipment is also useful in ground level electron, muon spectrum study.

  6. Role of nuclear dynamics in the Asymmetric molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions for C 1s photoejection from CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Miyabe, Shungo; Haxton, Dan; Rescigno, Tom; McCurdy, Bill

    2010-11-30

    We report the results of semiclassical calculations of the asymmetric molecular-frame photoelectron angular distributions for C 1s ionization of CO{sub 2} measured with respect to the CO{sup +} and O{sup +} ions produced by subsequent Auger decay, and show how the decay event can be used to probe ultrafast molecular dynamics of the transient cation. The fixed-nuclei photoionization amplitudes were constructed using variationally obtained electron-molecular ion scattering wave functions. The amplitudes are then used in a semiclassical manner to investigate their dependence on the nuclear dynamics of the cation. The method introduced here can be used to study other core-level ionization events.

  7. Two-dimensional ion-imaging of the angular distribution of fragments produced by photolysis of state-selected and oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Mastenbroek, J. W. G.; Taatjes, C. A.; Nauta, K.; Janssen, M. H. M.; Stolte, S.

    1995-04-01

    We use a combination of hexapole focusing and two-dimensional ion imaging to study the direct photolysis of methyl iodide molecules. Hexapole focusing allows us to select the (JKM) rotational state and orient the molecule before it is photolyzed. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of the products of the photolysis and two-dimensional imaging of the ions give us the internal energy and angular distribution of the fragments. Next to reporting results obtained with the photolysis of methyl iodide molecules we would like to discuss some future objects of study. Dissociation of linear triatomic molecules like BrCN, N2O and OCS results in rotationally highly excited diatomic fragments. The dynamics on the anisotropic excited state potentials can be revealed into much greater detail with oriented parents as compared to the conventional studies with isotropic parents.

  8. Measurement of dijet angular distributions and search for quark compositeness in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hartl, C; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kiesenhofer, W; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Benucci, L; Cerny, K; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Beauceron, S; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Devroede, O; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Hreus, T; Marage, P E; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Adler, V; Costantini, S; 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Florez, C; Gabella, W; Johns, W; Kurt, P; Maguire, C; Melo, A; Sheldon, P; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Lin, C; Neu, C; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Lamichhane, P; Mattson, M; Milstène, C; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Dasu, S; Efron, J; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Reeder, D; Ross, I; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M

    2011-05-20

    Dijet angular distributions are measured over a wide range of dijet invariant masses in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV, at the CERN LHC. The event sample, recorded with the CMS detector, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36 pb⁻¹. The data are found to be in good agreement with the predictions of perturbative QCD, and yield no evidence of quark compositeness. With a modified frequentist approach, a lower limit on the contact interaction scale for left-handed quarks of Λ⁺ = 5.6 TeV (Λ⁻ = 6.7 TeV) for destructive (constructive) interference is obtained at the 95% confidence level.

  9. Measurement of dijet angular distributions and search for quark compositeness in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV.

    PubMed

    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hartl, C; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kiesenhofer, W; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Benucci, L; Cerny, K; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Beauceron, S; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Devroede, O; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Hreus, T; Marage, P E; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Adler, V; Costantini, S; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; McCartin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Walsh, S; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Ceard, L; De Favereau De Jeneret, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; De Jesus Damiao, D; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; Da Costa, E M; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Oguri, V; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, F; Dias, F A; Dias, M A F; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Marinho, F; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dyulendarova, M; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xu, M; Yang, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Guo, S; Guo, Y; Li, W; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhang, L; Zhu, B; Zou, W; Cabrera, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Attikis, A; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Rykaczewski, H; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Mahmoud, M A; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Azzolini, V; Eerola, P; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Shreyber, I; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Broutin, C; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dahms, T; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Wyslouch, B; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Cardaci, M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Ferro, C; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Greder, S; Juillot, P; Karim, M; Le Bihan, A-C; Mikami, Y; Van Hove, P; Fassi, F; Mercier, D; Baty, C; Beaupere, N; Bedjidian, M; Bondu, O; Boudoul, G; Boumediene, D; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Falkiewicz, A; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sordini, V; Tosi, S; Tschudi, Y; Verdier, P; Xiao, H; Megrelidze, L; Roinishvili, V; Lomidze, D; Anagnostou, G; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Jussen, R; Klein, K; Merz, J; Mohr, N; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Ata, M; Bender, W; Erdmann, M; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Klimkovich, T; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Magass, C; Masetti, G; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Heydhausen, D; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Pooth, O; Rennefeld, J; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Thomas, M

    2011-05-20

    Dijet angular distributions are measured over a wide range of dijet invariant masses in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV, at the CERN LHC. The event sample, recorded with the CMS detector, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 36 pb⁻¹. The data are found to be in good agreement with the predictions of perturbative QCD, and yield no evidence of quark compositeness. With a modified frequentist approach, a lower limit on the contact interaction scale for left-handed quarks of Λ⁺ = 5.6 TeV (Λ⁻ = 6.7 TeV) for destructive (constructive) interference is obtained at the 95% confidence level. PMID:21668222

  10. Molecular photoelectron angular distribution rotations in multi-photon resonant ionization of H{sub 2}{sup +} by circularly polarized ultraviolet laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Kai-Jun Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D.

    2015-04-14

    We study effects of pulse durations on molecular photoelectron angular distributions (MPADs) in ultrafast circular polarization ultraviolet resonant ionization processes. Simulations performed on aligned H{sub 2}{sup +} by numerically solving time dependent Schrödinger equations show rotations of MPADs with respect to the molecular symmetry axes. It is found that in multi-photon resonant ionization processes, rotation angles are sensitive to pulse durations, which we attribute to the coherent resonant excitation between the ground state and the intermediate excited electronic state induced by Rabi oscillations. Multi-photon nonresonant and single photon ionization processes are simulated and compared which exhibit a constant rotation angle. An asymmetry parameter is introduced to describe the pulse duration sensitivity by perturbation theory models. Influence of pulse frequency detunings on MPADs is also investigated where oscillations of rotations are absent at long pulse durations due to nonresonance excitation.

  11. Energy and angular distribution of low energy H+ and D+ backscattered from polycrystalline carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Overbury, S. H.; Dittner, P. F.; Datz, S.; Thoe, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    The energy distributions of H/sup +/ and D/sup +/ backscattered from a polycrystalline graphite sample were recorded as a function of total scattering angle, angle of incidence, and for incident beam energies 200 < E/sub i/ < 3000 eV. The general shapes of the distributions are discussed qualitatively, and their variation with incident energy and total scattering angle are explained and compared with theoretical and other experimental results. The average energies E/sup - +/, of the distributions are found to increase relative to the single scattering energy, E/sub k/, with decreasing incident energy, E/sup - +//E/sub k/ also increases with increasing exit angle from the solid in a way which is slightly dependent upon the angle of incidence. The integrated intensities of the distributions are found to depend strongly upon the angle of incidence, with a normally incident beam producing a nearly cosine distribution of backscattered ions and grazing angles of incidence producing an intensity which peaks at an angle forward of the specular direction. Using charge fractions obtained previously for surface scattering from graphite and transmission through thin carbon foil, values of the particle reflection coefficient R/sub N/ are obtained as a function of energy.

  12. The Far-Field Angular Distribution of High-Order Harmonics Produced in Light Scattering from a Thin Low - Gas Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peatross, Justin Bruce

    The far-field angular distributions of high-order optical harmonics have been measured. Harmonics up to the 41st order were observed in the light scattered from noble gas targets subjected to very intense pulses of laser radiation with wavelength 1053nm. The experimental conditions minimized collective effects such as phase-mismatch due to propagation or refractive index effects caused, for example, by free electrons arising in the ionization of the target Ar, Kr, or Xe atoms. The angular distributions of many harmonic orders, ranging from the low teens to the upper thirties, all of which emerge collinear to the laser beam, could be distinguished and recorded simultaneously. Gaussian laser pulses, 1.25 -times-diffraction-limited and 1.4ps duration, were focused to intensities ranging from 1times 10^ {13} W/cm^2 to 5times 10^{14} W/cm ^2 using f/70 optics. A novel gas target localized the gas distribution to a thickness of about 1mm, less than one tenth of the laser confocal parameter, at pressures of 1 Torr and less. The narrow and low-density gas distribution employed in these experiments allows the harmonics to be thought of as emerging from atoms lying in a single plane in the interaction region. This is in contrast with previously reported harmonic generation experiments in which propagation effects played strong roles. At these pressures, an order of magnitude below pressures used in other experiments, free electrons created by ionization of target atoms had a negligible effect on the far-field harmonic profiles. We have found that the far-field distributions of nearly all of the harmonics exhibit a narrow central peak surrounded by broad wings of about the same width as the emerging laser beam. The relative widths and strengths of the wings have been found to vary with harmonic order, laser intensity, and atomic species. Since the intensity varies radially across the laser beam in the atomic source plane, an intensity-dependent phase variation among the

  13. Angular distributions and anisotropy of the fission fragments from neutron-induced fission of 233U and 209Bi in intermediate energy range 1-200 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobyev, A. S.; Gagarski, A. M.; Shcherbakov, O. A.; Vaishnene, L. A.; Barabanov, A. L.

    2016-09-01

    New results of the neutron-induced fission experiments carried out at the neutron time-of-flight spectrometer GNEIS of the PNPI are given. Angular distributions of fission fragments from the neutron-induced fission of 233U and 209Bi nuclei have been measured in the energy range 1-200 MeV using position sensitive multiwire proportional counters as fission fragment detector. The recent improvements of the measurement and data processing procedures are described. The data on anisotropy of fission fragments deduced from the measured angular distributions are presented in comparison with the experimental data of other authors.

  14. Photoionization of iodine atoms: Angular distributions and relative partial photoionization cross-sections in the energy region 11.0-23.0 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eypper, Marie; Innocenti, Fabrizio; Morris, Alan; Dyke, John M.; Stranges, Stefano; West, John B.; King, George C.

    2010-08-01

    Relative partial photoionization cross-sections and angular distribution parameters, β, have been measured for the first, I+(P32)←I(P23/2), and fourth, I+(D12)←I(P23/2), (5p)-1 photoelectron (PE) bands of atomic iodine, by performing angle-resolved constant-ionic-state (CIS) measurements on these PE bands in the photon energy range 11.0-23.0 eV. Three Rydberg series, two ns and one nd series, which converge to the I+ P31 limit at 11.33 eV and four Rydberg series, two ns and two nd series, which converge to the I+ D12 limit at 12.15 eV were observed in the first PE band CIS spectra. The fourth band CIS spectrum showed structure in the 12.9-14.1eV photon energy range, which is also seen in the first band CIS spectra. This structure arises from excitation to ns and nd Rydberg states that are parts of series converging to the I+ S10 limit we reported on earlier, as well as 5s→5p excitations in the photon energy range 17.5-22.5 eV. These atomic iodine CIS spectra show reasonably good agreement with the equivalent spectra obtained for atomic bromine. The β-plots for the first PE band recorded up to the I+ P31 and I+ D12 limits only show resonances corresponding to some of the 5p→nd excitations observed in the first band CIS spectra scanned to the I+ D12 limit (12.15 eV). These plots are interpreted in terms of an angular momentum transfer model with the positive values of β obtained on resonances corresponding to parity allowed jt=1 and 3 channels and the off-resonance negative β values corresponding to parity unfavored channels, where jt is the quantum number for angular momentum transfer between the molecule, and the ion and photoelectron. The β-plots recorded for iodine are significantly different from those obtained for atomic bromine. Comparison of the experimental CIS spectra and β-plots with available theoretical results highlights the need for higher level calculations which include factors such as configuration interaction in the initial and final

  15. Dynamics of multidissociation paths of acetaldehyde photoexcited at 157 nm: Branching ratios, distributions of kinetic energy, and angular anisotropies of products

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shih-Huang

    2009-11-07

    After the photolysis of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO) at 157.6 nm in a molecular-beam apparatus using photofragment translational spectroscopy and vacuum-ultraviolet photoionization to detect products, we observed 13 photofragments associated with six primary dissociation channels and secondary dissociation of products CH{sub 3}CO and HCO. We measured time-of-flight spectra and spatial angular anisotropies of products and evaluated the branching ratios of products. All photoproducts have nearly isotropic angular distributions with an average |{beta}| value less than 0.05. Primary dissociations to CH{sub 3}CO+H and CH{sub 3}+HCO are two major paths; most CH{sub 3}CO subsequently decomposes spontaneously to CH{sub 3}+CO and CH{sub 2}CO+H and most HCO decomposes to H+CO. The ternary dissociation to CH{sub 3}+CO+H thus accounts for approximately half of the total branching. Dissociations to CH{sub 2}CO+H{sub 2} and CH{sub 2}+CH{sub 2}O are observable, but the production of CH{sub 4}+CO is ambiguous. The productions of C{sub 2}H{sub 3}+OH and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O indicate that isomerization from acetaldehyde to ethenol occurs before fragmentation. After photoexcitation to the n-3p state, most acetaldehyde converts into states T{sub 1} and S{sub 0} but a little isomerizes to ethenol followed by multichannel decomposition.

  16. Sensitivity of MCNP5 calculations for a spherical numerical benchmark problem to the angular scattering distributions for deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Kozier, K. S.

    2006-07-01

    This paper examines the sensitivity of MCNP5 k{sub eff} results to various deuterium data files for a simple benchmark problem consisting of an 8.4-cm radius sphere of uranium surrounded by an annulus of deuterium at the nuclide number density corresponding to heavy water. This study was performed to help clarify why {Delta}k{sub eff} values of about 10 mk are obtained when different ENDF/B deuterium data files are used in simulations of critical experiments involving solutions of high-enrichment uranyl fluoride in heavy water, while simulations of low-leakage, heterogeneous critical lattices of natural-uranium fuel rods in heavy water show differences of <1 mk. The benchmark calculations were performed as a function of deuterium reflector thickness for several uranium compositions using deuterium ACE files derived from ENDF/B-VII.b1 (release beta 1), ENDF/B-VI.4 and JENDL-3.3, which differ primarily in the energy/angle distributions for elastic scattering <3.2 MeV. Calculations were also performed using modified ACE files having equiprobable cosine bin values in the centre-of-mass reference frame in a progressive manner with increasing energy. It was found that the {Delta}k{sub eff} values increased with deuterium reflector thickness and uranium enrichment. The studies using modified ACE files indicate that most of the reactivity differences arise at energies <1 MeV; hence, this energy range should be given priority if new scattering distribution measurements are undertaken. (authors)

  17. The power spectrum from the angular distribution of galaxies in the CFHTLS-Wide fields at redshift ˜0.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granett, B. R.; Guzzo, L.; Coupon, J.; Arnouts, S.; Hudelot, P.; Ilbert, O.; McCracken, H. J.; Mellier, Y.; Adami, C.; Bel, J.; Bolzonella, M.; Bottini, D.; Cappi, A.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; Franzetti, P.; Fritz, A.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Krywult, J.; Le Brun, V.; Le Fevre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Malek, K.; Marulli, F.; Meneux, B.; Paioro, L.; Polletta, M.; Pollo, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Schlagenhaufer, H.; Tasca, L.; Tojeiro, R.; Vergani, D.; Zanichelli, A.

    2012-03-01

    We measure the real-space galaxy power spectrum on large scales at redshifts 0.5-1.2 using optical colour selected samples from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. With the redshift distributions measured with a preliminary ˜14 000 spectroscopic redshifts from the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS), we deproject the angular distribution and directly estimate the three-dimensional power spectrum. We use a maximum likelihood estimator that is optimal for a Gaussian random field giving well-defined window functions and error estimates. This measurement presents an initial look at the large-scale structure field probed by the VIPERS. We measure the galaxy bias of the VIPERS-like sample to be bg= 1.38 ± 0.05 (σ8= 0.8) on scales k < 0.2 h Mpc-1 averaged over 0.5 < z < 1.2. We further investigate three photometric redshift slices, and marginalizing over the bias factors while keeping other Λ cold dark matter parameters fixed, we find the matter density Ωm= 0.30 ± 0.06.

  18. Charges and angular distributions of fast fragments produced in 3. 2-TeV /sup 16/O collisions with Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Gerbier, G.; Williams, W.T.; Price, P.B.; Guoxiao, R.; Vanderhaeghe, G.

    1987-11-30

    Out of 30 000 interactions of 3.2-TeV /sup 16/O nuclei in Pb, we found that no fast fragments had a charge Z>8, none with Zapprox. >5.5 had a charge that differed from an integer by as much as (1/3, and none with Zapprox. >5.5 had an angle to the beam >0.8 mrad. The cross section for production of a fast fragment with Z>8 or a stable particle with charge (19/3e, 20) / 3 e, (22/3e, or (23/3e is less than 240 ..mu..b at 90% confidence level. Using a measurement technique with a position resolution of 30 ..mu..rad, we found the transverse-momentum distributions for C, N, and O to be Gaussians with widths approx. =100 MeV/c, similar to those measured in projectile fragmentation of /sup 16/O at a factor 100 lower energy.

  19. Interacting Electrons in Parabolic Quantum Dots:. Energy Levels, Addition Energies, and Charge Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Michael; Siewert, Jens; Vojta, Thomas

    We investigate the properties of interacting electrons in a parabolic confinement. To this end we numerically diagonalize the Hamiltonian using the Hartree-Fock based diagonalization method which is related to the configuration interaction approach. We study different types of interactions, Coulomb as well as short range. In addition to the ground state energy we calculate the spatial charge distribution and compare the results to those of the classical calculation. We find that a sufficiently strong screened Coulomb interaction produces energy level bunching for classical as well as for quantum-mechanical dots. Bunching in the quantum-mechanical system occurs due to an interplay of kinetic and interaction energy, moreover, it is observed well before reaching the limit of a Wigner crystal. It also turns out that the shell structure of classical and quantum mechanical spatial charge distributions is quite similar.

  20. Interacting Electrons in Parabolic Quantum Dots:. Energy Levels, Addition Energies, and Charge Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Michael; Siewert, Jens; Vojta, Thomas

    2001-08-01

    We investigate the properties of interacting electrons in a parabolic confinement. To this end we numerically diagonalize the Hamiltonian using the Hartree-Fock based diagonalization method which is related to the configuration interaction approach. We study different types of interactions, Coulomb as well as short range. In addition to the ground state energy we calculate the spatial charge distribution and compare the results to those of the classical calculation. We find that a sufficiently strong screened Coulomb interaction produces energy level bunching for classical as well as for quantum-mechanical dots. Bunching in the quantum-mechanical system occurs due to an interplay of kinetic and interaction energy, moreover, it is observed well before reaching the limit of a Wigner crystal. It also turns out that the shell structure of classical and quantum mechanical spatial charge distributions is quite similar.

  1. Search for new phenomena in dijet mass and angular distributions from pp collisions at √{ s} = 13 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. 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V.; Pelikan, D.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penwell, J.; Peralva, B. S.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. 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M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-03-01

    This Letter describes a model-agnostic search for pairs of jets (dijets) produced by resonant and non-resonant phenomena beyond the Standard Model in 3.6 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions with a centre-of-mass energy of √{ s} = 13 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The distribution of the invariant mass of the two leading jets is examined for local excesses above a data-derived estimate of the smoothly falling prediction of the Standard Model. The data are also compared to a Monte Carlo simulation of Standard Model angular distributions derived from the rapidity of the two jets. No evidence of anomalous phenomena is observed in the data, which are used to exclude, at 95% CL, quantum black holes with threshold masses below 8.3 TeV, 8.1 TeV, or 5.1 TeV in three different benchmark scenarios; resonance masses below 5.2 TeV for excited quarks, 2.6 TeV in a W‧ model, a range of masses starting from mZ‧ = 1.5 TeV and couplings from gq = 0.2 in a Z‧ model; and contact interactions with a compositeness scale below 12.0 TeV and 17.5 TeV respectively for destructive and constructive interference between the new interaction and QCD processes. These results significantly extend the ATLAS limits obtained from 8 TeV data. Gaussian-shaped contributions to the mass distribution are also excluded if the effective cross-section exceeds values ranging from approximately 50-300 fb for masses below 2 TeV to 2-20 fb for masses above 4 TeV.

  2. Distribution and additive partitioning of diversity in freshwater mollusk communities in Southern Brazilian streams.

    PubMed

    Martello, Alcemar R; Hepp, Luiz U; Kotzian, Carla B

    2014-03-01

    Additive partitioning of species diversity is a promising approach for analyzing patterns of diversity in mollusk communities, especially their spatial distribution. Our aims were to assess the distribution of mollusk communities in Southern Brazilian streams, and to evaluate the partitioning of community diversity at different spatial scales. The study was carried out in the lower course of the Toropi River, one of the main tributaries of the Ibicui River Basin, in Southern Brazil. Four microbasins were considered: Sertão da Mata, Ribeirão, Tororaipi and Chiniquá, and sampling were undertaken in autumn, April and May 2009. Six sites were sampled in each stream: two in 1st-order segments, two in 2nd-order segments, and two in 3rd-order segments. All species found and the community as a whole, exhibited a clumped distribution. However, the variance-to-mean ratios for the Drepanotrema kermatoides and Heleobia bertoniana were higher than those of other species, suggesting a higher degree of aggregation. The additive partitioning of the species richness showed that the observed richness at smallest scale (alpha=within streams) represented 20.7%, and among-streams (beta1) represented 10.5% of the total richness. The richness and Shannon diversity index observed at the alpha scale, were higher than those observed at the first level of beta diversity scale (beta1=among-streams). The interaction between passive dispersal, tolerance to changes in some environmental variables, abiotic factors, and clumped distribution might have determined the spatial distribution of the communities studied. The greatest variation at the larger scales of analysis, involving among-orders and among-microbasins (beta2 and beta3, respectively) components, was expected, considering that the increase in distance leads to greater differences in richness (higher beta diversity). In conclusion, our results showed that the clumped distribution influenced the partition of the diversity of the

  3. Influence of dry mixing and distribution of conductive additives in cathodes for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Werner; Nötzel, Dorit; Wenzel, Valentin; Nirschl, Hermann

    2015-08-01

    Conductive additives, like carbon black or graphite, are essential components of lithium ion batteries due to the limited electrical conductivity of most electrode materials. However, there is still a lack of knowledge about the optimized distribution of these materials within the electrode. A dry mixing process is used in order to prepare a conductive coating by depositing carbon black on the surface of Li(Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3)O2 (NMC) cathode particles. It is demonstrated that this - from a theoretically point of view - favorable distribution does not allow the preparation of working electrodes without taking into account the role of the binder. After adding an organic binder to the slurry, the polymer deposits on top of the carbon shell during drying and inhibits the conductive contact between the particles. This can be avoided by a fraction of distributed carbon particles which are associated with the binder phase providing conductive paths through the isolating organic material. It is shown that carbon black and graphite are principally fulfilling this task, but both materials are leading to varying processing behavior and electrode properties.

  4. Angular and energy distribution of Sn ion debris ejected from a laser-produced plasma source, for laser power densities in the range suitable for extreme ultraviolet lithography

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, A.; Morris, O.; Sokell, E.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, experimental results are presented for the spatial and energy distributions of charge-discriminated Sn ions ejected from laser-produced plasmas. The plasmas were formed on solid, planar Sn targets, irradiated with a Nd:YAG laser. Ions were investigated using a calibrated electrostatic sector analyzer, scanning an energy-to-charge ratio range of 0.22 to 2.2 keV/e for emission angles between 20 and 80 degrees relative to target normal. Results were obtained for three laser power densities, in the region suitable for inducing significant extreme ultraviolet emission, of the order 1.5-8.1 x 10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}. The fully differentiated data were found to be well characterized by Gaussian fits, which allowed trends in the emission profiles to be readily quantified. Ions of set energy and charge were observed to possess a preferential angle of emission, the superposition of which yields a physical basis for the total angular emission observed previously and in this work. The experimental results obtained have been related to physical processes within the plasma that influence the energy and angle of ejection of ions from laser produced plasmas.

  5. Angular distributions of leptons from J/ ψ's produced in 920 GeV fixed-target proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Adams, M.; Agari, M.; Albrecht, H.; Aleksandrov, A.; Amaral, V.; Amorim, A.; Aplin, S. J.; Aushev, V.; Bagaturia, Y.; Balagura, V.; Bargiotti, M.; Barsukova, O.; Bastos, J.; Batista, J.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th. S.; Belkov, A.; Belkov, Ar.; Belotelov, I.; Bertin, A.; Bobchenko, B.; Böcker, M.; Bogatyrev, A.; Bohm, G.; Bräuer, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Bruschi, M.; Buchholz, P.; Buran, T.; Carvalho, J.; Conde, P.; Cruse, C.; Dam, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danilov, M.; de Castro, S.; Deppe, H.; Dong, X.; Dreis, H. B.; Egorytchev, V.; Ehret, K.; Eisele, F.; Emeliyanov, D.; Essenov, S.; Fabbri, L.; Faccioli, P.; Feuerstack-Raible, M.; Flammer, J.; Fominykh, B.; Funcke, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Gellrich, A.; Giacobbe, B.; Gläß, J.; Goloubkov, D.; Golubkov, Y.; Golutvin, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, I.; Gorišek, A.; Gouchtchine, O.; Goulart, D. C.; Gradl, S.; Gradl, W.; Grimaldi, F.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Guilitsky, Yu.; Hansen, J. D.; Hernández, J. M.; Hofmann, W.; Hohlmann, M.; Hott, T.; Hulsbergen, W.; Husemann, U.; Igonkina, O.; Ispiryan, M.; Jagla, T.; Jiang, C.; Kapitza, H.; Karabekyan, S.; Karpenko, N.; Keller, S.; Kessler, J.; Khasanov, F.; Kiryushin, Yu.; Kisel, I.; Klinkby, E.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kolanoski, H.; Korpar, S.; Krauss, C.; Kreuzer, P.; Križan, P.; Krücker, D.; Kupper, S.; Kvaratskheliia, T.; Lanyov, A.; Lau, K.; Lewendel, B.; Lohse, T.; Lomonosov, B.; Männer, R.; Mankel, R.; Masciocchi, S.; Massa, I.; Matchikhilian, I.; Medin, G.; Medinnis, M.; Mevius, M.; Michetti, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.; Mizuk, R.; Muresan, R.; Zur Nedden, M.; Negodaev, M.; Nörenberg, M.; Nowak, S.; Núñez Pardo de Vera, M. T.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Padilla, C.; Peralta, D.; Pernack, R.; Pestotnik, R.; Petersen, B. Aa.; Piccinini, M.; Pleier, M. A.; Poli, M.; Popov, V.; Pose, D.; Prystupa, S.; Pugatch, V.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Pyrlik, J.; Reeves, K.; Reßing, D.; Rick, H.; Riu, I.; Robmann, P.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rybnikov, V.; Sánchez, F.; Sbrizzi, A.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schreiner, A.; Schröder, H.; Schwanke, U.; Schwartz, A. J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Schwenninger, B.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Sciacca, F.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Shuvalov, S.; Silva, L.; Sözüer, L.; Solunin, S.; Somov, A.; Somov, S.; Spengler, J.; Spighi, R.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanovnik, A.; Starič, M.; Stegmann, C.; Subramania, H. S.; Symalla, M.; Tikhomirov, I.; Titov, M.; Tsakov, I.; Uwer, U.; van Eldik, C.; Vassiliev, Yu.; Villa, M.; Vitale, A.; Vukotic, I.; Wahlberg, H.; Walenta, A. H.; Walter, M.; Wang, J. J.; Wegener, D.; Werthenbach, U.; Wolters, H.; Wurth, R.; Wurz, A.; Xella-Hansen, S.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zeuner, T.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Z.; Zimmermann, R.; Živko, T.; Zoccoli, A.

    2009-04-01

    A study of the angular distributions of leptons from decays of J/ ψ’s produced in p-C and p-W collisions at sqrt{s}=41.6 GeV has been performed in the J/ ψ Feynman- x region -0.34< x F <0.14 and for J/ ψ transverse momenta up to 5.4 GeV/ c. The data were collected by the HERA-B experiment at the HERA proton ring of the DESY laboratory. The results, based on a clean selection of 2.3×105 J/ ψ’s reconstructed in both the e + e - and μ + μ - decay channels, indicate that J/ ψ’s are produced polarized. The magnitude of the effect is maximal at low p T . For p T >1 GeV/ c a significant dependence on the reference frame is found: the polar anisotropy is more pronounced in the Collins-Soper frame and almost vanishes in the helicity frame, where, instead, a significant azimuthal anisotropy arises.

  6. Detector system for the angular distribution measurement of 12C + 12C elastic scattering at 200-400A MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, W. W.; Zhang, G. L.; Terashima, S.; Guo, C. L.; Tanihata, I.; Le, X. Y.; Wang, T. F.; Zhang, X. H.; Sun, Z. Y.; Duan, L. M.; Hu, R. J.; Lu, C. G.; Ma, P.

    2016-10-01

    To obtain the angular distributions of 12C + 12C elastic scatterings with the incident energies of 200-400A MeV for the study of three-body forces, a detector system was constructed at second Radioactive Ion Beam Line in Lanzhou (RIBLL2) of Institute of Modern Physics (IMP). This system was composed of five plastic scintillation detectors with two read-outs for each detector, a Multi Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC) and a 4×4 CsI(Tl) array. The 12C beam with the incident energy of 200A MeV on a natural carbon target was used to test this detector system. It is found that the plastic scintillation detector can give the good energy loss (Δ E) and time of flight (TOF) signals, it can also reflect the position information of scattered 12C events. MWPC can precisely provide the trajectories of scattered particles. This system has a very good particle identification ability and can clearly distinguish the scattered 12C particles from the fragments. It can be used for the study of the three-body forces effect for high energy heavy-ion scattering.

  7. Angular distribution of different vibrational components of the X and B states reached after resonant Auger decay of core-excited H2O: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjelte, I.; Karlsson, L.; Svensson, S.; De Fanis, A.; Carravetta, V.; Saito, N.; Kitajima, M.; Tanaka, H.; Yoshida, H.; Hiraya, A.; Koyano, I.; Ueda, K.; Piancastelli, M. N.

    2005-02-01

    Vibrationally resolved spectra have been obtained for the lowest-lying cationic states XB12,AA12, and BB22 of the water molecule reached after participator resonant Auger decay of core-excited states. The angular distribution has been measured of the first four vibrational components of the X state in the photon energy regions including the O 1s →4a1 and the O 1s→2b2 core excitations, and for different portions of the vibrational envelope of the B state in the photon energy region including the O 1s→2b2 core excitation. For the X state, a large relative spread in β values of the different vibrational components is observed across both resonances. For the B state, a very different trend is observed for the high binding energy side and the low binding energy side of the related spectral feature as a function of photon energy. A theoretical method based on the scattering K matrix has been used to calculate both the photoabsorption spectrum and the β values, by taking both interference between direct and resonant photoemission and vibrational/lifetime interference into account. The numerical results show qualitative agreement with the trends detected in the experimental values and explain the conspicuous variations of the β values primarily in terms of coupling between direct and resonant photoemission by interaction terms of different sign for different final vibrational states.

  8. New 1π sr acceptance angle display-type ellipsoidal mesh analyzer for electron energy and two-dimensional angular distribution as well as imaging analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, László; Goto, Kentaro; Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Fumihiko; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2011-08-01

    We propose a Display-type Ellipsoidal Mesh Analyzer (DELMA) using a newly developed 1π sr wide acceptance angle electrostatic lens (WAAEL), energy aperture and some other electrostatic lenses [1-5]. It can display two-dimensional angular distributions of charged particles within the acceptance angle of ±60°, which is much larger than the largest acceptance angle range so far and comparable to the display-type spherical mirror analyzer (DIANA) developed by Daimon et al. [6,8-11]. It also has a focusing capability with 5 times magnification and ˜30 μm lateral resolution. The relative energy resolution is typically from 2 to 5×10-3 depending on the emission area of the sample, as well as on the diameter of energy aperture.Because this new analyzer has a function of low-magnification photoemission electron microscope, this instrument will be extended and applied as a new type Stereo-PEEM [7] in near future.

  9. Reaction mechanism in the {sup 16}O+{sup 27}Al system: Measurements and analysis of excitation functions and angular distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Unnati,; Singh, Devendra P.; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.; Bhardwaj, H. D.

    2007-06-15

    To study the dynamics of heavy ion fusion reactions in the lower mass region, experiments were carried out to measure the cross sections of radioactive residues produced in the interaction of the {sup 16}O ion with {sup 27}Al target nucleus at 19 different energies in very close intervals covering the energy range from {approx_equal}58 to 94 MeV, using the well-known recoil catcher off-line {gamma}-ray spectroscopy technique. The simulation of experimental data was performed using statistical-model-based computer codes, viz., CASCADE, PACE2, and ALICE-91. The analysis of measured excitation functions indicates that these residues are likely to be produced by complete fusion, incomplete fusion, and direct reaction processes. Furthermore, to confirm the contribution of different reaction channels, a complementary experiment was performed that measured the angular distributions of the residues produced in the {sup 16}O+{sup 27}Al system at 85 MeV beam energy. The analysis of the results of both experiments indicates that at these energies, the direct reactions compete with complete fusion and incomplete fusion reaction processes.

  10. Spectral Energy Distributions of Young Stars in IC 348: The Role of Disks in Angular Momentum Evolution of Young, Low-mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Blanc, Thompson S.; Covey, Kevin R.; Stassun, Keivan G.

    2011-08-01

    Theoretical work suggests that a young star's angular momentum content and rotation rate may be strongly influenced by magnetic interactions with its circumstellar disk. A generic prediction of these "disk-locking" theories is that a disk-locked star will be forced to co-rotate with the Keplerian angular velocity of the inner edge of the disk; that is, the disk's inner-truncation radius should equal its co-rotation radius. These theories have also been interpreted to suggest a gross correlation between young stars' rotation periods and the structural properties of their circumstellar disks, such that slowly rotating stars possess close-in disks that enforce the star's slow rotation, whereas rapidly rotating stars possess anemic or evacuated inner disks that are unable to brake the stars and instead the stars spin up as they contract. To test these expectations, we model the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 33 young stars in IC 348 with known rotation periods and infrared excesses indicating the presence of circumstellar disks. For each star, we match the observed SED, typically sampling 0.6-8.0 μm, to a grid of 200,000 pre-computed star+disk radiative transfer models, from which we infer the disk's inner-truncation radius. We then compare this truncation radius to the disk's co-rotation radius, calculated from the star's measured rotation period. We do not find obvious differences in the disk truncation radii of slow rotators versus rapid rotators. This holds true both at the level of whether close-in disk material is present at all, and in analyzing the precise location of the inner disk edge relative to the co-rotation radius among the subset of stars with close-in disk material. One interpretation is that disk locking is unimportant for the IC 348 stars in our sample. Alternatively, if disk locking does operate, then it must operate on both the slow and rapid rotators, potentially producing both spin-up and spin-down torques, and the transition from the

  11. A generalized additive model for the spatial distribution of snowpack in the Spanish Pyrenees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Moreno, J. I.; Nogués-Bravo, D.

    2005-10-01

    A generalized additive model (GAM) was used to model the spatial distribution of snow depth in the central Spanish Pyrenees. Statistically significant non-linear relationships were found between distinct location and topographical variables and the average depth of the April snowpack at 76 snow poles from 1985 to 2000. The joint effect of the predictor variables explained more than 73% of the variance of the dependent variable. The performance of the model was assessed by applying a number of quantitative approaches to the residuals from a cross-validation test. The relatively low estimated errors and the possibility of understanding the processes that control snow accumulation, through the response curves of each independent variable, indicate that GAMs may be a useful tool for interpolating local snow depth or other climate parameters.

  12. Effects of dimerization on the photoelectron angular distribution parameters from chiral camphor enantiomers obtained with circularly polarized vacuum-ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahon, Laurent; Garcia, Gustavo A.; Soldi-Lose, Héloïse; Daly, Steven; Powis, Ivan

    2010-09-01

    As an intermediate state of matter between the free monomeric gas phase and the solid state, clusters may exhibit a specific electronic structure and photoionization dynamics that can be unraveled by different types of electron spectroscopies. From mass-selected ion yield scans measured for photoionization of (R)-camphor, the ionization potentials (IPs) of the monomer (8.66±0.01 eV), and of the homochiral dimer (⩽8.37±0.01 eV) and trimer (⩽8.30±0.01 eV) were obtained. These spectra, combined with threshold photoelectron spectroscopy and velocity map ion imaging, allow us to show that the camphor monomer and dimer photoionization channels are decoupled, i.e., that the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the dimer does not undergo a dissociative ionization process that would lead to a spurious contribution to the monomer ion channel. Therefore mass selection, as achieved in our imaging photoelectron-photoion coincidence experiments, leads to size selection of the nascent monomer or dimer species. Since both the monomer and dimer are chiral, their photoelectron angular distribution (PAD) not only involves the usual β anisotropy parameter but also a chiral asymmetry parameter b1 that can generate a forward-backward asymmetry in the PAD. This has been investigated using circularly polarized light (CPL) to record the photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) in the near-threshold vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization region. Analysis of size-selected electron images recorded with left- and right-handed CPL shows that over the first 1.5 eV above the HOMO orbital ionization potentials (IPs), the β parameter is not affected by the dimerization process, while the chiral b1 parameter shows clear differences between the monomer and the dimer, confirming that PECD is a subtle long-range probe of the molecular potential.

  13. An apparatus for measuring the energy and angular distribution of secondary electrons emitted from water vapor by fast heavy-ion impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsawa, Daisuke; Kawauchi, Hidetaka; Hirabayashi, Masataka; Okada, Yuki; Honma, Toshihiro; Higashi, Akio; Amano, Shigeru; Hashimoto, Yoshinori; Soga, Fuminori; Sato, Yukio

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus has been built to measure the doubly differential cross-section of electron emission from water vapor with fast heavy-ion impact (6-25 MeV/u). Ejected electrons are detected by a Chevron-type microchannel plate assembly after being analyzed by a 45° inclined parallel-plate electrostatic spectrometer, which is rotatable from 20° to 160° with respect to the incident-beam direction. The scattering chamber is made of iron, and both the electron spectrometer and the detector assembly are mounted in a μ-metal housing in order to suppress the effects of stray magnetic fields (including that of Earth). Water vapor is emitted into the interaction region from a nozzle of 1 × 15 mm2 aperture, and is instantly frozen and trapped as ice on a stainless-steel panel, which is cooled by liquid N2. With this water-vapor generation and collection system, a stable water-vapor jet (10-2-10-3 Torr) was obtained without deteriorating the pressure in the scattering chamber (∼4 × 10-7 Torr with a vapor flow of 40.0 cc/min). Using the present apparatus, we have successfully measured the energy and angular distribution (7-10,000 eV and 20-160°) of secondary electrons produced in the collision of a 6.0-MeV/u He2+ ion with water vapor; binary-encounter collision peaks were clearly observed at the several keV region for angles smaller than 90°, as well as the K-LL Auger peak of oxygen at ∼500 eV for all angles.

  14. [Distribution of Phosphorus Forms in the Overlying Water Under Disturbance with the Addition of Algae].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Li, Yong; Li, Da-peng; Huang, Yong; Zhu, Pei-ying

    2016-04-15

    Distribution of different phosphorus (P) forms in the overlying water and the contribution of different algae to the P disappearance were investigated under disturbance with the addition of algae (Microcystis aeruginosa and Selenastrum capricornutum, respectively). The sediments and overlying water were taken from Meiliang Bay in Taihu Lake. The results showed that the concentrations of total P (TP), dissolved total P (DTP), dissolved inorganic P (DIP) and biavailable P (BAP) decreased with and without disturbance. The uptake of DTP and DIP by Microcystis aeruginosa was better than that of Selenastrum capricornutum under the disturbance, but it was the opposite without the disturbance. The disappearance of P in the overlying water was attributed completely to the physico-chemical adsorption of the suspended solids and the uptake of algae. But the contribution of suspended solids and algae depended on the disturbance. The contribution of Microcystis aeruginosa and Selenastrum capricornutum to DTP and DIP absorption was about 60% without disturbance. However, the value was reduced to 40% (Microcystis aeruginosa) and 25% ( Selenastrum capricornutum) under the disturbance. Under the disturbance and the action of algae, the distribution of sedimentary P forms changed. NH4 Cl-P and Ca-P release and Fe/Al-P increase were observed with and without disturbance. The decrease of NH4 Cl-P and Ca-P and the increase of Fe/Al-P were more obvious with disturbance than without disturbance. Selenastrum capricornutum was favor of the release of Ca-P and the formation of Fe/Al-P. PMID:27548963

  15. [Distribution of Phosphorus Forms in the Overlying Water Under Disturbance with the Addition of Algae].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Li, Yong; Li, Da-peng; Huang, Yong; Zhu, Pei-ying

    2016-04-15

    Distribution of different phosphorus (P) forms in the overlying water and the contribution of different algae to the P disappearance were investigated under disturbance with the addition of algae (Microcystis aeruginosa and Selenastrum capricornutum, respectively). The sediments and overlying water were taken from Meiliang Bay in Taihu Lake. The results showed that the concentrations of total P (TP), dissolved total P (DTP), dissolved inorganic P (DIP) and biavailable P (BAP) decreased with and without disturbance. The uptake of DTP and DIP by Microcystis aeruginosa was better than that of Selenastrum capricornutum under the disturbance, but it was the opposite without the disturbance. The disappearance of P in the overlying water was attributed completely to the physico-chemical adsorption of the suspended solids and the uptake of algae. But the contribution of suspended solids and algae depended on the disturbance. The contribution of Microcystis aeruginosa and Selenastrum capricornutum to DTP and DIP absorption was about 60% without disturbance. However, the value was reduced to 40% (Microcystis aeruginosa) and 25% ( Selenastrum capricornutum) under the disturbance. Under the disturbance and the action of algae, the distribution of sedimentary P forms changed. NH4 Cl-P and Ca-P release and Fe/Al-P increase were observed with and without disturbance. The decrease of NH4 Cl-P and Ca-P and the increase of Fe/Al-P were more obvious with disturbance than without disturbance. Selenastrum capricornutum was favor of the release of Ca-P and the formation of Fe/Al-P.

  16. Generalized linear and generalized additive models in studies of species distributions: Setting the scene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guisan, A.; Edwards, T.C.; Hastie, T.

    2002-01-01

    An important statistical development of the last 30 years has been the advance in regression analysis provided by generalized linear models (GLMs) and generalized additive models (GAMs). Here we introduce a series of papers prepared within the framework of an international workshop entitled: Advances in GLMs/GAMs modeling: from species distribution to environmental management, held in Riederalp, Switzerland, 6-11 August 2001. We first discuss some general uses of statistical models in ecology, as well as provide a short review of several key examples of the use of GLMs and GAMs in ecological modeling efforts. We next present an overview of GLMs and GAMs, and discuss some of their related statistics used for predictor selection, model diagnostics, and evaluation. Included is a discussion of several new approaches applicable to GLMs and GAMs, such as ridge regression, an alternative to stepwise selection of predictors, and methods for the identification of interactions by a combined use of regression trees and several other approaches. We close with an overview of the papers and how we feel they advance our understanding of their application to ecological modeling. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Angular distributions of secondary particles in {sup 132}Xe + Em collisions at an energy of 1 GeV per nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Basova, E.S.; Petrov, N.V.; Trofimova, T.P.; Tursunov, B.P.

    1995-03-01

    Data on the angular characteristics of charged secondary particles in {sup 132}Xe + Em collisions are presented. The experimental results are compared with the results of calculations made in the Dubna version of the cascade-evaporation model. 18 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Orbital angular momentum microlaser.

    PubMed

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-29

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes.

  19. Orbital angular momentum microlaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Pei; Zhang, Zhifeng; Sun, Jingbo; Walasik, Wiktor; Longhi, Stefano; Litchinitser, Natalia M.; Feng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Structured light provides an additional degree of freedom for modern optics and practical applications. The effective generation of orbital angular momentum (OAM) lasing, especially at a micro- and nanoscale, could address the growing demand for information capacity. By exploiting the emerging non-Hermitian photonics design at an exceptional point, we demonstrate a microring laser producing a single-mode OAM vortex lasing with the ability to precisely define the topological charge of the OAM mode. The polarization associated with OAM lasing can be further manipulated on demand, creating a radially polarized vortex emission. Our OAM microlaser could find applications in the next generation of integrated optoelectronic devices for optical communications in both quantum and classical regimes.

  20. Angular signal radiography.

    PubMed

    Li, Panyun; Zhang, Kai; Bao, Yuan; Ren, Yuqi; Ju, Zaiqiang; Wang, Yan; He, Qili; Zhu, Zhongzhu; Huang, Wanxia; Yuan, Qingxi; Zhu, Peiping

    2016-03-21

    Microscopy techniques using visible photons, x-rays, neutrons, and electrons have made remarkable impact in many scientific disciplines. The microscopic data can often be expressed as the convolution of the spatial distribution of certain properties of the specimens and the inherent response function of the imaging system. The x-ray grating interferometer (XGI), which is sensitive to the deviation angle of the incoming x-rays, has attracted significant attention in the past years due to its capability in achieving x-ray phase contrast imaging with low brilliance source. However, the comprehensive and analytical theoretical framework is yet to be presented. Herein, we propose a theoretical framework termed angular signal radiography (ASR) to describe the imaging process of the XGI system in a classical, comprehensive and analytical manner. We demonstrated, by means of theoretical deduction and synchrotron based experiments, that the spatial distribution of specimens' physical properties, including absorption, refraction and scattering, can be extracted by ASR in XGI. Implementation of ASR in XGI offers advantages such as simplified phase retrieval algorithm, reduced overall radiation dose, and improved image acquisition speed. These advantages, as well as the limitations of the proposed method, are systematically investigated in this paper. PMID:27136780

  1. Angular momentum in human walking.

    PubMed

    Herr, Hugh; Popovic, Marko

    2008-02-01

    Angular momentum is a conserved physical quantity for isolated systems where no external moments act about a body's center of mass (CM). However, in the case of legged locomotion, where the body interacts with the environment (ground reaction forces), there is no a priori reason for this relationship to hold. A key hypothesis in this paper is that angular momentum is highly regulated throughout the walking cycle about all three spatial directions [|Lt| approximately 0], and therefore horizontal ground reaction forces and the center of pressure trajectory can be explained predominantly through an analysis that assumes zero net moment about the body's CM. Using a 16-segment human model and gait data for 10 study participants, we found that calculated zero-moment forces closely match experimental values (Rx2=0.91; Ry2=0.90). Additionally, the centroidal moment pivot (point where a line parallel to the ground reaction force, passing through the CM, intersects the ground) never leaves the ground support base, highlighting how closely the body regulates angular momentum. Principal component analysis was used to examine segmental contributions to whole-body angular momentum. We found that whole-body angular momentum is small, despite substantial segmental momenta, indicating large segment-to-segment cancellations ( approximately 95% medio-lateral, approximately 70% anterior-posterior and approximately 80% vertical). Specifically, we show that adjacent leg-segment momenta are balanced in the medio-lateral direction (left foot momentum cancels right foot momentum, etc.). Further, pelvis and abdomen momenta are balanced by leg, chest and head momenta in the anterior-posterior direction, and leg momentum is balanced by upper-body momentum in the vertical direction. Finally, we discuss the determinants of gait in the context of these segment-to-segment cancellations of angular momentum.

  2. Localization of angular momentum in optical waves propagating through turbulence.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Darryl J; Oesch, Denis W

    2011-12-01

    This is the first in a series of papers demonstrating that photons with orbital angular momentum can be created in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence. The scope of this first paper is much narrower. Here, we demonstrate that atmospheric turbulence can impart non-trivial angular momentum to beams and that this non-trivial angular momentum is highly localized. Furthermore, creation of this angular momentum is a normal part of propagation through atmospheric turbulence. PMID:22273930

  3. Localization of angular momentum in optical waves propagating through turbulence.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Darryl J; Oesch, Denis W

    2011-12-01

    This is the first in a series of papers demonstrating that photons with orbital angular momentum can be created in optical waves propagating through distributed turbulence. The scope of this first paper is much narrower. Here, we demonstrate that atmospheric turbulence can impart non-trivial angular momentum to beams and that this non-trivial angular momentum is highly localized. Furthermore, creation of this angular momentum is a normal part of propagation through atmospheric turbulence.

  4. Maximum angular accuracy of pulsed laser radar in photocounting limit.

    PubMed

    Elbaum, M; Diament, P; King, M; Edelson, W

    1977-07-01

    To estimate the angular position of targets with pulsed laser radars, their images may be sensed with a fourquadrant noncoherent detector and the image photocounting distribution processed to obtain the angular estimates. The limits imposed on the accuracy of angular estimation by signal and background radiation shot noise, dark current noise, and target cross-section fluctuations are calculated. Maximum likelihood estimates of angular positions are derived for optically rough and specular targets and their performances compared with theoretical lower bounds.

  5. E1 and E2S factors of C12(α,γ0)O16 from γ-ray angular distributions with a 4 π-detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assunção, M.; Fey, M.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Kiener, J.; Tatischeff, V.; Hammer, J. W.; Beck, C.; Boukari-Pelissie, C.; Coc, A.; Correia, J. J.; Courtin, S.; Fleurot, F.; Galanopoulos, E.; Grama, C.; Haas, F.; Hammache, F.; Hannachi, F.; Harissopulos, S.; Korichi, A.; Kunz, R.; Ledu, D.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Malcherek, D.; Meunier, R.; Paradellis, Th.; Rousseau, M.; Rowley, N.; Staudt, G.; Szilner, S.; Thibaud, J. P.; Weil, J. L.

    2006-05-01

    A new experiment to determine the thermonuclear cross section of the C12(α,γ)O16 reaction has been performed in regular kinematics using an intense α-particle beam of up to 340 μA from the Stuttgart DYNAMITRON. For the first time, a 4π-germanium-detector setup has been used to measure the angular distribution of the γ rays at all angles simultaneously. It consisted of an array of nine EUROGAM high-purity Ge detectors in close geometry, actively shielded individually with bismuth germanate crystals. The C12 targets were isotopically enriched by magnetic separation during implantation. The depth profiles of the implanted carbon in the C12 targets were determined by Rutherford backscattering for purposes of cross-section normalization and absolute determination of the E1 and E2S factors. Angular distributions of the γ decay to the O16 ground state were measured in the energy range Ec.m.=1.30 2.78 MeV and in the angular range (lab.) 30° 130°. From these distributions, astrophysical E1 and E2S-factor functions vs energy were calculated, both of which are indispensable to the modeling of this reaction and the extrapolation toward lower energies. The separation of the E1 and E2 capture channels was done both by taking the phase value ϕ12 as a free parameter and by fixing it using the results of elastic α-particle scattering on C12 in the same energy range.

  6. E1 and E2 S factors of {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}{sub 0}){sup 16}O from {gamma}-ray angular distributions with a 4 {pi}-detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Assuncao, M.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Kiener, J.; Tatischeff, V.; Boukari-Pelissie, C.; Coc, A.; Correia, J.J.; Grama, C.; Hannachi, F.; Korichi, A.; LeDu, D.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Meunier, R.; Thibaud, J.P.; Beck, C.; Courtin, S.

    2006-05-15

    A new experiment to determine the thermonuclear cross section of the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction has been performed in regular kinematics using an intense {alpha}-particle beam of up to 340 {mu}A from the Stuttgart DYNAMITRON. For the first time, a 4{pi}-germanium-detector setup has been used to measure the angular distribution of the {gamma} rays at all angles simultaneously. It consisted of an array of nine EUROGAM high-purity Ge detectors in close geometry, actively shielded individually with bismuth germanate crystals. The {sup 12}C targets were isotopically enriched by magnetic separation during implantation. The depth profiles of the implanted carbon in the {sup 12}C targets were determined by Rutherford backscattering for purposes of cross-section normalization and absolute determination of the E1 and E2 S factors. Angular distributions of the {gamma} decay to the {sup 16}O ground state were measured in the energy range E{sub c.m.}=1.30-2.78 MeV and in the angular range (lab.) 30 deg. -130 deg. . From these distributions, astrophysical E1 and E2 S-factor functions vs energy were calculated, both of which are indispensable to the modeling of this reaction and the extrapolation toward lower energies. The separation of the E1 and E2 capture channels was done both by taking the phase value {phi}{sub 12} as a free parameter and by fixing it using the results of elastic {alpha}-particle scattering on {sup 12}C in the same energy range.

  7. Determination of solar flare accelerated ion angular distributions from SMM gamma ray and neutron measurements and determination of the He-3/H ratio in the solar photosphere from SMM gamma ray measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    Comparisons of Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) observations of gamma-ray line and neutron emission with theoretical calculation of their expected production by flare accelerated ion interactions in the solar atmosphere have led to significant advances in the understanding of solar flare particle acceleration and interaction, as well as the flare process itself. These comparisons have enabled the determination of, not only the total number and energy spectrum of accelerated ions trapped at the sun, but also the ion angular distribution as they interact in the solar atmosphere. The Monte Carlo program was modified to include in the calculations of ion trajectories the effects of both mirroring in converging magnetic fields and of pitch angle scattering. Comparing the results of these calculations with the SMM observations, not only the angular distribution of the interacting ions can be determined, but also the initial angular distribution of the ions at acceleration. The reliable determination of the solar photospheric He-3 abundance is of great importance for understanding nucleosynthesis in the early universe and its implications for cosmology, as well as for the study of the evolution of the sun. It is also essential for the determinations of the spectrum and total number of flare accelerated ions from the SMM/GRS gamma-ray line measurements. Systematic Monte Carlo calculations of the time dependence were made as a function of the He-3 abundance and other variables. A new series of calculations were compared for the time-dependent flux of 2.223 MeV neutron capture line emission and the ratio of the time-integrated flux in the 2.223 MeV line to that in the 4.1 to 6.4 MeV nuclear deexcitation band.

  8. Complete determination of the photoionization dynamics of a polyatomic molecule. II. Determination of radial dipole matrix elements and phases from experimental photoelectron angular distributions from A1Au acetylene.

    PubMed

    Hockett, Paul; Reid, Katharine L

    2007-10-21

    We present a fit to photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) measured following the photoionization of rotationally selected A1Au state acetylene. In the case of the 4(1)2Sigmau- vibronic state of the ion, we are able to use this fit to make a complete determination of the radial dipole matrix elements and phases connecting the prepared level to each photoelectron partial wave. We have also investigated other Renner-Teller subbands with a view to disentangling geometrical and dynamical contributions to the resulting PADs.

  9. Galactic angular momenta and angular momentum couplings in the large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Björn Malte; Merkel, Philipp M.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we revisit the acquisition of angular momentum of galaxies by tidal shearing and compute the angular momentum variance ? as well as the angular momentum correlation function CL(r), using tidal torquing in the Zel'dovich approximation as the model for angular momentum build-up. Under the assumption that haloes form at peaks in the density field we determine the protohalo's inertia from the peak shape and embed it in a tidal field. Inertia and shear are drawn from a random process and we compute the angular momentum variance and correlation function by sampling from a Gaussian distribution which shows the correct covariances between all relevant quantities. We describe the way in which the correlations in angular momentum result from an interplay of long-ranged correlations in the tidal shear and short-ranged correlations in the inertia field. Our description takes care of the relative orientation of the eigensystems of these two symmetric tensors. We propose a new form of the angular momentum correlation function which is able to distinguish between parallel and antiparallel alignment of angular momentum vectors, and comment on implications of intrinsic alignments for weak lensing measurements. We confirm the scaling L/M ∝ M2/3 and find the angular momentum distribution of Milky Way sized haloes to be correlated on scales of ˜1 Mpc h-1. The correlation function can be well fitted by an empirical relation of the form CL(r) ∝ exp(-[r/r0]β).

  10. Angular Acceleration without Torque?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    Hardly. Just as Robert Johns qualitatively describes angular acceleration by an internal force in his article "Acceleration Without Force?" here we will extend the discussion to consider angular acceleration by an internal torque. As we will see, this internal torque is due to an internal force acting at a distance from an instantaneous center.

  11. Angular distributions of reflected and refracted relativistic electron beams crossing a thin planar target at a small angle to its surface

    SciTech Connect

    Serov, A. V.; Mamonov, I. A.; Kol’tsov, A. V.

    2015-10-15

    The scattering of electrons by aluminum, copper, and lead foils, as well as by bimetallic aluminum-lead and aluminum-copper foils, has been studied experimentally. A microtron with an energy of particles of 7.4 MeV has been used as a source of electrons. The beam of particles incident on a target at small angles is split into particles reflected from the foil, which constitute a reflected beam, and particles crossing the foil, which constitute a refracted beam. The effect of the material and thickness of the foil, as well as the angle between the initial trajectory of the beam and the plane of the target, on the direction of motion and the angular divergence of the beam crossing the foil and the beam reflected from the foil has been analyzed. Furthermore, the effect of the sequence of metal layers in bimetallic films on the angles of refraction and reflection of the beam has been examined.

  12. Angular momentum effects in subbarrier fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Halbert, M.L.; Beene, J.R.; Hensley, D.C.; Honkanen, K.; Semkow, T.M.; Abenante, V.; Sarantites, D.G.; Li, Z.

    1988-01-01

    Angular-momentum distributions sigma/sub L/ for the compound nucleus /sup 164/Yb were deduced from measurements of ..gamma..-ray multiplicity for all significant evaporation residues from fusion of /sup 64/Ni and /sup 100/Mo at and below the Coulomb barrier. The excitation functions can be reproduced with coupled-channels calculations only if additional coupling beyond the known inelastic strengths is included. Even with this augmented coupling, however, at the lowest bombarding energies the experimental sigma/sub L/ extend to higher L values than the predictions. Single-barrier penetration models for a potential with an energy-dependent depth and shape fitted to the excitation function likewise underestimate the role of high-L partial waves. Somewhat better success is achieved with models in which fission is allowed to occur at distances comparable with or even larger than the Coulomb barrier radius. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Nonuniform character of the population of spin projections K for a fissile nucleus at the scission point and anisotropies in the angular distributions of fragments originating from the induced fission of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Kadmensky, S. G.; Bunakov, V. E.; Kadmensky, S. S.

    2012-11-15

    It is shown that the emergence of anisotropies in the angular distributions of fragments originating from the spontaneous and induced fission of oriented actinide nuclei is possible only if nonuniformities in the population of the projectionsM (K) of the fissile-nucleus spin onto the z axis of the laboratory frame (fissile-nucleus symmetry axis) appear simultaneously in the vicinity of the scission point but not in the vicinity of the outer saddle point of the deformation potential. The possibilities for creating the orientation of fissile nuclei for spontaneous and induced fission and the effect of these orientations on the anisotropies under analysis are considered. The role of Coriolis interaction as a unique source of the mixing of different-K fissile-nucleus states at all stages of the fission process is studied with allowance for the dynamical enhancement of this interaction for excited thermalized states of the nucleus involved that is characterized by a high energy density. It is shown that the absence of thermalization of excited states of the fissile nucleus that appear because of the effect of nonadiabaticity of its collective deformation motion in the vicinity of the scission point is a condition of conservation of the influence that transition fission states formed at the inner and outer fission barriers exerts on the distribution of the spin projections K for lowenergy spontaneous nuclear fission. It is confirmed that anisotropies observed in the angular distributions of fragments originating from the fission of nuclei that is induced by fast light particles (multiply charged ions) are due to the appearance of strongly excited equilibrium(nonequilibrium) states of the fissile nucleus in the vicinity of its scission point that have a Gibbs (non-Gibbs) distribution of projections K.

  14. Source Distribution Method for Unsteady One-Dimensional Flows With Small Mass, Momentum, and Heat Addition and Small Area Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirels, Harold

    1959-01-01

    A source distribution method is presented for obtaining flow perturbations due to small unsteady area variations, mass, momentum, and heat additions in a basic uniform (or piecewise uniform) one-dimensional flow. First, the perturbations due to an elemental area variation, mass, momentum, and heat addition are found. The general solution is then represented by a spatial and temporal distribution of these elemental (source) solutions. Emphasis is placed on discussing the physical nature of the flow phenomena. The method is illustrated by several examples. These include the determination of perturbations in basic flows consisting of (1) a shock propagating through a nonuniform tube, (2) a constant-velocity piston driving a shock, (3) ideal shock-tube flows, and (4) deflagrations initiated at a closed end. The method is particularly applicable for finding the perturbations due to relatively thin wall boundary layers.

  15. Angular velocity discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Three experiments designed to investigate the ability of naive observers to discriminate rotational velocities of two simultaneously viewed objects are described. Rotations are constrained to occur about the x and y axes, resulting in linear two-dimensional image trajectories. The results indicate that observers can discriminate angular velocities with a competence near that for linear velocities. However, perceived angular rate is influenced by structural aspects of the stimuli.

  16. Angular scattering functions of algae and silt: an analysis of backscattering to scattering fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Arnold G.; Hoogenboom, H. J.; Volten, H.; Schreurs, R.; de Haan, Johan F.

    1997-02-01

    In order to obtain more information on the angular scattering behavior of algae and silt research was initiated to determine whether or not the volume scattering functions by Petzold of the San Diego Harbor are appropriate for use in other types of turbid waters as is often stated in literature. This paper presents a selection of the measured angular scattering distribution functions over the range 10 degrees-165 degrees, the extrapolated angular scattering distribution functions extended to the range of 0 degrees- 180 degree by fitting Mie functions and the calculated backward scattering to total scattering ratios. The San Diego Harbor measurements by Petzold may not be applied to other turbid waters; it is in the backscattering region where the samples deviate most from the San Diego ASD from Petzold. A large addition to existing literature values for backscatter probabilities is presented for 14 freshwater and marine algal species samples and 2 estuarine silt samples.

  17. Angular distribution of the longitudinal p(vector sign)p(vector sign) spin correlation parameter A{sub zz} at 197.4 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Lorentz, B.; Haeberli, W.; Rathmann, F.; Wise, T.; Doskow, J.; Dzemidzic, M.; Meyer, H. O.; Pollock, R. E.; Przewoski, B. von; Rinckel, T.

    2000-05-01

    A polarized proton beam with a large longitudinal polarization component of 0.545{+-}0.005 (96% of the total polarization) was prepared in a storage ring (IUCF-Cooler). This was achieved by means of spin precession solenoids in two of the six straight sections of the ring. A polarized hydrogen storage cell target internal to the ring was used to measure the longitudinal spin correlation coefficient A{sub zz} in pp elastic scattering over the laboratory angular range 5.5 degree sign -43.5 degree sign ({theta}{sub c.m.}=11.5 degree sign -90 degree sign ) with statistical errors of typically 0.025. The absolute normalization was determined to an accuracy of 2.0% by use of the identity A{sub yy}-A{sub xx}-A{sub zz}{identical_to}1 at {theta}{sub c.m.}=90 degree sign . The identity also allows a reduction of the scale factor uncertainty of the previously published analyzing powers and spin correlation coefficients. The results are compared to recent pp partial wave analyses and NN potential models. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  18. Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite. Part 1; Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, N. G.; Smith, N. M.; Kato, S.; Miller, W. F.; Gupta, S. K.; Minnis, P.; Wielicki, B. A.

    2003-01-01

    Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES) investigates the critical role that clouds and aerosols play in modulating the radiative energy flow within the Earth-atmosphere system. CERES builds upon the foundation laid by previous missions, such as the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment, to provide highly accurate top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes together with coincident cloud and aerosol properties inferred from high-resolution imager measurements. This paper describes the method used to construct empirical angular distribution models (ADMs) for estimating shortwave, longwave, and window TOA radiative fluxes from CERES radiance measurements on board the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite. To construct the ADMs, multiangle CERES measurements are combined with coincident high-resolution Visible Infrared Scanner measurements and meteorological parameters from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts data assimilation product. The ADMs are stratified by scene types defined by parameters that have a strong influence on the angular dependence of Earth's radiation field at the TOA. Examples of how the new CERES ADMs depend upon the imager-based parameters are provided together with comparisons with existing models.

  19. Large-Angular-Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Smoot, G. F.

    1980-05-01

    We report the results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3 K cosmic background radiation. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (.089 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20 km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of 47 mK Hz{sup 1�}. The measurements how clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fit by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 360{+ or -}50km sec{sup -1} toward the direction 11.2{+ or -}0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 {+ or -}8 degrees declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypotheses of dipole and quadrupole angular distributions places a 1 mK limit on the amplitude of most components of quadrupole anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 mK limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 degrees.

  20. Effect of external phosphate addition on solid-phase iron distribution and iron accumulation in Mangrove Kandelia obovata (S. L.).

    PubMed

    Du, Jingna; Liu, Jingchun; Lu, Haoliang; Hansell, Dennis; Zhang, Qiong; Wang, Wenyun; Yan, Chongling

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of phosphate (PO4 (3-)) addition on iron (Fe) cycling in mangrove ecosystem. Kandelia obovata (S. L.), one of the dominant mangrove species in the southeast of China, was cultivated in rhizoboxes under three different levels of P concentrations. Results showed the solid-phase Fe distribution and Fe(II)/Fe(III) values in both the root zone (rhizosphere) and bulk soil (non-rhizosphere) were comparable among all P levels (p > 0.05); P addition significantly decreased the pore water Fe content both in the rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere zone (p < 0.05); higher amount of reactive Fe was found in rhizosphere sediments, while in the non-rhizosphere sediments, higher concentration of crystalline Fe was determined; P significantly increased iron plaque formation and iron accumulation in K. obovata (S. L.) tissues (p < 0.05); P addition increased K. obovata (S. L.) biomass and chlorophyll content. It was suggested that P is implicated in the Fe cycling in mangrove plants; more reactive iron, higher abundance of root Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) and Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), and together with higher amount of K. obovata (S. L.) root organic acids exudation result in a rapid Fe cycling in rhizosphere, which contribute to comparable solid-phase iron distribution among different P levels.

  1. Effect of external phosphate addition on solid-phase iron distribution and iron accumulation in Mangrove Kandelia obovata (S. L.).

    PubMed

    Du, Jingna; Liu, Jingchun; Lu, Haoliang; Hansell, Dennis; Zhang, Qiong; Wang, Wenyun; Yan, Chongling

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of phosphate (PO4 (3-)) addition on iron (Fe) cycling in mangrove ecosystem. Kandelia obovata (S. L.), one of the dominant mangrove species in the southeast of China, was cultivated in rhizoboxes under three different levels of P concentrations. Results showed the solid-phase Fe distribution and Fe(II)/Fe(III) values in both the root zone (rhizosphere) and bulk soil (non-rhizosphere) were comparable among all P levels (p > 0.05); P addition significantly decreased the pore water Fe content both in the rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere zone (p < 0.05); higher amount of reactive Fe was found in rhizosphere sediments, while in the non-rhizosphere sediments, higher concentration of crystalline Fe was determined; P significantly increased iron plaque formation and iron accumulation in K. obovata (S. L.) tissues (p < 0.05); P addition increased K. obovata (S. L.) biomass and chlorophyll content. It was suggested that P is implicated in the Fe cycling in mangrove plants; more reactive iron, higher abundance of root Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) and Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), and together with higher amount of K. obovata (S. L.) root organic acids exudation result in a rapid Fe cycling in rhizosphere, which contribute to comparable solid-phase iron distribution among different P levels. PMID:25943505

  2. Nitrogen oxide abatement by distributed fuel addition. Quarterly report No. 2, November 1, 1987--January 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, J.O.L.; Meraab, J.

    1988-03-25

    The purpose of this project is to develop techniques for nitrogen oxides abatement by distributed fuel addition. The major nitrogen oxide of interest is Nitric Oxide (NO), a precursor to premature forest damage and to acid rain. Recently interest has also been evoked with respect to an additional oxide of nitrogen, namely Nitrous Oxide (N{sub 2}O). Therefore, abatement measures for NO{sub x} are being investigated to determine their influence on N{sub 2}O as well. This report briefly describes the significance of N{sub 2}O emissions to the environment and the urgent need to develop techniques that can reduce emissions of both NO and N{sub 2}O. Reburning through distributed fuel addition may be an effective technique for NO{sub x} (mainly NO) emission control as described in the previous quarterly report. Reburning may also be effective in reducing N{sub 2}O levels. A technique for N{sub 2}O measurement by gas chromatography/electron capture detection was developed during this quarter, and is described in this report. This analysis technique will be used in the proposed experimental study to investigate the effectiveness of reburning on N{sub 2}O control.

  3. Auger-electron angular distributions calculated without the two-step approximation: Calculation of angle-resolved resonant Auger spectra of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Colle, Renato; Embriaco, Davide; Massini, Michol; Simonucci, Stefano; Taioli, Simone

    2004-10-01

    Analytic expressions for the direct, resonant, and interference contributions to the differential cross section of a resonant Auger process, produced by the inner-shell photoionization of a linear molecule either 'fixed in space' or belonging to a gas of randomly oriented molecules, have been derived following Dill's procedures [Dill et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 45, 1393 (1980)], but going beyond the two-step approximation. Angle-resolved Auger spectra of the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} molecule measured on top of the C 1s{yields}{pi}* resonance [Kivimaeki et al., J. Phys. B 30, 4279 (1997)] have been calculated together with asymmetry parameters, analyzing also the different contributions to the electron angular distributions.

  4. Angular distribution measurements of the xenon N{sub 4,5}O{sub 2,3}O{sub 2,3} Auger electrons: Determination of alignment and intrinsic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, G.; Kukk, E.; Berrah, N.

    2000-04-01

    In the framework of the two-step model of Auger decay the alignment of the xenon 4d{sup -1} primary hole states has been derived as a function of photon energy. This quantity was obtained from angular distribution measurements of the N{sub 4,5}O{sub 2,3}O{sub 2,3} Auger lines after ionization of free atoms by monochromatized synchrotron radiation of 80-250 eV photon energy. The data show a minimum of the alignment parameter in the Cooper minimum of the 4d photoionization cross section, which proves the vanishing of the outgoing {epsilon}f electron wave. Furthermore, the intrinsic parameters for all lines in this Auger group were determined and are compared with previous experiments and calculations. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  5. LOCAL MAGNETIC BEHAVIOR OF 54Fe in EuFe2As2 AND Eu0.5K0.5Fe2As2: MICROSCOPIC STUDY USING TIME DIFFERENTIAL PERTURBED ANGULAR DISTRIBUTION (TDPAD) SPECTROSCOPY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanta, S. K.; Mishra, S. N.; Davane, S. M.; Layek, S.; Hossain, Z.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we report the time differential perturbed angular distribution measurements of 54Fe on a polycrystalline EuFe2As2 and Eu0.5K0.5Fe2As2. The hyperfine field and nuclear spin-relaxation rate are strongly temperature dependent in the paramagnetic state suggesting strong spin fluctuation in the parent compound. The local susceptibility show Curie-Weiss-like temperature dependence and Korringa-like relaxation in the tetragonal phase indicating the presence of local moment. In the orthorhombic phase, the hyperfine field behavior suggesting quasi two-dimensional magnetic ordering. The experimental results are in a good agreement with first-principle calculations based on density functional theory.

  6. Parity-violating deep-inelastic electron-deuteron scattering: Higher twist and parton angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seng, Chien-Yeah; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.

    2013-07-01

    We study the effect of parton angular momentum on the twist-four correction to the left-right asymmetry in the electron-deuteron parity-violating deep-inelastic scattering (PVDIS). We show that this higher-twist correction is transparent to the dynamics of parton angular momentum needed to account for the Sivers and Boer-Mulders functions and spin-independent parton distribution functions. A sufficiently precise measurement of the PVDIS asymmetry may, thus, provide additional information about the parton dynamics responsible for nucleon spin.

  7. Particle size distribution and chemical composition of total mixed rations for dairy cattle: water addition and feed sampling effects.

    PubMed

    Arzola-Alvarez, C; Bocanegra-Viezca, J A; Murphy, M R; Salinas-Chavira, J; Corral-Luna, A; Romanos, A; Ruíz-Barrera, O; Rodríguez-Muela, C

    2010-09-01

    Four dairy farms were used to determine the effects of water addition to diets and sample collection location on the particle size distribution and chemical composition of total mixed rations (TMR). Samples were collected weekly from the mixing wagon and from 3 locations in the feed bunk (top, middle, and bottom) for 5 mo (April, May, July, August, and October). Samples were partially dried to determine the effect of moisture on particle size distribution. Particle size distribution was measured using the Penn State Particle Size Separator. Crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber contents were also analyzed. Particle fractions 19 to 8, 8 to 1.18, and <1.18 mm were judged adequate in all TMR for rumen function and milk yield; however, the percentage of material>19 mm was greater than recommended for TMR, according to the guidelines of Cooperative Extension of Pennsylvania State University. The particle size distribution in April differed from that in October, but intermediate months (May, July, and August) had similar particle size distributions. Samples from the bottom of the feed bunk had the highest percentage of particles retained on the 19-mm sieve. Samples from the top and middle of the feed bunk were similar to that from the mixing wagon. Higher percentages of particles were retained on >19, 19 to 8, and 8 to 1.18 mm sieves for wet than dried samples. The reverse was found for particles passing the 1.18-mm sieve. Mean particle size was higher for wet than dried samples. The crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber contents of TMR varied with month of sampling (18-21, 40-57, and 21-34%, respectively) but were within recommended ranges for high-yielding dairy cows. Analyses of TMR particle size distributions are useful for proper feed bunk management and formulation of diets that maintain rumen function and maximize milk production and quality. Water addition may help reduce dust associated with feeding TMR. PMID

  8. Angular velocity-based structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yizheng; Kiremidjian, Anne S.; Rajagopal, Ram; Loh, Chin-Hsiung

    2016-04-01

    Damage detection is an important application of structural health monitoring. With the recent development of sensing technology, additional information about structures, angular velocity, has become available. In this paper, the angular velocity signals obtained from gyroscopes are modeled as an autoregressive (AR) model. The damage sensitive features (DSFs) are defined as a function of the AR coefficients. It is found that the mean values of the DSF for the damaged and undamaged signals are different. Also, we show that the angular velocity- based AR model has a linear relationship with the acceleration-based AR model. To test the proposed damage detection method, the algorithm has been tested with the experimental data from a recent shake table test where the damage is introduced systemically. The results indicate that the change of DSF means is statistically significant, and the angular velocity-based DSFs are sensitive to damage.

  9. Unveiling Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Angular momentum is a notoriously difficult concept to grasp. Visualization often requires three-dimensional pictures of vectors pointing in seemingly arbitrary directions. A simple student-run laboratory experiment coupled with intuitive explanations by an instructor can clear up some of the inherent ambiguity of rotational motion. Specifically, the precessional period of a suspended spinning bicycle wheel can be related to the spinning frequency through a simple algebraic expression. An explanation of this precession apart from the concept of angular momentum will be given.

  10. Angular shear plate

    SciTech Connect

    Ruda, Mitchell C.; Greynolds, Alan W.; Stuhlinger, Tilman W.

    2009-07-14

    One or more disc-shaped angular shear plates each include a region thereon having a thickness that varies with a nonlinear function. For the case of two such shear plates, they are positioned in a facing relationship and rotated relative to each other. Light passing through the variable thickness regions in the angular plates is refracted. By properly timing the relative rotation of the plates and by the use of an appropriate polynomial function for the thickness of the shear plate, light passing therethrough can be focused at variable positions.

  11. Controlling neutron orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Clark, Charles W; Barankov, Roman; Huber, Michael G; Arif, Muhammad; Cory, David G; Pushin, Dmitry A

    2015-09-24

    The quantized orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons offers an additional degree of freedom and topological protection from noise. Photonic OAM states have therefore been exploited in various applications ranging from studies of quantum entanglement and quantum information science to imaging. The OAM states of electron beams have been shown to be similarly useful, for example in rotating nanoparticles and determining the chirality of crystals. However, although neutrons--as massive, penetrating and neutral particles--are important in materials characterization, quantum information and studies of the foundations of quantum mechanics, OAM control of neutrons has yet to be achieved. Here, we demonstrate OAM control of neutrons using macroscopic spiral phase plates that apply a 'twist' to an input neutron beam. The twisted neutron beams are analysed with neutron interferometry. Our techniques, applied to spatially incoherent beams, demonstrate both the addition of quantum angular momenta along the direction of propagation, effected by multiple spiral phase plates, and the conservation of topological charge with respect to uniform phase fluctuations. Neutron-based studies of quantum information science, the foundations of quantum mechanics, and scattering and imaging of magnetic, superconducting and chiral materials have until now been limited to three degrees of freedom: spin, path and energy. The optimization of OAM control, leading to well defined values of OAM, would provide an additional quantized degree of freedom for such studies.

  12. Induced Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  13. Integrating multibeam backscatter angular response, mosaic and bathymetry data for benthic habitat mapping.

    PubMed

    Che Hasan, Rozaimi; Ierodiaconou, Daniel; Laurenson, Laurie; Schimel, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Multibeam echosounders (MBES) are increasingly becoming the tool of choice for marine habitat mapping applications. In turn, the rapid expansion of habitat mapping studies has resulted in a need for automated classification techniques to efficiently map benthic habitats, assess confidence in model outputs, and evaluate the importance of variables driving the patterns observed. The benthic habitat characterisation process often involves the analysis of MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic or angular response with observation data providing ground truth. However, studies that make use of the full range of MBES outputs within a single classification process are limited. We present an approach that integrates backscatter angular response with MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic and their derivatives in a classification process using a Random Forests (RF) machine-learning algorithm to predict the distribution of benthic biological habitats. This approach includes a method of deriving statistical features from backscatter angular response curves created from MBES data collated within homogeneous regions of a backscatter mosaic. Using the RF algorithm we assess the relative importance of each variable in order to optimise the classification process and simplify models applied. The results showed that the inclusion of the angular response features in the classification process improved the accuracy of the final habitat maps from 88.5% to 93.6%. The RF algorithm identified bathymetry and the angular response mean as the two most important predictors. However, the highest classification rates were only obtained after incorporating additional features derived from bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic. The angular response features were found to be more important to the classification process compared to the backscatter mosaic features. This analysis indicates that integrating angular response information with bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic, along with their derivatives

  14. Integrating Multibeam Backscatter Angular Response, Mosaic and Bathymetry Data for Benthic Habitat Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Che Hasan, Rozaimi; Ierodiaconou, Daniel; Laurenson, Laurie; Schimel, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Multibeam echosounders (MBES) are increasingly becoming the tool of choice for marine habitat mapping applications. In turn, the rapid expansion of habitat mapping studies has resulted in a need for automated classification techniques to efficiently map benthic habitats, assess confidence in model outputs, and evaluate the importance of variables driving the patterns observed. The benthic habitat characterisation process often involves the analysis of MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic or angular response with observation data providing ground truth. However, studies that make use of the full range of MBES outputs within a single classification process are limited. We present an approach that integrates backscatter angular response with MBES bathymetry, backscatter mosaic and their derivatives in a classification process using a Random Forests (RF) machine-learning algorithm to predict the distribution of benthic biological habitats. This approach includes a method of deriving statistical features from backscatter angular response curves created from MBES data collated within homogeneous regions of a backscatter mosaic. Using the RF algorithm we assess the relative importance of each variable in order to optimise the classification process and simplify models applied. The results showed that the inclusion of the angular response features in the classification process improved the accuracy of the final habitat maps from 88.5% to 93.6%. The RF algorithm identified bathymetry and the angular response mean as the two most important predictors. However, the highest classification rates were only obtained after incorporating additional features derived from bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic. The angular response features were found to be more important to the classification process compared to the backscatter mosaic features. This analysis indicates that integrating angular response information with bathymetry and the backscatter mosaic, along with their derivatives

  15. Angular Synchronization by Eigenvectors and Semidefinite Programming

    PubMed Central

    Singer, A.

    2010-01-01

    The angular synchronization problem is to obtain an accurate estimation (up to a constant additive phase) for a set of unknown angles θ1, …, θn from m noisy measurements of their offsets θi − θj mod 2π. Of particular interest is angle recovery in the presence of many outlier measurements that are uniformly distributed in [0, 2π) and carry no information on the true offsets. We introduce an efficient recovery algorithm for the unknown angles from the top eigenvector of a specially designed Hermitian matrix. The eigenvector method is extremely stable and succeeds even when the number of outliers is exceedingly large. For example, we successfully estimate n = 400 angles from a full set of m=(4002) offset measurements of which 90% are outliers in less than a second on a commercial laptop. The performance of the method is analyzed using random matrix theory and information theory. We discuss the relation of the synchronization problem to the combinatorial optimization problem Max-2-Lin mod L and present a semidefinite relaxation for angle recovery, drawing similarities with the Goemans-Williamson algorithm for finding the maximum cut in a weighted graph. We present extensions of the eigenvector method to other synchronization problems that involve different group structures and their applications, such as the time synchronization problem in distributed networks and the surface reconstruction problems in computer vision and optics. PMID:21179593

  16. Neutron angular distributions from the core break-up reactions of the {sup 11}Be and {sup 11}Li halo nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Grevy, S.; Axelsson, L.; Jonson, B.; Nilsson, T.; Nyman, G.; Smedberg, M.; Angelique, J. C.; Orr, N.; Anne, R.; Lewitowicz, M.; Saint-Laurent, M. G.; Guillemaud-Mueller, D.; Mueller, A. C.; Pougheon, F.; Sorlin, O.; Hansen, P. G.; Hornshoj, P.; Riisager, K.

    1998-12-21

    The halo nuclei {sup 11}Be and {sup 11}Li have been studied through core break-up reactions, where the halo neutrons are detected in anti-coincidence with the core of the halo nucleus. In this particular channel, the halo neutrons are not expected to participate in the reaction and should therefore show the same properties as when situated inside the halo nucleus. The widths of the halo neutron momentum distributions have been extracted in coincidence with He fragments, {gamma}=32{+-}4 MeV/c, and Li fragments, {gamma}=42{+-}4 MeV/c for {sup 11}Be and with He fragments, {gamma}=42{+-}6 MeV/c for {sup 11}Li. An experimental value of the shadow effect for {sup 11}Be when breaking up to Li and He fragments has been obtained to be 0.63. A simple theoretical calculation to reproduce this value is given.

  17. Measurement of the angular distribution of the electron from W {r_arrow} e = {nu} decay, in p pbar at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV, as function of P{sub T}{sup W}

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The goal of this work is to study the behavior of the angular distribution of the electron from the decay of the W boson in a specific rest frame of the W, the Collins-Soper frame. More specifically, the parameter {alpha}{sub 2} from the expression d{sigma}/d(P{sub T}{sup W}){sup 2} d cos {theta}* = k(1 + {alpha}{sub 2} cos {theta}* + {alpha}{sup 2}(cos {theta}*){sup 2}), corresponding to the distribution of cos {theta}* in the Collins-Soper frame, was measured. The experimental value of {alpha}P{sub 2} was compared with the predictions made by E. Mirkes [11] who included the radiative QCD perturbations in the weak-interaction B{sub boson} {r_arrow} lepton + lepton. This experimental value was extracted for the first time using knowledge about how the radiative QCD perturbations will modify the predictions given by the Electro-Weak process only.

  18. Quark and Gluon Orbital Angular Momentum: Where Are We?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorcé, Cédric; Liu, Keh-Fei

    2016-06-01

    The orbital angular momentum of quarks and gluons contributes significantly to the proton spin budget and attracted a lot of attention in the recent years, both theoretically and experimentally. We summarize the various definitions of parton orbital angular momentum together with their relations with parton distributions functions. In particular, we highlight current theoretical puzzles and give some prospects.

  19. Time-resolved orbital angular momentum spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Noyan, Mehmet A.; Kikkawa, James M.

    2015-07-20

    We introduce pump-probe magneto-orbital spectroscopy, wherein Laguerre-Gauss optical pump pulses impart orbital angular momentum to the electronic states of a material and subsequent dynamics are studied with 100 fs time resolution. The excitation uses vortex modes that distribute angular momentum over a macroscopic area determined by the spot size, and the optical probe studies the chiral imbalance of vortex modes reflected off the sample. First observations in bulk GaAs yield transients that evolve on time scales distinctly different from population and spin relaxation, as expected, but with surprisingly large lifetimes.

  20. Probing Angular Correlations in Sequential Double Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; Woerner, H. J.; Arissian, L.; Liu, L. R.; Meckel, M.; Rippert, A.; Doerner, R.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Staudte, A.

    2011-09-09

    We study electron correlation in sequential double ionization of noble gas atoms and HCl in intense, femtosecond laser pulses. We measure the photoelectron angular distributions of Ne{sup +} relative to the first electron in a pump-probe experiment with 8 fs, 800 nm, circularly polarized laser pulses at a peak intensity of a few 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Using a linear-linear pump-probe setup, we further study He, Ar, and HCl. We find a clear angular correlation between the two ionization steps in the sequential double ionization intensity regime.

  1. Karhunen-Loeve Estimation of the Power Spectrum Parameters from the Angular Distribution of Galaxies in Early Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szalay, Alexander S.; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Matsubara, Takahiko; Scranton, Ryan; Vogeley, Michael S.; Connolly, Andrew; Dodelson, Scott; Eisenstein, Daniel; Frieman, Joshua A.; Gunn, James E.

    2003-01-01

    We present measurements of parameters of the three-dimensional power spectrum of galaxy clustering from 222 square degrees of early imaging data in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The projected galaxy distribution on the sky is expanded over a set of Karhunen-Loeve (KL) eigenfunctions, which optimize the signal-to-noise ratio in our analysis. A maximum likelihood analysis is used to estimate parameters that set the shape and amplitude of the three-dimensional power spectrum of galaxies in the SDSS magnitude-limited sample with r* less than 21. Our best estimates are gamma = 0.188 +/- 0.04 and sigma(sub 8L) = 0.915 +/- 0.06 (statistical errors only), for a flat universe with a cosmological constant. We demonstrate that our measurements contain signal from scales at or beyond the peak of the three-dimensional power spectrum. We discuss how the results scale with systematic uncertainties, like the radial selection function. We find that the central values satisfy the analytically estimated scaling relation. We have also explored the effects of evolutionary corrections, various truncations of the KL basis, seeing, sample size, and limiting magnitude. We find that the impact of most of these uncertainties stay within the 2 sigma uncertainties of our fiducial result.

  2. Angular momentum and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strittmatter, P. A.

    The present investigation is mainly concerned with the importance of high angular resolution observations in studies of star formation and, in particular, with elucidating the role which angular momentum plays in the process. A brief report is included on recent high angular resolution observations made with the Steward Observatory speckle camera system. A consideration of the angular momentum in interstellar clouds indicates that rotation precludes quasi-spherical contraction. A number of solutions to this angular momentum problem are examined, taking into account questions concerning the help provided by high angular resolution observations for an elucidation of the various possible scenarios of star formation. Technical aspects involved in obtaining suitable data are investigated. It is concluded that high angular resolution observations hold considerable promise for solving at least some of the problems associated with the role of angular momentum in star formation.

  3. Quantum Heuristics of Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy-Leblond, Jean-Marc

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the quantization of angular momentum components, Heisenberg-type inequalities for their spectral dispersions, and the quantization of the angular momentum modulus, without using operators or commutation relations. (MLH)

  4. Approach for simultaneous measurement of two-dimensional angular distribution of charged particles. III. Fine focusing of wide-angle beams in multiple lens systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Daimon, Hiroshi; Tóth, László; Matsui, Fumihiko

    2007-04-01

    This paper provides a way of focusing wide-angle charged-particle beams in multiple lens systems. In previous papers [H. Matsuda , Phys. Rev. E 71, 066503 (2005); 74, 036501 (2006)], it was shown that an ellipsoidal mesh, combined with electrostatic lenses, enables correction of spherical aberration over wide acceptance angles up to ±60° . In this paper, practical situations where ordinary electron lenses are arranged behind the wide-angle electrostatic lenses are taken into account using ray tracing calculation. For practical realization of the wide-angle lens systems, the acceptance angle is set to ±50° . We note that the output beams of the wide-angle electrostatic lenses have somewhat large divergence angles which cause unacceptable or non-negligible spherical aberration in additional lenses. A solution to this problem is presented showing that lens combinations to cancel spherical aberration are available, whereby wide-angle charged-particle beams can be finely focused with considerably reduced divergence angles less than ±5° .

  5. Effects of overburden, biomass and atmospheric inversions on energy and angular distributions of gamma rays from U, K, Th, and airborne radon sources. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, R.M.; Leggett, D.; Wells, M.B.

    1980-12-01

    This report describes a set of radiation transport calculations that were run with the AHISN S/sub n/ discrete ordinates code and a point kernel code to determine the energy, polar angle and height in air distributions of the total and direct gamma-ray flux densities from: (1) uranium sources of 3.2, 200 and 800 ppM in a sandstone orebody covered with biomass densities of 0, 10.2, 20.4, 51.0 and 102.0 kg/m/sup 2/; (2) thorium sources of 12, 25 and 80 ppM in a sandstone ore body covered with biomass densities of 0, 10.2, 20.4, 51.0 and 102.0 kg/m/sup 2/; (3) potassium source (2.5 wt %) in a sandstone ore body covered with biomass densities of 0, 10.2, 20.4, 51.0 and 102.0 kg/m/sup 2/; (4) constant airborne source with height for no inversion and for inversion layer heights of 65.22, 260.32 and 458.43 m; (5) exponentially decreasing airborne source for no inversion and inversion layer heights of 65.22, 260.32 and 458.43 m; (6) 3.2 ppM uranium source in overburden layers of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm thick; (7) 12 ppM thorium source in overburden layers of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm; (8) 2.5 wt % of potassium in overburden layers of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm thick; and (9) 3.2 ppM, 200 ppM, and 800 ppM uranium source in sandstone orebody covered with overburden thicknesses of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm. Gamma-ray emission from the decay of natural uranium, thorium, radon, and potassium are given in a 45-energy group structure applicable to the energy windows used to map the potential uranium ore reserves.

  6. Angular correlation between proton and neutron rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, N.

    2013-07-01

    A brief review is given on the controversy and its solution about the fact that the angular momentum vector of protons and that of neutrons in well-deformed nuclei at low total angular momenta have a strong correlation that they are oriented in opposite directions. In a simple two-rotor model in 2-dimensional space, this fact is explained as originating from the quantum mechanical uncertainty relation between the angle and the angular momentum for the relative rotation of the two rotors. As the second topic, a more realistic model consisting of two triaxial rotors in 3-dimensional space coupled with a QQ interaction is employed to investigate a possible shears-band-like collective rotation predicted by T. Otsuka, in which the angle at which the angular momentum of protons and that of neutrons intersect changes continuously from 180° at spin zero toward 0° at high spins within the same rotational band. The probability distributions of the angle between the two angular momenta and the angle between the longest principal axes of two rotors are calculated to examine the participation of the scissors mode in the evolution of the ground rotational band versus spin.

  7. An orbital angular momentum spectrometer for electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Tyler; Grillo, Vincenzo; McMorran, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    With the advent of techniques for preparation of free-electron and neutron orbital angular momentum (OAM) states, a basic follow-up question emerges: how do we measure the orbital angular momentum state distribution in matter waves? Control of both the energy and helicity of light has produced a range of spectroscopic applications, including molecular fingerprinting and magnetization mapping. Realization of an analogous dual energy-OAM spectroscopy with matter waves demands control of both initial and final energy and orbital angular momentum states: unlike for photons, final state post-selection is necessary for particles that cannot be annihilated. We propose a magnetic field-based mechanism for quantum non-demolition measurement of electron OAM. We show that OAM-dependent lensing is produced by an operator of form U =exp iLzρ2/ℏb2 where ρ =√{x2 +y2 } is the radial position operator, Lz is the orbital angular momentum operator along z, and b is the OAM dispersion length. We can physically realize this operator as a term in the time evolution of an electron in magnetic round lens. We discuss prospects and practical challenges for implementation of a lensing orbital angular momentum measurement. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences (BES), under the Early Career Research Program Award # DE-SC0010466.

  8. Plate tectonics conserves angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowin, C.

    2010-03-01

    A new combined understanding of plate tectonics, Earth internal structure, and the role of impulse in deformation of the Earth's crust is presented. Plate accelerations and decelerations have been revealed by iterative filtering of the quaternion history for the Euler poles that define absolute plate motion history for the past 68 million years, and provide an unprecedented precision for plate angular rotation variations with time at 2-million year intervals. Stage poles represent the angular rotation of a plate's motion between adjacent Euler poles, and from which the maximum velocity vector for a plate can be determined. The consistent maximum velocity variations, in turn, yield consistent estimates of plate accelerations and decelerations. The fact that the Pacific plate was shown to accelerate and decelerate, implied that conservation of plate tectonic angular momentum must be globally conserved, and that is confirmed by the results shown here (total angular momentum ~1.4+27 kg m2 s-1). Accordingly, if a plate decelerates, other plates must increase their angular momentums to compensate. In addition, the azimuth of the maximum velocity vectors yields clues as to why the "bend" in the Emperor-Hawaiian seamount trend occurred near 46 Myr. This report summarizes processing results for 12 of the 14 major tectonic plates of the Earth (except for the Juan de Fuca and Philippine plates). Plate accelerations support the contention that plate tectonics is a product of torques that most likely are sustained by the sinking of positive density anomalies revealed by geoid anomalies of the degree 4-10 packet of the Earth's spherical harmonic coefficients. These linear positive geoid anomalies underlie plate subduction zones and are presumed due to phase changes in subducted gabbroic lithosphere at depth in the upper lower mantle (above 1200 km depth). The tectonic plates are pulled along by the sinking of these positive mass anomalies, rather than moving at near constant

  9. Haptic underestimation of angular extent.

    PubMed

    Lakatos, S; Marks, L E

    1998-01-01

    To what extent can individuals accurately estimate the angle between two surfaces through touch alone, and how does tactile judgment compare to visual judgment? Subjects' ability to estimate angle size for a variety of haptic and visual stimuli was examined in a series of nine experiments. Triangular wooden blocks and raised contour outlines comprising different angles and radii of curvature at the apex were used in experiments 1-4 and it was found that subjects consistently underestimated angular extent relative to visual baselines and that the degree of underestimation was inversely related to the actual size of the angle. Angle estimates also increased with increasing radius of curvature when actual angle size was held constant. In contrast, experiments 5-8 showed that subjects did not underestimate angular extent when asked to perform a haptic-visual match to a computerized visual image; this outcome suggests that visual input may 'recalibrate' the haptic system's internal metric for estimating angle. The basis of this cross-modal interaction was investigated in experiment 9 by varying the nature and extent of visual cues available in haptic estimation tasks. The addition of visual-spatial cues did not significantly reduce the magnitude of haptic underestimation. The experiments as a whole indicate that haptic underestimations of angle occur in a number of different stimulus contexts, but leave open the question of exactly what type of visual information may serve to recalibrate touch in this regard. PMID:10197190

  10. Communication: angular momentum alignment and fluorescence polarization of alkali atoms photodetached from helium nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Hernando, Alberto; Beswick, J Alberto; Halberstadt, Nadine

    2013-12-14

    The theory of photofragments angular momentum polarization is applied to the photodetachment of an electronically excited alkali atom from a helium nanocluster (N = 200). The alignment of the electronic angular momentum of the bare excited alkali atoms produced is calculated quantum mechanically by solving the excited states coupled equations with potentials determined by density functional theory (DFT). Pronounced oscillations as a function of excitation energy are predicted for the case of Na@(He)200, in marked contrast with the absorption cross-section and angular distribution of the ejected atoms which are smooth functions of the energy. These oscillations are due to quantum interference between different coherently excited photodetachment pathways. Experimentally, these oscillations should be reflected in the fluorescence polarization and polarization-resolved photoelectron yield of the ejected atoms, which are proportional to the electronic angular momentum alignment. In addition, this result is much more general than the test case of NaHe200 studied here. It should be observable for larger droplets, for higher excited electronic states, and for other alkali as well as for alkali-earth atoms. Detection of these oscillations would show that the widely used pseudo-diatomic model can be valid beyond the prediction of absorption spectra and could help in interpreting parts of the dynamics, as already hinted by some experimental results on angular anisotropy of bare alkali fragments.

  11. Communication: Angular momentum alignment and fluorescence polarization of alkali atoms photodetached from helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Hernando, Alberto; Beswick, J. Alberto; Halberstadt, Nadine

    2013-12-14

    The theory of photofragments angular momentum polarization is applied to the photodetachment of an electronically excited alkali atom from a helium nanocluster (N = 200). The alignment of the electronic angular momentum of the bare excited alkali atoms produced is calculated quantum mechanically by solving the excited states coupled equations with potentials determined by density functional theory (DFT). Pronounced oscillations as a function of excitation energy are predicted for the case of Na@(He){sub 200}, in marked contrast with the absorption cross-section and angular distribution of the ejected atoms which are smooth functions of the energy. These oscillations are due to quantum interference between different coherently excited photodetachment pathways. Experimentally, these oscillations should be reflected in the fluorescence polarization and polarization-resolved photoelectron yield of the ejected atoms, which are proportional to the electronic angular momentum alignment. In addition, this result is much more general than the test case of NaHe{sub 200} studied here. It should be observable for larger droplets, for higher excited electronic states, and for other alkali as well as for alkali-earth atoms. Detection of these oscillations would show that the widely used pseudo-diatomic model can be valid beyond the prediction of absorption spectra and could help in interpreting parts of the dynamics, as already hinted by some experimental results on angular anisotropy of bare alkali fragments.

  12. Measurement of the angular distribution of the electron from W {r_arrow} e = {nu} decay, in p{anti p} at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV, as function of P{sub T}{sup W}; Medida de la distribucion angular del electron de W en e + neutrino en p{anti p} a 1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, M.I.M.

    1996-10-07

    The goal of this work was to study the behavior of the angular distribution of the electron form the decay of the W boson in a specific rest-frame of the W, the Collins-Soper frame. This thesis consists of four major divisions, each dealing with closely related themes: (a) Physics Background, (b) Description of the Hardware and General Software Tools, (c) Description of the Analysis and Specific Tools, and (d) Results and Conclusions. Each division is comprised of one or more chapters and each chapter is divided into sections and subsections.

  13. On the vector model of angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saari, Peeter

    2016-09-01

    Instead of (or in addition to) the common vector diagram with cones, we propose to visualize the peculiarities of quantum mechanical angular momentum by a completely quantized 3D model. It spotlights the discrete eigenvalues and noncommutativity of components of angular momentum and corresponds to outcomes of measurements—real or computer-simulated. The latter can be easily realized by an interactive worksheet of a suitable program package of algebraic calculations. The proposed complementary method of visualization helps undergraduate students to better understand the counterintuitive properties of this quantum mechanical observable.

  14. Maximal breaking of symmetry at critical angles and a closed-form expression for angular deviations of the Snell law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, Manoel P.; Carvalho, Silvânia A.; De Leo, Stefano

    2014-09-01

    A detailed analysis of the propagation of laser Gaussian beams at critical angles shows under which conditions it is possible to maximize the breaking of symmetry in the angular distribution and for which values of the laser wavelength and beam waist it is possible to find an analytic formula for the maximal angular deviation from the optical path predicted by the Snell law. For beam propagation through N dielectric blocks and for a maximal breaking of symmetry, a closed expression for the Goos-Hänchen shift is obtained. The multiple-peak phenomenon clearly represents additional evidence of the breaking of symmetry in the angular distribution of optical beams. Finally, the laser wavelength and beam-waist conditions to produce focal effects in the outgoing beam are also briefly discussed.

  15. Neutron spectral and angular distribution measurements for 113 and 256 MeV protons on range-thick Al and sup 238 U targets using the foil activation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Intasorn, A.

    1989-07-01

    Second neutron yields, energy spectra, and angular distributions have been measured at seven angles from 0 to 150{degree} for 113 and 256 MeV protons stopped in range-thick targets of aluminum and depleted uranium ({sup 238}U). Thin foil stacks of ten different materials were activated by secondary neutrons at distances of 20--30 cm from the targets. Following each irradiation, 30--40 different activation products were measured by gamma-ray spectroscopy. These activation rates were then used to adjust neutron energy spectra calculated by the HETC computer code. Activation cross sections were taken from ENDF/BV below 20 MeV, from literature values tested in Be(d,n) fields up to 50 MeV, and from proton spallation data and calculations from 50--250 MeV. Spectral adjustments were made with the STAY'SL computer code using a least-squares technique to minimize {chi}{sup 2} for a covariance matrix determined from uncertainties in the measured activities, cross sections, and calculated flux spectra. Neutron scattering effects were estimated from foil packets irradiated at different distances from the target. Proton effects were measured with (p,n) reactions. Systematic differences were found between the adjusted and calculated neutron spectra, namely, that HETC underpredicts the neutron flux at back angles by a factor of 2--3 and slightly overpredicts the flux at forward angles. 19 refs., 23 figs., 13 tabs.

  16. A comparison of additional treatment processes to limit particle accumulation and microbial growth during drinking water distribution.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Lut, M C; Verberk, J Q J C; Van Dijk, J C

    2013-05-15

    Water quality changes, particle accumulation and microbial growth occurring in pilot-scale water distribution systems fed with normally treated and additional treated groundwater were monitored over a period of almost one year. The treatment processes were ranked in the following order: nanofiltration (NF) > (better than) ultrafiltration (UF) > ion exchange (IEX) for limiting particle accumulation. A different order was found for limiting overall microbial growth: NF > IEX > UF. There were strong correlations between particle load and particle accumulation, and between nutrient load and microbial growth. It was concluded that particle accumulation can be controlled by reducing the particle load in water treatment plants; and the microbial growth can be better controlled by limiting organic nutrients rather than removing biomass in water treatment plants. The major focus of this study was on microbial growth. The results demonstrated that growth occurred in all types of treated water, including the phases of bulk water, biofilm and loose deposits. Considering the growth in different phases, similar growth in bulk water was observed for all treatments; NF strongly reduced growth both in loose deposits and in biofilm; UF promoted growth in biofilm, while strongly limiting growth in loose deposits. IEX had good efficiency in between UF and NF, limiting both growths in loose deposits and in biofilm. Significant growth was found in loose deposits, suggesting that loose deposit biomass should be taken into account for growth evaluation and/or prediction. Strong correlations were found between microbial growth and pressure drop in a membrane fouling simulator which proved that a membrane fouling simulator can be a fast growth predictor (within a week). Different results obtained by adenosine triphosphate and flow cytometry cell counts revealed that ATP can accurately describe both suspended and particle-associated biomass, and flow cytometry files of TCC measurements needs

  17. Ultrafast coherent control of angular momentum during a one-photon excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, D. A.; Eppink, A. T. J. B.; Meerts, W. L.; Kimel, A. V.; Kirilyuk, A.; Rasing, Th.; Zande, W. J. van der

    2011-10-15

    The subpicosecond dynamics of angular momentum transfer in the excited rubidium 5p state is studied in real time by observing photoelectron angular distributions with velocity map imaging. Retrieving the populations of the degenerate Zeeman levels and reconstructing the angular momentum, we show that in the case of resonant excitation the angular momentum does not follow the momentary helicity of the electric field of the pulse. This is in contrast with off-resonant excitation where the angular momentum and pulse helicity are fully correlated. Our study shows how to generate and shape ultrashort pulses of orbital and spin angular momentum in a controllable way.

  18. How Angular Velocity Features and Different Gyroscope Noise Types Interact and Determine Orientation Estimation Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Pasciuto, Ilaria; Ligorio, Gabriele; Bergamini, Elena; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2015-09-18

    In human movement analysis, 3D body segment orientation can be obtained through the numerical integration of gyroscope signals. These signals, however, are affected by errors that, for the case of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are mainly due to: constant bias, scale factor, white noise, and bias instability. The aim of this study is to assess how the orientation estimation accuracy is affected by each of these disturbances, and whether it is influenced by the angular velocity magnitude and 3D distribution across the gyroscope axes. Reference angular velocity signals, either constant or representative of human walking, were corrupted with each of the four noise types within a simulation framework. The magnitude of the angular velocity affected the error in the orientation estimation due to each noise type, except for the white noise. Additionally, the error caused by the constant bias was also influenced by the angular velocity 3D distribution. As the orientation error depends not only on the noise itself but also on the signal it is applied to, different sensor placements could enhance or mitigate the error due to each disturbance, and special attention must be paid in providing and interpreting measures of accuracy for orientation estimation algorithms.

  19. How Angular Velocity Features and Different Gyroscope Noise Types Interact and Determine Orientation Estimation Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Pasciuto, Ilaria; Ligorio, Gabriele; Bergamini, Elena; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    In human movement analysis, 3D body segment orientation can be obtained through the numerical integration of gyroscope signals. These signals, however, are affected by errors that, for the case of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are mainly due to: constant bias, scale factor, white noise, and bias instability. The aim of this study is to assess how the orientation estimation accuracy is affected by each of these disturbances, and whether it is influenced by the angular velocity magnitude and 3D distribution across the gyroscope axes. Reference angular velocity signals, either constant or representative of human walking, were corrupted with each of the four noise types within a simulation framework. The magnitude of the angular velocity affected the error in the orientation estimation due to each noise type, except for the white noise. Additionally, the error caused by the constant bias was also influenced by the angular velocity 3D distribution. As the orientation error depends not only on the noise itself but also on the signal it is applied to, different sensor placements could enhance or mitigate the error due to each disturbance, and special attention must be paid in providing and interpreting measures of accuracy for orientation estimation algorithms. PMID:26393606

  20. Semiclassical complex angular momentum theory and Pade reconstruction for resonances, rainbows, and reaction thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolovski, D.; Msezane, A.Z.

    2004-09-01

    A semiclassical complex angular momentum theory, used to analyze atom-diatom reactive angular distributions, is applied to several well-known potential (one-particle) problems. Examples include resonance scattering, rainbow scattering, and the Eckart threshold model. Pade reconstruction of the corresponding matrix elements from the values at physical (integral) angular momenta and properties of the Pade approximants are discussed in detail.

  1. Angular momentum evolution for galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedrosa, S. E.; Tissera, P. B.

    2015-08-01

    Using cosmological hydrodinamics simulations we study the angular momentum content of the simulated galaxies in relation with their morphological type. We found that not only the angular momentum of the disk component follow the expected theoretical relation (Mo, Mao White model), but also the spheroidal one, with a gap due to its lost of angular momentum. We also found that the galaxy size can plot in one general relation, despite the morphological type,, in agreement with recent findings.

  2. Maple procedures for the coupling of angular momenta. VIII. Spin-angular coefficients for single-shell configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaigalas, G.; Scharf, O.; Fritzsche, S.

    2005-03-01

    very beginning, the RACAH program has been designed as an interactive environment for the (symbolic) manipulation and computation of expressions from the theories of angular momentum and the atomic shell model. With the present extension of the program, we provide the user with a simple access to the coefficients of fractional grandparentage (CFGP) as well as to the spin-angular coefficients of one- and two-particle physical operators. To facilitate the specification of the tensorial form of the operators, a short but powerful notation has been introduced for the creation and annihilation operators as well as for the products of such operators as required for the development of many-body perturbation theory in a symmetry-adapted basis. All the coefficients and the matrix elements from above are equally supported for both LS- and jj-coupled operators and functions. The main procedures of the present extension are described below in Appendix B. In addition, a list of all available commands of the RACAH program can be found in the file Racah-commands.ps which is distributed together with the code. Typical running time: The program replies promptly on most requests. Even large tabulations of standard quantities and pure spin-angular coefficients for one- and two-particle scalar operators in LS- and jj-coupling can be carried out in a few (tens of) seconds.

  3. Intrinsic Angular Momentum of Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santarelli, Vincent

    1979-01-01

    Derives a familiar torque-angular momentum theorem for the electromagnetic field, and includes the intrinsic torques exerted by the fields on the polarized medium. This inclusion leads to the expressions for the intrinsic angular momentum carried by the radiation traveling through a charge-free medium. (Author/MA)

  4. Depth distribution of Frank loop defects formed in ion-irradiated stainless steel and its dependence on Si addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongyue; Murakami, Kenta; Dohi, Kenji; Nishida, Kenji; Soneda, Naoki; Li, Zhengcao; Liu, Li; Sekimura, Naoto

    2015-12-01

    Although heavy ion irradiation is a good tool to simulate neutron irradiation-induced damages in light water reactor, it produces inhomogeneous defect distribution. Such difference in defect distribution brings difficulty in comparing the microstructure evolution and mechanical degradation between neutron and heavy ion irradiation, and thus needs to be understood. Stainless steel is the typical structural material used in reactor core, and could be taken as an example to study the inhomogeneous defect depth distribution in heavy ion irradiation and its influence on the tested irradiation hardening by nano-indentation. In this work, solution annealed stainless steel model alloys are irradiated by 3 MeV Fe2+ ions at 400 °C to 3 dpa to produce Frank loops that are mainly interstitial in nature. The silicon content of the model alloys is also tuned to change point defect diffusion, so that the loop depth distribution influenced by diffusion along the irradiation beam direction could be discussed. Results show that in low Si (0% Si) and base Si (0.42% Si) samples the depth distribution of Frank loop density quite well matches the dpa profile calculated by the SRIM code, but in high Si sample (0.95% Si), the loop number density in the near-surface region is very low. One possible explanation could be Si's role in enhancing the effective vacancy diffusivity, promoting recombination and thus suppressing interstitial Frank loops, especially in the near-surface region, where vacancies concentrate. By considering the loop depth distribution, the tested irradiation hardening is successfully explained by the Orowan model. A hardening coefficient of around 0.30 is obtained for all the three samples. This attempt in interpreting hardening results may make it easier to compare the mechanical degradation between different irradiation experiments.

  5. THE PERSISTENCE OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM IN A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM AFTER THE ADDITION OF FILTRATION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is evidence that drinking water may be a source of pathogenic nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections in humans. One method by which NTM are believed to enter drinking water distribution systems is by their intracellular location within protozoa. Our goal was to determ...

  6. PREDICTING LEAD DISSOLUTION IN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS: EFFECT OF FLUORIDE ADDITIVES ON LEAD SOLUBILITY AND CORROSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many water systems have encountered difficulties in meeting the action levels established by the Lead and Copper Rule. Several chemical parameters contribute to the corrosion of lead plumbing and may influence the nature of the passivating films formed on distribution materials....

  7. THE PERSISTENCE OF NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA INI A DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM AFTER THE ADDITION OF FILTRATION TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is evidence that drinking water may be a source of pathogenic nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections in humans. One method by which NTM are believed to enter drinking water distribution systems is by their intracellular colonization of protozoa. Our goal was to determ...

  8. Rapid generation of light beams carrying orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Magaña-Loaiza, Omar S; Chen, Changchen; Rodenburg, Brandon; Malik, Mehul; Boyd, Robert W

    2013-12-16

    We report a technique for encoding both amplitude and phase variations onto a laser beam using a single digital micro-mirror device (DMD). Using this technique, we generate Laguerre-Gaussian and vortex orbital-angular-momentum (OAM) modes, along with modes in a set that is mutually unbiased with respect to the OAM basis. Additionally, we have demonstrated rapid switching among the generated modes at a speed of 4 kHz, which is much faster than the speed regularly achieved by phase-only spatial light modulators (SLMs). The dynamic control of both phase and amplitude of a laser beam is an enabling technology for classical communication and quantum key distribution (QKD) systems that employ spatial mode encoding.

  9. Bayesian Deconvolution for Angular Super-Resolution in Forward-Looking Scanning Radar

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Yuebo; Huang, Yulin; Sun, Zhichao; Wang, Yue; Yang, Jianyu

    2015-01-01

    Scanning radar is of notable importance for ground surveillance, terrain mapping and disaster rescue. However, the angular resolution of a scanning radar image is poor compared to the achievable range resolution. This paper presents a deconvolution algorithm for angular super-resolution in scanning radar based on Bayesian theory, which states that the angular super-resolution can be realized by solving the corresponding deconvolution problem with the maximum a posteriori (MAP) criterion. The algorithm considers that the noise is composed of two mutually independent parts, i.e., a Gaussian signal-independent component and a Poisson signal-dependent component. In addition, the Laplace distribution is used to represent the prior information about the targets under the assumption that the radar image of interest can be represented by the dominant scatters in the scene. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed deconvolution algorithm has higher precision for angular super-resolution compared with the conventional algorithms, such as the Tikhonov regularization algorithm, the Wiener filter and the Richardson–Lucy algorithm. PMID:25806871

  10. Angular Distribution Models for Top-of-Atmosphere Radiative Flux Estimation from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Instrument on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Satellite. Part II; Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loeb, N. G.; Loukachine, K.; Wielicki, B. A.; Young, D. F.

    2003-01-01

    Top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes from the Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy System (CERES) are estimated from empirical angular distribution models (ADMs) that convert instantaneous radiance measurements to TOA fluxes. This paper evaluates the accuracy of CERES TOA fluxes obtained from a new set of ADMs developed for the CERES instrument onboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The uncertainty in regional monthly mean reflected shortwave (SW) and emitted longwave (LW) TOA fluxes is less than 0.5 W/sq m, based on comparisons with TOA fluxes evaluated by direct integration of the measured radiances. When stratified by viewing geometry, TOA fluxes from different angles are consistent to within 2% in the SW and 0.7% (or 2 W/sq m) in the LW. In contrast, TOA fluxes based on ADMs from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) applied to the same CERES radiance measurements show a 10% relative increase with viewing zenith angle in the SW and a 3.5% (9 W/sq m) decrease with viewing zenith angle in the LW. Based on multiangle CERES radiance measurements, 18 regional instantaneous TOA flux errors from the new CERES ADMs are estimated to be 10 W/sq m in the SW and, 3.5 W/sq m in the LW. The errors show little or no dependence on cloud phase, cloud optical depth, and cloud infrared emissivity. An analysis of cloud radiative forcing (CRF) sensitivity to differences between ERBE and CERES TRMM ADMs, scene identification, and directional models of albedo as a function of solar zenith angle shows that ADM and clear-sky scene identification differences can lead to an 8 W/sq m root-mean-square (rms) difference in 18 daily mean SW CRF and a 4 W/sq m rms difference in LW CRF. In contrast, monthly mean SW and LW CRF differences reach 3 W/sq m. CRF is found to be relatively insensitive to differences between the ERBE and CERES TRMM directional models.

  11. Effect of tin addition on the distribution of phosphorus and metallic impurities in Si-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tianyu; Lai, Huixian; Sheng, Zhilin; Gan, Chuanhai; Xing, Pengfei; Luo, Xuetao

    2016-11-01

    Metallurgical grade silicon was purified through solvent refining method by adding tin to the Si-Al alloy. The distribution of phosphorus and metallic impurities in the resulting Si-Al-Sn melts was investigated. Compared with the primary Si and the eutectic αAl+Si, the phosphorus and metallic impurities were more distinctly distributed in the βSn phase, which was always accompanied by needle-like intermetallic β-Al5SiFe compounds. To improve the phosphorus and metallic impurity removal ratios, Si-Al-Sn ternary alloys with different composition were investigated. The phosphorus removal ratio increased with the aluminum and tin content in the Si-Al-Sn ternary alloy. Compared to increasing the Al content and keeping the Si/Sn ratio fixed, the impurity removal ratios were higher when the Sn content was increased to the same mass percentage and the Si/Al ratio was kept fixed in the Si-Al-Sn melt.

  12. Angular Momentum Transport in Solar-type Stars: Testing the Timescale for Core-Envelope Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denissenkov, Pavel A.; Pinsonneault, Marc; Terndrup, Donald M.; Newsham, Grant

    2010-06-01

    We critically examine the constraints on internal angular momentum transport which can be inferred from the spin-down of open cluster stars. The rotation distribution inferred from rotation velocities and periods is consistent for larger and more recent samples, but smaller samples of rotation periods appear biased toward shorter periods relative to vsin i studies. We therefore focus on whether the rotation period distributions observed in star forming regions can be evolved into the observed ones in the Pleiades, NGC 2516, M 34, M 35, M 37, and M 50 with plausible assumptions about star-disk coupling and angular momentum loss from magnetized solar-like winds. Solid-body (SB) models are consistent with the data for low-mass fully convective stars but highly inconsistent for higher mass stars where the surface convection zone can decouple for angular momentum purposes from the radiative interior. The Tayler-Spruit magnetic angular momentum transport mechanism, commonly employed in models of high-mass stars, predicts SB rotation on extremely short timescales of less than 1 Myr and is therefore unlikely to operate in solar-type pre-main-sequence (pre-MS) and MS stars at the predicted rate. Models with core-envelope decoupling can explain the spin-down of 1.0 and 0.8 solar mass slow rotators with characteristic coupling timescales of 55 ± 25 Myr and 175 ± 25 Myr, respectively. The upper envelope of the rotation distribution is more strongly coupled than the lower envelope of the rotation distribution, in accord with theoretical predictions that the angular momentum transport timescale should be shorter for more rapidly rotating stars. Constraints imposed by the solar rotation curve are also discussed. We argue that neither hydrodynamic mechanisms nor our revised and less efficient prescription for the Tayler-Spruit dynamo can reproduce both spin-down and the internal solar rotation profile by themselves. It is likely that a successful model of angular momentum

  13. Transverse angular momentum of photons

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, Andrea

    2010-05-15

    We develop the quantum theory of transverse angular momentum of light beams. The theory applies to paraxial and quasiparaxial photon beams in vacuum and reproduces the known results for classical beams when applied to coherent states of the field. Both the Poynting vector, alias the linear momentum, and the angular-momentum quantum operators of a light beam are calculated including contributions from first-order transverse derivatives. This permits a correct description of the energy flow in the beam and the natural emergence of both the spin and the angular momentum of the photons. We show that for collimated beams of light, orbital angular-momentum operators do not satisfy the standard commutation rules. Finally, we discuss the application of our theory to some concrete cases.

  14. Angular analysis of the B 0 → K *0 μ + μ - decay using 3 fb-1 of integrated luminosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Fabianska, M.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-02-01

    An angular analysis of the B 0 → K *0(→ K + π -) μ + μ - decay is presented. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1 of pp collision data collected at the LHCb experiment. The complete angular information from the decay is used to determine CP-averaged observables and CP asymmetries, taking account of possible contamination from decays with the K + π - system in an S-wave configuration. The angular observables and their correlations are reported in bins of q 2, the invariant mass squared of the dimuon system. The observables are determined both from an unbinned maximum likelihood fit and by using the principal moments of the angular distribution. In addition, by fitting for q 2-dependent decay amplitudes in the region 1.1 < q 2 < 6.0 GeV2/ c 4, the zero-crossing points of several angular observables are computed. A global fit is performed to the complete set of CP-averaged observables obtained from the maximum likelihood fit. This fit indicates differences with predictions based on the Standard Model at the level of 3.4 standard deviations. These differences could be explained by contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model, or by an unexpectedly large hadronic effect that is not accounted for in the Standard Model predictions. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  15. Low-field NMR determination of water distribution in meat batters with NaCl and polyphosphate addition.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jun-Hua; Deng, Ya-Min; Jia, Na; Li, Ru-Ren; Cao, Jin-Xuan; Liu, Deng-Yong; Li, Jian-Rong

    2016-06-01

    The objective was to elucidate the influence of NaCl and polyphosphates in the stage of protein swelling on the water-holding capacity (WHC) of meat batter. The meat batters were formulated with salt in different ways by adding established amounts of only NaCl, only polyphosphates, jointly adding NaCl and polyphosphates, and a control without any salt. An increase (p<0.05) in water retention was found when a combination of NaCl and polyphosphates was used. A high textural parameter was observed in the two treatments with NaCl, but not in the group with only polyphosphate. For the polyphosphate group, T22 was lower (p<0.05) than in the other three before heating; however, after heating, T21 and T22 were both significantly decreased, and a new component emerged, T23, which was significantly lower than the others. For the NaCl treatment, heated or not, T22 was always the highest. It was revealed that NaCl had affected the WHC by increasing the mobility and distribution of water, particularly with polyphosphate, but polyphosphate could not be an equal substitute for NaCl given its resulting lowest textural properties and poor microstructure. By presenting different hydration states in the protein swelling stage, the meat batter qualities were differentiated. PMID:26830593

  16. Low-field NMR determination of water distribution in meat batters with NaCl and polyphosphate addition.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jun-Hua; Deng, Ya-Min; Jia, Na; Li, Ru-Ren; Cao, Jin-Xuan; Liu, Deng-Yong; Li, Jian-Rong

    2016-06-01

    The objective was to elucidate the influence of NaCl and polyphosphates in the stage of protein swelling on the water-holding capacity (WHC) of meat batter. The meat batters were formulated with salt in different ways by adding established amounts of only NaCl, only polyphosphates, jointly adding NaCl and polyphosphates, and a control without any salt. An increase (p<0.05) in water retention was found when a combination of NaCl and polyphosphates was used. A high textural parameter was observed in the two treatments with NaCl, but not in the group with only polyphosphate. For the polyphosphate group, T22 was lower (p<0.05) than in the other three before heating; however, after heating, T21 and T22 were both significantly decreased, and a new component emerged, T23, which was significantly lower than the others. For the NaCl treatment, heated or not, T22 was always the highest. It was revealed that NaCl had affected the WHC by increasing the mobility and distribution of water, particularly with polyphosphate, but polyphosphate could not be an equal substitute for NaCl given its resulting lowest textural properties and poor microstructure. By presenting different hydration states in the protein swelling stage, the meat batter qualities were differentiated.

  17. Additions to the Encyrtidae and Mymaridae (Chalcidoidea) of India with new distribution and host records for some species

    PubMed Central

    Rameshkumar, A.; V, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Encyrtidae and Mymaridae of India have not been surveyed in depth and hosts are not known for most of the species as the methods of collections used are passive and do not yield firsthand information on the hosts. Based on our ongoing surveys on the Encyrtidae and Mymaridae of India, we report here new distribution and host records for some species. New information Acmopolynema campylurum Xu and Lin, Litus cynipseus Haliday, Omyomymar glabrum Lin and Chiappini and Platystethynium Ogloblin (Mymaridae), and Rhytidothorax purpureiscutellum (Girault) (Encyrtidae) are reported for the first time from India. Anagyrus aquilonaris (Noyes and Hayat) is recorded as new to Arunachal Pradesh and Meghalaya. Paraphaenodiscus indicus Singh and Agarwal and Paraphaenodiscus monawari Bhuiya are recorded from south India for the first time, the latter on a new host, Pulvinaria polygonata. Chorizococcus sorghi Williams (Pseudococcidae) is reported as a host for Cryptanusia ajmerensis (Fatma & Shafee), for which no hosts are hitherto known and the male of Cryptanusia is documented for the first time. Aclerda sp. is recorded as a new host for Neastymachus axillaris Singh, Agarwal and Basha. PMID:26069438

  18. Angular momentum sensitive two-center interference.

    PubMed

    Ilchen, M; Glaser, L; Scholz, F; Walter, P; Deinert, S; Rothkirch, A; Seltmann, J; Viefhaus, J; Decleva, P; Langer, B; Knie, A; Ehresmann, A; Al-Dossary, O M; Braune, M; Hartmann, G; Meissner, A; Tribedi, L C; AlKhaldi, M; Becker, U

    2014-01-17

    In quantum mechanics the Young-type double-slit experiment can be performed with electrons either traveling through a double slit or being coherently emitted from two inversion symmetric molecular sites. In the latter one the valence photoionization cross sections of homonuclear diatomic molecules were predicted to oscillate over kinetic energy almost 50 years ago. Beyond the direct proof of the oscillatory behavior of these photoionization cross sections σ, we show that the angular distribution of the emitted electrons reveals hitherto unexplored information on the relative phase shift between the corresponding partial waves through two-center interference patterns.

  19. Angular Momentum Sensitive Two-Center Interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilchen, M.; Glaser, L.; Scholz, F.; Walter, P.; Deinert, S.; Rothkirch, A.; Seltmann, J.; Viefhaus, J.; Decleva, P.; Langer, B.; Knie, A.; Ehresmann, A.; Al-Dossary, O. M.; Braune, M.; Hartmann, G.; Meissner, A.; Tribedi, L. C.; AlKhaldi, M.; Becker, U.

    2014-01-01

    In quantum mechanics the Young-type double-slit experiment can be performed with electrons either traveling through a double slit or being coherently emitted from two inversion symmetric molecular sites. In the latter one the valence photoionization cross sections of homonuclear diatomic molecules were predicted to oscillate over kinetic energy almost 50 years ago. Beyond the direct proof of the oscillatory behavior of these photoionization cross sections σ, we show that the angular distribution of the emitted electrons reveals hitherto unexplored information on the relative phase shift between the corresponding partial waves through two-center interference patterns.

  20. Large-Angular-Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic BackgroundRadiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gorenstein, M.V.; Smoot, G.F.

    1980-05-01

    We report the results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3 K cosmic background radiation. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (0.89 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20 km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of 47 mK Hz{sup -1/2}. The measurements show clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fit by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 360 {+-} 50km sec{sup -1} toward the direction 11.2 {+-} 0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 {+-} 8 degrees declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypothesis of dipole and quadrupole angular distributions places a 1 mK limit on the amplitude of most components of quadrupole anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 mK limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 degrees.

  1. Inhomogeneous Broadening in Perturbed Angular Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Austin; Adams, Mike; Hodges, Jeffery; Park, Tyler; Stufflebeam, Michael; Evenson, William; Matheson, Phil; Zacate, Matthew

    2009-10-01

    Our research concerns the effect of a static distribution of defects on the net electric field gradient (EFG) within crystal structures. Defects and vacancies perturb the distribution of gamma rays emitted from radioactive probe nuclei within the crystal. These defects and vacancies produce a net EFG at the site of the probe which causes the magnetic quadrupole moment of the nucleus of the probe to precess about the EFG. The net EFG, which is strongly dependent upon the defect concentration, perturbs the angular correlation (PAC) of the gamma rays, and is seen in the damping of the perturbation function, G2(t), in time and broadening of the spectral peaks in the Fourier transform. We have used computer simulations to study the probability distribution of EFG tensor components in order to uncover the concentration dependence of G2(t). This in turn can be used to analyze experimental PAC data and quantitatively describe properties of the crystal.

  2. Identification, clinical distribution, and susceptibility to methicillin and 18 additional antibiotics of clinical Staphylococcus isolates: nationwide investigation in Italy.

    PubMed

    Varaldo, P E; Cipriani, P; Focá, A; Geraci, C; Giordano, A; Madeddu, M A; Orsi, A; Pompei, R; Prenna, M; Repetto, A

    1984-06-01

    A multicentric study of clinical Staphylococcus isolates was performed by seven operative units working in different areas of Italy. Over a 6-month period, a total of 3,226 staphylococci, isolated from in- and outpatients, were identified and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by a protocol agreed upon by all units. On the basis of their bacteriolytic-activity patterns and other conventional tests, the isolates were identified by lyogroups , which closely correlate with human Staphylococcus species. Lyogroup I (Staphylococcus aureus) and lyogroup III (Staphylococcus capitis) were the most and the least frequently isolated staphylococci, respectively. Significant differences depending on strain origin from in- or outpatients were only observed with lyogroup IV (i.e., novobiocin- resistant staphylococci), whose isolation from outpatients was three times greater than from inpatients. Lyogroup I was predominant among isolates from most clinical sources. Lyogroup IV predominated in strains isolated from the urinary tract; lyogroup V (Staphylococcus epidermidis) predominated in strains from blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and indwelling artificial devices; and lyogroup VI ( Staphylococcus hominis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, and Staphylococcus warneri ) predominated in strains from bile and the male genital tract. The incidence of methicillin resistance within the different lyogroups varied from unit to unit, suggesting epidemiological differences among different hospitals and different geographical areas. On the whole, methicillin resistance was more frequent in coagulase-negative staphylococci than in S. aureus and ranged from 19% for lyogroups I and III to 30% for lyogroup II (Staphylococcus simulans). Laboratory testing with 18 additional antibiotics suggested the occurrence of some specific differences in susceptibility among the different lyogroups . The rate of organisms resistant to the various antibiotics was greater among methicillin-resistant than among

  3. Identification, clinical distribution, and susceptibility to methicillin and 18 additional antibiotics of clinical Staphylococcus isolates: nationwide investigation in Italy.

    PubMed

    Varaldo, P E; Cipriani, P; Focá, A; Geraci, C; Giordano, A; Madeddu, M A; Orsi, A; Pompei, R; Prenna, M; Repetto, A

    1984-06-01

    A multicentric study of clinical Staphylococcus isolates was performed by seven operative units working in different areas of Italy. Over a 6-month period, a total of 3,226 staphylococci, isolated from in- and outpatients, were identified and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by a protocol agreed upon by all units. On the basis of their bacteriolytic-activity patterns and other conventional tests, the isolates were identified by lyogroups , which closely correlate with human Staphylococcus species. Lyogroup I (Staphylococcus aureus) and lyogroup III (Staphylococcus capitis) were the most and the least frequently isolated staphylococci, respectively. Significant differences depending on strain origin from in- or outpatients were only observed with lyogroup IV (i.e., novobiocin- resistant staphylococci), whose isolation from outpatients was three times greater than from inpatients. Lyogroup I was predominant among isolates from most clinical sources. Lyogroup IV predominated in strains isolated from the urinary tract; lyogroup V (Staphylococcus epidermidis) predominated in strains from blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and indwelling artificial devices; and lyogroup VI ( Staphylococcus hominis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, and Staphylococcus warneri ) predominated in strains from bile and the male genital tract. The incidence of methicillin resistance within the different lyogroups varied from unit to unit, suggesting epidemiological differences among different hospitals and different geographical areas. On the whole, methicillin resistance was more frequent in coagulase-negative staphylococci than in S. aureus and ranged from 19% for lyogroups I and III to 30% for lyogroup II (Staphylococcus simulans). Laboratory testing with 18 additional antibiotics suggested the occurrence of some specific differences in susceptibility among the different lyogroups . The rate of organisms resistant to the various antibiotics was greater among methicillin-resistant than among

  4. Distribution and Viability of Fetal and Adult Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in a Biaxial Rotating Vessel Bioreactor after Seeding on Polymeric 3D Additive Manufactured Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Leferink, Anne M.; Chng, Yhee-Cheng; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A.; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    One of the conventional approaches in tissue engineering is the use of scaffolds in combination with cells to obtain mechanically stable tissue constructs in vitro prior to implantation. Additive manufacturing by fused deposition modeling is a widely used technique to produce porous scaffolds with defined pore network, geometry, and therewith defined mechanical properties. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for tissue engineering-based cell therapies due to their multipotent character. One of the hurdles to overcome when combining additive manufactured scaffolds with MSCs is the resulting heterogeneous cell distribution and limited cell proliferation capacity. In this study, we show that the use of a biaxial rotating bioreactor, after static culture of human fetal MSCs (hfMSCs) seeded on synthetic polymeric scaffolds, improved the homogeneity of cell and extracellular matrix distribution and increased the total cell number. Furthermore, we show that the relative mRNA expression levels of indicators for stemness and differentiation are not significantly changed upon this bioreactor culture, whereas static culture shows variations of several indicators for stemness and differentiation. The biaxial rotating bioreactor presented here offers a homogeneous distribution of hfMSCs, enabling studies on MSCs fate in additive manufactured scaffolds without inducing undesired differentiation. PMID:26557644

  5. ISMI: a classification index for high angular resolution diffusion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röttger, D.; Dudai, D.; Merhof, D.; Müller, S.

    2012-02-01

    Magnetic resonance diffusion imaging provides a unique insight into the white matter architecture of the brain in vivo. Applications include neurosurgical planning and fundamental neuroscience. Contrary to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) is able to characterize complex intra-voxel diffusion distributions and hence provides more accurate information about the true diffusion profile. Anisotropy indices aim to reduce the information of the diffusion probability function to a meaningful scalar representation that classifies the underlying diffusion and thereby the neuronal fiber configuration within a voxel. These indices can be used to answer clinical questions such as the integrity of certain neuronal pathways. Information about the underlying fiber distribution can be beneficial in tractography approaches, reconstructing neuronal pathways using local diffusion orientations. Therefore, an accurate classification of diffusion profiles is of great interest. However, the differentiation between multiple fiber orientations and isotropic diffusion is still a challenging task. In this work, we introduce ISMI, an index which successfully differentiates isotropic diffusion and single and multiple fiber populations. The classifier is based on the orientation distribution function (ODF) resulting from Q-ball imaging. We compare our results with the well-known general fractional anisotropy (GFA) index using a fiber phantom comprising challenging diffusion profiles such as crossing, fanning and kissing fiber configurations and a human brain dataset considering the centrum semiovale. Additionally, we visualize the results directly on the fibers represented by streamtubes using a heat color map.

  6. Knee abduction angular impulses during prolonged running with wedged insoles.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, Ryan T; Worobets, Jay T; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2013-07-01

    Wedged insoles may produce immediate effects on knee abduction angular impulses during running; however, it is currently not known whether these knee abduction angular impulse magnitudes are maintained throughout a run when fatigue sets in. If changes occur, this could affect the clinical utility of wedged insoles in treating conditions such as patellofemoral pain. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine whether knee abduction angular impulses are altered during a prolonged run with wedged insoles. It was hypothesized that knee abduction angular impulses would be reduced following a prolonged run with wedged insoles. Nine healthy runners participated. Runners were randomly assigned to either a 6-mm medial wedge condition or a 6-mm lateral wedge condition and then ran continuously overground for 30 min. Knee abduction angular impulses were quantified at 0 and 30 min using a gait analysis procedure. After 2 days, participants returned to perform the same test but with the other wedge type. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to evaluate main effects of wedge condition and time and interactions between wedge condition and time (α = 0.05). Paired t-tests were used for post hoc analysis (α = 0.01). No interaction effects (p = 0.958) were found, and knee abduction angular impulses were not significantly different over time (p = 0.384). Lateral wedge conditions produced lesser knee abduction angular impulses than medial conditions at 0 min (difference of 2.79 N m s, p = 0.006) and at 30 min (difference of 2.76 N m s, p < 0.001). It is concluded that significant knee abduction angular impulse changes within wedge conditions do not occur during a 30-min run. Additionally, knee abduction angular impulse differences between wedge conditions are maintained during a 30-min run.

  7. Relevance of angular momentum conservation in mesoscale hydrodynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Götze, Ingo O; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2007-10-01

    The angular momentum is conserved in fluids with a few exceptions such as ferrofluids. However, it can be violated locally in fluid simulations to reduce computational costs. The effects of this violation are investigated using a particle-based simulation method, multiparticle collision dynamics, which can switch on or off angular-momentum conservation. To this end, we study circular Couette flows between concentric and eccentric cylinders, where nonphysical torques due to the lack of the angular-momentum conservation are found whereas the velocity field is not affected. In addition, in simulations of fluids with different viscosities in contact and star polymers in solvent, incorrect angular velocities occur. These results quantitatively agree with the theoretical predictions based on the macroscopic stress tensor.

  8. Interferometric measurement of angular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Arellano, Fabián Erasmo; Panjwani, Hasnain; Carbone, Ludovico; Speake, Clive C.

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the design and realization of a homodyne polarization interferometer for measuring angular motion. The optical layout incorporates carefully designed cat's eye retroreflectors that maximize the measurable range of angular motion and facilitate initial alignment. The retroreflectors are optimized and numerically characterized in terms of defocus and spherical aberrations using Zemax software for optical design. The linearity of the measurement is then calculated in terms of the aberrations. The actual physical interferometer is realized as a compact device with optical components from stock and without relying on adjustable holders. Evaluation of its performance using a commercial autocollimator confirmed a reproducibility within 0.1%, a non-linearity of less than 1 ppm with respect to the autocollimator, an upper limit to its sensitivity of about 5 × 10-11 rad/sqrt{textrm {Hz}} from audioband down to 100 mHz and an angular measurement range of more than ±1°.

  9. Interferometric measurement of angular motion.

    PubMed

    Peña Arellano, Fabián Erasmo; Panjwani, Hasnain; Carbone, Ludovico; Speake, Clive C

    2013-04-01

    This paper describes the design and realization of a homodyne polarization interferometer for measuring angular motion. The optical layout incorporates carefully designed cat's eye retroreflectors that maximize the measurable range of angular motion and facilitate initial alignment. The retroreflectors are optimized and numerically characterized in terms of defocus and spherical aberrations using Zemax software for optical design. The linearity of the measurement is then calculated in terms of the aberrations. The actual physical interferometer is realized as a compact device with optical components from stock and without relying on adjustable holders. Evaluation of its performance using a commercial autocollimator confirmed a reproducibility within 0.1%, a non-linearity of less than 1 ppm with respect to the autocollimator, an upper limit to its sensitivity of about 5 × 10(-11) rad/Hz from audioband down to 100 mHz and an angular measurement range of more than ±1°.

  10. Non-Colinearity of Angular Velocity and Angular Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burr, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the principles, construction, and operation of an apparatus which serves to demonstrate the non-colinearity of the angular velocity and momentum vectors as well as the inertial tensors. Applications of the apparatus to teaching of advanced undergraduate mechanics courses are recommended. (CC)

  11. Solar cell angular position transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, M. C.; Gray, D. L. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An angular position transducer utilizing photocells and a light source is disclosed. The device uses a fully rotatable baffle which is connected via an actuator shaft to the body whose rotational displacement is to be measured. The baffle blocks the light path between the light source and the photocells so that a constant semicircular beam of light reaches the photocells. The current produced by the photocells is fed through a resistor, a differential amplifier measures the voltage drop across the resistor which indicates the angular position of the actuator shaft and hence of the object.

  12. Automated Angular Momentum Recoupling Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, H. T.; Silbar, Richard R.

    1992-04-01

    We present a set of heuristic rules for algebraic solution of angular momentum recoupling problems. The general problem reduces to that of finding an optimal path from one binary tree (representing the angular momentum coupling scheme for the reduced matrix element) to another (representing the sub-integrals and spin sums to be done). The method lends itself to implementation on a microcomputer, and we have developed such an implementation using a dialect of LISP. We describe both how our code, called RACAH, works and how it appears to the user. We illustrate the use of RACAH for several transition and scattering amplitude matrix elements occurring in atomic, nuclear, and particle physics.

  13. Orbital angular momentum density of a general Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoquan; Ji, Zhiyue; Ru, Guoyun

    2016-07-01

    Based on the vectorial Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral formulae, the analytical expression of a general Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam with an arbitrary topological charge is derived in free space. By using the analytical expressions of the electromagnetic field beyond the paraxial approximation, the orbital angular momentum density of a general Lorentz-Gauss vortex beam can be calculated. The effects of the linearly polarized angle and the topological charge on the three components of the orbital angular momentum density are investigated in the reference plane. The two transversal components of the orbital angular momentum are composed of two lobes with the same areas and opposite signs. The longitudinal component of the orbital angular momentum density is composed of four lobes with the same areas. The sign of the orbital angular momentum density in a pair of lobes is positive, and that of the orbital angular momentum density in the other pair of lobes is negative. Moreover, the negative magnitude of the orbital angular momentum density is larger than the positive magnitude of the orbital angular momentum density. The linearly polarized angle affects not only the shape and the location of the lobes, but also the magnitude of the three components of the orbital angular momentum density. With increasing the topological charge, the distribution of the orbital angular momentum density expands, the magnitude of the orbital angular momentum density increases, and the shape of the lobe also slightly changes.

  14. Orbital angular momentum density of a general Lorentz–Gauss vortex beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Guoquan; Ji, Zhiyue; Ru, Guoyun

    2016-07-01

    Based on the vectorial Rayleigh–Sommerfeld integral formulae, the analytical expression of a general Lorentz–Gauss vortex beam with an arbitrary topological charge is derived in free space. By using the analytical expressions of the electromagnetic field beyond the paraxial approximation, the orbital angular momentum density of a general Lorentz–Gauss vortex beam can be calculated. The effects of the linearly polarized angle and the topological charge on the three components of the orbital angular momentum density are investigated in the reference plane. The two transversal components of the orbital angular momentum are composed of two lobes with the same areas and opposite signs. The longitudinal component of the orbital angular momentum density is composed of four lobes with the same areas. The sign of the orbital angular momentum density in a pair of lobes is positive, and that of the orbital angular momentum density in the other pair of lobes is negative. Moreover, the negative magnitude of the orbital angular momentum density is larger than the positive magnitude of the orbital angular momentum density. The linearly polarized angle affects not only the shape and the location of the lobes, but also the magnitude of the three components of the orbital angular momentum density. With increasing the topological charge, the distribution of the orbital angular momentum density expands, the magnitude of the orbital angular momentum density increases, and the shape of the lobe also slightly changes.

  15. Noncontact measurement of angular deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    Technique for measuring instantaneous angular deflection of object requires no physical contact. Technique utilizes two flat refractors, converging lens, and different photocell. Distinction of method is its combination of optical and electromechanical components into feedback system in which measurement error is made to approach zero. Application is foreseen in measurement of torsional strain.

  16. Olympic Wrestling and Angular Momentum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carle, Mark

    1988-01-01

    Reported is the use of a wrestling photograph in a noncalculus introductory physics course. The photograph presents a maneuver that could serve as an example for a discussion on equilibrium, forces, torque, and angular motion. Provided are some qualitative thoughts as well as quantitative calculations. (YP)

  17. The parton orbital angular momentum: Status and prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keh-Fei; Lorcé, Cédric

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical progress on the formulation and classification of the quark and gluon orbital angular momenta (OAM) is reviewed. Their relation to parton distributions and open questions and puzzles are discussed. We give a status report on the lattice calculation of the parton kinetic and canonical OAM and point out several strategies to calculate the quark and gluon canonical OAM on the lattice.

  18. CONNECTING ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND GALACTIC DYNAMICS: THE COMPLEX INTERPLAY BETWEEN SPIN, MASS, AND MORPHOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Teklu, Adelheid F.; Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus; Beck, Alexander M.; Burkert, Andreas; Schulze, Felix; Steinborn, Lisa K.; Schmidt, Andreas S.

    2015-10-10

    The evolution and distribution of the angular momentum of dark matter (DM) halos have been discussed in several studies over the past decades. In particular, the idea arose that angular momentum conservation should allow us to infer the total angular momentum of the entire DM halo from measuring the angular momentum of the baryonic component, which is populating the center of the halo, especially for disk galaxies. To test this idea and to understand the connection between the angular momentum of the DM halo and its galaxy, we use a state-of-the-art, hydrodynamical cosmological simulation taken from the set of Magneticum Pathfinder simulations. Thanks to the inclusion of the relevant physical processes, the improved underlying numerical methods, and high spatial resolution, we successfully produce populations of spheroidal and disk galaxies self-consistently. Thus, we are able to study the dependence of galactic properties on their morphology. We find that (1) the specific angular momentum of stars in disk and spheroidal galaxies as a function of their stellar mass compares well with observational results; (2) the specific angular momentum of the stars in disk galaxies is slightly smaller compared to the specific angular momentum of the cold gas, in good agreement with observations; (3) simulations including the baryonic component show a dichotomy in the specific stellar angular momentum distribution when splitting the galaxies according to their morphological type (this dichotomy can also be seen in the spin parameter, where disk galaxies populate halos with slightly larger spin compared to spheroidal galaxies); (4) disk galaxies preferentially populate halos in which the angular momentum vector of the DM component in the central part shows a better alignment to the angular momentum vector of the entire halo; and (5) the specific angular momentum of the cold gas in disk galaxies is approximately 40% smaller than the specific angular momentum of the total DM halo

  19. Connecting Angular Momentum and Galactic Dynamics: The Complex Interplay between Spin, Mass, and Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teklu, Adelheid F.; Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus; Beck, Alexander M.; Burkert, Andreas; Schmidt, Andreas S.; Schulze, Felix; Steinborn, Lisa K.

    2015-10-01

    The evolution and distribution of the angular momentum of dark matter (DM) halos have been discussed in several studies over the past decades. In particular, the idea arose that angular momentum conservation should allow us to infer the total angular momentum of the entire DM halo from measuring the angular momentum of the baryonic component, which is populating the center of the halo, especially for disk galaxies. To test this idea and to understand the connection between the angular momentum of the DM halo and its galaxy, we use a state-of-the-art, hydrodynamical cosmological simulation taken from the set of Magneticum Pathfinder simulations. Thanks to the inclusion of the relevant physical processes, the improved underlying numerical methods, and high spatial resolution, we successfully produce populations of spheroidal and disk galaxies self-consistently. Thus, we are able to study the dependence of galactic properties on their morphology. We find that (1) the specific angular momentum of stars in disk and spheroidal galaxies as a function of their stellar mass compares well with observational results; (2) the specific angular momentum of the stars in disk galaxies is slightly smaller compared to the specific angular momentum of the cold gas, in good agreement with observations; (3) simulations including the baryonic component show a dichotomy in the specific stellar angular momentum distribution when splitting the galaxies according to their morphological type (this dichotomy can also be seen in the spin parameter, where disk galaxies populate halos with slightly larger spin compared to spheroidal galaxies); (4) disk galaxies preferentially populate halos in which the angular momentum vector of the DM component in the central part shows a better alignment to the angular momentum vector of the entire halo; and (5) the specific angular momentum of the cold gas in disk galaxies is approximately 40% smaller than the specific angular momentum of the total DM halo

  20. Noncontact measurement of angular position and angular movement by means of laser goniometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatov, Yuri V.; Nikolaev, Maxim S.; Pavlov, Petr A.; Venediktov, Vladimir Yu.

    2015-05-01

    The results of analysis and experimental investigation of a laser goniometer (LG), working in the mode of the noncontact measurement of an object's angular position, are presented. The important feature of this approach is the very wide range of high-accuracy measurements. In this case, the LG, characterized by the accuracy of ˜0.1 arc sec, has big advantages in comparison to photoelectrical autocollimators which have a rather narrow range of measured angular positions. Our results indicate that the use of a laser dynamic goniometer makes it possible to measure constant angles with an accuracy of 0.05 to 0.1 arc sec in the range of possible angles of 15 to 20 deg. If the measured angle is varying, the residual measurement error contains an additional component, which is equal to ˜0.2 arc sec, induced by the nonflatness of the optical polygon's faces and by the problems with statistical averaging of the measurement results.

  1. Improvement of Resistance to Slag Penetration in Magnesia-Based Refractory with Colloidal Alumina Addition II by Means of a Proper Particle Size Distribution of MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huijun; Sichen, Du

    2016-06-01

    By addition of colloidal alumina, three different particle sizes of dead burnt MgO were employed as raw materials to prepare MgO-based spinel substrates at 1773 K (1500 °C). It was found that the particle size of MgO, as well as its size distribution, had substantial impact on the resistance of the refractory to the slag penetration at 1873 K (1600 °C). Using relatively small particles of MgO (<0.5 mm) can efficiently limit the slag penetration, due to the formation of solid phases (CaO·Al2O3 and CaO-MgO-Al2O3) at the grain boundaries. A particularly significant improvement against the slag penetration was found on MgO substrates with a proper particle size distribution in a size range of 0-1 mm. The improvement could be mainly related to the higher density and distribution of spinel phase in the MgO matrix, which is mostly located at the borders of large MgO particles.

  2. Handheld directional reflectometer: an angular imaging device to measure BRDF and HDR in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattison, Phillip R.; Dombrowski, Mark S.; Lorenz, James M.; Davis, Keith J.; Mann, Harley C.; Johnson, Philip; Foos, Bryan

    1998-10-01

    Many applications require quantitative measurements of surface light scattering, including quality control on production lines, inspection of painted surfaces, inspection of field repairs, etc. Instruments for measuring surface scattering typically fall into two main categories, namely bidirectional reflectometers, which measure the angular distribution of scattering, and hemispherical directional reflectometers, which measure the total scattering into the hemisphere above the surface. Measurement of the bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) gives the greatest insight into how light is scattered from a surface. Measurements of BRDF, however, are typically very lengthy measurements taken by moving a source and detector to map the scattering. Since BRDF has four angular degrees of freedom, such measurements can require hours to days to complete. Instruments for measuring BRDF are also typically laboratory devices, although a field- portable bi-directional reflectometer does exist. Hemispherical directional reflectance (HDR) is a much easier measurement to make, although care must be taken to use the proper methodology when measuring at wavelengths beyond 10 micrometer, since integrating spheres (typically used to make such measurements) are very energy inefficient and lose their integrating properties at very long wavelengths. A few field- portable hemispherical directional reflectometers do exist, but typically measure HDR only at near-normal angles. Boeing Defense and Space Group and Surface Optics Corporation, under a contract from the Air Force Research Laboratory, have developed a new hand-held instrument capable of measuring both BRDF and HDR using a unique, patented angular imaging technique. A combination of an hemi-ellipsoidal mirror and an additional lens translate the angular scatter from a surface into a two-dimensional spatial distribution, which is recorded by an imaging array. This configuration fully maps the scattering from a half

  3. THE DEPENDENCE OF STELLAR MASS AND ANGULAR MOMENTUM LOSSES ON LATITUDE AND THE INTERACTION OF ACTIVE REGION AND DIPOLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Garraffo, Cecilia; Drake, Jeremy J.; Cohen, Ofer

    2015-11-01

    Rotation evolution of late-type stars is dominated by magnetic braking and the underlying factors that control this angular momentum loss are important for the study of stellar spin-down. In this work, we study angular momentum loss as a function of two different aspects of magnetic activity using a calibrated Alfvén wave-driven magnetohydrodynamic wind model: the strengths of magnetic spots and their distribution in latitude. By driving the model using solar and modified solar surface magnetograms, we show that the topology of the field arising from the net interaction of both small-scale and large-scale field is important for spin-down rates and that angular momentum loss is not a simple function of large scale magnetic field strength. We find that changing the latitude of magnetic spots can modify mass and angular momentum loss rates by a factor of two. The general effect that causes these differences is the closing down of large-scale open field at mid- and high-latitudes by the addition of the small-scale field. These effects might give rise to modulation of mass and angular momentum loss through stellar cycles, and present a problem for ab initio attempts to predict stellar spin-down based on wind models. For all the magnetogram cases considered here, from dipoles to various spotted distributions, we find that angular momentum loss is dominated by the mass loss at mid-latitudes. The spin-down torque applied by magnetized winds therefore acts at specific latitudes and is not evenly distributed over the stellar surface, though this aspect is unlikely to be important for understanding spin-down and surface flows on stars.

  4. Phonons with orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Ayub, M. K.; Ali, S.; Mendonca, J. T.

    2011-10-15

    Ion accoustic waves or phonon modes are studied with orbital angular momentum (OAM) in an unmagnetized collissionless uniform plasma, whose constituents are the Boltzmann electrons and inertial ions. For this purpose, we have employed the fluid equations to obtain a paraxial equation in terms of ion density perturbations and discussed its Gaussian beam and Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beam solutions. Furthermore, an approximate solution for the electrostatic potential problem is presented, allowing to express the components of the electric field in terms of LG potential perturbations. The energy flux due to phonons is also calculated and the corresponding OAM is derived. Numerically, it is shown that the parameters such as azimuthal angle, radial and angular mode numbers, and beam waist, strongly modify the profiles of the phonon LG potential. The present results should be helpful in understanding the phonon mode excitations produced by Brillouin backscattering of laser beams in a uniform plasma.

  5. ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND GALAXY FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Fall, S. Michael

    2012-12-15

    separate, fundamental j{sub *}-M{sub *} scaling relations. This provides a physical motivation for characterizing galaxies most basically with two parameters: mass and bulge-to-disk ratio. Next, in an approach complementary to numerical simulations, we construct idealized models of angular momentum content in a cosmological context, using estimates of dark matter halo spin and mass from theoretical and empirical studies. We find that the width of the halo spin distribution cannot account for the differences between spiral and elliptical j{sub *}, but that the observations are reproduced well if these galaxies simply retained different fractions of their initial j complement ({approx}60% and {approx}10%, respectively). We consider various physical mechanisms for the simultaneous evolution of j{sub *} and M{sub *} (including outflows, stripping, collapse bias, and merging), emphasizing that the vector sum of all such processes must produce the observed j{sub *}-M{sub *} relations. We suggest that a combination of early collapse and multiple mergers (major or minor) may account naturally for the trend for ellipticals. More generally, the observed variations in angular momentum represent simple but fundamental constraints for any model of galaxy formation.

  6. Angular two-point correlation of NVSS galaxies revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Song; Schwarz, Dominik J.

    2016-06-01

    We measure the angular two-point correlation and angular power spectrum from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) of radio galaxies. They are found to be consistent with the best-fit cosmological model from the Planck analysis, and with the redshift distribution obtained from the Combined EIS-NVSS Survey Of Radio Sources (CENSORS). Our analysis is based on an optimal estimation of the two-point correlation function and makes use of a new mask that takes into account direction dependent effects of the observations, sidelobe effects of bright sources and galactic foreground. We also set a flux threshold and take the cosmic radio dipole into account. The latter turns out to be an essential step in the analysis. This improved cosmological analysis of the NVSS emphasizes the importance of a flux calibration that is robust and stable on large angular scales for future radio continuum surveys.

  7. Astrophysical interpretation of small-scale neutrino angular correlation searches with IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuermann, Martin; Schimp, Michael; Wiebusch, Christopher H.

    2016-10-01

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory has discovered a diffuse all-flavor flux of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. However, the corresponding astrophysical sources have not yet been identified. Neither significant point sources nor significant angular correlations of event directions have been observed by IceCube or other instruments to date. We present a new method to interpret the non-observation of angular correlations in terms of exclusions on the strength and number of point-like neutrino sources in generic astrophysical scenarios. Additionally, we constrain the presence of these sources taking into account the measurement of the diffuse high-energy neutrino flux by IceCube. We apply the method to two types of astrophysically motivated source count distributions: The first type is obtained by considering the cosmological evolution of the co-moving density of active galaxies, while the second type is directly derived from the gamma ray source count distribution observed by Fermi-LAT. As a result, we constrain the possible parameter space for both types of source count distributions.

  8. Controversy concerning the definition of quark and gluon angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leader, Elliot

    2011-05-01

    A major controversy has arisen in QCD as to how to split the total angular momentum into separate quark and gluon contributions, and as to whether the gluon angular momentum can itself be split, in a gauge-invariant way, into a spin and orbital part. Several authors have proposed various answers to these questions and offered a variety of different expressions for the relevant operators. I argue that none of these is acceptable and suggest that the canonical expression for the momentum and angular momentum operators is the correct and physically meaningful one. It is then an inescapable fact that the gluon angular momentum operator cannot, in general, be split in a gauge-invariant way into a spin and orbital part. However, the projection of the gluon spin onto its direction of motion, i.e. its helicity is gauge invariant and is measured in deep inelastic scattering on nucleons. The Ji sum rule, relating the quark angular momentum to generalized parton distributions, though not based on the canonical operators, is shown to be correct, if interpreted with due care. I also draw attention to several interesting aspects of QED and QCD, which, to the best of my knowledge, are not commented upon in the standard textbooks on field theory.

  9. Grain orientations and distribution of Y2Ba4CuUOx phase in melt-textured YBCO with addition of depleted uranium oxide studied by EBSD