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Sample records for addition cured silicone

  1. A comparison of dimensional accuracy between three different addition cured silicone impression materials.

    PubMed

    Forrester-Baker, L; Seymour, K G; Samarawickrama, D; Zou, L; Cherukara, G; Patel, M

    2005-06-01

    Ten impressions of a metal implant abutment were made with each of three addition-cured silicone impression materials. Using the technique of co-ordinate metrology, the shoulder region of the abutment and corresponding regions of both impressions and dies made from these impressions were scanned and measured. Comparison of these measurements indicated that the mean dimension measured from the shoulder region for each group of impression materials was significantly different from those taken from the original metal implant abutment. However, when these impressions were cast in a gypsum based die material, none of the measured dimensions taken from the casts were significantly different from those taken from the original metal implant abutment. Thus, any change in measured dimensions occurring during impression making, was compensated for in some way by the casting process.

  2. New addition curing polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frimer, Aryeh A.; Cavano, Paul

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to improve the thermal-oxidative stability (TOS) of PMR-type polymers, the use of 1,4-phenylenebis (phenylmaleic anhydride) PPMA, was evaluated. Two series of nadic end-capped addition curing polyimides were prepared by imidizing PPMA with either 4,4'-methylene dianiline or p-phenylenediamine. The first resulted in improved solubility and increased resin flow while the latter yielded a compression molded neat resin sample with a T(sub g) of 408 C, close to 70 C higher than PME-15. The performance of these materials in long term weight loss studies was below that of PMR-15, independent of post-cure conditions. These results can be rationalized in terms of the thermal lability of the pendant phenyl groups and the incomplete imidization of the sterically congested PPMA. The preparation of model compounds as well as future research directions are discussed.

  3. Effect of a laboratory surfactant on compatibility of type IV dental stones with addition-cured silicone impression materials.

    PubMed

    Tredwin, Christopher Jeremy; Nesbit, Michael; Butta, Rajeev; Moles, David R

    2008-06-01

    This study compared the effect of a surfactant on surface detail reproduction between combinations of addition-cured silicone impression materials and type IV stones. Six hundred impressions were made of a ruled test block using; Examix-NDS, Doric-Es Flo-Light, Panasil Contact Plus, Extrude Wash and President Plus Jet. Half of the impressions were treated with a surfactant (Aurofilm). Impressions were poured with type IV dental stones; Silky Rock, Fuji Rock, Suprastone and Vel-Mix and the 20 mu line was scored. A laboratory surfactant (Aurofilm) significantly reduced (P<0.01) compatibility with; (i) Examix-NDS and Suprastone, (ii) Examix-NDS and Velmix, (iii) Extrude Wash and Fuji Rock.

  4. High Flow Addition Curing Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Vannucci, Raymond D.; Ansari, Irfan; Cerny, Lawrence L.; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    1994-01-01

    A new series of high flow PMR-type addition curing polyimides was developed, which employed the substitution of 2,2'-bis (trifluoromethyl) -4,4'-diaminobiphenyl (BTDB) for p-phenylenediamine (p -PDA) in a PMR-IL formulation. These thermoset polyimides, designated as 12F resins, were prepared from BTDB and the dimethyl ester of 4,4'- (hexafluo- roisopropylidene) -diphthalic acid (HFDE) with either nadic ester (NE) or p-aminostyrene (PAS) as the endcaps for addition curing. The 12F prepolymers displayed lower melting temperatures in DSC analysis, and higher melt flow in rheological studies than the cor- responding PMR-11 polyimides. Long-term isothermal aging studies showed that BTDB- based 12F resins exhibited comparable thermo-oxidative stability to P-PDA based PMR-11 polyimides. The noncoplanar 2- and 2'-disubstituted biphenyldiamine (BTDB) not only lowered the melt viscosities of 12F prepolymers, but also retained reasonable thermal sta- bility of the cured resins. The 12F polyimide resin with p-aminostyrene endcaps showed the best promise for long-term, high-temperature application at 343 C (650 F).

  5. Influence of curing agent on fibrosis around silicone implants.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Josna; Mohanty, Mira

    2013-01-01

    Severe capsular contracture around silicone expander breast implants leading to pain and failure is a major clinical problem. Even though earlier studies have implicated the immunogenicity of silicone, the role of physical and chemical properties of the silicone material in excessive collagen deposition and fibrosis has been less addressed. The present study investigates whether there is any correlation between the type of curing systems i.e. addition and free radical curing and the fibrosis around silicone elastomer. The experiment carried out uses commercially available silicone ventriculo-peritoneal shunt material elastomer cured by platinum and the results are compared with results obtained in a similar study carried out by the authors using commercially available silicone tissue expander material cured by peroxide. Ultra-high molecular weight poly-ethylene (UHMWPE), the standard reference for biocompatibility evaluation, was used as the control material. The materials were implanted in rat skeletal muscle for 30 and 90 days. Inflammatory cells, myofibroblasts, cytokines, and collagen deposition at the material-tissue interface were identified by haematoxylin-eosin and Masson's Trichrome stains and semi-quantitated based on immunohistochemical studies. Results indicate that even though the cellular response in the initial phase of wound healing was similar in both platinum and peroxide-cured materials, the collagen deposition in the proliferative phase was more around peroxide-cured material in comparison to the platinum-cured silicone elastomer. There is a need to look into the molecular mechanisms of this interaction and the possibility of using curing systems other than free radical peroxide in the manufacture of silicone elastomer expanders for breast prosthesis.

  6. Improved Cure-in-Place Silicone Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, C. E.; Sweet, J.; Gonzalez, R.

    1982-01-01

    Two improved cure-in-place silicone-elastomer-based adhesives have low thermal expansion and low thermal conductivity. Adhesives are flexible at low temperature and withstand high temperatures without disintegrating. New ablative compounds were initially developed for in-flight repair of insulating tile on Space Shuttle orbiter. Could find use in other applications requiring high-performance adhesives, such as sealants for solar collectors.

  7. Improved cure method for single component silicone rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lippitt, M. W.

    1969-01-01

    Water is incorporated in a carrier and then thoroughly mixed with the single component silicone rubber containing acetic anhydride as a curing agent. Because curing occurs with the water supplied internally, controlled curing is possible within a reasonable period of time, regardless of the thickness of the material.

  8. Silicone rubber curing by high intensity infrared radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, T.; Tsai, J.; Cherng, C.; Chen, J.

    1994-08-10

    A high-intensity (12 kW) and compact (80 cm) infrared heating oven for fast curing (12 seconds) of tube-like silicone rubber curing studies is reported. Quality inspection by DSC and DMA and results from pilot-scale curing oven all suggest that infrared heating provides a better way of vulcanization regarding to curing time, quality, cost, and spacing over conventional hot air heating. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  9. Silicone rubber curing by high intensity infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tung-Way; Tsai, Jen-Hui; Cherng, Chung-Pin; Chen, Jan-Ku

    1994-08-01

    A high-intensity (12 kW) and compact (80 cm) infrared heating oven for fast curing (12 seconds) of tube-like silicone rubber curing studies is reported. Quality inspection by DSC and DMA and results from pilot-scale curing oven all suggest that infrared heating provides a better way of vulcanization regarding to curing time, quality, cost, and spacing over conventional hot air heating.

  10. Evaluation of Degreasers as Brine Curing Additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The length of time needed for brine curing of raw hides and skins, a minimum of 18 h, is a time-consuming and expensive process. In this paper we initially report the results of an investigation of the stratigraphic distribution of sodium chloride and water in fleshed hides cured for varying interv...

  11. [Effects of silicon carbide on the cure depth, hardness and compressive strength of composite resin].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Lin, Yi'na; Liu, Xiaoqing

    2009-08-01

    The hardness, compressive strength and cure depth are important indices of the composite resin. This investigation was made with regard to the effects of silicon carbide on the cure depth, hardness and compressive strength of the light-curing composite resin. Different amounts of silicon carbide were added to the light-curing composite resin, which accounted for 0 wt%, 1 wt%, 0.6 wt%, 0.3 wt%, 0.1 wt%, 0.05 wt% and 0.005 wt% of the composite resin, respectively. The hardness, compressive strength and cure depth of the six afore-mentioned groups of composite resin were measured by the vernier caliper, the vickers hardness tester and the tensile strength of machine, respectively. The results showed that silicon carbide improved the hardness and compressive strength of the light-curing composite resin,when the concentration was 0.05 wt%. And the cure depth was close to that of control.

  12. Compounds from Silicones Alter Enzyme Activity in Curing Barnacle Glue and Model Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Rittschof, Daniel; Orihuela, Beatriz; Harder, Tilmann; Stafslien, Shane; Chisholm, Bret; Dickinson, Gary H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Attachment strength of fouling organisms on silicone coatings is low. We hypothesized that low attachment strength on silicones is, in part, due to the interaction of surface available components with natural glues. Components could alter curing of glues through bulk changes or specifically through altered enzyme activity. Methodology/Principal Findings GC-MS analysis of silicone coatings showed surface-available siloxanes when the coatings were gently rubbed with a cotton swab for 15 seconds or given a 30 second rinse with methanol. Mixtures of compounds were found on 2 commercial and 8 model silicone coatings. The hypothesis that silicone components alter glue curing enzymes was tested with curing barnacle glue and with commercial enzymes. In our model, barnacle glue curing involves trypsin-like serine protease(s), which activate enzymes and structural proteins, and a transglutaminase which cross-links glue proteins. Transglutaminase activity was significantly altered upon exposure of curing glue from individual barnacles to silicone eluates. Activity of purified trypsin and, to a greater extent, transglutaminase was significantly altered by relevant concentrations of silicone polymer constituents. Conclusions/Significance Surface-associated silicone compounds can disrupt glue curing and alter enzyme properties. Altered curing of natural glues has potential in fouling management. PMID:21379573

  13. Degradation of thermally-cured silicone encapsulant under terrestrial UV

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Can; Miller, David C.; Tappan, Ian A.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2016-12-01

    Concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) modules operate in extreme conditions, including enhanced solar flux, elevated operating temperature, and frequent thermal cycling. Coupled with active environmental species such as oxygen and moisture, the operating conditions pose a unique materials challenge for guaranteeing operational lifetimes of greater than 25 years. Specifically, the encapsulants used in the optical elements are susceptible to environmental degradation during operation. For example, the interfaces must remain in contact to prevent optical attenuation and thermal runaway. We developed fracture mechanics based metrologies to characterize the adhesion of the silicone encapsulant and its adjacent surfaces, as well as the cohesion of the encapsulant. Further, we studied the effects of weathering on adhesion using an outdoor concentrator operating in excess of 1100 times the AM1.5 direct irradiance and in indoor environmental chambers with broadband ultraviolet (UV) irradiation combined with controlled temperature and humidity. We observed a sharp initial increase in adhesion energy followed by a gradual decrease in adhesion as a result of both outdoor concentrator exposure and indoor UV weathering. We characterized changes in mechanical properties and chemical structures using XPS, FTIR, and DMA to understand the fundamental connection between mechanical strength and the degradation of the silicone encapsulant. We developed physics based models to explain the change in adhesion and to predict operational lifetimes of the materials and their interfaces.

  14. Evaluation of heat-cured resin bases following the addition of denture teeth using a second heat cure.

    PubMed

    Polukoshko, K M; Brudvik, J S; Nicholls, J I; Smith, D E

    1992-04-01

    This study compared heat-cured acrylic resin denture baseplate distortions following a second heat cure used to add the denture teeth. The second heat cure was done with three different water-bath curing temperatures. The distortions were evaluated in three planes by use of a measuring microscope. Recorded distortions were not clinically significant.

  15. A custom-made nasal implant: prefabrication from curing of silicone adhesive.

    PubMed

    Han, K; Kang, J

    1996-02-01

    When nasal augmentation is performed with implants fashioned from a piece of solid silicone block or commercially available prefabricated implants, the precise sculpturing of the ventral surface of the implant in order to conform to the convex contour of the nose is often difficult to achieve, increasing the possibility for malposition and extrusion. We devised two methods of making soft silicone elastomer implants from nasal cast models obtained from alginate impressions of patients' noses: type I, in which the implant is made from the curing of silicone adhesive that is spread on both sides of the sheet blueprint placed on the cast model, and type II, in which the implant is made only from the curing of silicone adhesive. Because these custom-made implants have a ventral surface of exact concave contour conforming to the convex surface of the nasal framework, they blend in nicely with the various configurations of the existing nasal framework and thus minimize malposition and extrusion. These implants also avoid having a prototype nose for everyone and are more cost-effective than commercially available implants.

  16. Silicon carbide sintered body manufactured from silicon carbide powder containing boron, silicon and carbonaceous additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Hidehiko

    1987-01-01

    A silicon carbide powder of a 5-micron grain size is mixed with 0.15 to 0.60 wt% mixture of a boron compound, i.e., boric acid, boron carbide (B4C), silicon boride (SiB4 or SiB6), aluminum boride, etc., and an aluminum compound, i.e., aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum hydroxide, aluminum carbide, etc., or aluminum boride (AlB2) alone, in such a proportion that the boron/aluminum atomic ratio in the sintered body becomes 0.05 to 0.25 wt% and 0.05 to 0.40 wt%, respectively, together with a carbonaceous additive to supply enough carbon to convert oxygen accompanying raw materials and additives into carbon monoxide.

  17. Additives to silane for thin film silicon photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Hurley, Patrick Timothy; Ridgeway, Robert Gordon; Hutchison, Katherine Anne; Langan, John Giles

    2013-09-17

    Chemical additives are used to increase the rate of deposition for the amorphous silicon film (.alpha.Si:H) and/or the microcrystalline silicon film (.mu.CSi:H). The electrical current is improved to generate solar grade films as photoconductive films used in the manufacturing of Thin Film based Photovoltaic (TFPV) devices.

  18. Edge-Selectively Functionalized Graphene-Like Platelets as a Co-curing Agent and a Nanoscale Additive to Epoxy Resin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-12

    second method is where graphene can be grown using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a metal substrate18–20 or from single crystal silicon carbide...1 Final Report for AOARD Grant 114042 “Edge-selectively functionalized graphene -like platelets as a co-curing agent and a nanoscale additive...the role of a molecular wedge to exfoliate the AB-graphite into individual graphene and graphene -like platelets upon dispersion in polar solvents

  19. Nanoscale semiconducting silicon as a nutritional food additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canham, L. T.

    2007-05-01

    Very high surface area silicon powders can be realized by high energy milling or electrochemical etching techniques. Such nanoscale silicon structures, whilst biodegradable in the human gastrointestinal tract, are shown to be remarkably stable in most foodstuffs and beverages. The potential for using silicon to improve the shelf life and bioavailability of specific nutrients in functional foods is highlighted. Published drug delivery data implies that the nanoentrapment of hydrophobic nutrients will significantly improve their dissolution kinetics, through a combined effect of nanostructuring and solid state modification. Nutrients loaded to date include vitamins, fish oils, lycopene and coenzyme Q10. In addition, there is growing published evidence that optimized release of orthosilicic acid, the biodegradation product of semiconducting silicon in the gut, offers beneficial effects with regard bone health. The utility of nanoscale silicon in the nutritional field shows early promise and is worthy of much further study.

  20. The effect of additional etching and curing mechanism of composite resin on the dentin bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In-Su; Son, Sung-Ae; Hur, Bock; Kwon, Yong-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of additional acid etching and curing mechanism (light-curing or self-curing) of a composite resin on the dentin bond strength and compatibility of one-step self-etching adhesives. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixteen human permanent molars were randomly divided into eight groups according to the adhesives used (All-Bond Universal: ABU, Clearfil S3 Bond: CS3), additional acid etching (additional acid etching performed: EO, no additional acid etching performed: EX), and composite resins (Filtek Z-250: Z250, Clearfil FII New Bond: CFNB). Group 1: ABU-EO-Z250, Group 2: ABU-EO-CFNB, Group 3: ABU-EX-Z250, Group 4: ABU-EX-CFNB, Group 5: CS3-EO-Z250, Group 6: CS3-EO-CFNB, Group 7: CS3-EX-Z250, Group 8: CS3-EX-CFNB. After bonding procedures, composite resins were built up on dentin surfaces. After 24-hour water storage, the teeth were sectioned to make 10 specimens for each group. The microtensile bond strength test was performed using a microtensile testing machine. The failure mode of the fractured specimens was examined by means of an optical microscope at ×20 magnification. The data was analyzed using a one-way ANOVA and Scheffe's post-hoc test (α=.05). RESULTS Additional etching groups showed significantly higher values than the no additional etching group when using All-Bond Universal. The light-cured composite resin groups showed significantly higher values than the self-cured composite resin groups in the Clearfil S3 Bond. CONCLUSION The additional acid etching is beneficial for the dentin bond strength when using low acidic one-step self-etch adhesives, and low acidic one-step self-etch adhesives are compatible with self-cured composite resin. The acidity of the one-step self-etch adhesives is an influencing factor in terms of the dentin bonding strength and incompatibility with a self-cured composite resin. PMID:24353889

  1. Silicon-Containing Tri- and Tetra-Functional Cyanate Esters: Synthesis, Cure Kinetics, and Network Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Correspondence to: Andrew J. Guenthner (E-mail: andrew.guenthner@edwards.af.mil) Additional Supporting Information may be found in the online version...performance. Because the carbon-silicon bond is in general longer and more flexible than a corresponding carbon-   3    carbon bond, the molecular segments... corresponding networks formed from di-functional cyanate esters without silicon. We further show that these advantages are retained when the

  2. Tin nanoparticles as an effective conductive additive in silicon anodes

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, L.; Beaudette, C.; Guo, J.; Bozhilov, K.; Mangolini, L.

    2016-01-01

    We have found that the addition of tin nanoparticles to a silicon-based anode provides dramatic improvements in performance in terms of both charge capacity and cycling stability. Using a simple procedure and off-the-shelf additives and precursors, we developed a structure in which the tin nanoparticles are segregated at the interface between the silicon-containing active layer and the solid electrolyte interface. Even a minor addition of tin, as small as ∼2% by weight, results in a significant decrease in the anode resistance, as confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This leads to a decrease in charge transfer resistance, which prevents the formation of electrically inactive “dead spots” in the anode structure and enables the effective participation of silicon in the lithiation reaction. PMID:27484849

  3. Characterization of the Low-Curing-Temperature Silver Paste with Silver 2-Ethylhexanoate Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chun-An; Lin, Pang; Lin, Hong-Ching; Wang, Sea-Fue

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the effects of the solvent and atmosphere on the thermal decomposition behaviors of silver 2-ethylhexanoate and α-terpenol are investigated. Low-curing-temperature silver pastes made from Ag flakes, α-terpineol and various amounts of silver 2-ethylhexanoate, were prepared and characterized. The microstructures and resistivities of cured films screen-printed from the pastes were examined. The results of thermal analysis in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres revealed that thermal decomposition is the dominating reaction during the heating process of silver 2-ethylhexanoate, even though the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) result revealed an exothermic reaction for silver 2-ethylhexanoate heated in air due to oxidation. Thermal decomposition left almost pure Ag particles, which is beneficial for bridging between silver flake particles in the films. On the basis of the rheological behavior, microstructural evolution and electrical evaluation, it can be concluded that a low-curing-temperature silver paste with 5 wt % silver 2-ethylhexanoate addition is the best formulation, which possesses shear-thinning and thixotropic properties and a resistivity of 7.8× 10-6 Ω cm after being cured at 250 °C, which is relatively close to the bulk resistivity of Ag.

  4. The effect of accelerated ageing on performance properties of addition type silicone biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Stathi, K; Tarantili, P A; Polyzois, G

    2010-05-01

    The UV-protection provided to addition type silicone elastomers by various colorants, such as conventional dry earth pigments, as well as the so called "functional or reactive" pigments, was investigated. Moreover, the effect of a UV light absorber and a silica filler was also explored. Under the experimental parameters of this work, the exposure of silicone to UV radiation resulted in some changes of the IR absorbance, thermal decomposition after 400 degrees C, T(g) and tensile properties, whereas the storage modulus of samples was not affected. The obtained spectroscopic data, as well as the results of TGA and storage modulus, were interpreted by assuming that chain scission takes place during aging, whereas the improvement of tensile strength allows the hypothesis of a post-curing process, initiated by UV radiation. Therefore, the increase of T(g) could partly be due to the above reason and, furthermore, to the contribution of a rearrangement of chain fragments within the free volume of the elastomeric material. Regarding the evaluation of various coloring agents used in this work, the obtained results show that dry pigments are more sensitive to accelerated ageing conditions in comparison with functional liquid pigments. Moreover, the hydrophobic character of silicone matrix is enhanced, with the addition of this type pigments because of the vinyl functional silanes groups present in their chemical structure. Finally, it should be noted that the incorporation of silica nanofiller did not seem to prevent the silicone elastomer from degradation upon UV irradiation, but showed a significant reinforcing effect.

  5. Moisture-cured silicone-urethanes-candidate materials for tissue engineering: a biocompatibility study in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mrówka, P; Kozakiewicz, J; Jurkowska, A; Sienkiewicz, E; Przybylski, J; Lewandowski, Z; Przybylski, J; Lewandowska-Szumieł, M

    2010-07-01

    This study was performed to verify the response of human bone-derived cells (HBDCs) to moisture-cured silicone-urethanes (mcSUUs) in vitro, as the first step toward using them as scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Good surgical handling, tissue cavity filling, stable mechanical properties, and potentially improved oxygen supply to cells after implantation justify the investigation of these nondegradable elastomers. A set of various mcSUUs were obtained by moisture-curing NCO-terminated prepolymers, synthesized from oligomeric siloxane diols of two different oligosiloxane chain lengths, and two different diisocyanates (MDI and IPDI), using two different NCO/OH molar ratios. Dibutyltindilaurate (DBTL) or N-dimethylethanolamine (N-met) served as catalysts. After 7 days of culture, cell number, viability, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were determined, and after 21 days, cell viability and collagen production were determined. Material characteristics significantly influenced the cell response. The mcSUUs prepared with DBTL (widely used in the syntheses of biomaterials) were cytotoxic. The MDI-based mcSUUs were significantly more favored by HBDCs than the IPDI-based ones in all performed tests. MDI-based material with low 2/1 NCO/OH and short chain length was the best support for cells, comparable with tissue-culture polystyrene (with ALP activity even higher). HBDCs cultured on porous scaffolds from this mcSUU produced a tissue-like structure in culture. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res, 2010.

  6. Role of additives in wood polymer composites. Relationship to analogous radiation grafting and curing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Loo-Teck; Garnett, John L.; Mohajerani, Shahroo

    1999-08-01

    Wood polymer composites (WPC) were prepared by impregnating an Australian softwood, Pinus radiata with methyl methacrylate which subsequently underwent in situ polymerisation utilising either γ radiation or the catalyst-accelerator method. Novel additives including thermal initiator, crosslinking agents, an inclusion compound and oxygen scavenger were incorporated to improve the polymer loading and properties of the resulting WPC. Polymer loadings of WPC obtained utilising the accelerator-catalyst method corresponded well with those obtained using γ radiation with 20 kGy radiation dose. The mechanistic significance of the current work in analogous radiation grafting and curing processes is discussed.

  7. The fate of silicone oil during heat-curing glass siliconization--changes in molecular parameters analyzed by size exclusion and high temperature gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Mundry, T; Schurreit, T; Surmann, P

    2000-01-01

    The siliconization of pharmaceutical glass containers, usually for parenteral formulations, is performed in a so-called heat-curing process using diluted aqueous emulsions of medical grade silicone oils. To do this, the emulsion film is spread on the inner container surface, followed by an application of dry heat at temperatures above 300 degrees C. Water and surfactants are removed by degradation and vaporization, while the thermostable poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is left on the surface. In the present study, heat-cured siliconized glass containers of two different types were solvent-extracted to obtain material of heat-treated PDMS. These samples were analyzed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and high-temperature gas chromatography (GC) with special respect to low molecular-weight siloxanes (LMWS). By comparison with the untreated starting materials, significant changes in the molecular weight distribution (MWD) of the silicone oil were revealed. Almost all of the LMWS present in untreated materials were not detectable in the heat-cured extract of a 100 cSt. Baysilone silicone oil. Small amounts of PDMS-molecules, with chain lengths of 25 up 45 siloxane units, were traceable. The examination of a second product of higher viscosity yielded unexpected results. The heat-treated extract contained none of the siloxanes that were detected in the starting material. Siloxanes of chain lengths of up to 45 units having molecular weights of over 3000 g/mol could not be found after the siliconization process. This led to the conclusion that not only vaporization effects must be responsible for their absence, but also that silicone suffers from a heat-induced degradation. The results of SEC and GC analysis were supported by each other. The whole molecular weight distribution and four distinct fractions were characterized by SEC, while the GC analysis was capable of a high-resolution view into the LMWS fraction below 3500 g/mol. In conclusion, the benefit of the heat

  8. Synthesis and UV-Curing Behaviors of Urethane Acrylic Oligomers Modified by the Incorporation of Silicone Diols into the Soft Segments for a 3D Multi-Chip Package Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Tae-Hyung; Park, Ji-Won; Kim, Hyun-Joong

    2015-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-curable urethane acrylic oligomers were synthesized and then modified by the incorporation of silicone diols with different molecular weights to improve thermal stability for temporary bonding and debonding adhesives in a three-dimensional multi-chip package process. The UV-curing behaviors were investigated using photo-differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance, and gel fraction, while the UV-curing kinetics was also studied. In addition, the thermal stability of the samples was checked using thermogravimetric analysis. UV-curing and thermal stability were more affected by the molecular weight of the silicone diols than by UV dose due to both the flexibility and the steric hindrance of the synthesized oligomer structures.

  9. Chemical Origins of Permanent Set in a Peroxide Cured Filled Silicone Elastomer - Tensile and 1H NMR Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, S; Deteresa, S; Shields, A; Sawvel, A; Balazs, B; Maxwell, R S

    2004-10-29

    The aging of a commercial filled siloxane polymeric composite in states of high stress and Co-60 {gamma}-radiation exposure has been studied. DC-745 is a commercially available silicone elastomer consisting of dimethyl, methyl-phenyl, and vinyl-methyl siloxane monomers crosslinked with a peroxide vinyl specific curing agent. It is filled with {approx}30 wt.% mixture of high and low surface area silicas. This filled material is shown to be subject to permanent set if exposed to radiation while under tensile stress. Tensile modulus measurements show that the material gets marginally softer with combined radiation exposure and tensile strain as compared to material exposed to radiation without tensile strain. In addition, the segmental dynamics as measured by both uniaxial NMR relaxometry and Multiple Quantum NMR methods indicate that the material is undergoes radiatively-induced crosslinking in the absence of tensile strain and a combination of crosslinking and strain dependent increase in dynamic order parameter for the network chains. The MQ-NMR also suggests a small change in the number of polymer chains associated with the silica filler surface. Comparison of the prediction of the relative change in crosslink density from the NMR data as well as solvent swelling data and from that predicted from the Tobolsky model suggest that degradation leads to a deviation from Gaussian chain statistics and the formation of increased numbers of elastically ineffective network chains.

  10. Addition polyimide adhesives containing ATBN and silicone elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saint Clair, A. K.; Saint Clair, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of added elastomers on the thermal stability, adhesive strength, and fracture toughness of LARC-13, a high-temperature addition polyimide adhesive. Various butadiene/acrylonitrile and silicon elastomers were incorporated into the polyimide resin either as physical polyblends, or by chemically reacting the elastomers with the polyimide backbone. Adhesive single lap-shear and T-peel strengths were measured before and after ageing at elevated temperature. A tapered double-cantilever beam specimen was used to determine the fracture toughness of the elastomer-modified polyimide adhesives.

  11. Addition Curing Thermosets Endcapped with 4-Amino (2.2) Paracyclophane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, John F.; Sutter, James K.; Meador, Mary A. B.; Baldwin, Larry J.; Meador, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    A new family of addition curing polyimides were prepared that contained 4-amino (2.2)-paracyclophane as the endcap. An improved synthesis of the endcap 4-amino-(2.2) cyclophane was accomplished increasing the yield to 60 percent and simplifying the procedure. DSC and rheological analysis of endcapped polyimide oligomers confirmed that the onset for polymerization of the ethylene bridge was 250 C. C-13 CP/MAS NMR was used to determine the structural changes of the oligomers after thermal treatment. The cyclophane capped polyimides were successfully compression molded to form void free neat resin specimens. Tg's as high as 353 C were obtained by thermomechanical analysis for postcured samples. Preliminary thermal stability studies suggest that these resins have a high onset of decomposition ranging from 549 to 567 C.

  12. Effect of tiger nut fibre addition on the quality and safety of a dry-cured pork sausage ("Chorizo") during the dry-curing process.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Zapata, E; Zunino, V; Pérez-Alvarez, J A; Fernández-López, J

    2013-11-01

    There is a growing interest in the revalorization of co-products from the food industry. Co-products from tiger nuts (Cyperus esculentus) milk production are a suitable fibre source. "Chorizo" is the most popular dry-cured meat product in Spain. The aim of this work was to study the effect of the tiger nut fibre addition (0, 5, and 7.5%) on the quality (composition, physicochemical, and sensorial properties) and safety (oxidation and microbial quality) of a Spanish dry-cured sausage, during the 28days of its dry-curing process. Tiger nut fibre (TNF) addition decreased fat and increased moisture content. The addition of TNF significantly increased (p<0.05) the total dietary fibre content of "Chorizo". Lightness (L*), yellowness (b*) and redness index (a*/b*) were significantly (p<0.05) affected by the fibre content. The addition of 5% and 7.5% TNF to chorizo provided rich fibre and a healthier product. Although there were slight changes in the physicochemical properties, its quality (traditional characteristics) and its safety remained.

  13. Properties of silicon-germanium thermoelectric alloys with additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclane, George; Raag, Valvo; Danielson, Lee; Wood, Charles; Vandersande, Jan

    1986-01-01

    The paper reports the results of measurements (Seebeck and Hall coefficients, electrical resistivity, and thermal conductivity) on silicon-germanium (Si-20 at. pct Ge) alloy with boron phosphide, B(6.5)P) as an additive, prepared as described by McLane et al. (1986). The power factor (Seebeck coefficient squared divided by electrical resistivity) and the thermal conductivity of SeGe/B(6.5)P material were found to be lower than for the 'standard' SiGe (Si-22 at. pct Ge) material. However, no net improvement was achieved in the figure-of-merit of the sample tested. It is suggested that structural inhomogeneities, revealed by a SEM examination, might be responsible for this lack of improvement.

  14. Volume stabilization of high MgO cement: Effect of curing conditions and fly ash addition

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, M.M.; Mullick, A.K.

    1998-11-01

    Hydration of high MgO cement paste under autoclave condition causes the rapid formation and crystallization of magnesium hydroxide and leads to the creation of larger pore sizes. This results in the loss of mechanical strength and higher expansion values. Under ambient water curing, precipitation and distribution of gelatinous calcium silicate hydrates into the finer network causes a homogeneous morphology and the development of smaller pores. The resultant higher mechanical strength associated with partial hydration of MgO yields reduced expansion. High MgO cement paste containing fly ash also showed considerable pore refinement and improved hydrate morphology favoring volume stability under both autoclave and ambient water curing.

  15. The thermal conductivity of silicon nitride with molybdenum disilicide additions

    SciTech Connect

    Beecher, S.C.; Dinwiddie, R.B.; Abeel, A.M.; Lowden, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    Room-temperature thermal conductivity has been measured for a series of silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) matrix composites with molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) additions of 2, 5 10, 25 and 50 wt. %. Included in these measurements were a pure MoSi{sub 2} sample and a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} sample containing only sintering aids. Aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and yttrium oxide (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were added as the sintering aids, at approximately 6 and 2 respectively. When the amount of MoSi{sub 2} was increased to greater than 10 wt. %, the amount of the sintering aids necessary to densify the composite was decreased. No sintering aids were added to the pure MoSi{sub 2} sample. Thermal conductivities of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} sample without MoSi{sub 2} and the pure MoSi{sub 2} sample wee 36 W/m.K and 52 W/m.K respectively, which agree very well with the literature values for similar materials. No statistically significant changes were observed in the thermal conductivity for those samples containing up to 10 wt. % MoSi{sub 2}. However, between 10 and 25 wt. % MoSi{sub 2} there was a dramatic decrease in the thermal conductivity from 37 to 20.9 W/m.K. The thermal conductivity then increased steadily with further additions of MoSi{sub 2} up to 52 W/m.K for the pure MoSi{sub 2} specimen.

  16. Nitroxide polymer networks formed by Michael addition: on site-cured electrode-active organic coating.

    PubMed

    Ibe, Takeshi; Frings, Rainer B; Lachowicz, Artur; Kyo, Soichi; Nishide, Hiroyuki

    2010-05-28

    Highly and homogeneously crosslinked poly(beta-ketoester) networks densely bearing robust nitroxide radicals were prepared via a click-type and stepwise Michael polyaddition. A half-battery cell composed of the thermally-cured radical network coatings displayed a rapid, reversible, and almost stoichiometric redox-activity even with a thickness of ca. 10 mum, which may be applicable as the electrode of organic-based rechargeable devices.

  17. Structure-to-property relationships in addition cured polymers. 4: Correlations between thermo-oxidative weight losses of norbornenyl cured polyimide resins and their composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, William B.

    1992-01-01

    Relationships are identified between the thermo-oxidative stability (TOS) at 316 C of a wide variety of PMR (polymerization of monomeric reactants) addition cured polyimide resins and their corresponding graphite fiber composites. Weight loss results at 316 C confirmed the expected relationship of increasing aliphatic endcap content with decreasing TOS. Moreover, the resin TOS study also showed an unexpected linear correlation of decreasing weight loss to increasing ratio of benzylic diamine to aliphatic endcap in the range of the stoichiometries studied. Only after long term 316 C aging does the dianhydride used with the benzylic diamines become an additional factor in influencing the amount of PMR resin and composite weight losses. Also, the benzylic systems consistently showed much lower resin and composite weight losses at 316 C than the corresponding nonbenzylic norbornenyl resins and composites, except when the nonbenzylic diamine monomer does not contain a connecting group. Instead, this diamine resulted in a 316 C resin and composite weight loss that was only competitive with benzylic type diamines. Results show excellent correlation between TOS of all graphite fiber PMR composites and resins.

  18. Fatty acid profile, total cholesterol, vitamin content, and TBARS value of turkey breast muscle cured with the addition of lycopene.

    PubMed

    Skiepko, N; Chwastowska-Siwiecka, I; Kondratowicz, J; Mikulski, D

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of lycopene addition for curing turkey meat on the profile of fatty acids, total cholesterol, vitamin content, and the TBARS of the final products. The analyzed material comprised 64 breast muscles, of which 16 (RBM) were immediately transported to a laboratory. Another 16 (UBM) were heat treated in a convection steam oven, and 32 muscles were cured for 3 days in two types of curing mixture: without (CBM) and with (CBM+Lyc) tomato peel extract standardized for 5% lycopene content. After completed curing, samples were steamed and grilled under the same conditions as raw samples. Statistical analysis demonstrated the highest (P≤0.01) mean content of vitamin A (0.07 μg/g) in chilled muscles. The content of vitamin E was lower (P≤0.01) in UBM samples than in CBM+Lyc and RBM. The TBARS value was the lowest (P≤0.01) in RBM muscles (0.35 mg MDA/kg of meat). Although there were no differences between products, but lower TBARS were found in CBM+Lyc samples. The content of cholesterol was higher (P≤0.01) in CBM+Lyc products than in the RBM and UBM. RBM samples contained (P≤0.01) the lowest amount of saturated, monounsaturated, and hypercholesterolemic fatty acids, and the highest of unsaturated, polyunsaturated, and hypocholesterolemic fatty acids. CBM+Lyc samples contained (P≤0.01) less hypercholesterolemic and more hypocholesterolemic fatty acids than CBM group. Higher (P≤0.01) unsaturated/saturated and hypocholesterolemic/hypercholesterolemic fatty acid ratios were also found in CBM+Lyc products. The study demonstrated that the used processing technology caused reduction (P≤0.01) of n-3 and n-6 PUFA content. Findings suggest that the addition of lycopene in the process of meat curing and heat treatment in meat industry do not change the content of vitamins and cholesterol or alter the TBARS value in turkey meat products. Nevertheless, lycopene can be used to increase the content of essential

  19. Effects of silicon additions on the mechanical properties and microstructure of high speed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, F.; Ding, P.; Zhou, S.; Kang, M.; Edmonds, D.V.

    1997-11-01

    The effects of silicon additions up to 3.5 wt% on the mechanical properties and microstructure of high speed steels 6W3Mo2Cr4V, W3Mo2Cr4V and W9Mo3Cr4V have been investigated. In order to understand these effects further, a Fe-16Mo-0.9C alloy is also used. The results show silicon additions can increase the temper hardness of steels Fe-16Mo-0.9C, 6W3Mo2Cr4V and W3Mo2Cr4V, bu yield an opposite influence on the temper hardness in W9Mo3Cr4V steels. A critical tempering temperature exists for the bending strength of high speed steels containing silicon. If tempering is carried out at temperatures lower than the critical temperature, the bending strength of the high speed steels can be improved by the addition of silicon, otherwise their bending strength is decreased. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that silicon additions can obviously refine secondary hardening carbides and inhibit the formation of M{sub 3}C cementite at peak temperature. However, they are also found to accelerate both the depletion of martensite and the formation of coarse M{sub 6}C precipitates during tempering. The mechanism whereby silicon additions affect the secondary hardness of high speed steels is discussed in detail, and the types of high speed steel in which silicon additions can be used are suggested.

  20. Developing a High Thermal Conductivity Fuel with Silicon Carbide Additives

    SciTech Connect

    baney, Ronald; Tulenko, James

    2012-11-20

    The objective of this research is to increase the thermal conductivity of uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) without significantly impacting its neutronic properties. The concept is to incorporate another high thermal conductivity material, silicon carbide (SiC), in the form of whiskers or from nanoparticles of SiC and a SiC polymeric precursor into UO{sub 2}. This is expected to form a percolation pathway lattice for conductive heat transfer out of the fuel pellet. The thermal conductivity of SiC would control the overall fuel pellet thermal conductivity. The challenge is to show the effectiveness of a low temperature sintering process, because of a UO{sub 2}-SiC reaction at 1,377°C, a temperature far below the normal sintering temperature. Researchers will study three strategies to overcome the processing difficulties associated with pore clogging and the chemical reaction of SiC and UO{sub 2} at temperatures above 1,300°C:

  1. Effect of Addition of Natural Antioxidants on the Shelf-Life of "Chorizo", a Spanish Dry-Cured Sausage.

    PubMed

    Pateiro, Mirian; Bermúdez, Roberto; Lorenzo, José Manuel; Franco, Daniel

    2015-01-14

    The dose effect of the addition of natural antioxidants (tea, chestnut, grape seed and beer extracts) on physicochemical, microbiological changes and on oxidative stability of dry-cured "chorizo", as well as their effect during the storage under vacuum conditions was evaluated. Color parameters were significantly (p < 0.05) affected by the addition of antioxidants so that samples that contained antioxidants were more effective in maintaining color. The improving effects were dose-dependent with highest values with the dose of 50 mg/kg during ripening and depend on the extract during vacuum packaging. Addition of antioxidants decreased (p < 0.05) the oxidation, showing thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values below 0.4 mg MDA/kg. Natural antioxidants matched or even improved the results obtained for butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). Regarding texture profile analysis (TPA) analysis, hardness values significantly (p < 0.001) decreased with the addition of antioxidants, obtaining the lower results with the dose of 200 mg/kg both during ripening and vacuum packaging. Antioxidants reduced the counts of total viable counts (TVC), lactic acid bacteria (LAB), mold and yeast. Free fatty acid content during ripening and under vacuum conditions showed a gradual and significant (p < 0.05) release as a result of lipolysis. At the end of ripening, the addition of GRA1000 protected chorizos from oxidative degradation.

  2. The Effect of Post-Cure and Antimony Trioxide Addition on the Glass Transition of Polyester and Vinyl Ester Resin Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    Modulus GPa Gigapascal GRP Glass Reinforced Plastic HPSEC High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography min Minute mcal Millicalories mL Milliliter MW...Tpost-cure Post-Cure Temperature Cross-Link Density -iv- 1. INTRODUCTION Reinforced polymeric materials, in particular glass reinforced plastics (GRP’s...properties of glass reinforced plastics , requires that the resin, the reinforcing fibre, the additives (such as fire retardants), and their interaction

  3. The effects of copper additives on the quantity and cell viability of adherent Staphylococcus epidermidis in silicone implants.

    PubMed

    Gosau, Martin; Prantl, Lukas; Feldmann, Martina; Kokott, Andreas; Hahnel, Sebastian; Burgers, Ralf

    2010-04-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the antibacterial effect of copper additives in silicone implants. Specimens of a standard silicone material used in breast augmentation and modified copper-loaded silicone specimens were prepared and incubated in a Staphylococcus epidermidis suspension (2 h, 37 degrees C). After the quantification of adhering staphylococci using a biofluorescence assay (Resazurin), the viability of the adhering bacterial cells was quantified by live or dead cell labeling in combination with fluorescence microscopy. In the Resazurin fluorometric quantification, a higher amount of adhering S. epidermidis cells was detected on pure silicone (4612 [2319/7540] relative fluorescence units [rfu]) than on silicone with copper additives (2701 [2158/4153] rfu). Additionally, a significantly higher amount of adhering bacterial cells (5.07% [2.03%/8.93%]) was found for pure silicone than for silicone with copper additives (1.72% [1.26%/2.32%]); (p < 0.001). Calculations from live or dead staining showed that the percentage of dead S. epidermidis cells adhered on pure silicone (52.1%) was significantly lower than on silicone with copper additives (79.7%); (p < 0.001). In vitro, silicone material with copper additives showed antibacterial effects against S. epidermidis. Copper-loaded silicone may prevent bacterial colonization, resulting in lower infection rates of silicone implants.

  4. A New Attempt at Alkaline Texturization of Monocrystaline Silicon with Anionic Surfactant as the Additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hailing; Wang, Wenjing; Zhao, Lei; Zhou, Chunlan; Diao, Hongwei

    2012-10-01

    Owing to the volatilization of isopropanol (IPA), instability in the alkaline texturization of monocrystalline silicon has been a big problem for a long time. Many additives were adapted to replace IPA, such as high boiling point alcohols. In this experiment, as a new attempt, sodium lauryl sulfate (SDS), a type of anionic surfactant, was used as the additive in NaOH solution. The etching properties of silicon in 2 wt % NaOH/15-30 mg/L SDS solution were analyzed. To improve the wettability of silicon, two types of metal salt, NaCl and Na2CO3 with concentration from 2 to 15 wt %, were applied to the 2 wt % NaOH/15 mg/L SDS solution. The results showed that the effect of NaCl was better than that of Na2CO3. Finally, the role of the additive was discussed.

  5. Plastic-Syringe Induced Silicone Contamination in Organic Photvoltaic Fabrication: Implications for Small-Volume Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, John A.; Nalwa, Kanwar S.; Mahadevapuram, Rakesh; Chen, Yuqing; Anderegg, James; Chaudhary, Sumit

    2012-05-15

    Herein, the implications of silicone contamination found in solution-processed conjugated polymer solar cells are explored. Similar to a previous work based on molecular cells, we find this contamination as a result of the use of plastic syringes during fabrication. However, in contrast to the molecular case, we find that glass-syringe fabricated devices give superior performance than plastic-syringe fabricated devices in poly(3-hexylthiophene)-based cells. We find that the unintentional silicone addition alters the solution’s wettability, which translates to a thinner, less absorbent film on spinning. With many groups studying the effects of small-volume additives, this work should be closely considered as many of these additives may also directly alter the solutions’ wettability, or the amount of silicone dissolved off the plastic syringes, or both. Thereby, film thickness, which generally is not reported in detail, can vary significantly from device to device.

  6. Plastic-syringe induced silicone contamination in organic photovoltaic fabrication: implications for small-volume additives.

    PubMed

    Carr, John A; Nalwa, Kanwar S; Mahadevapuram, Rakesh; Chen, Yuqing; Anderegg, James; Chaudhary, Sumit

    2012-06-27

    Herein, the implications of silicone contamination found in solution-processed conjugated polymer solar cells are explored. Similar to a previous work based on molecular cells, we find this contamination as a result of the use of plastic syringes during fabrication. However, in contrast to the molecular case, we find that glass-syringe fabricated devices give superior performance than plastic-syringe fabricated devices in poly(3-hexylthiophene)-based cells. We find that the unintentional silicone addition alters the solution's wettability, which translates to a thinner, less absorbent film on spinning. With many groups studying the effects of small-volume additives, this work should be closely considered as many of these additives may also directly alter the solutions' wettability, or the amount of silicone dissolved off the plastic syringes, or both. Thereby, film thickness, which generally is not reported in detail, can vary significantly from device to device.

  7. Simultaneous interpenetrating silicone hydrogel based on radical/addition polymerization for extended release of ocular therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinku; Zhang, Leilei; Zhang, Yongchun; Li, Tianduo; Huo, Guanghua

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogels with interpenetrating network (IPN) can overcome thermodynamic incompatibility and obtain transparent materials with limited phase separation. In this report, hydroxyl-grafting polysiloxane (HPSO) was synthesized and transparent silicone hydrogels with interpenetrating network were simultaneously prepared based on radical polymerization of methacrylic monomer of 3-methacryloxypropyl tris(trimethylsiloxy)silane/N,N-dimethylacrylamide and addition polymerization of HPSO/isophorone diisocyanate. The silicone hydrogels were characterized by dehydration kinetics, tensile tester, light transmittance, ion permeability, oxygen permeability, and lysozyme deposition. The results show that increasing the proportion of hydrophobic network of HPSO in the IPN silicone hydrogel decreases equilibrium swelling ratio, ion permeability, Young's modulus, and lysozyme deposition; on the contrary, increased tensile strength, elongation at break and oxygen permeability. Puerarin and ketoconazole were used as models to evaluate the drug loading and in vitro release behavior of the silicone hydrogels. It is revealed that the amount of loaded drugs in the hydrogel decreases with the increase of HPSO network in the hydrogels. All the silicone hydrogels exhibit extended release behavior, especially for ketoconazole, the in vitro release is divided into two phases corresponding to the rapid release at initial 24 h and relatively slow release from 125 to 360 h.

  8. Structure-to-property Relationships in Addition Cured Polymers 2: Resin Tg Composite Initial Mechanical Properties of Norbornenyl Cured Polyimide Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, W. B.

    1986-01-01

    PRM (polymerization of monomeric reactants) methodology was used to prepare thirty different polyimide oligomeric resins. Monomeric composition as well as chain length between sites of crosslinks were varied to examine their effects on glass transition temperature (Tg) of the cured/postcured resins. An almost linear correlation of Tg versus molecular distance between the crosslinks was observed. An attempt was made to correlate Tg with initial mechanical properties (flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength) of unidirectional graphite fiber composites prepared with these resins. However, the scatter in mechanical strength data prevented obtaining as clear a correlation as was observed for the structural modification/crosslink distance versus Tg. Instead, only a range of composite mechanical properties was obtained at the test temperatures studied (room temperature, 288 and 316 C). Perhaps more importantly, what did become apparent during the attempted correlation study was: (1) that PMR methodology could be used to prepare composites from resins that contain a wide variety of monomer modifications, and (2) that these composites almost invariably provided satisfactory initial mechanical properties as long as the resins selected were melt processable.

  9. Structure-to-property relationships in addition cured polymers. II - Resin Tg and composite initial mechanical properties of norbornenyl cured polyimide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, William B.

    1986-01-01

    PRM (polymerization of monomeric reactants) methodology was used to prepare thirty different polyimide oligomeric resins. Monomeric composition as well as chain length between sites of crosslinks were varied to examine their effects on glass transition temperature (Tg) of the cured/postcured resins. An almost linear correlation of Tg versus molecular distance between the crosslinks was observed. An attempt was made to correlate Tg with initial mechanical properties (flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength) of unidirectional graphite fiber composites prepared with these resins. However, the scatter in mechanical strength data prevented obtaining as clear a correlation as was observed for the structural modification/crosslink distance versus Tg. Instead, only a range of composite mechanical properties was obtained at the test temperatures studied (room temperature, 288 and 316 C). Perhaps more importantly, what did become apparent during the attempted correlation study was: (1) that PMR methodology could be used to prepare composites from resins that contain a wide variety of monomer modifications, and (2) that these composites almost invariably provided satisfactory initial mechanical properties as long as the resins selected were melt processable.

  10. Effects of Silver Oxide Addition on the Electrical Resistivity and Microstructure of Low-Temperature-Curing Metallo-Organic Decomposition Silver Pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chun-An; Lin, Pang; Lin, Hong-Ching; Wang, Sea-Fue

    2007-07-01

    The thermal decomposition of silver paste with the addition of a metallo-organic decomposition (MOD) compound generally requires a curing time of greater than 10 min and a curing temperature greater than 250 °C, which does not meet the requirement for high-speed production in flexible substrates. In this study, attempts to modify the curing conditions of MOD silver pastes through the substitutions of silver flakes with silver(I) oxide (Ag2O) and silver(II) oxide (AgO) were performed. Differential thermal analysis (DTA), derivative thermogravimetric analysis (DTG), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicated that the presence of residual silver oxide, which effectively catalyzes the evaporation of α-terpineol and the decomposition of silver 2-ethylhexanoate, decreases the curing temperature and shortens the soaking time. The reduced silver and the remaining Ag2O enhance the connectivity and packing density of the silver flakes, and thus increase the electric conductivity of the films. For films prepared from pastes with 20 wt % Ag2O or AgO, resistivities of 14× 10-6 and 19× 10-6 μΩ\\cdotcm, respectively, were successfully achieved after being cured at 200 °C for 5 min.

  11. Novel Ceramic Additives for Screen-Printable Silicon Solar Cell Metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Yu-Chou; Shao, Yue; Shi, Frank G.

    2016-08-01

    The interfacial structure between front-side silver electrodes and n-type silicon emitters plays a very crucial role for the electrical and mechanical properties of silicon solar cells. Studies show that the residual glass layers at the Ag/Si interfaces will significantly increase the contact resistance, and this subsequently leads to a decrease in the overall efficiency of the silicon solar cells. In this work, silver-coated nano-sized non-glass frits using an electroless plating method were employed to improve the interfacial conductivity. Transfer length method was applied to evaluate the electrical performance of the samples made with different ceramic additives. For samples made with nano-sized silver-coated ceramic additives, the improvement of conductivity was found to be about 22% compared to additives with the same compositions with no surface treatment. The results indicate that the silver layer on the surface of ceramic additives provides a conducting channel within the residual insulating layer and therefore reduces overall electrical resistance.

  12. Modification of silicone sealant to improve gamma radiation resistance, by addition of protective agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Pérez, Giovanni; Burillo, Guillermina

    2013-09-01

    Poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) sealant (SS) was modified with the addition of different protective compounds to conserve its physical-chemical properties during gamma irradiation. 2-Vinyl naphthalene (2-VN), bisphenol-A (BPA) and poly (vinyl carbazole) (PVK) were used to evaluate radiation protection through the crosslinking effect of radiation. The samples were irradiated with doses from 100 kGy to 500 kGy at room temperature in air, with a 60Co gamma source, and the changes in molecular weight, thermal behavior, elastic properties and infrared spectra (FTIR-ATR) absorbance analysis were determined. The molecular weight of unmodified silicone sealant increases with the absorbed dose because of crosslinking as predominant effect. However, the crosslinking effect was inhibited with the addition of protective agent due to the aromatic compounds present. Modified silicone sealant films present better radiation resistance than unmodified system.

  13. Effects of Fe2O3 addition on the nitridation of silicon powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasegawa, Y.; Inomata, Y.; Kijima, K.; Matsuyama, T.

    1977-01-01

    The reaction of silicon powder and nitrogen was studied in the range of 1300-1400 C. When an addition of Fe2O3 was more than 0.8wt%, the reaction was linear and compared to samples with no Fe2O3, the reaction velocity increased 5 to 10 times. The reactions were mediated by the process of peeling and cracking in a thin layer of Si2N4 formed on the silicon particles or on the surface of the Fe-Si melts. As the addition of Fe2O3 increased, the reaction activation energy for highly pure samples decreased. Fe2O3 which exceeded the Si3N4 solubility limits was finally converted to d-Fe.

  14. ENHANCED GROWTH RATE AND SILANE UTILIZATION IN AMORPHOUS SILICON AND NANOCRYSTALLINE-SILICON SOLAR CELL DEPOSITION VIA GAS PHASE ADDITIVES

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgeway, R G; Hegedus, S S; Podraza, N J

    2012-08-31

    Air Products set out to investigate the impact of additives on the deposition rate of both CSi and Si-H films. One criterion for additives was that they could be used in conventional PECVD processing, which would require sufficient vapor pressure to deliver material to the process chamber at the required flow rates. The flow rate required would depend on the size of the substrate onto which silicon films were being deposited, potentially ranging from 200 mm diameter wafers to the 5.7 m2 glass substrates used in GEN 8.5 flat-panel display tools. In choosing higher-order silanes, both disilane and trisilane had sufficient vapor pressure to withdraw gas at the required flow rates of up to 120 sccm. This report presents results obtained from testing at Air Products electronic technology laboratories, located in Allentown, PA, which focused on developing processes on a commercial IC reactor using silane and mixtures of silane plus additives. These processes were deployed to compare deposition rates and film properties with and without additives, with a goal of maximizing the deposition rate while maintaining or improving film properties.

  15. Cure Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Micromet Instruments Inc. manufactures the Eumetric System II Microdielectrometer, key to which is a miniature electronic probe - a silicon microchip that contains electrodes and circuitry for measuring the electrical properties of whatever material is placed in contact with the electrodes. The rest of the system consists of additional sensors, electronic components, microcomputers, modules, and software.

  16. Growth, characterization, and properties of carbon nitride with and without silicon addition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.C.; Wu, C.T.; Wu, J.J.; Chen, K.H.

    2000-01-30

    Carbon nitride and silicon carbon nitride have been grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition, electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma chemical vapor deposition, magnetron sputtering and ion beam sputtering. Depending on the specific process details, a wide range of microstructure and morphologies has been demonstrated. Effects of Si addition to CN network on the structure of the deposited materials were studied. While Si involvement in CVD process was crucial for crystal growth, excessive Si incorporation led to formation of amorphous phase in PVD process. Various optical constants including the band gap and refractive index of the SiCN phases are also reported.

  17. Densification of silicon carbide using oxy-nitride additives for space-based telescope mirror applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R. Suresh; Shukla, Anoop K.; Babu, Sankaranarayanan; Sivakumar, Dhenuvakonda; Gandhi, Ashutosh S.

    2011-07-01

    Densification behavior of alpha silicon carbide (SiC) during vacuum hot pressing was studied up to 1900ºC with sintering additives based on AlN and Y2O3 in different proportions. Near theoretical density was obtained with a total sintering additive content of < 4 vol.%. The microstructure of SiC sintered with AlN+Y2O3 revealed fine equiaxed grains against the additional elongated grains exhibited by SiC sintered with AlN alone. The SiC having high density exhibited very good strength, elastic modulus, high thermal conductivity, low coefficient of thermal expansion and excellent polishability for telescope mirror applications.

  18. Analysis of Additional CFT Support at Z=0 for the Silicon Half Trough

    SciTech Connect

    Cease, H.; Lee, A.; /Fermilab

    2000-03-20

    The D-Zero silicon trough is segmented into two half troughs. Loading to the Central Fiber Tracker Barrel 1 is at both ends and near Z = 0. The loading near Z = 0 is thought to be 4 lbs at 4 points. The point locations are at +/-45 degrees for each half trough on each side of Z = O. An additional support at Z = O is required to prevent beam sag and out of round distortions to the CFT Barrel 1. An additional joining washer will be attached between barrels 1 and 2 at Z = 0. Also a support ring will be attached to the inner diameter of barrel 1 to further help in out of round distortions. Details of the washer and loading are modeled using ANSYS.

  19. Influence of molybdenum silicide additions on high-temperature oxidation resistance of silicon nitride materials

    SciTech Connect

    Klemm, H.; Tangermann, K.; Schubert, C.; Hermel, W.

    1996-09-01

    The influence of additions of molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) on the microstructure and the mechanical properties of a silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) material, with neodymium oxide (Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and aluminum nitride (AlN) as sintering aids, was studied. The composites, containing 5, 10, and 17.6 wt% MoSi{sub 2}, were fabricated by hot pressing. All materials exhibited a similar phase composition, detected by X-ray diffractometry. Up to MoSi{sub 2} additions of 10 wt%, mechanical properties such as strength, fracture toughness, or creep at 1,400 C were not affected significantly, in comparison to that of monolithic Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The oxidation resistance of the composites, in terms of weight gain, degraded. After 1,000 h of oxidation at 1,400 and 1,450 C in air, a greater weight gain (by a factor of approximately three) was obtained, in comparison to that of the material without MoSi{sub 2}. Nevertheless, after 1,000 h of oxidation, the degradation in strength of the composites was considerably less severe than that of the material without MoSi{sub 2}. An additional layer was formed, caused by processes at the surface of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} material, preventing the formation of pores, cracks, or glassy-phase-rich areas, which are common features of oxidation damage in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials. This surface layer, containing Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3} and silicon oxynitride (Si{sub 2}ON{sub 2}), was the result of reactions between MoSi{sub 2}, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, and the oxygen penetrating by diffusion into the material during the high-temperature treatment.

  20. Advanced electrolyte/additive for lithium-ion batteries with silicon anode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuo; He, Meinan; Su, Chi-Cheung; Zhang, Zhengcheng

    2016-08-01

    State-of-the-art lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are based on a lithium transition metal oxide cathode, a graphite anode and a nonaqueous carbonate electrolyte. To further increase the energy and power density of LIBs, silicon anodes have been intensively explored due to their high theoretical capacity, low operation potential, and low cost. However, the main challenges for Si anode are the large volume change during lithiation/delithiation process and the instability of the solid-electrolyte-interphase associated with this process. Recently, significant progress has been achieved via advanced material fabrication technologies and rational electrolyte design in terms of improving the Coulombic efficiency and capacity retention. In this paper, new developments in advanced electrolyte and additive for LIBs with Si anode were systematically reviewed, and perspectives over future research were suggested.

  1. Effect of additives on the anisotropic etching of silicon by using a TMAH based solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Ki-Hwa; Kim, Bum-Joon; Kim, Jung-Sik

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the anisotropic etching properties of single crystal silicon were examined using a tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH). The variations in the Si etching rate and surface morphology at different etching temperatures and TMAH concentrations were evaluated. The effects of different additives were also examined. As the THAM concentration (10-25 wt. %) decreased, the etching rate increased from 10 μm/h to 70 μm/h at temperatures between 70°C and 90°C. On the other hand, the etched surface roughness became degraded as the hillock density and corner undercut ratio increased. To solve these problems, four additives, pyrazine, ammonium persulfate (AP), ammonium hydrogen sulfate (AHS), and isopropyl alcohol (IPA), were added to the TMAH solution. The experimental results showed that these additives play an important role in increasing the etching rate up to 10-20%. The etched surface was also improved significantly by the decreased hillock density on the surface. The addition of IPA to the TMAH solution showed excellent results in improving the etched surface flatness and the undercutting compensation. On the other hand, one of the characteristics of IPA is the decrease in etching rate with increasing amount of IPA. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. The Influence of Silicon Additions on Friction and Wear of Nickel Alloys at Temperatures to 1000 Degrees Fahrenheit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Johnson, Robert L.

    1960-01-01

    Small additions of silicon have considerable beneficial effect on performance on slider alloys. This effect has most frequently been attributed to increased hardness. The research reported was conducted to consider a hypothesis that the primary role of silicon in slider alloys is one of supporting the formation of protective surface films. Friction and wear data were obtained at temperatures from 75 to 1000 degrees Fahrenheit with a series of binary silicon-nickel alloys containing up to 10 percent silicon. Pertinent hot hardness, metallurgical and surface-film analysis data are included. Atmospheres used were air, mixtures of oxygen and argon, a mixture of hydrogen and nitrogen, and a halogenated methane gas lubricant. The results show the role of silicon as a film former to be of great importance in success of silicon-containing alloys as slider materials for extreme temperatures. The range of variables studied gave friction coefficients from 0.05 to greater than 10.00 depending on film formation tendencies. Alloys with 5 percent or more silicon having a duplex structure showed the best results. Film formation resulted from surface reactions or the smearing of the softer phase from the alloys having duplex structure.

  3. Influence of disinfection with peracetic acid and hypochlorite in dimensional alterations of casts obtained from addition silicone and polyether impressions.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Daher Antonio; Peçanha, Marcelo Massaroni; Neves, Ana Christina Claro; Frizzera, Fausto; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Silva-Concílio, Laís Regiane

    2013-11-01

    Dental impressions disinfection is important to reduce the risk of cross contamination but this process may produce dimensional distortions. Peracetic acid is a disinfectant agent with several favorable characteristics yet underutilized in Dentistry. The aim of this paper is to compare the dimensional stability of casts obtained from addition silicone and polyether impressions that were immersed for 10 minutes in a solution of 0.2% peracetic acid or 1% sodium hypochlorite. Sixty samples in type IV gypsum were produced after a master cast that simulated a full crown preparation of a maxillary premolar. Samples were divided in 6 groups (n = 10) according to the impression material and disinfection agent: Group AC--addition silicone control (without disinfectant); Group APA--addition silicone + 0.2% peracetic acid; Group AH--addition silicone + 1% sodium hypochlorite; Group PC--polyether control (without disinfectant); Group PPA--polyether + 0.2% peracetic acid; Group PH--polyether + 1% sodium hypochlorite. Cast height, base and top diameter were measured and a mean value was obtained for each sample and group all data was statistically analyzed (ANOVA, p < 0.05). There was not a significant statistical difference between addition silicone and polyether impressions regardless of the disinfectant materials. It can be concluded that disinfection with the proposed agents did not produce significant alterations of the impressions and the peracetic acid could be considered a reliable material to disinfect dental molds.

  4. Microbiological and physicochemical characterization of dry-cured Halal goat meat. Effect of salting time and addition of olive oil and paprika covering.

    PubMed

    Cherroud, Sanâa; Cachaldora, Aida; Fonseca, Sonia; Laglaoui, Amin; Carballo, Javier; Franco, Inmaculada

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this work was to define a simple technological process for dry-cured Halal goat meat elaboration. The aims of this study were to analyze physicochemical parameters and to enumerate the microbial population at the end of the different manufacturing processes (two salting times and the addition of olive oil and paprika covering) on 36 units of meat product. A total of 532 strains were isolated from several selective culture media and then identified using classical and molecular methods. In general, salt effect and the addition of olive oil and paprika were significant for all the studied microbial groups as well as on NaCl content and water activity. Molecular analysis proves that staphylococci, especially Staphylococcus xylosus and Staphylococcus equorum, were the most common naturally occurring microbiota. The best manufacturing process would be obtained with a longer salting time and the addition of the olive oil and paprika covering.

  5. Additive Manufacturing of Silicon Carbide-Based Ceramic Matrix Composites: Technical Challenges and Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Halbig, Michael C.; Grady, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced SiC-based ceramic matrix composites offer significant contributions toward reducing fuel burn and emissions by enabling high overall pressure ratio (OPR) of gas turbine engines and reducing or eliminating cooling air in the hot-section components, such as shrouds, combustor liners, vanes, and blades. Additive manufacturing (AM), which allows high value, custom designed parts layer by layer, has been demonstrated for metals and polymer matrix composites. However, there has been limited activity on additive manufacturing of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). In this presentation, laminated object manufacturing (LOM), binder jet process, and 3-D printing approaches for developing ceramic composite materials are presented. For the laminated object manufacturing (LOM), fiber prepreg laminates were cut into shape with a laser and stacked to form the desired part followed by high temperature heat treatments. For the binder jet, processing optimization was pursued through silicon carbide powder blending, infiltration with and without SiC nano powder loading, and integration of fibers into the powder bed. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted along with XRD, TGA, and mechanical testing. Various technical challenges and opportunities for additive manufacturing of ceramics and CMCs will be presented.

  6. Hot-pressed silicon nitride with various lanthanide oxides as sintering additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, K.; Toibana, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of addition of various lanthanide oxides and their mixture with Y2O3 on the sintering of Si3N4 were investigated. The addition of simple and mixed lanthanide oxides promoted the densification of Si3N4 in hot-pressing at 1800 C under 300-400kg/ centimeters squared for 60 min. The crystallization of yttrium and lanthanide-silicon oxynitrides which was observed inn the sintered body containing yttrium-lanthanide mixed oxides as additives led to the formation of a highly refractory Si3N4 ceramic having a bending strength of 82 and 84 kg/millimeters squared at room temperature and 1300 C respectively. In a Y2O3+La2O3 system, a higher molar ratio of La2O3 to Y2O3 gave a higher hardness and strength at high temperatures. It was found that 90 min was an optimum sintering time for the highest strength.

  7. Preparation and tribological properties of fluorosilane surface-modified lanthanum trifluoride nanoparticles as additive of fluoro silicone oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiao; He, Jie; Yu, Laigui; Li, Zhiwei; Zhang, Zhijun; Zhang, Pingyu

    2014-10-01

    LaF3 nanoparticles surface-modified with fluorosilane were synthesized by surface modification technology. The size, morphology and phase structure of as-prepared surface-modified LaF3 nanoparticles were analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The tribological properties of surface-modified LaF3 nanoparticles as additive of fluoro silicone oil were evaluated with a four-ball machine, and the morphology and elemental composition of worn steel surfaces were examined with a scanning electron microscope and an X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. Results show that 3-(heptafluoroisopropoxy)propyltriethoxysilane as the modifier is able to improve the dispersibility of LaF3 nanoparticles in fluoro silicone oil. Moreover, when the optimum concentration, 0.08 wt.% of fluorosilane surface-modified LaF3 is added into fluoro silicone oil, as-synthesized fluorosilane surface-modified LaF3 nanoparticles exhibit excellent anti-wear as additive in fluoro silicone oil. The wear scar diameter under the optimum concentration is always smaller than that under the lubrication of fluoro silicone oil alone. Especially, when the load is 500 N, 600 N and 700 N, the wear scar diameter is reduced by 17%, 43% and 42%, respectively. In addition, during the friction process, LaF3 nanoparticles are deposited on the rubbed steel surface to form LaF3 deposition layer which functions jointly with the boundary lubricating film thereby resulting in improved tribological properties.

  8. The Effect of Fluoroethylene Carbonate as an Additive on the Solid Electrolyte Interphase on Silicon Lithium-Ion Electrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Schroder, Kjell; Li, Juchuan; Dudney, Nancy J.; ...

    2015-08-03

    Fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) has become a standard electrolyte additive for use with silicon negative electrodes, but how FEC affects solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation on the silicon anode’s surface is still not well understood. Herein, SEI formed from LiPF6-based carbonate electrolytes, with and without FEC, were investigated on 50 nm thick amorphous silicon thin film electrodes to understand the role of FEC on silicon electrode surface reactions. In contrast to previous work, anhydrous and anoxic techniques were used to prevent air and moisture contamination of prepared SEI films. This allowed for accurate characterization of the SEI structure and composition bymore » X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling. These results show that FEC reduction leads to fluoride ion and LiF formation, consistent with previous computational and experimental results. Surprisingly, we also find that these species decrease lithium-ion solubility and increase the reactivity of the silicon surface. We conclude that the effectiveness of FEC at improving the Coulombic efficiency and capacity retention is due to fluoride ion formation from reduction of the electrolyte, which leads to the chemical attack of any silicon-oxide surface passivation layers and the formation of a kinetically stable SEI comprising predominately lithium fluoride and lithium oxide.« less

  9. The Effect of Fluoroethylene Carbonate as an Additive on the Solid Electrolyte Interphase on Silicon Lithium-Ion Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Schroder, Kjell; Li, Juchuan; Dudney, Nancy J.; Meng, Ying Shirley; Stevenson, Keith J.; Alvarado, Judith

    2015-08-03

    Fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) has become a standard electrolyte additive for use with silicon negative electrodes, but how FEC affects solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation on the silicon anode’s surface is still not well understood. Herein, SEI formed from LiPF6-based carbonate electrolytes, with and without FEC, were investigated on 50 nm thick amorphous silicon thin film electrodes to understand the role of FEC on silicon electrode surface reactions. In contrast to previous work, anhydrous and anoxic techniques were used to prevent air and moisture contamination of prepared SEI films. This allowed for accurate characterization of the SEI structure and composition by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling. These results show that FEC reduction leads to fluoride ion and LiF formation, consistent with previous computational and experimental results. Surprisingly, we also find that these species decrease lithium-ion solubility and increase the reactivity of the silicon surface. We conclude that the effectiveness of FEC at improving the Coulombic efficiency and capacity retention is due to fluoride ion formation from reduction of the electrolyte, which leads to the chemical attack of any silicon-oxide surface passivation layers and the formation of a kinetically stable SEI comprising predominately lithium fluoride and lithium oxide.

  10. Silicon addition to soybean (Glycine max L.) plants alleviate zinc deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pascual, Ma Blanca; Echevarria, Virginia; Gonzalo, Ma José; Hernández-Apaolaza, Lourdes

    2016-11-01

    It is well established the beneficial role of silicon (Si) in alleviating abiotic stress. However, it remains poorly understood the mechanisms of the Si-mediated protection against metal deficiency, especially the zinc (Zn) one. Recently, it has been proposed that Si may act by an interaction with this biometal in the root apoplast contributing to its movement through the plant, as in the case of Fe deficiency. In the present work, the effect of initial or continuous Si doses in soybean Zn deficient plants has been studied. For that purpose, plants grown in hydroponic culture were treated with different Si doses (0.0, 0.5 and 1.0 mM) under Zn limiting conditions. SPAD index in leaves, several growth parameters, mineral content in the whole plant and the formation of Zn pools in roots were determined. An initial addition of 0.5 mM of Si to the nutrient solution led to an enhancement of plants growth, Zn and Si content in leaves, and a higher storage of Zn in the root apoplast. The results suggest that this treatment enhanced Zn accumulation on roots and its movement to shoots when needed, mitigating Zn deficiency symptoms.

  11. Crystallization of grain boundary phases in silicon nitride with low additive contents by microwave annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Tiegs, T.N.; Ploetz, K.L.; Kiggans, J.O.; Yeckley, R.L.

    1993-06-01

    Microwave annealing of dense Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-4% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} materials showed improvements over conventional heating. Increases in fracture toughness were observed for annealing between 1200--1650C. The high temperature strength was related to the residual {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} content which is indicative of a finer average grain size in the specimens. The high temperature dynamic fatigue showed increased stress to failure for specimens microwave annealed between 1400--1550C for periods >5 h. Silicon nitrides with different sintering additives would require different conditions for optimum crystallization. While there were some observed property improvements, they were not so dramatic to justify abandoning conventional over microwave heating. The Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-4% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} materials used in the study were developed for elevated temperature use and already posses excellent good high temperature strength, fatigue resistance and creep properties. This is due to the very refractory nature of the grain boundary phases and the small quantity of secondary phase present. However, microwave annealing of these materials may be necessary in applications where the maximum in fracture toughness and fatigue resistance are required and thus justifies its use.

  12. Effect of Addition of Natural Antioxidants on the Shelf-Life of “Chorizo”, a Spanish Dry-Cured Sausage

    PubMed Central

    Pateiro, Mirian; Bermúdez, Roberto; Lorenzo, José Manuel; Franco, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The dose effect of the addition of natural antioxidants (tea, chestnut, grape seed and beer extracts) on physicochemical, microbiological changes and on oxidative stability of dry-cured “chorizo”, as well as their effect during the storage under vacuum conditions was evaluated. Color parameters were significantly (p < 0.05) affected by the addition of antioxidants so that samples that contained antioxidants were more effective in maintaining color. The improving effects were dose-dependent with highest values with the dose of 50 mg/kg during ripening and depend on the extract during vacuum packaging. Addition of antioxidants decreased (p < 0.05) the oxidation, showing thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values below 0.4 mg MDA/kg. Natural antioxidants matched or even improved the results obtained for butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). Regarding texture profile analysis (TPA) analysis, hardness values significantly (p < 0.001) decreased with the addition of antioxidants, obtaining the lower results with the dose of 200 mg/kg both during ripening and vacuum packaging. Antioxidants reduced the counts of total viable counts (TVC), lactic acid bacteria (LAB), mold and yeast. Free fatty acid content during ripening and under vacuum conditions showed a gradual and significant (p < 0.05) release as a result of lipolysis. At the end of ripening, the addition of GRA1000 protected chorizos from oxidative degradation. PMID:26785337

  13. Silicon addition to hydroxyapatite increases nanoscale electrostatic, van der Waals, and adhesive interactions.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Jennifer; Dean, Delphine; Patel, Nelesh; Botelho, Claudia; Best, Serena; Santos, José D; Lopes, Maria A; Bonfield, William; Ortiz, Christine

    2006-08-01

    The normal intersurface forces between nanosized probe tips functionalized with COO(-)-terminated alkanethiol self-assembling monolayers and dense, polycrystalline silicon-substituted synthetic hydroxyapatite (SiHA) and phase pure hydroxyapatite (HA) were measured via a nanomechanical technique called chemically specific high-resolution force spectroscopy. A significantly larger van der Waals interaction was observed for the SiHA compared to HA; Hamaker constants (A) were found to be A(SiHA) = 35 +/- 27 zJ and A(HA) = 13 +/- 12 zJ. Using the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek approximation, which assumes linear additivity of the electrostatic double layer and van der Waals components, and the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann surface charge model for electrostatic double-layer forces, the surface charge per unit area, sigma (C/m(2)), was calculated as a function of position for specific nanosized areas within individual grains. SiHA was observed to be more negatively charged than HA with sigma(SiHA) = -0.024 +/- 0.013 C/m(2), two times greater than sigma(HA) = -0.011 +/- 0.006 C/m(2). Additionally, SiHA was found to have increased surface adhesion (0.7 +/- 0.3 nN) compared to HA (0.5 +/- 0.3 nN). The characterization of the nanoscale variations in surface forces of SiHA and HA will enable an improved understanding of the initial stages of bone-biomaterial bonding.

  14. Use of additives to improve microstructures and fracture resistance of silicon nitride ceramics

    DOEpatents

    Becher, Paul F.; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2011-06-28

    A high-strength, fracture-resistant silicon nitride ceramic material that includes about 5 to about 75 wt-% of elongated reinforcing grains of beta-silicon nitride, about 20 to about 95 wt-% of fine grains of beta-silicon nitride, wherein the fine grains have a major axis of less than about 1 micron; and about 1 to about 15 wt-% of an amorphous intergranular phase comprising Si, N, O, a rare earth element and a secondary densification element. The elongated reinforcing grains have an aspect ratio of 2:1 or greater and a major axis measuring about 1 micron or greater. The elongated reinforcing grains are essentially isotropically oriented within the ceramic microstructure. The silicon nitride ceramic exhibits a room temperature flexure strength of 1,000 MPa or greater and a fracture toughness of 9 MPa-m.sup.(1/2) or greater. The silicon nitride ceramic exhibits a peak strength of 800 MPa or greater at 1200 degrees C. Also included are methods of making silicon nitride ceramic materials which exhibit the described high flexure strength and fracture-resistant values.

  15. The properties of polycrystalline silicon solar cells with controlled titanium additions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.; Hopkins, R. H.; Davis, J. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    By coupling the results of electrical measurements, such as spectral response, lighted and dark I-V determinations, and deep-level-transient spectroscopy with optical and laser scan photomicroscopy, the effects of grain boundaries and impurities on silicon solar cells were evaluated. Titanium, which produces two deep levels in silicon, degrades cell performance by reducing bulk lifetime and thus cell short-circuit current. Electrically active grain boundaries induce carrier recombination in the bulk and depletion regions of the solar cell. Experimental data imply a small but measurable segregation of titanium into some grain boundaries of the polycrystalline silicon containing high Ti concentration. However, for the titanium-contaminated polycrystalline material used in this study, solar cell performance is dominated by the electrically active titanium concentration in the grains. Microstructural impacts on the devices are of secondary importance

  16. Alleviation of Copper Toxicity in Arabidopsis Thaliana and Zinnia Elegans by Silicon Addition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the role of silicon in plants has been studied for over 150 years, and this element can mitigate the effects of certain heavy metals, its role in Cu metabolism is unclear. Therefore, the role of Si in plant response to Cu stress was investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Heyn) and Zinnia el...

  17. Cure SMA

    MedlinePlus

    ... the SMA drug pipeline. Together, we're making real progress toward a treatment and a cure. Latest ... Announce SPINRAZA (nusinersen) Meets Primary Endpoint at Interim Analysis of Phase 3 CHERISH Study Biogen and Ionis ...

  18. Influences of nitrogen, phosphorus and silicon addition on plant productivity and species richness in an alpine meadow.

    PubMed

    Xu, Danghui; Fang, Xiangwen; Zhang, Renyi; Gao, Tianpeng; Bu, Haiyan; Du, Guozhen

    2015-11-15

    Fertilization, especially with nitrogen (N), increases aboveground primary productivity (APP), but reduces plant species richness at some level. Silicon (Si) fertilization alone, or with addition of N or phosphorus (P), has multiple direct and indirect beneficial effects on plant growth and development, both for individuals and the whole community. This study aimed to examine the effects of Si, N, P, NSi and PSi combinations on APP and species richness of the community and of four functional groups in an alpine meadow. The results showed that plots fertilized with Si in combination with either N or P had higher APP than when fertilized with N or P alone. Addition of N or P increased APP, and the higher APP occurred when the highest level of N was added, indicating co-limitation of N and P, with N being most limiting. Silicon fertilization alone or with addition of N increased the APP of grasses and forbs. Nitrogen addition decreased the community species richness; Si with addition of N alleviated the loss of species richness of the whole community and the forbs group. For the four functional groups, N or P addition increased the species richness of grasses and decreased that of forbs. Our findings highlight the importance of Si in improving APP and alleviating N fertilization-induced biodiversity loss in grasslands, and will help improve our ability to predict community composition and biomass dynamics in alpine meadow ecosystems subject to changing nutrient availability.

  19. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY Texturization of mono-crystalline silicon solar cells in TMAH without the addition of surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiying, Ou; Yao, Zhang; Hailing, Li; Lei, Zhao; Chunlan, Zhou; Hongwei, Diao; Min, Liu; Weiming, Lu; Jun, Zhang; Wenjing, Wang

    2010-10-01

    Etching was performed on (100) silicon wafers using silicon-dissolved tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) solutions without the addition of surfactant. Experiments were carried out in different TMAH concentrations at different temperatures for different etching times. The surface phenomena, etching rates, surface morphology and surface reflectance were analyzed. Experimental results show that the resulting surface covered with uniform pyramids can be realized with a small change in etching rates during the etching process. The etching mechanism is explained based on the experimental results and the theoretical considerations. It is suggested that all the components in the TMAH solutions play important roles in the etching process. Moreover, TMA+ ions may increase the wettability of the textured surface. A good textured surface can be obtained in conditions where the absorption of OH-/H2O is in equilibrium with that of TMA+/SiO2 (OH)22-.

  20. A clinical comparative study of Cadiax Compact II and intraoral records using wax and addition silicone.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Kianoosh; Pour, Sasan Rasaei; Ahangari, Ahmad Hassan; Ghodsi, Safoura

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of mandibular movements is necessary to form the occlusal anatomical contour, analyze the temporomandibular joint status, and evaluate the patient's occlusion. This clinical study was conducted to compare the mandibular recording device Cadiax Compact II with routine intraoral records for measuring condylar inclinations. The results showed that the differences between Cadiax and intraoral records were statistically significant for all measurements. Cadiax measurements had a stronger correlation with silicone records. The quantities of recorded Bennett angles were lower and the values of sagittal condylar inclination were higher with Cadiax than with routine intraoral records.

  1. Relaxed Poisson cure rate models.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Josemar; Cordeiro, Gauss M; Cancho, Vicente G; Balakrishnan, N

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to make the standard promotion cure rate model (Yakovlev and Tsodikov, ) more flexible by assuming that the number of lesions or altered cells after a treatment follows a fractional Poisson distribution (Laskin, ). It is proved that the well-known Mittag-Leffler relaxation function (Berberan-Santos, ) is a simple way to obtain a new cure rate model that is a compromise between the promotion and geometric cure rate models allowing for superdispersion. So, the relaxed cure rate model developed here can be considered as a natural and less restrictive extension of the popular Poisson cure rate model at the cost of an additional parameter, but a competitor to negative-binomial cure rate models (Rodrigues et al., ). Some mathematical properties of a proper relaxed Poisson density are explored. A simulation study and an illustration of the proposed cure rate model from the Bayesian point of view are finally presented.

  2. Evaluation of effect of tray space on the accuracy of condensation silicone, addition silicone and polyether impression materials: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Varun; Aeran, Himanshu

    2012-09-01

    Optimal thickness of impression materials in the custom tray in order to get the most accurate impression. To investigate the effect of different tray spacer thickness on the accuracy and the dimensional stability of impressions made from monophasic condensation silicone, addition silicone and polyether impression materials. Three different types of elastomeric monophasic impression materials were used for making the impression of a master die with tray having tray spacer thickness of 2, 4 and 6 mm. Each type of impression was poured in die stone after 1 h. Each cast was analyzed by a travelling microscope and compared with the master die. The data was tabulated and subjected to statistical evaluation. The results of the study indicated that the impressions made from 2 to 4 mm spaced trays produced more accurate stone casts when compared to 6 mm spaced tray. No statistical significant differences were observed between the accuracy and dimensional stability of the three materials tested. Minimum changes were observed when the cast was poured after 1 h and the tray space was 2 mm for all the materials tested. It is therefore advisable not to exceed tray space of 2 mm.

  3. [Comparative evaluation of physical-mechanical properties and surface morphology of the samples of base self cured acrylic resin "Redont-kolir" polymerized in the silicone and alginate matrixes].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Determination of advantages of using silicone or alginate impression material as a matrix is decisive for quality of immediate and transitional dentures manufactured by the direct method using self-cured acrylic resins. The aim of this study was a comparative evaluation of physical-mechanical properties and surface morphology of the samples of base self-cured acrylic resin "Redont-kolir" polymerized in the silicone and alginate matrix. The samples were polymerized in the C-silicone - "Zeta plus-putty" ("Zhermack", Italy) and alginate -"Ypeen" ("Spofa Dental", Czech Republic) matrixes under different regimes: 1) in the pneumopolymerizer "Averon" at an air pressure of 3 atm., a temperature of 450C for 15 minutes, and 2) polymerization in water at 450C for 15 minutes. We determined the following physical and mechanical properties: bending load, toughness, bending stress at break, hardness by Heppler, conical point of fluidity and water absorption. Electron microscopy studies of the samples have been conducted on electronic raster microscope JSM-840 ("Jeol", Japan). As a result of studies, it was found that the optimum regime of polymerization for acrylate "Redont-kolir" is in the pneumopolymerizer "Averon" at an air pressure of 3 atm., a temperature of 450 C for 15 minutes. By the results of studying the surface morphology of the samples we can draw a conclusion that the use of an alginate impression material as matrix allows to obtain a qualitatively better surface of denture. But taking into account the technological properties of the alginate impression materials, namely an expressed shrinkage, their use for this purpose must be limited by the time during which the impression matrix remain stable in size, which is specified by manufacturer's recommendations.

  4. N-type crystalline silicon films free of amorphous silicon deposited on glass by HCl addition using hot wire chemical vapour deposition.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yung-Bin; Park, Hyung-Ki; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Song, Jean-Ho; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2011-09-01

    Since n-type crystalline silicon films have the electric property much better than those of hydrogenated amorphous and microcrystalline silicon films, they can enhance the performance of advanced electronic devices such as solar cells and thin film transistors (TFTs). Since the formation of amorphous silicon is unavoidable in the low temperature deposition of microcrystalline silicon on a glass substrate at temperatures less than 550 degrees C in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition and hot wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD), crystalline silicon films have not been deposited directly on a glass substrate but fabricated by the post treatment of amorphous silicon films. In this work, by adding the HCl gas, amorphous silicon-free n-type crystalline silicon films could be deposited directly on a glass substrate by HWCVD. The resistivity of the n-type crystalline silicon film for the flow rate ratio of [HCl]/[SiH4] = 7.5 and [PH3]/[SiH4] = 0.042 was 5.31 x 10(-4) ohms cm, which is comparable to the resistivity 1.23 x 10(-3) ohms cm of films prepared by thermal annealing of amorphous silicon films. The absence of amorphous silicon in the film could be confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  5. The addition of silicon carbide to surrogate nuclear fuel kernels made by the internal gelation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, R. D.; Hunn, J. D.; Birdwell, J. F.; Lindemer, T. B.; Collins, J. L.

    2010-06-01

    The US Department of Energy plans to use the internal gelation process to make tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated transuranic (TRU) fuel particles. The focus of this work is to develop TRU fuel kernels with high crush strengths, good ellipticity, and adequately dispersed silicon carbide (SiC). The submicron SiC particles in the TRU kernels are to serve as getters for excess oxygen and to potentially sequester palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium, which could damage the coatings during irradiation. Zirconium oxide microspheres stabilized with yttrium were used as surrogates because zirconium and TRU microspheres from the internal gelation process are amorphous and encounter similar processing problems. The hardness of SiC required modifications to the experimental system that was used to make uranium carbide kernels. Suitable processing conditions and equipment changes were identified so that the SiC could be homogeneously dispersed in gel spheres for subsequent calcination into strong spherical kernels.

  6. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  7. Sintered-reaction Bonded Silicon Nitride Densified by a Gas Pressure Sintering Process Effects of Rare Earth Oxide Sintering Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. H.; Ko, J. W.; Park, Y. J.; Kim, H. D.; Lin, Hua-Tay; Becher, Paul F

    2012-01-01

    Reaction-bonded silicon nitrides containing rare-earth oxide sintering additives were densified by gas pressure sintering. The sintering behavior, microstructure and mechanical properties of the resultant specimens were analyzed. For that purpose, Lu2O3-SiO2 (US), La2O3-MgO (AM) and Y2O3-Al2O3 (YA) additive systems were selected. Among the tested compositions, densification of silicon nitride occurred at the lowest temperature when using the La2O3-MgO system. Since the Lu2O3-SiO2 system has the highest melting temperature, full densification could not be achieved after sintering at 1950oC. However, the system had a reasonably high bending strength of 527 MPa at 1200oC in air and a high fracture toughness of 9.2 MPa m1/2. The Y2O3-Al2O3 system had the highest room temperature bending strength of 1.2 GPa

  8. Tantalum as a diffusion barrier between copper and silicon: Failure mechanism and effect of nitrogen additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, Karen; Fryer, Peter M.; Cabral, Cyril, Jr.; Harper, J. M. E.; Bailey, P. J.; Kelleher, K. H.

    1992-06-01

    The interaction of Cu with Si separated by thin (50 nm) layers of tantalum, Ta2N, and a nitrogen alloy of Ta has been investigated to determine the factors that affect the success of these materials as diffusion barriers to copper. Intermixing in these films was followed as a function of annealing temperature by in situ resistance measurements, Rutherford backscattering spectra, scanning electron microscopy, and cross-section transmission electron microscopy. Ta prevents Cu-silicon interaction up to 550 °C for 30 min in flowing purified He. At higher temperatures, copper penetration results in the formation of η`-Cu3Si precipitates at the Ta-Si interface. Local defect sites appear on the surface of the sample in the early stages of this reaction. The Ta subsequently reacts with the substrate at 650 °C to form a planar hexagonal-TaSi2 layer. Ta silicide formation, which does not occur until 700 °C in a Ta-Si binary reaction couple, is accelerated by the presence of Cu. Nitrogen-alloyed Ta is a very similar diffusion barrier to Ta. It was found that Ta2N is a more effective barrier to copper penetration, preventing Cu reaction with the substrate for temperatures up to at least 650 °C for 30 min. In this case, local Cu-Si reaction occurs along with the formation of a uniform Ta5Si3 layer at the Ta2N-Si interface.

  9. Dielectric cure monitoring: Preliminary studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, B. E.; Semmel, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary studies have been conducted on two types of dielectric cure monitoring systems employing both epoxy resins and phenolic composites. An Audrey System was used for 23 cure monitoring runs with very limited success. Nine complete cure monitoring runs have been investigated using a Micromet System. Two additional measurements were performed to investigate the Micromet's sensitivity to water absorption in a post-cure carbon-phenolic material. While further work is needed to determine data significance, the Micromet system appears to show promise as a feedback control device during processing.

  10. The Effect of Silicon and Aluminum Additions on the Oxidation Resistance of Lean Chromium Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, J.S.; Alman, D.E.; Rawers, J.C.

    2001-09-01

    The effect of Si and Al additions on the oxidation of lean chromium austenitic stainless steels has been studied. A baseline composition of Fe-16Cr-16Ni-2Mn-1Mo was selected to allow combined Si and Al additions of up to 5 wt. pct. in a fully austenitic alloy. The baseline composition was selected using a net Cr equivalent equation to predict the onset of G-ferrite formation in austenite. Cyclic oxidation tests in air for 1000 hours were carried out on alloys with Si only or combined Si and Al additions in the temperature range 700 C to 800 C. Oxidation resistance of alloys with Si only additions were outstanding, particularly at 800 C. It was evident that different rate controlling mechanisms for oxidation were operative at 700 C and 800 C in the Si alloys. In addition, Si alloys pre-oxidized at 800 C, showed a zero weight gain in subsequent testing for 1000 hours at 700 C. The rate controlling mechanism in alloys with combined Si and Al addition for oxidation at 800 C was also different than alloys with Si only. SEM and ESCA analysis of the oxide films and base material at the oxide/base metal interface were conducted to study potential rate controlling mechanisms.

  11. Effect of additives on mechanical properties of macroporous silicon carbide ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Jung-Hye; Kim, Young-Wook

    2010-06-01

    Macroporous SiC ceramics were fabricated by carbothermal reduction of polysiloxane-derived SiOC containing hollow microspheres, followed by sintering and subsequent annealing. The effects of the additive composition and the annealing temperature on the porosity, microstructure, and mechanical strength of the resulting porous ceramics were investigated. Varying the additive composition was found to result in different porosities, microstructures, and mechanical properties. When the samples were sintered at 1750 °C and then annealed at 1900 °C for 4 h, the SiC prepared with 3% Al2O3 and 2% Y2O3 showed the highest strength (a flexural strength of 55 MPa and a compressive strength of 289 MPa, at a porosity of 45 %). The present results suggest that judicious selection of the sintering additive composition is very important for improving the mechanical properties of macroporous SiC ceramics.

  12. Effects of oxide additions and temperature on sinterability of milled silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arias, A.

    1980-01-01

    Specimens of milled alpha-Si3N4 with 0 to 5.07 equivalent percent of oxide additions were pressureless sintered at 1650 to 1820 C for 4 hours in nitrogen while covered with powdered Si3N4 + SiO2. Densities of less than or equal to 97.5 percent resulted with approximately 2.5 equivalent percent of MgO, CeO2, Y2O3, and three mixtures involving these oxides. Densities of greater than or equal to 94 percent were obtained with approximately 0.62 equivalent percent of the same additives. At most temperatures, best sinterability (density maxima) was obtained with 1.2 to 2.5 equivalent percent additive.

  13. Oxidation of silicon nitride sintered with rare-earth oxide additions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mieskowski, D. M.; Sanders, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of rare-earth oxide additions on the oxidation of sintered Si3N4 were examined. Insignificant oxidation occurred at 700 and 1000 C, with no evidence of phase instability. At 1370 C, the oxidation rate was lowest for Y2O3 and increased for additions of La2O3, Sm2O3, and CeO2, in that order. Data obtained from X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, and scanning electron microscopy indicate that oxidation occurs via diffusion of cationic species from Si3N4 grain boundaries.

  14. Densification of Reaction Bonded Silicon Nitride with the Addition of Fine Si Powder Effects on the Sinterability and Mechanical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sea-Hoon; Cho, Chun-Rae; Park, Young-Jo; Ko, Jae-Woong; Kim, Hai-Doo; Lin, Hua-Tay; Becher, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    The densification behavior and strength of sintered reaction bonded silicon nitrides (SRBSN) that contain Lu2O3-SiO2 additives were improved by the addition of fine Si powder. Dense specimens (relative density: 99.5%) were obtained by gas-pressure sintering (GPS) at 1850oC through the addition of fine Si. In contrast, the densification of conventional specimens did not complete at 1950oC. The fine Si decreased the onset temperature of shrinkage and increased the shrinkage rate because the additive helped the compaction of green bodies and induced the formation of fine Si3N4 particles after nitridation and sintering at and above 1600oC. The amount of residual SiO2 within the specimens was not strongly affected by adding fine Si powder because most of the SiO2 layer that had formed on the fine Si particles decomposed during nitridation. The maximum strength and fracture toughness of the specimens were 991 MPa and 8.0 MPa m1/2, respectively.

  15. Effect of additive composition on mechanical properties of pressureless sintered silicon carbide ceramics sintered with alumina, aluminum nitride and yttria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eom, Jung-Hye; Seo, Yu-Kwang; Kim, Young-Wook; Lee, Seoung-Jae

    2015-05-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics were pressureless sintered with 3 vol% Al2O3-Y2O3-AlN additives with the AlN/(Al2O3+AlN) molar ratios of 0-0.75 at 1850-2000 °C for 1 hr and the effects of additive composition (i.e., changes in the AlN/(Al2O3+AlN) molar ratio while maintaining constant Y2O3 content) on the mechanical properties of the pressureless-sintered SiC ceramics were investigated. Self-reinforced microstructures consisting of relatively large platelet SiC grains and relatively small equiaxed grains have been obtained in all specimens when sintered at 1900 °C for 1 h in an argon atmosphere. The achievement of self-reinforced microstructures under such mild conditions (holding for 1 hr at 1900 °C) is caused by the beneficial effects of additive composition and the acceleration of the β→α phase transformation of SiC by seeding, i.e., the addition of 1 vol% α-SiC into β-SiC. The typical flexural strength and fracture toughness of the pressureless-sintered SiC ceramics with an AlN/(Al2O3+AlN) mole ratio of 0.5 were 433 MPa and 6.6 MPa·m1/2 at room temperature, respectively.

  16. The effects of different types of nano-silicon dioxide additives on the properties of sludge ash mortar.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huan-Lin; Chang, Wei-Che; Lin, Deng-Fong

    2009-04-01

    To improve the drawbacks caused by the sludge ash replacement in mortar, the previous studies have shown that the early strength and durability of sludge ash/cement mortar are improved by adding nano-silicon dioxide (nano-SiO2) to mortar. In this article, three types of nano-SiO2--SS, HS, and SP (manufacturer code names)--were applied to sludge ash/cement mixture to make paste or mortar specimens. The object is to further extend the recycle of the sludge ash by determining the better type of nano-SiO2 additive to improve properties of sludge ash/ cement paste or mortar. The cement was replaced by 0, 10, 20, and 30% of sludge ash, and 0 and 2% of nano-SiO2 additives were added to the sludge ash paste or mortar specimens. Tests such as setting time, compressive strength, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance, and thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis were performed in this study. Test results show that nano-SiO2 additives can not only effectively increase the hydration product (calcium silicate hydrate [C-S-H] gel), but also make the crystal structure denser. Among the three types of nano-SiO2 additive, the SS type can best improve the properties of sludge ash/cement paste or mortar, followed by the SP and HS types.

  17. Consolidation of silicon nitride without additives. [for gas turbine engine efficiency increase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikora, P. F.; Yeh, H. C.

    1976-01-01

    The use of ceramics for gas turbine engine construction might make it possible to increase engine efficiency by raising operational temperatures to values beyond those which can be tolerated by metallic alloys. The most promising ceramics being investigated in this connection are Si3N4 and SiC. A description is presented of a study which had the objective to produce dense Si3N4. The two most common methods of consolidating Si3N4 currently being used include hot pressing and reaction sintering. The feasibility was explored of producing a sound, dense Si3N4 body without additives by means of conventional gas hot isostatic pressing techniques and an uncommon hydraulic hot isostatic pressing technique. It was found that Si3N4 can be densified without additions to a density which exceeds 95% of the theoretical value

  18. Effect of silicon addition on soybean (Glycine max) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) plants grown under iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, María José; Lucena, Juan J; Hernández-Apaolaza, Lourdes

    2013-09-01

    Silicon is considered an essential element in several crops enhancing growth and alleviating different biotic and abiotic stresses. In this work, the role of Si in the alleviation of iron deficiency symptoms and in the Fe distribution in iron deficient plants has been studied. Thus, soybean and cucumber plants grown in hydroponic culture under iron limiting conditions were treated with different Si doses (0.0, 0.5 and 1.0 mM). The use of a strong chelating agent such as HBED avoided Fe co-precipitation in the nutrient solution and allowed for the first time the analysis of Si effect in iron nutrition without the interference of the iron rhizospheric precipitation. SPAD index, plant growth parameters and mineral content in plant organs were determined. For soybean, the addition of 0.5 mM of Si to the nutrient solution without iron, initially or continuously during the experiment, prevented the chlorophyll degradation, slowed down the growth decrease due to the iron deficiency and maintained the Fe content in leaves. In cucumber, Si addition delayed the decrease of stem dry weight, stem length, node number and iron content in stems and roots independently of the dose, but no-effect was observed in chlorosis symptoms alleviation in leaves. The observed response to Si addition in iron deficiency was plant-specific, probably related with the different Fe efficiency strategies developed by these two species.

  19. Effect of Yttria additives on properties of pressureless-sintered silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arias, A.

    1981-01-01

    Si3N4-base ceramics were made from milled Si3N4 containing 11.1 wt% SiO2 and oxide additives by pressureless sintering at 1760 C. The four-point-average moduli of rupture were 460, 515, and 515 MPa at room temperature and 270, 256, and 227 MPa at 1400 C for compositions with 3.67, 7.22, and 14.0 wt% Y2O3, respectively. The oxidation resistance of these compositions decreased with increasing Y2O3 in the 600 to 1400 C range, and no surface oxide cracking or spalling was noted. Partial substitution of Al2O3 for Y2O3 reduced both strength and oxidation resistance.

  20. A Comparison of Dimensional Accuracy of Addition Silicone of Different Consistencies with Two Different Spacer Designs - In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Eswaran, B; Eswaran, MA; Prabhu, R; Geetha, KR; Krishna, GP; Jagadeshwari

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Dimensional accuracy of impression materials is crucial for the production of working casts in Fixed Prosthodontics. The accurate replication of tooth preparations and their arch position requires impression materials that exhibit limited distortion. Methods: This study was conducted to comparatively evaluate the dimensional accuracy of additional silicones by comparing two different techniques and spacer designs, by measuring the linear changes in interpreparation distance. The impressions were made from a stainless steel master die simulating a three unit bridge. A total 80 die stone (type IV, Ultrarock) models were obtained from the impressions made using two different parameters. The two different parameters are Multimix and Monophasic technique and different spacer designs. Result: The interpreparation distance of the abutments in the casts was measured using a travelling microscope. Each sample was measured thrice and the mean value was calculated. The results obtained were statistically analysed and the values fall within the clinically acceptable range. Conclusion: The most accurate combination is multimix technique with spacer design which uses less bulk of impression material. PMID:25177635

  1. New pressure-sensitive silicone adhesive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiffer, J. L.; Stoops, W. E., Jr.; St. Clair, T. L.; Watkins, V. E., Jr.; Kelly, T. P.

    1981-01-01

    Adhesive for high or low temperatures does not stretch severely under load. It is produced by combining intermediate-molecular-weight pressure sensitive adhesive which does not cure with silicone resin that cures with catalyst to rubbery tack-free state. Blend of silicone tackifier and cured rubbery silicone requires no solvents in either atmospheric or vacuum environments. Ratio of ingredients varies for different degrees of tack, creep resistance, and tensile strength.

  2. Synthesis of binder-like molecules covalently linked to silicon nanoparticles and application as anode material for lithium-ion batteries without the use of electrolyte additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assresahegn, Birhanu Desalegn; Bélanger, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    A chemically modified silicon anode is prepared for application as anode in lithium-ion batteries by covalent attachment of polyacrylic acid to enable self-adhesion between the active material particles. The polyacrylic acid polymer is formed by atom transfer radical polymerization using 1-(bromoethyl)benzene initiator groups initially bonded to a hydrogenated silicon surface. The grafting of 1-(bromoethyl)benzene and polyacrylic acid is confirmed by various material characterization techniques. The electrochemical performance of the silicon anodes is also evaluated by galvanostatic cycling. The chemically modified composite silicon anode (with active material loading of 0.9-1 mg cm-2) showed a significantly improved performance in terms of: gravimetric capacitance (more than 2000 mAh g-1) after 300 cycles and 80% capacity retention with an average 99.6% Coulombic efficiency at a current density of 0.34 A g-1. However, the unmodified electrode cycled 75 times in the same conditions only retains 46% of its initial capacity with an average 95.1% Coulombic efficiency. The new composite Si electrode performs better at high charge/discharge rate and allows the use of larger proportion of the active material by reducing the amount of binder. It is noteworthy that these composite silicon electrodes are tested without the use of expensive electrolyte additives.

  3. Optimal Composite Curing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handel, Paul; Guerin, Daniel

    The Optimal Composite Curing System (OCCS) is an intelligent control system which incorporates heat transfer and resin kinetic models coupled with expert knowledge. It controls the curing of epoxy impregnated composites, preventing part overheating while maintaining maximum cure heatup rate. This results in a significant reduction in total cure time over standard methods. The system uses a cure process model, operating in real-time, to determine optimal cure profiles for tool/part configurations of varying thermal characteristics. These profiles indicate the heating and cooling necessary to insure a complete cure of each part in the autoclave in the minimum amount of time. The system coordinates these profiles to determine an optimal cure profile for a batch of thermally variant parts. Using process specified rules for proper autoclave operation, OCCS automatically controls the cure process, implementing the prescribed cure while monitoring the operation of the autoclave equipment.

  4. Quantitation of buried contamination by use of solvents. [degradation of silicone polymers by amine solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappas, S. P.; Hsiao, Y. C.; Hill, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    Spore recovery form cured silicone potting compounds using amine solvents to degrade the cured polymers was investigated. A complete list of solvents and a description of the effect of each on two different silicone polymers is provided.

  5. The impact of nanosilver addition on element ions release form light-cured dental composite and compomer into 0.9% NaCl.

    PubMed

    Sokołowski, Krzysztof; Szynkowska, Małgorzata I; Pawlaczyk, Aleksandra; Łukomska-Szymańska, Monika; Sokołowski, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to identify and to assess in semi-quantified way the release of different ions from composite and compomer restorative materials subjected to 0.9% NaCl solution, which simulates the environment of the human body. In the present study, the number of ions (Al, Ag, Ba, Sr, Ti) released from dental fillings over time (one week, one month and 3 months), in different temperatures (23°C, 37°C) and depending on the materials applied (unmodified/modified with nanosilver) was investigated. The results suggest that nanosilver addition influences directly on the process of metal ion releasing into 0.9% NaCl solution. The increase in the number of counts of metal ions was observed in the solutions in which samples modified with nanosilver were kept. Higher amount of metal ion release was observed for composite samples rather than for compomer materials. The study revealed that in general the number of released metal ions increases with the time of storage (for metal ions: Ti, Ba, Sr) and at higher temperature (Ag, Ti, Ba). Reverse tendency observed for silver ion release versus incubation time may be caused by the process of silver adsorption, which takes place on the surface of analyzed material and test-tube walls, where samples were incubated.

  6. Curing units' ability to cure restorative composites and dual-cured composite cements under composite overlay.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Ho; Kim, Su-Sun; Cho, Yong-Sik; Lee, Chang-Kyu; Noh, Byng-Duk

    2004-01-01

    , microhardnesses of the upper and lower surfaces reached OM. When they were cured with the PAC unit, only 48 seconds was needed for the upper and lower surfaces to reach OM. When they were cured using the laser, the lower surface did not reach OM in any of the groups. When the specimens were cured using the LQTH lamp, 180 seconds of curing was needed for Z100 to reach OM, whereas Tetric Ceram did not reach OM. In Z100, 60, 12, 30 and 60 seconds were needed in HQTH, PAC, Laser and LQTH, respectively, for the specimens to reach 80% OM. Tetric Ceram was needed 60,24,45 and 180 seconds to reach 80% OM. In the Variolink II specimen, microhardness of the upper and lower surfaces did not reach OM even though they were light cured with the HQTH lamp for 120 seconds. When they were cured with the PAC unit, 48 seconds was insufficient for them to reach OM. When they were cured with laser for 45 and 60 seconds, microhardness reached OM on the upper surface but not on the lower surface. However, when they were cured using the LQTH lamp, microhardness did not reach OM on the upper and lower surfaces even though the curing time was extended to three minutes. In Variolink II, 120, 36, 45 and >180 seconds were needed in HQTH, PAC, Laser and LQTH, respectively, for the specimens to reach 80% OM. In conclusion, the PAC system is the most effective curing system to cure the restorative composite and dual cured resin cement under the 1.5 mm Targis overlay, followed by the laser, HQTH and LQTH units. In addition, the restorative composites cured more efficiently than the dual-cured resin cements.

  7. Curing agent for polyepoxides and epoxy resins and composites cured therewith. [preventing carbon fiber release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A curing for a polyepoxide is described which contains a divalent aryl radical such as phenylene a tetravalent aryl radical such as a tetravalent benzene radical. An epoxide is cured by admixture with the curing agent. The cured epoxy product retains the usual properties of cured epoxides and, in addition, has a higher char residue after burning, on the order of 45% by weight. The higher char residue is of value in preventing release to the atmosphere of carbon fibers from carbon fiber-epoxy resin composites in the event of burning of the composite.

  8. Extension of a Cox proportional hazards cure model when cure information is partially known

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu; Lin, Yong; Lu, Shou-En; Li, Chin-Shang; Shih, Weichung Joe

    2014-01-01

    When there is evidence of long-term survivors, cure models are often used to model the survival curve. A cure model is a mixture model consisting of a cured fraction and an uncured fraction. Traditional cure models assume that the cured or uncured status in the censored set cannot be distinguished. But in many practices, some diagnostic procedures may provide partial information about the cured or uncured status relative to certain sensitivity and specificity. The traditional cure model does not take advantage of this additional information. Motivated by a clinical study on bone injury in pediatric patients, we propose a novel extension of a traditional Cox proportional hazards (PH) cure model that incorporates the additional information about the cured status. This extension can be applied when the latency part of the cure model is modeled by the Cox PH model. Extensive simulations demonstrated that the proposed extension provides more efficient and less biased estimations, and the higher efficiency and smaller bias is associated with higher sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic procedures. When the proposed extended Cox PH cure model was applied to the motivating example, there was a substantial improvement in the estimation. PMID:24511081

  9. Development of High Temperature Addition - Cured Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    Propdi%.tion of 3-(3-nitroph«-noxy),icctophfnom- - Kxpt-riment 111057-69 TO a slurry of sodium sand (46. 0 grams, 2. 00 g-atoms) in dry...After all of the sodium had reacted, as evidenced by the absence of a grey color the slurry was added under argon to a solution of 3...extracting the residue with benzene. The fil- tered benzene extract was washed successively with 1:1 hydrochloric acid. 10 percent aqueous sodium

  10. An evaluation of dimensional accuracy of one-step and two-step impression technique using addition silicone impression material: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pande, Neelam A; Parkhedkar, R D

    2013-09-01

    The study is aimed to evaluate the dimensional accuracy, the effect of undercut of two different configurations and the elastic recovery of addition silicone impression material assessed indirectly, by measuring the dimensions on stone models recorded from the impression of the master model, using one-step and two-step impression technique, for addition silicone impression materials. Measurements are taken to evaluate horizontal or linear and vertical dimensional changes, of the abutment V and abutment C from the stainless steel model. Heavy body/light body material is used for making one-step impression technique in a custom tray. Putty/light body is used for taking two-step technique in a stock metal tray. Improved die stone is used for pouring the impression. The different 11 locations on the dies produced by two different techniques are measured microscopically on image analyzer and compared with those of stainless steel model. Anova test was applied to test the differences of mean values of inter and intra abutment measurements, to calculate p value. Unpaired t test was applied to calculate t value. Results showed less deviation of stone models produced by one-step technique from stainless steel model, whereas the deviation of stone models produced by two-step is comparatively more. (p < 0.01). This difference of deviation is significantly less in one-step as compared to two-step technique. One-step is sufficiently dimensionally accurate than two-step technique in conjunction with addition silicone impression material. They have the best elastic recovery from the two undercut configurations.

  11. Solubilization and spore recovery from silicone polymers. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsiao, Y. C.

    1974-01-01

    A non-sporicidal technique for solvent degradation of cured silicone polymers was developed which involves chemical degradation of cured silicone polymers by amine solvents at room temperature. Substantial improvements were obtained in the recovery of seeded spores from room temperature cured polymers as compared to the standard recovery procedures, which indicates that the curing process is not sufficiently exothermic to reduce spore viability. The dissolution reaction of cured silicone polymers whith amine solvents is proposed to occur by bimolecular nucleophilic displacement. The chemical structure of silicone polymers was determined by spectroscopic methods. The phenyl to methyl ratio, R/Si ratio, molecular weight, and hydroxyl content of the silicone resins were determined.

  12. Modeling the mechanical and aging properties of silicone rubber and foam - stockpile-historical & additively manufactured materials

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A.; Weisgraber, T. H.; Gee, R. H.

    2014-09-30

    M97* and M9763 belong to the M97xx series of cellular silicone materials that have been deployed as stress cushions in some of the LLNL systems. Their purpose of these support foams is to distribute the stress between adjacent components, maintain relative positioning of various components, and mitigate the effects of component size variation due to manufacturing and temperature changes. In service these materials are subjected to a continuous compressive strain over long periods of time. In order to ensure their effectiveness, it is important to understand how their mechanical properties change over time. The properties we are primarily concerned about are: compression set, load retention, and stress-strain response (modulus).

  13. Reaction cured glass and glass coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, H. E.; Leiser, D. B.; Katvala, V. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to reaction cured glass and glass coatings prepared by reacting a compound selected from the group consisting of silicon tetraboride, silicon hexaboride, other boron silicides, boron and mixtures with a reactive glass frit composed of a porous high silica borosilicate glass and boron oxide. The glassy composites of the present invention are useful as coatings on low density fibrous porous silica insulations used as heat shields and for articles such as reaction vessels that are subjected to high temperatures with rapid heating and cooling and that require resistance to temperature and repeated thermal shock at temperatures up to about 1482C (2700PF).

  14. Radiation curing of epoxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Lawrence W.; Singh, Ajit

    The literature on radiation polymerization of epoxy compounds has been reviewed to assess the potential use of radiation for curing these industrially important monomers. Chemical curing of epoxies may proceed by either cationic or anionic mechanisms depending on the nature of the curing agent, but most epoxies polymerize by cationic mechanisms under the influence of high-energy radiation. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of epoxy compounds is inhibited by trace quantities of water because of proton transfer from the chain-propagating epoxy cation to water. Several different methods with potential for obtaining high molecular weight polymers by curing epoxies with high-energy radiation have been studied. Polymeric products with epoxy-like properties have been produced by radiation curing of epoxy oligomers with terminal acrylate groups and mixtures of epoxies with vinyl monomers. Both of these types of resin have good potential for industrial-scale curing by radiation treatment.

  15. Curing of Furfuryl Alcohol-Impregnated Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, J. W.; Brayden, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    Delamination problem in reinforced carbon/carbon parts impregnated with oxalic acid-catalyzed furfuryl alcohol overcome by instituting two additional quality-control tests on alcohol and by changing curing conditions.

  16. Exploratory Development of an Ultrafast-Curing Wound Dressing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-30

    topical antimicrobial agent should: Be poorly absorbed through skin for maximum kill potential at the applied slite * Be bactericidal at low local...our development of non -toxic, tissue compa- tible oligomers which cure under UV radiation. Curing by UV radiation is a breakthrough in medical-grade...suitable way to prevent adhesion; we concluded that poly- urethanes (being relatively tacky) could not be made non - adhe-ent. Silicone gums, on the other

  17. Control of Chitin Nanofiber Production by the Lipid-Producing Diatom Cyclotella sp. through Fed-Batch Addition of Dissolved Silicon and Nitrate in a Bubble-Column Photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Chiriboga, Omar; Rorrer, Gregory L

    2017-02-11

    Diatoms are single-celled algae that make cell walls of nanopatterned biogenic silica called frustules through metabolic uptake of dissolved silicon and its templated condensation into biosilica. The centric marine diatom Cyclotella sp. also produces intracellular lipids and the valued co-product chitin, an N-acetyl glucosamine biopolymer that is extruded from selected frustule pores as pure nanofibers. The goal of this study was to develop a nutrient feeding strategy to control the production of chitin nanofibers from Cyclotella with the co-production of biofuel lipids. A two-stage phototrophic cultivation process was developed where Stage I set the cell suspension to a silicon-starved state under batch operation, and Stage II continuously added silicon and nitrate to the silicon-starved cells to enable one more cell doubling to 4 ⋅ 10(6) cells/mL. The silicon delivery rate was set to enable a silicon-limited cell division rate under cumulative delivery of 0.8 mM Si and 1.2 mM nitrate (1.5:1 mol N/mol Si) over a 4-14 day addition period. In Stage II, both cell number and chitin production were linear with time. Cell number and the specific chitin production rate increased linearly with increasing silicon delivery rate to achieve cumulative product yields of 12 ± 1 mg chitin/10(9) cells and 33 ± 3 mg lipid/10(9) cells. Therefore, chitin production is controlled through cell division, which is externally controlled through silicon delivery. Lipid production was not linearly correlated to silicon delivery and occurred primarily during Stage I, just after the complete co-consumption of both dissolved silicon and nitrate. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of silicon additions on oxidation and mechanical behavior of the nickel-base superalloy B-1900

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, R. V., Jr.; Lowell, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Test specimens with nominal additions of Si were tested in oxidation, thermal fatigue, sulfidation, tension, and stress rupture, and were also extensively studied metallographically. Alloy B-1900 modified with 0.6- or 1.2-wt% Si exhibited oxidation resistance equivalent to that of aluminide-coated B-1900 during cyclic, high-gas-velocity oxidation tests. Resistances to thermal fatigue and sulfidation were improved by the Si additions, but were not superior to aluminide-coated B-1900. Stress-rupture tests at 1000 C of specimens given the standard heat treatment to simulate an aluminide coating cycle showed Si to be detrimental. However, application of another heat treatment increased the rupture life of the alloy with 0.6-wt% Si to that of the unmodified B-1900 given the standard heat treatment.

  19. One-step microwave foaming and curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, J.; Lee, R.; Sorathia, U. A. K.; Wilcoxson, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    Process that combines microwave foaming and curing of polyimide precursors in single step produces fire-resistant foam slabs of much larger volume than has previously been possible. By adding selected conductive fillers to powder precursors and by using high-power microwave oven, foam slabs with dimensions in excess of 61 by 61 by 7.6 cm are made. Typical foaming and curing and curing time is 35 minutes in microwave oven with additional 1 to 2 hour postcure in conventional oven.

  20. Additional-Body Effects in a Self-Aligned Deca-Nanometer Ultrathin-Body and Buried Oxide Silicon-on-Insulator Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor: A Three-Dimensional Simulation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jyi-Tsong; Eng, Yi-Chuen; Chen, Cheng-Hsin; Fan, Yi-Hsuan

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we numerically investigate the additional-body effects (ABEs) created by the isolation-last fabrication process of a self-aligned deca-nanometer ultrathin-body and buried oxide (UTBB) silicon-on-insulator (SOI) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). The reasons for the device's new electrical characteristics are also explained in detail. The additional silicon body volumes of the UTBB SOI MOSFET are found to improve the subthreshold swing and the on/off current ratio. The additional body has a negative effect, however, upon both the gate leakage current and the total gate capacitance, when compared with a standard UTBB SOI MOSFET.

  1. Purified silicon production system

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2004-03-30

    Method and apparatus for producing purified bulk silicon from highly impure metallurgical-grade silicon source material at atmospheric pressure. Method involves: (1) initially reacting iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to create silicon tetraiodide and impurity iodide byproducts in a cold-wall reactor chamber; (2) isolating silicon tetraiodide from the impurity iodide byproducts and purifying it by distillation in a distillation chamber; and (3) transferring the purified silicon tetraiodide back to the cold-wall reactor chamber, reacting it with additional iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to produce silicon diiodide and depositing the silicon diiodide onto a substrate within the cold-wall reactor chamber. The two chambers are at atmospheric pressure and the system is open to allow the introduction of additional source material and to remove and replace finished substrates.

  2. Isothiourea-Mediated Organocatalytic Michael Addition-Lactonization on a Surface: Modification of SAMs on Silicon Oxide Substrates.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Ross; Parkin, John D; Smith, Andrew D; Hähner, Georg

    2016-04-05

    Tailoring the functionality of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) can be achieved either by depositing prefunctionalized molecules with the appropriate terminal groups or by chemical modification of an existing SAM in situ. The latter approach is particularly advantageous to allow for diversity of surface functionalization from a single SAM and if the incorporation of bulky groups is desired. In the present study an organocatalytic isothiourea-mediated Michael addition-lactonization process analogous to a previously reported study in solution is presented. An achiral isothiourea, 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrimido[2,1-b]benzothiazole (DHPB), promotes the intermolecular Michael addition-lactonization of a trifluoromethylenone terminated SAM and a variety of arylacetic acids affording C(6)-trifluoromethyldihydropyranones tethered to the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle, and ellipsometry analysis were conducted to confirm the presence of the substituted dihydropyranone. A model study of this approach was also performed in solution to probe the reaction diastereoselectivity as it cannot be measured directly on the surface.

  3. Cure of incurable lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    De Nardo, Gerald L.

    2006-10-01

    The most potent method for augmenting the cytocidal power of monoclonal antibody (MAb) treatment is to conjugate radionuclides to the MAb to deliver systemic radiotherapy (radioimmunotherapy; RIT). The antigen, MAb, and its epitope can make a difference in the performance of the drug. Additionally, the radionuclide, radiochemistry, chelator for radiometals and the linker between the MAb and chelator can have a major influence on the performance of drugs (radiopharmaceuticals) for RIT. Smaller radionuclide carriers, such as antibody fragments and mimics, and those used for pretargeting strategies, have been described and evaluated. All of these changes in the drugs and strategies for RIT have documented potential for improved performance and patient outcomes. RIT is a promising new therapy that should be incorporated into the management of patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) soon after these patients have proven incurable. Predictable improvements using better drugs, strategies, and combinations with other drugs seem certain to make RIT integral to the management of patients with NHL, and likely lead to cure of currently incurable NHL.

  4. Control of Subthreshold Characteristics of Narrow-Channel Silicon-on-Insulator n-Type Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Transistor with Additional Side Gate Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Koji; Sunami, Hideo

    2007-04-01

    A silicon-on-insulator (SOI) n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) transistor with additional side gate electrodes is fabricated and its subthreshold characteristics are discussed. Since its device structure provides independent biasing to gates, flexible device-characteristic control for the respective device is expected. The key fabrication process is the formation of transistor gates. Additional side gate electrodes are formed by reactive ion etching (RIE) with a SiO2-covered top gate as an etching mask. Subthreshold characteristics are improved by negative side-gate biasing. In addition, the side-gate voltage VSG required to decrease off-leakage current by one decade is around 100 mV. Since the sidewall oxide thickness is chosen to be 5 nm, which is the same as the top-oxide thickness, rather sensitive subthreshold-characteristic control compared with that of biasing through a thick buried-oxide layer is achieved in response to performance requirement. In the viewpoint of stand-by-power suppression, these provide a certain controllability to a circuit operation.

  5. Quenching and partitioning response of carbon-manganese-silicon sheet steels containing nickel, molybdenum, aluminum and copper additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahkonen, Joonas

    . Retained austenite fractions up to 28 pct and UTS levels exceeding 1500, 1600, and 1700 MPa with TE levels of 20, 17 and 12 pct respectively were measured for the 0.3C-5Mn-1.6Si alloy. Molybdenum and aluminum additions to a 0.3C-3Mn-1.5Si alloy were not observed to significantly affect the resulting tensile properties at a partitioning temperature of 400 °C. Partitioning at 450 °C increased the TE levels of the 0.3C-3Mn-1.5Si-0.25Mo-0.85Al alloy and decreased the TE levels of the 0.3C-3Mn-1.5Si-0.25Mo alloy while similar UTS levels were measured in both alloys. The aluminum addition potentially increased strain hardening. RA fractions were observed to be close to predicted levels in both alloys. Copper and nickel additions were not observed to increase the resulting maximum UTS˙TE levels. Copper and nickel additions increased RA levels and the measured RA levels were observed to be close to the predicted values.

  6. Hypoxanthine enhances the cured meat taste.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Sayaka; Nakamura, Yukinobu; Yoshida, Yuka; Hattori, Akihito

    2017-02-01

    We evaluated the enhancement of cured meat taste during maturation by sensory analysis. We focused on the heat-stable sarcoplasmic fraction (HSSF) to identify the factors related to cured meat taste. Because the dry matter of HSSF contained more than 30% nitrogen, nitrogen compounds such as free amino acids, small peptides and adenosine triphosphate-related compounds seemed to be the important components of HSSF. The samples cured with HSSF for 2 h exhibited the same taste profile as ones cured without HSSF for 168 h. Therefore, the changes in the amount and fractions of nitrogen compounds were examined in HSSF during incubation from 0 to 168 h. The concentration of hypoxanthine (Hx) gradually increased, while inosine-5'-monophosphate decreased during the incubation. The samples cured with pickles containing various concentrations of Hx were subjected to sensory analysis. The addition of Hx, in a dose-dependent fashion, enhanced cured meat taste by maturation for 2 h. It was concluded that Hx is essential for the enhancement of cured meat taste.

  7. Hypoxanthine enhances the cured meat taste

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yukinobu; Yoshida, Yuka; Hattori, Akihito

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the enhancement of cured meat taste during maturation by sensory analysis. We focused on the heat‐stable sarcoplasmic fraction (HSSF) to identify the factors related to cured meat taste. Because the dry matter of HSSF contained more than 30% nitrogen, nitrogen compounds such as free amino acids, small peptides and adenosine triphosphate‐related compounds seemed to be the important components of HSSF. The samples cured with HSSF for 2 h exhibited the same taste profile as ones cured without HSSF for 168 h. Therefore, the changes in the amount and fractions of nitrogen compounds were examined in HSSF during incubation from 0 to 168 h. The concentration of hypoxanthine (Hx) gradually increased, while inosine‐5′‐monophosphate decreased during the incubation. The samples cured with pickles containing various concentrations of Hx were subjected to sensory analysis. The addition of Hx, in a dose‐dependent fashion, enhanced cured meat taste by maturation for 2 h. It was concluded that Hx is essential for the enhancement of cured meat taste. PMID:27169902

  8. Effects of Interface Coating and Nitride Enhancing Additive on Properties of Hi-Nicalon SiC Fiber Reinforced Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishana T.; Hull, David R.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Babuder, Raymond

    2000-01-01

    Strong and tough Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites (SiC/ RBSN) have been fabricated by the fiber lay-up approach. Commercially available uncoated and PBN, PBN/Si-rich PBN, and BN/SiC coated SiC Hi-Nicalon fiber tows were used as reinforcement. The composites contained approximately 24 vol % of aligned 14 micron diameter SiC fibers in a porous RBSN matrix. Both one- and two-dimensional composites were characterized. The effects of interface coating composition, and the nitridation enhancing additive, NiO, on the room temperature physical, tensile, and interfacial shear strength properties of SiC/RBSN matrix composites were evaluated. Results indicate that for all three coated fibers, the thickness of the coatings decreased from the outer periphery to the interior of the tows, and that from 10 to 30 percent of the fibers were not covered with the interface coating. In the uncoated regions, chemical reaction between the NiO additive and the SiC fiber occurs causing degradation of tensile properties of the composites. Among the three interface coating combinations investigated, the BN/SiC coated Hi-Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced RBSN matrix composite showed the least amount of uncoated regions and reasonably uniform interface coating thickness. The matrix cracking stress in SiC/RBSN composites was predicted using a fracture mechanics based crack bridging model.

  9. Assessing the prediction accuracy of cure in the Cox proportional hazards cure model: an application to breast cancer data.

    PubMed

    Asano, Junichi; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Hamada, Chikuma

    2014-01-01

    A cure rate model is a survival model incorporating the cure rate with the assumption that the population contains both uncured and cured individuals. It is a powerful statistical tool for prognostic studies, especially in cancer. The cure rate is important for making treatment decisions in clinical practice. The proportional hazards (PH) cure model can predict the cure rate for each patient. This contains a logistic regression component for the cure rate and a Cox regression component to estimate the hazard for uncured patients. A measure for quantifying the predictive accuracy of the cure rate estimated by the Cox PH cure model is required, as there has been a lack of previous research in this area. We used the Cox PH cure model for the breast cancer data; however, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) could not be estimated because many patients were censored. In this study, we used imputation-based AUCs to assess the predictive accuracy of the cure rate from the PH cure model. We examined the precision of these AUCs using simulation studies. The results demonstrated that the imputation-based AUCs were estimable and their biases were negligibly small in many cases, although ordinary AUC could not be estimated. Additionally, we introduced the bias-correction method of imputation-based AUCs and found that the bias-corrected estimate successfully compensated the overestimation in the simulation studies. We also illustrated the estimation of the imputation-based AUCs using breast cancer data.

  10. 21 CFR 170.60 - Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nitrites and/or nitrates in curing premixes. 170... nitrates in curing premixes. (a) Nitrites and/or nitrates are food additives when combined in curing... nitrates, when packaged separately from flavoring and seasoning in curing premixes, may continue to be...

  11. Fast Curing of Composite Wood Products

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Arthur J. Ragauskas

    2006-04-26

    The overall objective of this program is to develop low temperature curing technologies for UF and PF resins. This will be accomplished by: • Identifying the rate limiting UF and PF curing reactions for current market resins; • Developing new catalysts to accelerate curing reactions at reduced press temperatures and times. In summary, these new curing technologies will improve the strength properties of the composite wood products and minimize the detrimental effects of wood extractives on the final product while significantly reducing energy costs for wood composites. This study is related to the accelerated curing of resins for wood composites such as medium density fiberboard (MDF), particle board (PB) and oriented strandboard (OSB). The latter is frequently manufactured with a phenol-formaldehyde resin whereas ureaformaldehyde (UF) resins are usually used in for the former two grades of composite wood products. One of the reasons that hinder wider use of these resins in the manufacturing of wood composites is the slow curing speed as well as inferior bondability of UF resin. The fast curing of UP and PF resins has been identified as an attractive process development that would allow wood to be bonded at higher moisture contents and at lower press temperatures that currently employed. Several differing additives have been developed to enhance cure rates of PF resins including the use of organic esters, lactones and organic carbonates. A model compound study by Conner, Lorenz and Hirth (2002) employed 2- and 4-hydroxymethylphenol with organic esters to examine the chemical basis for the reported enhanced reactivity. Their studies suggested that the enhance curing in the presence of esters could be due to enhanced quinone methide formation or enhanced intermolecular SN2 reactions. In either case the esters do not function as true catalysts as they are consumed in the reaction and were not found to be incorporated in the polymerized resin product. An

  12. Curing efficiency of various resin-based materials polymerized through different ceramic thicknesses and curing time

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Won; Cha, Hyun-Suk

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this in vitro study was to examine the curing efficiency of various resin-based materials polymerized through ceramic restorations with 3 different thicknesses. Curing efficiency was evaluated by determining the surface microhardness (VHN) of the resin specimens. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four kinds of resin materials were used. Z350 (3M ESPE Filtek™ Z350: A2 Shade), Z250 (3M ESPE Filtek™ Z250: A2 Shade) and Variolink® II (VL: Ivoclar vivadent, base: transparent) either with or without a self-curing catalyst (VLC: Ivoclar vivadent, catalyst: low viscosity/transparent) were filled into the silicone mold (10 mm diameter, 1 mm thick). They were cured through ceramic discs (IPS e.max Press MO-0 ingot ivoclar vivadent, 10 mm diameter, 0.5, 1 and 2 mm thicknesses) by LED light-curing units for 20 and 40 seconds. Vicker's microhardness numbers (VHNs) were measured on the bottom surfaces by a microhardness tester. Data were analyzed using a 3- way analysis of variance (ANOVA) at a significance level of 0.05. RESULTS The thickness of ceramic disc increased, the VHNs of all four resin types were decreased (P<.05). The mean VHN values of the resins light cured for 40 seconds were significantly higher than that of LED for 20 seconds in all four resin materials (P<.05). VLC showed significantly higher VHN values than VL regardless of other conditions (P<.05). Z350 and Z250 showed higher values than VL or VLC (P<.01). CONCLUSION Thinner ceramic disc with increased curing time resulted higher VHN values of all resin materials. The use of a catalyst produced a greater hardness with all polymerization methods. Restorative resin materials (Z350, Z250) showed higher VHN values than resin cement materials (VL, VLC). PMID:22053242

  13. New advanced shotcrete admixtures: Internal curing

    SciTech Connect

    Melbye, T.A.

    1995-12-31

    Tunnels and other underground construction projects have one of the worst curing conditions due to the ventilation that blows continuously dry (cold or hot) air into the tunnel. It can be compared with concrete exposed to a windy area. One would think that tunnels have ideal curing conditions with high humidity (water leakage), no wind and no sun exposure. However, this is not the case. MBT has developed a new system for more efficient and secure curing of wet shotcrete, repair mortars as well as concrete. Internal curing means that a special admixture is added to the concrete/mortar during batching as a normal admixture. This admixture produces an internal barrier in the shotcrete/concrete which secures safer hydration and better chemical resistance than the application of conventional curing agents. The benefits resulting from the new technology are impressive: The time consuming application and, in the case of various shotcrete layers, removal of curing agents are no longer necessary; curing is guaranteed from the very beginning of hydration; and there is no negative influence on bonding between layers. As a consequence of th is optimum curing effect, all other shotcrete characteristics are improved: density, final strengths, freeze/thaw and chemical resistances, watertightness, less cracking and shrinkage. In addition, MEYCO TCC 735 also improves pumpability and workability of shotcrete, even with low-grade aggregates. It particularly improves the pumpability of steel fiber reinforced shotcrete mixes. In combination with the MEYCO TCC system it contrives to even increase the beneficial effects of the slump killing system by further improving fiber orientation, reducing fiber rebound and thus raising toughness values.

  14. The cure of cancer: a European perspective.

    PubMed

    Francisci, Silvia; Capocaccia, Riccardo; Grande, Enrico; Santaquilani, Mariano; Simonetti, Arianna; Allemani, Claudia; Gatta, Gemma; Sant, Milena; Zigon, Giulia; Bray, Freddie; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska

    2009-04-01

    Cancer survival analyses based on cancer registry data do not provide direct information on the main aim of cancer treatment, the cure of the patient. In fact, classic survival indicators do not distinguish between patients who are cured, and patients who will die of their disease and in whom prolongation of survival is the main objective of treatment. In this study, we applied parametric cure models to the cancer incidence and follow-up data provided by 49 EUROCARE-4 (European Cancer Registry-based study, fourth edition) cancer registries, with the aims of providing additional insights into the survival of European cancer patients diagnosed from 1988 to 1999, and of investigating between-population differences. Between-country estimates the proportion of cured patients varied from about 4-13% for lung cancer, from 9% to 30% for stomach cancer, from 25% to 49% for colon and rectum cancer, and from 55% to 73% for breast cancer. For all cancers combined, estimates varied between 21% and 47% in men, and 38% and 59% in women and were influenced by the distribution of cases by cancer site. Countries with high proportions of cured and long fatal case survival times for all cancers combined were characterised by generally favourable case mix. For the European pool of cases both the proportion of cured and the survival time of fatal cases were associated with age, and increased from the early to the latest diagnosis period. The increases over time in the proportions of Europeans estimated cured of lung, stomach and colon and rectum cancers are noteworthy and suggest genuine progress in cancer control. The proportion of cured of all cancers combined is a useful general indicator of cancer control as it reflects progress in diagnosis and treatment, as well as success in the prevention of rapidly fatal cancers.

  15. Effect of small additions of silicon, iron, and aluminum on the room-temperature tensile properties of high-purity uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, R.L.

    1983-11-14

    Eleven binary and ternary alloys of uranium and very low concentrations of iron, silicon, and aluminum were prepared and tested for room-temperature tensile properties after various heat treatments. A yield strength approximately double that of high-purity derby uranium was obtained from a U-400 ppM Si-200 ppM Fe alloy after beta solution treatment and alpha aging. Higher silicon plus iron alloy contents resulted in increased yield strength, but showed an unacceptable loss of ductility.

  16. Cure shrinkage effects in epoxy and polycyanate matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Spellman, G.P.

    1995-12-22

    A relatively new advanced composite matrix, polycyanate ester, was evaluated for cure shrinkage. The chemical cure shrinkage of composites is difficult to model but a number of clever experimental techniques are available to the investigator. In this work the method of curing a prepreg layup on top of a previously cured laminate of identical ply composition is utilized. The polymeric matrices used in advanced composites have been primarily epoxies and therefore a common system of this type, Fiberite 3501-6, was used as a base case material. Three polycyanate matrix systems were selected for the study. These are: Fiberite 954-2A, YLA RS-3, and Bryte Technology BTCy-1. The first three of these systems were unidirectional prepreg with carbon fiber reinforcement. The Bryte Technology material was reinforced with E-glass fabric. The technique used to evaluate cure shrinkage results in distortion of the flatness of an otherwise symmetric laminate. The first laminate is cured in a conventional fashion. An identical layup is cured on this first laminate. During the second cure all constituents are exposed to the same thermal cycles. However, only the new portion of the laminate will experience volumetric changes associate with matrix cure. The additional strain of cure shrinkage results in an unsymmetric distribution of residual stresses and an associated warpage of the laminate. The baseline material, Fiberite 3501-6, exhibited cure shrinkage that was in accordance with expectations. Cure strains were {minus}4.5E-04. The YLA RS-3 material had cure strains somewhat lower at {minus}3.2E-04. The Fiberite 954-2A cure strain was {minus}1.5E-04 that is 70% lower than the baseline material. The glass fabric material with the Bryte BTCy-1 matrix did not result in meaningful results because the processing methods were not fully compatible with the material.

  17. Silicone-Rubber Stitching Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    Fabric products protected from raveling by coating threads and filling stitching holes with silicone rubber. Uncored silicone rubber applied to stitching lines with air-pressurized sealant gun. Next, plastic release film placed on coated side, and blanket flipped over so release film lies underneath. Blanket then bagged and adhesive cured under partial vacuum of about 3.5 psi or under pressure. Applications include balloons, parachutes, ultralight aircraft, sails, rescue harnesses, tents, or other fabric products highly stressed in use.

  18. Addition polymers from 1,4,5,8-tetrahydro-1,4;5,8-diepoxyanthracene and Bis-dienes. 2: Evidence for thermal dehydration occurring in the cure process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Olshavsky, Michael A.; Meador, Michael A.; Ahn, Myong-Ku

    1988-01-01

    Diels-Alder cycloaddition copolymers from 1,4,5,8-tetrahydro-1,4;5,8-diepoxyanthracene and anthracene end-capped polyimide oligomers appear, by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), to undergo dehydration at elevated temperatures. This would produce thermally stable pentiptycene units along the polymer backbone, and render the polymers incapable of unzipping through a retro-Diels-Alder pathway. High resolution solid 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of one formulation of the polymer system before and after heating at elevated temperatures, shows this to indeed be the case. NMR spectra of solid samples of the polymer before and after heating correlated well with those of the parent pentiptycene model compound before and after acid-catalyzed dehydration. Isothermal gravimetric analyses and viscosities of the polymer before and after heat treatment support dehydration as a mechanism for the cure reaction.

  19. Process for curing bismaleimide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, John A. (Inventor); OTHY S.imides alone. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to vinyl pyridine group containing compounds and oligomers, their advantageous copolymerization with bismaleimide resins, and the formation of reinforced composites based on these copolymers. When vinyl pyridines including vinyl stilbazole materials and vinyl styrylpyridine oligomer materials are admixed with bismaleimides and cured to form copolymers the cure temperatures of the copolymers are substantially below the cure temperatures of the bismaleimides alone.

  20. Characterization of curing behavior of UV-curable LSR for LED embedded injection mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tae, Joon-Sung; Yim, Kyung-Gyu; Rhee, Byung-Ohk; Kwak, Jae B.

    2016-11-01

    For many applications, liquid silicone rubber (LSR) injection molding is widely used for their great design flexibility and high productivity. In particular, a sealing part for a mobile device such as smartphone and watch has been produced by injection molding. While thermally curable LSR causes deformation problem due to a high mold temperature, UV-curable LSR can be molded at room temperature, which has advantages for over-molding with inserts of temperature-sensitive materials. Ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV LEDs) have advantages such as a longer service life, a lower heat dissipation, and smaller size to equip into the mold than conventional halogen or mercury UV lamps. In this work, rheological behavior of UV-curable LSR during curing process was analyzed by UV LEDs available in the market. UV-LEDs of various wave lengths and intensities were tested. The steady shear test was applied to find the starting time of curing and the SAOS was applied to find the ending time of curing to estimate processing time. In addition, the hardness change with irradiation energy was compared with the rheological data to confirm the reliability of the rheological test.

  1. FTIR Monitoring Of Curing Of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druy, Mark A.; Stevenson, William A.; Young, Philip R.

    1990-01-01

    Infrared-sensing optical fiber system developed to monitor principal infrared absorption bands resulting from vibrations of atoms and molecules as chemical bonds form when resin cured. System monitors resin chemistry more directly. Used to obtain Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum from graphite fiber/polyimide matrix resin prepreg. Embedded fiber optic FTIR sensor used to indicate state of cure of thermosetting composite material. Developed primarily to improve quality of advanced composites, many additional potential applications exist because principal of operation applicable to all organic materials and most inorganic gases. Includes monitoring integrities of composite materials in service, remote sensing of hazardous materials, and examination of processes in industrial reactors and furnaces.

  2. Urethane/Silicone Adhesives for Bonding Flexing Metal Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Paul D.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesives that are blends of commercially available urethane and silicone adhesives have been found to be useful for bonding metal parts that flex somewhat during use. These urethane/silicone adhesives are formulated for the specific metal parts to be bonded. The bonds formed by these adhesives have peel and shear strengths greater than those of bonds formed by double-sided tapes and by other adhesives, including epoxies and neat silicones. In addition, unlike the bonds formed by epoxies, the bonds formed by these adhesives retain flexibility. In the initial application for which the urethane/silicone adhesives were devised, there was a need to bond spring rings, which provide longitudinal rigidity for inflatable satellite booms, with the blades that provide the booms axial strength. The problem was to make the bonds withstand the stresses, associated with differences in curvature between the bonded parts, that arose when the booms were deflated and the springs were compressed. In experiments using single adhesives (that is, not the urethane/ silicone blends), the bonds were broken and, in each experiment, it was found that the adhesive bonded well with either the ring or with the blade, but not both. After numerous experiments, the adhesive that bonded best with the rings and the adhesive that bonded best with the blades were identified. These adhesives were then blended and, as expected, the blend bonded well with both the rings and the blades. The two adhesives are Kalex (or equivalent) high-shear-strength urethane and Dow Corning 732 (or equivalent) silicone. The nominal mixture ratio is 5 volume parts of the urethane per 1 volume part of the silicone. Increasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond weaker but more flexible, and decreasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond stronger but more brittle. The urethane/silicone blend must be prepared and used quickly because of the limited working time of the urethane: The precursor of the urethane

  3. Infrared curing simulations of liquid composites molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakouzi, S.; Pancrace, J.; Schmidt, F. M.; Le Maoult, Y.; Berthet, F.

    2011-05-01

    Infrared radiation is an effective energy source to cure thermosetting polymers. Its usage is expected to reduce curing time in comparison with thermal heating and mold thermally regulated. In addition, because of the polymerization mechanism and instant on-off control of this power, an improvement in the final properties of the material is also expected. In this paper, we studied the infrared interaction with carbon (or glass) fibers reinforced epoxy matrix, where Liquid resin infusion (LRI) is used to manufacture the composite. Temperature of the composite is a key parameter that affects its mechanical properties and is controlled by the infrared emitters and the exothermic heat released from the polymerization. Radiative heat flux is computed using the in-lab developed software RAYHEAT. Then, the heat flux (or absorbed energy for glass fibers) is exported to the finite element based program COMSOLMULTIPHYSICS where heat balance equation is solved. This equation is coupled with the exothermic heat released during the curing process in order to predict the composite temperature versus time and degree of cure. Numerical simulations will be performed on planar parts (sheet shape) as well as curvilinear shapes. Experimental validations of the infrared curing carbon (glass)-epoxy composite system are presented in this paper Sheet surface temperature distribution are measured thanks to infrared camera. Kinetic parameters were estimated from differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experimental data.

  4. Infrared curing simulations of liquid composites molding

    SciTech Connect

    Nakouzi, S.; Pancrace, J.; Schmidt, F. M.; Le Maoult, Y.; Berthet, F.

    2011-05-04

    Infrared radiation is an effective energy source to cure thermosetting polymers. Its usage is expected to reduce curing time in comparison with thermal heating and mold thermally regulated. In addition, because of the polymerization mechanism and instant on-off control of this power, an improvement in the final properties of the material is also expected. In this paper, we studied the infrared interaction with carbon (or glass) fibers reinforced epoxy matrix, where Liquid resin infusion (LRI) is used to manufacture the composite. Temperature of the composite is a key parameter that affects its mechanical properties and is controlled by the infrared emitters and the exothermic heat released from the polymerization. Radiative heat flux is computed using the in-lab developed software RAYHEAT. Then, the heat flux (or absorbed energy for glass fibers) is exported to the finite element based program COMSOLMULTIPHYSICS where heat balance equation is solved. This equation is coupled with the exothermic heat released during the curing process in order to predict the composite temperature versus time and degree of cure. Numerical simulations will be performed on planar parts (sheet shape) as well as curvilinear shapes. Experimental validations of the infrared curing carbon (glass)-epoxy composite system are presented in this paper Sheet surface temperature distribution are measured thanks to infrared camera. Kinetic parameters were estimated from differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experimental data.

  5. Additive manufacturing of polymer-derived ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckel, Zak C.; Zhou, Chaoyin; Martin, John H.; Jacobsen, Alan J.; Carter, William B.; Schaedler, Tobias A.

    2016-01-01

    The extremely high melting point of many ceramics adds challenges to additive manufacturing as compared with metals and polymers. Because ceramics cannot be cast or machined easily, three-dimensional (3D) printing enables a big leap in geometrical flexibility. We report preceramic monomers that are cured with ultraviolet light in a stereolithography 3D printer or through a patterned mask, forming 3D polymer structures that can have complex shape and cellular architecture. These polymer structures can be pyrolyzed to a ceramic with uniform shrinkage and virtually no porosity. Silicon oxycarbide microlattice and honeycomb cellular materials fabricated with this approach exhibit higher strength than ceramic foams of similar density. Additive manufacturing of such materials is of interest for propulsion components, thermal protection systems, porous burners, microelectromechanical systems, and electronic device packaging.

  6. Additive manufacturing of polymer-derived ceramics.

    PubMed

    Eckel, Zak C; Zhou, Chaoyin; Martin, John H; Jacobsen, Alan J; Carter, William B; Schaedler, Tobias A

    2016-01-01

    The extremely high melting point of many ceramics adds challenges to additive manufacturing as compared with metals and polymers. Because ceramics cannot be cast or machined easily, three-dimensional (3D) printing enables a big leap in geometrical flexibility. We report preceramic monomers that are cured with ultraviolet light in a stereolithography 3D printer or through a patterned mask, forming 3D polymer structures that can have complex shape and cellular architecture. These polymer structures can be pyrolyzed to a ceramic with uniform shrinkage and virtually no porosity. Silicon oxycarbide microlattice and honeycomb cellular materials fabricated with this approach exhibit higher strength than ceramic foams of similar density. Additive manufacturing of such materials is of interest for propulsion components, thermal protection systems, porous burners, microelectromechanical systems, and electronic device packaging.

  7. Why cure, why now?

    PubMed Central

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R

    2017-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is highly effective at preventing morbidity and mortality due to infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), but does not eradicate the virus. Consequently, cART must be administered life-long. Recent progress has stimulated research towards a cure of HIV infection. Approaches under investigation include hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, latency reactivating agents, immune based therapies, and cell-based therapies. Each of these approaches carries potential risks that must be weighed against the availability of safe and effective cART. Balancing the risks and benefits of this research poses unique challenges to potential study participants, clinicians and investigators. PMID:27273887

  8. The Lourdes Medical Cures Revisited†

    PubMed Central

    François, Bernard; Sternberg, Esther M.; Fee, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the cures recorded in Lourdes, France, between 1858, the year of the Visions, and 1976, the date of the last certified cure of the twentieth century. Initially, the records of cures were crude or nonexistent, and allegations of cures were accepted without question. A Medical Bureau was established in 1883 to examine and certify the cures, and the medical methodology improved steadily in the subsequent years. We discuss the clinical criteria of the cures and the reliability of medical records. Some 1,200 cures were said to have been observed between 1858 and 1889, and about one hundred more each year during the “Golden Age” of Lourdes, 1890–1914. We studied 411 patients cured in 1909–14 and thoroughly reviewed the twenty-five cures acknowledged between 1947 and 1976. No cure has been certified from 1976 through 2006. The Lourdes phenomenon, extraordinary in many respects, still awaits scientific explanation. Lourdes concerns science as well as religion. PMID:22843835

  9. Effect of Curing Profile on Kaolin-based Geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heah, C. Y.; Kamarudin, H.; Bakri, A. M. Mustafa Al; Binhussain, M.; Luqman, M.; Nizar, I. Khairul; Ruzaidi, C. M.; Liew, Y. M.

    Depending on the processing conditions, geopolymers can exhibit a wide variety of properties and characteristics. Curing profile serves as a crucial parameter in synthesis of geopolymers. In this paper, the influence of curing temperature and curing time on the properties of kaolin-based geopolymer was studied. The samples were separated into several curing conditions; including curing at ambient temperature, 40 °C, 60 °C, 80 °C and 100 °C for 1 day, and up to 3 days. The compressive strength and SEM analysis of geopolymer products were evaluated. Results showed that curing condition has a significant effect on the mechanical properties of kaolin-based geopolymer. Generally, curing at ambient temperature was not feasible, while increase in temperature favored the strength development. In addition, prolonged curing time improved the geopolymerization process, and led to higher strength gain. However, curing at high temperature for a long period of time caused failure of the sample at a later age.

  10. Effectiveness of Membrane-Forming Curing Compounds for Curing Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    Type I portland cement designated WES-48, C-I and a graded silica sand from Ottawa, IL, C-109, was used in preparing the mortar for testing. The test...report for the portland cement is shown in Table 1. Membrane-Forming Curing Compounds 6. Nine curing compounds obtained from four manufacturers were...evaluating the effectiveness of cure of portland - cement mortar were investigated that included: water absorptivity at different depths, capillary porosity

  11. Comparative static curing versus dynamic curing on tablet coating structures.

    PubMed

    Gendre, Claire; Genty, Muriel; Fayard, Barbara; Tfayli, Ali; Boiret, Mathieu; Lecoq, Olivier; Baron, Michel; Chaminade, Pierre; Péan, Jean Manuel

    2013-09-10

    Curing is generally required to stabilize film coating from aqueous polymer dispersion. This post-coating drying step is traditionally carried out in static conditions, requiring the transfer of solid dosage forms to an oven. But, curing operation performed directly inside the coating equipment stands for an attractive industrial application. Recently, the use of various advanced physico-chemical characterization techniques i.e., X-ray micro-computed tomography, vibrational spectroscopies (near infrared and Raman) and X-ray microdiffraction, allowed new insights into the film-coating structures of dynamically cured tablets. Dynamic curing end-point was efficiently determined after 4h. The aim of the present work was to elucidate the influence of curing conditions on film-coating structures. Results demonstrated that 24h of static curing and 4h of dynamic curing, both performed at 60°C and ambient relative humidity, led to similar coating layers in terms of drug release properties, porosity, water content, structural rearrangement of polymer chains and crystalline distribution. Furthermore, X-ray microdiffraction measurements pointed out different crystalline coating compositions depending on sample storage time. An aging mechanism might have occur during storage, resulting in the crystallization and the upward migration of cetyl alcohol, coupled to the downward migration of crystalline sodium lauryl sulfate within the coating layer. Interestingly, this new study clearly provided further knowledge into film-coating structures after a curing step and confirmed that curing operation could be performed in dynamic conditions.

  12. Curing mechanism of flexible aqueous polymeric coatings.

    PubMed

    Irfan, Muhammad; Ahmed, Abid Riaz; Dashevskiy, Andriy; Kolter, Karl; Bodmeier, Roland

    2017-02-25

    The objective of this study was to explain curing phenomena for pellets coated with a flexible polymeric coating based on poly(vinyl acetate) (Kollicoat(®) SR 30D) with regard to the effect of starter cores, thickness of drug layer, adhesion of coating to drug-layered-cores as well as coating properties. In addition, appropriate approaches to eliminate the curing effect were identified. Sugar or MCC cores were layered with the model drugs carbamazepine, theophylline, propranolol HCl, tramadol HCl and metoprolol HCl using HPMC (5 or 25% w/w, based on drug) as a binder. Drug-layered pellets were coated with Kollicoat(®) SR 30D in a fluidized bed coater using TEC (10% w/w) as plasticizer and talc (35-100% w/w) as anti-tacking agent. Drug release, pellet properties (morphology, water uptake-weight loss and osmolality) and adhesion of the coating to the drug layer were investigated as a function of curing at 60 °C or 60 °C/75% RH for 24 h. The film formation of the aqueous dispersion of Kollicoat(®) SR 30D was complete, and therefore, a strong curing effect (decrease in drug release) at elevated temperature and humidity (60 °C/75% RH) could not be explained by the well-known hydroplasticization and the further gradual coalescence of the colloidal polymer particles. According to the provided mechanistic explanation, the observed curing effect was associated with 1) high flexibility of coating, 2) adhesion between coating and drug layer, 3) water retaining properties of the drug layer, and 4) osmotically active cores. Unwanted curing effects could be minimized/eliminated by the addition of talc or/and pore-forming water soluble polymers in the coating, increasing binder amount or applying an intermediate coating, by increasing the thickness of drug layer or using non-osmotic cores. A new insight into curing phenomena mainly associated with the adhesion between drug layer and coating was provided. Appropriate approaches to avoid unwanted curing effect were identified.

  13. Modeling HIV Cure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelson, Alan; Conway, Jessica; Cao, Youfang

    A large effort is being made to find a means to cure HIV infection. I will present a dynamical model of post-treatment control (PTC) or ``functional cure'' of HIV-infection. Some patients treated with suppressive antiviral therapy have been taken off of therapy and then spontaneously control HIV infection such that the amount of virus in the circulation is maintained undetectable by clinical assays for years. The model explains PTC occurring in some patients by having a parameter regime in which the model exhibits bistability, with both a low and high steady state viral load being stable. The model makes a number of predictions about how to attain the low PTC steady state. Bistability in this model depends upon the immune response becoming exhausted when over stimulated. I will also present a generalization of the model in which immunotherapy can be used to reverse immune exhaustion and compare model predictions with experiments in SIV infected macaques given immunotherapy and then taken off of antiretroviral therapy. Lastly, if time permits, I will discuss one of the hurdles to true HIV eradication, latently infected cells, and present clinical trial data and a new model addressing pharmacological means of flushing out the latent reservoir. Supported by NIH Grants AI028433 and OD011095.

  14. [Towards the definition of cure].

    PubMed

    Touzet, Patrick

    Is the term cure adapted to psychiatry? Firstly, it is important to establish what this status represents. What is immediately clear is that the term cure cannot be addressed in isolation. Considering the term leads us to question notions such as those of disease and the norm, without forgetting the actual purpose of care. Cure can then be envisaged more as a 'possible' for caregivers.

  15. Silicone metalization

    SciTech Connect

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  16. Silicone metalization

    SciTech Connect

    Maghribi, Mariam N.; Krulevitch, Peter; Hamilton, Julie

    2006-12-05

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  17. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Ladder Assembly Sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Ratzmann, Paul; /Fermilab

    1994-08-17

    This is an abridged version of the assembly sequence described by the DO assembly subgroup of Cooper, Hrycyk, Kowalski, Rapidis, and Ratzmann. This primarily is used to indicate major steps during the sequence and to list fixturing requirements. Assembly - (1) Place support rails in (1) 3 Chip Ladder Construction fixture. The two rails get held under vacuum. (2) Apply adhesive to the region where contact will be made with the beryllium substrates. (3) Place underside beryllium pieces (active and dummy ends) into the (1) 3 Chip Ladder Construction fixture. These pieces get placed in the fixture against the appropriate pins to mimic final positioning in the bulkhead. Apply vacuum to the beryllium pieces. Allow to cure? (4) Align silicon in (1) 3 Chip Ladder Construction fixture. Reference features on the fixture will be parameterized. Holes in the fixture near the silicon center line will be targeted to set the silicon axis relative to the beryllium slot edge. Z positioning of the detectors will be achieved by shimming between the detectors and butting up the end of the silicon against the fixture. (5) Remove silicon detectors and apply adhesive to the rails and upper surfaces of the beryllium. (6) Replace silicon and check final position of the detectors. (7) Release vacuum on the rails so they cure in a stress-free state. Allow adhesive to cure. (8) Apply adhesive and align HDI to the silicon using (2) 3 Chip HDI Gluing fixture. The HDI will have tabs which are held by the fixture for location relative to the detectors. Allow adhesive to cure. (9) Move ladder to (3) 3 Chip Wirebonding Fixture. Transfer fixture to the wirebonder and bond chip-silicon and silicon-silicon.

  18. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1984-08-07

    Polybismaleimides prepared by delayed curing of bis-imides having the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the --(CH.sub.2).sub.n -- group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine.

  19. Silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  20. Method of making silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  1. Ambient curing fire resistant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamermesh, C. L.; Hogenson, P. A.; Tung, C. Y.; Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of development of an ambient curing foam is described. The thermal stability and flame spread index of the foams were found to be comparable to those of the high-temperature cured polyimide foams by Monsanto two-foot tunnel test and NASA T-3 Fire test. Adaptation of the material to spray in place applications is described

  2. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of "standard" polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  3. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of "standard" polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  4. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.

    1993-11-09

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of standard polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  5. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.

    1995-03-07

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of ``standard`` polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  6. 3D silicone rubber interfaces for individually tailored implants.

    PubMed

    Stieghorst, Jan; Bondarenkova, Alexandra; Burblies, Niklas; Behrens, Peter; Doll, Theodor

    2015-01-01

    For the fabrication of customized silicone rubber based implants, e.g. cochlear implants or electrocortical grid arrays, it is required to develop high speed curing systems, which vulcanize the silicone rubber before it runs due to a heating related viscosity drop. Therefore, we present an infrared radiation based cross-linking approach for the 3D-printing of silicone rubber bulk and carbon nanotube based silicone rubber electrode materials. Composite materials were cured in less than 120 s and material interfaces were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, curing related changes in the mechanical and cell-biological behaviour were investigated with tensile and WST-1 cell biocompatibility tests. The infrared absorption properties of the silicone rubber materials were analysed with fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in transmission and attenuated total reflection mode. The heat flux was calculated by using the FTIR data, emissivity data from the infrared source manufacturer and the geometrical view factor of the system.

  7. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1996-01-01

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  8. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1998-06-02

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  9. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, A.M.

    1996-01-30

    A method is disclosed for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors. 10 figs.

  10. Silicon on insulator with active buried regions

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1998-06-02

    A method for forming patterned buried components, such as collectors, sources and drains, in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) devices. The method is carried out by epitaxially growing a suitable sequence of single or multiple etch stop layers ending with a thin silicon layer on a silicon substrate, masking the silicon such that the desired pattern is exposed, introducing dopant and activating in the thin silicon layer to form doped regions. Then, bonding the silicon layer to an insulator substrate, and removing the silicon substrate. The method additionally involves forming electrical contact regions in the thin silicon layer for the buried collectors.

  11. The 1200 C cyclic oxidation behavior of two nickel-aluminum alloys (Ni3AL and NiAl) with additions of chromium, silicon, and titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Santoro, G. J.

    1972-01-01

    The alloys Ni3Al and NiAl with and without 1 and 3 atomic percent chromium, silicon, and titanium replacing the aluminum were cyclically oxidized at 1200 C for times to 200 hours, and the results were compared with those obtained with the alloy B-1900 subjected to the same oxidation process. The evaluation was based on metal recession, specific weight change, metallography, electron microprobe analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The oxidation resistance of Ni3Al was improved by Si, unaffected by Ti, and degraded by Cr. The oxidation resistance of NiAl was slightly improved by Ti, unaffected by Si, and degraded by Cr. The oxidation resistance of Ni3Al with 1 atomic percent Si was nearly equal to that of NiAl. Alloy B-1900 exhibited oxidation resistance comparable to that of Ni3Al + Cr compositions.

  12. Enhanced fluorescence, morphological and thermal properties of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots incorporated in silicone resin.

    PubMed

    Trung, Nguyen Ngoc; Luu, Quynh-Phuong; Son, Bui Thanh; Sinh, Le Hoang; Bae, Jin-Young

    2013-01-01

    Our research focused on the morphological and optical properties of core/shell cadmium selenide/zinc sulfide (CdSe/ZnS) quantum dots incorporated in silicone resin. After dispersing ligand-coated quantum dots into Dow Corning two-component silicone resins (OE6630A and OE6630B at 1:4 mixing ratio by weight), the resins were cured at 150 degrees C for 1.5 hours to produce the quantum dot-silicone resin nanocomposites. The optical, morphological and thermal properties of the quantum dot incorporated in silicone resin were investigated by ultraviolet-visible, fluorescence, atomic force microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. When the quantum dots, originally coated with trioctylamine ligand, were transferred from a chloroform solvent to methyl phenyl silicone oil and silicone resins of high viscosity, the quantum dots showed increased turbidity and lowered fluorescence intensity. Fluorescence enhancement was investigated by using various functional ligands such as poly(1, 1-dimethyl silazane) (multi-silazane), hexamethylenediamine (diamine), cysteamine (amino-thiol), triethylsilane (reactive hydrosilane), hexamethyldisilazane, nonamethyltrisilazane, octamethylcyclotetrasilazane (reactive amines). The results showed that the reactive amines were good additive ligands for enhancing the fluorescence of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots dispersed in the silicone resins, providing 1.2-2.48 Im/W and 4.2-5.56% higher luminous efficiency and photoluminescence conversion efficiency, respectively. We speculate that these reactive amines donate electrons to the surface electron traps, thereby reducing charge recombination. In addition, quantum dots aggregate to form quantum dot clusters with a relatively homogeneously dispersed in the silicone resin matrices, showing good emission properties due to surface passivation and good colloidal stability with the addition of silazane compounds to the resin

  13. Compounding with Silicones.

    PubMed

    Allen, Loyd V

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1940s, methylchlorosilanes have been used to treat glassware to prevent blood from clotting. The use of silicones in pharmaceutical and medical applications has grown to where today they are used in many life-saving devices (pacemakers, hydrocephalic shunts) and pharmaceutical applications from tubing, to excipients in topical formulations, to adhesives to affix transdermal drug delivery systems, and are also being used in products as active pharmaceutical ingredients, such as antiflatulents. About 60% of today's skin-care products now contain some type of silicone where they are considered safe and are known to provide a pleasant "silky-touch," non-greasy, and non-staining feel. Silicones exhibit many useful characteristics, and the safety of these agents supports their numerous applications; their biocompatibility is partially due to their low-chemical reactivity displayed by silicones, low-surface energy, and their hydrophobicity. Silicones are used both as active ingredients and as excipients. In addition is their use for "siliconization," or surface treatment, of many parenteral packaging components. Dimethicone and silicone oil are used as lubricants on stoppers to aid machineability, in syringes to aid piston movement, or on syringe needles to reduce pain upon injection. Silicones are also useful in pharmaceutical compounding as is discussed in this artiele included with this article are in developing formulations with silicones.

  14. Help us find the cures.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Delyth

    2013-01-01

    Despite significant advances in research, breast cancer is still the most common form of cancer, with 50,000 cases diagnosed and 12,000 dying of the disease each year in the UK. In October 2013, Breast Cancer Campaign published a Gap Analysis of breast cancer research that provides us with what we need to know about and what we now need to do to overcome - prevent, cure and outlive - breast cancer. In addition to highlighting the gaps in our understanding of breast cancer, the paper identifies five strategic solutions, which require a collaborative approach amongst researchers in academia and industry, funders, donors, policy-makers and parliamentarians, healthcare professionals and patients to achieve significant progress. Breast Cancer Campaign is calling for funding organizations to reverse the decline in resources targeted towards breast cancer research, an improved and collaborative infrastructure to support breast cancer research, multidisciplinary collaboration and improved clinical trial design. We hope that breast cancer can be overcome by 2050, but this can only be achieved through collaboration with others. The actions that will make a difference have been identified and we must act now.

  15. Bond Sensitivity to Silicone Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, G. A.; Hudson, W. D.; Hudson, W. D.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Currently during fabrication of the Space Shuttle booster rocket motors, the use of silicone and silicone-containing products is prohibited in most applications. Many shop aids and other materials containing silicone have the potential, if they make contact with a bond surface, to transfer some of the silicone to the substrates being bonded. Such transfer could result in a reduction of the bond strength or even failure of the subsequent bonds. This concern is driving the need to understand the effect of silicones and the concentration needed to affect a given bond-line strength. Additionally, as silicone detection methods used for materials acceptance improve what may have gone unnoticed earlier is now being detected. Thus, realistic silicone limits for process materials (below which bond performance is satisfactory) are needed rather than having an absolute no silicone permitted policy.

  16. Diamine curing agents for polyurethanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, V. L.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Three aromatic diamines have properties that make them promising candidates as curing agents for converting isocyanates to polyurethanes with higher adhesive strengths, higher softening temperatures, better toughness, and improved abrasion resistance.

  17. Silicon-Containing Moieties as Enhancers of Segment and Junction Flexibility in High-Temperature Thermosetting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-11

    All samples were melted, blended, and de-gassed for 30 min. prior to cure in silicone molds under N2, cure schedule for 1 hr at 150 °C followed...Containing Cyanate Esters: Non-isothermal DSC 12 114 kJ/mol Post- cure Tg: 305 °C BADCy 95 kJ/mol Incomplete Cure 117 kJ/mol Post- cure Tg: 250°C...STT3 do not achieve full conversion even when cured at high temperatures, in accord with the shape of the non-isothermal DSC curves STT3

  18. Correlation of cure monitoring techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S. S.; Mopsik, F. I.; Hunston, D. L.

    Six different composite matrix or neat resin cure-monitoring methods are presently used to follow the cure process in a model epoxy system, and the results obtained are compared. Differential scanning calorimetry, viscosity monitoring, the ultrasonic shear wave propagation technique, dielectric spectrometry, and two different fluorescence intensity techniques are compared with a view to common traits and differences. Dielectric fluorescence and ultrasonic measurement techniques are noted to be applicable to on-line process monitoring.

  19. Dimensional changes in stone models simulating full crown preparations with adjacent teeth resulting from long-term immersion of medium-viscosity addition-type silicone rubber impressions in disinfectant solutions.

    PubMed

    Hiraguchi, Hisako; Iwasaki, Yukiko; Iwasaki, Eriko; Kikuchi, Hisaji; Hirose, Hideharu; Yoneyama, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    If impression materials could be immersed in disinfectant solutions for a longer period, then this form of disinfection would be easier to incorporate into dental preparation procedures. This study investigated the dimensional changes in stone models resulting from immersion of medium-viscosity hydrophilic addition-type silicone rubber impression material in disinfectant solutions for 30 min and 24 h. Impressions of a master die designed to simulate a full crown preparation with adjacent teeth were immersed in 2% glutaraldehyde and 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde solutions. The dimensional changes in the mesiodistal and buccolingual dimensions in the stone models were then measured using a three-dimensional coordinate system. It was found that the dimensional changes in the stone models caused by immersion of the impression materials were less than 15 μm. Immersion in 2% glutaraldehyde or 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde for 24 h was as clinically acceptable for medium-viscosity hydrophilic addition-type silicone rubber impressions as immersion for 30 min.

  20. Plasmid curing of Oenococcus oeni.

    PubMed

    Mesas, Juan M; Rodríguez, M Carmen; Alegre, M Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Two strains of Oenococcus oeni, RS1 (which carries the plasmid pRS1) and RS2 (which carries the plasmids pRS2 and pRS3), were grown in the presence of different curing agents and at different temperatures. Sublethal temperature together with acriflavine generated all possible types of cured strains, i.e., lacking pRS1 (from strain RS1), and lacking pRS2, pRS3, or both (from strain RS2). Sublethal temperature together with acridine orange only generated cured strains lacking pRS3. These results suggest that acriflavine is a better curing agent than acridine orange for O. oeni, and that pRS3 is the most sensitive to these curing agents. We also observed spontaneous loss of pRS2 or both pRS2 and pRS3 by electroporation. The ability to cure O. oeni strains of plasmids provides a critical new tool for the genetic analysis and engineering of this commercially important bacterium.

  1. Variable frequency microwave (VFM) curing, processing of thermoset prepreg laminates. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Paulauskas, F.L.

    1996-09-30

    The objective of this work was to investigate the beneficial effect of the variable frequency microwave (VFM) technology to cure thermosetting prepreg laminates. Further, it was to investigate the interrelationship and effect on the curing process of frequency, band width, and curing time with different types of laminates. Previous studies of microwave-assisted curing of neat resins (epoxy) and unidirectional glass and carbon fiber laminates with a fixed frequency of 2.45 GHz, have shown that a substantial reduction in the curing time was obtained. Results of this earlier work indicate that the microwave-assisted curing of multidirectional glass fiber laminates also show a substantial reduction of the required curing time. This may be explained by the penetration of microwave energy directly and throughout the laminate with enhancement of the kinetics of the chemical reaction. The fixed frequency microwave radiation of 2.45 GHz has been demonstrated to be a partially acceptable method to cure unidirectional carbon fiber laminates. Multidirectional carbon fiber/epoxy laminates demonstrate a lack of coupling during the curing process. A direct curing of these laminates was not possible by microwave radiation with the experimental approach used in agreement with previous work. In addition to this short coming, the unidirectional laminate samples cured with the fixed frequency are visually nonuniform. Localized areas of darker colors (burn, hot spots, overheating) are attributed to the formation of standing waves within the microwave cavity. For this reason, the laminates are subject to proper rotation while curing through fixed frequency. The present research indicates that variable frequency microwave technology is a sound and acceptable processing method to effectively cure uni-, bi- or multi-directional thermosetting glass fiber laminates. Also, this methodology will effectively cure unidirectional thermosetting carbon fiber laminates. For all these cases, this

  2. Curing Behavior and Viscoelasticity of Dual-Curable Adhesives Based on High-Reactivity Azo Initiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Gyu; Shim, Gyu-Seong; Park, Ji-Won; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Moon, Sang-Eun; Kim, Young-Kwan; No, Dong-Hun; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Han, Kwan-Young

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the curing behavior of dual-curable acrylic resin to solve problems associated with curing of adhesives in shaded areas during display manufacture. A low-temperature curing-type thermal initiator, 2,2'-azobis (4-methoxy-2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile), with a 30°C half-life decomposition temperature was used in the investigation. Dual-curable adhesives were prepared according to the thermal initiator content and ultraviolet (UV) radiation dose. The effects of thermal initiator and UV irradiation on the curing behavior and viscoelasticity were investigated. Using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and gel-fraction analysis, an evaluation was carried out to determine the degree of curing after dual UV/thermal curing. In addition, the real-time curing behavior was evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and a UV/advanced rheometric expansion system. A lift-off test was carried out to verify the effects of dual curing on adhesion performance. Application of UV irradiation before thermal curing suppressed the thermal curing efficiency. Also, the network structure formed after dual curing with low UV dose showed higher crosslinking density. Therefore, the thermal initiator radical effectively influenced uncured areas with low curing temperature and initiator content without causing problems in UV-curable zones.

  3. Rat subchronic inhalation study of smoke from cigarettes containing flue-cured tobacco cured either by direct-fired or heat-exchanger curing processes.

    PubMed

    Kinsler, Steven; Pence, Deborah H; Shreve, W Keith; Mosberg, Arnold T; Ayres, Paul H; Sagartz, John W

    2003-07-01

    A subchronic, nose-only inhalation study compared the effects of mainstream smoke from a cigarette containing 100% flue-cured tobacco cured by a direct-fired process to that of a cigarette containing 100% flue-cured tobacco cured by a heat exchanger process. The tobaccos and mainstream smoke from tobaccos cured by the heat exchanger process have been shown to have significantly lower levels of tobacco-specific nitrosamines than tobaccos cured by a direct-fired process. Male and female rats were exposed for 1 h/day, 5 days/wk, for 13 wk to mainstream smoke at 0, 0.06, 0.20, or 0.80 mg wet total particulate matter per liter of air. Clinical signs, body and organ weights, clinical chemistry, hematology, carboxyhemoglobin, serum nicotine, plethysmography, gross pathology, and histopathology were determined. When histologic changes resulting from exposure to smoke from the two types of cigarettes were compared, the only significant difference was increased epithelial hyperplasia of the anterior nasal cavity in males in the high-exposure group for the heat-exchanger cigarette. At the end of the exposure period, subsets of rats from each group were maintained without smoke exposures for an additional 13 wk (recovery period). At the end of the recovery period, there were no statistically significant differences in histopathological findings observed between the heat-exchanger-cured tobacco cigarette when compared to the direct-fired cured tobacco cigarette. The complete toxicological assessment in this study of heat exchanger and direct-fired tobaccos suggests no overall biologically significant differences between the two cigarettes.

  4. Comprehensive study of dynamic curing effect on tablet coating structure.

    PubMed

    Gendre, Claire; Genty, Muriel; da Silva, Julio César; Tfayli, Ali; Boiret, Mathieu; Lecoq, Olivier; Baron, Michel; Chaminade, Pierre; Péan, Jean Manuel

    2012-08-01

    The dissolution method is still widely used to determine curing end-points to ensure long-term stability of film coatings. Nevertheless, the process of curing has not yet been fully investigated. For the first time, joint techniques were used to elucidate the mechanisms of dynamic curing over time from ethylcellulose (Aquacoat)-based coated tablets. X-ray micro-computed tomography (XμCT), Near Infrared (NIR), and Raman spectroscopies as well as X-ray microdiffraction were employed as non-destructive techniques to perform direct measurements on tablets. All techniques indicated that after a dynamic curing period of 4h, reproducible drug release can be achieved and no changes in the microstructure of the coating were any longer detected. XμCT analysis highlighted the reduced internal porosity, while both NIR and Raman measurements showed that spectral information remained unaltered after further curing. X-ray microdiffraction revealed densification of the coating layer with a decrease in the overall coating thickness of about 10 μm as a result of curing. In addition, coating heterogeneity attributed to cetyl alcohol was observed from microscopic images and Raman analysis. This observation was confirmed by X-ray microdiffraction that showed that crystalline cetyl alcohol melted and spread over the coating surface with curing. Prior to curing, X-ray microdiffraction also revealed the existence of two coating zones differing in crystalline cetyl alcohol and sodium lauryl sulfate concentrations which could be explained by migration of these constituents within the coating layer. Therefore, the use of non-destructive techniques allowed new insights into tablet coating structures and provided precise determination of the curing end-point compared to traditional dissolution testing. This thorough study may open up new possibilities for process and formulation control.

  5. Dimensional stability ofautoclave sterilised addition cured impressions and trays.

    PubMed

    Deb, S; Etemad-Shahidi, S; Millar, B J

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dimensional accuracy of impressions following sterilisation by autoclaving. Dental impressions (75) were of a dentoform containing 6 reference points. The impressions were split into 5 groups of 15, each group used a different impression technique. Groups were divided into 3 subgroups with 5 impressions as control, 5 for disinfection by Perform-ID and 5 being autoclaved. Measurements were made using a travelling light microscope. A minimal significant dimensional difference (0.010.05). The trays and materials tested were suitable for the autoclave sterilisation.

  6. A New Kind of Curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A new curing method using automated tape placement (ATP) with electron beam (EB), or e-beam, produces a combination known as in situ e-beam curing. Through a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Science Research Laboratory, Inc., created the in situ e-beam curing technique, which uses a low-energy electron beam gun to cure various composite materials. One important benefit is the technique's utilization of room temperature curing, which lessens the chance of mismatching the thermal expansion coefficients of different materials. For instance, metals and composites will expand at different rates when heated, but the low-energy e-beam gun reduces the expansion differential. Using a low-energy gun also results in less x-ray shielding, significantly reduced capital costs, reduced facility space, and increased processing capabilities for larger parts. However, using a low-energy gun also means that each tape layer is treated individually because the gun can penetrate only one layer at a time. The e-beam gun emits lower energy x-rays, which are more easily shielded than those emitted by previous guns. The low-energy system is relatively portable due to its light weight and small size. The gun weighs about 70 pounds and can be easily mounted on a robotic arm or an ATP head.

  7. A cure shrinkage model for analyzing the stresses and strains in encapsulated assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, R.S.; Lagasse, R.R.; Guess, T.R.; Plazek, D.J.; Bero, C.

    1992-12-31

    Electrical component assemblies are encapsulated to provide delicate parts with voltage isolation and protection against damage caused by shock, vibration, and harsh atmospheric environments. During cure, thermosetting resins shrink and harden simultaneously. If the natural deformation of the resin is constrained by adhesion to the mold or to relatively stiff embedded components, cure shrinkage stresses are generated in the encapsulant. Subsequent cooling or thermal cycling produces additional stresses that are caused by the mismatches in thermal strains among the materials in the encapsulated assembly. Although cure shrinkage stresses frequently are neglected because they are considerably smaller than thermal stresses, cure shrinkage stresses can cause delamination or fractures in the encapsulant, since the partially cured resin is not as tough as the fully cured material. Cracks generated during cure can compromise performance (e. g., permit dielectric breakdown), degrade a component`s protection, and grow under subsequent thermal cycling producing residual stresses that differ from those found in uncracked assemblies. 3 refs., 11 figs.

  8. A cure shrinkage model for analyzing the stresses and strains in encapsulated assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, R. S.; Lagasse, R. R.; Guess, T. R.; Plazek, D. J.; Bero, C.

    Electrical component assemblies are encapsulated to provide delicate parts with voltage isolation and protection against damage caused by shock, vibration, and harsh atmospheric environments. During cure, thermosetting resins shrink and harden simultaneously. If the natural deformation of the resin is constrained by adhesion to the mold or to relatively stiff embedded components, cure shrinkage stresses are generated in the encapsulant. Subsequent cooling or thermal cycling produces additional stresses that are caused by the mismatches in thermal strains among the materials in the encapsulated assembly. Although cure shrinkage stresses frequently are neglected because they are considerably smaller than thermal stresses, cure shrinkage stresses can cause delamination or fractures in the encapsulant, since the partially cured resin is not as tough as the fully cured material. Cracks generated during cure can compromise performance (e.g., permit dielectric breakdown), degrade a component's protection, and grow under subsequent thermal cycling producing residual stresses that differ from those found in uncracked assemblies.

  9. A cure shrinkage model for analyzing the stresses and strains in encapsulated assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, R.S.; Lagasse, R.R.; Guess, T.R. ); Plazek, D.J.; Bero, C. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    Electrical component assemblies are encapsulated to provide delicate parts with voltage isolation and protection against damage caused by shock, vibration, and harsh atmospheric environments. During cure, thermosetting resins shrink and harden simultaneously. If the natural deformation of the resin is constrained by adhesion to the mold or to relatively stiff embedded components, cure shrinkage stresses are generated in the encapsulant. Subsequent cooling or thermal cycling produces additional stresses that are caused by the mismatches in thermal strains among the materials in the encapsulated assembly. Although cure shrinkage stresses frequently are neglected because they are considerably smaller than thermal stresses, cure shrinkage stresses can cause delamination or fractures in the encapsulant, since the partially cured resin is not as tough as the fully cured material. Cracks generated during cure can compromise performance (e. g., permit dielectric breakdown), degrade a component's protection, and grow under subsequent thermal cycling producing residual stresses that differ from those found in uncracked assemblies. 3 refs., 11 figs.

  10. Direct Syn Addition of Two Silicon Atoms to a C≡C Triple Bond by Si-Si Bond Activation: Access to Reactive Disilylated Olefins.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Maha; Gaumont, Annie-Claude; Durandetti, Muriel; Maddaluno, Jacques

    2017-02-20

    A catalytic intramolecular silapalladation of alkynes affords, in good yields and stereoselectively, syn-disilylated heterocycles of different chemical structure and size. When applied to silylethers, this reaction leads to vinylic silanols that undergo a rhodium-catalyzed addition to activated olefins, providing the oxa-Heck or oxa-Michael products, depending on the reaction conditions.

  11. Dynamically cured thermoplastic olefin polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Hazelton, D.R.; Puydak, R.C.; Booth, D.A.

    1986-08-19

    A thermoplastic composition is described comprising a polyolefin resin, a first rubber component selected from the group consisting of polyisobutylene, and ethylene propylene copolymer (EPM) and EPDM and a second rubber component selected from the group consisting of halogenated butyl rubber and polychoroprene, the second rubber component being cured utilizing a curative other than a peroxide, which is a vulcanizing agent for the second rubber but not for the first rubber, the second rubber being cured to a fully vulcanized state by dynamic vulcanization in the presence of the polyolefin resin and first rubber compound.

  12. 21 CFR 172.480 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 172.480 Section 172.480 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.480 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in food in accordance with the following...

  13. Grain-boundary phases in hot-pressed silicon nitride containing Y2O3 and CeO2 additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guha, J. P.; Hench, L. L.

    1983-01-01

    Auger electron spectroscopy in conjunction with X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy is used to analyze the grain-boundary phases of Y2O3- and CeO2-doped Si3N4 hot-pressed materials in order to demonstrate that the additives concentrate predominantly in the grain boundaries of Si3N4 in the form of various oxynitride phases. A high oxygen content observed in sample fracture surfaces was found to be consistent with the existence of an oxygen-enriched phase in the grain boundaries. The presence of yttrium and cerium in the fracture surfaces and an overall increase in the O/N ratio imply that the additive oxides are predominantly concentrated in the intergranular phases.

  14. Light emission from porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penczek, John

    The continuous evolution of silicon microelectronics has produced significant gains in electronic information processing. However, greater improvements in performance are expected by utilizing optoelectronic techniques. But these techniques have been severely limited in silicon- based optoelectronics due to the lack of an efficient silicon light emitter. The recent observation of efficient light emission from porous silicon offer a promising opportunity to develop a suitable silicon light source that is compatible with silicon microelectronics. This dissertation examined the porous silicon emission mechanism via photoluminescence, and by a novel device structure for porous silicon emitters. The investigation first examined the correlation between porous silicon formation conditions (and subsequent morphology) with the resulting photoluminescence properties. The quantum confinement theory for porous silicon light emission contends that the morphology changes induced by the different formation conditions determine the optical properties of porous silicon. The photoluminescence spectral shifts measured in this study, in conjunction with TEM analysis and published morphological data, lend support to this theory. However, the photoluminescence spectral broadening was attributed to electronic wavefunction coupling between adjacent silicon nanocrystals. An novel device structure was also investigated in an effort to improve current injection into the porous silicon layer. The selective etching properties of porous silicon were used to create a p-i-n structure with crystalline silicon contacts to the porous silicon layer. The resulting device was found to have unique characteristics, with a negative differential resistance region and current-induced emission that spanned from 400 nm to 5500 nm. The negative differential resistance was correlated to resistive heating effects in the device. A numerical analysis of thermal emission spectra from silicon films, in addition to

  15. Curing properties of furfuryl alcohol condensate with carbonaceous fine particles under ultrasonication.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, K; Akatsu, T; Tanabe, Y; Yasuda, E

    2001-04-01

    Ultrasonic treatment (sonication) was carried out through the curing process of furan resin by using an ultrasonic homogenizer at the frequency of 20 kHz and the various intensities (0-90 W). Various carbonaceous fine particles were added to furan resin to investigate the change of polymerization degree. The curing rate of furan resin was accelerated by sonication, which increased the polymerization degree with an increase in ultrasound intensity. The increase of curing rate was also observed by small additions of carbonaceous fine particles. In this case, the curing rate was increased with an increase in the specific surface area on additives.

  16. Improving light-curing instruction in dental school.

    PubMed

    Federlin, Marianne; Price, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Delivering an inadequate amount of light to a light-cured resin will result in a resin that is inadequately cured. This study measured the radiant exposure that students delivered to a simulated restoration to determine if instruction with immediate feedback increased the amount of light they delivered. The amount of light (radiant exposure in J/cm(2)) delivered to a simulated restoration by sixty-three dental students using the same curing light for twenty seconds was recorded. The experiment was repeated after the students had been given detailed light-curing instructions together with immediate feedback using the MARCPS system. Initially, the students delivered between 1.4 and 17.5 J/cm(2) (mean±SD: 9.8±3.5 J/cm(2)). After receiving instructions and feedback on their light-curing technique, they delivered between 6.7 J/cm(2) and 17.8 J/cm(2) (mean±SD: 13.2±3.3 J/cm(2)). ANOVA and Fisher's post hoc multiple comparison tests showed that providing immediate feedback on the students' light-curing technique made a significant improvement in the radiant exposure they delivered (p<0.05). It was concluded that many dental students in this study were not using the curing light properly. After the students had received one session of additional instruction and immediate feedback using the MARC-PS, they delivered 35 percent more light energy to the same simulated restoration. Students who were closer to graduation showed a greater improvement in their light-curing technique (p=0.0091).

  17. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  18. Use of silicon in liquid sintered silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1984-12-11

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  19. Breather cloth for vacuum curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, M. W.

    1979-01-01

    Finely-woven nylon cloth that has been treated with Teflon improves vacuum adhesive bonding of coatings to substrates. Cloth is placed over coating; entire assembly, including substrate, coating, and cloth, is placed in plastic vacuum bag for curing. Cloth allows coating to "breathe" when bag is evacuated. Applications include bonding film coatings to solar concentrators and collectors.

  20. Cleaner Vacuum-Bag Curing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemons, J. M.; Penn, B. G.; Ledbetter, Frank E., III; Daniels, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    Improvement upon recommended procedures saves time and expense. Autoclave molding in vacuum bag cleaner if adhesive-backed covering placed around caul plate as well as on mold plate. Covering easy to remove after curing and leaves caul plate free of resin deposits.

  1. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J. Brock

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  2. Dielectric Analysis of Thermoset Cure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-07

    the polymerization of thermosetting polymers, 3. Polyst . Sci., 31, 30S (1959) 58. Warfield, R. V. * Petro*, M. C.: A study of the polymerization of...cure: isothemal curs kinetics, Ihermochimica Acta, 14. 41 (1976) 64. ludd. N. C. W.: Investigation of the polymerization of an unsaturated polyester

  3. Curing chemistry of phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers: Model compounds, carbon-13 labeling and cure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Christopher Chad

    1998-11-01

    determining the structure of the cured resin. In addition, several relationships between the final structure of the cured resin and properties were noted.

  4. Experimental design for optimizing drug release from silicone elastomer matrix and investigation of transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Snorradóttir, Bergthóra S; Gudnason, Pálmar I; Thorsteinsson, Freygardur; Másson, Már

    2011-04-18

    Silicone elastomers are commonly used for medical devices and external prosthesis. Recently, there has been growing interest in silicone-based medical devices with enhanced function that release drugs from the elastomer matrix. In the current study, an experimental design approach was used to optimize the release properties of the model drug diclofenac from medical silicone elastomer matrix, including a combination of four permeation enhancers as additives and allowing for constraints in the properties of the material. The D-optimal design included six factors and five responses describing material properties and release of the drug. The first experimental object was screening, to investigate the main and interaction effects, based on 29 experiments. All excipients had a significant effect and were therefore included in the optimization, which also allowed the possible contribution of quadratic terms to the model and was based on 38 experiments. Screening and optimization of release and material properties resulted in the production of two optimized silicone membranes, which were tested for transdermal delivery. The results confirmed the validity of the model for the optimized membranes that were used for further testing for transdermal drug delivery through heat-separated human skin. The optimization resulted in an excipient/drug/silicone composition that resulted in a cured elastomer with good tensile strength and a 4- to 7-fold transdermal delivery increase relative to elastomer that did not contain excipients.

  5. Nitrite, nitrite alternatives, and the control of Clostridium botulinum in cured meats.

    PubMed

    Pierson, M D; Smoot, L A

    1982-01-01

    Historically, nitrite has been a component of meat-curing additives for several centuries. In recent years the safety of nitrite as an additive in cured meats has been questioned mainly because of the possible formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines. Nitrite has many important functions in meat curing including its role in color development, flavor, antioxidant properties, and antimicrobial activity. The inhibition of Clostridium botulinum growth and toxin production is an especially important antimicrobial property of nitrite. This review discusses the effects of processing, curing ingredients (especially nitrite), and storage of cured meats in relation to the control of C. botulinum. If nitrite is eliminated from cured meats or the level of usage decreased, then alternatives for the antibotulinal function of nitrite need to be considered. Several potential alternatives including sorbates, parabens, and biological acidulants are discussed.

  6. Observations on the Influence of Secondary Me Oxides Additives (Me=Si,Al, Mg) on the Microstructural Evolution and Mechanical Behavior of Silicon Nitride Ceramics Containing RE2O3 (RE=La, Gd, Lu)

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, Paul F; Averill, Frank; Lin, Hua-Tay; Waters, Shirley B; Shibata, Naoya; Painter, Gayle S; van Benthem, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of β Si3N4 microstructures is influenced by the adsorption of rare earth elements at grain surfaces and by the viscosity of the intergranular phases. Theoretical and STEM studies show that the RE atoms exhibit different tendencies to segregate from the liquid phase to grain surfaces and different binding strengths at these surfaces. When combined with MgO (or Al2O3) secondary additions, the rare earth additives are combined in low viscosity intergranular phases during densification and the α to β phase transformation and microstructural evolution are dominated by the RE adsorption behavior. On the other hand, a much higher viscosity intergranular phase forms when the RE2O3 are combined with SiO2. While the rare earth adsorption behavior remains the same, the phase transformation and microstructure are now dominated by Si3N4 solubility and transport in the high liquid phase. By understanding these additive effects, one can develop reinforced microstructures leading silicon nitride ceramics with greatly improved mechanical behavior.

  7. Curing the noise epidemic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazer, Susan

    2005-09-01

    The argument is made that design does not stop when the fixed architectural and acoustical components are in place. Spaces live and breathe with the people who reside in them. Research and examples are presented that show that noise, auditory clutter, thrives on itself in hospitals. Application of the Lombard reflex studies fit into the hospital setting, but do not offer solutions as to how one might reduce the impact. In addition, the basis for looking at the noise component as a physical as well cultural dynamic will be addressed. Whether the result of the wrong conversation in the wrong place or the right conversation in an unfortunate place, talk mixed with sounds of technology is shown to cause its own symptoms. From heightened anxiety and stress to medical errors, staff burnout, or HIPAA violations, the case is made that noise is pandemic in hospitals and demands financial and operational investment. An explanation of how to reduce noise by design of the dynamic environment - equipment, technology, staff protocols is also provided.

  8. Investigation of Residual Stresses in a Hot Cured Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy Resin Composite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    to establish confidence in its use. Little work has been reported on the magnitudes of residual curing stresses and their effect on the performance...premature failure if the residual and service stresses are additive. Fbr accurate design work it is therefore essential to take residual curing stresses...used to evaluate the residual curing stresses in a liminated plate is given in Reference 2. The computer code developed in Reference 3 was used in this

  9. Effects of Silicon and Boron Additions on the Susceptibility to Quench Embrittlement and the Bending Fatigue Performance of Vacuum Carburized Modified 4320 Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer III, Harry M; Spice, Jason J; Greer, John G.; Krauss, George; Matlock, D. K.

    2007-01-01

    The potential to reduce the susceptibility to quench embrittlement, a fracture mechanism that promotes intergranular fracture in high carbon steels, and to improve the bending fatigue performance of vacuum carburized modified SAE 4320 steels was evaluated. Data were obtained on an industrially produced SAE 4320 steel and four laboratory produced steels based on the 4320 composition but with additions of Si (1.0 or 2.0 wt pct) and B (0 or 17 ppm). All five alloys were vacuum carburized together and gas quenched with three different cooling rates as controlled by the gas quench conditions: 10 bar nitrogen, and 15 and 20 bar helium. Modified Brugger fatigue samples of each alloy and quench condition were tested in cantilever bending and failed samples were analyzed with scanning electron and Auger spectroscopy. Standard S-N curves and endurance limits were obtained and the fracture surfaces were evaluated using both light and electron microscopy techniques to determine fracture initiation sites and fracture growth mechanisms, both in the stable fatigue crack growth zone and in the overload zone. The percentage of transgranular fracture in the carburized case was quantified and used as a measure of the susceptibility to quench embrittlement. The susceptibility to quench embrittlement was observed to be independent of quench rate and boron additions, but depended on Si content. With an increase in Si content, the extent of intergranular fracture decreased, indicating a decrease in the susceptibility to quench embrittlement. However, with an increase in Si content to 2 wt pct, significant grain growth occurred producing prior austenite grain sizes 2 to 3 times those observed in the base or 1 pct Si alloys. The grain growth experienced by the high Si alloys was interpreted to result from the effects the retardation of cementite nucleation and growth at austenite grain boundaries. The fatigue properties were shown to be essentially independent of cooling rate and

  10. Silicon production process evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Engineering design of the third distillation column in the process was accomplished. The initial design is based on a 94.35% recovery of dichlorosilane in the distillate and a 99.9% recovery of trichlorosilane in the bottoms. The specified separation is achieved at a reflux ratio of 15 with 20 trays (equilibrium stages). Additional specifications and results are reported including equipment size, temperatures and pressure. Specific raw material requirements necessary to produce the silicon in the process are presented. The primary raw materials include metallurgical grade silicon, silicon tetrachloride, hydrogen, copper (catalyst) and lime (waste treatment). Hydrogen chloride is produced as by product in the silicon deposition. Cost analysis of the process was initiated during this reporting period.

  11. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  12. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamines containing phenylethynyl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidi none to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  13. Accelerated Cure Project for Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... main content Accelerating research toward a cure for multiple sclerosis Home Contact Us Search form Search Connect Volunteer ... is to accelerate efforts toward a cure for multiple sclerosis by rapidly advancing research that determines its causes ...

  14. FDA Warns Against Bogus Autism 'Cures'

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_164602.html FDA Warns Against Bogus Autism 'Cures' Unproven therapies won't help and could ... Don't fall for products claiming to cure autism, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. There's ...

  15. Monitoring Polymer Curing Via Electromagnetic Impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, William T.; Covington, John C.; Kranbuehl, David E.; Hoff, Melanie; Delos, Susan

    1992-01-01

    New nondestructive in-situ electromagnetic-impedance measurement technique senses cure-processing properties of high-temperature, high-performance thermostat and thermoplastic resins. Continuous frequency-dependent measurement and analysis performed during curing cycle. Monitors and measures molecular properties of polymeric resin in liquid and solid states. Applications include nondestructive means for evaluation of materials, determination of "window" boundaries of curing cycles of thermoplastics and thermoset resins, and for online, closed-loop control of curing cycles.

  16. 7 CFR 51.1412 - Well cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Well cured. 51.1412 Section 51.1412 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Well cured. Well cured means that the kernel separates freely from the shell, breaks cleanly when...

  17. 7 CFR 51.1412 - Well cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Well cured. 51.1412 Section 51.1412 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Pecans in the Shell 1 Definitions § 51.1412 Well cured. Well cured means that...

  18. 7 CFR 51.1412 - Well cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Well cured. 51.1412 Section 51.1412 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Well cured. Well cured means that the kernel separates freely from the shell, breaks cleanly when...

  19. 7 CFR 51.1412 - Well cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Well cured. 51.1412 Section 51.1412 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Grades of Pecans in the Shell 1 Definitions § 51.1412 Well cured. Well cured means that...

  20. Composite Curing Process Nondestructive Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    selected cure cycles, and conservative methods have been adopted to offset potentially degrading conditions. This approach invariably increases...fluoresce in ordinary solvents will, however, fluoresce strongly in viscous media such as glycerol at low temperatures. A number of studies on the...viscosity solvents is due to fasL nonradiative deactivation (relaxation) of the excited state by intramolecular torsional motions. When such torsional

  1. Hybrid Helmet Cure Cycle Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Distribution List 11 iv List of Figures Figure 1. DSC scans of cured and uncured carbon fiber-epoxy prepreg ...thermoplastic fabrics, molded with thermoset prepregs was designed at ARL. Proposed manufacturing of the helmet involved pressure molding a number...of plies of aramid fabric with a thermoplastic film, and two plies of carbon fiber-epoxy prepreg , BT250-E (Bryte Technologies, Inc.) that would add

  2. Characterization-curing-property studies of HBRF 55A resin formulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, E. M.; Mijovic, J.

    1985-01-01

    Characterization curing property investigations on HBRF 55A resin formulations are reported. The initial studies on as received cured samples cut from a full-size FWC are reviewed. Inadequacies of as-received and aged samples are pointed out and additional electron microscopic evidence is offered. Characterization of as-received ingredients of HBRF 55A formulation is described. Specifically, Epon 826, Epon 828, EpiRez 5022, RD-2 and various amines, including Tonox and Tonox 60.40, were characterized. Cure kinetics of various formulations are investigated. Changes in physical/thermal properties (viscosity, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density) during cure are described.

  3. Influence of sample composition and processing parameters on the UV cure of clear coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, C. S. B.; Machado, L. D. B.; Volponi, J. E.; Pino, E. S.

    2003-08-01

    Photocurable systems consist of functional macromolecules, which undergo polymerization and a photoinduced crosslinking reaction under UV irradiation. Radiation-curable coatings have gained importance because they are environmentally friendly and save more energy than conventional heat-curable processes. The performance of UV-curable coatings depends on their formulation and cure quality. The quality of UV radiation cure depends on lamp characteristics, photoinitiator (PI) content, film thickness, curing environment, substrate and temperature. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of coating thickness and UV radiation dose, as well as coating characteristics such as PI content and stabilizer additive composition, on the curing process.

  4. Cure shrinkage of thermoset composites

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.D. )

    1993-01-01

    The shrinkage of thermoset composites during cure was studied using a volumetric dilatometer. The material systems studied were AS4 carbon fiber/Hercules' 3501-6 epoxy, IM7 carbon fiber/Hercules 8551-7A toughened epoxy and IM7 carbon fiber/BASF's 5250-4 bismaleimide. Shrinkage of the samples due to both polymerization and thermal expansion effects was seen. The volume changes of the materials during cure were then compared to results from dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and dielectric cure monitoring. Maximums in volume corresponded to minimums in storage and loss modulus from DMA and maximums in the dielectric loss factor. Resin shrinkage during the 177 deg C (350 F) hold corresponded to the onset of polymerization seen by the rapid increase in the storage modulus and the decrease in the dielectric loss factor response due to reduced ion mobility. These results show that volumetric dilatometry can be an effective tool in the development of materials processing strategies and can be useful in studying residual stresses in composites. 9 refs.

  5. Freud's psychoanalysis: a moral cure.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Johan

    2014-08-01

    That psychoanalytical treatment in its classical Freudian sense is primarily a moral or ethical cure is not a very controversial claim. However, it is far from obvious how we are to understand precisely the moral character of psychoanalysis. It has frequently been proposed that this designation is valid because psychoanalysis strives neither to cure psychological symptoms pharmaceutically, nor to superficially modify the behaviour of the analysand, but to lead the analysand through an interpretive process during which he gradually gains knowledge of the unconscious motives that determine his behaviour, a process that might ideally liberate him to obtain, in relation to his inner desires, the status of a moral agent. There resides something appealing in these claims. But it is the author's belief that there is an even deeper moral dimension applying to psychoanalytical theory and praxis. Freudian psychoanalysis is a moral cure due to its way of thematizing psychological suffering as moral suffering. And this means that the moral subject - the being that can experience moral suffering - is not primarily something that the psychoanalytical treatment strives to realize, but rather the presupposition for the way in which psychoanalysis theorizes psychological problems as such.

  6. From HCV To HBV Cure.

    PubMed

    Schinazi, Raymond F; Asselah, Tarik

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 170 million people are chronically infected with HCV and 350 million are chronically infected with HBV worldwide. It is estimated that more than one million patients die from complications related to chronic viral hepatitis, mainly HCC which is one of the most frequent cancers in many countries, especially Africa, the Middle East and Asia. HCV drug development has been impressive, and this revolution led to several direct-acting antiviral agents achieving an HCV cure after only 6-12 weeks. This progress could theorically lead to HCV global elimination making HCV and its consequences a rarity. HBV research and development programs can learn from the HCV experience, to achieve an HBV functional or sterilizing cure. This review will summarize key steps which have been realized for an HCV cure, and discuss the next steps to achieve for an HCV elimination. And also, how this HCV revolution has inspired scientists and clinicians to achieve the same for HBV.

  7. Application of silicon piezoresistive stress test chips in electronic packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yida

    In this work, both special (100) and (111) silicon test chips containing an array of optimized piezoresistive stress sensor rosettes have been successfully applied within several electronic packaging configurations. Unlike (100) silicon test chips, (111) silicon test chips are able to measure the complete stress state on the die surface. After calibration and characterization of the test chips, they were packaged into various assemblies. The post packaging resistances of the sensors were then recorded at room temperature, as a function of temperature excursion, and during long term packaging reliability qualification tests (thermal cycling and thermal aging). The stresses on the die surface were calculated using the measured resistance changes and the appropriate theoretical equations. For comparison purposes, three-dimensional nonlinear finite element simulations of the packaging processes were also performed, and the stress predictions were correlated with the experimental test chip data. AAA2 (100) silicon test chips containing optimized four element dual polarity rosettes have been applied within 44 pin Plastic Leaded Chip Carrier (PLCC) packages and 240 pin Quad Flat Packs (QFP's). In these plastic package experiments, comparison of the stress levels induced by various molding compounds was emphasized. Advanced (111) silicon test chips (BMW-1 or BMW-2) comprising an array of optimized eight-element dual polarity piezoresistive sensor rosettes were encapsulated in 240 pin QFP's, 160 pin QFP's, Chip on Board (COB) packages, and 281 pin ceramic Pin Grid Array (PGA) packages. In addition to molding compound evaluations, BMW-1 test chips encapsulated in 240 pin QFP's were used to detect the presence of delaminations between the die surface and the encapsulant. In the wire bonded COB package studies, die surface stress evaluations were conducted after die attachment, and throughout the cure cycle of the liquid encapsulant. The stresses were also studied as a

  8. Radical-cured block copolymer-modified thermosets

    SciTech Connect

    Redline, Erica M.; Francis, Lorraine F.; Bates, Frank S.

    2013-01-10

    Poly(ethylene-alt-propylene)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEP-PEO) diblock copolymers were synthesized and added at 4 wt % to 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane (BisGMA), a monomer that cures using free radical chemistry. In separate experiments, poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) was combined as a secondary monomer with BisGMA and the monomers were loaded with 4 wt % PEP-PEO. The diblock copolymers self-assembled into well-dispersed spherical micelles with PEP cores and PEO coronas. No appreciable change in the final extent of cure of the thermosets was caused by the addition of diblock copolymer, except in the case of BisGMA, where the addition of the block copolymer increased extent of cure by 12%. Furthermore, the extent of cure was increased by 29% and 37% with the addition of 25 and 50 wt % PEGDMA, respectively. Elastic modulus and fracture resistance were also determined, and the values indicate that the addition of block copolymers does not significantly toughen the thermoset materials. This finding is surprising when compared with the large increase in fracture resistance seen in block copolymer-modified epoxies, and an explanation is proposed.

  9. 21 CFR 573.940 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 573.940 Section 573.940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Listing § 573.940 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in animal feed...

  10. 21 CFR 172.480 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 172.480 Section 172.480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.480 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in food...

  11. 21 CFR 172.480 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 172.480 Section 172.480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.480 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in food...

  12. 21 CFR 573.940 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 573.940 Section 573.940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Listing § 573.940 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in animal feed...

  13. 21 CFR 172.480 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 172.480 Section 172.480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.480 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in food...

  14. 21 CFR 573.940 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 573.940 Section 573.940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Listing § 573.940 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in animal feed...

  15. 21 CFR 573.940 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Silicon dioxide. 573.940 Section 573.940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... Listing § 573.940 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in animal feed...

  16. 21 CFR 172.480 - Silicon dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Silicon dioxide. 172.480 Section 172.480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Agents § 172.480 Silicon dioxide. The food additive silicon dioxide may be safely used in food...

  17. Silicon spintronics.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Ron

    2012-04-23

    Worldwide efforts are underway to integrate semiconductors and magnetic materials, aiming to create a revolutionary and energy-efficient information technology in which digital data are encoded in the spin of electrons. Implementing spin functionality in silicon, the mainstream semiconductor, is vital to establish a spin-based electronics with potential to change information technology beyond imagination. Can silicon spintronics live up to the expectation? Remarkable advances in the creation and control of spin polarization in silicon suggest so. Here, I review the key developments and achievements, and describe the building blocks of silicon spintronics. Unexpected and puzzling results are discussed, and open issues and challenges identified. More surprises lie ahead as silicon spintronics comes of age.

  18. Photo-Curing: UV Radiation curing of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Christina A.

    2004-01-01

    The Polymers Branch of the Materials Division is dedicated to the development of high-performance for a variety of applications. Areas of significant interest include high- temperature polymers, low density, and high strength insulating materials, conductive polymers, and high density polymer electrolytes. This summer our group is working diligently on a photo-curing project. There is interest in the medical community feel the need for a new and improved balloon that will be used for angioplasty (a form of heart surgery). This product should maintain flexibility but add many other properties. Like possibly further processability and resistance to infection. Our group intends on coming up with this product by using photo-enolization (or simply, photo-curing) by Diels-Alder trapping. The main objective was to synthesize a series of new polymers by Diels-Alder cycloaddition of photoenols with more elastomeric properties. Our group was responsible for performing the proper photo-curing techniques of the polymers with diacrylates and bismaleimides, synthesizing novel monomers, and evaluating experimental results. We attempted to use a diacrylate to synthesize the polymer because of previous research done within the Polymers Branch here at NASA. Most acrylates are commercially available, have more elastometric properties than a typical rigid aromatic structure has and they contain ethylene oxides in the middle of their structure that create extensive flexibility. The problem we encountered with the acrylates is that they photo chemically and thermally self polymerize and create diradicals at low temperatures; these constraints caused a lot of unnecessary side reactions. We want to promote solely, diketone polymerization because this type of polymerization has the ability to cause very elastic polymers. We chose to direct our attention towards the usage of maleimides because they are known for eliminating these unnecessary side reactions.

  19. Is Curing Behavior Dependent on Morphology in Reactive Polyurethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Young Gyu; Hashida, Tomoko; Krishnamoothy, Jayaraman; Hsu, Shaw Ling

    2004-03-01

    Reactive polyurethanes usually are formulated as ternary polymer blends whose components are often crystalline polyester, amorphous polyether, and acrylate with high glass transition temperature. Therefore, the morphology developed is highly dependent on the composition and thermal history. Ambient water vapor reacts with the isocyanate-terminated prepolymers, which leads to increase in molecular weight and mechanical properties achievable. Previously, there have been limited studies describing this reaction process. We have investigated the morphological and compositional effects on curing kinetics and chemical reactions induced by water vapor diffusion into prepolymer using time-resolved reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. It was found that the curing kinetics is strongly related to the prepolymer composition, which affects the molecular mobility, hydrophilicity, phase separation, and crystallization. In addition, we found that the curing rate decreased significantly with the development of liquid/liquid phase separation.

  20. Modelling geographically referenced survival data with a cure fraction.

    PubMed

    Cooner, Freda; Banerjee, Sudipto; McBean, A Marshall

    2006-08-01

    The emergence of geographical information systems and related softwares nowadays enables medical databases to incorporate the geographical information on patients, allowing studies in spatial associations. Public health administrators and researchers are often interested in detecting variation in survival patterns by region or county in order to understand the possible factors that contribute towards such spatial discrepancies. These issues have led statisticians to develop survival models that account for spatial clustering and variation. Additionally, with rapid developments in medical and health sciences, researchers increasingly encounter data sets where a substantial portion of patients are cured. Models accounting for cure in the population assist in the prognosis of potentially terminal diseases. This article proposes a Bayesian modelling framework that models spatial associations for areally referenced survival data using a general class of cure models proposed by Cooner et al. The special models we outline are alternatives to the traditional proportional hazards models and can be fitted using standard Bayesian software such as WinBUGS.

  1. ProCure21+ should speed scheme starts.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    This October saw the launch of the new ProCure21+ National Framework under which, the Department of Health (DH) team behind the new scheme claims, the NHS can potentially save a further pound 200 million of public money on top of the substantial sums saved under predecessor, ProCure21, via faster, more streamlined procurement, design, planning, and construction, of publicly-funded healthcare schemes. HEJ editor Jonathan Baillie discussed, with the DH's senior responsible officer (SRO) and P21+ team leader Peter Sellars, the background to the new Framework's introduction, the success of its forerunner, and the additional benefits that ProCure21 + (which is backed by organisations incuding HM Treasury, the National Audit Office, and the Office of Government Commerce) should bring to the entire healthcare building supply chain.

  2. Curing depth of composite resin light cured by LED and halogen light-curing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calixto, L. R.; Lima, D. M.; Queiroz, R. S.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Andrade, M. F.

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the polymerization effectiveness of a composite resin (Z-250) utilizing microhardness testing. In total, 80 samples with thicknesses of 2 and 4 mm were made, which were photoactivated by a conventional halogen light-curing unit, and light-curing units based on LED. The samples were stored in water distilled for 24 h at 37°C. The Vickers microhardness was performed by the MMT-3 microhardness tester. The microhardness means obtained were as follows: G1, 72.88; G2, 69.35; G3, 67.66; G4, 69.71; G5, 70.95; G6, 75.19; G7, 72.96; and G8, 71.62. The data were submitted to an analysis of variance (ANOVA’s test), adopting a significance level of 5%. The results showed that, in general, there were no statistical differences between the halogen and LED light-curing units used with the same parameters.

  3. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material. PMID:27172815

  4. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-05-13

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material.

  5. Polyfibroblast: A Self-Healing and Galvanic Protection Additive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-27

    with a moisture- cured polyurethane-urea (MCPU). When scratched, the foaming action of a propellant ejects the resin from the broken tubes and...completely fills the crack. No catalysts or curing agents are needed since the polymerization is driven by ambient humidity. 15. SUBJECT TERMS corrosion...0.016 in. 0.014 in. 0.003 in. 0-4 0-4 0-4 0-4 0-4 Silicone oil 1 3 4 4 4 4 Silicone oil 2 2 3 4 3 3 5% OTS 1 0 0 0 0 4 5% OTS 2 3 3 3 2 4 10% OTS

  6. Modifying a silicone potting compound for space flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. J.; Clatterbuck, C. H.

    1982-01-01

    RTV-615 has been devolatilized by subjecting the uncatalyzed resin to a temperature of between 125 and 150 C for 24 hours in a vacuum of about 10 to the -6th torr. The resultant resin can be catalyzed and after a room temperature cure the outgassing of the resin is sufficiently low when tested according to ASTM E-595 that it is suitable for space flight use. Tests of physical properties of the cured devolatilized resin were compared with those of the as received silicone. The devolatilized silicones are slightly harder, have a higher tear resistance and higher tensile strengths.

  7. Light curing of resin-based composites in the LED era.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Norbert; Lohbauer, Ulrich; García-Godoy, Franklin; Frankenberger, Roland

    2008-06-01

    This review thoroughly accumulated information regarding new technologies for state-of-the-art light curing of resin composite materials. Visible light cured resin-based composites allow the dentist to navigate the initiation of the polymerization step for each layer being applied. Curing technology was regularly subjected to changes during the last decades, but meanwhile the LED era is fully established. Today, four main polymerization types are available, i.e. halogen bulbs, plasma are lamps, argon ion lasers, and light emitting diodes. Additionally, different curing protocols should help to improve photopolymerization in terms of less stress being generated. Conclusions were: (1) with high-power LED units of the latest generation, curing time of 2 mm thick increments of resin composite can be reduced to 20 seconds to obtain durable results; (2) curing depth is fundamentally dependent on the distance of the resin composite to the light source, but only decisive when exceeding 6 mm; (3) polymerization kinetics can be modified for better marginal adaptation by softstart polymerization; however, in the majority of cavities this may not be the case; (4) adhesives should be light-cured separately for at least 10 seconds when resin composite is applied directly; (5) photocuring through indirect restorations such as ceramics is still a problem, therefore, both dual-cured adhesives and dual-cured composites and resin coating in any way are recommended; and (6) heat generation with high-power photopolymerization units should not be underestimated as a biological problem for both gingival and pulpal tissues.

  8. Chromothriptic Cure of WHIM Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, David H.; Gao, Ji-Liang; Liu, Qian; Siwicki, Marie; Martens, Craig; Jacobs, Paejonette; Velez, Daniel; Yim, Erin; Bryke, Christine R.; Hsu, Nancy; Dai, Zunyan; Marquesen, Martha M.; Stregevsky, Elina; Kwatemaa, Nana; Theobald, Narda; Long Priel, Debra A.; Pittaluga, Stefania; Raffeld, Mark A.; Calvo, Katherine R.; Maric, Irina; Desmond, Ronan; Holmes, Kevin L.; Kuhns, Douglas B.; Balabanian, Karl; Bachelerie, Françoise; Porcella, Stephen F.; Malech, Harry L.; Murphy, Philip M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chromothripsis is a catastrophic cellular event recently described in cancer in which chromosomes undergo massive deletion and rearrangement. Here we report a case in which chromothripsis spontaneously cured a patient with WHIM syndrome, an autosomal dominant combined immunodeficiency disease caused by gain-of-function mutation of the chemokine receptor CXCR4. In this patient, deletion of the disease allele, CXCR4R334X, as well as 163 other genes from one copy of chromosome 2 occurred in a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) that repopulated the myeloid but not the lymphoid lineage. In competitive mouse bone marrow (BM) transplantation experiments, Cxcr4 haploinsufficiency was sufficient to confer a strong long-term engraftment advantage of donor BM over BM from either wild-type or WHIM syndrome model mice, suggesting a potential mechanism for the patient’s cure. Our findings suggest that partial inactivation of CXCR4 may have general utility as a strategy to promote HSC engraftment in transplantation. PMID:25662009

  9. Improved Thermal Property of a Multilayered Graphite Nanoplatelets Filled Silicone Resin Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jin; Zhang, Haiyan; Tang, Muyao; Tu, Wenying; Zhang, Xiubin

    2015-02-01

    We produced graphite nanoplatelets (GNP)/silicone resin composites at various loadings. The utilized GNPs were characterized by two-dimensional structure with high aspect ratio (~1810), and the GNP with approximately 10-30 nm thickness and 10-50 µm in length evenly dispersed throughout the resin matrix, which enables that GNPs effectively act as thermally conductive medium, thus contributed considerably to the formation of an efficient three-dimensional network for heat flow. The thermal conductivities of 5, 10, 15, and 20 wt.% GNP composite were 0.35, 1.02, 1.32, and 2.01 W/(m K), and were ca. 0.9, 4.7, 6.3, and 10.2 times higher than that of silicone resin at room temperature, respectively. The thermal conductivity decreased with elevated temperature in 25-200 °C, which was reminiscent at higher loading. Differential scanning calorimeter analysis showed that GNP addition increased the curing temperature of silicone resin from 90 to 119 °C, probably by hindering the free movement (mobility) of the silicone chains. The result showed that the GNP not only reduced the CTE but also improved the thermal stability of composite simultaneously.

  10. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Karthik

    2011-12-01

    Silicon Photonics is quickly proving to be a suitable interconnect technology for meeting the future goals of on-chip bandwidth and low power requirements. However, it is not clear how silicon photonics will be integrated into CMOS chips, particularly microprocessors. The issue of integrating photonic circuits into electronic IC fabrication processes to achieve maximum flexibility and minimum complexity and cost is an important one. In order to minimize usage of chip real estate, it will be advantageous to integrate in three-dimensions. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is emerging as a promising material for the 3-D integration of silicon photonics for on-chip optical interconnects. In addition, a-Si:H film can be deposited using CMOS compatible low temperature plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process at any point in the fabrication process allowing maximum flexibility and minimal complexity. In this thesis, we demonstrate a-Si:H as a high performance alternate platform to crystalline silicon, enabling backend integration of optical interconnects in a hybrid photonic-electronic network-on-chip architecture. High quality passive devices are fabricated on a low-loss a-Si:H platform enabling wavelength division multiplexing schemes. We demonstrate a broadband all-optical modulation scheme based on free-carrier absorption effect, which can enable compact electro-optic modulators in a-Si:H. Furthermore, we comprehensively characterize the optical nonlinearities in a-Si:H and observe that a-Si:H exhibits enhanced nonlinearities as compared to crystalline silicon. Based on the enhanced nonlinearities, we demonstrate low-power four-wave mixing in a-Si:H waveguides enabling high speed all-optical devices in an a-Si:H platform. Finally, we demonstrate a novel data encoding scheme using thermal and all-optical tuning of silicon waveguides, increasing the spectral efficiency in an interconnect link.

  11. ASRM test report: Autoclave cure process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachbar, D. L.; Mitchell, Suzanne

    1992-01-01

    ASRM insulated segments will be autoclave cured following insulation pre-form installation and strip wind operations. Following competitive bidding, Aerojet ASRM Division (AAD) Purchase Order 100142 was awarded to American Fuel Cell and Coated Fabrics Company, Inc. (Amfuel), Magnolia, AR, for subcontracted insulation autoclave cure process development. Autoclave cure process development test requirements were included in Task 3 of TM05514, Manufacturing Process Development Specification for Integrated Insulation Characterization and Stripwind Process Development. The test objective was to establish autoclave cure process parameters for ASRM insulated segments. Six tasks were completed to: (1) evaluate cure parameters that control acceptable vulcanization of ASRM Kevlar-filled EPDM insulation material; (2) identify first and second order impact parameters on the autoclave cure process; and (3) evaluate insulation material flow-out characteristics to support pre-form configuration design.

  12. ASRM test report: Autoclave cure process development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachbar, D. L.; Mitchell, Suzanne

    1992-05-01

    ASRM insulated segments will be autoclave cured following insulation pre-form installation and strip wind operations. Following competitive bidding, Aerojet ASRM Division (AAD) Purchase Order 100142 was awarded to American Fuel Cell and Coated Fabrics Company, Inc. (Amfuel), Magnolia, AR, for subcontracted insulation autoclave cure process development. Autoclave cure process development test requirements were included in Task 3 of TM05514, Manufacturing Process Development Specification for Integrated Insulation Characterization and Stripwind Process Development. The test objective was to establish autoclave cure process parameters for ASRM insulated segments. Six tasks were completed to: (1) evaluate cure parameters that control acceptable vulcanization of ASRM Kevlar-filled EPDM insulation material; (2) identify first and second order impact parameters on the autoclave cure process; and (3) evaluate insulation material flow-out characteristics to support pre-form configuration design.

  13. The electrophotonic silicon biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Juan-Colás, José; Parkin, Alison; Dunn, Katherine E.; Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Johnson, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of personalized and stratified medicine requires label-free, low-cost diagnostic technology capable of monitoring multiple disease biomarkers in parallel. Silicon photonic biosensors combine high-sensitivity analysis with scalable, low-cost manufacturing, but they tend to measure only a single biomarker and provide no information about their (bio)chemical activity. Here we introduce an electrochemical silicon photonic sensor capable of highly sensitive and multiparameter profiling of biomarkers. Our electrophotonic technology consists of microring resonators optimally n-doped to support high Q resonances alongside electrochemical processes in situ. The inclusion of electrochemical control enables site-selective immobilization of different biomolecules on individual microrings within a sensor array. The combination of photonic and electrochemical characterization also provides additional quantitative information and unique insight into chemical reactivity that is unavailable with photonic detection alone. By exploiting both the photonic and the electrical properties of silicon, the sensor opens new modalities for sensing on the microscale. PMID:27624590

  14. The electrophotonic silicon biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan-Colás, José; Parkin, Alison; Dunn, Katherine E.; Scullion, Mark G.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Johnson, Steven D.

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of personalized and stratified medicine requires label-free, low-cost diagnostic technology capable of monitoring multiple disease biomarkers in parallel. Silicon photonic biosensors combine high-sensitivity analysis with scalable, low-cost manufacturing, but they tend to measure only a single biomarker and provide no information about their (bio)chemical activity. Here we introduce an electrochemical silicon photonic sensor capable of highly sensitive and multiparameter profiling of biomarkers. Our electrophotonic technology consists of microring resonators optimally n-doped to support high Q resonances alongside electrochemical processes in situ. The inclusion of electrochemical control enables site-selective immobilization of different biomolecules on individual microrings within a sensor array. The combination of photonic and electrochemical characterization also provides additional quantitative information and unique insight into chemical reactivity that is unavailable with photonic detection alone. By exploiting both the photonic and the electrical properties of silicon, the sensor opens new modalities for sensing on the microscale.

  15. Interfacial Properties of Electron Beam Cured Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, C.C.

    1999-12-30

    The objectives of the CRADA are to: Confirm that fiber-resin adhesion is responsible for the observed poor shear properties; Determine the mechanism(s) responsible for poor adhesion between carbon fibers and epoxy resins after e-beam curing; Develop and evaluate resin systems and fiber treatments to improve the properties of e-beam cured, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites; and Develop refined methods for processing e-beam cured, carbon-fiber-reinforced composites.

  16. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  17. UV-cured, platinum-free, soft poly(dimethylsiloxane) networks.

    PubMed

    Goswami, K; Skov, A L; Daugaard, A E

    2014-07-21

    To overcome the drawbacks exhibited by platinum-catalyzed curing of silicones, photoinitiated thiol-ene cross-linking of high-molecular-weight poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) prepolymers has been investigated as a pathway to novel soft PDMS networks, based on commercially available starting materials was developed. Through a fast and efficient two-step cross-linking reaction highly flexible PDMS elastomers were prepared.

  18. Method of reusably sealing a silicone rubber vacuum bag to a mold for composite manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbach, John (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A silicone rubber vacuum bag for use in composite article manufacture is reusably sealed to a mold, without mechanical clamping means. The mold-mating portion of the bag is primed with a silicone rubber adhesive, which is cured thereto, and a layer of semiadhesive sealer is applied between the primed mold-mating portion of the bag and the mold.

  19. Effects of Temperature and Humidity on Wilethane 44 Cure

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Weigle

    2006-10-01

    Wilethane 44 is a polyurethane adhesive developed by the Materials Team within ESA-MEE at Los Alamos National Laboratory as a replacement for Hexcel Corporation Urethane 7200. Urethane 7200 is used in numerous weapon systems, but it was withdrawn from the market in 1989. The weapons complex requires a replacement material for use in the W76-1 LEP and the W88, as well as for assembly of JTAs for other warheads. All polyurethane systems are susceptible to moisture reacting with unreacted isocyanate groups. This side reaction competes with the curing reaction and results in CO{sub 2} formation. Therefore, a polyurethane adhesive can exhibit foaming if appropriate environmental controls are not in place while it cures. A designed experiment has been conducted at TA-16-304 to determine the effects of ambient conditions on the properties of cured Wilethane 44. Temperature was varied from 15 C to 30 C and relative humidity from 15% to 40%. The density, hardness at 24 hours, and butt tensile strength on aluminum substrates were measured and fitted to quadratic equations over the experimental space. Additionally, the loss and storage moduli during cure were monitored as a function of cure temperature. These experiments provide a stronger basis for establishing appropriate environmental conditions and cure times when using Wilethane 44. The current guidelines are a working time of 90 minutes, a cure time of 18 hours, and a relative humidity of less than 25%, regardless of ambient temperature. Viscosity measurements revealed that the working time is a strong function of temperature and can be as long as 130 minutes at 15 C or as short as 90 minutes at 30 C. The experiments also showed that the gel time is much longer than originally thought, as long as 13 hours at 15 C. Consequently, it may be necessary to extend the required cure time at temperatures below 20 C. Allowable humidity varies as a function of temperature from 34% at 15 C to 15% at 30 C.

  20. New "cures" for ailing communications.

    PubMed

    Johnston, B

    1988-07-01

    The benefits of voice processing technologies applied "one piece at a time" in the proper fashion can provide four "cures" to communications problems: The image of the healthcare facility in the eyes of the public will improve because calls are handled more quickly, efficiently, and professionally than before. Providing faster patient care information and eliminating delays in medical staff and personnel communications creates the opportunity to give better patient care and customer service. Elimination of time wasting "telephone tag" and "memo blizzards" will result in an increase in employee productivity. Personnel can be reassigned to more productive tasks. The net effect of voice processing on the healthcare industry is a continued merging of computers and telephones, resulting in a voice capability system which includes the telephone system, the call processing system, the voice messaging system, the voice response system, and the host computer system, all being accessed by the same terminal. Just the basic plain-vanilla touchtone telephone will handle it all.

  1. A study of the effects of curing and storage conditions on controlled release diphenhydramine HCl pellets coated with Eudragit NE30D.

    PubMed

    Lin, Angela Y; Muhammad, Nouman A; Pope, David; Augsburger, Larry L

    2003-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the possible impacts of curing and storage conditions on dissolution of controlled release diphenhydramine HCl pellets coated with EUDRAGIT NE30D. The accumulative percentage of dissolved active drug was used as the response in three statistical experimental design studies: 32 full factorial, Box-Behnken and 2(3) designs. By only considering curing temperature and curing time, both factors were found to significantly affect the dissolution rate, but curing temperature had greater impact than curing time. When considering polymer coating level, curing temperature and curing time together, polymer coating level and curing temperature had important effects on dissolution rate, but curing time became insignificant among these three factors. The addition of the water-soluble additives hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose and mannitol made coating films less sensitive to curing, and there was little or no difference in their effect in the model studied. Lower levels of a water-insoluble additive (kaolin) had little impact on dissolution; however, when the level of water-insoluble additive increased, the coating film became more sensitive to curing, especially at the lower curing temperature of 30 degrees C.

  2. Ohmic Curing of Printed Silver Conductive Traces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberson, D. A.; Wicker, R. B.; MacDonald, E.

    2012-09-01

    Ohmic heating was demonstrated as a novel curing method (or curing enhancement) useful in decreasing the resistivity of conductive traces printed with both micro- and nanoparticle-loaded inks while (1) only locally heating the substrate and (2) curing in a matter of seconds compared with the range of 30 min to 1 h required by traditional oven-curing. In one experiment using traces composed of microparticle ink, which required initial air-drying as a preprocess step, application of an ohmic curing cycle resulted in resistivity of 80 nΩ m, roughly six times that of bulk silver. In a second experiment employing nanoparticle inks, which required an initial thermal cure as a preprocess, a resistivity of 43 nΩ m, roughly three times that of bulk silver, was attained after the application of an ohmic curing cycle. Electrical characterization of the ohmic curing process was performed in real time to understand the impact of cycling and duration on the resulting conductivity. Finally, the effect of printed trace length on the ohmic curing process was explored and found to have a near-linear relationship with the reduction in resistance when the applied electrical current was normalized to measured resistance. The microstructural changes which occurred as a result of ohmic curing such as particle sintering and grain growth were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The results presented in this work demonstrate the use of ohmic heating to overcome temperature limitations imposed on a thermal curing process by substrate material properties or other sources.

  3. Hydrodynamic slip in silicon nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-03-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to better understand the hydrodynamic behavior of water flowing through silicon nanochannels. The water-silicon interaction potential was calibrated by means of size-independent molecular dynamics simulations of silicon wettability. The wettability of silicon was found to be dependent on the strength of the water-silicon interaction and the structure of the underlying surface. As a result, the anisotropy was found to be an important factor in the wettability of these types of crystalline solids. Using this premise as a fundamental starting point, the hydrodynamic slip in nanoconfined water was characterized using both equilibrium and nonequilibrium calculations of the slip length under low shear rate operating conditions. As was the case for the wettability analysis, the hydrodynamic slip was found to be dependent on the wetted solid surface atomic structure. Additionally, the interfacial water liquid structure was the most significant parameter to describe the hydrodynamic boundary condition. The calibration of the water-silicon interaction potential performed by matching the experimental contact angle of silicon led to the verification of the no-slip condition, experimentally reported for silicon nanochannels at low shear rates.

  4. Effects of Silicon Substitution in the Main Chain Network Segments of Polycyanurates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-28

    cure in silicone molds under N2, cure schedule for 1 hr at 150 °C followed by 24 hrs at 210 °C, with ramp rates at 5 °C / min. ESR255 BADCy SiMCy...Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Effects of Silicon Substitution in the Main...National Meeting, San Diego, CA, 25-29 March 2012. 14. ABSTRACT This presentation summarizes the study of the effects of silicon substitution in both

  5. Toughening reinforced epoxy composites with brominated polymeric additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z. (Inventor); Gilwee, W. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Cured polyfunctional epoxy resins including tris(hydroxyphenyl)methane triglycidyl ether are toughened by addition of polybrominated polymeric additives having an EE below 1500 to the pre-cure composition. Carboxy-terminated butadiene-acrylonitrile rubber is optionally present in the pre-cure mixture as such or as a pre-formed copolymer with other reactants. Reinforced composites, particularly carbon-reinforced composites, of these resins are disclosed and shown to have improved toughness.

  6. Survival of Streptococcus suis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Trueperella pyogenes in dry-cured Iberian pork shoulders and loins.

    PubMed

    Cardoso-Toset, F; Luque, I; Morales-Partera, A; Galán-Relaño, A; Barrero-Domínguez, B; Hernández, M; Gómez-Laguna, J

    2017-02-01

    Dry-cured hams, shoulders and loins of Iberian pigs are highly appreciated in national and international markets. Salting, additive addition and dehydration are the main strategies to produce these ready-to-eat products. Although the dry curing process is known to reduce the load of well-known food borne pathogens, studies evaluating the viability of other microorganisms in contaminated pork have not been performed. In this work, the efficacy of the dry curing process to eliminate three swine pathogens associated with pork carcass condemnation, Streptococcus suis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae and Trueperella pyogenes, was evaluated. Results of this study highlight that the dry curing process is a suitable method to obtain safe ready-to-eat products free of these microorganisms. Although salting of dry-cured shoulders had a moderate bactericidal effect, results of this study suggest that drying and ripening were the most important stages to obtain dry-cured products free of these microorganisms.

  7. Ultrasonic mixing of epoxy curing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; St.clair, T. L.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for mixing solid curing agents into liquid epoxy resins using ultrasonic energy was developed. This procedure allows standard curing agents such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents such as 4,4 prime-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS) and its 3,3 prime-isomer, (3,3 prime-DDS) to be mixed without prior melting of the curing agent. It also allows curing agents with very high melt temperatures such as 4,4 prime-diaminobenzophenone (4,4 prime-DABP) (242 C) to be mixed without premature curing. Four aromatic diamines were ultrasonically blended into MY-720 epoxy resin. These were 4,4 prime-DDS; 3,3 prime-DDA; 4,4 prime-DABP and 3,3 prime-DABP. Unfilled moldings were cast and cured for each system and their physical and mechanical properties compared.

  8. 7 CFR 29.6010 - Cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cured. 29.6010 Section 29.6010 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6010 Cured. Tobacco dried of its sap by either natural or...

  9. Curing of Graphite/Epoxy Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    365-371 (1973). 21. Pappalardo , L. T., "DSC Evaluation of B-Stage Epoxy-Glass Prepregs For Multilayer Boards," SPE Technical Papers, 20, 13-16 (1974...Kamal, M. R., "Differential Scanning Calorimetry of Epoxy Cure: Isothermal Cure Kinetics," Thermochimica Acta, 14, 41-59 (1976). 24. Pappalardo , L. T

  10. Microhardness of resin composites polymerized by plasma arc or conventional visible light curing.

    PubMed

    Park, S Ho; Krejci, I; Lutz, F

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of the plasma arc curing (PAC) unit for composite curing. To compare its effectiveness with conventional quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) light curing units, the microhardness of two composites (Z100 and Tetric Ceram) that had been light cured by the PAC or QTH units, were compared according to the depth from the composite surface. In addition, linear polymerization shrinkage was compared using a custom-made linometer between composites which were light cured by PAC or QTH units. Measuring polymerization shrinkage for two resin composites (Z100 and Tetric Ceram) was performed after polymerization with either QTH or PAC units. In the case of curing with the PAC unit, the composite was light cured with Apollo 95E for two (Group 1), three (Group 2), six (Group 3) or 2 x 6 (Group 4) seconds. For light curing with the QTH unit, the composite was light cured for 60 seconds with Optilux 500 (Group 5). The linear polymerization shrinkage of composites was determined in the linometer. Two resin composites were used to measure microhardness. Two-mm thick samples were light cured for three seconds (Group 1), six seconds (Group 2) or 12 (2 x 6) seconds (Group 3) with Apollo 95E or they were conventionally light cured with Optilux 500 for 30 seconds (Group 4) or 60 seconds (Group 5). For 3 mm thick samples, the composites were light cured for six seconds (Group 1), 12 (2 x 6) seconds (Group 2) or 18 (3 x 6) seconds (Group 3) with Apollo 95E or they were conventionally light cured with Optilux 500 for 30 seconds (Group 4) or 60 seconds (Group 5). Twenty samples were assigned to each group. The microhardness of the upper and lower surfaces was measured with a Vickers hardness-measuring instrument under load. The difference in microhardness between the upper and lower surfaces in each group was analyzed by paired t-test. For the upper or lower surfaces, one-way ANOVA with Tukey was used. For Tetric Ceram, the amount of polymerization shrinkage

  11. Ceramic silicon-boron-carbon fibers from organic silicon-boron-polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, Salvatore R. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Novel high strength ceramic fibers derived from boron, silicon, and carbon organic precursor polymers are discussed. The ceramic fibers are thermally stable up to and beyond 1200 C in air. The method of preparation of the boron-silicon-carbon fibers from a low oxygen content organosilicon boron precursor polymer of the general formula Si(R2)BR(sup 1) includes melt-spinning, crosslinking, and pyrolysis. Specifically, the crosslinked (or cured) precursor organic polymer fibers do not melt or deform during pyrolysis to form the silicon-boron-carbon ceramic fiber. These novel silicon-boron-carbon ceramic fibers are useful in high temperature applications because they retain tensile and other properties up to 1200 C, from 1200 to 1300 C, and in some cases higher than 1300 C.

  12. Cure Chemistry of Phenylethynyl Terminated Oligomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Karen H.; Orwoll, Robert A.; Young, Philip R.; Jensen, Brian J.; McNair, Harold M.

    1997-01-01

    The ability to process high performance polymers into quality, void-free composites has been significantly advanced using oligomers terminated with reactive groups which cure or crosslink at elevated temperature without the evolution of volatile byproducts. Several matrix resin systems of considerable interest to the aerospace community utilize phenylethynyl-terminated imide (PETI) technology to achieve this advantage. The present paper addresses the cure chemistry of PETI oligomers. The thermal cure of a low molecular weight model compound was studied using a variety of analytical techniques including differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The studies indicate an extremely complex cure process. Many stable products were isolated and this paper reports current work on identification of those products. The intent of this research is to provide fundamental insight into the molecular structure of the cured PETI engineering materials so that performance and durability can be more fully assessed.

  13. 7 CFR 29.2519 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2519 Section 29.2519 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2519 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured...

  14. 7 CFR 29.2519 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2519 Section 29.2519 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2519 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured...

  15. 7 CFR 29.2519 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2519 Section 29.2519 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2519 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured...

  16. 7 CFR 29.2519 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2519 Section 29.2519 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2519 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured...

  17. 7 CFR 29.2519 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2519 Section 29.2519 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Kentucky and Tennessee Fire-Cured and Foreign-Grown Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2519 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured...

  18. 9 CFR 319.103 - Cured beef tongue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cured beef tongue. 319.103 Section 319... Cured beef tongue. In preparing “Cured Beef Tongue,” the application of curing solution to the fresh beef tongue shall not result in an increase in the weight of the cured beef tongue of more than...

  19. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of "standard" polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface.

  20. Vacuum deposition and curing of liquid monomers apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.

    1996-08-20

    The present invention is the formation of solid polymer layers under vacuum. More specifically, the present invention is the use of ``standard`` polymer layer-making equipment that is generally used in an atmospheric environment in a vacuum, and degassing the monomer material prior to injection into the vacuum. Additional layers of polymer or metal or oxide may be vacuum deposited onto solid polymer layers. Formation of polymer layers under a vacuum improves material and surface characteristics, and subsequent quality of bonding to additional layers. Further advantages include use of less to no photoinitiator for curing, faster curing, fewer impurities in the polymer electrolyte, as well as improvement in material properties including no trapped gas resulting in greater density, and reduced monomer wetting angle that facilitates spreading of the monomer and provides a smoother finished surface. 3 figs.

  1. Curing efficiency of modern LED units.

    PubMed

    Rencz, Adam; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2012-02-01

    Recent reports claim that modern light-emitting diode (LED) curing units improve curing efficiency by increasing the units' irradiance. In this context also, short polymerisation times up to 5 s are proposed. The aim of this study was to examine whether there are differences in the curing efficiency of modern LED curing units by assessing their effect on two different composite materials and by varying the irradiation time. A nano- and a micro-hybrid resin-based composite (RBC) were polymerised for 5, 10 and 20 s with three commercial and a Prototype LED unit (Elipar™ S10). Cylindrical specimens (6 mm in depth, 4 mm in diameter) were prepared in three increments, each 2-mm thick, and were consecutively cured. Degree of cure was measured for 20 min in real time at the bottom of the samples, starting with the photoinitiation. The micro-mechanical properties (modulus of elasticity, E and Vickers hardness, HV) were measured as a function of depth, in 100-μm steps, on the above described samples stored in distilled water for 24 h at 37°C. Data were analysed with multivariate ANOVA followed by Tukey's test, t test and partial eta-squared statistics. In descending order of the strength of their effect, the type of RBC, depth, polymerisation time and curing unit were significant factors affecting the micro-mechanical parameters (p < 0.05). The degree of cure at 6-mm depth was less but significantly influenced by the curing unit and curing time and was independent from the type of RBC. A 5-s irradiation time is not recommended for these units. Whereas a 5-s irradiation is acceptable at the sample's surface, a minimum of 20 s of irradiation is necessary for an adequate polymerisation 2 mm beyond the surface.

  2. Direct fabrication of silicone lenses with 3D printed parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal, Tahseen; Watkins, Rachel; Cen, Zijian; Lee, W. M.

    2016-11-01

    The traditional process of making glass lenses requires grinding and polishing of the material which is a tedious and sensitive process. Existing polymer lens making techniques, such as high temperature reflow techniques, have been significantly simple lens making processes which cater well to customer industry. Recently, the use of UV-curing liquid lens has ushered in customized lens making (Printed Optics), but contains undesirable yellowing effects. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a transparent polymer curable at low temperature (<100°C) provides an alternative to lens making. In this work, we showed that PDMS lenses are fabricated using single silicone droplets which are formed in a guided and controlled passive manner using 3D printed tools. These silicone lenses have attributes such as smoothness of curvature, resilience to temperature change, low optical aberrations, high transparency (>95%) and minimal aging (yellowing). Moreover, these lenses have a range of focal lengths (3.5 mm to 14.5 mm as well as magnifications (up to 160X). In addition, we created smartphone attachment to turn smart device (tablet or smartphone) into a low-powered microscope. In future we plan to extend this method to produce microlens array.

  3. Studies of the Crystallization Process of Aluminum-Silicon Alloys Using a High Temperature Microscope. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justi, S.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that primary silicon crystals grow polyhedral in super-eutectic AlSi melts and that phosphorus additives to the melt confirm the strong seeding capacity. Primary silicon exhibits strong dendritic seeding effects in eutectic silicon phases of various silicon alloys, whereas primary aluminum does not possess this capacity. Sodium addition also produces a dendritic silicon network growth in the interior of the sample that is attributed to the slower silicon diffusion velocity during cooling.

  4. Effectiveness of light emitting diode and halogen light curing units for curing microhybrid and nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Shwetha; Suprabha, BS

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To compare the polymerization efficacy of micro-hybrid and nanocomposites cured with Quartz-tungsten halogen (QTH) and light emitting diode (LED) light curing units (LCUs). The effectiveness of pulse cure mode in LED LCU was also investigated. Materials and Methods: Both micro-hybrid and nanocomposite specimens were cured using four different curing protocols giving a total of eight experimental groups. Ten cylindrical specimens were prepared for each group, and light cured for 40 s on the top surface, thus giving a total of eighty specimens. Vicker hardness measurements were carried out on the top and bottom surfaces after 24 h and hardness ratio was calculated. Results: For both micro-hybrid and nanocomposites, highest mean VHN was observed for the group cured with QTH LCU, and the lowest was observed for the group cured with second LED LCU in standard mode but the difference was significant only in case of nanocomposite. Conclusion: Curing nanocomposites with QTH LCU results in better micro hardness. Pulse cure mode does not effectively increase polymerization efficacy than the standard mode of curing. PMID:23833457

  5. Comparative study of optical fiber cure-monitoring methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Peter A.; Powell, Graham R.; Fernando, Gerard F.; Waters, David N.; France, Chris M.; Spooncer, Ronald C.

    1997-06-01

    This paper reports on a comparative study undertaken for different types of optical fiber sensor developed to monitor the cure of an epoxy resin system. The optical fiber sensors used to monitor the cure process were based on transmission spectroscopy, evanescent wave spectroscopy and refractive index monitoring. The transmission sensor was prepared by aligning two optical fibers within a specially prepared sleeve with a gap between the optical fiber end-faces. During cure, resin from the specimen flowed into the gap between the optical fibers allowing transmission spectra of the resin to be obtained. The evanescent wave sensor was prepared by stripping the cladding from a high refractive index core optical fiber. The prepared sensor was embedded in the sample and attenuated total reflectance spectra recorded from the resin/core boundary. Refractive index monitoring was undertaken using a high refractive index core optical fiber which had a small portion of its cladding removed. The prepared sensor was embedded in the resin specimen and light from a single wavelength source was launched into the fiber. Changes in the guiding characteristics of the sensor due to refractive index changes at the resin/core boundary were used to monitor the progress of the cure reaction. The transmission and evanescent wave spectroscopy sensors were used to follow changes in characteristic near-infrared absorption bands of the resin over the range 1450 - 1700 nm during the cure reaction. Consequently these techniques required tunable wavelength sources covering specific wavelength ranges. However, the refractive index based sensor used a single wavelength source. Therefore the equipment costs for this type of sensor were considerably less. Additionally, the refractive index sensor did not require a single wavelength source at any particular wavelength and could be applied to any spectral region in which the optical fiber would transmit light. The advantages and disadvantages of these

  6. Siloxane containing addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Addition polyimide oligomers have been synthesized from bis(gamma-aminopropyl) tetramethyldisiloxane and 3, 3', 4, 4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride using a variety of latent crosslinking groups as endcappers. The prepolymers were isolated and characterized for solubility (in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents), melt flow and cure properties. The most promising systems, maleimide and acetylene terminated prepolymers, were selected for detailed study. Graphite cloth reinforced composites were prepared and properties compared with those of graphite/Kerimid 601, a commercially available bismaleimide. Mixtures of the maleimide terminated system with Kerimid 601, in varying proportions, were also studied.

  7. Silicon microdosimetry.

    PubMed

    Agosteo, Stefano; Pola, Andrea

    2011-02-01

    Silicon detectors are being studied as microdosemeters since they can provide sensitive volumes of micrometric dimensions. They can be applied for assessing single-event effects in electronic instrumentation exposed to complex fields around high-energy accelerators or in space missions. When coupled to tissue-equivalent converters, they can be used for measuring the quality of radiation therapy beams or for dosimetry. The use of micrometric volumes avoids the contribution of wall effects to the measured spectra. Further advantages of such detectors are their compactness, cheapness, transportability and a low sensitivity to vibrations. The following problems need to be solved when silicon devices are used for microdosimetry: (i) the sensitive volume has to be confined in a region of well-known dimensions; (ii) the electric noise limits the minimum detectable energy; (iii) corrections for tissue-equivalency should be made; (iv) corrections for shape equivalency should be made when referring to a spherical simulated site of tissue; (v) the angular response should be evaluated carefully; (vi) the efficiency of a single detector of micrometric dimensions is very poor and detector arrays should be considered. Several devices have been proposed as silicon microdosemeters, based on different technologies (telescope detectors, silicon on insulator detectors and arrays of cylindrical p-n junctions with internal amplification), in order to satisfy the issues mentioned above.

  8. 7 CFR 29.3002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions. Artificial heat is sometimes used to...-cured tobacco should not carry the odor of smoke or fumes resulting from the application of...

  9. 7 CFR 29.3002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions. Artificial heat is sometimes used to...-cured tobacco should not carry the odor of smoke or fumes resulting from the application of...

  10. 7 CFR 29.3002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions. Artificial heat is sometimes used to...-cured tobacco should not carry the odor of smoke or fumes resulting from the application of...

  11. 7 CFR 29.3002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions. Artificial heat is sometimes used to...-cured tobacco should not carry the odor of smoke or fumes resulting from the application of...

  12. Effect of irradiation on the parameters that influence quality characteristics of uncured and cured cooked turkey meat products.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xi; Moon, Sunhee; Lee, Hyunyong; Ahn, Dong U

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of irradiation on lipid/protein oxidation, color changes, and off-odor volatiles production in uncured and cured cooked turkey meat products. Uncured cooked turkey breast meat and cured commercial turkey breast rolls and ham were prepared and irradiated at 0, 1.5, 3.0, and 4.5 kGy using a linear accelerator. The results showed that irradiation had little effects on lipid oxidation of cured cooked turkey products, but accelerated lipid oxidation in uncured cooked turkey breast meat (P < 0.05). Protein oxidation was increased both in cured and uncured meats (P < 0.05), but more in cured cooked meat by irradiation. The redness of uncured cooked turkey was increased (P < 0.05), but the redness of cured cooked turkey meat was faded by irradiation (P < 0.05). Irradiated cured cooked turkey meat products produced less off-odor volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide, 3-methyl/2-methyl-butananl, and hexanal) than irradiated uncured cooked meat products due to various additives in the cured meat products. Our results suggested that irradiation resulted in different chemical reactions to pigments in uncured and cured cooked turkey meat products, but cured cooked turkey meat products have a higher tolerance to odor deterioration than uncured cooked turkey meat products.

  13. Optimal cure cycle design for autoclave processing of thick composites laminates: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Jean W.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal analysis and the calculation of thermal sensitivity of a cure cycle in autoclave processing of thick composite laminates were studied. A finite element program for the thermal analysis and design derivatives calculation for temperature distribution and the degree of cure was developed and verified. It was found that the direct differentiation was the best approach for the thermal design sensitivity analysis. In addition, the approach of the direct differentiation provided time histories of design derivatives which are of great value to the cure cycle designers. The approach of direct differentiation is to be used for further study, i.e., the optimal cycle design.

  14. Tribological properties of sintered polycrystalline and single crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Srinivasan, M.

    1982-01-01

    Tribological studies and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses were conducted with sintered polycrystalline and single crystal silicon carbide surfaces in sliding contact with iron at various temperatures to 1500 C in a vacuum of 30 nPa. The results indicate that there is a significant temperature influence on both the friction properties and the surface chemistry of silicon carbide. The main contaminants on the as received sintered polycrystalline silicon carbide surfaces are adsorbed carbon, oxygen, graphite, and silicon dioxide. The surface revealed a low coefficient of friction. This is due to the presence of the graphite on the surface. At temperatures of 400 to 600 C graphite and copious amount of silicon dioxide were observed on the polycrystalline silicon carbide surface in addition to silicon carbide. At 800 C, the amount of the silicon dioxide decreased rapidly and the silicon carbide type silicon and carbon peaks were at a maximum intensity in the XPS spectra. The coefficients of friction were high in the temperature range 400 to 800 C. Small amounts of carbon and oxygen contaminants were observed on the as received single crystal silicon carbide surface below 250 C. Silicon carbide type silicon and carbon peaks were seen on the silicon carbide in addition to very small amount of graphite and silicon dioxide at temperatures of 450 to 800 C.

  15. The curing of high-performance concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeks, Kenneth Wayne

    This dissertation describes the latest information, technology, and research on the curing of high performance concrete (HPC). Expanded somewhat beyond the scope of HPC, it examines the current body of knowledge on the effects of various curing regimes on concrete. The significance and importance of curing are discussed as well as the various definitions of HPC. The current curing requirements, standards, and criteria as proposed by ACI, as well as those of other countries, are reviewed and discussed. The current prescriptive curing requirements may not be applicable to high performance concrete. The research program reported in this dissertation looked at one approach to development of curing criteria for this relatively new class of concrete. The program applies some of the basic concepts of the methodology developed by the German researcher, H. K. Hilsdorf, to the curing of HPC with the objective to determine minimum curing durations for adequate strength development. The approach is to determine what fraction of the standard-cured 28-day strength has to be attained at the end of the curing period to assure that the design strength is attained in the interior of the member. An innovative direct tension test was developed to measure the strength at specific depths from the drying surface of small mortar cylinders (50 x 127 mm (2 x 5 in.)). Two mortar mixtures were investigated, w/c = 0.30 and w/c = 0.45, and three different moist curing regimes, 1-day, 3-day, and 7-day. Specimens were stored in two environmental chambers at 25sp°C, 50% RH; and 25sp°C, 70% RH, until testing at the age of 28 days. Direct tensile tests were conducted using steel disks epoxied to the ends of the specimens. Also, the penetration of the drying front was calculated from the drying data using porosity and degree of hydration relationships. The major observation from these tests was that adequate strength is attained in both mortar mixtures with only one day of moist curing. The drying

  16. Purification and deposition of silicon by an iodide disproportionation reaction

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2002-01-01

    Method and apparatus for producing purified bulk silicon from highly impure metallurgical-grade silicon source material at atmospheric pressure. Method involves: (1) initially reacting iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to create silicon tetraiodide and impurity iodide byproducts in a cold-wall reactor chamber; (2) isolating silicon tetraiodide from the impurity iodide byproducts and purifying it by distillation in a distillation chamber; and (3) transferring the purified silicon tetraiodide back to the cold-wall reactor chamber, reacting it with additional iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to produce silicon diiodide and depositing the silicon diiodide onto a substrate within the cold-wall reactor chamber. The two chambers are at atmospheric pressure and the system is open to allow the introduction of additional source material and to remove and replace finished substrates.

  17. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1996-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  18. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, D.R.; Brzezinski, M.A.

    1996-06-11

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidation state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  19. Acceleration of curing of resin composite at the bottom surface using slow-start curing methods.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takako; Morigami, Makoto; Sadr, Alireza; Tagami, Junji

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two slow-start curing methods on acceleration of the curing of resin composite specimens at the bottom surface. The light-cured resin composite was polymerized using one of three curing techniques: (1) 600 mW/cm(2) for 60 s, (2) 270 mW/cm(2) for 10 s+0-s interval+600 mW/cm(2) for 50 s, and (3) 270 mW/cm(2) for 10 s+5-s interval+600 mW/cm(2) for 50 s. After light curing, Knoop hardness number was measured at the top and bottom surfaces of the resin specimens. The slow-start curing method with the 5-s interval caused greater acceleration of curing of the resin composite at the bottom surface of the specimens than the slow-start curing method with the 0-s interval. The light-cured resin composite, which had increased contrast ratios during polymerization, showed acceleration of curing at the bottom surface.

  20. Visible light-curing unit.

    PubMed

    2002-10-01

    Ortholux XT is a high-intensity light source emitting filtered visible blue light in the 400- to 500-nanometer range for polymerization of visible-light-cured resins. The Ortholux handpiece comes with a portable power supply, a light-intensity check in the power supply, a spare lamp, an eyeshield and a mounting kit. The handpiece consists of a pistol grip with a thermoplastic housing that contains the light source, cooling fan, light guide receptacle (8- or 13-millimeter-diameter fused quartz lightguide), optical filter, light switch and timer switch. The timer is operator-selectable with options of five, 10, 15 and 20 seconds and an XT option of up to 600 seconds. The push-button switch allows for timer disruption and reactivation. 3M Unitek reported (3M Unitek, unpublished data submitted to the ADA, date not known) that the cooling fan generates noise below 43 decibels when the internal handpiece temperature is below 100 C. At 120 C, the fan speed increases, generating 52 dBA. The U.S. Air Force Dental Investigative Service reported that the cooling fan is extremely quiet. The light shuts off when it reaches 140 C. The light source is a 75-watt tungsten/halogen lamp. The handpiece weighs less than one pound. The power supply contains the built-in intensity meter that illuminates a green light-emitting diode when the tested light exceeds 400 milliwatts per square centimeter. The power cord is six feet in length. A built-in voltage regulator ensures a steady voltage supply to the unit.

  1. [Mineral water as a cure].

    PubMed

    Nocco, Priska Binz

    2008-01-01

    The treatment of diseases with mineral spring water belongs to the oldest medical therapies. The "remedy" mineral water is therefore of importance also within the pharmacy. The present pharmacy historical work examines the impact of the use of mineral waters, as well as of their dried components, as therapeutic agents in the 19th and early 20th centuries, i.e. from approx. 1810 to 1930, as well as the contributions given by pharmacists in the development and analysis of mineral water springs. Beside these aspects, the aim here is also to describe the role played by pharmacists in the production of artificial mineral water as well as in the sale and wholesale of natural and artificial mineral water. In the first part of this work the situation in Switzerland and its surrounding countries, such as Germany, France, Italy and Austria, is discussed. The second part contains a case-study of the particular situation in the Canton Tessin. It is known from the scientific literature published at that time that information on mineral water was frequently reported. Starting from the beginning of the 19th century the number of such publications increased tremendously. The major part of them were publications in scientific journals or contributions to medical and pharmaceutical manuals and reference books. In particular the spa-related literature, such as spa-guides, was of growing interest to a broad public. The inclusion of monographs into the Swiss, the Cantonal as well the foreign pharmacopoeias granted a legal frame for the mineral waters and their dried components. These works are of major importance from a pharmacy historical standpoint and represent a unique proof of historical evidence of the old medicinal drug heritage. The most frequently used therapies based on mineral waters were drinking and bath cures. Several diseases, particularly those of a chronic character, were treated with mineral waters. The positive influence of these cures on the recovery of the patients

  2. The stability of new transparent polymeric materials: The epoxy trimethoxyboroxine system. Part 1: The preparation, characterization and curing of epoxy resins and their copolymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, E.; Lin, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of resin composition, curing conditions fillers, and flame retardant additives on the flammability of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol-A (DGEBA) as measured by the oxygen index is examined. The oxygen index of DGEBA cured with various curing agents was between 0.198 to 0.238. Fillers and flame retardant additives can increase the oxygen index dependent on the material and the amount used. Changes in the basic cured resin properties can be anticipated with the addition of noncompatible additives. High flame resistant epoxy resins with good stability and mechanical properties are investigated.

  3. Investigation of the curing variables of asphalt-rubber binder

    SciTech Connect

    Billiter, T.C.; Chun, J.S.; Davison, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    Currently, the paving industry utilizes a curing time of 1 hour at 177{degrees}C (350{degrees}F) for producing asphalt-rubber binder. Billiter et al. showed that at these curing conditions, 1 hour at 177{degrees}C (350{degrees}F), adding rubber to asphalt was beneficial, with the rubber improving the low-temperature creep stiffness at (-15{degrees}C (5{degrees}F)), the temperature susceptibility in the 0{degrees}C-90{degrees}C (32{degrees}F-194{degrees}F) temperature region, increasing G* and {eta}* at 60{degrees}C (140{degrees}F) and 1.0 rad/sec, and decreasing 8 at 60{degrees}C (140{degrees}F) and 1.0 rad/sec. On the other hand, Billiter et al. (2) showed that the addition of rubber was also detrimental, in that the viscosity increased significantly in the compaction temperature region of 149{degrees}C-193{degrees}C (300{degrees}F-380{degrees}F). This increased viscosity can cause compaction problems, with Allison reporting that engineers blamed the compaction problems of asphalt-rubber on undissolved crumb rubber, which they believed had no beneficial effect. Additionally, the engineers reported that improper compaction led to early road failure. This work investigates the variables of binders, curing tenperature and time, and amount of mechancial energy on asphalt properties.

  4. Method for one-to-one polishing of silicon nitride and silicon oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babu, Suryadevara V. (Inventor); Natarajan, Anita (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of removing silicon nitride at about the same removal rate as silicon dioxide by CMP. The method utilizes a polishing slurry that includes colloidal silica abrasive particles dispersed in water and additives that modulate the silicon dioxide and silicon nitride removal rates such that they are about the same. In one embodiment of the invention, the additive is lysine or lysine mono hydrochloride in combination with picolinic acid, which is effective at a pH of about 8. In another embodiment of the invention, the additive is arginine in combination with picolinic acid, which is effective at a pH of about 10.

  5. The effect of Low Earth Orbit exposure on some experimental fluorine and silicon-containing polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Young, Philip R.; Kalil, Carol G.; Chang, Alice C.; Siochi, Emilie J.

    1994-01-01

    Several experimental fluorine and silicon-containing polymers in film form were exposed to low Earth orbit (LEO) on a Space Shuttle flight experiment (STS-46, Evaluation of Oxygen Interaction with Materials, EOIM-3). The environmental parameters of primary concern were atomic oxygen (AO) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The materials were exposed to 2.3 plus or minus 0.1 x 10(exp 20) oxygen atoms/sq cm and 30.6 UV sun hours during the flight. In some cases, the samples were exposed at ambient, 120 C and 200 C. The effects of exposure on these materials were assessed utilizing a variety of characterization techniques including optical, scanning electron (SEM) and scanning tunneling (STM) microscopy, UV-visible (UV-VIS) transmission, diffuse reflectance infrared (DR-FTIR), x-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy, and in a few cases, gel permeation chromatography (GPC). In addition, weight losses of the films, presumably due to AO erosion, were measured. The fluorine-containing polymers exhibited significant AO erosion and exposed films were diffuse or 'frosted' in appearance and consequently displayed dramatic reductions in optical transmission. The silicon-containing films exhibited minimum AO erosion and the optical transmission of exposed films was essentially unchanged. The silicon near the exposed surface in the films was converted to silicate/silicon oxide upon AO exposure which subsequently provided protection for the underlying material. The silicon-containing epoxies are potentially useful as AO resistant coatings and matrix resins as they are readily processed into carbon fiber reinforced composites and cured via electron radiation.

  6. Inelastic micromechanics of curing stresses in composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foye, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The combined finite element/laminate analysis method is used to study the thermal curing stresses in composite materials with a nonlinearly elastic matrix subject to creep. The application of this analysis to boron/epoxy composites shows that curing stress levels in the laminate are of sufficient magnitude to cause widespread yielding in the matrix. The stress levels, based on the creep analysis of a typical laminate cure cycle, indicate that the residual stresses can vary from 80 to 100% of the residual stress estimates based on linear thermoelastic analysis. It is shown that there is virtually no change in the static longitudinal or shear response of unidirectional and cross-ply boron/epoxy laminates as a result of curing stresses. Results of a series of constant-stress, high temperature creep tests are presented.

  7. Ceramic Stereolithography: Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics by Photopolymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halloran, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Ceramic stereolithography and related additive manufacturing methods involving photopolymerization of ceramic powder suspensions are reviewed in terms of the capabilities of current devices. The practical fundamentals of the cure depth, cure width, and cure profile are related to the optical properties of the monomer, ceramic, and photo-active components. Postpolymerization steps, including harvesting and cleaning the objects, binder burnout, and sintering, are discussed and compared with conventional methods. The prospects for practical manufacturing are discussed.

  8. Tracking Polymer Cure Via Embedded Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, David L.; Davidson, T. Fred

    1993-01-01

    Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy applied in interior of specimen of material by bringing infrared light through specimen in optical fiber. Light interacts with material via evanescent-wave effect. Spectra obtained in this way at various times during curing process also combined with data from ultrasonic, thermographic, and dielectric-impedance monitoring, and other measurement techniques to obtain more complete characterization of progress of curing process.

  9. Energy curable compositions having improved cure speeds

    DOEpatents

    Halm, Leo W.

    1993-01-01

    A composition and method provide improved physical properties and cure speed of polyurethane precursors, with or without free radical polymerizable monomers or oligomers present, by use of a two component catalyst system. The resin blend can be activated with a latent organometallic catalyst combined with an organic peroxide which can be a hydroperoxide or an acyl peroxide to decrease the cure time while increasing the break energy and tangent modulus of the system.

  10. Energy curable compositions having improved cure speeds

    DOEpatents

    Halm, L.W.

    1993-05-18

    The composition and method provide improved physical properties and cure speed of polyurethane precursors, with or without free radical polymerizable monomers or oligomers present, by use of a two component catalyst system. The resin blend can be activated with a latent organometallic catalyst combined with an organic peroxide which can be a hydroperoxide or an acyl peroxide to decrease the cure time while increasing the break energy and tangent modulus of the system.

  11. Radiation Curing of Natural Fiber Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xueyuan

    This research is a study of the process and feasibility of applying UV to cure natural and recycled fiber composites. The influence of HEMA on the water absorption and mechanical properties of the composites also investigated. Results show that UV curing is feasible in the manufacture of natural and recycle fiber composites. HEMA significantly improved the water resistance of the composite. HEMA-treated natural and recycled fiber composites have better bending strength after water impregnation, than non-treated composites.

  12. Can liver transplantation provide the statistical cure?

    PubMed

    Cucchetti, Alessandro; Vitale, Alessandro; Cescon, Matteo; Gambato, Martina; Maroni, Lorenzo; Ravaioli, Matteo; Ercolani, Giorgio; Burra, Patrizia; Cillo, Umberto; Pinna, Antonio D

    2014-02-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) represents the only chance of long-term survival for patients with end-stage liver disease. When the mortality rate for transplant patients returns to the same level as that for the general population, they can be considered statistically cured. However, cure models in the setting of LT have never been applied. Data from 1371 adult patients undergoing LT for the first time between January 1999 and December 2012 at 2 Italian centers were reviewed in order to establish probabilities of being cured by LT. A parametric Weibull model was applied to compare the mortality rate after LT to the rate expected for the general population (matched by sex and age). The observed 3-, 5-, and 10-year overall survival rates after LT were 77.8%, 73.3%, and 65.6%, respectively, and they did not differ between the 2 centers (P = 0.37). The cure fraction for the entire study population was 63.4% (95% confidence interval = 52.6%-72.0%), and the time to cure was 10 years with a 90% confidence level. The best cure fraction was observed for younger recipients without hepatitis C virus (HCV) who had favorable donor-recipient matches, that is, low Donor Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (D-MELD) scores (90.1%); conversely, the lowest probability was observed for elderly HCV recipients with high D-MELD scores (34.6%). The time to cure was 6.22 years for non-HCV patients and 14.78 years for HCV patients. The median survival time for uncured patients was 2.29 years. Among uncured recipients, the longest survival time was observed for younger patients (7.31 years). In conclusion, we provide here a new clinical measure for LT suggesting that survival after transplantation can approximate that of the general population and provide a statistical cure.

  13. Anomalous Behavior of Cured Epoxy Resins: Density at Room Temperature versus Time and Temperature of Cure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    density (at 250 C) of a OGEBA epoxy resin cured with phthalic acid anhydride increased with time of cure at a single cure temperature, reached a maximum...time to vitrification to eventually form a glass. A more appropriate time indicator for the formation of glassy-state material in principle is that... enthalpy relaxation immediately above the assigned Tg, is typical of all slow-cooled, and also of fast-cooled specimens which had vitrified during

  14. High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

    2012-05-14

    UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

  15. Assessing the fit of parametric cure models.

    PubMed

    Wileyto, E Paul; Li, Yimei; Chen, Jinbo; Heitjan, Daniel F

    2013-04-01

    Survival data can contain an unknown fraction of subjects who are "cured" in the sense of not being at risk of failure. We describe such data with cure-mixture models, which separately model cure status and the hazard of failure among non-cured subjects. No diagnostic currently exists for evaluating the fit of such models; the popular Schoenfeld residual (Schoenfeld, 1982. Partial residuals for the proportional hazards regression-model. Biometrika 69, 239-241) is not applicable to data with cures. In this article, we propose a pseudo-residual, modeled on Schoenfeld's, to assess the fit of the survival regression in the non-cured fraction. Unlike Schoenfeld's approach, which tests the validity of the proportional hazards (PH) assumption, our method uses the full hazard and is thus also applicable to non-PH models. We derive the asymptotic distribution of the residuals and evaluate their performance by simulation in a range of parametric models. We apply our approach to data from a smoking cessation drug trial.

  16. Color Developing Capacity of Plasma-treated Water as a Source of Nitrite for Meat Curing

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Samooel; Kim, Hyun Joo; Park, Sanghoo; Choe, Jun Ho; Jeon, Hee-Joon; Choe, Wonho

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of plasma with liquid generates nitrogen species including nitrite (NO−2). Therefore, the color developing capacity of plasma-treated water (PTW) as a nitrite source for meat curing was investigated in this study. PTW, which is generated by surface dielectric barrier discharge in air, and the increase of plasma treatment time resulted in increase of nitrite concentration in PTW. The PTW used in this study contains 46 ppm nitrite after plasma treatment for 30 min. To evaluate the effect of PTW on the cured meat color, meat batters were prepared under three different conditions (control, non-cured meat batter; PTW, meat batter cured with PTW; Sodium nitrite, meat batter cured with sodium nitrite). The meat batters were vacuum-packaged and cooked in a water-bath at 80℃ for 30 min. The typical color of cured meat developed in cooked meat batter treated with sodium nitrite or PTW. The lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) values were similar in all conditions, whereas, the redness (a*) values of cooked meat batter with PTW and sodium nitrite (p<0.05) were significantly higher than the control. These data indicate that PTW can be used as a nitrite source in the curing process of meat without addition of other nitrite sources. PMID:26761900

  17. Barcoll hardness of different resin-based composites cured by halogen or light emitting diode (LED).

    PubMed

    Bala, Oya; Uçtasli, Mine Betül; Tüz, M Atilla

    2005-01-01

    The clinical performance of light curing resin composites is greatly influenced by the quality of the light-curing unit (LCU). Halogen LCUs are commonly used for curing composite materials. However, they have some drawbacks. The development of new, blue, super bright light emitting diodes (LED LCU) of 470-nm wavelength with high light irradiance comes as an alternative to standard halogen LCUs of 450-470-nm wavelengths. This study evaluated the surface hardness of the different resin-based composites (flowable, hybrid and packable resin composites) cured by LED LCU or halogen LCU. A Teflon mold 10-mm in diameter and 2-mm in depth was made to obtain five disk-shaped specimens for each experimental group. Then, the specimens were cured by an LED LCU or halogen LCU for 40 seconds. The hardness of the upper and lower surfaces was measured with a Barcoll hardness-measuring instrument. The statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan test at a p=0.05 significance level. The results of the hardness test indicated that the hardness of resin composites cured by an LED LCU were greater than those cured by a halogen LCU. Additionally, for all resin-based composites, the hardness values for the upper surfaces were higher than the lower surfaces. However, for both results no statistically significant differences were observed (p>0.05).

  18. Effect of network structure on thermal and mechanical properties of cured epoxy resin containing mesogenic group

    SciTech Connect

    Ochi, M.; Shimizu, Y.; Tsuyuno, N.

    1996-10-01

    Epoxy resin containing biphenol group as a mesogenic group was cured with phenol (PN) and catechol (CN) novolacs. In the CN-cured biphenol type epoxy resin, the glass-rubber transition, almost disappeared and thus the very high elastic modulus was obtained in the high temperature region. It is clear that the micro-Brownian motion of the network chains is highly suppressed in this cured system. On the other hand, the PN-cured resin showed the well-defined glass-rubber transition and thus the low rubbery modulus. In addition, in the former system, the characteristic pattern like a schlieren texture was clearly observed in the polarized optical microphotographs. This shows that the mesogenic group contained in the epoxy molecule is oriented in the system cued with catechol novolac, which has neighboring active hydrogens. The computer simulation based on the molecular mechanics also showed that the orientation of the network chains should occur in the CN-cured biphenol epoxy system. Thus, we conclude that the suppression of the micro-Brownian motion in the CN-cured system is due to the orientation of network chains containing a mesogenic group. Moreover, it has been shown that die mechanical and bonding strength at high temperature is considerably improved by the suppression of the network chain in the CN-cured biphenol resin system.

  19. Investigation of adhesive bond cure conditions using nonlinear ultrasonic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndt, Tobias Paul

    2000-09-01

    meaningful and reliable for differentiating our adhesive bonds. In this approach, ultrasonic tone burst signals at increasing power levels and over a wide frequency range are transmitted through each bond sample to determine its excitation-dependent nonlinear harmonic resonance behavior. Excitation-dependent relative amplitude changes observed particularly in the higher harmonic spectral data are discussed as a possible result of a nonlinear interface effect, based on a local displacement and strain analysis in the linear approximation. Moreover, several attempts of a more detailed analysis of the excitation-dependent data at specific resonances by taking two-frequency ratios and by applying various normalization schemes in the linear and in the logarithmic amplitude domain are presented. Two of these analysis approaches are found to be particularly promising. One approach may represent a very robust algorithm for classifying an adhesive bond as being ``good'' or ``bad'', that is whether it had been properly cured or not. The second approach may in addition to a differentiation between various cure conditions ultimately even provide information with respect to the actual bond strength.

  20. Effect of Fermented Spinach as Sources of Pre-Converted Nitrite on Color Development of Cured Pork Loin

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ko-Eun

    2017-01-01

    The effect of fermented spinach extracts on color development in cured meats was investigated in this study. The pH values of raw cured meats without addition of fermented spinach extract or nitrite (negative control) were higher (p<0.05) than those added with fermented spinach extract. The pH values of raw and cooked cured meats in treatment groups were decreased with increasing addition levels of fermented spinach extract. The lightness and yellowness values of raw cured meats formulated with fermented spinach extract were higher (p<0.05) than those of the control groups (both positive and negative controls). The redness values of cooked cured meats were increased with increasing fermented spinach extract levels, whereas the yellowness values of cooked cured meats were decreased with increasing levels of fermented spinach extract. The lowest volatile basic nitrogen (VBN) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) values were observed in the positive control group with addition of nitrite. TBARS values of cured meats added with fermented spinach extract were decreased with increasing levels of fermented spinach extract and VBN values of curing meat with 30% fermented spinach extract was lower than the other treatments. Total viable bacterial counts in cured meats added with fermented spinach extract ranged from 0.34-1.01 Log CFU/g. E. coli and coliform bacteria were not observed in any of the cured meats treated with fermented spinach extracts or nitrite. Residual nitrite contents in treatment groups were increased with increasing levels of fermented spinach extract added. These results demonstrated that fermented spinach could be added to meat products to improve own curing characteristics. PMID:28316477

  1. Radiation experience with the CDF silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Husemann, Ulrich; /Rochester U.

    2005-11-01

    The silicon detectors of the CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider are operated in a harsh radiation environment. The lifetime of the silicon detectors is limited by radiation damage, and beam-related incidents are an additional risk. This article describes the impact of beam-related incidents on detector operation and the effects of radiation damage on electronics noise and the silicon sensors. From measurements of the depletion voltage as a function of the integrated luminosity, estimates of the silicon detector lifetime are derived.

  2. 7 CFR 29.2269 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2269 Section 29.2269 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2269 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires from which...

  3. 7 CFR 29.2269 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2269 Section 29.2269 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2269 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires from which...

  4. 7 CFR 29.2269 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2269 Section 29.2269 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2269 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires from which...

  5. 7 CFR 29.2269 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2269 Section 29.2269 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2269 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires from which...

  6. 7 CFR 29.2269 - Fire-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fire-cured. 29.2269 Section 29.2269 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2269 Fire-cured. Tobacco cured under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires from which...

  7. [Progress in endogenous plasmid curing of bacteria--a review].

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Song, Cunjiang

    2013-11-04

    To investigate the functions of the bacteria endogenous plasmid, which include bacterial drug resistance, symbiosis, capsular formation and heavy metal resistance, the endogenous plasmid needs to be cured first. We reviewed physical, chemical and molecular biological methods of endogenous plasmid curing, clarified the curing principles. The prospective of research on plasmid curing was also discussed, based on our own studies.

  8. 7 CFR 29.3502 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.3502 Section 29.3502 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3502 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions without the use...

  9. 7 CFR 29.6002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.6002 Section 29.6002 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6002 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions..., pole-burn, and shed-burn in damp weather. Air-cured tobacco should not carry the odor of smoke or...

  10. 7 CFR 29.6002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Air-cured. 29.6002 Section 29.6002 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6002 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions..., pole-burn, and shed-burn in damp weather. Air-cured tobacco should not carry the odor of smoke or...

  11. 7 CFR 58.412 - Coolers or curing rooms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coolers or curing rooms. 58.412 Section 58.412... Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection and Grading Service 1 Rooms and Compartments § 58.412 Coolers or curing rooms. Coolers or curing rooms where cheese is held for curing or storage...

  12. Composite Cure Process Modeling and Simulations using COMPRO(Registered Trademark) and Validation of Residual Strains using Fiber Optics Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sreekantamurthy, Thammaiah; Hudson, Tyler B.; Hou, Tan-Hung; Grimsley, Brian W.

    2016-01-01

    Composite cure process induced residual strains and warping deformations in composite components present significant challenges in the manufacturing of advanced composite structure. As a part of the Manufacturing Process and Simulation initiative of the NASA Advanced Composite Project (ACP), research is being conducted on the composite cure process by developing an understanding of the fundamental mechanisms by which the process induced factors influence the residual responses. In this regard, analytical studies have been conducted on the cure process modeling of composite structural parts with varied physical, thermal, and resin flow process characteristics. The cure process simulation results were analyzed to interpret the cure response predictions based on the underlying physics incorporated into the modeling tool. In the cure-kinetic analysis, the model predictions on the degree of cure, resin viscosity and modulus were interpreted with reference to the temperature distribution in the composite panel part and tool setup during autoclave or hot-press curing cycles. In the fiber-bed compaction simulation, the pore pressure and resin flow velocity in the porous media models, and the compaction strain responses under applied pressure were studied to interpret the fiber volume fraction distribution predictions. In the structural simulation, the effect of temperature on the resin and ply modulus, and thermal coefficient changes during curing on predicted mechanical strains and chemical cure shrinkage strains were studied to understand the residual strains and stress response predictions. In addition to computational analysis, experimental studies were conducted to measure strains during the curing of laminated panels by means of optical fiber Bragg grating sensors (FBGs) embedded in the resin impregnated panels. The residual strain measurements from laboratory tests were then compared with the analytical model predictions. The paper describes the cure process

  13. Structural Evolution of Silica Gel and Silsesquioxane Using Thermal Curing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nan; Rao, YuanQiao; Sun, Shengtong; Hou, Lei; Wu, Peiyi; Fan, Shaojuan; Ye, Bangjiao

    2016-08-01

    The curing of coatings of two types of siloxane containing materials, silica gel and silsesquioxane, at a modest temperature (<280℃) was studied with in situ heating Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) in combination with perturbation correlation moving window (PCMW) and two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) analyses. The result revealed detailed structural evolution of these two different gels. When the silica gel was heated, (Si-O)6 rings appeared from the random Si-O-Si network formed after sol gel reaction, followed by condensation of silanol groups. Upon further heating, the existing (Si-O)4 rings were broken down and converted into (Si-O)6 structures, and finally isolated silanols appeared. The transition from (Si-O)4 rings to (Si-O)6 rings was observed by IR and further confirmed with positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS). In comparison, during the curing of hybrid silsesquioxane, the condensation of silanols happens immediately upon heating without the rearrangement of Si-O-Si network. Afterwards, the fraction of (Si-O)6 ring structure increased. (Si-O)4 structures exhibited higher stability in hybrid silsesquioxanes. In addition, the amount of silanols in silsesquioxane continued to reduce without the generation of isolated silanol in the end. The different curing behavior of silsesquioxanes from silica gel originates from the organic groups in silsesquioxanes, which lowers the cross-linking density and reduces the rigidity of siloxane network.

  14. 22.5% efficient silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector

    SciTech Connect

    Geissbühler, Jonas Werner, Jérémie; Martin de Nicolas, Silvia; Hessler-Wyser, Aïcha; Tomasi, Andrea; Niesen, Bjoern; De Wolf, Stefaan; Barraud, Loris; Despeisse, Matthieu; Nicolay, Sylvain; Ballif, Christophe

    2015-08-24

    Substituting the doped amorphous silicon films at the front of silicon heterojunction solar cells with wide-bandgap transition metal oxides can mitigate parasitic light absorption losses. This was recently proven by replacing p-type amorphous silicon with molybdenum oxide films. In this article, we evidence that annealing above 130 °C—often needed for the curing of printed metal contacts—detrimentally impacts hole collection of such devices. We circumvent this issue by using electrodeposited copper front metallization and demonstrate a silicon heterojunction solar cell with molybdenum oxide hole collector, featuring a fill factor value higher than 80% and certified energy conversion efficiency of 22.5%.

  15. Oblique patterned etching of vertical silicon sidewalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce Burckel, D.; Finnegan, Patrick S.; David Henry, M.; Resnick, Paul J.; Jarecki, Robert L.

    2016-04-01

    A method for patterning on vertical silicon surfaces in high aspect ratio silicon topography is presented. A Faraday cage is used to direct energetic reactive ions obliquely through a patterned suspended membrane positioned over the topography. The technique is capable of forming high-fidelity pattern (100 nm) features, adding an additional fabrication capability to standard top-down fabrication approaches.

  16. The nature of the defects generated from plasma exposure in pristine and ultraviolet-cured low-k organosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, H.; Shohet, J. L.; Jiang, G.; Antonelli, G. A.; Nishi, Y.

    2011-06-20

    Defects in low-k organosilicate glass produced during air and nitrogen plasma exposure were investigated. The defects, through the measurements of electron-spin resonance and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, were found to be silicon-dangling bonds. Air-plasma exposure increases the defect concentrations by breaking silicon-hydrogen bonds. Nitrogen-plasma exposure as well as free-radical exposure has only a small influence on the bond breaking. It was also shown that ultraviolet curing improves the chemical-damage resistance of the dielectric.

  17. The nature of the defects generated from plasma exposure in pristine and ultraviolet-cured low-k organosilicate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, H.; Jiang, G.; Antonelli, G. A.; Nishi, Y.; Shohet, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    Defects in low-k organosilicate glass produced during air and nitrogen plasma exposure were investigated. The defects, through the measurements of electron-spin resonance and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, were found to be silicon-dangling bonds. Air-plasma exposure increases the defect concentrations by breaking silicon-hydrogen bonds. Nitrogen-plasma exposure as well as free-radical exposure has only a small influence on the bond breaking. It was also shown that ultraviolet curing improves the chemical-damage resistance of the dielectric.

  18. Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    The use of silicon detectors has experienced an exponential growth in accelerator and space based experiments, similar to trends in the semiconductor industry as a whole, usually paraphrased as ``Moore's Law.'' Some of the essentials for this phenomenon will be presented, together with examples of the exciting science results which it enabled. With the establishment of a ``semiconductor culture'' in universities and laboratories around the world, an increased understanding of the sensors results in thinner, faster, more radiation-resistant detectors, spawning an amazing wealth of new technologies and applications, which will be the main subject of the presentation.

  19. Cured products from different animal species.

    PubMed

    Paleari, Maria Antonietta; Moretti, Vittorio Maria; Beretta, Giuseppe; Mentasti, Tiziana; Bersani, Carla

    2003-04-01

    An assessment was made of the proximate composition, pH and a(W) of raw beef, horsemeat and the meat of wild boar, deer and goat. The same assessment, together with one of fatty acids, cholesterol and free amino acids, was made of the same meats as cured products. The raw meat of the different animal species was found to have a reduced lipid, but high protein content. The cured meat of the horse and wild boar had low saturated fatty acid levels; the wild boar, goatmeat and beef were quantitatively similar with regard to monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) while in the horsemeat the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were more raised, at an intermediate level in deer and extremely reduced in the beef final product. The cholesterol content in the cured product was markedly reduced in the horsemeat. The free amino acids content in the cured deer, wild boar and goat meat was more elevated, than in beef and horse cured meat.

  20. When to start paediatric testing of the adult HIV cure research agenda?

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Seema K

    2017-01-01

    Ethical guidelines recommend that experimental interventions should be tested in adults first before they are tested and approved in children. Some challenge this paradigm, however, and recommend initiating paediatric testing after preliminary safety testing in adults in certain cases. For instance, commentators have argued for accelerated testing of HIV vaccines in children. Additionally, HIV cure research on the use of very early therapy (VET) in infants, prompted in part by the Mississippi baby case, is one example of a strategy that is currently being tested in infants before it has been well tested in adults. Because infants’ immune systems are still developing, the timing of HIV transmission is easier to identify in infants than in adults, and infants who receive VET might never develop the viral reservoirs that make HIV so difficult to eradicate, infants may be uniquely situated to achieve HIV cure or sustained viral remission. Several commentators have now argued for earlier initiation of HIV cure interventions other than (or in addition to) VET in children. HIV cure research is therefore a good case for re-examining the important question of when to initiate paediatric research. I will argue that, despite the potential for HIV cure research to benefit children and the scientific value of involving children in this research, the HIV cure agenda should not accelerate the involvement of children for the following reasons: HIV cure research is highly speculative, risky, aimed at combination approaches and does not compare favourably with the available alternatives. I conclude by drawing general implications for the initiation of paediatric testing, including that interventions that have to be used in combination with others and cures for chronic diseases may not be valuable enough to justify early paediatric testing. PMID:27259546

  1. Bond strengths of lingual orthodontic brackets bonded with light-cured composite resins cured by transillumination.

    PubMed

    King, L; Smith, R T; Wendt, S L; Behrents, R G

    1987-04-01

    A method of curing light-cured composite resins by transillumination to cement acid-etched fixed partial dentures was adapted to bond solid mesh-backed lingual orthodontic brackets. Results of this investigation showed that the bond strengths of the orthodontic brackets bonded with light-cured composite resins were significantly less (P less than 0.05) than the bond strengths of the orthodontic brackets cemented with traditional adhesives and orthodontic composite resins. Notwithstanding, the bond strengths achieved with the transilluminated light-cured composite resins should be adequate to withstand the forces of mastication and orthodontic movements. There was no correlation of bond strengths of the brackets cemented with the transilluminated light-cured composite resins when compared to the faciolingual widths of the teeth.

  2. Light curing time reduction: in vitro evaluation of new intensive light-emitting diode curing units.

    PubMed

    Mavropoulos, A; Staudt, C B; Kiliaridis, S; Krejci, I

    2005-08-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was to establish the minimum necessary curing time to bond stainless steel brackets (Mini Diamond Twin) using new, intensive, light-emitting diode (LED) curing units. Seventy-five bovine primary incisors were divided into five equal groups. A standard light curing adhesive (Transbond XT) was used to bond the stainless steel brackets using different lamps and curing times. Two groups were bonded using an intensive LED curing lamp (Ortholux LED) for 5 and 10 seconds. Two more groups were bonded using another intensive LED curing device (Ultra-Lume LED 5) also for 5 and 10 seconds. Finally, a high-output halogen lamp (Optilux 501) was used for 40 seconds to bond the final group, which served as a positive control. All teeth were fixed in hard acrylic and stored for 24 hours in water at 37 degrees C. Shear bond strength (SBS) was measured using an Instron testing machine. Weibull distribution and analysis of variance were used to test for significant differences. The SBS values obtained were significantly different between groups (P < 0.001). When used for 10 seconds, the intensive LED curing units achieved sufficient SBS, comparable with the control. In contrast, 5 seconds resulted in significantly lower SBS. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was not significantly affected.A curing time of 10 seconds was found to be sufficient to bond metallic brackets to incisors using intensive LED curing units. These new, comparatively inexpensive, curing lamps seem to be an advantageous alternative to conventional halogen lamps for bonding orthodontic brackets.

  3. Silicon photonics manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Zortman, William A; Trotter, Douglas C; Watts, Michael R

    2010-11-08

    Most demonstrations in silicon photonics are done with single devices that are targeted for use in future systems. One of the costs of operating multiple devices concurrently on a chip in a system application is the power needed to properly space resonant device frequencies on a system's frequency grid. We asses this power requirement by quantifying the source and impact of process induced resonant frequency variation for microdisk resonators across individual die, entire wafers and wafer lots for separate process runs. Additionally we introduce a new technique, utilizing the Transverse Electric (TE) and Transverse Magnetic (TM) modes in microdisks, to extract thickness and width variations across wafers and dice. Through our analysis we find that a standard six inch Silicon on Insulator (SOI) 0.35 μm process controls microdisk resonant frequencies for the TE fundamental resonances to within 1 THz across a wafer and 105 GHz within a single die. Based on demonstrated thermal tuner technology, a stable manufacturing process exhibiting this level of variation can limit the resonance trimming power per resonant device to 231 μW. Taken in conjunction with the power to compensate for thermal environmental variations, the expected power requirement to compensate for fabrication-induced non-uniformities is 17% of that total. This leads to the prediction that thermal tuning efficiency is likely to have the most dominant impact on the overall power budget of silicon photonics resonator technology.

  4. Lower-curing-temperature PMR polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    Studies were performed to achieve a lower-curing-temperature PMR polyimide. The use of m-aminostyrene as the end-cap instead of the monoalkyl ester of 5-normbornene-2,3 dicarboxylic acid was investigated in typical PMR formulations. Model compound studies were also performed. Differential scanning calorimetry studies were performed on model compounds and neat resins to establish their melting and curing characteristics. The elevated temperature weight loss characteristics of neat resins and graphite fiber composites were determined. The room temperature and short-time 260 C (500 F) mechanical properties of the composites were also determined. The use of m-aminostyrene end-caps reduced the final cure temperature of PMR resins by about 55 C (100 F), but the composites prepared with these resins are limited to use temperatures of about 260 C (500 F).

  5. The research of UV curing injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Pengcheng; Chang, Le; Song, Le; Cai, Tianze; Ding, Yumei; Yang, Weimin

    2015-05-01

    The micro-injection molding technology and the UV (ultraviolet) curing technique are combined to bring about a new plastic forming method, UV curing injection molding. The mean weight of micro-product is an important process characteristic for UV curing injection molding as well as the surface quality of micro-features is another important process characteristic for this new plastic forming method. This research investigates three effects of processing factors on the mass-change rate of micro-product and the surface quality of micro-features. In every particular, the following two factors are considered: UV material system temperature and the packing pressure. The study revealed that as usual, the micro-products gain weight with the imported increasing UV material system temperature and the improved packing pressure. Meanwhile, the increasing packing pressure also improves the surface quality, yet, warming the UV system temperature up has no effect on the quality of the product.

  6. Integrative physicians and an herbal cancer "cure".

    PubMed

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Rosenberg, Shoshana Keren; Samuels, Noah

    2016-08-01

    Oncologists are frequently asked about herbal remedies claiming to "cure" cancer, or at least delay its progression. While complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) should be aimed primarily at improving quality-of-life (QOL) related concerns, "wonder cures" are part of an alternative health belief model providing hope for a "miracle" where conventional treatment has failed. We describe a physician with extensive small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) undergoing chemotherapy, with significant toxicities and impaired daily function. He had come for an integrative physician (IP) consultation, provided by a medical doctor dually trained in CIM and supportive cancer care, taking place in a conventional supportive cancer care service. We describe the IP consultation in general and regarding an herbal remedy which was being promoted as a "cure" for cancer. The subsequent patient-tailored CIM treatment process, in which patients receive evidence-based guidance on treatments which address QOL-related concerns, are presented.

  7. Cure-in-place process for seals

    DOEpatents

    Hirasuna, Alan R.

    1981-01-01

    A cure-in-place process which allows a rubber seal element to be deformed to its service configuration before it is cross-linked and, hence, is a plastic and does not build up internal stress as a result of the deformation. This provides maximum residual strength to resist the differential pressure. Furthermore, the process allows use of high modulus formulations of the rubber seal element which would otherwise crack if cured and then deformed to its service configuration, resulting in a seal which has better gap bridging capability. Basically, the process involves positioning an uncured seal element in place, deforming it to its service configuration, heating the seal element, curing it in place, and then fully seating the seal.

  8. Synthesis and cure characterization of high temperature polymers for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuntao

    The E-beam curable BMI resin systems and phenylethynyl terminated AFR-PEPA-4 oligomer together with an imide model compound N-phenyl-[4-(phenylethynyl) phthalimide] were synthesized and characterized. E-beam exposure cannot propagate the polymerization of BMI system until the temperature goes up to 100°C. However, a small amount of oligomers may be generated from solid-state cure reaction under low E-beam intensity radiation. Higher intensity E beam at 40 kGy per pass can give above 75% reaction conversion of BMI with thermal cure mechanism involved. NVP is a good reactive diluent for BMI resin. The cure extents of BMI/NVP increase with the increase of the dosage and applied dosage per pass. The reaction rate is much higher at the beginning of the E-beam cure and slows down after 2 dose passes due to diffusion control. Free radical initiator dicumyl peroxide can accelerate the reaction rate at the beginning of E-beam cure reaction but doesn't affect final cure conversion very much. According to the results from FT-IR, 200 kGy total dosage E-beam exposure at 10 kGy per pass can give 70% reaction conversion of BMI/NVP with the temperature rise no more than 50°C. The product has a Tg of 180°C. The predicted ultimate Tg of cured AFR-PEPA-4 polyimide is found to be 437.2°C by simulation of DSC Tg as a function of cure. The activation energy of thermal cure reaction of AFR-PEPA-4 oligomer is 142.6 +/- 10.0 kJ/mol with the kinetic order of 1 when the reaction conversion is less than 80%. The kinetics analysis of the thermal cure of N-phenyl-[4-(phenylethynyl) phthalimide] was determined by FT-IR spectroscopy by following the absorbance of the phenylethynyl triple bond and conjugated bonds. The thermal crosslinking of N-phenyl-[4-(phenylethynyl) phthalimide] through phenylethynyl addition reaction has a reaction order of 0.95 and an activation energy of 173.5 +/- 8.2 kJ/mol. The conjugated bond addition reactions have a lower reaction order of 0.94 and lower activation

  9. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Baik, Sunggi

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic.

  10. Use of free silicon in liquid phase sintering of silicon nitrides and sialons

    DOEpatents

    Raj, R.; Baik, S.

    1985-11-12

    This invention relates to the production of improved high density nitrogen based ceramics by liquid-phase densification of silicon nitride or a compound of silicon-nitrogen-oxygen-metal, e.g. a sialon. In the process and compositions of the invention minor amounts of finely divided silicon are employed together with the conventional liquid phase producing additives to enhance the densification of the resultant ceramic. 4 figs.

  11. Crime, criminals, and cures: medical model revisited.

    PubMed

    Sampson, R J

    2000-06-01

    David Lykken's target article assesses the causes of crime and advocates a controversial "cure"--parental licensure. Although Lykken gets many of the facts about criminals right, ultimately the disease metaphor breaks down. Crime requires three things--motivated offenders ("criminals"), suitable targets or victims, and the absence of capable guardians to prevent the act. Typical of medical model approaches, failure to consider the convergence in time and space of the three necessary elements for crime results in a misdiagnosis. In this invited commentary, I briefly note three reasons why Lykken's cure, along with the medical model in general, is unlikely to bear fruit.

  12. Prevent and cure disuse bone loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jee, Webster S. S.

    1994-01-01

    Anabolic agents like parathyroid hormone and postagladin E-like substances were studied in dogs and rats to determine their effectiveness in the prevention and cure of bone loss due to immobilization. It was determined that postagladin E2 administration prevented immobilization while at the same time it added extra bone in a dose responsive manner. Although bone mass returns, poor trabecular architecture remains after normal ambulation recovery from immobilization. Disuse related bone loss and poor trabecular architecture were cured by post-immobilization postagladin E2 treatment.

  13. Chiropractor charged with claiming HIV cure.

    PubMed

    1999-07-23

    The Missouri Board of Chiropractic Examiners will decide later this year if [name removed]' license should be revoked or suspended because [name removed] allegedly told an HIV-positive patient that he had been cured. [Name removed] denies claiming that the patient was cured by his Interro machine. The patient claims he and his wife then decided to have children. The mother gave birth in 1992, and although the infant is not infected, the mother is. The patient's mother-in-law testified that [name removed] had assured her that the patient's virus had been absolutely eradicated by his treatments.

  14. The mechanisms of cure in psychoanalysis.

    PubMed

    Lander, Rómulo

    2007-01-01

    The author considers the theoretical contributions of Lacan and Bion in relation to therapeutic action or the mechanisms of the cure. Whereas Bion felt that the analysand should ultimately experience transformation in O, Lacan described the analysand's goal as not to give in to one's desire or to be one's self. The author distinguishes among various types of neurotic and psychotic structures in discussing the limits of the cure, noting that the analyst's acts--as well as his words--can function as analytic interpretations. Lacan's theories of jouissance, the sexual phantom, identification with the analytic function, and post-analytic effects are also discussed.

  15. Invasive Scedosporium sternal osteomyelitis following lung transplant: Cured.

    PubMed

    Denton, E J; Smibert, O; Gooi, J; Morrissey, C O; Snell, G; McGiffin, D; Paraskeva, M

    2016-06-01

    Scedosporium is an important pathogen in cystic fibrosis (CF) and post-transplant but rarely causes invasive infection. Treatment remains challenging, particularly due to inherent resistance to multiple antifungal agents. We present a young man with CF who developed invasive sternal and rib infection 10-months following lung transplant. The infection has been clinically and radiologically cured with extensive surgery and triazole therapy. This case highlights the importance of adjunctive surgery in addition to prolonged triazole treatment to manage invasive Scedosporium infections in immunosuppressed patients.

  16. Method for Molding Structural Parts Utilizing Modified Silicone Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); Baucom, Robert M. (Inventor); Snoha, John J. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    This invention improves upon a method for molding structural parts from preform material. Preform material to be used for the part is provided. A silicone rubber composition containing entrained air voids is prepared. The silicone rubber and preform material assembly is situated within a rigid mold cavity used to shape the preform material to die desired shape. The entire assembly is heated in a standard heating device so that the thermal expansion of the silicone rubber exerts the pressure necessary to force the preform material into contact with the mold container. The introduction of discrete air voids into the silicone rubber allows for accurately controlled pressure application on the preform material at the cure temperature.

  17. Study of silicone-based materials for the packaging of optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yeong-Her

    The first part of this work is to evaluate the main materials used for the packaging of high power light-emitting diodes (LEDs), i.e., the die attach materials, the encapsulant materials, and high color rendering index(CRI) sol-gel composite materials. All of these materials had been discussed the performance, reliability, and issues in high power LED packages. High power white LEDs are created either from blue or near-ultraviolet chips encapsulated with a yellow phosphor, or from red-green-blue LED light mixing systems. The phosphor excited by blue LED chip was mostly used in experiment of this dissertation. The die attach materials contains filler particles possessing a maximum particle size less than 1.5 mum in diameter blended with epoxy polymer matrix. Such compositions enable thin bond line thickness, which decreases thermal resistance that exists between thermal interface materials and the corresponding mating surfaces. The thermal conductivity of nano silver die attach materials is relatively low, the thermal resistance from the junction to board is just 1.6 KW-1 in the bond line thickness of 5.3 mum, which is much lower than the thermal resistance using conventional die attach materials. The silicone die attach adhesive made in the lab cures through the free radical reaction of epoxy-functional organopolysiloxane and through the hydrosilylation reaction between alkenyl-functional organopolysiloxane and silicone-boned hydrogen-functional organopolysiloxane. By the combination of the free radical reaction and the hydrosilylation reaction, the low-molecular-weight silicone oil will not be out-migrated and not contaminate wire bondability to the LED chip and lead frame. Hence, the silicone die attach adhesive made in the lab can pass all reliability tests, such as operating life test JEDEC 85°C/85RH and room temperature operating life test. For LED encapsulating materials, most of commercial silicone encapsulants still suffer thermal/radiation induced

  18. Residual monomer leaching from chemically cured and visible light-cured orthodontic adhesives.

    PubMed

    Eliades, T; Eliades, G; Brantley, W A; Johnston, W M

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the amount of residual monomer leached from chemically cured and visible light-cured orthodontic adhesives based on Bis-GMA/TEGDMA monomers, when bonded to ceramic and stainless steel brackets. The residual TEGDMA and Bis-GMA monomer concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis of the extracts after specimen immersion in ethanol/water solution for 15 days at 37 +/- 1 degree C. According to the results the highest monomer concentrations eluted were obtained from the chemically cured adhesive. Direct (through the bracket) irradiation of stainless steel brackets bonded to the visible light-cured adhesive showed high monomer elution as well. A polycarbonate base ceramic bracket manifested significantly greater amount of monomer release compared with ceramic brackets when combined with the visible light-cured adhesive. Indirect (from the incisal and cervical edges of the bracket) irradiation of the visible light-cured adhesive bonded to the stainless steel brackets resulted in lower residual monomer elution compared to that of directly (through the bracket) irradiated metallic brackets. No statistical difference was found between direct or indirect irradiation of the ceramic brackets tested, with respect to monomer elution from the light-cured adhesive.

  19. Curing kinetics of visible light curing dental resin composites investigated by dielectric analysis (DEA).

    PubMed

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Hausnerova, Berenika; Haenel, Thomas; Großgarten, Mandy; Möginger, Bernhard

    2014-03-01

    During the curing process of light curing dental composites the mobility of molecules and molecule segments is reduced leading to a significant increase of the viscosity as well as the ion viscosity. Thus, the kinetics of the curing behavior of 6 different composites was derived from dielectric analysis (DEA) using especially redesigned flat sensors with interdigit comb electrodes allowing for irradiation at the top side and measuring the ion viscosity at the bottom side. As the ion viscosities of dental composites change 1-3 orders of magnitude during the curing process, DEA provides a sensitive approach to evaluate their curing behavior, especially in the phase of undisturbed chain growth. In order to determine quantitative kinetic parameters a kinetic model is presented and examined for the evaluation of the ion viscosity curves. From the obtained results it is seen that DEA might be employed in the investigation of the primary curing process, the quality assurance of ingredients as well as the control of processing stability of the light curing dental composites.

  20. Gettering of interstitial iron in silicon by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposited silicon nitride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, A. Y.; Sun, C.; Markevich, V. P.; Peaker, A. R.; Murphy, J. D.; Macdonald, D.

    2016-11-01

    It is known that the interstitial iron concentration in silicon is reduced after annealing silicon wafers coated with plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride films. The underlying mechanism for the significant iron reduction has remained unclear and is investigated in this work. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) depth profiling of iron is performed on annealed iron-contaminated single-crystalline silicon wafers passivated with PECVD silicon nitride films. SIMS measurements reveal a high concentration of iron uniformly distributed in the annealed silicon nitride films. This accumulation of iron in the silicon nitride film matches the interstitial iron loss in the silicon bulk. This finding conclusively shows that the interstitial iron is gettered by the silicon nitride films during annealing over a wide temperature range from 250 °C to 900 °C, via a segregation gettering effect. Further experimental evidence is presented to support this finding. Deep-level transient spectroscopy analysis shows that no new electrically active defects are formed in the silicon bulk after annealing iron-containing silicon with silicon nitride films, confirming that the interstitial iron loss is not due to a change in the chemical structure of iron related defects in the silicon bulk. In addition, once the annealed silicon nitride films are removed, subsequent high temperature processes do not result in any reappearance of iron. Finally, the experimentally measured iron decay kinetics are shown to agree with a model of iron diffusion to the surface gettering sites, indicating a diffusion-limited iron gettering process for temperatures below 700 °C. The gettering process is found to become reaction-limited at higher temperatures.

  1. [Serious complications following gluteal injection of silicone].

    PubMed

    Herink, C; Zwaka, P A; Schön, M P; Mempel, M; Seitz, C S

    2013-08-01

    Silicone has a broad range of medical applications and plays an important role, for example, in plastic reconstruction. The use of silicone, however, may result in unpredictable consequences for the patient. These range from swelling and erythema at the site of injection and regional lymphadenopathy to the development of disseminated granulomas distant from the administration site. We report a woman who developed extensive distally-spreading ulcerations in both buttocks several years after gluteal silicone injection. Potential systemic reactions of silicone include intrapulmonary granulomas, embolism and related pneumonitis. Moreover, an association with the development of autoimmune diseases and neoplasias has been discussed. Therapeutic options include surgically removing the silicone and topical or systemic anti-inflammatory drug therapy. However, due to the diffuse dissemination of silicone, the former is often not completely possible and for the latter empirical data are limited and follow-up studies are missing. Liquid silicone is no longer authorized in Europe or in the U.S.A. When silicone implants are used, the decision should be weighed carefully and the patient adequately counseled. In addition, follow-up care on a regular basis is mandatory for both those with implants and those who obtained injections of liquid silicone in the past.

  2. X-ray-cured carbon-fiber composites for vehicle use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herer, Arnold; Galloway, Richard A.; Cleland, Marshall R.; Berejka, Anthony J.; Montoney, Daniel; Dispenza, Dan; Driscoll, Mark

    2009-07-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced composites were cured in molds using X-rays derived from a high-energy, high-current electron beam. X-rays could penetrate the mold walls as well as the fiber reinforcements and polymerize a matrix system. Matrix materials made from modified epoxy-acrylates were tailored to suitably low viscosity so that fiber wetting and adhesion could be attained. Techniques similar to vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) and conventional vacuum bagging of wet lay-ups were used. Inexpensive reinforced polyester molds were used to fabricate vehicle fenders. Moderately low-dose X-ray exposure was sufficient to attain functional properties, such as resistance to heat distortion at temperatures as high as 180 °C. The matrix system contained an impact additive which imparted toughness to the cured articles. "Class A" high gloss surfaces were achieved. Thermo-analytical techniques were used on small-sized samples of X-ray-cured matrix materials to facilitate selection of a system for use in making prototypes of vehicle components. X-rays-penetrated metal pieces that were placed within layers of carbon-fiber twill, which were cured and bonded into a structure that could be mechanically attached without concern over fracturing the composite. X-ray curing is a low temperature process that eliminates residual internal stresses which are imparted by conventional thermo-chemical curing processes.

  3. A Thermo-Viscoelastic Model of Cure Stress Development in Constrained Thermosetting Resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Sindee; Prasatya, Patricia; McKenna, Gregory

    2000-03-01

    The residual stresses in an epoxy resin subjected to three-dimensional constraints are calculated by extending to three dimensions a thermo-viscoelastic model developed previously by Simon et al.[1] to describe the time, temperature, and conversion dependence of the shear modulus for a commercial thermosetting material during cure. Experimental residual stress data as a function of cure are fit to obtain limiting values for the rubber and glassy bulk moduli. The residual stresses are then calculated as a function of cure history using the bulk moduli and the time function obtained in the thermo-viscoelastic model which includes the dependence of the shift factor on temperature and conversion. An important result of the work is that, contrary to some literature works, the stress free temperature in the curing material is not the cure temperature. Rather the stress free point is better related to the point of gelation with the consequence that large hydrostatic stresses can result due to cure shrinkage in addition to differential thermal expansion. 1. S. L. Simon, G. B. McKenna, and O. Sindt, J. Appl. Polym. Sci., In Press.

  4. Effects of Various Salts on Physicochemical Properties and Sensory Characteristics of Cured Meat

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Young-Boong; Jeon, Ki-Hong; Kim, Hyun-Wook

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the effects of refined, solar, and bamboo salt on the physico-chemical properties and sensory characteristics of cured pork loin. Moisture, protein, fat, and ash content, lightness, yellowness, cooking yield, and color, juiciness, and tenderness of sensory properties on curing pork loin exhibited no significant differences regardless of the nature of salts. The pH of raw and cooked cured pork loin with added bamboo salt was higher that of other salt treatments. However, the cooking loss, and Warner-Bratzler shear force of cured pork loin with added refined salt was lower than those of solar and bamboo salt pork loins cured. The flavor and overall acceptability scores of treatments with refined salt was higher than those of solar and bamboo salt treatments. The unique flavor of bamboo salt can render it as a functional material for marinating meat products. In addition, the results of this study reveal potential use of bamboo salt in meat curing. PMID:27194922

  5. Light-Cured Self-Etch Adhesives Undergo Hydroxyapatite-Triggered Self-Cure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Bai, X; Liu, Y W; Wang, Y

    2016-03-01

    Light cure is a popular mode of curing for dental adhesives. However, it suffers from inadequate light delivery when the restoration site is less accessible, in which case a self-cure mechanism is desirable to salvage any compromised polymerization. We previously reported a novel self-cure system mediated by ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)-benzoate (4E) and hydroxyapatite (HAp). The present work aims to investigate if such self-cure phenomenon takes place in adhesives that underwent prior inadequate light cure and to elucidate if HAp released from the dental etching process is sufficient to trigger it. Model self-etch adhesives were formulated with various components, including bis[2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]-phosphate (2MP) as acidic monomer and trimethylbenzoyl-diphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) as photoinitiator. In vitro evolution of degree of conversion (DC) of HAp-incorporated adhesives was monitored by infrared spectroscopy during light irradiation and dark storage. Selected adhesives were allowed to etch and extract HAp from enamel, light-cured in situ, and stored in the dark, after which Raman line mapping was used to obtain spatially resolved DC across the enamel-resin interface. Results showed that TPO+4E adhesives reached DC similar to TPO-only counterparts upon completion of light irradiation but underwent another round of initiation that boosted DC to ~100% regardless of HAp level or prior light exposure. When applied to enamel, TPO-only adhesives had ~80% DC in resin, which gradually descended to ~50% in enamel, whereas TPO+4E adhesives consistently scored ~80% DC across the enamel-resin interface. These observations suggest that polymerization of adhesives that underwent insufficient light cure is salvaged by the novel self-cure mechanism, and such salvaging effect can be triggered by HAp released from dental substrate during the etching process.

  6. Silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Ault, N.N.; Crowe, J.T. )

    1991-05-01

    This paper reports that, since silicon carbide (SiC) does not occur in nature, it must be synthesized by a high-temperature chemical reaction. The first commercial production began at the end of the 19th century when Acheson developed a process of reacting sand and coke in a resistance furnace. This process is still the basic SiC manufacturing process used today. High-quality silica sand (99.5% SiO{sub 2}), low-sulfur petroleum coke, and electricity (23.8 MJ/kg) are the major ingredients in the production of SiC. The reaction takes place in a trough-like furnace with a removable refractory side (or some similar configuration) and with permanent refractory ends holding carbon electrodes. When the furnace is started, the carbon electrodes are joined by the graphite core laid the length of the furnace near the center of the mixture which fills the furnace.

  7. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials

    PubMed Central

    El-Deeb, Heba A.; Ghalab, Radwa M.; Elsayed Akah, Mai M.; Mobarak, Enas H.

    2015-01-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers’ instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm2) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64–86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage. PMID:26966567

  8. Heat transfer properties and thermal cure of glass-ionomer dental cements.

    PubMed

    Gavic, Lidia; Gorseta, Kristina; Glavina, Domagoj; Czarnecka, Beata; Nicholson, John W

    2015-10-01

    Under clinical conditions, conventional glass-ionomer dental cements can be cured by application of heat from dental cure lamps, which causes acceleration in the setting. In order for this to be successful, such heat must be able to spread sufficiently through the cement to enhance cure, but not transmit heat so effectively that the underlying dental pulp of the tooth is damaged. The current study was aimed at measuring heat transfer properties of modern restorative glass-ionomers to determine the extent to which they meet these twin requirements. Three commercial glass ionomer cements (Ionofil Molar, Ketac Molar and Equia™ Fill) were used in association with three different light emitting diode cure lamps designed for clinical use. In addition, for each cement, one set of specimens was allowed to cure without application of a lamp. Temperature changes were measured at three different depths (2, 3 and 4 mm) after cure times of 20, 40 and 60 s. The difference among the tested groups was evaluated by ANOVA (P < 0.05) and post hoc Newman-Keuls test. All brands of glass-ionomer showed a small inherent setting exotherm in the absence of heat irradiation, but much greater temperature increases when exposed to the cure lamp. However, temperature rises did not exceed 12.9 °C. Application of the cure lamp led to the establishment of a temperature gradient throughout each specimen. Differences were typically significant (P < 0.05) and did not reflect the nominal power of the lamps, because those lamps have variable cooling systems, and are designed to optimize light output, not heating effect. Because the thermal conductivity of glass-ionomers is low, temperature rises at 4 mm depths were much lower than at 2 mm. At no time did the temperature rise sufficiently to cause concern about potential damage to the pulp.

  9. Repair bond strength of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials.

    PubMed

    El-Deeb, Heba A; Ghalab, Radwa M; Elsayed Akah, Mai M; Mobarak, Enas H

    2016-03-01

    The reparability of dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials using a light-cured one following one week or three months storage, prior to repair was evaluated. Two different dual-cured resin composites; Cosmecore™ DC automix and Clearfil™ DC automix core buildup materials and a light-cured nanofilled resin composite; Filtek™ Z350 XT were used. Substrate specimens were prepared (n = 12/each substrate material) and stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C either for one week or three months. Afterward, all specimens were ground flat, etched using Scotchbond™ phosphoric acid etchant and received Single Bond Universal adhesive system according to the manufacturers' instructions. The light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT) was used as a repair material buildup. To determine the cohesive strength of each solid substrate material, additional specimens from each core material (n = 12) were prepared and stored for the same periods. Five sticks (0.8 ± 0.01 mm(2)) were obtained from each specimen (30 sticks/group) for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing. Modes of failure were also determined. Two-way ANOVA revealed a significant effect for the core materials but not for the storage periods or their interaction. After one week, dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials (Cosmecore™ DC and Clearfil™ DC) achieved significantly higher repair μTBS than the light-cured nanofilled resin composite (Filtek™ Z350 XT). However, Clearfil™ DC revealed the highest value, then Cosmecore™ DC and Filtek™ Z350 XT, following storage for 3-month. Repair strength values recovered 64-86% of the cohesive strengths of solid substrate materials. The predominant mode of failure was the mixed type. Dual-cured resin composite core buildup materials revealed acceptable repair bond strength values even after 3-month storage.

  10. Thin silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.B.; Bacon, C.; DiReda, V.; Ford, D.H.; Ingram, A.E.; Cotter, J.; Hughes-Lampros, T.; Rand, J.A.; Ruffins, T.R.; Barnett, A.M.

    1992-12-01

    The silicon-film design achieves high performance by using a dun silicon layer and incorporating light trapping. Optimally designed thin crystalline solar cells (<50 microns thick) have performance advantages over conventional thick devices. The high-performance silicon-film design employs a metallurgical barrier between the low-cost substrate and the thin silicon layer. Light trapping properties of silicon-film on ceramic solar cells are presented and analyzed. Recent advances in process development are described here.

  11. Silicon: the health benefits of a metalloid.

    PubMed

    Martin, Keith R

    2013-01-01

    Silicon is the second most abundant element in nature behind oxygen. As a metalloid, silicon has been used in many industrial applications including use as an additive in the food and beverage industry. As a result, humans come into contact with silicon through both environmental exposures but also as a dietary component. Moreover, many forms of silicon, that is, Si bound to oxygen, are water-soluble, absorbable, and potentially bioavailable to humans presumably with biological activity. However, the specific biochemical or physiological functions of silicon, if any, are largely unknown although generally thought to exist. As a result, there is growing interest in the potential therapeutic effects of water-soluble silica on human health. For example, silicon has been suggested to exhibit roles in the structural integrity of nails, hair, and skin, overall collagen synthesis, bone mineralization, and bone health and reduced metal accumulation in Alzheimer's disease, immune system health, and reduction of the risk for atherosclerosis. Although emerging research is promising, much additional, corroborative research is needed particularly regarding speciation of health-promoting forms of silicon and its relative bioavailability. Orthosilicic acid is the major form of bioavailable silicon whereas thin fibrous crystalline asbestos is a health hazard promoting asbestosis and significant impairment of lung function and increased cancer risk. It has been proposed that relatively insoluble forms of silica can also release small but meaningful quantities of silicon into biological compartments. For example, colloidal silicic acid, silica gel, and zeolites, although relatively insoluble in water, can increase concentrations of water-soluble silica and are thought to rely on specific structural physicochemical characteristics. Collectively, the food supply contributes enough silicon in the forms aforementioned that could be absorbed and significantly improve overall human health

  12. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  13. Advanced Fast Curing Adhesives for Adverse Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    set of battle damage repair adhesives include Belzona 2311 elastomer , Belzona 1221 super metal, and Belzona metal plug, which are very fast curing...resin, and dinonylphenol (10). Marine use A-788 Splash Zone epoxy- polyamide mastic from Z Spar, Los Angeles, CA was used for testing (11). The

  14. Campus Violence: Kinds, Causes, and Cures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Leighton C., Ed.; Pollard, Jeffrey W., Ed.

    This volume offers 14 papers on the types, sources, and possible cures of violence on college campuses from prominent workers in higher education. Following a preface the titles are: (1) "Conceptualizing Campus Violence: Definitions, Underlying Factors, and Effects" by Mary L. Roark; (2) "Administrative Perspectives on Disruptive…

  15. Quantitative prediction of stresses during thermoset cure

    SciTech Connect

    Adolf, D.; Chambers, B.; Burchett, S.

    1996-07-01

    Two thin-walled Al tubes were filled with epoxy which were cured isothermally; one tube was instrumented with strain gauges, and the other with thermocouples. Finite element codes were used. Predicted and measured centerline hoop strains are shown; predictions and measurements agree. This is being applied to encapsulated components.

  16. Audacious Cures for America's Ailing Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gevirtzman, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The problems in our nation's schools, and the cures for those problems, have been mired in confusion, innuendo, and deception. It is time someone separated the truths about our schools from the lies. Now retired from education, and finally free to speak up, veteran high school teacher Bruce J. Gevirtzman reveals his shocking ideas for fixing our…

  17. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  18. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  19. Effect of UV curing time on physical and electrical properties and reliability of low dielectric constant materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Kai-Chieh; Cheng, Yi-Lung; Chang, Wei-Yuan; Chang, Yu-Min; Leu, Jihperng

    2014-11-01

    This study comprehensively investigates the effect of ultraviolet (UV) curing time on the physical, electrical, and reliability characteristics of porous low-k materials. Following UV irradiation for various periods, the depth profiles of the chemical composition in the low-k dielectrics were homogeneous. Initially, the UV curing process preferentially removed porogen-related CH{sub x} groups and then modified Si-CH{sub 3} and cage Si-O bonds to form network Si-O bonds. The lowest dielectric constant (k value) was thus obtained at a UV curing time of 300 s. Additionally, UV irradiation made porogen-based low-k materials hydrophobic and to an extent that increased with UV curing time. With a short curing time (<300 s), porogen was not completely removed and the residues degraded reliability performance. A long curing time (>300 s) was associated with improved mechanical strength, electrical performance, and reliability of the low-k materials, but none of these increased linearly with UV curing time. Therefore, UV curing is necessary, but the process time must be optimized for porous low-k materials on back-end of line integration in 45 nm or below technology nodes.

  20. Role of surface-reaction layer in HBr/fluorocarbon-based plasma with nitrogen addition formed by high-aspect-ratio etching of polycrystalline silicon and SiO2 stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Taku; Matsui, Miyako; Yokogawa, Kenetsu; Arase, Takao; Mori, Masahito

    2016-06-01

    The etching of polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si)/SiO2 stacks by using VHF plasma was studied for three-dimensional NAND fabrication. One critical goal is achieving both a vertical profile and high throughput for multiple-stack etching. While the conventional process consists of multiple steps for each stacked layer, in this study, HBr/fluorocarbon-based gas chemistry was investigated to achieve a single-step etching process to reduce process time. By analyzing the dependence on wafer temperature, we improved both the etching profile and rate at a low temperature. The etching mechanism is examined considering the composition of the surface reaction layer. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed that the adsorption of N-H and Br was enhanced at a low temperature, resulting in a reduced carbon-based-polymer thickness and enhanced Si etching. Finally, a vertical profile was obtained as a result of the formation of a thin and reactive surface-reaction layer at a low wafer temperature.

  1. Characterization of the relationship of the cure cycle chemistry to cure cycle processing properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic dielectric analysis (DDA) is used to study curing polymer systems and thermoplastics. Measurements are made over a frequency range of six decades. This wide range of frequencies increases the amount of information which can be obtained. The data is analyzed in terms of the frequency dependence of the complex permittivity epsilon sup *, specific conductivity sigma (ohm/cm) and the relaxation time tau, parameters which are characteristic of the cure state of the material and independent of the size of the sample.

  2. Bond strength of a light-cured and two auto-cured glass ionomer liners.

    PubMed

    Holtan, J R; Nystrom, G P; Olin, P S; Rudney, J; Douglas, W H

    1990-10-01

    Ninety-nine extracted human molar teeth were used in this study comparing the shear bond strengths on dentine of one light-cured and two auto-cured polyalkenoate (glass ionomer) cements. Bond strength can be influenced by differences in tooth structure. A balanced-incomplete block design (Hull and Nie, 1981) was used to reduce variation attributable to such differences. Cements were applied to paired dentine surfaces in combinations such that 66 tooth sides were treated with each material. A light-cured dentinal adhesive and composite resin restorative material were then placed and shear bond strength testing was conducted exactly 24 h after the completion of each specimen. Mean forces (MPa) for the three materials were compared using an appropriate analysis of variance model (balanced-incomplete-blocks) The shear bond strengths (MPa) of the light-cured liner (Espe, Seefeld/Oberbay, FRG) was 4.71 +/- 1.16. Vitrabond showed the greatest variance of all three materials tested, however this material's average bond strength was greater than the maximum achieved for the other materials. Student-Newman-Keuls comparison of means showed that all cements differed significantly from each other (alpha = 0.05). It is concluded that the light-cured glass ionomer liner exhibited significantly better shear bond strength performance than the two auto-cured glass ionomers tested.

  3. High Efficiency, Low Cost Solar Cells Manufactured Using 'Silicon Ink' on Thin Crystalline Silicon Wafers

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniadis, H.

    2011-03-01

    Reported are the development and demonstration of a 17% efficient 25mm x 25mm crystalline Silicon solar cell and a 16% efficient 125mm x 125mm crystalline Silicon solar cell, both produced by Ink-jet printing Silicon Ink on a thin crystalline Silicon wafer. To achieve these objectives, processing approaches were developed to print the Silicon Ink in a predetermined pattern to form a high efficiency selective emitter, remove the solvents in the Silicon Ink and fuse the deposited particle Silicon films. Additionally, standard solar cell manufacturing equipment with slightly modified processes were used to complete the fabrication of the Silicon Ink high efficiency solar cells. Also reported are the development and demonstration of a 18.5% efficient 125mm x 125mm monocrystalline Silicon cell, and a 17% efficient 125mm x 125mm multicrystalline Silicon cell, by utilizing high throughput Ink-jet and screen printing technologies. To achieve these objectives, Innovalight developed new high throughput processing tools to print and fuse both p and n type particle Silicon Inks in a predetermined pat-tern applied either on the front or the back of the cell. Additionally, a customized Ink-jet and screen printing systems, coupled with customized substrate handling solution, customized printing algorithms, and a customized ink drying process, in combination with a purchased turn-key line, were used to complete the high efficiency solar cells. This development work delivered a process capable of high volume producing 18.5% efficient crystalline Silicon solar cells and enabled the Innovalight to commercialize its technology by the summer of 2010.

  4. Silicon quantum dots for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Chen, Song; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (or quantum dots, QDs) exhibit unique optical and electronic properties such as size-controlled fluorescence, high quantum yields, and stability against photobleaching. These properties allow QDs to be used as optical labels for multiplexed imaging and in drug delivery detection systems. Luminescent silicon QDs and surface-modified silicon QDs have also been developed as potential minimally toxic fluorescent probes for bioapplications. Silicon, a well-known power electronic semiconductor material, is considered an extremely biocompatible material, in particular with respect to blood. This review article summarizes existing knowledge related to and recent research progress made in the methods for synthesizing silicon QDs, as well as their optical properties and surface-modification processes. In addition, drug delivery systems and in vitro and in vivo imaging applications that use silicon QDs are also discussed.

  5. Cationic cure kinetics of a polyoxometalate loaded epoxy nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Benjamin J.

    2012-08-06

    The reaction cure kinetics of a novel polyoxometalate (POM) loaded epoxy nanocomposite is described. The POM is dispersed in the epoxy resin up to volume fractions of 0.1. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements show the cure of the epoxy resin to be sensitive to the POM loading. A kinetics study of the cure exotherm confirms that POM acts as a catalyst promoting cationic homopolymerization of the epoxy resin. The cure reaction is shown to propagate through two cure regimes. A fast cure at short time is shown to be propagation by the activated chain end (ACE) mechanism. A slow cure at long time is shown to be propagation by the activated monomer (AM) mechanism. The activation energies for the fast and slow cure regimes agree well with other epoxy based systems that have been confirmed to propagate by the ACE and AM mechanisms.

  6. A Study of Upgraded Phenolic Curing for RSRM Nozzle Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smartt, Ziba

    2000-01-01

    A thermochemical cure model for predicting temperature and degree of cure profiles in curing phenolic parts was developed, validated and refined over several years. The model supports optimization of cure cycles and allows input of properties based upon the types of material and the process by which these materials are used to make nozzle components. The model has been refined to use sophisticated computer graphics to demonstrate the changes in temperature and degree of cure during the curing process. The effort discussed in the paper will be the conversion from an outdated solid modeling input program and SINDA analysis code to an integrated solid modeling and analysis package (I-DEAS solid model and TMG). Also discussed will be the incorporation of updated material properties obtained during full scale curing tests into the cure models and the results for all the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) nozzle rings.

  7. Effect of graphene oxide sheet size on the curing kinetics and thermal stability of epoxy resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao; Jin, Jie; Song, Mo; Lin, Yue

    2016-10-01

    This work revealed the influences of graphene oxide (GO) sheet size on the curing kinetics and thermal stability of epoxy resins. A series of GO/epoxy nanocomposites were prepared by the incorporation of three different sized GO sheets, namely GO-1, GO-2 and GO-3, the average size of which was 10.79 μm, 1.72 μm and 0.70 μm, respectively. The morphologies of the nanocomposites were observed by field emission gun scanning electron microscope. The dispersion quality of each sized GO was comparable in the epoxy matrix. The curing kinetics was investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry and analyzed based on kinetics model. Addition of a small amount of GO (0.1 wt%) exhibited strong catalytic effect on the curing reaction of epoxy resin. The activation energy was reduced by 18.9%, 28.8% and 14.6% with addition of GO-1, GO-2 and GO-3, respectively. GO-2 with medium size (1.72 μm) showed the most effective catalysis on the cure. The thermal stability of the cured resins was evaluated based on thermogravimetric analysis. GO/epoxy nanocomposites showed improved thermal stability in the range of 420 °C-500 °C, compared with the pure resin. A ˜ 4% more residue was obtained in each of the incorporated system. The variations of GO sheet size did not influence the enhancement effect on the thermal stability.

  8. Polycrystalline silicon study: Low-cost silicon refining technology prospects and semiconductor-grade polycrystalline silicon availability through 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costogue, E. N.; Ferber, R.; Lutwack, R.; Lorenz, J. H.; Pellin, R.

    1984-01-01

    Photovoltaic arrays that convert solar energy into electrical energy can become a cost effective bulk energy generation alternative, provided that an adequate supply of low cost materials is available. One of the key requirements for economic photovoltaic cells is reasonably priced silicon. At present, the photovoltaic industry is dependent upon polycrystalline silicon refined by the Siemens process primarily for integrated circuits, power devices, and discrete semiconductor devices. This dependency is expected to continue until the DOE sponsored low cost silicon refining technology developments have matured to the point where they are in commercial use. The photovoltaic industry can then develop its own source of supply. Silicon material availability and market pricing projections through 1988 are updated based on data collected early in 1984. The silicon refining industry plans to meet the increasing demands of the semiconductor device and photovoltaic product industries are overviewed. In addition, the DOE sponsored technology research for producing low cost polycrystalline silicon, probabilistic cost analysis for the two most promising production processes for achieving the DOE cost goals, and the impacts of the DOE photovoltaics program silicon refining research upon the commercial polycrystalline silicon refining industry are addressed.

  9. New Perspectives in Silicon Micro and Nanophotonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalino, M.; Coppola, G.; De Stefano, L.; Calio, A.; Rea, I.; Mocella, V.; Dardano, P.; Romano, S.; Rao, S.; Rendina, I.

    2015-05-01

    In the last two decades, there has been growing interest in silicon-based photonic devices for many optical applications: telecommunications, interconnects and biosensors. In this work, an advance overview of our results in this field is presented. Proposed devices allow overcoming silicon intrinsic drawbacks limiting its application as a photonic substrate. Taking advantages of both non-linear and linear effects, size reduction at nanometric scale and new two-dimensional emerging materials, we have obtained a progressive increase in device performance along the last years. In this work we show that a suitable design of a thin photonic crystal slab realized in silicon nitride can exhibit a very strong field enhancement. This result is very promising for all photonic silicon devices based on nonlinear phenomena. Moreover we report on the fabrication and characterization of silicon photodetectors working at near-infrared wavelengths based on the internal photoemission absorption in a Schottky junction. We show as an increase in device performance can be obtained by coupling light into both micro-resonant cavity and waveguiding structures. In addition, replacing metal with graphene in a Schottky junction, a further improve in PD performance can be achieved. Finally, silicon-based microarray for biomedical applications, are reported. Microarray of porous silicon Bragg reflectors on a crystalline silicon substrate have been realized using a technological process based on standard photolithography and electrochemical anodization of the silicon. Our insights show that silicon is a promising platform for the integration of various optical functionalities on the same chip opening new frontiers in the field of low-cost silicon micro and nanophotonics.

  10. Breast Implants: Saline vs. Silicone

    MedlinePlus

    ... to women of any age for breast reconstruction. Silicone breast implants Silicone implants are pre-filled with ... likely be inserted at the same time. Ruptured silicone implant If a silicone breast implant ruptures, you ...

  11. Electron Beam Curing of Polymer Matrix Composites - CRADA Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C. J.; Howell, Dave; Norris, Robert E.

    1997-05-01

    The major cost driver in manufacturing polymer matrix composite (PMC) parts and structures, and one of the elements having the greatest effect on their quality and performance, is the standard thermal cure process. Thermal curing of PMCs requires long cure times and high energy consumption, creates residual thermal stresses in the part, produces volatile toxic by-products, and requires expensive tooling that is tolerant of the high cure temperatures.

  12. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    ... or natural. Natural food additives include: Herbs or spices to add flavor to foods Vinegar for pickling ... Certain colors improve the appearance of foods. Many spices, as well as natural and man-made flavors, ...

  13. 7 CFR 29.6002 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6002 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions. Artificial heat sometimes is used to control excess humidity during the curing period to prevent pole-sweat... resulting from the application of artificial heat....

  14. 7 CFR 30.12 - Fire-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fire-cure. 30.12 Section 30.12 Agriculture Regulations... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.12 Fire-cure. To cure tobacco under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires, the smoke...

  15. 7 CFR 30.12 - Fire-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fire-cure. 30.12 Section 30.12 Agriculture Regulations... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.12 Fire-cure. To cure tobacco under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires, the smoke...

  16. 7 CFR 30.12 - Fire-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fire-cure. 30.12 Section 30.12 Agriculture Regulations... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.12 Fire-cure. To cure tobacco under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires, the smoke...

  17. 7 CFR 30.12 - Fire-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire-cure. 30.12 Section 30.12 Agriculture Regulations... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.12 Fire-cure. To cure tobacco under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires, the smoke...

  18. 7 CFR 30.12 - Fire-cure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fire-cure. 30.12 Section 30.12 Agriculture Regulations... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.12 Fire-cure. To cure tobacco under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires, the smoke...

  19. 7 CFR 29.3502 - Air-cured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Dark Air-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 35, 36, 37 and Foreign Type 95) § 29.3502 Air-cured. Tobacco cured under natural atmospheric conditions without the use of fire, except for the purpose of preventing pole-burn in damp weather....

  20. UV curing with water based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, E.; Haeussling, L.; Jaeger, U.

    1995-12-01

    Conventional coatings technology requires a large effort to reduce emissions of organic solvents and other volatile organic components. Alleviations, yet not a solution to this problem are high solids coatings formulations or even powder coatings technology. An entirely different concept is used in radiation curing of coatings, where all the elements of the originally low molar mass components of the coating formulation are polymerized into one large network. Thus there should be no emissions of low molar mass compounds from UV- or Electron beam cured films. Water as a diluent in UV-curable formulations can either be used directly as a solvent or in emulsions (with the help of emulsifying agents) without a loss in performance of coatings properties, such as hardness, elasticity and reactivity. To the contrary, the prearrangement of functionalities in the final coating due to the prior phase separation in the emulsion seems to slightly increase hardness and adhesion as well as elasticity.

  1. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for HIV cure

    PubMed Central

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    The apparent cure of an HIV-infected person following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from an allogeneic donor homozygous for the ccr5Δ32 mutation has stimulated the search for strategies to eradicate HIV or to induce long-term remission without requiring ongoing antiretroviral therapy. A variety of approaches, including allogeneic HSCT from CCR5-deficient donors and autologous transplantation of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells, are currently under investigation. This Review covers the experience with HSCT in HIV infection to date and provides a survey of ongoing work in the field. The challenges of developing HSCT for HIV cure in the context of safe, effective, and convenient once-daily antiretroviral therapy are also discussed. PMID:26731468

  2. Light-Curing Adhesive Repair Tapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allred, Ronald; Haight, Andrea Hoyt

    2009-01-01

    Adhesive tapes, the adhesive resins of which can be cured (and thereby rigidized) by exposure to ultraviolet and/or visible light, are being developed as repair patch materials. The tapes, including their resin components, consist entirely of solid, low-outgassing, nonhazardous or minimally hazardous materials. They can be used in air or in vacuum and can be cured rapidly, even at temperatures as low as -20 C. Although these tapes were originally intended for use in repairing structures in outer space, they can also be used on Earth for quickly repairing a wide variety of structures. They can be expected to be especially useful in situations in which it is necessary to rigidize tapes after wrapping them around or pressing them onto the parts to be repaired.

  3. Aloe vera as cure for lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Patil, Bharati A; Bhaskar, Hebbar Pragati; Pol, Jyoti S; Sodhi, Amandeep; Madhu, Asha V

    2013-01-01

    Oral lichen planus is a difficult condition to treat because of its chronic nature. Various treatment modalities have resulted in partial regression of symptoms but not a complete cure. Aloe vera, a product with minimal adverse effects, can be tried to treat this disorder. A 38-year-old male patient diagnosed with lichen planus of the skin and the oral mucosa was suffering from severe pain and a burning sensation intraorally and pruritus of the skin lesions. Considering the extensive involvement, an herbal alternative was considered. The patient was prescribed aloe vera juice and gel application for two months. At the nine-month follow-up, the patient was symptom-free and totally cured of the intraoral and skin lesions.

  4. Toughening reinforced epoxy composites with brominated polymeric additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nir, Z.; Gilwee, W. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Cured polyfunctional epoxy resins including tris (hydroxyphenyl) methane triglycidyl ether are toughened by addition of polybrominated polymeric additives having an EE below 1500 to the pre-cure composition. Carboxy terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber is optionally present in the precure mixture as such or as a pre-formed copolymer with other reactants. Reinforced composites, particularly carbon reinforced composites, of these resins are disclosed and shown to have improved toughness.

  5. Sage Gene Expression Profiles Characterizing Cure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    early stage tumours (the cacoethesis of Celsus). Twentieth century progress in antisepsis , anaesthesia, and surgery changed this point of view. The first... antisepsis or anaesthesia. Nitrous oxide was described in 1842 and ether was first demonstrated in 1846. Schleiden (1838), a German, was among the first to...and antisepsis which allowed surgeons to attempt a radical cure of breast cancer. He describes a series of 616 cases, 70% of whom had skin infiltration

  6. Coating and curing apparatus and methods

    DOEpatents

    Brophy, Brenor L.; Gonsalves, Peter R.; Maghsoodi, Sina; Colson, Thomas E.; Yang, Yu S.; Abrams, Ze'ev R.

    2016-04-19

    Disclosed is a coating apparatus including flow coating and roll-coating that may be used for uniform sol-gel coating of substrates such as glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed are methods for substrate preparation, flow coating and roll coating. Lastly, systems and methods for curing sol-gel coatings deposited onto the surface of glass substrates using high temperature air-knives, infrared emitters and direct heat applicators are disclosed.

  7. Photothermal Monitoring Of Curing Of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooney, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared radiometry (TRIR) adapted to monitoring curing of some polymers in production. Proposal part of continuing effort to perfect production of hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene for use in liners of solid-fuel rocket motors. Applicable to monitoring changing states of many other materials in process. TRIR, non-contact technique implemented with remotely situated equipment and better suited to use in production.

  8. Characterization and Cure Monitoring of Structural Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-01

    OX tiLE (OP? MTL TR 89-15 AD CHARACTERIZATION AND CURE MONITORING OF STRUCTURAL ADHESIVES CD WALTER X. ZUKAS, HOWARD H. WONG, DAVID A. DUNN, and...REPORT NUMB3ER 7. AUTHOR(s) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBERs) Walter X. Zukas, Howard H. Wong, David A. Dunn, and Stanley E. Wentworth I. PERFORING...Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 1 ATTN: B. Fanconi, Polymer Standards Division 1 D. Hunston, Polymer Standards Division 1 Dr. Stanley M. Barkin , Staff

  9. Coating and curing apparatus and methods

    DOEpatents

    Brophy, Brenor L; Maghsoodi, Sina; Neyman, Patrick J; Gonsalves, Peter R; Hirsch, Jeffrey G; Yang, Yu S

    2015-02-24

    Disclosed are coating apparatus including flow coating and roll-coating that may be used for uniform sol-gel coating of substrates such as glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed are methods for substrate preparation, flow coating and roll coating. Lastly systems and methods for skin curing sol-gel coatings deposited onto the surface of glass substrates using a high temperature air-knife are disclosed.

  10. Demonstration of Mer-Cure Technology for Enhanced Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect

    John Marion; Dave O'Neill; Kevin Taugher; Shin Kang; Mark Johnson; Gerald Pargac; Jane Luedecke; Randy Gardiner; Mike Silvertooth; Jim Hicks; Carl Edberg; Ray Cournoyer; Stanley Bohdanowicz; Ken Peterson; Kurt Johnson; Steve Benson; Richard Schulz; Don McCollor; Mike Wuitshick

    2008-06-01

    Alstom Power Inc. has completed a DOE/NETL-sponsored program (under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. De-FC26-07NT42776) to demonstrate Mer-Cure{trademark}, one of Alstom's mercury control technologies for coal-fired boilers. The Mer-Cure{trademark}system utilizes a small amount of Mer-Clean{trademark} sorbent that is injected into the flue gas stream for oxidation and adsorption of gaseous mercury. Mer-Clean{trademark} sorbents are carbon-based and prepared with chemical additives that promote oxidation and capture of mercury. The Mer-Cure{trademark} system is unique in that the sorbent is injected into an environment where the mercury capture kinetics is accelerated. The full-scale demonstration program originally included test campaigns at two host sites: LCRA's 480-MW{sub e} Fayette Unit No.3 and Reliant Energy's 190-MW{sub e} Shawville Unit No.3. The only demonstration tests actually done were the short-term tests at LCRA due to budget constraints. This report gives a summary of the demonstration testing at Fayette Unit No.3. The goals for this Mercury Round 3 program, established by DOE/NETL under the original solicitation, were to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 90% at a cost significantly less than 50% of the previous target of $60,000/lb mercury removed. The results indicated that Mer-Cure{trademark} technology could achieve mercury removal of 90% based on uncontrolled stack emissions. The estimated costs for 90% mercury control, at a sorbent cost of $0.75 to $2.00/lb respectively, were $13,400 to $18,700/lb Hg removed. In summary, the results from demonstration testing show that the goals established by DOE/NETL were met during this test program. The goal of 90% mercury reduction was achieved. Estimated mercury removal costs were 69-78% lower than the benchmark of $60,000/lb mercury removed, significantly less than 50% of the baseline removal cost.

  11. Process for producing silicon

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Carleton, Karen L.

    1984-01-01

    A process for producing silicon includes forming an alloy of copper and silicon and positioning the alloy in a dried, molten salt electrolyte to form a solid anode structure therein. An electrically conductive cathode is placed in the electrolyte for plating silicon thereon. The electrolyte is then purified to remove dissolved oxides. Finally, an electrical potential is applied between the anode and cathode in an amount sufficient to form substantially pure silicon on the cathode in the form of substantially dense, coherent deposits.

  12. Photopatternable silicone compositions for electronic packaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkness, Brian R.; Gardner, Geoff B.; Alger, James S.; Cummings, Michelle R.; Princing, Jennifer; Lee, Yeong; Meynen, Herman; Gonzales, Mario; Vandevelde, Bart; Vanden Bulcke, Mathieu; Winters, Christophe; Beyne, Eric

    2004-05-01

    A growing need for low stress high temperature thick film materials has prompted the development of new spin-coatable photopatternable silicones (Dow Corning WL-5000 series) to assist manufactures in building the next generation of electronic devices. These new negative-tone materials can be easily coated onto electronic substrates and patterned using standard i-line and broadband lithographic processes. Films ranging from 6 to 50 μm have been demonstrated with patterned features resolved to an aspect ratio of less than 1.3. The etched regions provide a sloped sidewall and curved surfaces to facilitate metallization processes. The films are cured at low temperatures (150 to 250°C) to provide low modulus values in the range of 150 to 500 MPa, are inherently hydrophobic, and are based on cure chemistry that is acid free and delivers thermally stable cross-links. As a result, the films show very little shrinkage during thermal cure (~2%), do not require extended high temperature processing, and provide a very low residual stress (<8 MPa). They also show excellent thermal stability and mechanical integrity when exposed to high temperatures. A simple wet process has been developed to facilitate film rework and allow for sacrificial layer applications.

  13. Thermal rheological analysis of cure process of epoxy prepreg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liangfeng

    2002-01-01

    The cure process of epoxy prepreg used as composite pipe joints was studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Bohlin Rheometer and other techniques. Isothermal DSC measurements were conducted between 110 and 220°C, at 10°C intervals. The results show that the complete cure reaction could be achieved at 220°C. The isothermal cure process was simulated with the four-parameter autocatalytic model. Except in the late stage of cure reaction, the model agrees well with the experimental data, especially at high temperatures. To account for the effect of diffusion on the cure rate, a diffusion factor was introduced into the model. The modified model greatly improved the predicated data at the late stage of cure reaction. The dynamic cure process was different from the isothermal cure process in that it is composed of two cure reactions. For dynamic cure process, a three-parameter autocatalytic model was used. The parameters in the model were determined by two methods. One was based on Kissinger and Ozawa approach. The whole curing process was modeled with two reactions. Another method was based on Borchardt and Daniels kinetic approach with whole curing process was modeled with one reaction. The fitting results by first and second method agreed well with experimental value in the late and early cure stage, separately. Rheological properties of epoxy prepreg are closely related to the cure process. With the development of cure reaction, gelation occurs and epoxy prepreg becomes difficult to process. As temperature increases, the gel time decreases. Viscosity profiles were described by different models. Except the first and nth order viscosity models, new viscosity models were proposed. The proposed new viscosity models are better than the old models for both isothermal and dynamic cure processes. To graphically represent the phase changes of the cure process, the isothermal cure diagrams of time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and conversion

  14. Consequences of Atomic Oxygen Interaction With Silicone and Silicone Contamination on Surfaces in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Haytas, Christy A.

    1999-01-01

    The exposure of silicones to atomic oxygen in low Earth orbit causes oxidation of the surface, resulting in conversion of silicone to silica. This chemical conversion increases the elastic modulus of the surface and initiates the development of a tensile strain. Ultimately, with sufficient exposure, tensile strain leads to cracking of the surface enabling the underlying unexposed silicone to be converted to silica resulting in additional depth and extent of cracking. The use of silicone coatings for the protection of materials from atomic oxygen attack is limited because of the eventual exposure of underlying unprotected polymeric material due to deep tensile stress cracking of the oxidized silicone. The use of moderate to high volatility silicones in low Earth orbit has resulted in a silicone contamination arrival at surfaces which are simultaneously being bombarded with atomic oxygen, thus leading to conversion of the silicone contaminant to silica. As a result of these processes, a gradual accumulation of contamination occurs leading to deposits which at times have been up to several microns thick (as in the case of a Mir solar array after 10 years in space). The contamination species typically consist of silicon, oxygen and carbon. which in the synergistic environment of atomic oxygen and UV radiation leads to increased solar absorptance and reduced solar transmittance. A comparison of the results of atomic oxygen interaction with silicones and silicone contamination will be presented based on the LDEF, EOIM-111, Offeq-3 spacecraft and Mir solar array in-space results. The design of a contamination pin-hole camera space experiment which uses atomic oxygen to produce an image of the sources of silicone contamination will also be presented.

  15. In-Situ Cure Monitoring of the Immidization Reaction of PMR-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cossins, Sheryl; Kellar, Jon J.; Winter, Robb M.

    1997-01-01

    Glass fiber reinforced polymer composites are becoming widely used in industry. With this increase in production, an in-situ method of quality control for the curing of the polymer is desirable. This would allow for the production of high-quality parts having more uniform properties.' Recently, in-situ fiber optic monitoring of polymer curing has primarily focused on epoxy resins and has been performed by Raman or fluorescence methods. In addition, some infrared (IR) investigations have been performed using transmission or ATR cells. An alternate IR approach involves using optical fibers as a sensor by utilizing evanescent wave spectroscopy.

  16. Characterization of the relationship of the cure cycle chemistry to cure cycle processing properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic Dielectric measurements made over a wide range of frequency provide a sensitive and convenient means for monitoring the cure process in thermosets and thermoplastics. The measurement of dielectric relaxation is one of only a few instrumental techniques available for studying molecular properties in both the liquid and solid states. Furthermore, it is probably the only convenient experimental technique for studying the polymerization process of going from a monomeric liquid of varying viscosity to a crosslinked, insoluble, high temperature solid. The objective of the research is to develop on-line dielectric instrumentation for quantitative nondestructive material evaluation and closed loop smart cure cycle control. The key is to relate the chemistry of the cure cycle process to the dielectric properties of the polymer system by correlating the time, temperature, and frequency dependent dielectric measurements with chemical characterization measurements. Measurement of the wide variation in magnitude of the complex permittivity with both frequency and state of cure, coupled with chemical characterization work, have been shown in the laboratory to have the potential to determine: resin quality, composition and age; cure cycle window boundaries; onset of flow and point of maximum flow; extent of and completion of reaction; evolution of volatiles; T sub g; and, crosslinking and molecular weight buildup.

  17. Microhardness and Young's modulus of a bonding resin cured with different curing units.

    PubMed

    Yamauti, Monica; Nikaido, Toru; Ikeda, Masaomi; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji

    2004-12-01

    This study evaluated the microhardness and Young's modulus of a photocurable bonding resin, Clearfil SE Bond (SE), cured with four curing units at different distances. The curing units used were: Candelux (Quartz-tungsten halogen), Lux-O-Max (Blue light emitting diode), Arc-light (Plasma-arc), and Rayblaze (Metal halide). Discs of bonding resin were prepared using vinyl molds and were photocured at the top surface with light tip at three different distances (contact, 2 and 4 mm). After 24 hours of storage in water at 37 degrees C, the specimens were sectioned into halves, embedded in epoxy resin, and polished. The microhardness and Young's modulus of this bonding resin were measured using a nanoindentation tester. Six specimens were prepared for each group. The data was statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA test and Tukey multiple comparison test (p < 0.01). The microhardness of SE was affected by light source and distance, as was Young's modulus. Candelux and Rayblaze presented the highest hardness and Young's modulus results. Both properties presented high values when the curing unit tip was maintained in contact with the irradiated surface. Increasing the distance between the curing unit tip and the irradiated surface decreased the hardness and Young's modulus of SE.

  18. Electrodeposition of molten silicon

    DOEpatents

    De Mattei, Robert C.; Elwell, Dennis; Feigelson, Robert S.

    1981-01-01

    Silicon dioxide is dissolved in a molten electrolytic bath, preferably comprising barium oxide and barium fluoride. A direct current is passed between an anode and a cathode in the bath to reduce the dissolved silicon dioxide to non-alloyed silicon in molten form, which is removed from the bath.

  19. Efficient Silicon Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, H. E.; Hill, D. M.; Jewett, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    High-purity silicon efficiently produced and transferred by continuous two-cycle reactor. New reactor operates in relatively-narrow temperature rate and uses large surfaces area to minimize heat expenditure and processing time in producing silicon by hydrogen reduction of trichlorosilane. Two cycles of reactor consists of silicon production and removal.

  20. High Tg and fast curing epoxy-based anisotropic conductive paste for electronic packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeratitham, Waralee; Somwangthanaroj, Anongnat

    2016-03-01

    Herein, our main objective is to prepare the fast curing epoxy system with high glass transition temperature (Tg) by incorporating the multifunctional epoxy resin into the mixture of diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) as a major epoxy component and aromatic diamine as a hardener. Furthermore, the curing behavior as well as thermal and thermomechanical properties were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and thermomechanical analysis (TMA). It was found that Tg obtained from tan δ of DGEBA/aromatic diamine system increased from 100 °C to 205 °C with the presence of 30 percentage by weight of multifunctional epoxy resin. Additionally, the isothermal DSC results showed that the multifunctional epoxy resin can accelerate the curing reaction of DGEBA/aromatic diamine system. Namely, a high degree of curing (˜90%) was achieved after a few minutes of curing at low temperature of 130 °C, owing to a large number of epoxy ring of multifunctional epoxy resin towards the active hydrogen atoms of aromatic diamine.

  1. Depth of cure and marginal adaptation to dentin of xenon lamp polymerized resin composites.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Itoh, K; Yukitani, W; Wakumoto, S; Hisamitsu, H

    2001-01-01

    Marginal adaptation of four resin composites (Clearfil APX, Estelite, Silux Plus and Z-100) cured with two xenon lamp units (Plasma Arc Curing System or Apollo 95E) or a halogen lamp unit (Witelite) were evaluated by measuring the wall-to-wall contraction gap width. A cylindrical dentin cavity (ø3 mm x 1.5 mm) prepared in an extracted human molar was treated with the Megabond system or an experimental bonding system consisting of 0.5 M EDTA, 35% GM and Clearfil Photo Bond prior to composite filling and was irradiated for three seconds (xenon lamp) or 40 seconds (halogen lamp). The contraction gap was measured with a light microscope. In addition, the curing capability of these three light sources was evaluated by measuring the curing depth of the composites filled in a split Teflon mold (ø4 mm x 8 mm). There was no marginal gap formation for Clearfil APX, Estelite and Silux Plus treated with the experimental bonding system regardless of the type of light sources. The curing depth of the xenon lamp was significantly higher than the halogen lamp, while marginal adaptation did not suffer any significant deterioration.

  2. Towards Multidisciplinary HIV-Cure Research: Integrating Social Science with Biomedical Research.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Cynthia I; Ross, Anna Laura; Auerbach, Judith D; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Dubé, Karine; Tucker, Joseph D; Noseda, Veronica; Possas, Cristina; Rausch, Dianne M

    2016-01-01

    The quest for a cure for HIV remains a timely and key challenge for the HIV research community. Despite significant scientific advances, current HIV therapy regimens do not completely eliminate the negative impact of HIV on the immune system; and the economic impact of treating all people infected with HIV globally, for the duration of their lifetimes, presents significant challenges. This article discusses, from a multidisciplinary approach, critical social, behavioral, ethical, and economic issues permeating the HIV-cure research agenda. As part of a search for an HIV cure, both the perspective of patients/participants and clinical researchers should be taken into account. In addition, continued efforts should be made to involve and educate the broader community.

  3. Two-year color changes of light-cured composites: influence of different light-curing units.

    PubMed

    Usumez, Aslihan; Ozturk, Nilgun; Ozturk, Bora

    2005-01-01

    This study determined color changes in a composite cured with various types of curing units after two years. A hybrid (Clearfil AP-X) composite was cured with a conventional halogen, a high intensity halogen, a plasma arc and a light emitting diode unit. The specimens were stored in light-proof boxes after the curing procedure to avoid further exposure to light and stored in 37 degrees C in 100% humidity. Colorimetric values of the specimens immediately after curing and after two years were measured using a colorimeter. The CIE 1976 L*a*b color system was used to determine color differences. Differences from baseline were calculated as deltaE*ab. Data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance (p<0.05). The deltaE*ab values varied significantly, depending on the curing unit used. The specimens cured with a plasma arc curing unit induced significantly higher color changes than any other specimen and the color differences were also visually appreciable by the non-skilled operator (deltaE*ab >2.5). The specimens cured with a high intensity halogen curing unit produced the lowest color change; however, there were no statistically significant differences among the color changes of specimens cured with conventional halogen, high intensity halogen and the light emitting diode unit, and the color changes were not clinically relevant (deltaE*ab <2.5). The results of this study suggest that composite materials undergo measurable changes due to curing unit exposure. The specimens cured with a plasma arc light showed the highest color changes as compared to specimens cured with other curing units.

  4. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  5. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  6. Effect of Particular Breed on the Chemical Composition, Texture, Color, and Sensorial Characteristics of Dry-cured Ham

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Pil Nam; Park, Kuyng Mi; Kang, Sun Moon; Kang, Geun Ho; Cho, Soo Hyun; Park, Beom Young; Van Ba, Hoa

    2014-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the impact of specific breed on the characteristics of dry-cured ham. Eighty thighs from Korean native pig (KNP), crossbreed (Landrace×Yorkshire)♀×Duroc♂ (LYD), Berkshire (Ber), and Duroc (Du) pig breeds (n = 10 for each breed) were used for processing of dry-cured ham. The thighs were salted with 6% NaCl (w/w) and 100 ppm NaNO2, and total processing time was 413 days. The effects of breed on the physicochemical composition, texture, color and sensory characteristics were assessed on the biceps femoris muscle of the hams. The results revealed that the highest weight loss was found in the dry-cured ham of LYD breed and the lowest weight loss was found in Ber dry-cured ham. The KNP dry-cured ham contain higher intramuscular fat level than other breed hams (p<0.05). It was observed that the dry-cured ham made from KNP breed had the lowest water activity value and highest salt content, while the LYD dry-cure ham had higher total volatile basic nitrogen content than the Ber and Du hams (p<0.05). Zinc, iron and total monounsaturated fatty acids levels were higher in KNP ham while polyunsaturated fatty acids levels were higher in Du ham when compared to other breed hams (p<0.05). Additionally, the KNP dry-cured ham possessed higher Commission International de l’Eclairage (CIE) a* value, while the Du dry-cured ham had higher L*, CIE b* and hue angle values (p<0.05). Furthermore, breed significantly affected the sensory attributes of dry-cured hams with higher scores for color, aroma and taste found in KNP dry-cured ham as compared to other breed hams (p<0.05). The overall outcome of the study is that the breed has a potential effect on the specific chemical composition, texture, color and sensorial properties of dry-cured hams. These data could be useful for meat processors to select the suitable breeds for economical manufacturing of high quality dry-cured hams. PMID:25083111

  7. Effect of post-curing treatment on mechanical properties of composite resins.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Chetti, Verónica A; Macchi, Ricardo L; Iglesias, María E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effect of additional curing procedures on the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity of indirect and direct composite materials. Twenty-four rectangular prism-shaped 2 mm x 2 mm x 25 mm samples of Belleglass, Premisa (Kerr), Adoro and Heliomolar (Ivoclar Vivadent) were prepared. Each composite was packed in an ad-hoc stainless steel device with a TeflonR instrument. A mylar strip and a glass slab were placed on top to obtain a flat surface. Polymerization was activated for 20 seconds with a halogen unit (Astralis 10, Ivoclar - Vivadent) with soft start regime and an output with a 350 to 1200 mw/cm2 range at four different points according to the diameter of the end of the guide. The specimens obtained were then randomly divided into two different groups: with and without additional treatment. In the group with additional treatment, the samples adorro were submitted to 25 minutes in Lumamat 100 (Ivoclar Vivadent) and the rest to 20 minutes in BelleGlass HP (Kerr). After the curing procedures, all samples were treated with sandpapers of decreasing grain size under water flow, and stored in distilled water for 24 h. Flexural strength was measured according to the ISO 404920 recommendations and elastic modulus was determined following the procedures of ANSI/ADA standard No. 27. Statistical differences were found among the different materials and curing procedures employed (P<0.01). The elastic modulus was significantly higher after the additional curing treatment for all materials except Premisa. Further work is needed to determine the association between the actual monomers present in the matrix and the effect of additional curing processes on the mechanical properties of both direct and indirect composites, and its clinical relevance.

  8. Curing and Post-curing Viscoelastic Monitoring of an Epoxy Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodhbani, N.; Marechal, P.; Duflo, H.

    An experimental setup has been developed for the monitoring of ultrasonic parameters during polymerization in the context of the monitoring of composite plate production. An analytical approach is proposed based on the modeling of the wave velocity fitted by a Weibull distribution and was investigated to validate this approach by the Debye series modeling (DSM). The monitoring of the cured epoxy is also performed after curing in order to study the thermal transformation compared with DSC measurements. As a result, an approximated frequency-temperature (f, T) model is proposed for attenuation and velocity frequency and temperature dispersions.

  9. Thick-film materials for silicon photovoltaic cell manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, M. B.

    1977-01-01

    Thick film technology is applicable to three areas of silicon solar cell fabrication; metallization, junction formation, and coating for protection of screened ohmic contacts, particularly wrap around contacts, interconnection and environmental protection. Both material and process parameters were investigated. Printed ohmic contacts on n- and p-type silicon are very sensitive to the processing parameters of firing time, temperature, and atmosphere. Wrap around contacts are easily achieved by first printing and firing a dielectric over the edge and subsequently applying a low firing temperature conductor. Interconnection of cells into arrays can be achieved by printing and cofiring thick film metal pastes, soldering, or with heat curing conductive epoxies on low cost substrates. Printed (thick) film vitreous protection coatings do not yet offer sufficient optical uniformity and transparency for use on silicon. A sprayed, heat curable SiO2 based resin shows promise of providing both optical matching and environmental protection.

  10. Glass-silicon column

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  11. Porous silicon gettering

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Al-Jassim, M.

    1995-08-01

    We have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that utilizes the very large surface areas, produced by porous silicon etch on both front and back surfaces of the silicon wafer, as gettering sites. In this method, a simple and low-cost chemical etching is used to generate the porous silicon layers. Then, a high-flux solar furnace (HFSF) is used to provide high-temperature annealing and the required injection of silicon interstitials. The gettering sites, along with the gettered impurities, can be easily removed at the end the process. The porous silicon removal process consists of oxidizing the porous silicon near the end the gettering process followed by sample immersion in HF acid. Each porous silicon gettering process removes up to about 10 {mu}m of wafer thickness. This gettering process can be repeated so that the desired purity level is obtained.

  12. Impurities in silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    Metallic impurities, both singly and in combinations, affect the performance of silicon solar cells. Czochralski silicon web crystals were grown with controlled additions of secondary impurities. The primary electrical dopants were boron and phosphorus. The silicon test ingots were grown under controlled and carefully monitored conditions from high-purity charge and dopant material to minimize unintentional contamination. Following growth, each crystal was characterized by chemical, microstructural, electrical, and solar cell tests to provide a detailed and internally consistent description of the relationships between silicon impurity concentration and solar cell performance. Deep-level spectroscopy measurements were used to measure impurity concentrations at levels below the detectability of other techniques and to study thermally-induced changes in impurity activity. For the majority of contaminants, impurity-induced performance loss is due to a reduction of the base diffusion length. From these observations, a semi-empirical model which predicts cell performance as a function of metal impurity concentration was formulated. The model was then used successfully to predict the behavior of solar cells bearing as many as 11 different impurities.

  13. Synthesis and properties of transparent cycloaliphatic epoxy-silicone resins for opto-electronic devices packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Nan; Liu, WeiQu; Yan, ZhenLong; Wang, ZhengFang

    2013-01-01

    Cycloaliphatic epoxy-silicone resins were successfully synthesized through a two-step reaction route: (і) hydrosilylation of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane (TMCTS) and 1,2-epoxy-4-vinyl-cyclohexane (VCMX), (іі) blocking of unreacted Sisbnd H in (і) with n-butanol. The molecular structures of the cycloaliphatic epoxy-silicone resins were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR and 29Si NMR). High grafting efficiencies of epoxy groups were confirmed by 1H NMR combined with weighting results, indicating over 90 mol% of cycloaliphatic epoxy were grafted on the silicone resins. Subsequently, Sisbnd H groups from TMCTS were almost totally consumed after the blocking reactions. In comparison with commercial available cycloaliphatic epoxy resin 3,4-epoxycyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate (ERL-4221) cured by MHHPA, the cured cycloaliphatic epoxy-silicone resins exhibited better thermal stability, lower water absorption and higher UV/thermal resistance. Moreover, the characteristics of transmittance (>90%, 800 nm), 5 wt.% mass loss temperature (>330 °C) and no yellowing during thermal aging at 120 °C or UV aging for 288 h of the cured cycloaliphatic epoxy-silicone resins, made them possible for power light-emitting diode (LED) encapsulants, or other packaging materials, like optical lenses, and electronic sealings.

  14. The development of low temperature curing adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. E.; Sutherland, J. D.; Hom, J. M.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for the development of a practical low temperature (293 K-311 K/68 F-100 F) curing adhesive system based on a family of amide/ester resins was studied and demonstrated. The work was conducted on resin optimization and adhesive compounding studies. An improved preparative method was demonstrated which involved the reaction of an amine-alcohol precursor, in a DMF solution with acid chloride. Experimental studies indicated that an adhesive formulation containing aluminum powder provided the best performance when used in conjunction with a commercial primer.

  15. Lower-curing-temperature PMR polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delvigs, P.

    1982-01-01

    Partial substitution of a p-aminostyrene end-cap for the monomethyl ester of 5-norbornene-2, 3-dicarboxylic acid lowered the final cure temperature of typical PMR resins from 600 F to 500 F. The weight loss characteristics of neat resins and graphite fiber composites prepared by using the mixed end-cap approach were determined at 600 F. The room temperature and short-time elevated temperature mechanical properties of the composites at 550 F and 600 F were determined. The mechanical property retention characteristics of the composites at 550 F and 600 F are discussed.

  16. The cure for employee malaise--motivation.

    PubMed

    Dawson, K M; Dawson, S N

    1991-01-01

    Although working conditions, hours, pay, and advancement opportunities are better now than in the 1950s--the "golden age" of American business--today's workers are significantly less satisfied. Why? The authors believe the cause of this malaise is lack of motivation. This article examines several techniques to cure employee malaise and discusses the long-term benefits of these techniques, which include empowerment, recognition, career development, the Pygmalion effect, incentives, and rewards. By making a commitment to these motivational techniques, managers will boost the morale and enthusiasm of their employees and their organization. This motivational process is not quick and easy; developing your employees is an ongoing process.

  17. Epoxy resin cure. [Phenyl glycidyl ether

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.E.; Woodburn, G.L.

    1986-07-01

    The reactions that occur between the model epoxy, phenyl glycidyl ether, and the cure agent dicyandiamide (DICY) have been investigated using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) techniques. It is shown that the reaction at 130/sup 0/C requires 90 min for completion when catalyzed by boron trifluoride monoethyl amine (BF/sub 3/-MEA). At least three major products are formed. The identity of these products is based on previously published spectroscopic data. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Degree of conversion of two dual-cured resin cements light-irradiated through zirconia ceramic disks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kim, Young-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic study was to measure the degree of conversion (DC) of dual-cured resin cements light-irradiated through zirconia ceramic disks with different thicknesses using various light-curing methods. MATERIALS AND METHODS Zirconia ceramic disks (KT12) with three different thicknesses (1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 mm) were prepared. The light transmittance of the disks was measured using ultraviolet visible near-infrared spectroscopy. Four different light-curing protocols were used by combining two curing light modes (Elipar TriLight (standard mode) and bluephase G2 (high power mode)) with light-exposure times of 40 and 120 seconds. The DCs of the two dual-cured resin cements (Duo-Link and Panavia F2.0) light-irradiated through the disks was analyzed at three time intervals (3, 7, and 10 minutes) by FTIR spectroscopy. The data was analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA (α=.05).Two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test were used to analyze the 10 minute DC results. RESULTS The 1.0 mm thick disk exhibited low light transmittance (<25%), and the transmittance decreased considerably with increasing disk thickness. All groups exhibited significantly higher 10 minute DC values than the 3 or 7 minute values (P<.05), but some exceptions were observed in Duo-Link. Two-way ANOVA revealed that the influence of the zirconia disk thickness on the 10 minute DC was dependent on the light-curing methods (P<.001). This finding was still valid even at 4.0 mm thickness, where substantial light attenuation took place. CONCLUSION The curing of the dual-cured resin cements was affected significantly by the light-curing technique, even though the additional chemical polymerization mechanism worked effectively. PMID:24353887

  19. Cure behavior of epoxy polymers used in microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taweeplengsangsuke, Jantrawan

    2000-10-01

    Underfill resins are used to reduce solder fatigue in flip-chip assemblies. Both underfilling and curing processes are critical to achieve reliable finished products. This study included two main themes; the development of processing diagrams for commercial underfill resins and the fundamental understanding of cure kinetics and evolution of cure stresses in model epoxies. A variety of techniques have been used to characterize the fundamental phenomena involved in the processing of underfill resins. The flow behavior, cure kinetics, cure stresses, outgassing phenomena and void formation of underfill resins were studied. Processing diagrams for underfill resins were developed by mapping fundamental phenomena involved to provide a guideline for underfilling and curing steps. With these processing diagrams one should be able to design his underfilling and curing process with scientific approach. Two commercial underfill resins, which were evaluated as part of a SEMATECH program, where shown to possess significantly different processing characteristics. However, the appropriate explanation could not be made without knowing the proprietary chemistry of the systems. Therefore, model epoxies were formulated. Three different systems were investigated; amine, imidazole, and anhydride curing agent systems. With the known chemistry, the reaction kinetics and developed cure stress can be explained more clearly. Vitrification, which severely retards the rate of reaction, was found in amine (N-aminoethylpiperazine) and anhydride (Hexahydro-4-methylphthalic anhydride) cured systems when the cure temperatures were lower than the glass transition temperature (T g) of fully cured samples; however, imidazole(2-ethyl-4-methyl-imidazole) did not show vitrification when it was cured at 20 degrees below the T g of fully cured sample due to the large exotherms. Interestingly for imidazole system, the higher cure temperature exhibited a lower Tg. This could possibly be explained by the

  20. Sensory properties, consumer liking and choice determinants of Lucanian dry cured sausages.

    PubMed

    Braghieri, Ada; Piazzolla, Nicoletta; Carlucci, Angela; Bragaglio, Andrea; Napolitano, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Based on a food choice questionnaire we identified as the most influential aspects affecting consumer choice of Lucanian dry cured sausages: taste, animal health and addition of preservatives. Therefore, as a second step we conducted a study to assess the effect of preservative addition on sausage sensory properties and consumer liking, with a particular emphasis on taste. The addition of preservatives did not change the perception of taste attributes by an experienced panel, whereas differences were detected in terms of odor, texture and color attributes. However, consumers did not express a preference for a particular product in terms of overall liking, taste/flavor liking and texture liking, whereas appearance liking was higher for sausages containing preservatives. Since sausage taste was unaffected by the addition of preservative, in order to prevent the potentially detrimental effect of a label indicating their presence, producers should make an effort to obtain high quality Lucanian dry cured sausages without using them.

  1. UV-curing of natural rubber based coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, C.; Le Xuan, H.; Nguyen, T.V.T.

    1995-12-01

    The crosslinking polymerization of acrylate- or epoxy-functionalized natural rubber was shown to proceed rapidly upon UV exposure in the presence of radical- or cationic-type photoinitiators. The polymerization process was studied quantitatively by infrared spectroscopy, and found to develop with long kinetic chains. The addition of an acrylate monomer increased markedly the reaction rate and the final degree of conversion, because of its plasticizing effect in these solid films. Interpenetrating polymer networks were formed by a single 1 s exposure of a 1/1 blend of a diacrylate monomer and an epoxidized natural rubber, in the presence of both radical and cationic photoinitiators. The UV-curing of an epoxidized and acrylated natural rubber leads to the formation of a dual polymer network which combines both toughness and flexibility and gives impact resistant coatings having a good resistance to scratching and abrasion.

  2. Oh the irony: Iron as a cancer cause or cure?

    PubMed

    Foy, Susan P; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2011-12-01

    Iron-oxide nanoparticles facilitate cancer diagnosis through enhanced contrast, selectively enhance tumor cell death with magnetic hyperthermia, and improve drug delivery with magnetic drug targeting. One application that remains largely unexplored is using the iron-oxide nanoparticles themselves to selectively inhibit tumor growth. In this leading opinion paper, we propose that high doses of iron-oxide nanoparticles can be used as a treatment for cancer by generating an oxidative assault against cancer. This proposal may be met with resistance considering the controversy surrounding iron in the field of cancer. Iron generates reactive oxygen species through the Fenton reaction, which may both cause - or cure cancer. Additionally, high demand for iron by cancer cells leads to contradictory therapeutic approaches: iron deprivation or overdose are both potential cancer therapies.

  3. Critical parameters for electron beam curing of cationic epoxies and property comparison of electron beam cured cationic epoxies versus thermal cured resins and composites

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, C.J.; Norris, R.E.; Yarborough, K.; Havens, S.J.; Lopata, V.J.

    1997-01-16

    Electron beam curing of composites is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process offering the following advantages compared to conventional thermal curing: substantially reduced manufacturing costs and curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvements in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance electron beam curing of composites. The CRADA has successfully developed hundreds of new toughened and untoughened resins, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility. Several patent applications have been filed for this work. Composites made from these easily processable, low shrinkage material match the performance of thermal cured composites and exhibit: low void contents comparable to autoclave cured composites (less than 1%); superb low water absorption values in the same range as cyanate esters (less than 1%); glass transition temperatures rivaling those of polyimides (greater than 390 C); mechanical properties comparable to high performance, autoclave cured composites; and excellent property retention after cryogenic and thermal cycling. These materials have been used to manufacture many composite parts using various fabrication processes including hand lay-up, tow placement, filament winding, resin transfer molding and vacuum assisted resin transfer molding.

  4. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining silicon carbide to silicon carbide and silicon nitride to silicon nitride for advanced heat engine applications, phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundberg, G. J.; Vartabedian, A. M.; Wade, J. A.; White, C. S.

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of joining, Phase 2 was to develop joining technologies for HIP'ed Si3N4 with 4wt% Y2O3 (NCX-5101) and for a siliconized SiC (NT230) for various geometries including: butt joins, curved joins and shaft to disk joins. In addition, more extensive mechanical characterization of silicon nitride joins to enhance the predictive capabilities of the analytical/numerical models for structural components in advanced heat engines was provided. Mechanical evaluation were performed by: flexure strength at 22 C and 1,370 C, stress rupture at 1,370 C, high temperature creep, 22 C tensile testing and spin tests. While the silicon nitride joins were produced with sufficient integrity for many applications, the lower join strength would limit its use in the more severe structural applications. Thus, the silicon carbide join quality was deemed unsatisfactory to advance to more complex, curved geometries. The silicon carbide joining methods covered within this contract, although not entirely successful, have emphasized the need to focus future efforts upon ways to obtain a homogeneous, well sintered parent/join interface prior to siliconization. In conclusion, the improved definition of the silicon carbide joining problem obtained by efforts during this contract have provided avenues for future work that could successfully obtain heat engine quality joins.

  5. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining silicon carbide to silicon carbide and silicon nitride to silicon nitride for advanced heat engine applications Phase 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, G.J.; Vartabedian, A.M.; Wade, J.A.; White, C.S.

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of joining, Phase 2 was to develop joining technologies for HIP`ed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with 4wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (NCX-5101) and for a siliconized SiC (NT230) for various geometries including: butt joins, curved joins and shaft to disk joins. In addition, more extensive mechanical characterization of silicon nitride joins to enhance the predictive capabilities of the analytical/numerical models for structural components in advanced heat engines was provided. Mechanical evaluation were performed by: flexure strength at 22 C and 1,370 C, stress rupture at 1,370 C, high temperature creep, 22 C tensile testing and spin tests. While the silicon nitride joins were produced with sufficient integrity for many applications, the lower join strength would limit its use in the more severe structural applications. Thus, the silicon carbide join quality was deemed unsatisfactory to advance to more complex, curved geometries. The silicon carbide joining methods covered within this contract, although not entirely successful, have emphasized the need to focus future efforts upon ways to obtain a homogeneous, well sintered parent/join interface prior to siliconization. In conclusion, the improved definition of the silicon carbide joining problem obtained by efforts during this contract have provided avenues for future work that could successfully obtain heat engine quality joins.

  6. Silicon nanopillars for field enhanced surface spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Sabrina M; Merkulov, Igor A; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Silicon nanowire and nanopillar structures have continued to draw increased attention in recent years due in part to their unique optical properties. Herein, electron beam lithography combined with reactive-ion etching is used to reproducibly create individual silicon nanopillars of various sizes, shapes, and heights. Finite difference time domain numerical analysis predicts enhancements in localized fields in the vicinity of appropriately-sized and coaxially-illuminated silicon nanopillars of approximately two orders of magnitude. By analyzing experimentally measured strength of the silicon Raman phonon line (500 cm-1), it was determined that nanopillars produced field enhancement that are consistent with these predictions. Additionally, we demonstrate that a thin layer of Zn phthalocyanine deposited on the nanopillar surface produced prominent Raman spectra yielding enhancement factors (EFs) better than 300. Finally, silicon nanopillars of cylindrical and elliptical shapes were labeled with different fluorophors and evaluated for their surface enhanced fluorescence (SEF) capability. The EF derived from analysis of the acquired fluorescence microscopy images indicate that silicon nanopillar structures can provide enhancement comparable or even stronger than those typically achieved using plasmonic SEF structures without the drawbacks of the metal-based substrates. It is anticipated that scaled up arrays of silicon nanopillars will enable SEF assays with extremely high sensitivity, while a broader impact of the reported phenomena are anticipated in photovoltaics, subwavelength light focusing, and fundamental nanophotonics.

  7. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Dennis R.; Brzezinski, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provide and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  8. The Interaction Between Lipoxygenase-Catalyzed Oxidation and Autoxidation in Dry-Cured Bacon and a Model System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingyang; Tang, Jing; Zhao, Jianying; Wu, Haizhou; Ditta, Yasir Allah; Zhang, Jianhao

    2015-12-01

    A model system was conducted to characterize the interaction between lipid autoxidation and enzyme-catalyzed oxidation in dry-cured bacon. This involved the use of a hydroxyl radical (HO•) generating system and the extraction and purification of lipoxygenases (LOX) from pork belly. The results showed that LOX activity rapidly (P < 0.05) increased during the curing of dry-cured bacon. This may be because of the hydroxyl-radical-mediated oxidation from LOX-Fe(2+) to LOX-Fe(3+), which activates LOX. In addition, experiments of the model system also showed that LOX activity could be inhibited by increasing the substrate concentration, although substrate type and concentration had no effect on autoxidation. Moreover, LOX enzyme-catalyzed oxidation and autoxidation could act synergistically to promote lipid oxidation irrespective of the substrate (linoleic or arachidonic acid). These results provide useful information for regulating lipid oxidation during the production of dry-cured pork products.

  9. Tough, High-Performance, Thermoplastic Addition Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Proctor, K. Mason; Gleason, John; Morgan, Cassandra; Partos, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Series of addition-type thermoplastics (ATT's) exhibit useful properties. Because of their addition curing and linear structure, ATT polymers have toughness, like thermoplastics, and easily processed, like thermosets. Work undertaken to develop chemical reaction forming stable aromatic rings in backbone of ATT polymer, combining high-temperature performance and thermo-oxidative stability with toughness and easy processibility, and minimizing or eliminating necessity for tradeoffs among properties often observed in conventional polymer syntheses.

  10. Enhancing nitrite inhibition of Clostridium botulinum with isoascorbate in perishable canned cured meat.

    PubMed Central

    Tompkin, R B; Christiansen, L N; Shaparis, A B

    1978-01-01

    Addition of sodium isoascorbate to the formulation for perishable canned comminuted cured meat markedly enhanced the efficacy of nitrite against Clostridium botulinum. This effect was reproducible through a series of three tests. In one test it was found that the initial addition of 50 microgram of sodium nitrite per g plus isoascorbate was as effective as 156 microgram of sodium nitrite per g alone. PMID:341810

  11. Informed consent to HIV cure research.

    PubMed

    Bromwich, Danielle; Millum, Joseph R

    2017-02-01

    Trials with highly unfavourable risk-benefit ratios for participants, like HIV cure trials, raise questions about the quality of the consent of research participants. Why, it may be asked, would a person with HIV who is doing well on antiretroviral therapy be willing to jeopardise his health by enrolling in such a trial? We distinguish three concerns: first, how information is communicated to potential participants; second, participants' motivations for enrolling in potentially high risk research with no prospect of direct benefit; and third, participants' understanding of the details of the trials in which they enrol. We argue that the communication concern is relevant to the validity of informed consent and the quality of decision making, that the motivation concern does not identify a genuine problem with either the validity of consent or the quality of decision making and that the understanding concern may not be relevant to the validity of consent but is relevant to the quality of decision making. In doing so, we derive guidance points for researchers recruiting and enrolling participants into their HIV cure trials, as well as the research ethics committees reviewing proposed studies.

  12. CURE: Clean use of reactor energy

    SciTech Connect

    1990-05-01

    This paper presents the results of a joint Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford)-Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) study that considered the feasibility of treating radioactive waste before disposal to reduce the inventory of long-lived radionuclides, making the waste more suitable for geologic disposal. The treatment considered here is one in which waste would be chemically separated so that long-lived radionuclides can be treated using specific processes appropriate for the nuclide. The technical feasibility of enhancing repository performance by this type of treatment is considered in this report. A joint Westinghouse Hanford-PNL study group developed a concept called the Clean Use of Reactor Energy (CURE), and evaluated the potential of current technology to reduce the long-lived radionuclide content in waste from the nuclear power industry. The CURE process consists of three components: chemical separation of elements that have significant quantities of long-lived radioisotopes in the waste, exposure in a neutron flux to transmute the radioisotopes to stable nuclides, and packaging of radionuclides that cannot be transmuted easily for storage or geologic disposal. 76 refs., 32 figs., 24 tabs.

  13. Out-of-Autoclave Cure Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Brian S.

    2015-01-01

    As the size of aerospace composite parts exceeds that of even the largest autoclaves, the development of new out-of-autoclave processes and materials is necessary to ensure quality and performance. Many out-of-autoclave prepreg systems can produce high-quality composites initially; however, due to long layup times, the resin advancement commonly causes high void content and variations in fiber volume. Applied Poleramic, Inc. (API), developed an aerospace-grade benzoxazine matrix composite prepreg material that offers more than a year out-time at ambient conditions and provides exceptionally low void content when out-of-autoclave cured. When compared with aerospace epoxy prepreg systems, API's innovation offers significant improvements in terms of out-time at ambient temperature and the corresponding tack retention. The carbon fiber composites developed with the optimized matrix technology have significantly better mechanical performance in terms of hot-wet retention and compression when compared with aerospace epoxy matrices. These composites also offer an excellent overall balance of properties. This matrix system imparts very low cure shrinkage, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and low density when compared with most aerospace epoxy prepreg materials.

  14. Adhesive Properties of Cured Phenylethynyl Containing Imides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.; Chang, Alice C.

    1997-01-01

    Considerable attention has been directed towards acetylene terminated oligomers over the last 20 years' and recent work has focused on phenylethynyl terminated imide (PETI) oligomers. These reactive oligomers possess several features which make them attractive candidates for use as composite matrices and adhesives. The phenylethynyl group can be readily incorporated into many different functionalized oligomers. The reactive oligomers possess relatively low melt viscosities and thermally cure without the evolution of volatile by-products. Once cured, they typically display high glass transition temperatures (Tgs), excellent solvent resistance and high mechanical properties. new modified phenylethynyl-terminated imide (LaRC MPEI) oligomers were synthesized at various molecular weights utilizing a small amount of trifunctional amine. As long as the amount of triamine is relatively small, this approach produces a mixture of linear, star-shaped and branched polymer chains that has lower melt and solution viscosity than an equivalent molecular weight linear phenylethynyl terminated imide oligomers. The work reported herein involves the synthesis and characterization of a copolymer using this approach and the preparation of blends utilizing a phenylethynyl containing reactive plasticizer of lower molecular weight called LaRC LV-121. The chemistry and properties of this new MPEI as well as some blends of MPEI with LV-121, are presented and compared to the linear version, LARC-PETI-5.

  15. Nanocrystalline silicon/amorphous silicon dioxide superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Fauchet, P.M.; Tsybeskov, L.; Zacharias, M. |; Hirschman, K. |

    1998-12-31

    Thin layers made of densely packed silicon nanocrystals sandwiched between amorphous silicon dioxide layers have been manufactured and characterized. An amorphous silicon/amorphous silicon dioxide superlattice is first grown by CVD or RF sputtering. The a-Si layers are recrystallized in a two-step procedure (nucleation + growth) for form layers of nearly identical nanocrystals whose diameter is given by the initial a-Si layer thickness. The recrystallization is monitored using a variety of techniques, including TEM, X-Ray, Raman, and luminescence spectroscopies. When the a-Si layer thickness decreases (from 25 nm to 2.5 nm) or the a-SiO{sub 2} layer thickness increases (from 1.5 nm to 6 nm), the recrystallization temperature increases dramatically compared to that of a single a-Si film. The removal of the a-Si tissue present between the nanocrystals, the passivation of the nanocrystals, and their doping are discussed.

  16. Silicon germanium carbon heteroepitaxial growth on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, James W.

    1993-10-01

    This project represents the initiation of band-gap engineering of Si-based devices at Arizona State University by James W. Mayer. While at Cornell, he directed the Microscience and Technology program supported by the Semiconductor Research Corporation. His Work on heteoepitaxy of SiGe on silicon convinced him that heteroepitaxy on Si was a viable technique for forming smaller band gap layers on silicon but the requirement was for larger energy-gap materials. In the fall of 1991, James Mayer visited Tom Picraux of Sandia National Laboratories and Clarence Tracy of Motorola Semiconductor Products to discuss the possibility of a joint program to investigate Silicon Germanium Carbon Heteroepitaxial Growth on Silicon. This represented a new research and development initiate for band gap engineering.

  17. Development of standardized specifications for silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A space silicon solar cell assembly (cell and coverglass) specification aimed at standardizing the diverse requirements of current cell or assembly specifications was developed. This specification was designed to minimize both the procurement and manufacturing costs for space qualified silicon solar cell assembilies. In addition, an impact analysis estimating the technological and economic effects of employing a standardized space silicon solar cell assembly was performed.

  18. Liquid crystal claddings for passive temperature stabilization of silicon photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptasinski, Joanna N.; Khoo, Iam-Choon; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2014-10-01

    Silicon photonics allows for high density component integration on a single chip and it brings promise for low-loss, high-bandwidth data processing in modern computing systems. Owing to silicon's high positive thermo-optic coefficient, temperature fluctuations tend to degrade the device performance. This work explores passive thermal stabilization of silicon photonic devices using nematic liquid crystal (NLC) claddings, as they possess large negative thermo-optic coefficients in addition to low absorption at the telecommunication wavelengths.

  19. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease (Nephropathy) Gastroparesis Mental Health Step On Up Treatment & Care Blood Glucose Testing Medication Doctors, Nurses & More ... us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to ...

  20. Adhesion to root canal dentine using one and two-step adhesives with dual-cure composite core materials.

    PubMed

    Foxton, R M; Nakajima, M; Tagami, J; Miura, H

    2005-02-01

    The regional tensile bond strengths of two dual-cure composite resin core materials to root canal dentine using either a one or two-step self-etching adhesive were evaluated. Extracted premolar teeth were decoronated and their root canals prepared to a depth of 8 mm and a width of 1.4 mm. In one group, a one-step self-etching adhesive (Unifil Self-etching Bond) was applied to the walls of the post-space and light-cured for 10 s. After which, the post-spaces were filled with the a dual-cure composite resin (Unifil Core) and then half the specimens were light-cured for 60 s and the other half placed in darkness for 30 min. In the second group, a self-etching primer (ED Primer II) was applied for 30 s, followed by an adhesive resin (Clearfil Photo Bond), which was light-cured for 10 s. The post-spaces were filled with a dual-cure composite resin (DC Core) and then half the specimens were light-cured for 60 s and the other half placed in darkness for 30 min. Chemical-cure composite resin was placed on the outer surfaces of all the roots, which were then stored in water for 24 h. They were serially sliced perpendicular to the bonded interface into 8, 0.6 mm-thick slabs, and then transversely sectioned into beams, approximately 8 x 0.6 x 0.6 mm, for the microtensile bond strength test (muTBS). Data were divided into two (coronal/apical half of post-space) and analysed using three-way anova and Scheffe's test (P < 0.05). Failure modes were observed under an scanning electron microscope (SEM) and statistically analysed. Specimens for observation of the bonded interfaces were prepared in a similar manner as for bond strength testing, cut in half and embedded in epoxy resin. They were then polished to a high gloss, gold sputter coated, and after argon ion etching, observed under an SEM. For both dual-cure composite resins and curing strategies, there were no significant differences in muTBS between the coronal and apical regions (P > 0.05). In addition, both dual-cure

  1. Contribution of a selected fungal population to proteolysis on dry-cured ham.

    PubMed

    Martín, Alberto; Córdoba, Juan J; Núñez, Félix; Benito, María J; Asensio, Miguel A

    2004-07-01

    The proteolytic changes taking place in dry-cured hams lead to increases in free amino acids. Such free amino acids not only contribute to flavour, but also serve as precursors of volatile compounds. Several months of ripening time are required to allow the particular flavour to develop. The fungal population allowed to grow on the surface of some types of dry-cured could play a key role on proteolysis, as it has been shown for dry-cured sausages. The purpose of this work was to study the possible contribution of fungi to proteolysis in dry-cured ham. For this, a strain each of non-toxigenic Penicillium chrysogenum (Pg222) and Debaryomyces hansenii (Dh345), selected for their proteolytic activity on myofibrillar proteins, were inoculated as starter cultures. Changes in the high ionic strength-soluble proteins of an external muscle (adductor) revealed in only 6 months higher proteolysis in the inoculated hams when compared to non-inoculated control hams. Proteolytic strains among the wild fungal population on non-inoculated control hams prevented from obtaining similar differences at the end of processing. However, inoculation with Pg222 and Dh345 led to higher levels for most free amino acids at the external muscle in fully dry-cured hams. In addition, the concentration for some of the more polar free amino acids (i.e. Asp, Glu, Ser and Gln) in inoculated hams was higher at external than at internal (biceps femoris) muscles. These promising results deserve further studies to know the impact of a selected fungal population on the volatile compounds and sensory properties of dry-cured ham.

  2. A novel method for the curing of metal particle loaded conductive inks and pastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberson, David Adrian

    The emerging technology of printed microelectronics involving the use of conductive inks in conjunction with standard printing techniques offers a fast and low waste method for creating microelectronics compared with standard manufacturing processes. A clear path to the creation of flexible electronics is present due to the ease of printing on flexible substrates. Moreover, creation of novel 3D structural electronics is possible via the integration of printing technologies and additive manufacturing (AM) techniques. A key obstacle to the manufacturing of flexible and structural electronics comes from the temperature restrictions imposed by the substrates, which are typically polymeric. This hindrance has the effect of limiting the thermal cure cycles necessary to create the maximum electrical performance of conductive traces printed with conductive ink, which must be thermally cured. Whether the ink has micro-scale conductive particles, nano-scale conductive particles, or is organometallic in nature, all conductive inks need some sort of thermal curing to perform properly. The research presented in this dissertation entails the development of a curing technique which creates the optimal electrical performance in conductive traces created from conductive ink on both flexible and 3D polymeric substrates. The utilization of ohmic heating in conjunction with and in lieu of thermal curing is shown to decrease the resistivity of conductive traces printed form conductive inks and pastes. Microstructural characterization was performed on successful and unsuccessful (electrically failed) specimens. A process characterization of the creation of a via/interconnect system in a 3D freeform was made and involved electrical characterization and printable conductor selection. Initial research involving electrical and microstructural characterization of the thermal curing process is presented along with novel findings showing the impact of inkjet printing procedure on the resulting

  3. Using a centrifuge for quality control of pre-wetted lightweight aggregate in internally cured concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Albert E.

    Early age shrinkage of cementitious systems can result in an increased potential for cracking which can lead to a reduction in service life. Early age shrinkage cracking can be particularly problematic for high strength concretes, which are often specified due to their high strength and low permeability. However, these high strength concretes frequently exhibit a reduction in the internal relative humidity (RH) due to the hydration reaction (chemical shrinkage) and self-desiccation which results in a bulk shrinkage, termed autogenous shrinkage, which is substantial at early ages. Due to the low permeability of these concretes, standard external curing is not always efficient in addressing this reduction in internal RH since the penetration of water can be limited. Internal curing has been developed to reduce autogenous shrinkage. Internally cured mixtures use internal reservoirs filled with fluid (generally water) that release this fluid at appropriate times to counteract the effects of self-desiccation thereby maintaining a high internal RH. Internally cured concrete is frequently produced in North America using pre-wetted lightweight aggregate. One important aspect associated with preparing quality internally cured concrete is being able to determine the absorbed moisture and surface moisture associated with the lightweight aggregate which enables aggregate moisture corrections to be made for the concrete mixture. This thesis represents work performed to develop a test method using a centrifuge to determine the moisture state of pre-wetted fine lightweight aggregate. The results of the test method are then used in a series of worksheets that were developed to assist field technicians when performing the tests and applying the results to a mixture design. Additionally, research was performed on superabsorbent polymers to assess their ability to be used as an internal curing reservoir.

  4. In situ cure monitoring of advanced fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Graham R.; Crosby, Peter A.; Fernando, Gerard F.; France, Chris M.; Spooncer, Ronald C.; Waters, David N.

    1995-04-01

    This paper describes a comparative study of in-situ cure monitoring and cure modelling by three methods: (a) evanescent wave spectroscopy, (b) refractive index change, (c) near- infrared spectroscopy. Optical fibers were embedded into aerospace epoxy resins during the manufacturing process of the composite. The cure characteristics were then tracked in real- time during the processing of the material via evanescent wave interaction. This technique is based upon monitoring of characteristic infrared absorption bands of the resin system to find the concentration of the epoxy and amine hardener as a function of cure time. Hence this technique is suitable for on-line process monitoring and optimization. Results obtained from the optical fiber sensors were used to model the curing behavior of the resin system. The results were compared with near-infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry experiments carried out under similar conditions. The feasibility of utilizing refractive index changes to monitor the extent of cure has also been demonstrated.

  5. Stress In A Fiber During Curing Of Surrounding Matrix Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Madhukar, Madhu S.; Kosuri, Ranga P.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments run to determine variation in tensile stress in single fiber during curing of matrix resin surrounding fiber. Study part of effort to understand physical mechanisms affecting residual stresses in matrix/fiber composites, with view toward optimizing curing cycles (in particular, optimizing temperature-vs.-time schedules of final cooldowns to ambient temperature) to minimize residual stresses. Results signify primary mechanisms affecting residual stress in fibers are thermal expansion and contraction and cure shrinkage of matrix material.

  6. Cure Characteristics of Tricyanate Ester High Temperature Composite Resins (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-09

    measurements of cure kinetics were undertaken using both isothermal and non-isothermal DSC , and compared to measures of conversion obtained through IR...measurements of cure kinetics were undertaken using both isothermal and non-isothermal DSC , and compared to measures of conversion obtained through IR...the effect of impurities on cure kinetics, comparative kinetics derived from non-isothermal and isothermal differential scanning calorimetry ( DSC

  7. Process Formulations And Curing Conditions That Affect Saltstone Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Reigel, M. M.; Pickenheim, B. R.; Daniel, W. E.

    2012-09-28

    The first objective of this study was to analyze saltstone fresh properties to determine the feasibility of reducing the formulation water to premix (w/p) ratio while varying the amount of extra water and admixtures used during processing at the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). The second part of this study was to provide information for understanding the impact of curing conditions (cure temperature, relative humidity (RH)) and processing formulation on the performance properties of cured saltstone.

  8. Silicon on graphite cloth

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, J.A.; Cotter, J.E.; Thomas, C.J.; Ingram, A.E.; Bai, Y.B.; Ruffins, T.R.; Barnett, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    A new polycrystalline silicon solar cell has been developed that utilizes commercially available graphite cloth as a substrate. This solar cell has achieved an energy conversion efficiency of 13.4% (AM1.5G). It is believed that this is a record efficiency for a silicon solar cell formed on a graphite substrate. The silicon-on-fabric structure is comprised of a thin layer of polycrystalline silicon grown directly on the graphite fabric substrate. The structure is fabricated by a low-cost ribbon process that avoids the expense and waste of wafering. The fabric substrate gives structural support to the thin device. Critical to the achievement of device quality silicon layers is control over impurities in the graphite fabric. The silicon-on-fabric technology has the potential to supply lightweight, low-cost solar cells to weight-sensitive markets at a fraction of the cost of conventionally thinned wafers.

  9. Silicon micro-mold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2006-10-24

    The present invention describes a method for rapidly fabricating a robust 3-dimensional silicon-mold for use in preparing complex metal micro-components. The process begins by depositing a conductive metal layer onto one surface of a silicon wafer. A thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask are then used to transfer a trace image pattern onto the opposite surface of the wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is anisotropically etched through the wafer thickness down to conductive metal layer to provide an etched pattern consisting of a series of rectilinear channels and recesses in the silicon which serve as the silicon micro-mold. Microcomponents are prepared with this mold by first filling the mold channels and recesses with a metal deposit, typically by electroplating, and then removing the silicon micro-mold by chemical etching.

  10. Growth of silicon bump induced by swift heavy ion at the silicon oxide-silicon interface

    SciTech Connect

    Carlotti, J.-F.; Touboul, A.D.; Ramonda, M.; Caussanel, M.; Guasch, C.; Bonnet, J.; Gasiot, J.

    2006-01-23

    Thin silicon oxide layers on silicon substrates are investigated by scanning probe microscopy before and after irradiation with 210 MeV Au+ ions. After irradiation and complete chemical etching of the silicon oxide layer, silicon bumps grown on the silicon surface are observed. It is shown that each impinging ion induces one silicon bump at the interface. This observation is consistent with the thermal spike theory. Ion energy loss is transferred to the oxide and induces local melting. Silicon-bump formation is favored when the oxide and oxide-silicon interface are silicon rich.

  11. Optical fibre grating refractometers for resin cure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buggy, S. J.; Chehura, E.; James, S. W.; Tatam, R. P.

    2007-06-01

    The use of fibre grating refractometers as a means of monitoring the cure of a UV-cured epoxy resin is presented. The wavelength shift of the attenuation bands of a long period grating and the spectral response of a tilted fibre Bragg grating sensor were measured simultaneously during the cure of the resin and compared with measurements made using a fibre optic Fresnel-based refractometer. The results showed a good correlation (6 × 10-3 rius) and illustrate the potential of the techniques for non-invasive composite material cure monitoring.

  12. Highly porous silicon membranes fabricated from silicon nitride/silicon stacks.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chengzhu; Striemer, Christopher C; Gaborski, Thomas R; McGrath, James L; Fauchet, Philippe M

    2014-07-23

    Nanopore formation in silicon films has previously been demonstrated using rapid thermal crystallization of ultrathin (15 nm) amorphous Si films sandwiched between nm-thick SiO2 layers. In this work, the silicon dioxide barrier layers are replaced with silicon nitride, resulting in nanoporous silicon films with unprecedented pore density and novel morphology. Four different thin film stack systems including silicon nitride/silicon/silicon nitride (NSN), silicon dioxide/silicon/silicon nitride (OSN), silicon nitride/silicon/silicon dioxide (NSO), and silicon dioxide/silicon/silicon dioxide (OSO) are tested under different annealing temperatures. Generally the pore size, pore density, and porosity positively correlate with the annealing temperature for all four systems. The NSN system yields substantially higher porosity and pore density than the OSO system, with the OSN and NSO stack characteristics fallings between these extremes. The higher porosity of the Si membrane in the NSN stack is primarily due to the pore formation enhancement in the Si film. It is hypothesized that this could result from the interfacial energy difference between the silicon/silicon nitride and silicon/silicon dioxide, which influences the Si crystallization process.

  13. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Synthesized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, Michael A.; Larkin, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have generated a great deal of scientific and commercial interest because of the countless envisioned applications that stem from their extraordinary materials properties. Included among these properties are high mechanical strength (tensile and modulus), high thermal conductivity, and electrical properties that make different forms of single-walled CNTs either conducting or semiconducting, and therefore, suitable for making ultraminiature, high-performance CNT-based electronics, sensors, and actuators. Among the limitations for CNTs is their inability to survive in high-temperature, harsh-environment applications. Silicon carbon nanotubes (SiCNTs) are being developed for their superior material properties under such conditions. For example, SiC is stable in regards to oxidation in air to temperatures exceeding 1000 C, whereas carbon-based materials are limited to 600 C. The high-temperature stability of SiCNTs is envisioned to enable high-temperature, harsh-environment nanofiber- and nanotube-reinforced ceramics. In addition, single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors are being developed for hightemperature, high-power electronics, and by analogy to CNTs with silicon semiconductors, SiCNTs with single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors may allow high-temperature harsh-environment nanoelectronics, nanosensors, and nanoactuators to be realized. Another challenge in CNT development is the difficulty of chemically modifying the tube walls, which are composed of chemically stable graphene sheets. The chemical substitution of the CNTs walls will be necessary for nanotube self-assembly and biological- and chemical-sensing applications. SiCNTs are expected to have a different multiple-bilayer wall structure, allowing the surface Si atoms to be functionalized readily with molecules that will allow SiCNTs to undergo self-assembly and be compatible with a variety of materials (for biotechnology applications and high-performance fiber-reinforced ceramics).

  14. SILICON CARBIDE FOR SEMICONDUCTORS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This state-of-the-art survey on silicon carbide for semiconductors includes a bibliography of the most important references published as of the end...of 1964. The various methods used for growing silicon carbide single crystals are reviewed, as well as their properties and devices fabricated from...them. The fact that the state of-the-art of silicon carbide semiconductors is not further advanced may be attributed to the difficulties of growing

  15. Silicon Carbide Shapes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Free-standing silicon carbide shapes are produced by passing a properly diluted stream of a reactant gas, for example methyltrichlorosilane, into a...reaction chamber housing a thin walled, hollow graphite body heated to 1300-1500C. After the graphite body is sufficiently coated with silicon carbide , the...graphite body is fired, converting the graphite to gaseous CO2 and CO and leaving a silicon carbide shaped article remaining.

  16. Bending strength and depth of cure of light-cured composite resins irradiated using filters that simulate enamel.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, H; Kanie, T; Fujii, K; Shinohara, N

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluates the light-attenuating effects of enamel on the properties of light-cured restorative resins using simple experimental filters. Three filters were designed to replicate the light transmittance characteristics of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mm thick human enamel. The bending strength, depth of cure, and levels of residual monomer for 12 shades of three commercial light-cured composite resins were examined. These resins were cured either using direct irradiation from a light source or irradiation through one of the filters. For all materials, the bending strength and depth of cure of specimens irradiated through a filter were lower and the levels of residual monomer were higher than those found in specimens irradiated directly. The results indicate that the light-attenuating effect of enamel reduces the polymerization efficiency, resulting in poorer mechanical properties of light-cured composite resins.

  17. The CDFII Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Thom

    2004-07-23

    The CDFII silicon detector consists of 8 layers of double-sided silicon micro-strip sensors totaling 722,432 readout channels, making it one of the largest silicon detectors in present use by an HEP experiment. After two years of data taking, we report on our experience operating the complex device. The performance of the CDFII silicon detector is presented and its impact on physics analyses is discussed. We have already observed measurable effects from radiation damage. These results and their impact on the expected lifetime of the detector are briefly reviewed.

  18. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert A.; Seager, Carleton H.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate 11, created y micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate 13. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face 15 (patterned silicon plate's surface) and the silicon wafer 17 it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands 19 that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face 15. The islands 19 may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face 15 and wafer 17 contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands 19 are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face 15, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands 19, together with at least one hole 12 bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas.

  19. Micromachined silicon electrostatic chuck

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.A.; Seager, C.H.

    1996-12-10

    An electrostatic chuck is faced with a patterned silicon plate, created by micromachining a silicon wafer, which is attached to a metallic base plate. Direct electrical contact between the chuck face (patterned silicon plate`s surface) and the silicon wafer it is intended to hold is prevented by a pattern of flat-topped silicon dioxide islands that protrude less than 5 micrometers from the otherwise flat surface of the chuck face. The islands may be formed in any shape. Islands may be about 10 micrometers in diameter or width and spaced about 100 micrometers apart. One or more concentric rings formed around the periphery of the area between the chuck face and wafer contain a low-pressure helium thermal-contact gas used to assist heat removal during plasma etching of a silicon wafer held by the chuck. The islands are tall enough and close enough together to prevent silicon-to-silicon electrical contact in the space between the islands, and the islands occupy only a small fraction of the total area of the chuck face, typically 0.5 to 5 percent. The pattern of the islands, together with at least one hole bored through the silicon veneer into the base plate, will provide sufficient gas-flow space to allow the distribution of the helium thermal-contact gas. 6 figs.

  20. Periodically poled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Jalali, Bahram

    2009-03-01

    We propose a new class of photonic devices based on periodic stress fields in silicon that enable second-order nonlinearity as well as quasi-phase matching. Periodically poled silicon (PePSi) adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on second-order nonlinear effects. As an example of the utility of the PePSi technology, we present simulations showing that midwave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50%.

  1. Silicon web process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Skutch, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.; Hopkins, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The silicon web process takes advantage of natural crystallographic stabilizing forces to grow long, thin single crystal ribbons directly from liquid silicon. The ribbon, or web, is formed by the solidification of a liquid film supported by surface tension between two silicon filaments, called dendrites, which border the edges of the growing strip. The ribbon can be propagated indefinitely by replenishing the liquid silicon as it is transformed to crystal. The dendritic web process has several advantages for achieving low cost, high efficiency solar cells. These advantages are discussed.

  2. SILICON METABOLISM IN DIATOMS

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Joyce C.

    1954-01-01

    1. Cells of the fresh water diatom Navicula pelliculosa may be grown in a mineral medium containing a low concentration of silicon. When transferred to a fresh silicate solution and incubated under non-growing conditions such deficient cells rapidly take up silicon from the medium. 2. The utilization of silicon is an aerobic process. 3. When deficient cells are washed with distilled water or saline, their ability to utilize silicon is impaired whereas respiration is unaffected. 4. The ability of washed cells to take up silicon can be partially restored with sulfate or ascorbic acid, and is completely restored by Na2S, Na2S2O3, glutathione, l-cysteine, dl-methionine, or ascorbic acid plus sulfate. 5. The sulfhydryl reagent, CdCl2, inhibits silicon utilization of unwashed cells at concentrations which do not affect respiration. This inhibition similarly is reversed by glutathione or cysteine. 6. However, sodium iodoacetate or sodium arsenite inhibits respiration and silicon utilization at the same concentrations. 7. The silicon taken up by deficient cells is deposited at the cell surface as a thickening of the existing silica frustules. 8. Sulfhydryl groups in the cell membrane may be involved in silicon uptake by diatoms. PMID:13163359

  3. Optical characterization of RTV615 silicone rubber compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Huber, G. M.

    2014-07-01

    Room Temperature Vulcanized (RTV) silicone compounds are commonly used to bond optical components. For our application, we needed to identify an adhesive with good ultraviolet transmission characteristics, to couple photomultipliers to quartz windows in a Heavy Gas Čerenkov detector that is being constructed for Experimental Hall C of Jefferson Lab to provide π/K separation up to 11 GeV/c. To this end, we present the light transmission results for Momentive RTV615 silicone rubber compound for wavelengths between 195-400 nm, obtained with an adapted reflectivity apparatus at Jefferson Lab. All samples cured at room temperature have transmissions ~ 93% for wavelengths between 360-400 nm and fall sharply below 230 nm. Wavelength dependent absorption coefficients were extracted with four samples of different thicknesses cured at normal temperature (25° C for 7 days). The absorption coefficient drops approximately two orders in magnitude from 220-400 nm, exhibiting distinct regions of flattening near 250 nm and 330 nm. We also investigated the effect of a high temperature curing method (100° C for 1 hour) and found 5-10% better transmission than with the normal method. The effect was more significant with larger sample thickness (3.35 mm) over the wavelength range of 220-280 nm.

  4. Ambient Cured Alkali Activated Flyash Masonry Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopal, K.; Radhakrishna; Sasalatti, Vinod M.

    2016-09-01

    Geopolymers belong to a category of non-conventional and non-Portland cement based cementitious binders which are produced using industrial by products like fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS). This paper reports on the development of geopolymer mortars for production of masonry units. The geopolymer mortars were prepared by mixing various by products with manufactured sand and a liquid mixture of sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. After curing at ambient conditions, the masonry units were tested for strength properties such as water absorption, initial rate of absorption, compression, shear- bond, and stress-strain behaviour etc. It was observed that the flexural strength of the blocks is more than 2 MPa and shear bond strength is more than 0.4MPa. It was found that the properties of geopolymer blocks were superior to the traditional masonry units. Hence they can be recommended for structural masonry.

  5. Stratospheric experiments on curing of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudinov, Viacheslav; Kondyurin, Alexey; Svistkov, Alexander L.; Efremov, Denis; Demin, Anton; Terpugov, Viktor; Rusakov, Sergey

    2016-07-01

    Future space exploration requires a large light-weight structure for habitats, greenhouses, space bases, space factories and other constructions. A new approach enabling large-size constructions in space relies on the use of the technology of polymerization of fiber-filled composites with a curable polymer matrix applied in the free space environment on Erath orbit. In orbit, the material is exposed to high vacuum, dramatic temperature changes, plasma of free space due to cosmic rays, sun irradiation and atomic oxygen (in low Earth orbit), micrometeorite fluence, electric charging and microgravitation. The development of appropriate polymer matrix composites requires an understanding of the chemical processes of polymer matrix curing under the specific free space conditions to be encountered. The goal of the stratospheric flight experiment is an investigation of the effect of the stratospheric conditions on the uncured polymer matrix of the composite material. The unique combination of low residual pressure, high intensity UV radiation including short-wave UV component, cosmic rays and other aspects associated with solar irradiation strongly influences the chemical processes in polymeric materials. We have done the stratospheric flight experiments with uncured composites (prepreg). A balloon with payload equipped with heater, temperature/pressure/irradiation sensors, microprocessor, carrying the samples of uncured prepreg has been launched to stratosphere of 25-30 km altitude. After the flight, the samples have been tested with FTIR, gel-fraction, tensile test and DMA. The effect of cosmic radiation has been observed. The composite was successfully cured during the stratospheric flight. The study was supported by RFBR grants 12-08-00970 and 14-08-96011.

  6. Curing of epoxy matrix composite in stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Kondyurina, Irina; Bilek, Marcela

    Large structures for habitats, greenhouses, space bases, space factories are needed for next stage of space exploitation. A new approach enabling large-size constructions in space relies on the use of the polymerization technology of fiber-filled composites with a curable polymer matrix applied in the free space environment. The polymerisation process is proposed for the material exposed to high vacuum, dramatic temperature changes, space plasma, sun irradiation and atomic oxygen (in low Earth orbit), micrometeorite fluence, electric charging and microgravitation. The stratospheric flight experiments are directed to an investigation of the curing polymer matrix under the stratospheric conditions on. The unique combination of low atmospheric pressure, high intensity UV radiation including short wavelength UV and diurnal temperature variations associated with solar irradiation strongly influences the chemical processes in polymeric materials. The first flight experiment with uncured composites was a part of the NASA scientific balloon flight program realised at the NASA stratospheric balloon station in Alice Springs, Australia. A flight cassette installed on payload was lifted with a “zero-pressure” stratospheric balloon filled with Helium. Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF) provided the launch, flight telemetry and landing of the balloon and payload. A cassette of uncured composite materials with an epoxy resin matrix was exposed 3 days in the stratosphere (40 km altitude). The second flight experiment was realised in South Australia in 2012, when the cassette was exposed in 27 km altitude. An analysis of the chemical structure of the composites showed, that the space irradiations are responsible for crosslinking of the uncured polymers exposed in the stratosphere. The first prepreg in the world was cured successfully in stratosphere. The investigations were supported by Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, NASA and RFBR (12-08-00970) grants.

  7. Spectrophotometric and colorimetric evaluation of staining of the light cured composite after exposure with different intensities of light curing units

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekhar, Veeramachaneni; Reddy, L Pramod; Prakash, T Jaya; Rao, G Anitha; Pradeep, M

    2011-01-01

    Aim/Objective: To understand the importance of intensity of light in polymerizing light cured composites and its relation to color stability. Materials and Methods: Forty specimens of composite disc with 3mm diameter and 1.5 mm thick were divided into two groups of 20 samples each. Group1: Twenty samples were cured with a light curing unit of380mw/cm2. Group2: Twenty samples cured with a light curing unit of 680mw/cm2. These polymerized samples were immersed in methylene blue dye for 24hoursand later washed and immersed in absolute alcohol for 24 hours. The amount of color released into absolute alcohol was assessed by spectrophotometric and colorimetric analysis. Results: Results were analyzed for spectrophotometric and colorimetric values by using the Mann-Whitney test. The group cured with low intensity light stained more compared to the group cured with a normal intensity of light. Conclusions: Intensity of light plays a crucial role in staining of the polymerized light cured composite. The intensity of the curing unit has to be maintained in acceptable limits to achieve good clinical results. PMID:22144810

  8. Comparative study of the sealing ability of light-cured versus chemically cured materials placed into furcation perforations.

    PubMed

    Alhadainy, H A; Himel, V T

    1993-09-01

    Two light-cured materials, Vitrebond and Prisma VLC Dycal, were compared with two chemically cured materials, Ketac Fil and Dycal, for ability to seal furcation perforations. Access openings and furcation perforations were prepared in 60 teeth and randomly divided into four equal groups. Furcation perforations were repaired with each of the tested materials, and the access openings were filled with composite resin. After teeth were immersed in 2% erythrocin B dye solution for 10 days, they were sectioned longitudinally and dye penetration was measured. The light-cured materials allowed statistically significant less dye leakage than did the chemically cured materials.

  9. Evaluation of the curing depth of two translucent composite materials using a halogen and two LED curing units.

    PubMed

    Polydorou, Olga; Manolakis, Alexandros; Hellwig, Elmar; Hahn, Petra

    2008-03-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the influence of one halogen and two light-emitting diode (LED) curing units on the curing depth of a conventional hybrid and two translucent resin composites by measuring the Knoop microhardness. In the first part of the study, a conventional hybrid resin composite and three curing units (one halogen: 40 s polymerization time, two LEDs: 10 and 20 s) were used. Ten cylindrical resin composite samples were prepared for each curing unit and each polymerization time tested. After polymerization, the soft part of the samples was removed. The samples were embedded in a polyacrylic resin and separated in the middle towards the direction, top-bottom. On the section plane, Knoop microhardness measurements were performed every 1 mm, starting at 0.5 mm under the surface. In the second part of the study, two translucent resin composites and a conventional hybrid composite resin were cured with the three curing units, and the microhardness was measured as mentioned above. The difference between the curing units tested was found statistically significant (p = 0.0009), as well as the difference between the materials concerning curing depth (p = 0.0001). Both translucent materials achieved microhardness values equal to the 80% of the surface values, in depths 3.5-5.5 mm, depending on the curing units used.

  10. Colour Stability of Heat and Cold Cure Acrylic Resins

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, P R; Reddy, Madan Mohan; Ebenezar, A.V. Rajesh; Sivakumar, G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: To evaluate the colour stability of heat and cold cure acrylic resins under simulated oral conditions with different colorants. Materials and Methods: Three different brands of heat cure acrylic resin and two rapid cure auto polymerizing acrylic resin of commercial products such as Trevelon Heat Cure (THC), DPI Heat cure (DHC), Pyrax Heat Cure (PHC), DPI Cold cure (DCC) and Acralyn-R-Cold cure (ACC) have been evaluated for discoloration and colour variation on subjecting it to three different, commonly employed food colorants such as Erythrosine, Tartarizine and Sunset yellow. In order to simulate the oral condition the food colorants were diluted with artificial saliva to the samples taken up for the study. These were further kept in an incubator at 37°C ± 1°C. The UV-visible spectrophotometer has been utilized to evaluate the study on the basis of CIE L* a* b* system. The prepared samples for standard evaluation have been grouped as control group, which has been tested with a white as standard, which is applicable for testing the colour variants. Results: The least colour changes was found to be with Sunset Yellow showing AE* value of 3.55 with heat cure acrylic resin branded as PHC material and the highest colour absorption with Tartarizine showing AE* value of 12.43 in rapid cure autopolymerzing acrylic resin material branded as ACC material. Conclusion: ACC which is a self cure acrylic resin shows a higher colour variation to the tartarizine food coloration. There were not much of discoloration values shown on the denture base resins as the food colorants are of organic azodyes. PMID:25738078

  11. Super soft silicone elastomers with high dielectric permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Frederikke B.; Yu, Liyun; Hvilsted, Søren; Skov, Anne L.

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) have many favourable properties. The obstacle of high driving voltages, however, limits the commercial viability of the technology at present. Driving voltage can be lowered by decreasing the Young's modulus and increasing the dielectric permittivity of silicone elastomers. A decrease in Young's modulus, however, is often accompanied by the loss of mechanical stability and thereby the lifetime of the DE. New soft elastomer matrices with high dielectric permittivity and low Young's modulus, with no loss of mechanical stability, were prepared by two different approaches using chloropropyl-functional silicone polymers. The first approach was based on synthesised chloropropyl-functional copolymers that were cross-linkable and thereby formed the basis of new silicone networks with high dielectric permittivity (e.g. a 43% increase). These networks were soft without compromising other important properties of DEs such as viscous and dielectric losses as well as electrical breakdown strength. The second approach was based on the addition of commercially available chloropropyl-functional silicone oil to commercial LSR silicone elastomer. Two-fold increase in permittivity was obtained by this method and the silicone oil decreased the Young's modulus significantly. The viscous losses, however, also increased with increasing content of silicone oil. Cross-linkable chloropropyl-functional copolymers offer a new silicone elastomer matrix that could form the basis of dielectric elastomers of the future, whereas the chloropropyl silicone oil approach is an easy tool for improvement of the properties of existing commercial silicone elastomers.

  12. The effect of simplified adhesives on the bond strength to dentin of dual-cure resin cements.

    PubMed

    Shade, A M; Wajdowicz, M N; Bailey, C W; Vandewalle, K S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strengths to dentin of two dual-cure resin cements, one with a unique initiator, NX3 (Kerr Corp), and the other with a traditional redox-initiator system, Calibra (Dentsply), when used in combination with simplified or nonsimplified adhesive agents. The two dual-cure resin cements, in either self- or dual-cure activation modes, were bonded to human dentin with four dental adhesives to create 16 subgroups of 10 specimens each. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37°C, the specimens were tested in shear in a universal testing machine. With both NX3 and Calibra, bond strengths significantly increased when the specimens were dual cured. In addition, with either cement in either mode, the nonsimplified adhesives performed significantly better than did the simplified adhesive bonding agents. When used specifically with simplified adhesives in either cure mode, NX3 did not produce significantly higher bond strengths than did Calibra. In general, lower dentin bond strengths were found with simplified adhesives or self-cure activation with either resin cement.

  13. Process Development for Silicon Carbide Based Structural Ceramics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-31

    silicon carbide base structural ceramics with reduced microstructural flaw size by in situ reaction of silicon with fine, ultra-uniform pored carbon skeletons that are produced from liquid polymer solutions without particulate additions. Thus far, very uniform carbon skeletons in two pore sizes (2.5 and 0.27 microns) have been produced and siliconized. Very uniform samples of approx 1 cm cross section have been produced in a silicon carbide material of approx 5 microns average size. Limited regions of material with carbide size less than 1 micron have

  14. Silicon- and tin-based cuprates: now catalytic in copper!

    PubMed

    Weickgenannt, Andreas; Oestreich, Martin

    2010-01-11

    Silicon- and tin-containing molecules are versatile building blocks in organic synthesis. A stalwart method for their preparation relies on the stoichiometric use of silicon- and tin-based cuprates, although a few copper(I)-catalyzed or even copper-free protocols have been known for decades. In this Concept, we describe our efforts towards copper(I)-catalyzed carbon--silicon and also carbon--tin bond formations using soft bis(triorganosilyl) and bis(triorganostannyl) zinc reagents as powerful sources of nucleophilic silicon and tin. Conjugate addition, allylic substitution, and carbon--carbon multiple bond functionalization is now catalytic in copper!

  15. Bio-based epoxy/chitin nanofiber composites cured with amine-type hardeners containing chitosan.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Mitsuhiro; Enjoji, Motohiro; Sakazume, Katsumi; Ifuku, Shinsuke

    2016-06-25

    Sorbitol polyglycidyl ether (SPE) which is a bio-based water-soluble epoxy resin was cured with chitosan (CS) and/or a commercial water-soluble polyamidoamine- or polyetheramine-type epoxy hardener (PAA or PEA). Furthermore, biocomposites of the CS-cured SPE (CS-SPE) and CS/PAA- or CS/PEA-cured SPE (SPE-CA or SPE-CE) biocomposites with chitin nanofiber (CNF) were prepared by casting and compression molding methods, respectively. The curing reaction of epoxy and amino groups of the reactants was confirmed by the FT-IR spectral analysis. SPE-CS and SPE-CA were almost transparent films, while SPE-CE was opaque. Transparency of SPE-CS/CNF and SPE-CA/CNF became a little worse with increasing CNF content. The tanδ peak temperature of SPE-CS was higher than those of SPE-PAA and SPE-PEA. SPE-CA or SPE-CE exhibited two tanδ peak temperatures related to glass transitions of the CS-rich and PAA-rich or PEA-rich moieties. The tanδ peak temperatures related to the CS-rich and PAA-rich moieties increased with increasing CNF content. A higher order of tensile strengths and moduli of the cured resins was SPE-CS≫SPE-CA>SPE-CE. The tensile strength and modulus of each sample were much improved by the addition of 3wt% CNF, while further addition of CNF caused a lowering of the strength and modulus.

  16. Modified Process For Formation Of Silicon Carbide Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, Donald R.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    1996-01-01

    Modified version of process for making SiC-fiber/SiC-matrix composite material reduces damage to SiC (SCS-6) fibers and to carbon-rich coatings on fibers. Modification consists of addition of second polymer-infiltration-and-pyrolysis step to increase carbon content of porous matrix before infiltration with liquid silicon or silicon alloy.

  17. A Novel Nanofabrication Technique of Silicon-Based Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingkuan; He, Xiaobin; Gao, Jianfeng; Li, Junjie; Wei, Yayi; Yan, Jiang

    2016-12-01

    A novel nanofabrication technique which can produce highly controlled silicon-based nanostructures in wafer scale has been proposed using a simple amorphous silicon (α-Si) material as an etch mask. SiO2 nanostructures directly fabricated can serve as nanotemplates to transfer into the underlying substrates such as silicon, germanium, transistor gate, or other dielectric materials to form electrically functional nanostructures and devices. In this paper, two typical silicon-based nanostructures such as nanoline and nanofin have been successfully fabricated by this technique, demonstrating excellent etch performance. In addition, silicon nanostructures fabricated above can be further trimmed to less than 10 nm by combing with assisted post-treatment methods. The novel nanofabrication technique will be expected a new emerging technology with low process complexity and good compatibility with existing silicon integrated circuit and is an important step towards the easy fabrication of a wide variety of nanoelectronics, biosensors, and optoelectronic devices.

  18. Production of silicon modified to have enhanced infrared absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weld, E.; Ayachitula, R.; de La Harpe, K.; Brandt, L.; Chilton, M.; Knize, R. J.; Patterson, B. M.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the enhanced optical properties of silicon microstructures formed by irradiation of a silicon wafer by a modulated continuous wave (CW) laser beam in the presence of SF6. The microstructures are doped with about 0.6% sulfur, which extends the absorption well below the 1.1um bandgap of crystalline silicon and results in a 60% increase in the absorption of infrared radiation. The microstructured silicon produced using microsecond pulses of CW light demonstrates comparable infrared absorption enhancement to black silicon made using more expensive and complicated laser systems. This enhanced absorption as a result of these microstructures has been studied over the past decade in an effort to create high responsivity detectors and night vision goggles and improve the efficiency of solar cells. We will also discuss additional methods that allow tunability and scalability in the production of silicon modified to demonstrate increased infrared absorption.

  19. A Novel Nanofabrication Technique of Silicon-Based Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Lingkuan; He, Xiaobin; Gao, Jianfeng; Li, Junjie; Wei, Yayi; Yan, Jiang

    2016-11-01

    A novel nanofabrication technique which can produce highly controlled silicon-based nanostructures in wafer scale has been proposed using a simple amorphous silicon (α-Si) material as an etch mask. SiO2 nanostructures directly fabricated can serve as nanotemplates to transfer into the underlying substrates such as silicon, germanium, transistor gate, or other dielectric materials to form electrically functional nanostructures and devices. In this paper, two typical silicon-based nanostructures such as nanoline and nanofin have been successfully fabricated by this technique, demonstrating excellent etch performance. In addition, silicon nanostructures fabricated above can be further trimmed to less than 10 nm by combing with assisted post-treatment methods. The novel nanofabrication technique will be expected a new emerging technology with low process complexity and good compatibility with existing silicon integrated circuit and is an important step towards the easy fabrication of a wide variety of nanoelectronics, biosensors, and optoelectronic devices.

  20. Method for forming silicon on a glass substrate

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    1995-01-01

    A method by which single-crystal silicon microelectronics may be fabricated on glass substrates at unconventionally low temperatures. This is achieved by fabricating a thin film of silicon on glass and subsequently forming the doped components by a short wavelength (excimer) laser doping procedure and conventional patterning techniques. This method may include introducing a heavily boron doped etch stop layer on a silicon wafer using an excimer laser, which permits good control of the etch stop layer removal process. This method additionally includes dramatically reducing the remaining surface roughness of the silicon thin films after etching in the fabrication of silicon on insulator wafers by scanning an excimer laser across the surface of the silicon thin film causing surface melting, whereby the surface tension of the melt causes smoothing of the surface during recrystallization. Applications for this method include those requiring a transparent or insulating substrate, such as display manufacturing. Other applications include sensors, actuators, optoelectronics, radiation hard and high temperature electronics.