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Sample records for addition energy transfer

  1. Photon mass energy transfer coefficients for elements z=1 to 92 and 48 additional substances of dosimetric interest.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideki

    2014-07-01

    Photon mass energy transfer coefficient is an essential factor when converting photon energy fluence into kinetic energy released per unit mass (kerma). Although mass attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficients can be looked up in databases, the mass energy transfer coefficient values are still controversial. In this paper, the photon mass energy transfer coefficients for elements Z=1-92 were calculated based on cross-sectional data for each photon interaction type. Mass energy transfer coefficients for 48 compounds and/or mixtures of dosimetric interest were calculated from coefficient data for elements using Bragg's additivity rule. We additionally developed software that can search these coefficient data for any element or substance of dosimetric interest. The database and software created in this paper should prove useful for radiation measurements and/or dose calculations.

  2. Solvation free energy of the peptide group: its model dependence and implications for the additive-transfer free-energy model of protein stability.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Asthagiri, D; Weber, Valéry

    2013-09-17

    The group-additive decomposition of the unfolding free energy of a protein in an osmolyte solution relative to that in water poses a fundamental paradox: whereas the decomposition describes the experimental results rather well, theory suggests that a group-additive decomposition of free energies is, in general, not valid. In a step toward resolving this paradox, here we study the peptide-group transfer free energy. We calculate the vacuum-to-solvent (solvation) free energies of (Gly)n and cyclic diglycine (cGG) and analyze the data according to experimental protocol. The solvation free energies of (Gly)n are linear in n, suggesting group additivity. However, the slope interpreted as the free energy of a peptide unit differs from that for cGG scaled by a factor of half, emphasizing the context dependence of solvation. However, the water-to-osmolyte transfer free energies of the peptide unit are relatively independent of the peptide model, as observed experimentally. To understand these observations, a way to assess the contribution to the solvation free energy of solvent-mediated correlation between distinct groups is developed. We show that linearity of solvation free energy with n is a consequence of uniformity of the correlation contributions, with apparent group-additive behavior in the water-to-osmolyte transfer arising due to their cancellation. Implications for inferring molecular mechanisms of solvent effects on protein stability on the basis of the group-additive transfer model are suggested.

  3. Solar Energy: Heat Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Henry H., III

    This module on heat transfer is one of six in a series intended for use as supplements to currently available materials on solar energy and energy conservation. Together with the recommended texts and references (sources are identified), these modules provide an effective introduction to energy conservation and solar energy technologies. The…

  4. Dexter energy transfer pathways

    PubMed Central

    Skourtis, Spiros S.; Liu, Chaoren; Antoniou, Panayiotis; Virshup, Aaron M.; Beratan, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Energy transfer with an associated spin change of the donor and acceptor, Dexter energy transfer, is critically important in solar energy harvesting assemblies, damage protection schemes of photobiology, and organometallic opto-electronic materials. Dexter transfer between chemically linked donors and acceptors is bridge mediated, presenting an enticing analogy with bridge-mediated electron and hole transfer. However, Dexter coupling pathways must convey both an electron and a hole from donor to acceptor, and this adds considerable richness to the mediation process. We dissect the bridge-mediated Dexter coupling mechanisms and formulate a theory for triplet energy transfer coupling pathways. Virtual donor–acceptor charge-transfer exciton intermediates dominate at shorter distances or higher tunneling energy gaps, whereas virtual intermediates with an electron and a hole both on the bridge (virtual bridge excitons) dominate for longer distances or lower energy gaps. The effects of virtual bridge excitons were neglected in earlier treatments. The two-particle pathway framework developed here shows how Dexter energy-transfer rates depend on donor, bridge, and acceptor energetics, as well as on orbital symmetry and quantum interference among pathways. PMID:27382185

  5. Dexter energy transfer pathways.

    PubMed

    Skourtis, Spiros S; Liu, Chaoren; Antoniou, Panayiotis; Virshup, Aaron M; Beratan, David N

    2016-07-19

    Energy transfer with an associated spin change of the donor and acceptor, Dexter energy transfer, is critically important in solar energy harvesting assemblies, damage protection schemes of photobiology, and organometallic opto-electronic materials. Dexter transfer between chemically linked donors and acceptors is bridge mediated, presenting an enticing analogy with bridge-mediated electron and hole transfer. However, Dexter coupling pathways must convey both an electron and a hole from donor to acceptor, and this adds considerable richness to the mediation process. We dissect the bridge-mediated Dexter coupling mechanisms and formulate a theory for triplet energy transfer coupling pathways. Virtual donor-acceptor charge-transfer exciton intermediates dominate at shorter distances or higher tunneling energy gaps, whereas virtual intermediates with an electron and a hole both on the bridge (virtual bridge excitons) dominate for longer distances or lower energy gaps. The effects of virtual bridge excitons were neglected in earlier treatments. The two-particle pathway framework developed here shows how Dexter energy-transfer rates depend on donor, bridge, and acceptor energetics, as well as on orbital symmetry and quantum interference among pathways.

  6. The Additive Property of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaoussis, Dimitris S.

    1995-01-01

    Presents exercises that analyze the additive property of energy. Concludes that if a body has more than one component of energy depending on the same physical quantity, the body's total energy will be the algebraic sum of the components if a linear relationship exists between the energy components and that physical quantity. (JRH)

  7. Additional Sawmill Electrical Energy Study.

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Hatch & Associates.

    1987-02-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the potential for reducing use of electrical energy at lumber dry kilns by reducing fan speeds part way through the lumber drying process. It included three tasks: to quantify energy savings at a typical mill through field tests; to investigate the level of electric energy use at a representative sample of other mills and thereby to estimate the transferability of the conservation to the region; and to prepare a guidebook to present the technology to mill operators, and to allow them to estimate the economic value of adopting the technique at their facilities. This document reports on the first two tasks.

  8. ENERGY-TRANSFER SYSTEMS

    DOEpatents

    Thonemann, P.C.; Cowhig, W.T.; Davenport, P.A.

    1963-04-01

    This patent relates to the transfer of energy in a traveling electromagnetic wave to direct-current electrical energy in a gaseous medium. The traveling wave is generated by means of a radio-frequency oscillator connected across a capacitance-loaded helix wound around a sealed tube enclosing the gaseous medium. The traveling wave causes the electrons within the medium to drift towards one end of the tube. The direct current appearing across electrodes placed at each end of the tube is then used by some electrical means. (AEC)

  9. Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Roderick; Lee, Brian; Love, Lonnie; Mabe, Gavin; Keller, Martin; Curran, Scott; Chinthavali, Madhu; Green, Johney; Sawyer, Karma; Enquist, Phil

    2016-02-05

    Meet AMIE - the Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy demonstration project. Led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and many industry partners, the AMIE project changes the way we think about generating, storing, and using electrical power. AMIE uses an integrated energy system that shares energy between a building and a vehicle. And, utilizing advanced manufacturing and rapid innovation, it only took one year from concept to launch.

  10. Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy Demonstration

    ScienceCinema

    Jackson, Roderick; Lee, Brian; Love, Lonnie; Mabe, Gavin; Keller, Martin; Curran, Scott; Chinthavali, Madhu; Green, Johney; Sawyer, Karma; Enquist, Phil

    2016-07-12

    Meet AMIE - the Additive Manufacturing Integrated Energy demonstration project. Led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and many industry partners, the AMIE project changes the way we think about generating, storing, and using electrical power. AMIE uses an integrated energy system that shares energy between a building and a vehicle. And, utilizing advanced manufacturing and rapid innovation, it only took one year from concept to launch.

  11. Energy transfer in the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelbring, H.

    2013-12-01

    Different types of energy transfer are presented from the literature and are approached and commented on. It follows from these articles that energy transfer in addition to solar irradiation is less well understood by contemporary scientist. The transformation of energy between kinetic and potential energy in planetary orbits might be of crucial importance for understanding energy transfer between celestial bodies and the development of commensurabilities. There is evidence pointing to interactions (friction) between space and satellites producing volcanism. The reversible transfer of energy between the orbit of Moon and Earth's rotational energy is crucial to the creation of the 13.6-day and 27.3-day periods in both solar variables and Earth bound climate variables. It is hypothesized that the Earth-Moon system is modulating the sunspot numbers and creating both these periods, and that the great planets are responsible for the 11 yr solar cycle.

  12. Energy Transfer in Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Godeferd, Fabien S.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The influence or rotation on the spectral energy transfer of homogeneous turbulence is investigated in this paper. Given the fact that linear dynamics, e.g. the inertial waves regime tackled in an RDT (Rapid Distortion Theory) fashion, cannot Affect st homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, the study of nonlinear dynamics is of prime importance in the case of rotating flows. Previous theoretical (including both weakly nonlinear and EDQNM theories), experimental and DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) results are gathered here and compared in order to give a self-consistent picture of the nonlinear effects of rotation on tile turbulence. The inhibition of the energy cascade, which is linked to a reduction of the dissipation rate, is shown to be related to a damping due to rotation of the energy transfer. A model for this effect is quantified by a model equation for the derivative-skewness factor, which only involves a micro-Rossby number Ro(sup omega) = omega'/(2(OMEGA))-ratio of rms vorticity and background vorticity as the relevant rotation parameter, in accordance with DNS and EDQNM results fit addition, anisotropy is shown also to develop through nonlinear interactions modified by rotation, in an intermediate range of Rossby numbers (Ro(omega) = (omega)' and Ro(omega)w greater than 1), which is characterized by a marco-Rossby number Ro(sup L) less than 1 and Ro(omega) greater than 1 which is characterized by a macro-Rossby number based on an integral lengthscale L and the micro-Rossby number previously defined. This anisotropy is mainly an angular drain of spectral energy which tends to concentrate energy in tile wave-plane normal to the rotation axis, which is exactly both the slow and the two-dimensional manifold. In Addition, a polarization of the energy distribution in this slow 2D manifold enhances horizontal (normal to the rotation axis) velocity components, and underlies the anisotropic structure of the integral lengthscales. Finally is demonstrated the

  13. Energy transfer in compressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bataille, Francoise; Zhou, YE; Bertoglio, Jean-Pierre

    1995-01-01

    This letter investigates the compressible energy transfer process. We extend a methodology developed originally for incompressible turbulence and use databases from numerical simulations of a weak compressible turbulence based on Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) closure. In order to analyze the compressible mode directly, the well known Helmholtz decomposition is used. While the compressible component has very little influence on the solenoidal part, we found that almost all of the compressible turbulence energy is received from its solenoidal counterpart. We focus on the most fundamental building block of the energy transfer process, the triadic interactions. This analysis leads us to conclude that, at low turbulent Mach number, the compressible energy transfer process is dominated by a local radiative transfer (absorption) in both inertial and energy containing ranges.

  14. Energy transfer processes in solar energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Fayer, M.D.

    1986-11-01

    By combining picosecond optical experiments and detailed statistical mechanics theory we continue to increase our understanding of the complex interplay of structure and dynamics in important energy transfer situations. A number of different types of problems will be focused on experimentally and theoretically. They are excitation transport among chromophores attached to finite size polymer coils; excitation transport among chromophores in monolayers, bilayers, and finite and infinite stacks of layers; excitation transport in large vesicle systems; and photoinduced electron transfer in glasses and liquids, focusing particularly on the back transfer of the electron from the photogenerated radical anion to the radical cation. 33 refs., 13 figs.

  15. Optimal Low Energy Earth-Moon Transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griesemer, Paul Ricord; Ocampo, Cesar; Cooley, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    The optimality of a low-energy Earth-Moon transfer is examined for the first time using primer vector theory. An optimal control problem is formed with the following free variables: the location, time, and magnitude of the transfer insertion burn, and the transfer time. A constraint is placed on the initial state of the spacecraft to bind it to a given initial orbit around a first body, and on the final state of the spacecraft to limit its Keplerian energy with respect to a second body. Optimal transfers in the system are shown to meet certain conditions placed on the primer vector and its time derivative. A two point boundary value problem containing these necessary conditions is created for use in targeting optimal transfers. The two point boundary value problem is then applied to the ballistic lunar capture problem, and an optimal trajectory is shown. Additionally, the ballistic lunar capture trajectory is examined to determine whether one or more additional impulses may improve on the cost of the transfer.

  16. Design optimization of heat transfer and fluidic devices by using additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nikhil

    After the development of additive manufacturing technology in the 1980s, it has found use in many applications like aerospace, automotive, marine, machinery, consumer and electronic applications. In recent time, few researchers have worked on the applications of additive manufacturing for heat transfer and fluidic devices. As the world has seen a drastic increase in population in last decades which have put stress on already scarce energy resources, optimization of energy devices which include energy storing devices, heat transfer devices, energy capturing devices etc. is need for the hour. Design of energy devices is often constrained by manufacturing constraints thus current design of energy devices is not an optimized one. In this research we want to conceptualize, design and manufacture optimized heat transfer and fluidic devices by exploiting the advantages provided by additive manufacturing. We want to benefit from the fact that very intricate geometry and desired surface finish can be obtained by using additive manufacturing. Additionally, we want to compare the efficacy of our designed device with conventional devices. Work on usage of Additive manufacturing for increasing efficiency of heat transfer devices can be found in the literature. We want to extend this approach to other heat transfer devices especially tubes with internal flow. By optimizing the design of energy systems we hope to solve current energy shortage and help conserve energy for future generation. We will also extend the application of additive manufacturing technology to fabricate "device for uniform flow distribution".

  17. Energy transfer in lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Estep, T N; Thompson, T E

    1979-01-01

    The quenching of fluorescence due to energy transfer between a dilute, random array of donor and acceptor chromophores in lipid bilayer was measured and compared to theoretical expressions developed to predict the decrease in emission intensity under these circumstances. The observed intensity was found to be the same function of quencher concentration in both planar, multilamellar dispersions and small, spherical vesicles. The degree of quenching was accurately predicted by a simple relation derived in this paper, as well as a more complex equation previously developed by Tweet, et al. The results suggest that significant quenching may be observed even when the average donor-acceptor separation exceeds the Förster critical distance by severalfold. Application of these results to problems of current interest in membrane research are discussed. PMID:262415

  18. Insight into a reversible energy transfer system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ming Xuan; Zou, Hong Yan; Gao, Peng Fei; Liu, Yue; Li, Na; Li, Yuan Fang; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-09-15

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) processes have wide applications; these processes involve a unidirectional energy transfer from a particular donor to a particular acceptor. Here, we report a plasmonic resonance energy transfer (PRET), which occurs from the surface of gold nanoparticles to fluorescent organic dyes, and coexists with a nanometal surface energy transfer (NSET) that operates in the reverse direction. The coexistence of both PRET and NSET in opposite directions means that the roles of both donor and acceptor can be interchanged, which could be identified by using spectrofluorometric measurements and light scattering dark field microscopic imaging. The experimental data could be further theoretically supported using Persson and Lang's model, the quasi-static approximation and finite-difference time-domain simulation. Moreover, disruption of the PRET process by altering the energy transfer pairs suggests that interactions occur inside the reversible energy transfer system, which manifest by increasing the fluorescence quenching efficiency of the NSET process.

  19. Energy transfer processes in solar energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Fayer, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    During the past year, we have been working in three general areas: electronic excitation transport in clustered chromophore systems and other complex systems, photo-induced electron transfer and back transfer in liquid solutions in which diffusion and charge interactions are important, and the construction of a new two color dye laser system to enhance our experimental capability.

  20. Replacing and Additive Horizontal Gene Transfer in Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sang Chul; Rasmussen, Matthew D.; Hubisz, Melissa J.; Gronau, Ilan; Stanhope, Michael J.; Siepel, Adam

    2012-01-01

    The prominent role of Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) in the evolution of bacteria is now well documented, but few studies have differentiated between evolutionary events that predominantly cause genes in one lineage to be replaced by homologs from another lineage (“replacing HGT”) and events that result in the addition of substantial new genomic material (“additive HGT”). Here in, we make use of the distinct phylogenetic signatures of replacing and additive HGTs in a genome-wide study of the important human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (SPY) and its close relatives S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis (SDE) and S. dysgalactiae subspecies dysgalactiae (SDD). Using recently developed statistical models and computational methods, we find evidence for abundant gene flow of both kinds within each of the SPY and SDE clades and of reduced levels of exchange between SPY and SDD. In addition, our analysis strongly supports a pronounced asymmetry in SPY–SDE gene flow, favoring the SPY-to-SDE direction. This finding is of particular interest in light of the recent increase in virulence of pathogenic SDE. We find much stronger evidence for SPY–SDE gene flow among replacing than among additive transfers, suggesting a primary influence from homologous recombination between co-occurring SPY and SDE cells in human hosts. Putative virulence genes are correlated with transfer events, but this correlation is found to be driven by additive, not replacing, HGTs. The genes affected by additive HGTs are enriched for functions having to do with transposition, recombination, and DNA integration, consistent with previous findings, whereas replacing HGTs seen to influence a more diverse set of genes. Additive transfers are also found to be associated with evidence of positive selection. These findings shed new light on the manner in which HGT has shaped pathogenic bacterial genomes. PMID:22617954

  1. Oblivious Transfer from the Additive White Gaussian Noise Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaka, Motohiko

    We consider the use of the additive white Gaussian noise channel to achieve information theoretically secure oblivious transfer. A protocol for this primitive that ensures the correctness and privacy for players is presented together with the signal design. We also study the information theoretic efficiency of the protocol, and some more practical issues where the parameter of the channel is unknown to the players.

  2. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Traeger, R.K.

    1982-03-01

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs related to geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel resources have provided a useful mechanism for transferring laboratory technologies to private industry. Significant transfer of hardware, computer programs, diagnostics and instrumentation, advanced materials, and in situ process understanding has occurred through US/DOE supported programs in the past five years. The text briefly reviews the technology transfer procedures and summarizes 32 items that have been transferred and another 20 technologies that are now being considered for possible transfer to industry. A major factor in successful transfer has been personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staff from private industry during all aspects of the technology development.

  3. Phosphorescence and Energy Transfer in Rigid Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enciso, E.; Cabello, A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an experiment which illustrates the general aspects of intermolecular energy transfer between triplet states in rigid solutions of organic compounds solved in an ethanol-ether mixture. Measurements of quenching and energy transfer processes are made using the chemicals of benzophenone and naphthalene. (CS)

  4. Nonradiative resonance energy transfer between semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Samosvat, D. M. Chikalova-Luzina, O. P.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2015-07-15

    A microscopic analysis of the mechanisms of nonradiative energy transfer in a system of two semiconductor QDs caused by Coulomb interaction of donor and acceptor electrons is performed. The energy transfer rate is calculated for QDs based on III–V compounds using the Kane model. Conditions are analyzed under which energy transfer from a donor to an acceptor is possible. The mixing in of the p states of the valence band to the s states of the conduction band is found to give rise to additional contributions to the matrix element of energy transfer. It is shown that these additional contributions play a considerable role in the energy transfer process at distances between QDs close to contact distances or much greater. The influence of the exchange interaction on the energy transfer mechanism is analyzed, and it is shown that this interaction should be taken into account for a quantitative description of the energy transfer when QDs are separated by a distance close to the contact distance.

  5. Phonon-assisted excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Wang, Xin; Fang, Ai-Ping; Li, Hong-Rong

    2016-09-01

    The phonon-assisted process of energy transfer aiming at exploring the newly emerging frontier between biology and physics is an issue of central interest. This article shows the important role of the intramolecular vibrational modes for excitation energy transfer in the photosynthetic systems. Based on a dimer system consisting of a donor and an acceptor modeled by two two-level systems, in which one of them is coupled to a high-energy vibrational mode, we derive an effective Hamiltonian describing the vibration-assisted coherent energy transfer process in the polaron frame. The effective Hamiltonian reveals in the case that the vibrational mode dynamically matches the energy detuning between the donor and the acceptor, the original detuned energy transfer becomes resonant energy transfer. In addition, the population dynamics and coherence dynamics of the dimer system with and without vibration-assistance are investigated numerically. It is found that, the energy transfer efficiency and the transfer time depend heavily on the interaction strength of the donor and the high-energy vibrational mode, as well as the vibrational frequency. The numerical results also indicate that the initial state and dissipation rate of the vibrational mode have little influence on the dynamics of the dimer system. Results obtained in this article are not only helpful to understand the natural photosynthesis, but also offer an optimal design principle for artificial photosynthesis. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174233).

  6. Theory of directed electronic energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Andrews, David L; Crisp, Richard G

    2006-03-01

    The migration of electronic energy between molecules or chromophores in molecular solids is a well-studied phenomenon. The ability to exert control over the directionality of this transfer, by a variety of methods involving applied electrical or optical fields, holds promise for advances in fields including nanoelectronics and energy harvesting materials. In this paper, we review in detail a number of methods for directing energy transfer, also identifying potential applications.

  7. Resonance energy transfer: Dye to metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wari, M. N.; Pujar, G. H.; Inamdar, S. R.

    2015-06-24

    In the present study, surface energy transfer (SET) from Coumarin 540A (C540 A) to Gold nanoparticle (Au) is demonstrated. The observed results show pronounced effect on the photoluminescence intensity and shortening of the lifetime of Coumarin 540A upon interaction with the spherical gold nanoparticle, also there are measured effects on radiative rate of the dye. Experimental results are analyzed with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and SET theories. The results obtained from distance-dependent quenching provide experimental evidence that the efficiency curve slope and distance of quenching is best modeled by surface energy transfer process.

  8. Optical Energy Transfer and Conversion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, William C. (Inventor); Hogan, Bartholomew P. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An optical power transfer system comprising a fiber spooler, a fiber optic rotary joint mechanically connected to the fiber spooler, and an electrical power extraction subsystem connected to the fiber optic rotary joint with an optical waveguide. Optical energy is generated at and transferred from a base station through fiber wrapped around the spooler, through the rotary joint, and ultimately to the power extraction system at a remote mobility platform for conversion to another form of energy.

  9. Targeting Low-Energy Ballistic Lunar Transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous low-energy ballistic transfers exist between the Earth and Moon that require less fuel than conventional transfers, but require three or more months of transfer time. An entirely ballistic lunar transfer departs the Earth from a particular declination at some time in order to arrive at the Moon at a given time along a desirable approach. Maneuvers may be added to the trajectory in order to adjust the Earth departure to meet mission requirements. In this paper, we characterize the (Delta)V cost required to adjust a low-energy ballistic lunar transfer such that a spacecraft may depart the Earth at a desirable declination, e.g., 28.5(white bullet), on a designated date. This study identifies the optimal locations to place one or two maneuvers along a transfer to minimize the (Delta)V cost of the transfer. One practical application of this study is to characterize the launch period for a mission that aims to launch from a particular launch site, such as Cape Canaveral, Florida, and arrive at a particular orbit at the Moon on a given date using a three-month low-energy transfer.

  10. Maximizing energy transfer in vibrofluidized granular systems.

    PubMed

    Windows-Yule, C R K; Rosato, A D; Parker, D J; Thornton, A R

    2015-05-01

    Using discrete particle simulations validated by experimental data acquired using the positron emission particle tracking technique, we study the efficiency of energy transfer from a vibrating wall to a system of discrete, macroscopic particles. We demonstrate that even for a fixed input energy from the wall, energy conveyed to the granular system under excitation may vary significantly dependent on the frequency and amplitude of the driving oscillations. We investigate the manner in which the efficiency with which energy is transferred to the system depends on the system variables and determine the key control parameters governing the optimization of this energy transfer. A mechanism capable of explaining our results is proposed, and the implications of our findings in the research field of granular dynamics as well as their possible utilization in industrial applications are discussed.

  11. Wireless energy transfer between anisotropic metamaterials shells

    SciTech Connect

    Díaz-Rubio, Ana; Carbonell, Jorge; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2014-06-15

    The behavior of strongly coupled Radial Photonic Crystals shells is investigated as a potential alternative to transfer electromagnetic energy wirelessly. These sub-wavelength resonant microstructures, which are based on anisotropic metamaterials, can produce efficient coupling phenomena due to their high quality factor. A configuration of selected constitutive parameters (permittivity and permeability) is analyzed in terms of its resonant characteristics. The coupling to loss ratio between two coupled resonators is calculated as a function of distance, the maximum (in excess of 300) is obtained when the shells are separated by three times their radius. Under practical conditions an 83% of maximum power transfer has been also estimated. -- Highlights: •Anisotropic metamaterial shells exhibit high quality factors and sub-wavelength size. •Exchange of electromagnetic energy between shells with high efficiency is analyzed. •Strong coupling is supported with high wireless transfer efficiency. •End-to-end energy transfer efficiencies higher than 83% can be predicted.

  12. Sieving polymer synthesis by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization.

    PubMed

    Nai, Yi Heng; Jones, Roderick C; Breadmore, Michael C

    2013-12-01

    Replaceable sieving polymers are the fundamental component for high resolution nucleic acids separation in CE. The choice of polymer and its physical properties play significant roles in influencing separation performance. Recently, reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization has been shown to be a versatile polymerization technique capable of yielding well defined polymers previously unattainable by conventional free radical polymerization. In this study, a high molecular weight PDMA at 765 000 gmol-1 with a PDI of 1.55 was successfully synthesized with the use of chain transfer agent - 2-propionic acidyl butyl trithiocarbonate (PABTC) in a multi-step sequential RAFT polymerization approach. This study represents the first demonstration of RAFT polymerization for synthesizing polymers with the molecular weight range suitable for high resolution DNA separation in sieving electrophoresis. Adjustment of pH in the reaction was found to be crucial for the successful RAFT polymerization of high molecular weight polymer as the buffered condition minimizes the effect of hydrolysis and aminolysis commonly associated with trithiocarbonate chain transfer agents. The separation efficiency of PABTC-PDMA was found to have marginally superior separation performance compared to a commercial PDMA formulation, POP™-CAP, of similar molecular weight range.

  13. Chemical activation through super energy transfer collisions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonathan M; Nikow, Matthew; Ma, Jianqiang; Wilhelm, Michael J; Han, Yong-Chang; Sharma, Amit R; Bowman, Joel M; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2014-02-05

    Can a molecule be efficiently activated with a large amount of energy in a single collision with a fast atom? If so, this type of collision will greatly affect molecular reactivity and equilibrium in systems where abundant hot atoms exist. Conventional expectation of molecular energy transfer (ET) is that the probability decreases exponentially with the amount of energy transferred, hence the probability of what we label "super energy transfer" is negligible. We show, however, that in collisions between an atom and a molecule for which chemical reactions may occur, such as those between a translationally hot H atom and an ambient acetylene (HCCH) or sulfur dioxide, ET of chemically significant amounts of energy commences with surprisingly high efficiency through chemical complex formation. Time-resolved infrared emission observations are supported by quasi-classical trajectory calculations on a global ab initio potential energy surface. Results show that ∼10% of collisions between H atoms moving with ∼60 kcal/mol energy and HCCH result in transfer of up to 70% of this energy to activate internal degrees of freedom.

  14. Plasmon-induced resonance energy transfer for solar energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangtian; Cushing, Scott K.; Meng, Fanke; Senty, Tess R.; Bristow, Alan D.; Wu, Nianqiang

    2015-09-01

    In Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), energy non-radiatively transfers from a blue-shifted emitter to a red-shifted absorber by dipole-dipole coupling. This study shows that plasmonics enables the opposite transfer direction, transferring the plasmonic energy towards the short-wavelength direction to induce charge separation in a semiconductor. Plasmon-induced resonance energy transfer (PIRET) differs from FRET because of the lack of a Stoke's shift, non-local absorption effects and a strong dependence on the plasmon's dephasing rate and dipole moment. PIRET non-radiatively transfers energy through an insulating spacer layer, which prevents interfacial charge recombination losses and dephasing of the plasmon from hot-electron transfer. The distance dependence of dipole-dipole coupling is mapped out for a range of detuning across the plasmon resonance. PIRET can efficiently harvest visible and near-infrared sunlight with energy below the semiconductor band edge to help overcome the constraints of band-edge energetics for single semiconductors in photoelectrochemical cells, photocatalysts and photovoltaics.

  15. Excitation energy transfer in the photosystem I

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, Andrew N

    2012-09-25

    Photosystem I is a multimeric pigment protein complex in plants, green alage and cyanobacteria that functions in series with Photosystem II to use light energy to oxidize water and reduce carbon dioxide. The Photosystem I core complex contains 96 chlorophyll a molecules and 22 carotenoids that are involved in light harvesting and electron transfer. In eucaryotes, PSI also has a peripheral light harvesting complex I (LHCI). The role of specific chlorophylls in excitation and electron transfer are still unresolved. In particular, the role of so-called bridging chlorophylls, located between the bulk antenna and the core electron transfer chain, in the transfer of excitation energy to the reaction center are unknown. During the past funding period, site directed mutagenesis has been used to create mutants that effect the physical properties of these key chlorophylls, and to explore how this alters the function of the photosystem. Studying these mutants using ultrafast absorption spectroscopy has led to a better understanding of the process by which excitation energy is transferred from the antenna chlorophylls to the electron transfer chain chlorophylls, and what the role of connecting chlorophylls and A_0 chlorophylls is in this process. We have also used these mutants to investigate whch of the central group of six chlorophylls are involved in the primary steps of charge separation and electron transfer.

  16. Electron transfer and energy transfer through bridged systems. I. Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimers, J. R.; Hush, N. S.

    1989-07-01

    A time-dependent formalism is developed for reactions in which energy (vibrational or electronic excitation, electron or hole transfer, etc.) is transferred coherently between centres through a bridge. This approach is inspired by the Robinson and Frosch model of energy transfer within two-level systems. This formalism yields a completely general algorithm which, in particular limits, reduces to a generalised form of both Fermi's golden rule and Rabi's rate equation, and, in so doing, unifies many existing theories. It is shown that, only in the limit of the bridge states being non-resonant with the initial and final states, can the full problem be represented by an effective two-level model. Existing methods based upon Löwdin diagonalization are shown to be appropriate only when this limit applies, and ambiguities which arise from the ad hoc nature of these methods are resolved. Also, it is typically only in this limit that the transfer of energy proceeds exponentially in time and can be described by a simple single-parameter rate constant. Only problems which can be modelled using a single set of quantum numbers are treated in this paper. Applications and more general problems are treated in subsequent papers.

  17. Energy transfer in Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

    PubMed

    Cook, Andrew W; Zhou, Ye

    2002-08-01

    The spatial structure and energy budget for Rayleigh-Taylor instability are examined using results from a 512 x 512 x 2040 point direct numerical simulation. The outer-scale Reynolds number of the flow follows a rough t(3) power law and reaches a final value of about 5500. Taylor microscales and Reynolds numbers are plotted to characterize anisotropy in the flow and document progress towards the mixing transition. A mixing parameter is defined which characterizes the relative rates of entrainment and mixing in the flow. The spectrum of each term in the kinetic energy equation is plotted, at regular time intervals, as a function of the inhomogeneous direction and the two-dimensional wave number for the homogeneous directions. The energy spectrum manifests the beginning of an inertial range by the latter stages of the simulation. The production and dissipation spectra become increasingly opposite and separate in wave space as the flow evolves. The transfer spectrum depends strongly on the inhomogeneous direction, with the net transfer being from large to small scales. Energy transfer at the bubble/spike fronts is strictly positive. Extensive cancellation occurs between the pressure and advection terms. The dilatation term produces negligible energy transfer, but its overall effect is to move energy from high to low density regions.

  18. Is there any energy transfer during acupuncture?

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Lee, Yong-Heum; Shin, Byung-Cheul; Jeong, Dong-Myong; Kim, Mo Kyung; Eo, Yoon-Gi; Ko, Su-Bok

    2005-01-01

    Acupuncture therapy is based on the principle of restoring equilibrium of the body's energy state by regulating the flow of Qi in the corresponding meridians and acupoints. The purpose of this study was to determine whether bio-energy transfer occurs during acupuncture of the meridians. We treated 20 normal healthy subjects with acupuncture and measured changes in the direct current (DC) potential between the stomach meridian points ST-39 and ST-37 in response to invasive insertion of a needle at ST-36. Using a crossover study design, the practitioner performed the procedure on each subject once with bare (uncovered) hands (ABH) and once wearing surgical gloves (ASH) to shield the electric energy transfer. ABH produced a response pattern to each stimulation, whereas ASH produced a response pattern only to the first step. ABH elicited a significantly higher response potential than did ASH (p < 0.001). These results suggest that there may be bio-energy (Qi) transfer during acupuncture along the meridians. This transferred bio-energy (Qi) seems to act as an electromotive force, which is purported to remove the stagnation or blockage of energy and restore an equilibrium state.

  19. 'Green' reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semsarilar, Mona; Perrier, Sébastien

    2010-10-01

    Reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization has revolutionized the field of polymer synthesis as a versatile tool for the production of complex polymeric architectures. As for all chemical processes, research and development in RAFT have to focus on the design and application of chemical products and processes that have a minimum environmental impact, and follow the principles of 'green' chemistry. In this Review, we summarize some of the green features of the RAFT process, and review the recent advances in the production of degradable polymers obtained from RAFT polymerization. Its use to modify biodegradable and renewable inorganic and organic materials to yield more functional products with enhanced applications is also covered. RAFT is a promising candidate for answering both the increasing need of modern society to employ highly functional polymeric materials and the global requirements for developing sustainable chemicals and processes.

  20. Rotational Energy Transfer in N2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.

    1994-01-01

    Using the N2-N2 intermolecular potential of van der Avoird et al. rotational energy transfer cross sections have been calculated using both the coupled state (CS) and infinite order sudden (IOS) approximations. The rotational energy transfer rate constants at 300 K, calculated in the CS approximation, are in reasonable agreement with the measurements of Sitz and Farrow. The IOS approximation qualitatively reproduces the dependence of the rate constants on the rotational quantum numbers, but consistently overestimates their magnitudes. The treatment of exchange symmetry will be discussed.

  1. Resonant vibrational energy transfer in ice Ih.

    PubMed

    Shi, L; Li, F; Skinner, J L

    2014-06-28

    Fascinating anisotropy decay experiments have recently been performed on H2O ice Ih by Timmer and Bakker [R. L. A. Timmer, and H. J. Bakker, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 4148 (2010)]. The very fast decay (on the order of 100 fs) is indicative of resonant energy transfer between OH stretches on different molecules. Isotope dilution experiments with deuterium show a dramatic dependence on the hydrogen mole fraction, which confirms the energy transfer picture. Timmer and Bakker have interpreted the experiments with a Förster incoherent hopping model, finding that energy transfer within the first solvation shell dominates the relaxation process. We have developed a microscopic theory of vibrational spectroscopy of water and ice, and herein we use this theory to calculate the anisotropy decay in ice as a function of hydrogen mole fraction. We obtain very good agreement with experiment. Interpretation of our results shows that four nearest-neighbor acceptors dominate the energy transfer, and that while the incoherent hopping picture is qualitatively correct, vibrational energy transport is partially coherent on the relevant timescale.

  2. The Transfer of Energy across the Cochlea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1959-03-01

    concerning different aspects of cochlear function are in an apparent conflict: the pressure-wave concept (which maintains that the acoustic energy entering...be diverted from the pressure wave. The dilemma is solved b/ consideration of fluid motion in cochleAr models. Energy is transferred from the...follows: erses the incompressible cochlear fluids thereby In response to acoustic stimulation of the crossing the cochlear duct at the point of cochlea, a

  3. Angular momentum conservation in dipolar energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Knight, Troy E; McCusker, James K

    2011-12-23

    Conservation of angular momentum is a familiar tenet in science but has seldom been invoked to understand (or predict) chemical processes. We have developed a general formalism based on Wigner's original ideas concerning angular momentum conservation to interpret the photo-induced reactivity of two molecular donor-acceptor assemblies with physical properties synthetically tailored to facilitate intramolecular energy transfer. Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic data establishing excited-state energy transfer from a rhenium(I)-based charge-transfer state to a chromium(III) acceptor can be fully accounted for by Förster theory, whereas the corresponding cobalt(III) adduct does not undergo an analogous reaction despite having a larger cross-section for dipolar coupling. Because this pronounced difference in reactivity is easily explained within the context of the angular momentum conservation model, this relatively simple construct may provide a means for systematizing a broad range of chemical reactions.

  4. Energy transfer of nucleic acid products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Paul M.; Hu, Hsiang-Yun; Khalil, Omar S.

    1995-04-01

    Fluorescence energy transfer was investigated as a homogeneous detection method for the gapped ligase chain reaction (G-LCR). Oligonucleotides of a Chlamydia trachomatic G-LCR probe set were labeled with fluorescein as the donor and Texas Red as the acceptor fluorophore. Amplification and detection of 10 molecules of synthetic target was demonstrated in spiked urine samples.

  5. Energy Efficient Storage and Transfer of Cryogens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Cryogenics is globally linked to energy generation, storage, and usage. Thermal insulation systems research and development is an enabling part of NASA's technology goals for Space Launch and Exploration. New thermal testing methodologies and materials are being transferred to industry for a wide range of commercial applications.

  6. Risk transfer via energy savings insurance

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Evan

    2001-10-01

    Among the key barriers to investment in energy efficiency improvements are uncertainties about attaining projected energy savings and apprehension about potential disputes over these savings. The fields of energy management and risk management are thus intertwined. While many technical methods have emerged to manage performance risks (e.g. building commissioning), financial risk transfer techniques are less developed in the energy management arena than in other more mature segments of the economy. Energy Savings Insurance (ESI) - formal insurance of predicted energy savings - is one method of transferring financial risks away from the facility owner or energy services contractor. ESI offers a number of significant advantages over other forms of financial risk transfer, e.g. savings guarantees or performance bonds. ESI providers manage risk via pre-construction design review as well as post-construction commissioning and measurement and verification of savings. We found that the two mos t common criticisms of ESI - excessive pricing and onerous exclusions - are not born out in practice. In fact, if properly applied, ESI can potentially reduce the net cost of energy savings projects by reducing the interest rates charged by lenders, and by increasing the level of savings through quality control. Debt service can also be ensured by matching loan payments to projected energy savings while designing the insurance mechanism so that payments are made by the insurer in the event of a savings shortfall. We estimate the U.S. ESI market potential of $875 million/year in premium income. From an energy-policy perspective, ESI offers a number of potential benefits: ESI transfers performance risk from the balance sheet of the entity implementing the energy savings project, thereby freeing up capital otherwise needed to ''self-insure'' the savings. ESI reduces barriers to market entry of smaller energy services firms who do not have sufficiently strong balance sheets to self

  7. Collisional energy transfer from excited nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, K.O.

    1991-05-01

    The radiative lifetimes of gaseous nitrogen dioxide excited by pulsed, tunable dye laser radiation are determined for excitation wavelengths ranging from 400 to 750 nm. When the data are expressed in the form of zero-pressure radiative rate constants (k{sub 0}/s{sup {minus}1}), they fit a linear equation with respect to excitation energy. This fit predicts a radiative lifetime of 64 {mu}s for 400 nm excitation and 102 {mu}s at 750 nm. The effects of pressure, observation delay time, and wavelength range of the fluorescence detection apparatus are determined for both radiative lifetime and quenching constant. Dispersed fluorescence spectra from excited nitrogen dioxide are analyzed into three-parameter functions that approximate the corresponding excited state population distributions. Energy transfer from nitrogen dioxide excited at 532 nm and colliding with thirteen buffer gases is studied by this population deconvolution method. The energy removal rate constants increase in the order Ne < Ar < Kr < Xe < He < CO < N{sub 2} < O{sub 2} < NO < NO{sub 2} < CO{sub 2} < SF{sub 6} < SO{sub 2}. The energy transfer rate constant is strongly correlated with the number of degrees of freedom of the buffer molecule and with low vibrational frequencies of the buffer molecule. Population deconvolution from excited nitrogen dioxide fluorescence spectra is again employed to find energy removal rate constants for the NO {sub 2}{sup *}-NO{sub 2} collisions, excited by dye laser at 475.34, 435.04, and 400.00 nm. The energy transfer rate constant increases with decreasing excitation wavelength. The energy removal rate constant between 400 and 532 nm excitation increases as the (3.6 {plus minus} 0.4) power of the excitation photon energy. 76 refs., 67 figs., 16 tabs.

  8. A Design Study Of A Wireless Power Transfer System For Use To Transfer Energy From A Vibration Energy Harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabham, N. J.; Harden, C.; Vincent, D.; Beeby, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    A wirelessly powered remote sensor node is presented along with its design process. The purpose of the node is the further expansion of the sensing capabilities of the commercial Perpetuum system used for condition monitoring on trains and rolling stock which operates using vibration energy harvesting. Surplus harvested vibration energy is transferred wirelessly to a remote satellite sensor to allow measurements over a wider area to be made. This additional data is to be used for long term condition monitoring. Performance measurements made on the prototype remote sensor node are reported and advantages and disadvantages of using the same RF frequency for power and data transfer are identified.

  9. Conformational disorder in energy transfer: beyond Förster theory.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Tammie; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Roitberg, Adrian E; Tretiak, Sergei

    2013-06-21

    Energy transfer in donor-acceptor chromophore pairs, where the absorption of each species is well separated while donor emission and acceptor absorption overlap, can be understood through a Förster resonance energy transfer model. The picture is more complex for organic conjugated polymers, where the total absorption spectrum can be described as a sum of the individual contributions from each subunit (chromophore), whose absorption is not well separated. Although excitations in these systems tend to be well localized, traditional donors and acceptors cannot be defined and energy transfer can occur through various pathways where each subunit (chromophore) is capable of playing either role. In addition, fast torsional motions between individual monomers can break conjugation and lead to reordering of excited state energy levels. Fast torsional fluctuations occur on the same timescale as electronic transitions leading to multiple trivial unavoided crossings between excited states during dynamics. We use the non-adiabatic excited state molecular dynamics (NA-ESMD) approach to simulate energy transfer between two poly-phenylene vinylene (PPV) oligomers composed of 3-rings and 4-rings, respectively, separated by varying distances. The change in the spatial localization of the transient electronic transition density, initially localized on the donors, is used to determine the transfer rate. Our analysis shows that evolution of the intramolecular transition density can be decomposed into contributions from multiple transfer pathways. Here we present a detailed analysis of ensemble dynamics as well as a few representative trajectories which demonstrate the intertwined role of electronic and conformational processes. Our study reveals the complex nature of energy transfer in organic conjugated polymer systems and emphasizes the caution that must be taken in performing such an analysis when a single simple unidirectional pathway is unlikely.

  10. Vibrational energy transfer in shocked molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Joe

    2010-01-07

    We consider the process of establishing thermal equilibrium behind an ideal shock front in molecular crystals and its possible role in initiating chemical reaction at high shock pressures. A new theory of equilibration via multiphonon energy transfer is developed to treat the scattering of shock-induced phonons into internal molecular vibrations. Simple analytic forms are derived for the change in this energy transfer at different Hugoniot end states following shock compression. The total time required for thermal equilibration is found to be an order of magnitude or faster than proposed in previous work; in materials representative of explosive molecular crystals, equilibration is predicted to occur within a few picoseconds following the passage of an ideal shock wave. Recent molecular dynamics calculations are consistent with these time scales. The possibility of defect-induced temperature localization due purely to nonequilibrium phonon processes is studied by means of a simple model of the strain field around an inhomogeneity. The specific case of immobile straight dislocations is studied, and a region of enhanced energy transfer on the order of 5 nm is found. Due to the rapid establishment of thermal equilibrium, these regions are unrelated to the shock sensitivity of a material but may allow temperature localization at high shock pressures. Results also suggest that if any decomposition due to molecular collisions is occurring within the shock front itself, these collisions are not enhanced by any nonequilibrium thermal state.

  11. Light Increases Energy Transfer Efficiency in a Boreal Stream

    PubMed Central

    Lesutienė, Jūratė; Gorokhova, Elena; Stankevičienė, Daiva; Bergman, Eva; Greenberg, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Periphyton communities of a boreal stream were exposed to different light and nutrient levels to estimate energy transfer efficiency from primary to secondary producers using labeling with inorganic 13C. In a one-day field experiment, periphyton grown in fast-flow conditions and dominated by opportunistic green algae were exposed to light levels corresponding to sub-saturating (forest shade) and saturating (open stream section) irradiances, and to N and P nutrient additions. In a two-week laboratory experiment, periphyton grown in low-flow conditions and dominated by slowly growing diatoms were incubated under two sub-saturating light and nutrient enrichment levels as well as grazed and non-grazed conditions. Light had significant positive effect on 13C uptake by periphyton. In the field experiment, P addition had a positive effect on 13C uptake but only at sub-saturating light levels, whereas in the laboratory experiment nutrient additions had no effect on the periphyton biomass, 13C uptake, biovolume and community composition. In the laboratory experiment, the grazer (caddisfly) effect on periphyton biomass specific 13C uptake and nutrient content was much stronger than the effects of light and nutrients. In particular, grazers significantly reduced periphyton biomass and increased biomass specific 13C uptake and C:nutrient ratios. The energy transfer efficiency, estimated as a ratio between 13C uptake by caddisfly and periphyton, was positively affected by light conditions, whereas the nutrient effect was not significant. We suggest that the observed effects on energy transfer were related to the increased diet contribution of highly palatable green algae, stimulated by higher light levels. Also, high heterotrophic microbial activity under low light levels would facilitate energy loss through respiration and decrease overall trophic transfer efficiency. These findings suggest that even a small increase in light intensity could result in community-wide effects on

  12. Light increases energy transfer efficiency in a boreal stream.

    PubMed

    Lesutienė, Jūratė; Gorokhova, Elena; Stankevičienė, Daiva; Bergman, Eva; Greenberg, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Periphyton communities of a boreal stream were exposed to different light and nutrient levels to estimate energy transfer efficiency from primary to secondary producers using labeling with inorganic (13)C. In a one-day field experiment, periphyton grown in fast-flow conditions and dominated by opportunistic green algae were exposed to light levels corresponding to sub-saturating (forest shade) and saturating (open stream section) irradiances, and to N and P nutrient additions. In a two-week laboratory experiment, periphyton grown in low-flow conditions and dominated by slowly growing diatoms were incubated under two sub-saturating light and nutrient enrichment levels as well as grazed and non-grazed conditions. Light had significant positive effect on (13)C uptake by periphyton. In the field experiment, P addition had a positive effect on (13)C uptake but only at sub-saturating light levels, whereas in the laboratory experiment nutrient additions had no effect on the periphyton biomass, (13)C uptake, biovolume and community composition. In the laboratory experiment, the grazer (caddisfly) effect on periphyton biomass specific (13)C uptake and nutrient content was much stronger than the effects of light and nutrients. In particular, grazers significantly reduced periphyton biomass and increased biomass specific (13)C uptake and C:nutrient ratios. The energy transfer efficiency, estimated as a ratio between (13)C uptake by caddisfly and periphyton, was positively affected by light conditions, whereas the nutrient effect was not significant. We suggest that the observed effects on energy transfer were related to the increased diet contribution of highly palatable green algae, stimulated by higher light levels. Also, high heterotrophic microbial activity under low light levels would facilitate energy loss through respiration and decrease overall trophic transfer efficiency. These findings suggest that even a small increase in light intensity could result in community

  13. Direct contact heat transfer for thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. D.

    1980-11-01

    Direct contact heat exchange offers the potential for increased efficiency and lower heat transfer costs in a variety of thermal energy storage systems. Models of direct contact heat transfer based on literature information identified dispersed phase drop size, the mechanism of heat transfer within the drop, and dispersed phase holdup as the parameters controlling direct contact system performance. Tests were defined and equipment constructed to provide independent determination of drop size, heat transfer mechanism, and hold up. Experiments with heptane dispersed in water are described. The velocity at which drop formation changes from dropwise to jetting was overpredicted by all literature correlations. Further experiments are needed to conclusively determine whether the salt in a salt hydrate melt acts to block internal circulation. In addition, the potential of low temperature oil/salt hydrate latent heat storage systems is evaluated in the laboratory.

  14. Energy transfer between laser filaments in liquid methanol.

    PubMed

    Strycker, B D; Springer, M; Trendafilova, C; Hua, X; Zhi, M; Kolomenskii, A A; Schroeder, H; Strohaber, J; Schuessler, H A; Kattawar, G W; Sokolov, A V

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate energy exchange between two filament-forming femtosecond laser beams in liquid methanol. Our results are consistent with those of previous works documenting coupling between filaments in air; in addition, we identify an unreported phenomenon in which the direction of energy exchange oscillates at increments in the relative pulse delay equal to an optical period (2.6 fs). Energy transfer from one filament to another may be used in remote sensing and spectroscopic applications utilizing femtosecond laser filaments in water and air.

  15. Rates of mass, momentum, and energy transfer at the magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    Empirical estimates of the global rates of transfer of solar wind mass, tangential momentum, and energy at the Earth's magnetopause are presented for comparison against model estimates based on the four principal mechanisms that have been proposed to explain such transfer. The comparisons, although not quite conclusive, strongly favor a model that incorporates some combination of direct magnetic connection and anomalous cross field diffusion. An additional global constraint, the rate at which magnetic flux is cycled through the magnetospheric convection system, strongly suggests that direct magnetic connection plays a significant if not dominant role in the solar wind/magnetosphere interaction.

  16. Energy transfer: Resonance is the key for coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Daniel B.

    2017-02-01

    The process of electronic energy transfer between molecules has long fascinated chemists. Femtosecond spectroscopy measurements of a series of molecular dimers now reveal signals that arise from non-Born-Oppenheimer coupling, suggesting a new mechanism to enhance energy transfer.

  17. Air Storage System Energy Transfer (ASSET) plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stys, Z. S.

    1983-09-01

    The design features and performance capabilities of Air Storage System Energy Transfer (ASSET) plants for transferring off-peak utility electricity to on-peak hours are described. The plant operations involve compressing ambient air with an axial flow compressor and depositing it in an underground reservoir at 70 bar pressure. Released during a peaking cycle, the pressure is reduced to 43 bar, the air is heated to 550 C, passed through an expander after a turbine, and passed through a low pressure combustion chamber to be heated to 850 C. A West German plant built in 1978 to supply over 300 MW continuous power for up to two hours is detailed, noting its availability factor of nearly 98 percent and power delivery cost of $230/kW installed. A plant being constructed in Illinois will use limestone caverns as the air storage tank.

  18. Distributed Wireless Power Transfer With Energy Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Zhang, Rui

    2017-04-01

    Energy beamforming (EB) is a key technique for achieving efficient radio-frequency (RF) transmission enabled wireless energy transfer (WET). By optimally designing the waveforms from multiple energy transmitters (ETs) over the wireless channels, they can be constructively combined at the energy receiver (ER) to achieve an EB gain that scales with the number of ETs. However, the optimal design of EB waveforms requires accurate channel state information (CSI) at the ETs, which is challenging to obtain practically, especially in a distributed system with ETs at separate locations. In this paper, we study practical and efficient channel training methods to achieve optimal EB in a distributed WET system. We propose two protocols with and without centralized coordination, respectively, where distributed ETs either sequentially or in parallel adapt their transmit phases based on a low-complexity energy feedback from the ER. The energy feedback only depends on the received power level at the ER, where each feedback indicates one particular transmit phase that results in the maximum harvested power over a set of previously used phases. Simulation results show that the two proposed training protocols converge very fast in practical WET systems even with a large number of distributed ETs, while the protocol with sequential ET phase adaptation is also analytically shown to converge to the optimal EB design with perfect CSI by increasing the training time. Numerical results are also provided to evaluate the performance of the proposed distributed EB and training designs as compared to other benchmark schemes.

  19. Investigation of Vibrational Energy Transfer in Connected Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, C.; Pi, W. S.

    1973-01-01

    The results are reported of an analytical and experimental investigation on the vibrational energy transfer between connected substructures under random excitation. In the analytical area, the basic foundation and assumptions of the statistical energy analysis (SEA) method, a major tool in random response analysis of structures, were examined and reviewed. A new SEA formulation based on the strong coupling condition of the substructures was carried out and presented. Also presented were the results of vibration energy transfer study based on the wave equations applied to connected structures. In the experimental phase, three simple structural models were fabricated and tested. Additional tests were performed on selected substructures which formed parts of the test models. The test results were presented and evaluated against the analytical data.

  20. Low-Energy Ballistic Transfers to Lunar Halo Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent lunar missions have begun to take advantage of the benefits of low-energy ballistic transfers between the Earth and the Moon rather than implementing conventional Hohmann-like lunar transfers. Both Artemis and GRAIL plan to implement low-energy lunar transfers in the next few years. This paper explores the characteristics and potential applications of many different families of low-energy ballistic lunar transfers. The transfers presented here begin from a wide variety of different orbits at the Earth and follow several different distinct pathways to the Moon. This paper characterizes these pathways to identify desirable low-energy lunar transfers for future lunar missions.

  1. Energy transfer process between exciton and surface plasmon: Complete transition from Forster to surface energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Arunandan; Tyagi, Priyanka; Srivastava, Ritu; Mehta, D. S.; Kamalasanan, M. N.

    2013-05-01

    The energy transfer process between surface plasmons and excitons was studied by varying the filling fraction of gold (Au) nano-clusters (NCs) and by placing a spacer of different thickness between Au NC and organic semiconductor layer. The intensity enhancement has occurred for 10%-50% filling fractions and 4-14 nm spacer thicknesses. Energy transfer mechanism was found to switch from Forster type to surface type by increase in filling fraction. Transverse electric field for Au NCs was simulated and we observed that for filling fraction <30%, Au NCs behave like 1-dimensional dipole and for >60%, they behave like 2-dimensional dipoles.

  2. Energy Transfer and Luminescence in Manganese - Crystals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danko, Joseph John

    An investigation, directed toward an understanding of the concentration-dependent characteristics of the Mn -Mn energy transfer, has been carried out in RbMn(,x)Mg(,1 -x)F(,3) via a detailed luminescence study in the temperature range, 4-120K. The emission of RbMn(,x)Mg(,1-x)F(,3), down to a concentration of 40% Mn, consists of two distinct Mn bands which are featureless except in the case of the stoichiometric system. The dominant sharp-line structure of this latter system spans the spectral range, 5515-5960(ANGSTROM), and is found to exhibit multi-magnon characteristics. The emission bands of RbMn(,x)Mg(,1-x)F(,3) are attributed to phonon-assisted transitions from two impurity-induced Mn traps. The variations of spectra and of the decay patterns with temperature are used to model the deexcitation mechanism in RbMn(,x)Mg(,1-x)F(,3) and result in the determination of the rate of energy transfer to the shallow luminescence trap. This work is prefaced by an introduction to the theory of collective electronic and magnetic excitations and by a comprehensive review of the various electronic, magnetic and optical properties of stoichiometric Mn-based crystals. As a secondary research effort, the 10488(ANGSTROM) line of Nd in RbMnF(,3):Nd was studied as a function of temperature. The strength of such a line is a direct consequence of the ability of Mn to efficiently transfer its excitation to the Nd centers. The lineshift with change in temperature is due to the continual absorption and emission of virtual phonons; the thermal line broadening is due to a Raman scattering of phonons.

  3. Energy Transfer in the Earth-Sun System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.; Kamide, Y.

    2007-02-01

    Conference on Earth-Sun System Exploration: Energy Transfer; Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, USA, 16-20 January 2006; The goal of this conference, which was supported by several agencies and organizations, was to provide a forum for physicists engaged in the Earth-Sun system as well as in laboratory experiments to discuss and exchange knowledge and ideas on physical processes involving energy transfer. The motivation of the conference stemmed from the following realization: Space assets form an important fabric of our society, performing functions such as television broadcasting, cell- phone communication, navigation, and remote monitoring of tropospheric weather. There is increasing awareness of how much our daily activities can be adversely affected by space disturbances stretching all the way back to the Sun. In some of these energetic phenomena, energy in various forms can propagate long distances from the solar surface to the interplanetary medium and eventually to the Earth's immediate space environment, namely, its magnetosphere, ionosphere, and thermosphere. In addition, transformation of energy can take place in these space disturbances, allowing charged-particle energy to be transformed to electromagnetic energy or vice versa. In- depth understanding of energy transformation and transmission in the Earth-Sun system will foster the identification of physical processes responsible for space disturbances and the prediction of their occurrences and effects. Participants came from 15 countries.

  4. Enhancing radiative energy transfer through thermal extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yixuan; Liu, Baoan; Shen, Sheng; Yu, Zongfu

    2016-06-01

    Thermal radiation plays an increasingly important role in many emerging energy technologies, such as thermophotovoltaics, passive radiative cooling and wearable cooling clothes [1]. One of the fundamental constraints in thermal radiation is the Stefan-Boltzmann law, which limits the maximum power of far-field radiation to P0 = σT4S, where σ is the Boltzmann constant, S and T are the area and the temperature of the emitter, respectively (Fig. 1a). In order to overcome this limit, it has been shown that near-field radiations could have an energy density that is orders of magnitude greater than the Stefan-Boltzmann law [2-7]. Unfortunately, such near-field radiation transfer is spatially confined and cannot carry radiative heat to the far field. Recently, a new concept of thermal extraction was proposed [8] to enhance far-field thermal emission, which, conceptually, operates on a principle similar to oil immersion lenses and light extraction in light-emitting diodes using solid immersion lens to increase light output [62].Thermal extraction allows a blackbody to radiate more energy to the far field than the apparent limit of the Stefan-Boltzmann law without breaking the second law of thermodynamics. Thermal extraction works by using a specially designed thermal extractor to convert and guide the near-field energy to the far field, as shown in Fig. 1b. The same blackbody as shown in Fig. 1a is placed closely below the thermal extractor with a spacing smaller than the thermal wavelength. The near-field coupling transfers radiative energy with a density greater than σT4. The thermal extractor, made from transparent and high-index or structured materials, does not emit or absorb any radiation. It transforms the near-field energy and sends it toward the far field. As a result, the total amount of far-field radiative heat dissipated by the same blackbody is greatly enhanced above SσT4, where S is the area of the emitter. This paper will review the progress in thermal

  5. Nanoparticles for heat transfer and thermal energy storage

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Dileep; Cingarapu, Sreeram; Timofeeva, Elena V.; Moravek, Michael

    2015-07-14

    An article of manufacture and method of preparation thereof. The article of manufacture and method of making the article includes an eutectic salt solution suspensions and a plurality of nanocrystalline phase change material particles having a coating disposed thereon and the particles capable of undergoing the phase change which provides increase in thermal energy storage. In addition, other articles of manufacture can include a nanofluid additive comprised of nanometer-sized particles consisting of copper decorated graphene particles that provide advanced thermal conductivity to heat transfer fluids.

  6. Photon Upconversion Through Tb(3+) -Mediated Interfacial Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Yang, Weifeng; Han, Sanyang; Sun, Qiang; Liu, Xiaogang

    2015-10-28

    A strategy of interfacial energy transfer upconversion is demonstrated through the use of a terbium (Tb(3+) ) dopant as energy donor or energy migrator in core-shell-structured nanocrystals. This mechanistic investigation presents a new pathway for photon upconversion, and, more importantly, contributes to the better control of energy transfer at the nanometer length scale.

  7. Ultrasound acoustic wave energy transfer and harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, Shima; Leadenham, Stephen; Guillot, François; Sabra, Karim; Erturk, Alper

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates low-power electricity generation from ultrasound acoustic wave energy transfer combined with piezoelectric energy harvesting for wireless applications ranging from medical implants to naval sensor systems. The focus is placed on an underwater system that consists of a pulsating source for spherical wave generation and a harvester connected to an external resistive load for quantifying the electrical power output. An analytical electro-acoustic model is developed to relate the source strength to the electrical power output of the harvester located at a specific distance from the source. The model couples the energy harvester dynamics (piezoelectric device and electrical load) with the source strength through the acoustic-structure interaction at the harvester-fluid interface. Case studies are given for a detailed understanding of the coupled system dynamics under various conditions. Specifically the relationship between the electrical power output and system parameters, such as the distance of the harvester from the source, dimensions of the harvester, level of source strength, and electrical load resistance are explored. Sensitivity of the electrical power output to the excitation frequency in the neighborhood of the harvester's underwater resonance frequency is also reported.

  8. Compost addition reduces porosity and chlordecone transfer in soil microstructure.

    PubMed

    Woignier, Thierry; Clostre, Florence; Fernandes, Paula; Rangon, Luc; Soler, Alain; Lesueur-Jannoyer, Magalie

    2016-01-01

    Chlordecone, an organochlorine insecticide, pollutes soils and contaminates crops and water resources and is biomagnified by food chains. As chlordecone is partly trapped in the soil, one possible alternative to decontamination may be to increase its containment in the soil, thereby reducing its diffusion into the environment. Containing the pesticide in the soil could be achieved by adding compost because the pollutant has an affinity for organic matter. We hypothesized that adding compost would also change soil porosity, as well as transport and containment of the pesticide. We measured the pore features and studied the nanoscale structure to assess the effect of adding compost on soil microstructure. We simulated changes in the transport properties (hydraulic conductivity and diffusion) associated with changes in porosity. During compost incubation, the clay microstructure collapsed due to capillary stresses. Simulated data showed that the hydraulic conductivity and diffusion coefficient were reduced by 95 and 70% in the clay microstructure, respectively. Reduced transport properties affected pesticide mobility and thus helped reduce its transfer from the soil to water and to the crop. We propose that the containment effect is due not only to the high affinity of chlordecone for soil organic matter but also to a trapping mechanism in the soil porosity.

  9. Stereoselective synthesis of cyclohexanones via phase transfer catalyzed double addition of nucleophiles to divinyl ketones.

    PubMed

    Silvanus, Andrew C; Groombridge, Benjamin J; Andrews, Benjamin I; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Carbery, David R

    2010-11-05

    Functionalized cyclohexanones are formed in excellent yield and diastereoselectivity from a phase transfer catalyzed double addition of active methylene pronucleophiles to nonsymmetrical divinyl ketones.

  10. Infrared radiative energy transfer in gaseous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1991-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the radiative interactions in various energy transfer processes in gaseous systems. Both gray and non-gray radiative formulations for absorption and emission by molecular gases are presented. The gray gas formulations are based on the Planck mean absorption coefficient and the non-gray formulations are based on the wide band model correlations for molecular absorption. Various relations for the radiative flux and divergence of radiative flux are developed. These are useful for different flow conditions and physical problems. Specific plans for obtaining extensive results for different cases are presented. The procedure developed was applied to several realistic problems. Results of selected studies are presented.

  11. Anisotropic energy transfers in quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K. Sandeep; Kumar, Raghwendra; Verma, Mahendra K.

    2014-10-15

    We perform direct numerical simulations of quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and compute various energy transfers including the ring-to-ring and conical energy transfers, and the energy fluxes of the perpendicular and parallel components of the velocity field. We show that the rings with higher polar angles transfer energy to ones with lower polar angles. For large interaction parameters, the dominant energy transfer takes place near the equator (polar angle θ≈(π)/2 ). The energy transfers are local both in wavenumbers and angles. The energy flux of the perpendicular component is predominantly from higher to lower wavenumbers (inverse cascade of energy), while that of the parallel component is from lower to higher wavenumbers (forward cascade of energy). Our results are consistent with earlier results, which indicate quasi two-dimensionalization of quasi-static magnetohydrodynamic flows at high interaction parameters.

  12. Radiation energy transfer in RNA polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempner, E. S.; Salovey, R.; Bernstein, S. L.

    1996-11-01

    Ribozymes are a special class of polyribonucleotide (RNA) molecules which possess intrinsic catalytic activity, capable of cleaving nucleic acid substrates. RNA molecules were synthesized containing a hammerhead ribozyme moiety of 52 nucleotides linked to an inactive leader sequence, for total lengths of either 262 or 1226 nucleotides. These RNAs were frozen and irradiated with high energy electrons. Surviving ribozyme activity was determined, using the ability of the irradiated ribozymes to cleave a labeled substrate. From the same irradiated samples, the amount of intact RNA remaining was determined following denaturing gel electrophoresis. Radiation target analyses of these data revealed a structural target size of 80 kDa and a ribozyme activity target size of 15 kDa for the smaller ribozyme, and 319 and 16 kDa, respectively, for the larger ribozyme. The disparity in target size for activity vs structure indicates that, in contrast to proteins, there is no spread of radiation damage far from the primary site of ionization in RNA molecules. The smaller target size for activity indicates that only primary ionizations occurring in the specific active region are effective. This is similar to the case for oligosaccharides. It is concluded that the presence of the ribose sugar in the polymer chain restricts radiation damage to a small region and prevents major energy transfer throughout the molecule.

  13. Femtosecond Carotenoid to Retinal Energy Transfer in Xanthorhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Polívka, Tomáš; Balashov, Sergei P.; Chábera, Pavel; Imasheva, Eleonora S.; Yartsev, Arkady; Sundström, Villy; Lanyi, Janos K.

    2009-01-01

    Xanthorhodopsin of the extremely halophilic bacterium Salinibacter ruber represents a novel antenna system. It consists of a carbonyl carotenoid, salinixanthin, bound to a retinal protein that serves as a light-driven transmembrane proton pump similar to bacteriorhodopsin of archaea. Here we apply the femtosecond transient absorption technique to reveal the excited-state dynamics of salinixanthin both in solution and in xanthorhodopsin. The results not only disclose extremely fast energy transfer rates and pathways, they also reveal effects of the binding site on the excited-state properties of the carotenoid. We compared the excited-state dynamics of salinixanthin in xanthorhodopsin and in NaBH4-treated xanthorhodopsin. The NaBH4 treatment prevents energy transfer without perturbing the carotenoid binding site, and allows observation of changes in salinixanthin excited-state dynamics related to specific binding. The S1 lifetimes of salinixanthin in untreated and NaBH4-treated xanthorhodopsin were identical (3 ps), confirming the absence of the S1-mediated energy transfer. The kinetics of salinixanthin S2 decay probed in the near-infrared region demonstrated a change of the S2 lifetime from 66 fs in untreated xanthorhodopsin to 110 fs in the NaBH4-treated protein. This corresponds to a salinixanthin-retinal energy transfer time of 165 fs and an efficiency of 40%. In addition, binding of salinixanthin to xanthorhodopsin increases the population of the S∗ state that decays in 6 ps predominantly to the ground state, but a small fraction (<10%) of the S∗ state generates a triplet state. PMID:19289053

  14. Energy transfer in nonlinear network models of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, F.; Sanejouand, Y.-H.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate how nonlinearity and topological disorder affect the energy relaxation of local kicks in coarse-grained network models of proteins. We find that nonlinearity promotes long-range, coherent transfer of substantial energy to specific functional sites, while depressing transfer to generic locations. In some cases, transfer is mediated by the self-localization of discrete breathers at distant locations from the kick, acting as efficient energy-accumulating centers.

  15. Energy transfer upconversion in ? and ? doped ? crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Jouart, Jean-Pierre; Mary, Gérard

    1998-01-01

    A comparative spectroscopic study for 0953-8984/10/2/027/img10 and 0953-8984/10/2/027/img11 doped 0953-8984/10/2/027/img12 crystals has been realised at liquid nitrogen temperature. The 0953-8984/10/2/027/img10 single-doped sample shows principally blue emission corresponding to the 0953-8984/10/2/027/img14 transition, whereas the 0953-8984/10/2/027/img11 codoped sample gives rise to a very efficient green emission which is ascribed to the 0953-8984/10/2/027/img16 transition. The total integrated upconversion emission intensity (including blue and green emissions) for the codoped crystal is three times more intense than that of the 0953-8984/10/2/027/img10 doped one, while the ratio for green emission rises to 27. The green emission in the codoped sample results mainly from the 0953-8984/10/2/027/img18 mixed centre, whereas the blue emission is essentially due to the 0953-8984/10/2/027/img19 pair. Two energy transfer upconversion mechanisms have been proposed and are discussed in the paper.

  16. Experimental study of enhanced heat transfer by addition of CuO nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesumathy, Stella; Udayakumar, M.; Suresh, S.

    2012-06-01

    An energy storage system has been designed to study the thermal characteristics of paraffin wax with an embedded nano size copper oxide (CuO) particle. This paper presents studies conducted on phase transition times, heat fraction as well as heat transfer characteristics of paraffin wax as phase change material (PCM) embedded with CuO nanoparticles. 40 nm mean size CuO particles of 2, 5 and 10% by weight were dispersed in PCM for this study. Experiments were performed on a heat exchanger with 1.5-10 l/min of heat transfer fluid (HTF) flow. Time-based variations of the temperature distributions are revealed from the results of observations of melting and solidification curves. The results strongly suggested that the thermal conductivity enhances 6, 6.7 and 7.8% in liquid state and in dynamic viscosity it enhances by 5, 14 and 30% with increasing mass fraction of the CNEPs. The thermal conductivity ratio of the composites can be augmented by a factor up to 1.3. The heat transfer coefficient during solidification increased about 78% for the maximum flow rate. The analysis of experimental results reveals that the addition of copper oxide nanoparticles to the paraffin wax enhances both the conduction and natural convection very effectively in composites and in paraffin wax. The paraffin wax-based composites have great potential for energy storage applications like industrial waste heat recovery, solar thermal applications and solar based dynamic space power generation with optimal fraction of copper oxide nanoparticles.

  17. Targeting Low-Energy Transfers to Low Lunar Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.; Anderson, Rodney L.

    2011-01-01

    A targeting scheme is presented to build trajectories from a specified Earth parking orbit to a specified low lunar orbit via a low-energy transfer and up to two maneuvers. The total transfer delta V (velocity) is characterized as a function of the Earth parking orbit inclination and the departure date for transfers to each given low lunar orbit. The transfer delta V (velocity) cost is characterized for transfers constructed to low lunar polar orbits with any longitude of ascending node and for transfers that arrive at the Moon at any given time during a month.

  18. Ion momentum and energy transfer rates for charge exchange collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J.; Banks, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    The rates of momentum and energy transfer have been obtained for charge exchange collisions between ion and neutral gases having arbitrary Maxwellian temperatures and bulk transport velocities. The results are directly applicable to the F-region of the ionosphere where 0+ - 0 charge is the dominant mechanism affecting ion momentum and energy transfer.

  19. Detecting Plasmon Resonance Energy Transfer with Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Augspurger, Ashley E.; Stender, Anthony S.; Han, Rui; Fang, Ning

    2013-12-30

    Gold nanoparticles are ideal probes for studying intracellular environments and energy transfer mechanisms due to their plasmonic properties. Plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) relies on a plasmonic nanoparticle to donate energy to a nearby resonant acceptor molecule, a process which can be observed due to the plasmonic quenching of the donor nanoparticle. In this study, a gold nanosphere was used as the plasmonic donor, while the metalloprotein cytochrome c was used as the acceptor molecule. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy allows for simultaneous monitoring of complex environments and noble metal nanoparticles in real time. Using DIC and specially designed microfluidic channels, we were able to monitor PRET at the single gold particle level and observe the reversibility of PRET upon the introduction of phosphate-buffered saline to the channel. In an additional experiment, single gold particles were internalized by HeLa cells and were subsequently observed undergoing PRET as the cell hosts underwent morphological changes brought about by ethanol-induced apoptosis.

  20. Picosecond energy transfer in Porphyridium cruentum and Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, S S; Treadwell, C; Barber, J

    1981-01-01

    Picosecond energy transfer is measured in Anacystis nidulans and Porphyridium cruentum. Fluorescence is sensitized by a 6-ps laser flash, at 530 nm. The time dependence of fluorescence is measured with reference to the laser pulse. Fluorescence is recorded from phycoerythrin (576 nm), R-phycocyanin (640 nm), allophycocyanin (666 nm), Photosystem II chlorophyll (690 nm) and long wave length chlorophyll (715 nm). Energy transfer measurements are made at 37 degrees C, 23 degrees C, and 0 degrees C, and 77 degrees K. It is shown that the rate of energy transfer can be varied with temperature. In both A. nidulans and P. cruentum there is a sequential transfer of excitation energy from phycoerythrin to phycocyanin to allophycocyan to Photosystem II chlorophyll fluorescence. The long wavelength chlorophyll fluorescence at 715 nm, however, does not always follow a sequential transfer of excitation energy. Depending on the temperature, fluorescence at 715 nm can precede fluorescence from phycocyanin. PMID:6788106

  1. Critical Role of Energy Transfer Between Terbium Ions for Suppression of Back Energy Transfer in Nonanuclear Terbium Clusters.

    PubMed

    Omagari, Shun; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Seki, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Koji; Ito, Hajime; Meijerink, Andries; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2016-11-15

    Lanthanide (Ln(III)) complexes form an important class of highly efficient luminescent materials showing characteristic line emission after efficient light absorption by the surrounding ligands. The efficiency is however lowered by back energy transfer from Ln(III) ion to the ligands, especially at higher temperatures. Here we report a new strategy to reduce back energy transfer losses. Nonanuclear lanthanide clusters containing terbium and gadolinium ions, TbnGd9-n clusters ([TbnGd9-n(μ-OH)10(butylsalicylate)16](+)NO3(-), n = 0, 1, 2, 5, 8, 9), were synthesized to investigate the effect of energy transfer between Tb(III) ions on back energy transfer. The photophysical properties of TbnGd9-n clusters were studied by steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques and revealed a longer emission lifetime with increasing number of Tb(III) ions in TbnGd9-n clusters. A kinetic analysis of temperature dependence of the emission lifetime show that the energy transfer between Tb(III) ions competes with back energy transfer. The experimental results are in agreement with a theoretical rate equation model that confirms the role of energy transfer between Tb(III) ions in reducing back energy transfer losses. The results provide a new strategy in molecular design for improving the luminescence efficiency in lanthanide complexes which is important for potential applications as luminescent materials.

  2. Critical Role of Energy Transfer Between Terbium Ions for Suppression of Back Energy Transfer in Nonanuclear Terbium Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Omagari, Shun; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Seki, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Koji; Ito, Hajime; Meijerink, Andries; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Lanthanide (Ln(III)) complexes form an important class of highly efficient luminescent materials showing characteristic line emission after efficient light absorption by the surrounding ligands. The efficiency is however lowered by back energy transfer from Ln(III) ion to the ligands, especially at higher temperatures. Here we report a new strategy to reduce back energy transfer losses. Nonanuclear lanthanide clusters containing terbium and gadolinium ions, TbnGd9−n clusters ([TbnGd9−n(μ-OH)10(butylsalicylate)16]+NO3−, n = 0, 1, 2, 5, 8, 9), were synthesized to investigate the effect of energy transfer between Tb(III) ions on back energy transfer. The photophysical properties of TbnGd9−n clusters were studied by steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques and revealed a longer emission lifetime with increasing number of Tb(III) ions in TbnGd9−n clusters. A kinetic analysis of temperature dependence of the emission lifetime show that the energy transfer between Tb(III) ions competes with back energy transfer. The experimental results are in agreement with a theoretical rate equation model that confirms the role of energy transfer between Tb(III) ions in reducing back energy transfer losses. The results provide a new strategy in molecular design for improving the luminescence efficiency in lanthanide complexes which is important for potential applications as luminescent materials. PMID:27845407

  3. Critical Role of Energy Transfer Between Terbium Ions for Suppression of Back Energy Transfer in Nonanuclear Terbium Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omagari, Shun; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Seki, Tomohiro; Fushimi, Koji; Ito, Hajime; Meijerink, Andries; Hasegawa, Yasuchika

    2016-11-01

    Lanthanide (Ln(III)) complexes form an important class of highly efficient luminescent materials showing characteristic line emission after efficient light absorption by the surrounding ligands. The efficiency is however lowered by back energy transfer from Ln(III) ion to the ligands, especially at higher temperatures. Here we report a new strategy to reduce back energy transfer losses. Nonanuclear lanthanide clusters containing terbium and gadolinium ions, TbnGd9‑n clusters ([TbnGd9‑n(μ-OH)10(butylsalicylate)16]+NO3‑, n = 0, 1, 2, 5, 8, 9), were synthesized to investigate the effect of energy transfer between Tb(III) ions on back energy transfer. The photophysical properties of TbnGd9‑n clusters were studied by steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques and revealed a longer emission lifetime with increasing number of Tb(III) ions in TbnGd9‑n clusters. A kinetic analysis of temperature dependence of the emission lifetime show that the energy transfer between Tb(III) ions competes with back energy transfer. The experimental results are in agreement with a theoretical rate equation model that confirms the role of energy transfer between Tb(III) ions in reducing back energy transfer losses. The results provide a new strategy in molecular design for improving the luminescence efficiency in lanthanide complexes which is important for potential applications as luminescent materials.

  4. Visual prosthesis wireless energy transfer system optimal modeling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Wireless energy transfer system is an effective way to solve the visual prosthesis energy supply problems, theoretical modeling of the system is the prerequisite to do optimal energy transfer system design. Methods On the basis of the ideal model of the wireless energy transfer system, according to visual prosthesis application condition, the system modeling is optimized. During the optimal modeling, taking planar spiral coils as the coupling devices between energy transmitter and receiver, the effect of the parasitic capacitance of the transfer coil is considered, and especially the concept of biological capacitance is proposed to consider the influence of biological tissue on the energy transfer efficiency, resulting in the optimal modeling’s more accuracy for the actual application. Results The simulation data of the optimal model in this paper is compared with that of the previous ideal model, the results show that under high frequency condition, the parasitic capacitance of inductance and biological capacitance considered in the optimal model could have great impact on the wireless energy transfer system. The further comparison with the experimental data verifies the validity and accuracy of the optimal model proposed in this paper. Conclusions The optimal model proposed in this paper has a higher theoretical guiding significance for the wireless energy transfer system’s further research, and provide a more precise model reference for solving the power supply problem in visual prosthesis clinical application. PMID:24428906

  5. Energy transfer processes along a supramolecular chain of π-conjugated molecules.

    PubMed

    Schmid, S A; Abbel, R; Schenning, A P H J; Meijer, E W; Herz, L M

    2012-08-13

    We have investigated the energy transfer dynamics in a supramolecular linear polymer chain comprising oligofluorene (OF) energy donor units linked by quadruple hydrogen-bonding groups, and oligophenylene (OPV) chain ends that act as energy acceptors. Using femtosecond spectroscopy, we followed the dynamics of energy transfer from the main chain of OF units to the OPV chain ends and simulated these data taking a Monte Carlo approach that included different extents of electronic wave function delocalization for the energy donor and acceptor. Best correlations between experimental and theoretical results were obtained for the assumption of electronic coupling occurring between a localized donor dipole moment and a delocalized acceptor moment. These findings emphasize that geometric relaxation following initial excitation of the donor needs to be taken into account, as it leads to a localization of the donor's excited state wave function prior to energy transfer. In addition, our simulations show that the energy transfer from the main chain to the ends is dominated by an interplay between slow and spatially limited exciton migration along the OF segments comprising the main chain and the comparatively faster hetero-transfer to the end-cap acceptors from directly adjoining OF segments. These results clearly support the description of host-guest energy transfer in linear polymer chains as a two-step mechanism with exciton diffusion in the host being a prerequisite to energy transfer to the guest.

  6. Spatial propagation of excitonic coherence enables ratcheted energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Stephan; Ishizaki, Akihito; Whaley, K Birgitta

    2012-10-01

    Experimental evidence shows that a variety of photosynthetic systems can preserve quantum beats in the process of electronic energy transfer, even at room temperature. However, whether this quantum coherence arises in vivo and whether it has any biological function have remained unclear. Here we present a theoretical model that suggests that the creation and recreation of coherence under natural conditions is ubiquitous. Our model allows us to theoretically demonstrate a mechanism for a ratchet effect enabled by quantum coherence, in a design inspired by an energy transfer pathway in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex of the green sulfur bacteria. This suggests a possible biological role for coherent oscillations in spatially directing energy transfer. Our results emphasize the importance of analyzing long-range energy transfer in terms of transfer between intercomplex coupling states rather than between site or exciton states.

  7. Spectral Energy Transfer and Dissipation of Magnetic Energy from Fluid to Kinetic Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, K.; Li, H.

    2007-01-19

    We investigate the magnetic energy transfer from the fluid to kinetic scales and dissipation processes using three-dimensional fully kinetic particle-in-cell plasma simulations. The nonlinear evolution of a sheet pinch is studied where we show that it exhibits both fluid scale global relaxation and kinetic scale collisionless reconnection at multiple resonant surfaces. The interactions among collisionless tearing modes destroy the original flux surfaces and produce stochastic fields, along with generating sheets and filaments of intensified currents. In addition, the magnetic energy is transferred from the original shear length scale both to the large scales due to the global relaxation and to the smaller, kinetic scales for dissipation. The dissipation is dominated by the thermal or pressure effect in the generalized Ohm's law, and electrons are preferentially accelerated.

  8. Energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial equipment: Additional opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenquist, Greg; McNeil, Michael; Iyer, Maithili; Meyers, Steve; McMahon, Jim

    2004-08-02

    Energy efficiency standards set minimum levels of energy efficiency that must be met by new products. Depending on the dynamics of the market and the level of the standard, the effect on the market for a given product may be small, moderate, or large. Energy efficiency standards address a number of market failures that exist in the buildings sector. Decisions about efficiency levels often are made by people who will not be responsible for the energy bill, such as landlords or developers of commercial buildings. Many buildings are occupied for their entire lives by very temporary owners or renters, each unwilling to make long-term investments that would mostly reward subsequent users. And sometimes what looks like apathy about efficiency merely reflects inadequate information or time invested to evaluate it. In addition to these sector-specific market failures, energy efficiency standards address the endemic failure of energy prices to incorporate externalities. In the U.S., energy efficiency standards for consumer products were first implemented in California in 1977. National standards became effective starting in 1988. By the end of 2001, national standards were in effect for over a dozen residential appliances, as well as for a number of commercial sector products. Updated standards will take effect in the next few years for several products. Outside the U.S., over 30 countries have adopted minimum energy performance standards. Technologies and markets are dynamic, and additional opportunities to improve energy efficiency exist. There are two main avenues for extending energy efficiency standards. One is upgrading standards that already exist for specific products. The other is adopting standards for products that are not covered by existing standards. In the absence of new and upgraded energy efficiency standards, it is likely that many new products will enter the stock with lower levels of energy efficiency than would otherwise be the case. Once in the stock

  9. A planning framework for transferring building energy technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Farhar, B C; Brown, M A; Mohler, B L; Wilde, M; Abel, F H

    1990-07-01

    Accelerating the adoption of new and existing cost-effective technologies has significant potential to reduce the energy consumed in US buildings. This report presents key results of an interlaboratory technology transfer planning effort in support of the US Department of Energy's Office of Building Technologies (OBT). A guiding assumption for planning was that OBT's R D program should forge linkages with existing programs whose goals involved enhancing energy efficiency in buildings. An ad hoc Technology Transfer Advisory Group reviewed the existing analysis and technology transfer program, brainstormed technology transfer approaches, interviewed DOE program managers, identified applicable research results, and developed a framework that management could use in deciding on the best investments of technology transfer resources. Representatives of 22 organizations were interviewed on their views of the potential for transferring energy efficiency technologies through active linking with OBT. The report describes these programs and interview results; outlines OBT tools, technologies, and practices to be transferred; defines OBT audiences; identifies technology transfer functions and presents a framework devised using functions and audiences; presents some 60 example technology transfer activities; and documents the Advisory Group's recommendations. 37 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  10. An ultra-efficient energy transfer beyond plasmonic light scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Sze-Ming; Zhong, Yan-Kai; Lin, Albert

    2014-11-14

    The energy transfer between nano-particles is of great importance for, solar cells, light-emitting diodes, nano-particle waveguides, and other photonic devices. This study shows through novel design and algorithm optimization, the energy transfer efficiency between plasmonic and dielectric nano-particles can be greatly improved. Using versatile designs including core-shell wrapping, supercells and dielectric mediated plasmonic scattering, 0.05 dB/μm attenuation can be achieved, which is 20-fold reduction over the baseline plasmonic nano-particle chain, and 8-fold reduction over the baseline dielectric nano-particle chain. In addition, it is also found that the dielectric nano-particle chains can actually be more efficient than the plasmonic ones, at their respective optimized geometry. The underlying physics is that although plasmonic nano-particles provide stronger coupling and field emission, the effect of plasmonic absorption loss is actually more dominant resulting in high attenuation. Finally, the group velocity for all design schemes proposed in this work is shown to be maintained above 0.4c, and it is found that the geometry optimization for transmission also boosts the group velocity.

  11. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer activation sensor for Arf6.

    PubMed

    Hall, Brian; McLean, Mark A; Davis, Kathryn; Casanova, James E; Sligar, Steven G; Schwartz, Martin A

    2008-03-15

    The involvement of the small GTPase Arf6 in Rac activation, cell migration, and cancer invasiveness suggests that it is activated in a spatially and temporally regulated manner. Small GTPase activation has been imaged in cells using probes in which the GTPase and a fragment of a downstream effector protein are fused to fluorescent reporter proteins that constitute a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) donor/acceptor pair. Unlike other Ras family GTPases, the N terminus of Arf6 is critical for membrane targeting and, thus, cannot be modified by fusion to a fluorescent protein. We found that the previously described C-terminal green fluorescent protein (GFP) derivative also shows diminished membrane targeting. Therefore, we inserted a fluorescent protein into an inert loop within the Arf6 sequence. This fusion showed normal membrane targeting, nucleotide-dependent interaction with the downstream effector GGA3, and normal regulation by a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) and a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). Using the recently developed CyPET/YPET fluorescent proteins as a FRET pair, we found that Arf6-CyPET underwent efficient energy transfer when bound to YPET-GGA3 effector domain in intact cells. The addition of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to fibroblasts triggered a rapid and transient increase in FRET, indicative of Arf6 activation. These reagents should be useful for investigations of Arf6 activation and function.

  12. On the revised concept of linear energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Kellerer, A M; Rossi, H H

    1995-03-01

    The quantities linear energy transfer or restricted linear energy transfer are utilized in calculations that link absorbed dose to the fluence distribution of a radiation field. The computations provide approximations to absorbed dose in terms of the intermediate quantity cema or reduced cema. With the definition of the restricted linear energy transfer, L delta, given in ICRU Report 33, the approximation remains imperfect. This study deals with the resulting need for a modified definition of L delta, as proposed in a draft report of ICRU. Essential differences between the old and the new definitions are demonstrated. The changed definition permits a rigorous formulation of the dependence between fluence and absorbed dose.

  13. Energy transfer between a biological labelling dye and gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racknor, Chris; Singh, Mahi R.; Zhang, Yinan; Birch, David J. S.; Chen, Yu

    2014-03-01

    We have demonstrated energy transfer between a biological labelling dye (Alexa Fluor 405) and gold nanorods experimentally and theoretically. The fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and density matrix method are used to study a hybrid system of dye and nanorods under one- and two-photon excitations. Energy transfer between dye and nanorods via the dipole-dipole interaction is found to cause a decrease in the fluorescence lifetime change. Enhanced energy transfer from dye to nanorods is measured in the presence of an increased density of nanorods. This study has potential applications in fluorescence lifetime-based intra-cellular sensing of bio-analytes as well as nuclear targeting cancer therapy.

  14. Energy Transfer and Triadic Interactions in Compressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bataille, F.; Zhou, Ye; Bertoglio, Jean-Pierre

    1997-01-01

    Using a two-point closure theory, the Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) approximation, we have investigated the energy transfer process and triadic interactions of compressible turbulence. In order to analyze the compressible mode directly, the Helmholtz decomposition is used. The following issues were addressed: (1) What is the mechanism of energy exchange between the solenoidal and compressible modes, and (2) Is there an energy cascade in the compressible energy transfer process? It is concluded that the compressible energy is transferred locally from the solenoidal part to the compressible part. It is also found that there is an energy cascade of the compressible mode for high turbulent Mach number (M(sub t) greater than or equal to 0.5). Since we assume that the compressibility is weak, the magnitude of the compressible (radiative or cascade) transfer is much smaller than that of solenoidal cascade. These results are further confirmed by studying the triadic energy transfer function, the most fundamental building block of the energy transfer.

  15. Testing energy non-additivity in white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, J. M.; Cortés, J. L.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Loret, N.

    2014-03-01

    We consider a particular effect which can be expected in scenarios of deviations from special relativity induced by Planckian physics: the loss of additivity in the total energy of a system of particles. We argue about the necessity to introduce a length scale to control the effects of non-additivity for macroscopic objects and consider white dwarfs as an appropriate laboratory to test this kind of new physics. We study the sensitivity of the mass-radius relation of the Chandrasekhar model to these corrections by comparing the output of a simple phenomenological model to observational data of white dwarfs.

  16. Spectral kinetic energy transfer in turbulent premixed reacting flows.

    PubMed

    Towery, C A Z; Poludnenko, A Y; Urzay, J; O'Brien, J; Ihme, M; Hamlington, P E

    2016-05-01

    Spectral kinetic energy transfer by advective processes in turbulent premixed reacting flows is examined using data from a direct numerical simulation of a statistically planar turbulent premixed flame. Two-dimensional turbulence kinetic-energy spectra conditioned on the planar-averaged reactant mass fraction are computed through the flame brush and variations in the spectra are connected to terms in the spectral kinetic energy transport equation. Conditional kinetic energy spectra show that turbulent small-scale motions are suppressed in the burnt combustion products, while the energy content of the mean flow increases. An analysis of spectral kinetic energy transfer further indicates that, contrary to the net down-scale transfer of energy found in the unburnt reactants, advective processes transfer energy from small to large scales in the flame brush close to the products. Triadic interactions calculated through the flame brush show that this net up-scale transfer of energy occurs primarily at spatial scales near the laminar flame thermal width. The present results thus indicate that advective processes in premixed reacting flows contribute to energy backscatter near the scale of the flame.

  17. Plasmon-Induced Resonant Energy Transfer: a coherent dipole-dipole coupling mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, Alan D.; Cushing, Scott K.; Li, Jiangtian; Wu, Nianqiang

    Metal-insulator-semiconductor core-shell nanoparticles have been used to demonstrate a dipole-dipole coupling mechanism that is entirely dependent on the dephasing time of the localized plasmonic resonance. Consequently, the short-time scale of the plasmons leads to broad energy uncertainty that allows for excitation of charge carriers in the semiconductor via stimulation of photons with energies below the energy band gap. In addition, this coherent energy transfer process overcomes interfacial losses often associated with direct charge transfer. This work explores the efficiency of the energy transfer process, the dipole-dipole coupling strength with dipole separation, shell thickness and plasmonic resonance overlap. We demonstrate limits where the coherent nature of the coupling is switched off and charge transfer processes can dominate. Experiments are performed using transient absorption spectroscopy. Results are compared to calculations using a quantum master equation. These nanostructures show strong potential for improving solar light-harvesting for power and fuel generation.

  18. Heat transfer characteristics for some coolant additives used for water cooled engines

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Ziyan, H.Z.; Helali, A.H.B.

    1996-12-31

    Engine coolants contain certain additives to prevent engine overheating or coolant freezing in cold environments. Coolants, also, contain corrosion and rust inhibitors, among other additives. As most engines are using engine cooling solutions, it is of interest to evaluate the effect of engine coolants on the boiling heat transfer coefficient. This has its direct impact on radiator size and environment. This paper describes the apparatus and the measurement techniques. Also, it presents the obtained boiling heat transfer results at different parameters. Three types of engine coolants and their mixtures in distilled water are evaluated, under sub-cooled and saturated boiling conditions. A profound effect of the presence of additives in the coolant, on heat transfer, was clear since changes of heat transfer for different coolants were likely to occur. The results showed that up to 180% improvement of boiling heat transfer coefficient is experienced with some types of coolants. However, at certain concentrations other coolants provide deterioration or not enhancement in the boiling heat transfer characteristics. This investigation proved that there are limitations, which are to be taken into consideration, for the composition of engine coolants in different environments. In warm climates, ethylene glycol should be kept at the minimum concentration required for dissolving other components, whereas borax is beneficial to the enhancement of the heat transfer characteristics.

  19. Micro-Plasma Transferred Arc Additive Manufacturing for Die and Mold Surface Remanufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhavar, Suyog; Paul, Christ Prakash; Jain, Neelesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Micro-plasma transferred arc ( µPTA) additive manufacturing is one of the newest options for remanufacturing of dies and molds surfaces in the near-millimeter range leading to extended usage of the same. We deployed an automatic micro-plasma deposition setup to deposit a wire of 300 µm of AISI P20 tool steel on the substrate of same material for the potential application in remanufacturing of the die and mold surface. Our present research effort is to establish µPTA additive manufacturing as a viable economical and cleaner methodology for potential industrial applications. We undertook the optimization of single weld bead geometry as the first step in our present study. Bead-on-plate trials were conducted to deposit single bead geometry at various processing parameters. The bead geometry (shape and size) and dilution were measured and the parametric dependence was derived. A set of parameters leading to reproducible regular and smooth single bead geometry were identified and used to prepare a thin wall for mechanical testing. The deposits were subjected to material characterization such as microscopic studies, micro-hardness measurements and tensile testing. The process was compared qualitatively with other deposition processes involving high-energy density beams and was found to be advantageous in terms of low initial and running costs with comparable properties. The outcome of the study confirmed the process capability of µPTA deposition leading to deployment of cost-effective and environmentally friendlier technology for die and mold remanufacturing.

  20. Energy Transfer and a Recurring Mathematical Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkin, Keith

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends the interesting work of a previous contributor concerning the analogies between physical phenomena such as mechanical collisions and the transfer of power in an electric circuit. Emphasis is placed on a mathematical function linking these different areas of physics. This unifying principle is seen as an exciting opportunity to…

  1. Energy efficient building design. A transfer guide for local governments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The fundamental concepts of the building design process, energy codes and standards, and energy budgets are introduced. These tools were combined into Energy Design Guidelines and design contract requirements. The Guidelines were repackaged for a national audience and a videotape for selling the concept to government executives. An effort to test transfer of the Guidelines to outside agencies is described.

  2. Energy transfer as a probe of protein dynamics in the proteins transferrin and calmodulin.

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, P B; Gorski, K M; Rosen, M A

    1988-01-01

    We have initiated an investigation into the usefulness of fluorescence energy transfer in probing protein dynamics. Our analysis involves measuring the energy transfer efficiency while perturbing the protein conformational equilibrium with heat. As the temperature increases, the amplitudes of vibrations increase, and fluorescence energy transfer should also increase if the donor and acceptor are in a flexible region of the protein. A theoretical analysis developed by Somogyi and co-workers for the temperature dependence of dipole-dipole energy transfer (Somogyi, B., J. Matko, S. Papp, J. Hevessey, G. R. Welch, and S. Damjanovich. 1984. Biochemistry. 23:3403-3411) was tested by the authors in one protein system. Energy transfer from tryptophan to a pyridoxamine derivatized side group in RNase increased 40% over 25 degrees C. Here we report further testing of this model in two additional protein systems: calmodulin, a calcium activated regulatory protein, and transferrin, a blood serum iron shuttle. Our studies show a slight differential sensitivity of the transfer efficiency to heat for the two systems. Normalized energy transfer over 6.5 A in calmodulin from a tyrosine donor to a Tb(III) acceptor increases 40% from 295 to 320 K. Normalized energy transfer over 42 A in transferrin from a Tb(III) donor to an Fe(III) acceptor increases 35% over the same temperature range. Whereas these results demonstrate that thermally induced fluctuations do increase energy transfer as predicted by Somogyi, they also appear rather insensitive to the nature of the protein host environment. In contrast to the Förster processes examined above, energy transfer over very short distances has shown an anomalously high temperature dependence. PMID:3395656

  3. Theoretical exploration of the mechanism of riboflavin formation from 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine: nucleophilic catalysis, hydride transfer, hydrogen atom transfer, or nucleophilic addition?

    PubMed

    Breugst, Martin; Eschenmoser, Albert; Houk, K N

    2013-05-01

    The cofactor riboflavin is biochemically synthesized by a constitutionally intricate process in which two molecules of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine react with each other to form one molecule of the cofactor and one molecule of 5-amino-6-(ribitylamino)uracil. Remarkably, this complex molecular transformation also proceeds non-enzymatically in boiling aqueous solution at pH 7.3. Four different mechanistic pathways for this transformation (nucleophilic catalysis, hydride transfer, hydrogen atom transfer, and a nucleophilic addition mechanism) have now been analyzed by density functional theory [M06-2X/def2-TZVPP/CPCM//M06-2X/6-31+G(d,p)/IEFPCM]. On the basis of these computational results, a so far unpublished nucleophilic addition mechanism is the lowest energy pathway yielding riboflavin. The previously proposed mechanism involving nucleophilic catalysis is higher in energy but is still a viable alternative for an enzyme-catalyzed process assisted by suitably positioned catalytic groups. Pathways involving the transfer of a hydride ion or of a hydrogen atom are predicted to proceed through higher energy transition states and intermediates.

  4. The measurement of bicycle exercising energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hung-Pin; Jian, Zi-Jie; Jwo, Ching-Song; Wang, Jiun-Yau; Chen, Sih-Li

    2010-08-01

    The main study purpose is to develop a device capable of translating exercise energy into hot or icy drinkable water. This device can accurately measure energy consumption during exercise, transform it, and apply it to a heating and refrigerating system. Traditional energy measurements were based on the amount of exercise load from the human body. The research tapped into this non-electric form of energy transmission to run a heating and refrigerating system. The energy requirement was 50.6 kcal. When compared to 57.9 kcal, which the body consumes based actual calorie test, the difference was within a 15% striking range. In terms of energy comparisons, this study demonstrates potential R & D value with this innovative design. It complied with carbon emission requirements by producing 2,000 cc of energy at 47°C of hot water and 1,300 cc of energy at 6.6°C of ice water, all without the use of conventional energy sources. As the paper shows, this device is an innovative and environmentally conscious design. In an upcoming low-carbon emissions future, its research potential is definitely worth evaluating.

  5. INTRAMOLECULAR CHARGE AND ENERGY TRANSFER IN MULTICHROMOPHORIC AROMATIC SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Edward C. Lim

    2008-09-09

    A concerted experimental and computational study of energy transfer in nucleic acid bases and charge transfer in dialkylaminobenzonitriles, and related electron donor-acceptor molecules, indicate that the ultrafast photoprocesses occur through three-state conical interactions involving an intermediate state of biradical character.

  6. Investigation of energy transfer in terbium doped Y 2SiO5 phosphor particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salis, M.; Carbonaro, C. M.; Corpino, R.; Anedda, A.; Ricci, P. C.

    2012-07-01

    The kinetics of luminescence of sol-gel synthesized terbium doped Y 2SiO5 (YSO) phosphor particles is investigated in detail with reference to Tb concentration in the 0.001%-10% range. By increasing the dopant concentration, the luminescence profile changes from a blue to a green peaked emission spectrum because of the energy transfer among centers. The inter-center energy transfer mechanism is well accounted for by the Inokuti-Hirayama (IH) kinetic model which is based on a statistical average of inter-center distance dependent decay modes of the donor luminescence. The distribution of the decay modes is implemented from the Förster-Dexter resonance theory of energy transfer by assuming a rate constant for the energy transfer by multipolar interactions between donors and acceptors. However, the experimental results recorded in the low concentration limit show the presence of green emission contributions in the luminescence spectrum which cannot be related to the Tb concentration; for this reason an additional internal energy transfer mechanism, occurring among levels of the same center, is proposed to account for the recorded emission properties. Thus, a new and more exhaustive model which includes both the internal and external energy transfer processes is considered; the proposed model allows a better explanation of the spectroscopic features of Tb related centers in YSO crystals and discloses the critical concentration and the quantum yields of the different energy transfer mechanisms.

  7. OGO-6 gas-surface energy transfer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeown, D.; Dummer, R. S.; Bowyer, J. M., Jr.; Corbin, W. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The kinetic energy flux of the upper atmosphere was analyzed using OGO-6 data. Energy transfer between 10 microwatts/sq cm and 0.1 W/sq cm was measured by short-term frequency changes of temperature-sensitive quartz crystals used in the energy transfer probe. The condition of the surfaces was continuously monitored by a quartz crystal microbalance to determine the effect surface contamination had on energy accommodation. Results are given on the computer analysis and laboratory tests performed to optimize the operation of the energy transfer probe. Data are also given on the bombardment of OGO-6 surfaces by high energy particles. The thermoelectrically-cooled quartz crystal microbalance is described in terms of its development and applications.

  8. Ligand reorganization and activation energies in nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianjun; Wang, Jianji; Stell, George

    2006-10-01

    The activation energy and ligand reorganization energy for nonadiabatic electron transfer reactions in chemical and biological systems are investigated in this paper. The free energy surfaces and the activation energy are derived exactly in the general case in which the ligand vibration frequencies are not equal. The activation energy is derived by free energy minimization at the transition state. Our formulation leads to the Marcus-Hush [J. Chem. Phys. 24, 979 (1956); 98, 7170 (1994); 28, 962 (1958)] results in the equal-frequency limit and also generalizes the Marcus-Sumi [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 4894 (1986)] model in the context of studying the solvent dynamic effect on electron transfer reactions. It is found that when the ligand vibration frequencies are different, the activation energy derived from the Marcus-Hush formula deviates by 5%-10% from the exact value. If the reduced reorganization energy approximation is introduced in the Marcus-Hush formula, the result is almost exact.

  9. Effective transfer of industrial energy conservation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, M.; Vallario, R.W.

    1983-04-01

    Voluntary participation in industrial energy conservation programs resulted in savings of approximately 1 million barrels of oil equivalent per day in the US during 1981. These energy savings accrued largely from the development, introduction, and acceptance by industry of new energy conserving technologies. These new technologies were developed through cost sharing programs between the Department of Energy and private industry. These joint efforts reduced risk to industry, thus making them willing to accept and use these new technologies at an accelerated rate. Examples of several technologies that were used by industry at an accelerated rate are described. These technologies are: textile foam finishing and dyeing, forging furnace modifications, and high-efficiency metallic recuperators.

  10. On Kinetics Modeling of Vibrational Energy Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmore, John O.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Cavolowsky, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Two models of vibrational energy exchange are compared at equilibrium to the elementary vibrational exchange reaction for a binary mixture. The first model, non-linear in the species vibrational energies, was derived by Schwartz, Slawsky, and Herzfeld (SSH) by considering the detailed kinetics of vibrational energy levels. This model recovers the result demanded at equilibrium by the elementary reaction. The second model is more recent, and is gaining use in certain areas of computational fluid dynamics. This model, linear in the species vibrational energies, is shown not to recover the required equilibrium result. Further, this more recent model is inconsistent with its suggested rate constants in that those rate constants were inferred from measurements by using the SSH model to reduce the data. The non-linear versus linear nature of these two models can lead to significant differences in vibrational energy coupling. Use of the contemporary model may lead to significant misconceptions, especially when integrated in computer codes considering multiple energy coupling mechanisms.

  11. Energy transfer mechanism and probability analysis of submarine pipe laterally impacted by dropped objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jing; Yu, Jian-xing; Yu, Yang; Lam, W.; Zhao, Yi-yu; Duan, Jing-hui

    2016-06-01

    Energy transfer ratio is the basic-factor affecting the level of pipe damage during the impact between dropped object and submarine pipe. For the purpose of studying energy transfer and damage mechanism of submarine pipe impacted by dropped objects, series of experiments are designed and carried out. The effective yield strength is deduced to make the quasi-static analysis more reliable, and the normal distribution of energy transfer ratio caused by lateral impact on pipes is presented by statistic analysis of experimental results based on the effective yield strength, which provides experimental and theoretical basis for the risk analysis of submarine pipe system impacted by dropped objects. Failure strains of pipe material are confirmed by comparing experimental results with finite element simulation. In addition, impact contact area and impact time are proved to be the major influence factors of energy transfer by sensitivity analysis of the finite element simulation.

  12. Dependence of the energy transfer to graphene on the excitation energy

    SciTech Connect

    Mackowski, Sebastian Kamińska, Izabela

    2015-07-13

    Fluorescence studies of natural photosynthetic complexes on a graphene layer demonstrate pronounced influence of the excitation wavelength on the energy transfer efficiency to graphene. Ultraviolet light yields much faster decay of fluorescence, with average efficiencies of the energy transfer equal to 87% and 65% for excitation at 405 nm and 640 nm, respectively. This implies that focused light changes locally the properties of graphene affecting the energy transfer dynamics, in an analogous way as in the case of metallic nanostructures. Demonstrating optical control of the energy transfer is important for exploiting unique properties of graphene in photonic and sensing architectures.

  13. International cooperation for renewable energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, M.H.

    1992-06-01

    This paper reports that in considering the potential of major renewable energy resources in relation to their remoteness from demand centers, it is necessary to take a global view of the implications of their utilization. The present concerns regarding global warming and environmental degradation from fossil fuel combustion could be given active direction if the positive benefits of renewable energy could be realized on a meaningful scale. The dire prospect of global warming looms large in the scientific consciousness, but strategies to counter the effects of increased release of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases are just beginning to emerge along with remedial measures to address other environmental threats. One of the ways to achieve this is to place more reliance on renewable energy. As the impact of small-scale dispersed sources of renewable energy is minimal in comparison with fossil fuel usage, a meaningful impact could only be made by drawing upon major sources of renewable energy, mainly hydropower, tidal, and solar, in large capacity installations concentrated at sites relatively far from demand centers. There are sites that warrant serious consideration in the face of the growing environmental impact of fossil fuel usage. However, to realize this objective, an environmental imperative should be adopted that would place the importance of global environmental security on a par with present concerns for national security.

  14. Complex quantum network model of energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes.

    PubMed

    Ai, Bao-Quan; Zhu, Shi-Liang

    2012-12-01

    The quantum network model with real variables is usually used to describe the excitation energy transfer (EET) in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complexes. In this paper we add the quantum phase factors to the hopping terms and find that the quantum phase factors play an important role in the EET. The quantum phase factors allow us to consider the space structure of the pigments. It is found that phase coherence within the complexes would allow quantum interference to affect the dynamics of the EET. There exist some optimal phase regions where the transfer efficiency takes its maxima, which indicates that when the pigments are optimally spaced, the exciton can pass through the FMO with perfect efficiency. Moreover, the optimal phase regions almost do not change with the environments. In addition, we find that the phase factors are useful in the EET just in the case of multiple pathways. Therefore, we demonstrate that the quantum phases may bring the other two factors, the optimal space of the pigments and multiple pathways, together to contribute the EET in photosynthetic complexes with perfect efficiency.

  15. Distant energy transfer for artificial human implants.

    PubMed

    Theodoridis, Michael P; Mollov, Stefan V

    2005-11-01

    The powering of human implants via inductive coupling has been an object of interest for the past two decades. This paper discusses some of the issues concerning a distant energy link used for supplying artificial human implants, operating at the frequency of 13.56 MHz. A procedure for the design of an energy-receiving coil is given for general applications. A design procedure is also developed, with focus on coils used for supplying human implants. The correctness of the analysis of this later design procedure has been verified by experimental results. Measurements with a human tissue simulant also show little deviation from the predictions.

  16. The feasibility of coherent energy transfer in microtubules.

    PubMed

    Craddock, Travis John Adrian; Friesen, Douglas; Mane, Jonathan; Hameroff, Stuart; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2014-11-06

    It was once purported that biological systems were far too 'warm and wet' to support quantum phenomena mainly owing to thermal effects disrupting quantum coherence. However, recent experimental results and theoretical analyses have shown that thermal energy may assist, rather than disrupt, quantum coherent transport, especially in the 'dry' hydrophobic interiors of biomolecules. Specifically, evidence has been accumulating for the necessary involvement of quantum coherent energy transfer between uniquely arranged chromophores in light harvesting photosynthetic complexes. The 'tubulin' subunit proteins, which comprise microtubules, also possess a distinct architecture of chromophores, namely aromatic amino acids, including tryptophan. The geometry and dipolar properties of these aromatics are similar to those found in photosynthetic units indicating that tubulin may support coherent energy transfer. Tubulin aggregated into microtubule geometric lattices may support such energy transfer, which could be important for biological signalling and communication essential to living processes. Here, we perform a computational investigation of energy transfer between chromophoric amino acids in tubulin via dipole excitations coupled to the surrounding thermal environment. We present the spatial structure and energetic properties of the tryptophan residues in the microtubule constituent protein tubulin. Plausibility arguments for the conditions favouring a quantum mechanism of signal propagation along a microtubule are provided. Overall, we find that coherent energy transfer in tubulin and microtubules is biologically feasible.

  17. Triangulating Nucleic Acid Conformations Using Multicolor Surface Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Riskowski, Ryan A; Armstrong, Rachel E; Greenbaum, Nancy L; Strouse, Geoffrey F

    2016-02-23

    Optical ruler methods employing multiple fluorescent labels offer great potential for correlating distances among several sites, but are generally limited to interlabel distances under 10 nm and suffer from complications due to spectral overlap. Here we demonstrate a multicolor surface energy transfer (McSET) technique able to triangulate multiple points on a biopolymer, allowing for analysis of global structure in complex biomolecules. McSET couples the competitive energy transfer pathways of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) with gold-nanoparticle mediated Surface Energy Transfer (SET) in order to correlate systematically labeled points on the structure at distances greater than 10 nm and with reduced spectral overlap. To demonstrate the McSET method, the structures of a linear B-DNA and a more complex folded RNA ribozyme were analyzed within the McSET mathematical framework. The improved multicolor optical ruler method takes advantage of the broad spectral range and distances achievable when using a gold nanoparticle as the lowest energy acceptor. The ability to report distance information simultaneously across multiple length scales, short-range (10-50 Å), mid-range (50-150 Å), and long-range (150-350 Å), distinguishes this approach from other multicolor energy transfer methods.

  18. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2015-12-14

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule's permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory.

  19. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2015-12-14

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule’s permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory.

  20. Energy Information Transfer in Virginia. A Planning Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickin, Patricia

    The Virginia Planning Conference for Solar Technology Information Transfer was held in Richmond in February 1978 to elicit suggestions on how to make Virginians aware of libraries as sources of energy information and how Virginia libraries can keep their energy materials and reference services up to date. A summary of this planning session and a…

  1. Enhancing Förster nonradiative energy transfer via plasmon interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, L. J.; Zhang, X.; Marocico, C. A.; Murphy, G. P.; Karanikolas, V. K.; Gun'ko, Y. K.; Lesnyak, V.; Gaponik, N.; Susha, A. S.; Rogach, A. L.; Parbrook, P. J.; Bradley, A. L.

    2016-04-01

    Plasmon-enhanced nonradiative energy transfer is demonstrated in two inorganic semiconductor systems. The first is comprised of colloidal nanocrystal CdTe donor and acceptor quantum dots, while the second is a hybrid InGaN quantum well-CdSe/ZnS quantum dot donor-acceptor system. Both structures are in a planar geometry. In the first case a monolayer of Au nanospheres is sandwiched between donor and acceptor quantum dot monolayers. The largest energy transfer efficiency is seen when the donor is ~3 nm from the Au nanopshere. A plasmon-enhanced energy transfer efficiency of ~ 40% has been achieved for a separation of 3 nm between the Au nanopshere monolayer and the acceptor monolayer. Despite the increased energy transfer efficiency these conditions result in strong quenching of the acceptor QD emission. By tuning the Au nanosphere concentration and Au nanosphere-acceptor QD separation the acceptor QD emission can be increased by a factor of ~2.8. The plasmon-enhanced nonradiative energy transfer is observed to extend over larger distances than conventional Forster resonance energy transfer. Under the experimental conditions reported herein, it can be described by the same d-4 dependence but with a larger characteristic distance. Using a Ag nanobox array plasmonic component plasmon-enhanced nonradiative energy transfer has also demonstrated from an InGaN quantum well to a ~80 nm thick layer of CdSe/ZnS colloidal quantum dots. An efficiency of ~27% is achieved, with an overall increase in the QD emission by ~70%.

  2. Redefining RECs: Additionality in the voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillenwater, Michael Wayne

    In the United States, electricity consumers are told that they can "buy" electricity from renewable energy projects, versus fossil fuel-fired facilities, through participation in a voluntary green power program. The marketing messages communicate to consumers that their participation and premium payments for a green label will cause additional renewable energy generation and thereby allow them to claim they consume electricity that is absent pollution as well as reduce pollutant emissions. Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) and wind energy are the basis for the majority of the voluntary green power market in the United States. This dissertation addresses the question: Do project developers respond to the voluntary REC market in the United States by altering their decisions to invest in wind turbines? This question is investigated by modeling and probabilistically quantifying the effect of the voluntary REC market on a representative wind power investor in the United States using data from formal expert elicitations of active participants in the industry. It is further explored by comparing the distribution of a sample of wind power projects supplying the voluntary green power market in the United States against an economic viability model that incorporates geographic factors. This dissertation contributes the first quantitative analysis of the effect of the voluntary REC market on project investment. It is found that 1) RECs should be not treated as equivalent to emission offset credits, 2) there is no clearly credible role for voluntary market RECs in emissions trading markets without dramatic restructuring of one or both markets and the environmental commodities they trade, and 3) the use of RECs in entity-level GHG emissions accounting (i.e., "carbon footprinting") leads to double counting of emissions and therefore is not justified. The impotence of the voluntary REC market was, at least in part, due to the small magnitude of the REC price signal and lack of

  3. Meson-exchange currents including energy transfer effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, W.P.; Walker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    The standard formalism of meson-exchange currents is extended to incorporate energy transfer effects. It is possible to make such an extension, in a chirally invariant way, for several exchange currents including those involving an intermediate isobar. It is found that the ''extended'' currents still satisfy conservation of the polar vector current (CVC) and partial conservation of the axial vector current (PCAC) where appropriate. The hypothesis of axial locality is found to be valid for the currents considered. Deuteron photodisintegration at intermediate energies is then used to illustrate the numerical importance of the energy transfer effects. A brief survey is carried out for other reactions where the inclusion of energy transfer effects in the evaluation of selected meson-exchange currents is believed important.

  4. Efficient Radioisotope Energy Transfer by Gold Nanoclusters for Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Volotskova, Olga; Sun, Conroy; Stafford, Jason H; Koh, Ai Leen; Ma, Xiaowei; Cheng, Zhen; Cui, Bianxiao; Pratx, Guillem; Xing, Lei

    2015-08-26

    Beta-emitting isotopes Fluorine-18 and Yttrium-90 are tested for their potential to stimulate gold nanoclusters conjugated with blood serum proteins (AuNCs). AuNCs excited by either medical radioisotope are found to be highly effective ionizing radiation energy transfer mediators, suitable for in vivo optical imaging. AuNCs synthesized with protein templates convert beta-decaying radioisotope energy into tissue-penetrating optical signals between 620 and 800 nm. Optical signals are not detected from AuNCs incubated with Technetium-99m, a pure gamma emitter that is used as a control. Optical emission from AuNCs is not proportional to Cerenkov radiation, indicating that the energy transfer between the radionuclide and AuNC is only partially mediated by Cerenkov photons. A direct Coulombic interaction is proposed as a novel and significant mechanism of energy transfer between decaying radionuclides and AuNCs.

  5. Efficiency of pulse high-current generator energy transfer into plasma liner energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshkin, V. I.

    2013-08-01

    The efficiency of capacitor-bank energy transfer from a high-current pulse generator into kinetic energy of a plasma liner has been analyzed. The analysis was performed using a model including the circuit equations and equations of the cylindrical shell motion. High efficiency of the energy transfer into kinetic energy of the liner is shown to be achieved only by a low-inductance generator. We considered an "ideal" liner load in which the load current is close to zero in the final of the shell compression. This load provides a high (up to 80%) efficiency of energy transfer and higher stability when compressing the liner.

  6. Tech Transfer Webinar: Energy Absorbing Materials

    ScienceCinema

    Duoss, Eric

    2016-07-12

    A new material has been designed and manufactured at LLNL that can absorb mechanical energy--a cushion--while also providing protection against sheering. This ordered cellular material is 3D printed using direct ink writing techniques under development at LLNL. It is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  7. Tech Transfer Webinar: Energy Absorbing Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duoss, Eric

    2014-06-17

    A new material has been designed and manufactured at LLNL that can absorb mechanical energy--a cushion--while also providing protection against sheering. This ordered cellular material is 3D printed using direct ink writing techniques under development at LLNL. It is expected to find utility in application spaces that currently use unordered foams, such as sporting and consumer goods as well as defense and aerospace.

  8. A Classroom Demonstration of Wireless Energy Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luczak, Matthew; Baker, Blane

    2010-01-01

    Resonance is one of the recurring themes in physics and, as such, is important in research applications and in explaining many everyday phenomena. Students often encounter resonance during studies of simple harmonic motion, sound, mechanical waves and AC circuits. Alternatively, or in addition, resonance can be demonstrated in the context of…

  9. Redshifted Cherenkov Radiation for in vivo Imaging: Coupling Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer to multiple Förster Resonance Energy Transfers

    PubMed Central

    Bernhard, Yann; Collin, Bertrand; Decréau, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Cherenkov Radiation (CR), this blue glow seen in nuclear reactors, is an optical light originating from energetic β-emitter radionuclides. CR emitter 90Y triggers a cascade of energy transfers in the presence of a mixed population of fluorophores (which each other match their respective absorption and emission maxima): Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) first, followed by multiple Förster Resonance Energy transfers (FRET): CRET ratios were calculated to give a rough estimate of the transfer efficiency. While CR is blue-weighted (300–500 nm), such cascades of Energy Transfers allowed to get a) fluorescence emission up to 710 nm, which is beyond the main CR window and within the near-infrared (NIR) window where biological tissues are most transparent, b) to amplify this emission and boost the radiance on that window: EMT6-tumor bearing mice injected with both a radionuclide and a mixture of fluorophores having a good spectral overlap, were shown to have nearly a two-fold radiance boost (measured on a NIR window centered on the emission wavelength of the last fluorophore in the Energy Transfer cascade) compared to a tumor injected with the radionuclide only. Some CR embarked light source could be converted into a near-infrared radiation, where biological tissues are most transparent. PMID:28338043

  10. Redshifted Cherenkov Radiation for in vivo Imaging: Coupling Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer to multiple Förster Resonance Energy Transfers.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Yann; Collin, Bertrand; Decréau, Richard A

    2017-03-24

    Cherenkov Radiation (CR), this blue glow seen in nuclear reactors, is an optical light originating from energetic β-emitter radionuclides. CR emitter (90)Y triggers a cascade of energy transfers in the presence of a mixed population of fluorophores (which each other match their respective absorption and emission maxima): Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) first, followed by multiple Förster Resonance Energy transfers (FRET): CRET ratios were calculated to give a rough estimate of the transfer efficiency. While CR is blue-weighted (300-500 nm), such cascades of Energy Transfers allowed to get a) fluorescence emission up to 710 nm, which is beyond the main CR window and within the near-infrared (NIR) window where biological tissues are most transparent, b) to amplify this emission and boost the radiance on that window: EMT6-tumor bearing mice injected with both a radionuclide and a mixture of fluorophores having a good spectral overlap, were shown to have nearly a two-fold radiance boost (measured on a NIR window centered on the emission wavelength of the last fluorophore in the Energy Transfer cascade) compared to a tumor injected with the radionuclide only. Some CR embarked light source could be converted into a near-infrared radiation, where biological tissues are most transparent.

  11. Redshifted Cherenkov Radiation for in vivo Imaging: Coupling Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer to multiple Förster Resonance Energy Transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, Yann; Collin, Bertrand; Decréau, Richard A.

    2017-03-01

    Cherenkov Radiation (CR), this blue glow seen in nuclear reactors, is an optical light originating from energetic β-emitter radionuclides. CR emitter 90Y triggers a cascade of energy transfers in the presence of a mixed population of fluorophores (which each other match their respective absorption and emission maxima): Cherenkov Radiation Energy Transfer (CRET) first, followed by multiple Förster Resonance Energy transfers (FRET): CRET ratios were calculated to give a rough estimate of the transfer efficiency. While CR is blue-weighted (300–500 nm), such cascades of Energy Transfers allowed to get a) fluorescence emission up to 710 nm, which is beyond the main CR window and within the near-infrared (NIR) window where biological tissues are most transparent, b) to amplify this emission and boost the radiance on that window: EMT6-tumor bearing mice injected with both a radionuclide and a mixture of fluorophores having a good spectral overlap, were shown to have nearly a two-fold radiance boost (measured on a NIR window centered on the emission wavelength of the last fluorophore in the Energy Transfer cascade) compared to a tumor injected with the radionuclide only. Some CR embarked light source could be converted into a near-infrared radiation, where biological tissues are most transparent.

  12. Parallel Data Transfer with Voice Calls for Energy-Efficient Mobile Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurminen, Jukka K.; Nöyränen, Janne

    Battery consumption is one challenge for mobile applications and services. In this paper we explore the scenario where mobile phones delay the transfer of non-urgent data and perform the communication while a voice call is active. Our measurements show that data transfer during voice call requires only slightly over 10% additional power and that simultaneous voice call slows down the file transfer by 3%-14%. As a result we can save over 80% of energy in data transfer if we can delay the communication to a time when user is speaking at the mobile phone. For a user speaking 26 minutes a day this would allow 50MB of low energy data communication. A large class of applications can delay their data transfer without major effect to the user experience. The power saving mechanism can be implemented either in an application specific fashion or, preferably, at the middleware layer.

  13. 27 CFR 479.83 - Transfer tax in addition to import duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transfer tax in addition to import duty. 479.83 Section 479.83 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS,...

  14. 27 CFR 479.83 - Transfer tax in addition to import duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Transfer tax in addition to import duty. 479.83 Section 479.83 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE...

  15. 27 CFR 479.83 - Transfer tax in addition to import duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Transfer tax in addition to import duty. 479.83 Section 479.83 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE...

  16. 27 CFR 479.83 - Transfer tax in addition to import duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Transfer tax in addition to import duty. 479.83 Section 479.83 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS,...

  17. 27 CFR 479.83 - Transfer tax in addition to import duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Transfer tax in addition to import duty. 479.83 Section 479.83 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS,...

  18. Chill water additive controls transfer of Salmonella and Campylobacter by improved chlorine efficacy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In earlier work, we showed that a proprietary additive (T-128) maintains chlorine activity in the presence of organic material such as broiler parts. T-128 improves the efficacy of chlorine to control transfer of Campylobacter and Salmonella from inoculated wings to un-inoculated wings during immer...

  19. A chemical additive to limit transfer of salmonella and campylobacter during immersion chill

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Broiler carcasses with different types and numbers of bacteria are commonly chilled together in an ice water bath which may lead to transfer of bacteria from carcass to carcass. Historically, chill tanks have been chlorinated to help prevent cross contamination. Recently other chemical additive op...

  20. Radiative energy transfer in molecular gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1992-01-01

    Basic formulations, analyses, and numerical procedures are presented to study radiative interactions in gray as well as nongray gases under different physical and flow conditions. After preliminary fluid-dynamical considerations, essential governing equations for radiative transport are presented that are applicable under local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. Auxiliary relations for relaxation times and spectral absorption models are also provided. For specific applications, several simple gaseous systems are analyzed. The first system considered consists of a gas bounded by two parallel plates having the same temperature. Within the gas there is a uniform heat source per unit volume. For this system, both vibrational nonequilibrium effects and radiation conduction interactions are studied. The second system consists of fully developed laminar flow and heat transfer in a parallel plate duct under the boundary condition of a uniform surface heat flux. For this system, effects of gray surface emittance are studied. With the single exception of a circular geometry, the third system is considered identical to the second system. Here, the influence of nongray walls is also studied.

  1. Technology transfer for the US Department of Energy's Energy Storage Program: Volume 1, Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneau, C.L.; Fassbender, L.L.

    1988-10-01

    Technologies developed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Energy Storage (STOR) Program must be converted into products, processes, or services that benefit the private sector. The process of technology transfer is the primary means of accomplishing this. The purpose of this report is to examine the technology transfer activities of the STOR Program and suggest mechanisms that might make the transfer of technologies from national laboratories and universities to the private sector more effective. A brief summary of recommendations that would improve the effectiveness of the transfer of energy storage technologies from the national laboratories to the private sector is discussed. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Correlated energy transfer between two ultracold atomic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krönke, Sven; Knörzer, Johannes; Schmelcher, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We study a single atom as an open quantum system, which is initially prepared in a coherent state of low energy and oscillates in a one-dimensional harmonic trap through an interacting ensemble of NA bosons, held in a displaced trap [arXiv:1410.8676]. The non-equilibrium quantum dynamics of the total system is simulated by means of an ab-initio method, giving us access to all properties of the open system and its finite environment. In this talk, we focus on unraveling the interplay of energy exchange and correlations between the subsystems, which are coupled in such a spatio-temporally localized manner. We show that an inter-species interaction-induced level splitting accelerates the energy transfer between the atomic species for larger NA, which becomes less complete at the same time. System-environment correlations prove to be significant except for times when the excess energy distribution among the subsystems is highly imbalanced. These correlations result in incoherent energy transfer processes, which accelerate the early energy donation of the single atom. By analyzing correlations between intra-subsystem excitations, certain energy transfer channels are shown to be (dis-)favored depending on the instantaneous direction of transfer.

  3. Calibration of a resonance energy transfer imaging system.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, M; Hensel, N F; Hartzman, R J

    1992-01-01

    A quantitative technique for the nondestructive visualization of nanometer scale intermolecular separations in a living system is described. A calibration procedure for the acquisition and analysis of resonance energy transfer (RET) image data is outlined. The factors limiting RET imaging of biological samples are discussed. Measurements required for the calibration include: (a) the spectral sensitivity of the image intensifier (or camera); (b) the transmission spectra of the emission filters; and (c) the quantum distribution functions of the energy transfer pair measured in situ. Resonance energy transfer imaging is demonstrated for two DNA specific dyes. The Förster critical distance for energy transfer between Hoechst 33342 (HO) and acridine orange (AO) is 4.5 +/- 0.7 nm. This distance is slightly greater than the distance of a single turn of the DNA helix (3.5 nm or approximately 10 base pairs), and is well below the optical diffraction limit. Timed sequences of intracellular energy transfer reveal nuclear structure, strikingly similar to that observed with confocal and electron microscopy, and may show the spatial distribution of eu- and hetero- chromatin in the interphase nuclei. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:1581499

  4. Production and Transfer of Energy and Information in Hamiltonian Systems

    PubMed Central

    Antonopoulos, Chris G.; Bianco-Martinez, Ezequiel; Baptista, Murilo S.

    2014-01-01

    We present novel results that relate energy and information transfer with sensitivity to initial conditions in chaotic multi-dimensional Hamiltonian systems. We show the relation among Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy, Lyapunov exponents, and upper bounds for the Mutual Information Rate calculated in the Hamiltonian phase space and on bi-dimensional subspaces. Our main result is that the net amount of transfer from kinetic to potential energy per unit of time is a power-law of the upper bound for the Mutual Information Rate between kinetic and potential energies, and also a power-law of the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy. Therefore, transfer of energy is related with both transfer and production of information. However, the power-law nature of this relation means that a small increment of energy transferred leads to a relatively much larger increase of the information exchanged. Then, we propose an “experimental” implementation of a 1-dimensional communication channel based on a Hamiltonian system, and calculate the actual rate with which information is exchanged between the first and last particle of the channel. Finally, a relation between our results and important quantities of thermodynamics is presented. PMID:24586891

  5. Production and transfer of energy and information in Hamiltonian systems.

    PubMed

    Antonopoulos, Chris G; Bianco-Martinez, Ezequiel; Baptista, Murilo S

    2014-01-01

    We present novel results that relate energy and information transfer with sensitivity to initial conditions in chaotic multi-dimensional Hamiltonian systems. We show the relation among Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy, Lyapunov exponents, and upper bounds for the Mutual Information Rate calculated in the Hamiltonian phase space and on bi-dimensional subspaces. Our main result is that the net amount of transfer from kinetic to potential energy per unit of time is a power-law of the upper bound for the Mutual Information Rate between kinetic and potential energies, and also a power-law of the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy. Therefore, transfer of energy is related with both transfer and production of information. However, the power-law nature of this relation means that a small increment of energy transferred leads to a relatively much larger increase of the information exchanged. Then, we propose an "experimental" implementation of a 1-dimensional communication channel based on a Hamiltonian system, and calculate the actual rate with which information is exchanged between the first and last particle of the channel. Finally, a relation between our results and important quantities of thermodynamics is presented.

  6. Paths to Förster's resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, B. R.

    2014-02-01

    Theodor Förster (1910-1974) developed a phenomenological theory of nonradiative resonance energy transfer which proved to be transformative in the fields of chemistry, biochemistry, and biology. This paper explores the experimental and the theoretical antecedents of Förster's theory of resonance energy transfer (FRET). Early studies of sensitized fluorescence, fluorescence depolarization, and photosynthesis demonstrated the phenomena of long-range energy transfer. At the same time physicists developed theoretical models which contained common physical mechanisms and parameters: oscillating dipoles as models for the atoms or molecules, dipole-dipole coupling for the interaction, and a distance R0 that is optimal for resonance energy transfer. Early theories predicted R0 that was too large as compared to experiments. Finally, in 1946 Förster developed a classical theory and in 1948 he developed a quantum mechanical theory; both theories predicted an inverse sixth power dependence of the rate of energy transfer and a R0 that agreed with experiments. This paper attempts to determine why Förster succeeded when the other theoreticians failed to develop the correct theory. The putative roles of interdisciplinary education and collaborative research are discussed. Furthermore, I explore the role of science journals and their specific audiences in the popularization of FRET to a broad interdisciplinary community.

  7. Dynamical tuning of energy transfer efficiency on a graphene monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karanikolas, Vasilios D.; Marocico, Cristian A.; Bradley, A. Louise

    2015-03-01

    In this contribution we present a theoretical investigation of the energy transfer efficiency between quantum systems placed in proximity of a monolayer of conducting graphene. We calculate the spontaneous emission rate of a quantum system and the energy transfer rate between a donor-acceptor pair, and thus the energy transfer efficiency, using a Green's tensor formalism. The direct interaction between the donor and acceptor dominates when they are close to each other, but is modified from its free-space behavior due to the presence of the graphene monolayer and its interaction with the donor and acceptor. We report on a very large influence of the graphene monolayer on the energy transfer efficiency due to both the Förster mechanism and the propagating graphene plasmon mode. In particular, the Förster radius R0 is modified from its free-space value of 20 nm and can reach values of 120 nm when close to a graphene monolayer. As the donor-acceptor separation is increased, their direct interaction is overshadowed by the interaction via the surface plasmon mode. Due to the large propagation length of the surface plasmon mode on graphene, an energy transfer efficiency as high as 50% can still be achieved for distances as large as 300 nm. The interaction via the surface plasmon mode is tunable via the doping of the graphene monolayer and the surface plasmon channel can also be switched off this way.

  8. Technology transfer for the US Department of Energy's Energy Storage Program: Volume 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneau, C.L.; Fassbender, L.L.

    1988-10-01

    This document contains the appendices to Technology Transfer Recommendations for the US Department of Energy's Storage Program (PNL-6484, Vol. 1). These appendices are a list of projects, publications, and presentations connected with the Energy Storage (STOR) program. In Volume 1, the technology transfer activities of the STOR program are examined and mechanisms for increasing the effectiveness of those activities are recommended.

  9. Multi-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies.

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K. E.

    1998-01-20

    The optimum conditions for multi-neutron transfer have been studied in the system {sup 58}Ni + {sup 124}Sn at bombarding energies at and below the Coulomb barrier. The experiments were performed in inverse kinematics with a {sup 124}Sn beam bombarding a {sup 58}Ni target. The particles were identified with respect to mass and Z in the split-pole spectrograph with a hybrid focal plane detector with mass and Z-resolutions of A/{Delta}A = 150 and Z/{Delta}Z = 70. At all energies the transfer of up to 6 neutrons was observed. The yields for these transfer reactions are found to decrease by about a factor of four for each transferred neutron.

  10. A turbulent burst model for energy transfer in the wall region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, L. C.

    A general surface renewal model of the turbulent burst phenomenon is developed in this paper for energy transfer in the wall region which accounts for the effects of inrush and ejection as well as the three-dimensional convective interaction between the large scale coherent structures. In addition, a practical analysis of fully turbulent convection heat transfer is developed by interfacing the wall model with a classical eddy diffusivity representation for the turbulent core.

  11. Excitation energy transfer: Study with non-Markovian dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Xianting

    2010-11-15

    In this paper, we investigate the non-Markovian dynamics of a model to mimic the excitation energy transfer (EET) between chromophores in photosynthesis systems. The numerical path integral method is used. This method includes the non-Markovian effects of the environmental affects, and it does not need the perturbation approximation in solving the dynamics of systems of interest. It implies that the coherence helps the EET between chromophores through lasting the transfer time rather than enhancing the transfer rate of the EET. In particular, the non-Markovian environment greatly increases the efficiency of the EET in the photosynthesis systems.

  12. Förster-Induced Energy Transfer in Functionalized Graphene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanostructures are ideal substrates for functionalization with molecules since they consist of a single atomic layer giving rise to an extraordinary sensitivity to changes in their surrounding. The functionalization opens a new research field of hybrid nanostructures with tailored properties. Here, we present a microscopic view on the substrate–molecule interaction in the exemplary hybrid material consisting of graphene functionalized with perylene molecules. First experiments on similar systems have been recently realized illustrating an extremely efficient transfer of excitation energy from adsorbed molecules to the carbon substrate, a process with a large application potential for high-efficiency photovoltaic devices and biomedical imaging and sensing. So far, there has been no microscopically founded explanation for the observed energy transfer. Based on first-principle calculations, we have explicitly investigated the different transfer mechanisms revealing the crucial importance of Förster coupling. Due to the efficient Coulomb interaction in graphene, we obtain strong Förster rates in the range of 1/fs. We investigate its dependence on the substrate–molecule distance R and describe the impact of the momentum transfer q for an efficient energy transfer. Furthermore, we find that the Dexter transfer mechanism is negligibly small due to the vanishing overlap between the involved strongly localized orbital functions. The gained insights are applicable to a variety of carbon-based hybrid nanostructures. PMID:24808936

  13. Resonance Energy Transfer in Upconversion Nanoplatforms for Selective Biodetection.

    PubMed

    Su, Qianqian; Feng, Wei; Yang, Dongpeng; Li, Fuyou

    2017-01-17

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) describes the process that energy is transferred from an excited donor to an acceptor molecule, leading to a reduction in the fluorescence emission intensity of the donor and an increase in that of the acceptor. By this technique, measurements with the good sensitivity can be made about distance within 1 to 10 nm under physiological conditions. For this reason, the RET technique has been widely used in polymer science, biochemistry, and structural biology. Recently, a number of RET systems incorporated with nanoparticles, such as quantum dots, gold nanoparticles, and upconversion nanoparticles, have been developed. These nanocrystals retain their optical superiority and can act as either a donor or a quencher, thereby enhancing the performance of RET systems and providing more opportunities in excitation wavelength selection. Notably, lanthanide-doped upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) have attracted considerable attention due to their inherent advantages of large anti-Stoke shifts, long luminescence lifetimes, and absence of autofluorescence under low energy near-infrared (NIR) light excitation. These nanoparticles are promising for the biodetection of various types of analytes. Undoubtedly, the developments of those applications usually rely on resonance energy transfer, which could be regarded as a flexible technology to mediate energy transfer from upconversion phosphor to acceptor for the design of luminescent functional nanoplatforms. Currently, researchers have developed many RET-based upconversion nanosystems (RET-UCNP) that respond to specific changes in the biological environments. Specifically, small organic molecules, biological molecules, metal-organic complexes, or inorganic nanoparticles were carefully selected and bound to the surface of upconversion nanoparticles for the preparation of RET-UCNP nanosystems. Benefiting from the advantage and versatility offered by this technology, the research of RET

  14. Forster energy transfer in chlorosomes of green photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Causgrove, T. P.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Energy transfer properties of whole cells and chlorosome antenna complexes isolated from the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium limicola (containing bacteriochlorophyll c), Chlorobium vibrioforme (containing bacteriochlorophyll d) and Pelodictyon phaeoclathratiforme (containing bacteriochlorophyll e) were measured. The spectral overlap of the major chlorosome pigment (bacteriochlorophyll c, d or, e) with the bacteriochlorophyll a B795 chlorosome baseplate pigment is greatest for bacteriochlorophyll c and smallest for bacteriochlorophyll e. The absorbance and fluorescence spectra of isolated chlorosomes were measured, fitted to gaussian curves and the overlap factors with B795 calculated. Energy transfer times from the bacteriochlorophyll c, d or e to B795 were measured in whole cells and the results interpreted in terms of the Forster theory of energy transfer.

  15. An estimate of spherical impactor energy transfer for mechanical frequency up-conversion energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corr, L. R.; Ma, D. T.

    2016-08-01

    Vibration energy harvesters, which use the impact mechanical frequency up-conversion technique, utilize an impactor, which gains kinetic energy from low frequency ambient environmental vibrations, to excite high frequency systems that efficiently convert mechanical energy to electrical energy. To take full advantage of the impact mechanical frequency up-conversion technique, it is prudent to understand the energy transfer from the low frequency excitations, to the impactor, and finally to the high frequency systems. In this work, the energy transfer from a spherical impactor to a multi degree of freedom spring / mass system, due to Hertzian impact, is investigated to gain insight on how best to design impact mechanical frequency up-conversion energy harvesters. Through this academic work, it is shown that the properties of the contact (or impact) area, i.e., radius of curvature and material properties, only play a minor role in energy transfer and that the equivalent mass of the target system (i.e., the spring / mass system) dictates the total amount of energy transferred during the impact. The novel approach of utilizing the well-known Hertzian impact methodology to gain an understanding of impact mechanical frequency up-conversion energy harvesters has made it clear that the impactor and the high frequency energy generating systems must be designed together as one system to ensure maximum energy transfer, leading to efficient ambient vibration energy harvesters.

  16. A new energy transfer model for turbulent free shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.-W.

    1992-01-01

    A new model for the energy transfer mechanism in the large-scale turbulent kinetic energy equation is proposed. An estimate of the characteristic length scale of the energy containing large structures is obtained from the wavelength associated with the structures predicted by a weakly nonlinear analysis for turbulent free shear flows. With the inclusion of the proposed energy transfer model, the weakly nonlinear wave models for the turbulent large-scale structures are self-contained and are likely to be independent flow geometries. The model is tested against a plane mixing layer. Reasonably good agreement is achieved. Finally, it is shown by using the Liapunov function method, the balance between the production and the drainage of the kinetic energy of the turbulent large-scale structures is asymptotically stable as their amplitude saturates. The saturation of the wave amplitude provides an alternative indicator for flow self-similarity.

  17. Hole-transfer induced energy transfer in perylene diimide dyads with a donor-spacer-acceptor motif.

    PubMed

    Kölle, Patrick; Pugliesi, Igor; Langhals, Heinz; Wilcken, Roland; Esterbauer, Andreas J; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina; Riedle, Eberhard

    2015-10-14

    We investigate the photoinduced dynamics of perylene diimide dyads based on a donor-spacer-acceptor motif with polyyne spacers of varying length by pump-probe spectroscopy, time resolved fluorescence, chemical variation and quantum chemistry. While the dyads with pyridine based polyyne spacers undergo energy transfer with near-unity quantum efficiency, in the dyads with phenyl based polyyne spacers the energy transfer efficiency drops below 50%. This suggests the presence of a competing electron transfer process from the spacer to the energy donor as the excitation sink. Transient absorption spectra, however, reveal that the spacer actually mediates the energy transfer dynamics. The ground state bleach features of the polyyne spacers appear due to the electron transfer decay with the same time constant present in the rise of the ground state bleach and stimulated emission of the perylene energy acceptor. Although the electron transfer process initially quenches the fluorescence of the donor it does not inhibit energy transfer to the perylene energy acceptor. The transient signatures reveal that electron and energy transfer processes are sequential and indicate that the donor-spacer electron transfer state itself is responsible for the energy transfer. Through the introduction of a Dexter blocker unit into the spacer we can clearly exclude any through bond Dexter-type energy transfer. Ab initio calculations on the donor-spacer and the donor-spacer-acceptor systems reveal the existence of a bright charge transfer state that is close in energy to the locally excited state of the acceptor. Multipole-multipole interactions between the bright charge transfer state and the acceptor state enable the energy transfer. We term this mechanism coupled hole-transfer FRET. These dyads represent a first example that shows how electron transfer can be connected to energy transfer for use in novel photovoltaic and optoelectronic devices.

  18. Determination of stepsize parameters for intermolecular vibrational energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Tardy, D.C.

    1992-03-01

    Intermolecular energy transfer of highly excited polyatomic molecules plays an important role in many complex chemical systems: combustion, high temperature and atmospheric chemistry. By monitoring the relaxation of internal energy we have observed trends in the collisional efficiency ({beta}) for energy transfer as a function of the substrate's excitation energy and the complexities of substrate and deactivator. For a given substrate {beta} increases as the deactivator's mass increase to {approximately}30 amu and then exhibits a nearly constant value; this is due to a mass mismatch between the atoms of the colliders. In a homologous series of substrate molecules (C{sub 3}{minus}C{sub 8}) {beta} decreases as the number of atoms in the substrate increases; replacing F with H increases {beta}. All substrates, except for CF{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and CF{sub 2}HCl below 10,000 cm{sup {minus}1}, exhibited that {beta} is independent of energy, i.e. <{Delta}E>{sub all} is linear with energy. The results are interpreted with a simple model which considers that {beta} is a function of the ocillators energy and its vibrational frequency. Limitations of current approximations used in high temperature unimolecular reactions were evaluated and better approximations were developed. The importance of energy transfer in product yields was observed for the photoactivation of perfluorocyclopropene and the photoproduction of difluoroethyne. 3 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Spectrum and energy transfer in steady Burgers turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.; Zhou, YE

    1995-01-01

    The spectrum, energy transfer, and spectral interactions in steady Burgers turbulence are studied using numerically generated data. The velocity field is initially random and the turbulence is maintained steady by forcing the amplitude of a band of low wavenumbers to be invariant in time, while permitting the phase to change as dictated by the equation. The spectrum, as expected, is very different from that of Navier-Stokes turbulence. It is demonstrated that the far range of the spectrum scales as predicted by Burgers. Despite the difference in their spectra, in matters of the spectral energy transfer and triadic interactions Burgers turbulence is similar to Navier-Stokes turbulence.

  20. Electro-mechanical energy conversion system having a permanent magnet machine with stator, resonant transfer link and energy converter controls

    DOEpatents

    Skeist, S. Merrill; Baker, Richard H.

    2006-01-10

    An electro-mechanical energy conversion system coupled between an energy source and an energy load comprising an energy converter device including a permanent magnet induction machine coupled between the energy source and the energy load to convert the energy from the energy source and to transfer the converted energy to the energy load and an energy transfer multiplexer to control the flow of power or energy through the permanent magnetic induction machine.

  1. Energy transfer between Eu3+ ions in calcium diborate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavín, V.; Martín, I. R.; Rodríguez-Mendoza, U. R.; Rodríguez, V. D.

    1999-11-01

    The evolution of the 5D0icons/Journals/Common/to" ALT="to" ALIGN="TOP"/> 7F0 emission of Eu3+ ions in calcium diborate glasses has been analysed using time resolved fluorescence line narrowing measurements in order to give a complete view of the energy transfer processes between these ions. At low concentration (2.5 mol% of Eu2O3) and exciting within the high energy side of the inhomogeneous 7F0icons/Journals/Common/to" ALT="to" ALIGN="TOP"/> 5D0 absorption band, the luminescence spectrum mainly consists of a narrow resonant peak that repeats the exciting profile, indicating that the migration processes between Eu3+ ions within the 5D0 level is not important. However, at higher concentrations (5 to 11.5 mol% of Eu2O3) the luminescence spectrum contains not only a narrow emission but also a broad band due to ions excited by energy transfer (background fluorescence), which for long times well reproduces the inhomogeneous profile. The temporal evolution of the narrow band fluorescence and the shape of the background fluorescence have been analysed using a previously proposed model. The purpose is to understand the dynamics involved in the energy transfer processes caused by the interaction between Eu3+ ions and the implications in their luminescence. A very good agreement with the experimental results is found taking into account an energy dependent quadrupole-quadrupole (S = 10) non-radiative energy transfer process assisted by a phonon from Eu3+ ions at high crystal field sites to ions at low crystal field sites. The temperature dependence of the energy transfer processes is analysed in the range from 13 to 60 K.

  2. Rotational Energy Transfer of N2 Gas Determined Using a New Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Rotational energy transfer between two N2 molecules is a fundamental process of some importance. Exchange is expected to play a role, but its importance is somewhat uncertain. Rotational energy transfer cross sections of N2 also have applications in many other fields including modeling of aerodynamic flows, laser operations, and linewidth analysis in nonintrusive laser diagnostics. A number of N2-N2 rigid rotor potential energy surface (PES) has been reported in the literature.

  3. Interacting scales and energy transfer in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE

    1993-01-01

    The dependence of the energy transfer process on the disparity of the interacting scales is investigated in the inertial and far-dissipation ranges of isotropic turbulence. The strategy for generating the simulated flow fields and the choice of a disparity parameter to characterize the scaling of the interactions is discussed. The inertial range is found to be dominated by relatively local interactions, in agreement with the Kolmogorov assumption. The far-dissipation is found to be dominated by relatively non-local interactions, supporting the classical notion that the far-dissipation range is slaved to the Kolmogorov scales. The measured energy transfer is compared with the classical models of Heisenberg, Obukhov, and the more detailed analysis of Tennekes and Lumley. The energy transfer statistics measured in the numerically simulated flows are found to be nearly self-similar for wave numbers in the inertial range. Using the self-similar form measured within the limited scale range of the simulation, an 'ideal' energy transfer function and the corresponding energy flux rate for an inertial range of infinite extent are constructed. From this flux rate, the Kolmogorov constant is calculated to be 1.5, in excellent agreement with experiments.

  4. Optimal Energy Transfer in Light-Harvesting Systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lipeng; Shenai, Prathamesh; Zheng, Fulu; Somoza, Alejandro; Zhao, Yang

    2015-08-20

    Photosynthesis is one of the most essential biological processes in which specialized pigment-protein complexes absorb solar photons, and with a remarkably high efficiency, guide the photo-induced excitation energy toward the reaction center to subsequently trigger its conversion to chemical energy. In this work, we review the principles of optimal energy transfer in various natural and artificial light harvesting systems. We begin by presenting the guiding principles for optimizing the energy transfer efficiency in systems connected to dissipative environments, with particular attention paid to the potential role of quantum coherence in light harvesting systems. We will comment briefly on photo-protective mechanisms in natural systems that ensure optimal functionality under varying ambient conditions. For completeness, we will also present an overview of the charge separation and electron transfer pathways in reaction centers. Finally, recent theoretical and experimental progress on excitation energy transfer, charge separation, and charge transport in artificial light harvesting systems is delineated, with organic solar cells taken as prime examples.

  5. Quantal Aspects of - Energy Transfer and Photodissociation of Oscillators.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, John Joseph

    1988-12-01

    Our first chapter examines the mechanism by which molecular rotation enhances vibrational relaxation of a diatomic molecule. Three factors are discussed, lowering by rotational transitions of the vibrational energy defect, coupling due to potential matrix elements off diagonal in rotational state, and additional phase shifts introduced into the incoming and outgoing waves by anisotropy in the intermolecular potential. The distorted wave solution of the coupled states scattering equations elucidates the importance of each factor for H_2(v = 1) - He, CO(v = 1) - H_2, and for vibrational energy transfer from H_2 (v = 1) to CO(v = 0,1,2). Rotation is found to play both an energetic and a dynamical role. In the energetic role, rotation lowers the vibrational energy defect and thereby enhances vibrational relaxation, while the dynamic contribution takes the form of additional phase shifts introduced into the incoming and outgoing waves by the potential anisotropy. Our results suggest that molecular anisotropy in the region of the classical turning point is an important factor in the rotational enhancement observed in recent comparisons of CSA and IOSA vibrational relaxation rate constants for the N_2-He and CO-He systems. In the second chapter we study the response of a highly excited Morse oscillator with 179 bound states to an intense, below resonance electromagnetic field. A dynamic, quantal description of dissociation is obtained from an inspection of the time dependent wavefunction. The bound to continuum transitions which occur during dissociation involve the emission of a high energy, coherent wave which propagates to infinity--a feature not observed in other studies of the periodically driven Morse oscillator. Initially, the exodus of this wave results in a rapid increase in the dissociation probability. However, at longer times the dissociation slows down and concurrently the system is localized in the bound state basis, indicating that even though the classical

  6. Energy transfer processes in solar energy conversion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fayer, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    The following were studied experimentally and/or theoretically: dynamics of energy transport and trapping in two-component systems (using rhodamine 6G and malachite green as traps), electronic excited state transport among molecules randomly distributed in a finite volume, electronic excitation transport in polymer systems, and excitation transport in synthetic Zn-chlorophyllide substituted hemoglobin. (DLC)

  7. Energy-transfer mechanisms in the CH3F-SF6 optically pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.; Koepf, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    The power of an optically pumped CH3F laser operating on the 496-micron line has been doubled with the addition of SF6 without any corresponding increase in pump absorption. It is suggested that a near-resonant energy transfer between CH3F and SF6 followed by SF6 deactivation is the mechanism responsible for the enhancement.

  8. Dark energy and dark matter from an additional adiabatic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunsby, Peter K. S.; Luongo, Orlando; Reverberi, Lorenzo

    2016-10-01

    The dark sector is described by an additional barotropic fluid which evolves adiabatically during the Universe's history and whose adiabatic exponent γ is derived from the standard definitions of specific heats. Although in general γ is a function of the redshift, the Hubble parameter and its derivatives, we find that our assumptions lead necessarily to solutions with γ =constant in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe. The adiabatic fluid acts effectively as the sum of two distinct components, one evolving like nonrelativistic matter and the other depending on the value of the adiabatic index. This makes the model particularly interesting as a way of simultaneously explaining the nature of both dark energy and dark matter, at least at the level of the background cosmology. The Λ CDM model is included in this family of theories when γ =0 . We fit our model to supernovae Ia, H (z ) and baryonic acoustic oscillation data, discussing the model selection criteria. The implications for the early Universe and the growth of small perturbations in this model are also discussed.

  9. Effects of mass addition on blunt-body boundary-layer transition and heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaattari, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    The model bodies tested at Mach number 7.32 were hemispheres, blunt cones, and spherical segments. The mass addition consisted of air ejected through porous forward surfaces of the models. The experimental data consisted of heat transfer measurements from which boundary layer transitions were deduced. The data verified various applicable boundary layer codes in the laminar and transitional flow regimes. Empirical heating rate data correlations were developed for the laminar and turbulent flow regimes.

  10. Direct contact heat transfer for thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. D.

    1982-03-01

    Direct contact heat exchange offers the potential for increased efficiency and lower heat transfer costs in a variety of thermal energy storage systems. SERI models of direct contact heat transfer based on literature information identified dispersed phase drop size, the mechanism of heat transfer within the drop, and dispersed phase holdup as the parameters controlling direct contact system performance. Tests were defined and equipment constructed to provide independent determination of drop size, heat transfer mechanism, and hold up. Further experiments are needed to conclusively determine whether the salt in a salt hydrate melt acts to block internal circulation. The potential of low temperature oil/salt hydrate latent heat storage systems is being evaluated in the laboratory.

  11. Transition of energy transfer from MHD turbulence to kinetic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan; Matthaeus, William; Parashar, Tulasi; Shi, Yipeng; Wan, Minping; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-11-01

    The classical energy cascade scenario is of great importance in explaining the heating of corona and solar wind. One can envision that energy residing in large-scale fluctuations is transported to smaller scales where dissipation occurs and finally drives kinetic processes that absorb the energy flux and energize charged particles. Here we inquire how the cascade operates in a compressible plasma, and how the characteristics of energy transfer vary going from MHD to kinetic scales. When filtering MHD equations, we can get an apparent inertial range over which the conservative energy cascade occurs and the scale locality of energy transfer is similar to the cases of incompressible MHD turbulence. Pervasive shocks not only make a significant difference on energy cascade and magnetic amplification, but can also introduce considerable pressure dilation, a complement of viscous and ohmic dissipation that can trigger an alternative channel of the conversion between kinetic and internal energy. The procedure can also be applied to the Vlasov equation and kinetic simulation, in comparison with MHD turbulence, and is a good candidate to investigate the energy cascade process and the analogous role of the (tensor) pressure dilation in collisionless plasma.

  12. Fluorescent resonant excitation energy transfer in linear polyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mousumi; Ramasesha, S.

    2010-03-01

    We have studied the dynamics of excitation transfer between two conjugated polyene molecules whose intermolecular separation is comparable to the molecular dimensions. We have employed a correlated electron model that includes both the charge-charge, charge-bond, and bond-bond intermolecular electron repulsion integrals. We have shown that the excitation transfer rate varies as inverse square of donor-acceptor separation R-2 rather than as R-6, suggested by the Förster type of dipolar approximation. Our time-evolution study also shows that the orientational dependence on excitation transfer at a fixed short donor-acceptor separation cannot be explained by Förster type of dipolar approximation beyond a certain orientational angle of rotation of an acceptor polyene with respect to the donor polyene. The actual excitation transfer rate beyond a certain orientational angle is faster than the Förster type of dipolar approximation rate. We have also studied the excitation transfer process in a pair of push-pull polyenes for different push-pull strengths. We have seen that, depending on the push-pull strength, excitation transfer could occur to other dipole coupled states. Our study also allows for the excitation energy transfer to optically dark states which are excluded by Förster theory since the one-photon transition intensity to these states (from the ground state) is zero.

  13. Excitation energy transfer in the green photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus: A specific effect of 1-hexanol on the optical properties of baseplate and energy transfer processes.

    PubMed

    Mimuro, M; Nishimura, Y; Yamazaki, I; Kobayashi, M; Wang, Z Y; Nozawa, T; Shimada, K; Matsuura, K

    1996-05-01

    The effect of 1-hexanol on spectral properties and the processes of energy transfer of the green gliding photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus was investigated with reference to the baseplate region. On addition of 1-hexanol to a cell suspension in a concentration of one-fourth saturation, a specific change in the baseplate region was induced: that is, a bleach of the 793-nm component, and an increase in absorption of the 813-nm component. This result was also confirmed by fluorescence spectra of whole cells and isolated chlorosomes. The processes of energy transfer were affected in the overall transfer efficiency but not kinetically, indicating that 1-hexanol suppressed the flux of energy flow from the baseplate to the B806-866 complexes in the cytoplasmic membranes. The fluorescence excitation spectrum suggests a specific site of interaction between bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c with a maximum at 771 nm in the rod elements and BChl a with a maximum at 793 nm in the baseplate, which is a funnel for a fast transfer of energy to the B806-866 complexes in the membranes. The absorption spectrum of chlorosomes was resolved to components consistently on the basis, including circular dichroism and magnetic circular dichroism spectra; besides two major BChl c forms, bands corresponding to tetramer, dimer, and monomer were also discernible, which are supposed to be intermediary components for a higher order structure. A tentative model for the antenna system of C. aurantiacus is proposed.

  14. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  15. Photoexcited energy transfer in a weakly coupled dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Laura Alfonso; Nelson, Tammie; Tretiak, Sergei; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2015-01-08

    Nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics (NA-ESMD) simulations have been performed in order to study the time-dependent exciton localization during energy transfer between two chromophore units of the weakly coupled anthracene dimer dithia-anthracenophane (DTA). Simulations are done at both low temperature (10 K) and room temperature (300 K). The initial photoexcitation creates an exciton which is primarily localized on a single monomer unit. Subsequently, the exciton experiences an ultrafast energy transfer becoming localized on either one monomer unit or the other, whereas delocalization between both monomers never occurs. In half of the trajectories, the electronic transition density becomes completely localized on the same monomer as the initial excitation, while in the other half, it becomes completely localized on the opposite monomer. In this article, we present an analysis of the energy transfer dynamics and the effect of thermally induced geometry distortions on the exciton localization. Finally, simulated fluorescence anisotropy decay curves for both DTA and the monomer unit dimethyl anthracene (DMA) are compared. As a result, our analysis reveals that changes in the transition density localization caused by energy transfer between two monomers in DTA is not the only source of depolarization and exciton relaxation within a single DTA monomer unit can also cause reorientation of the transition dipole.

  16. Low Energy Transfer Reactions With {sup 11}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, Jacob

    2009-08-26

    The low-energy transfer reaction {sup 11}Be(d,p){sup 12}Be gives us the opportunity to investigate single particle excitations in {sup 12}Be. The breaking of the magic number N = 8 for {sup 12}Be can be studied by comparing spectroscopic data with theoretical predictions.

  17. Plasmon resonance energy transfer and plexcitonic solar cell.

    PubMed

    Nan, Fan; Ding, Si-Jing; Ma, Liang; Cheng, Zi-Qiang; Zhong, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Ya-Fang; Qiu, Yun-Hang; Li, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Li; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2016-08-11

    Plasmon-mediated energy transfer is highly desirable in photo-electronic nanodevices, but the direct injection efficiency of "hot electrons" in plasmonic photo-detectors and plasmon-sensitized solar cells (plasmon-SSCs) is poor. On another front, Fano resonance induced by strong plasmon-exciton coupling provides an efficient channel of coherent energy transfer from metallic plasmons to molecular excitons, and organic dye molecules have a much better injection efficiency in exciton-SSCs than "hot electrons". Here, we investigate enhanced light-harvesting of chlorophyll-a molecules strongly coupled to Au nanostructured films via Fano resonance. The enhanced local field and plasmon resonance energy transfer are experimentally revealed by monitoring the ultrafast dynamical processes of the plexcitons and the photocurrent flows of the assembled plexciton-SSCs. By tuning the Fano factor and anti-resonance wavelengths, we find that the local field is largely enhanced and the efficiency of plexciton-SSCs consisting of ultrathin TiO2 films is significantly improved. Most strikingly, the output power of the plexciton-SSCs is much larger than the sum of those of the individual plasmon- and exciton-SSCs. Our observations provide a practical approach to monitor energy and electron transfer in plasmon-exciton hybrids at a strong coupling regime and also offer a new strategy to design photovoltaic nanodevices.

  18. Photoexcited energy transfer in a weakly coupled dimer

    DOE PAGES

    Hernandez, Laura Alfonso; Nelson, Tammie; Tretiak, Sergei; ...

    2015-01-08

    Nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics (NA-ESMD) simulations have been performed in order to study the time-dependent exciton localization during energy transfer between two chromophore units of the weakly coupled anthracene dimer dithia-anthracenophane (DTA). Simulations are done at both low temperature (10 K) and room temperature (300 K). The initial photoexcitation creates an exciton which is primarily localized on a single monomer unit. Subsequently, the exciton experiences an ultrafast energy transfer becoming localized on either one monomer unit or the other, whereas delocalization between both monomers never occurs. In half of the trajectories, the electronic transition density becomes completely localized on themore » same monomer as the initial excitation, while in the other half, it becomes completely localized on the opposite monomer. In this article, we present an analysis of the energy transfer dynamics and the effect of thermally induced geometry distortions on the exciton localization. Finally, simulated fluorescence anisotropy decay curves for both DTA and the monomer unit dimethyl anthracene (DMA) are compared. As a result, our analysis reveals that changes in the transition density localization caused by energy transfer between two monomers in DTA is not the only source of depolarization and exciton relaxation within a single DTA monomer unit can also cause reorientation of the transition dipole.« less

  19. Heavy ion mutagenesis: linear energy transfer effects and genetic linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kronenberg, A.; Gauny, S.; Criddle, K.; Vannais, D.; Ueno, A.; Kraemer, S.; Waldren, C. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized a series of 69 independent mutants at the endogenous hprt locus of human TK6 lymphoblasts and over 200 independent S1-deficient mutants of the human x hamster hybrid cell line AL arising spontaneously or following low-fluence exposures to densely ionizing Fe ions (600 MeV/amu, linear energy transfer = 190 keV/microns). We find that large deletions are common. The entire hprt gene (> 44 kb) was missing in 19/39 Fe-induced mutants, while only 2/30 spontaneous mutants lost the entire hprt coding sequence. When the gene of interest (S1 locus = M1C1 gene) is located on a nonessential human chromosome 11, multilocus deletions of several million base pairs are observed frequently. The S1 mutation frequency is more than 50-fold greater than the frequency of hprt mutants in the same cells. Taken together, these results suggest that low-fluence exposures to Fe ions are often cytotoxic due to their ability to create multilocus deletions that may often include the loss of essential genes. In addition, the tumorigenic potential of these HZE heavy ions may be due to the high potential for loss of tumor suppressor genes. The relative insensitivity of the hprt locus to mutation is likely due to tight linkage to a gene that is required for viability.

  20. Charge-transfer contributions to the excitonic coupling matrix element in BODIPY-based energy transfer cassettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiegel, J. Dominik; Lyskov, Igor; Kleinschmidt, Martin; Marian, Christel M.

    2017-01-01

    BODIPY-based dyads serve as model systems for the investigation of excitation energy transfer (EET). Through-space EET is brought about by direct and exchange interactions between the transition densities of donor and acceptor localized states. The presence of a molecular linker gives rise to additional charge transfer (CT) contributions. Here, we present a novel approach for the calculation of the excitonic coupling matrix element (ECME) including CT contributions which is based on supermolecular one-electron transition density matrices (STD). The validity of the approach is assessed for a model system of two π -stacked ethylene molecules at varying intermolecular separation. Wave functions and electronic excitation energies of five EET cassettes comprising anthracene as exciton donor and BODIPY as exciton acceptor are obtained by the redesigned combined density functional theory and multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI-R) method. CT contributions to the ECME are shown to be important in the covalently linked EET cassettes.

  1. Evidence that Additions of Grignard Reagents to Aliphatic Aldehydes Do Not Involve Single-Electron-Transfer Processes.

    PubMed

    Otte, Douglas A L; Woerpel, K A

    2015-08-07

    Addition of allylmagnesium reagents to an aliphatic aldehyde bearing a radical clock gave only addition products and no evidence of ring-opened products that would suggest single-electron-transfer reactions. The analogous Barbier reaction also did not provide evidence for a single-electron-transfer mechanism in the addition step. Other Grignard reagents (methyl-, vinyl-, t-Bu-, and triphenylmethylmagnesium halides) also do not appear to add to an alkyl aldehyde by a single-electron-transfer mechanism.

  2. Utilizing Energy Transfer in Binary and Ternary Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Feron, Krishna; Cave, James M; Thameel, Mahir N; O'Sullivan, Connor; Kroon, Renee; Andersson, Mats R; Zhou, Xiaojing; Fell, Christopher J; Belcher, Warwick J; Walker, Alison B; Dastoor, Paul C

    2016-08-17

    Energy transfer has been identified as an important process in ternary organic solar cells. Here, we develop kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) models to assess the impact of energy transfer in ternary and binary bulk heterojunction systems. We used fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy to determine the energy disorder and Förster radii for poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl), [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester, 4-bis[4-(N,N-diisobutylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl]squaraine (DIBSq), and poly(2,5-thiophene-alt-4,9-bis(2-hexyldecyl)-4,9-dihydrodithieno[3,2-c:3',2'-h][1,5]naphthyridine-5,10-dione). Heterogeneous energy transfer is found to be crucial in the exciton dissociation process of both binary and ternary organic semiconductor systems. Circumstances favoring energy transfer across interfaces allow relaxation of the electronic energy level requirements, meaning that a cascade structure is not required for efficient ternary organic solar cells. We explain how energy transfer can be exploited to eliminate additional energy losses in ternary bulk heterojunction solar cells, thus increasing their open-circuit voltage without loss in short-circuit current. In particular, we show that it is important that the DIBSq is located at the electron donor-acceptor interface; otherwise charge carriers will be trapped in the DIBSq domain or excitons in the DIBSq domains will not be able to dissociate efficiently at an interface. KMC modeling shows that only small amounts of DIBSq (<5% by weight) are needed to achieve substantial performance improvements due to long-range energy transfer.

  3. Vibration-assisted resonance in photosynthetic excitation-energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irish, E. K.; Gómez-Bombarelli, R.; Lovett, B. W.

    2014-07-01

    Understanding how the effectiveness of natural photosynthetic energy-harvesting systems arises from the interplay between quantum coherence and environmental noise represents a significant challenge for quantum theory. Recently it has begun to be appreciated that discrete molecular vibrational modes may play an important role in the dynamics of such systems. Here we present a microscopic mechanism by which intramolecular vibrations may be able to contribute to the efficiency and directionality of energy transfer. Excited vibrational states create resonant pathways through the system, supporting fast and efficient energy transport. Vibrational damping together with the natural downhill arrangement of molecular energy levels gives intrinsic directionality to the energy flow. Analytical and numerical results demonstrate a significant enhancement of the efficiency and directionality of energy transport that can be directly related to the existence of resonances between vibrational and excitonic levels.

  4. Wireless energy transfer: Dielectric lens antennas for beam shaping in wireless power-transfer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Ricardo; Carvalho, Nuno B.; Pinho, Pedro

    2017-02-01

    In the current contest of wireless systems, the last frontier remains the cut of the power cord. In that sense, the interest over wireless energy transfer technologies in the past years has grown exponentially. However, there are still many challenges to be overcome in order to enable wireless energy transfer full potential. One of the focus in the development of such systems is the design of very-high-gain, highly efficient, antennas that can compensate for the propagation loss of radio signals over the air. In this paper, we explore the design and manufacturing process of dielectric lenses, fabricated using a professional-grade desktop 3D printer. Lens antennas are used in order to increase beam efficiency and therefore maximize the efficiency of a wireless power-transfer system operating at microwave frequencies in the Ku band. Measurements of two fabricated prototypes showcase a large directivity, as predicted with simulations. xml:lang="fr"

  5. Coherent or hopping like energy transfer in the chlorosome ?

    SciTech Connect

    Nalbach, Peter

    2014-08-20

    Chlorosomes, as part of the light-harvesting system of green bacteria, are the largest and most efficient antennae systems in nature. We have studied energy transfer dynamics in the chlorosome in a simplified toy model employing a master equation. Dephasing and relaxation due to environmental fluctuations are included by Lindblad dephasing and Redfield thermalization rates. We find at room temperature three separate time scales, i.e. 25 fs, 250 fs and 2.5 ps and determine the according energy pathways through the hierarchical structure in the chlorosome. Quantum coherence lives up to 150 fs at which time the energy is spread over roughly 12 pigments in our model.

  6. Coherent or hopping like energy transfer in the chlorosome ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalbach, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Chlorosomes, as part of the light-harvesting system of green bacteria, are the largest and most efficient antennae systems in nature. We have studied energy transfer dynamics in the chlorosome in a simplified toy model employing a master equation. Dephasing and relaxation due to environmental fluctuations are included by Lindblad dephasing and Redfield thermalization rates. We find at room temperature three separate time scales, i.e. 25 fs, 250 fs and 2.5 ps and determine the according energy pathways through the hierarchical structure in the chlorosome. Quantum coherence lives up to 150 fs at which time the energy is spread over roughly 12 pigments in our model.

  7. The Role of Resonant Vibrations in Electronic Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Somsen, Oscar J. G.; Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Mančal, Tomáš; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nuclear vibrations play a prominent role in the spectroscopy and dynamics of electronic systems. As recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest, this may be even more so when vibrational frequencies are resonant with transitions between the electronic states. Herein, a vibronic multilevel Redfield model is reported for excitonically coupled electronic two‐level systems with a few explicitly included vibrational modes and interacting with a phonon bath. With numerical simulations the effects of the quantized vibrations on the dynamics of energy transfer and coherence in a model dimer are illustrated. The resonance between the vibrational frequency and energy gap between the sites leads to a large delocalization of vibronic states, which then results in faster energy transfer and longer‐lived mixed coherences. PMID:26910485

  8. Observation of resonant energy transfer between identical-frequency laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Afeyan, B. B.; Cohen, B. I.; Estabrook, K. G.; Glenzer, S. H.; Joshi, C.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Moody, J. D.; Wharton, K. B.

    1998-12-09

    Enhanced transmission of a low intensity laser beam is observed when crossed with an identical-frequency beam in a plasma with a flow velocity near the ion sound speed. The time history of the enhancement and the dependence on the flow velocity strongly suggest that this is due to energy transfer between the beams via a resonant ion wave with zero frequency in the laboratory frame. The maximum energy transfer has been observed when the beams cross in a region with Mach 1 flow. The addition of frequency modulation on the crossing beams is seen to reduce the energy transfer by a factor of two. Implications for indirect-drive fusion schemes are discussed.

  9. Mechanical energy generation and transfer in the racket arm during table tennis topspin backhands.

    PubMed

    Iino, Yoichi; Kojima, Takeji

    2016-06-01

    The ability to generate a high racket speed and a large amount of racket kinetic energy on impact is important for table tennis players. The purpose of this study was to understand how mechanical energy is generated and transferred in the racket arm during table tennis backhands. Ten male advanced right-handed table tennis players hit topspin backhands against pre-impact topspin and backspin balls. The joint kinetics at the shoulder, elbow and wrist of the racket arm was determined using inverse dynamics. A majority of the mechanical energy of the racket arm acquired during forward swing (65 and 77% against topspin and backspin, respectively) was due to energy transfer from the trunk. Energy transfer by the shoulder joint force in the vertical direction was the largest contributor to the mechanical energy of the racket arm against both spins and was greater against backspin than against topspin (34 and 28%, respectively). The shoulder joint force directed to the right, which peaked just before impact, transferred additional energy to the racket. Our results suggest that the upward thrust of the shoulder and the late timing of the axial rotation of the upper trunk are important for an effective topspin backhand.

  10. Incrementality and additionality: A new dimension to North-South resource transfers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, A. . School of Environmental Sciences); Werksman, J. . Foundation for International Environmental Law and Development)

    1994-06-01

    In the last four years, incrementality'' and additionality'' have emerged as new terms in the evolving lexicon of international environmental diplomacy. As Parties to the Conventions on Climate Change, Biodiversity and the Ozone Layer, industrialized states undertake to provide sufficient additional resources (the principle of additionality) to meet the incremental cost (the concept of incrementality) of measures undertaken by the developing countries to tackle global environmental problems. Issues of incrementality and additionality go to the heart of a much deeper and highly contentious debate on who should pay the costs of responding to global environmental problems; on how the payment should be made; on which agency or agencies should manage the transfers; and upon which parties should be compensated. Every sign is that if the overall North to South transfer breaks down or is retarded, then the process of implementing the aforementioned agreements may be jeopardized. This paper reviews the emergency of the two terms in international environmental politics; it pinpoints the theoretical and practical difficulties of defining and implementing them; and it assesses whether these difficulties and conflicts of opinion may, in some manner, be resolved.

  11. Analysis of medium-energy transfers to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Kenta; Topputo, Francesco; Campagnola, Stefano; Yanao, Tomohiro

    2016-09-01

    This study analyzes a recently discovered class of exterior transfers to the Moon. These transfers terminate in retrograde ballistic capture orbits, i.e., orbits with negative Keplerian energy and angular momentum with respect to the Moon. Yet, their Jacobi constant is relatively low, for which no forbidden regions exist, and the trajectories do not appear to mimic the dynamics of the invariant manifolds of the Lagrange points. This paper shows that these orbits shadow instead lunar collision orbits. We investigate the dynamics of singular, lunar collision orbits in the Earth-Moon planar circular restricted three-body problem, and reveal their rich phase space structure in the medium-energy regime, where invariant manifolds of the Lagrange point orbits break up. We show that lunar retrograde ballistic capture trajectories lie inside the tube structure of collision orbits. We also develop a method to compute medium-energy transfers by patching together orbits inside the collision tube and those whose apogees are located in the appropriate quadrant in the Sun-Earth system. The method yields the novel family of transfers as well as those ending in direct capture orbits, under particular energetic and geometrical conditions.

  12. Analysis of medium-energy transfers to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Kenta; Topputo, Francesco; Campagnola, Stefano; Yanao, Tomohiro

    2017-03-01

    This study analyzes a recently discovered class of exterior transfers to the Moon. These transfers terminate in retrograde ballistic capture orbits, i.e., orbits with negative Keplerian energy and angular momentum with respect to the Moon. Yet, their Jacobi constant is relatively low, for which no forbidden regions exist, and the trajectories do not appear to mimic the dynamics of the invariant manifolds of the Lagrange points. This paper shows that these orbits shadow instead lunar collision orbits. We investigate the dynamics of singular, lunar collision orbits in the Earth-Moon planar circular restricted three-body problem, and reveal their rich phase space structure in the medium-energy regime, where invariant manifolds of the Lagrange point orbits break up. We show that lunar retrograde ballistic capture trajectories lie inside the tube structure of collision orbits. We also develop a method to compute medium-energy transfers by patching together orbits inside the collision tube and those whose apogees are located in the appropriate quadrant in the Sun-Earth system. The method yields the novel family of transfers as well as those ending in direct capture orbits, under particular energetic and geometrical conditions.

  13. An optimized surface plasmon photovoltaic structure using energy transfer between discrete nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Albert; Fu, Sze-Ming; Chung, Yen-Kai; Lai, Shih-Yun; Tseng, Chi-Wei

    2013-01-14

    Surface plasmon enhancement has been proposed as a way to achieve higher absorption for thin-film photovoltaics, where surface plasmon polariton(SPP) and localized surface plasmon (LSP) are shown to provide dense near field and far field light scattering. Here it is shown that controlled far-field light scattering can be achieved using successive coupling between surface plasmonic (SP) nano-particles. Through genetic algorithm (GA) optimization, energy transfer between discrete nano-particles (ETDNP) is identified, which enhances solar cell efficiency. The optimized energy transfer structure acts like lumped-element transmission line and can properly alter the direction of photon flow. Increased in-plane component of wavevector is thus achieved and photon path length is extended. In addition, Wood-Rayleigh anomaly, at which transmission minimum occurs, is avoided through GA optimization. Optimized energy transfer structure provides 46.95% improvement over baseline planar cell. It achieves larger angular scattering capability compared to conventional surface plasmon polariton back reflector structure and index-guided structure due to SP energy transfer through mode coupling. Via SP mediated energy transfer, an alternative way to control the light flow inside thin-film is proposed, which can be more efficient than conventional index-guided mode using total internal reflection (TIR).

  14. Condensed droplet jumping: Capillary to inertial energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad; Morris, Michael; Wang, Evelyn

    2013-03-01

    When condensed droplets coalesce on a superhydrophobic nanostructured surface, the resulting droplet can jump from the surface due to the release of excess surface energy. This behavior has been shown to follow a simple inertial-capillary scaling. However, questions remain regarding the nature of the energy conversion process linking the excess surface energy of the system before coalescence and the kinetic energy of the jumping droplet. Furthermore, the primary energy dissipation mechanisms limiting this jumping behavior remain relatively unexplored. In this work, we present new experimental data from a two-camera setup capturing the trajectory of jumping droplets on nanostructured surfaces with a characteristic surface roughness length scale on the order of 10 nm. Coupled with a model developed to capture the main details of the bridging flow during coalescence, our findings suggest that: 1. the excess surface energy available for jumping is a fraction of that suggested by simple scaling due to incomplete energy transfer, 2. internal viscous dissipation is not a limiting factor on the jumping process at droplet sizes on the order of 10 μm and 3. jumping performance is strongly affected by forces associated with the external flow and fields around the droplet. This work suggests bounds on the heat transfer performance of superhydrophobic condensation surfaces.

  15. Heat transfer and material flow during laser assisted multi-layer additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Manvatkar, V.; De, A.; DebRoy, T.

    2014-09-28

    A three-dimensional, transient, heat transfer, and fluid flow model is developed for the laser assisted multilayer additive manufacturing process with coaxially fed austenitic stainless steel powder. Heat transfer between the laser beam and the powder particles is considered both during their flight between the nozzle and the growth surface and after they deposit on the surface. The geometry of the build layer obtained from independent experiments is compared with that obtained from the model. The spatial variation of melt geometry, cooling rate, and peak temperatures is examined in various layers. The computed cooling rates and solidification parameters are used to estimate the cell spacings and hardness in various layers of the structure. Good agreement is achieved between the computed geometry, cell spacings, and hardness with the corresponding independent experimental results.

  16. Energy transfer and device performance in phosphorescent dye doped polymer light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Yong-Young; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Kim, Jang-Joo; Yase, Kiyoshi

    2003-02-01

    Singlet and triplet-triplet energy transfer in phosphorescent dye doped polymer light emitting devices were investigated. Poly(N-vinylcarbazol) and poly[9,9'-di-n-hexyl-2,7-fluorene-alt- 1,4-(2,5-di-n-hexyloxy)phenylene] (PFHP) were selected as the host polymer for the phosphorescent dopants fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium(III) [Ir(ppy)3] and 2,3,7,8,12,13, 17,18-octaethyl-21H,23H-porphyrin platinum(II) (PtOEP) because of their high triplet energy levels and long phosphorescence lifetimes. In case of PVK film, efficient triplet energy transfers to both PtOEP and Ir(ppy)3 were observed. In contrast, the triplet energy transfer did not occur or was very weak from PFHP to both PtOEP and Ir(ppy)3 although usual requirements for triplet energy transfer were satisfied. Furthermore, the singlet-singlet energy transfer did not take place from PFHP to Ir(ppy)3 in doped films even though the Förster radius is more than 30 Å. However, the blended film of Ir(ppy)3 with PFHP and PMMA showed the green emission from Ir(ppy)3 via singlet energy transfer. In addition, the solution of PFHP and Ir(ppy)3 (8 wt. %) in p-xylene also showed green emission. The blocking of the energy transfers in the phosphorescent dye doped PFHP films is found to be originated from the formation of aggregates which is evident from the microscopic images taken by transmission electron microscope, atomic force microscope, and fluorescence microscope. The formation of aggregates prevents dopant molecules from being in close proximity with host molecules thereby inhibiting energy transfer processes. The phase separation deteriorates the device performance also. Therefore, the chemical compatibility of a dopant with a host polymer as well as conventional requirements for energy transfers must be significantly considered to fabricate efficient phosphorescent dye doped polymer light emitting devices.

  17. Transferability of regional permafrost disturbance susceptibility modelling using generalized linear and generalized additive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudy, Ashley C. A.; Lamoureux, Scott F.; Treitz, Paul; van Ewijk, Karin Y.

    2016-07-01

    To effectively assess and mitigate risk of permafrost disturbance, disturbance-prone areas can be predicted through the application of susceptibility models. In this study we developed regional susceptibility models for permafrost disturbances using a field disturbance inventory to test the transferability of the model to a broader region in the Canadian High Arctic. Resulting maps of susceptibility were then used to explore the effect of terrain variables on the occurrence of disturbances within this region. To account for a large range of landscape characteristics, the model was calibrated using two locations: Sabine Peninsula, Melville Island, NU, and Fosheim Peninsula, Ellesmere Island, NU. Spatial patterns of disturbance were predicted with a generalized linear model (GLM) and generalized additive model (GAM), each calibrated using disturbed and randomized undisturbed locations from both locations and GIS-derived terrain predictor variables including slope, potential incoming solar radiation, wetness index, topographic position index, elevation, and distance to water. Each model was validated for the Sabine and Fosheim Peninsulas using independent data sets while the transferability of the model to an independent site was assessed at Cape Bounty, Melville Island, NU. The regional GLM and GAM validated well for both calibration sites (Sabine and Fosheim) with the area under the receiver operating curves (AUROC) > 0.79. Both models were applied directly to Cape Bounty without calibration and validated equally with AUROC's of 0.76; however, each model predicted disturbed and undisturbed samples differently. Additionally, the sensitivity of the transferred model was assessed using data sets with different sample sizes. Results indicated that models based on larger sample sizes transferred more consistently and captured the variability within the terrain attributes in the respective study areas. Terrain attributes associated with the initiation of disturbances were

  18. Nonlinear mode coupling and vibrational energy transfer in Yukawa clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Ke; Kong, Jie; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    Nonlinear mode coupling and the subsequent vibrational energy transfer that results is an important topic in chemical physics research, ranging from small molecules consisting of several atoms to macromolecules such as those found in proteins and DNA. Nonlinear mode coupling is recognized as the mechanism leading to ergodicity, which is a foundational tenet of statistical mechanics. Over the past two decades, Yukawa systems of particles such as those found in complex plasma, have been shown to be an effective model across a large number of physical systems. In this research, nonlinear mode coupling in Yukawa clusters consisting of 3-10 particles is examined via numerical simulation of the vibrational energy transfer between modes starting from an initial excited state. The relationship between the energy transfer process and the internal resonance between modes having a specified frequency ratio and the temporal evolution of the system to a state of equal energy across all modes, i.e., the state of ergodicity, will be discussed. Support from the NSF and the DOE (award numbers PHY-1262031 and PHY-1414523) is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Resonance energy transfer study of lysozyme-lipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna P; Ioffe, Valeriya M; Molotkovsky, Julian G; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2008-05-01

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) between the tryptophan residues of lysozyme as donors and anthrylvinyl-labeled phosphatidylcholine (AV-PC) or phosphatidylglycerol (AV-PG) as acceptors has been examined to gain insight into molecular level details of the interactions of lysozyme with the lipid bilayers composed of PC with 10, 20, or 40 mol% PG. Energy transfer efficiency determined from the enhanced acceptor fluorescence was found to increase with content of the acidic lipid and surface coverage. The results of RET experiments performed with lipid vesicles containing 40 mol% PG were quantitatively analyzed in terms of the model of energy transfer in two-dimensional systems taking into account the distance dependence of orientation factor. Evidence for an interfacial location of the two predominant lysozyme fluorophores, Trp62 and Trp108, was obtained. The RET enhancement observed while employing AV-PG instead of AV-PC as an energy acceptor was interpreted as arising from the ability of lysozyme to bring about local demixing of the neutral and charged lipids in PC/PG model membranes.

  20. 2013 MOLECULAR ENERGY TRANSFER GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE (JANUARY 13-18, 2013 - VENTURA BEACH MARRIOTT, VENTURA CA

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Scott A.

    2012-10-18

    Sessions covered all areas of molecular energy transfer, with 10 sessions of talks and poster sessions covering the areas of :  Energy Transfer in Inelastic and Reactive Scattering  Energy Transfer in Photoinitiated and Unimolecular Reactions  Non-adiabatic Effects in Energy TransferEnergy Transfer at Surfaces and Interfaces  Energy Transfer in Clusters, Droplets, and Aerosols  Energy Transfer in Solution and Solid  Energy Transfer in Complex Systems  Energy Transfer: New vistas and horizons  Molecular Energy Transfer: Where Have We Been and Where are We Going?

  1. A wireless energy transfer platform, integrated at the bedside.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Hans; Puers, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a wireless energy transfer platform, integrated at the bedside. The system contains a matrix of identical inductive power transmitters, which are optimised to provide power to a wearable sensor network, with the purpose of wirelessly recording vital signals over an extended period of time. The magnetic link, operates at a transfer frequency of 6.78MHz and is able to transfer a power of 3.3mW to the remote side at an inter-coil distance of 100mm. The total efficiency of the power link is 26%. Moreover, the platform is able to dynamically determine the position of freely moving sensor nodes and selectively induce a magnetic field in the area where the sensor nodes are positioned. As a result, the patient will not be subjected to unnecessary radiation and the specific absorption rate standards are met more easily.

  2. Regulation control and energy management scheme for wireless power transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, John M.

    2015-12-29

    Power transfer rate at a charging facility can be maximized by employing a feedback scheme. The state of charge (SOC) and temperature of the regenerative energy storage system (RESS) pack of a vehicle is monitored to determine the load due to the RESS pack. An optimal frequency that cancels the imaginary component of the input impedance for the output signal from a grid converter is calculated from the load of the RESS pack, and a frequency offset f* is made to the nominal frequency f.sub.0 of the grid converter output based on the resonance frequency of a magnetically coupled circuit. The optimal frequency can maximize the efficiency of the power transfer. Further, an optimal grid converter duty ratio d* can be derived from the charge rate of the RESS pack. The grid converter duty ratio d* regulates wireless power transfer (WPT) power level.

  3. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Studies of Energy Transfer Dynamics in Antenna Complexes of Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Satoshi

    2001-01-01

    This thesis contains the candidate's original work on excitonic structure and energy transfer dynamics of two bacterial antenna complexes as studied using spectral hole-burning spectroscopy. The general introduction is divided into two chapters (1 and 2). Chapter 1 provides background material on photosynthesis and bacterial antenna complexes with emphasis on the two bacterial antenna systems related to the thesis research. Chapter 2 reviews the underlying principles and mechanism of persistent nonphotochemical hole-burning (NPHB) spectroscopy. Relevant energy transfer theories are also discussed. Chapters 3 and 4 are papers by the candidate that have been published. Chapter 3 describes the application of NPHB spectroscopy to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex from the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii; emphasis is on determination of the low energy vibrational structure that is important for understanding the energy transfer process associated within three lowest energy Qy-states of the complex. The results are compared with those obtained earlier on the FMO complex from Chlorobium tepidum. In Chapter 4, the energy transfer dynamics of the B800 molecules of intact LH2 and B800-deficient LH2 complexes of the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila are compared. New insights on the additional decay channel of the B800 ring of bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules are provided. General conclusions are given in Chapter 5.

  4. Tuning energy transfer in the peridinin-chlorophyll complex by reconstitution with different chlorophylls.

    PubMed

    Polívka, Tomás; Pascher, Torbjörn; Sundström, Villy; Hiller, Roger G

    2005-11-01

    In vitro studies of the carotenoid peridinin, which is the primary pigment from the peridinin chlorophyll-a protein (PCP) light harvesting complex, showed a strong dependence on the lifetime of the peridinin lowest singlet excited state on solvent polarity. This dependence was attributed to the presence of an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state in the peridinin excited state manifold. The ICT state was also suggested to be a crucial factor in efficient peridinin to Chl-a energy transfer in the PCP complex. Here we extend our studies of peridinin dynamics to reconstituted PCP complexes, in which Chl-a was replaced by different chlorophyll species (Chl-b, acetyl Chl-a, Chl-d and BChl-a). Reconstitution of PCP with different Chl species maintains the energy transfer pathways within the complex, but the efficiency depends on the chlorophyll species. In the native PCP complex, the peridinin S1/ICT state has a lifetime of 2.7 ps, whereas in reconstituted PCP complexes it is 5.9 ps (Chl-b) 2.9 ps (Chl-a), 2.2 ps (acetyl Chl-a), 1.9 ps (Chl-d), and 0.45 ps (BChl-a). Calculation of energy transfer rates using the Förster equation explains the differences in energy transfer efficiency in terms of changing spectral overlap between the peridinin emission and the absorption spectrum of the acceptor. It is proposed that the lowest excited state of peridinin is a strongly coupled S1/ICT state, which is the energy donor for the major energy transfer channel. The significant ICT character of the S1/ICT state in PCP enhances the transition dipole moment of the S1/ICT state, facilitating energy transfer to chlorophyll via the Förster mechanism. In addition to energy transfer via the S1/ICT, there is also energy transfer via the S2 and hot S1/ICT states to chlorophyll in all reconstituted PCP complexes.

  5. [INVITED] Laser-induced forward transfer: A high resolution additive manufacturing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaporte, Philippe; Alloncle, Anne-Patricia

    2016-04-01

    Among the additive manufacturing techniques, laser-induced forward transfer addresses the challenges of printing thin films in solid phase or small volume droplets in liquid phase with very high resolution. This paper reviews the physics of this process and explores the pros and cons of this technology versus other digital printing technologies. The main field of applications are printed electronics, organic electronics and tissue engineering, and the most promising short terms ones concern digital laser printing of sensors and conductive tracks. Future directions and emerging areas of interest are discussed such as printing solid from a liquid phase and 3D digital nanomanufacturing.

  6. Fluorescence energy transfer studies on the macrophage scavenger receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, Angelique Y.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Berns, Michael W.

    1994-08-01

    The macrophage scavenger receptor is a transmembrane, trimeric glycoprotein which recognizes a number of negatively charged ligands. Cross competition studies of various ligands indicate that the scavenger receptor may bear more than one type of binding site or that there may be more than one type of receptor. In this study we employed resonance energy transfer techniques to identify the location of the binding site for maleylated bovine serum albumin. Using vesicles derived from plasma membrane, we labeled the ligand with a donor probe and labeled the membrane surface with acceptor probes to determine the distance of bound ligand from the membrane surface. Measurements were taken with three different donor-acceptor pairs. Transfer measurements for ligand labeled with dansyl and HAE (hexadecanoylaminoeosin) as the acceptor yielded a distance of 47 angstrom from the surface of the plasma membrane. Similar measurements employing the same donors but using ORB (octadecylrhodamine B) as the acceptor produced a distance of 58 angstrom. Assuming that the receptor extends perpendicularly from the cell surface this distance lies within the two receptor `domains' closest to the cell surface. These domains include the spacer region, with no distinct proposed structure and a region which has sequence similarity to an alpha helical coiled coil. No transfer was observed between ligand monolabeled with fluorescein and DiI in the membrane. This suggests that the orientation of mal-BSA bound to receptor places the fluorescein probe too far from acceptor on the membrane surface to experience energy transfer.

  7. Energy transfer and dual cascade in kinetic magnetized plasma turbulence.

    PubMed

    Plunk, G G; Tatsuno, T

    2011-04-22

    The question of how nonlinear interactions redistribute the energy of fluctuations across available degrees of freedom is of fundamental importance in the study of turbulence and transport in magnetized weakly collisional plasmas, ranging from space settings to fusion devices. In this Letter, we present a theory for the dual cascade found in such plasmas, which predicts a range of new behavior that distinguishes this cascade from that of neutral fluid turbulence. These phenomena are explained in terms of the constrained nature of spectral transfer in nonlinear gyrokinetics. Accompanying this theory are the first observations of these phenomena, obtained via direct numerical simulations using the gyrokinetic code AstroGK. The basic mechanisms that are found provide a framework for understanding the turbulent energy transfer that couples scales both locally and nonlocally.

  8. Modelling excitonic-energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Tobias; Kreisbeck, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental study of energy transfer in photosynthesis has revealed an interesting transport regime, which lies at the borderline between classical transport dynamics and quantum-mechanical interference effects. Dissipation is caused by the coupling of electronic degrees of freedom to vibrational modes and leads to a directional energy transfer from the antenna complex to the target reaction-center. The dissipative driving is robust and does not rely on fine-tuning of specific vibrational modes. For the parameter regime encountered in the biological systems new theoretical tools are required to directly compare theoretical results with experimental spectroscopy data. The calculations require to utilize massively parallel graphics processor units (GPUs) for efficient and exact computations.

  9. Modelling excitonic-energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Tobias; Kreisbeck, Christoph

    2014-01-08

    The theoretical and experimental study of energy transfer in photosynthesis has revealed an interesting transport regime, which lies at the borderline between classical transport dynamics and quantum-mechanical interference effects. Dissipation is caused by the coupling of electronic degrees of freedom to vibrational modes and leads to a directional energy transfer from the antenna complex to the target reaction-center. The dissipative driving is robust and does not rely on fine-tuning of specific vibrational modes. For the parameter regime encountered in the biological systems new theoretical tools are required to directly compare theoretical results with experimental spectroscopy data. The calculations require to utilize massively parallel graphics processor units (GPUs) for efficient and exact computations.

  10. Resonance energy transfer study of peptide-lipid complexes.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, G; Saito, H; Molotkovsky, J; Tanaka, M; Egashira, M; Nakano, M; Handa, T

    2001-09-18

    Resonance energy transfer involving tryptophan as a donor and anthrylvinyl-labeled phosphatidylcholine (AV-PC), 3-methoxybenzanthrone (MBA) and 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonic acid (ANS) as acceptors has been examined to obtain information on the structure of peptide-lipid systems consisting of 18A or Ac-18A-NH(2) peptides and large unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles. The lower and upper limits for the tryptophan distance from the bilayer midplane have been assessed in terms of the models of energy transfer in two-dimensional systems, taking into account orientational effects. Evidence for the existence of preferential orientations of Ac-18A-NH(2) with respect to the lipid-water interface has been obtained.

  11. Energy release and transfer in guide field reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    2010-01-15

    Properties of energy release and transfer by magnetic reconnection in the presence of a guide field are investigated on the basis of 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Two initial configurations are considered: a plane current sheet with a uniform guide field of 80% of the reconnecting magnetic field component and a force-free current sheet in which the magnetic field strength is constant but the field direction rotates by 180 deg. through the current sheet. The onset of reconnection is stimulated by localized, temporally limited compression. Both MHD and PIC simulations consistently show that the outgoing energy fluxes are dominated by (redirected) Poynting flux and enthalpy flux, whereas bulk kinetic energy flux and heat flux (in the PIC simulation) are small. The Poynting flux is mainly associated with the magnetic energy of the guide field which is carried from inflow to outflow without much alteration. The conversion of annihilated magnetic energy to enthalpy flux (that is, thermal energy) stems mainly from the fact that the outflow occurs into a closed field region governed by approximate force balance between Lorentz and pressure gradient forces. Therefore, the energy converted from magnetic to kinetic energy by Lorentz force acceleration becomes immediately transferred to thermal energy by the work done by the pressure gradient force. Strong similarities between late stages of MHD and PIC simulations result from the fact that conservation of mass and entropy content and footpoint displacement of magnetic flux tubes, imposed in MHD, are also approximately satisfied in the PIC simulations.

  12. Response of silicon-Based Linear Energy Transfer Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aman, A.; Bman, B.; Badhwar, G. D.; ONeill, P. M. O.

    2000-01-01

    Silicon-based linear energy transfer (LET) telescope,(e. g., DOSTEL and RRMD) have recently been flown in space. LET spectra measured using tissue equivalent proportional counters show differences that need to be fully understood. A Monte Carlo technique based on: 1. radiation transport cluster intra-cascade model. 2. Landau-Vavilov distribution, 3. telescope geometry and detector coincidence & discriminator settings, 4. spacecraft shielding geometry, and 5. the external free space radiation environment, including recent albedo measurements, was developed.

  13. Modeling coherent excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic light harvesting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Pengfei

    2011-12-01

    Recent non-linear spectroscopy experiments suggest the excitation energy transfer in some biological light harvesting systems initially occurs coherently. Treating such processes brings significant challenge for conventional theoretical tools that usually involve different approximations. In this dissertation, the recently developed Iterative Linearized Density Matrix (ILDM) propagation scheme, which is non-perturbative and non-Markovian is extended to study coherent excitation energy transfer in various light harvesting complexes. It is demonstrated that the ILDM approach can successfully describe the coherent beating of the site populations on model systems and gives quantitative agreement with both experimental results and the results of other theoretical methods have been developed recently to going beyond the usual approximations, thus providing a new reliable theoretical tool to study this phenomenon. This approach is used to investigate the excited energy transfer dynamics in various experimentally studied bacteria light harvesting complexes, such as Fenna-Matthews-Olsen (FMO) complex, Phycocyanin 645 (PC645). In these model calculations, quantitative agreement is found between computed de-coherence times and quantum beating pattens observed in the non-linear spectroscopy. As a result of these studies, it is concluded that the stochastic resonance behavior is important in determining the optimal throughput. To begin addressing possible mechanics for observed long de-coherence time, various models which include correlation between site energy fluctuations as well as correlation between site energy and inter-site coupling are developed. The influence of both types of correlation on the coherence and transfer rate is explored using with a two state system-bath hamiltonian parametrized to model the reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides bacteria. To overcome the disadvantages of a fully reduced approach or a full propagation method, a brownian dynamics

  14. State-to-state dynamics of molecular energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, W.R.; Giese, C.F.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research program is to elucidate the elementary dynamical mechanisms of vibrational and rotational energy transfer between molecules, at a quantum-state resolved level of detail. Molecular beam techniques are used to isolate individual molecular collisions, and to control the kinetic energy of collision. Lasers are used both to prepare specific quantum states prior to collision by stimulated-emission pumping (SEP), and to measure the distribution of quantum states in the collision products by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The results are interpreted in terms of dynamical models, which may be cast in a classical, semiclassical or quantum mechanical framework, as appropriate.

  15. Vibrational Energy Transfer of Diatomic Gases in Hypersonic Expanding Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffin, Stephen Merrick

    In high temperature flows related to vehicles at hypersonic speeds significant excitation of the vibrational energy modes of the gas can occur. Accurate predictions of the vibrational state of the gas and the rates of vibrational energy transfer are essential to achieve optimum engine performance, for design of heat shields, and for studies of ground based hypersonic test facilities. The Landau -Teller relaxation model is widely used because it has been shown to give accurate predictions in vibrationally heating flows such as behind forebody shocks. However, a number of experiments in nozzles have indicated that it fails to accurately predict the rate of energy transfer in expanding, or cooling, flow regions and fails to predict the distribution of energy in the vibrational quantum levels. The present study examines the range of applicability of the Landau -Teller model in expanding flows and develops techniques which provide accurate predictions in expanding flows. In the present study, detailed calculations of the vibrational relaxation process of N_2 and CO in cooling flows are conducted. A coupled set of vibrational transition rate equations and quasi one-dimensional fluid dynamic equations is solved. Rapid anharmonic Vibration-Translation transition rates and Vibration -Vibration exchange collisions are found to be responsible for vibrational relaxation acceleration in situations of high vibrational temperature and low translational temperature. The predictions of the detailed master equation solver are in excellent agreement with experimental results. The exact degree of acceleration is cataloged in this study for N_2 and is found to be a function of both the translational temperature (T) and the ratio of vibrational to translational temperatures (T_{vib}/T). Non-Boltzmann population distributions are observed for values of T _{vib}/T as low as 2.0. The local energy transfer rate is shown to be an order of magnitude or more faster than the Landau-Teller model

  16. Homopolar machine for reversible energy storage and transfer systems

    DOEpatents

    Stillwagon, Roy E.

    1981-01-01

    A homopolar machine designed to operate as a generator and motor in reversibly storing and transferring energy between the machine and a magnetic load coil for a thermo-nuclear reactor. The machine rotor comprises hollow thin-walled cylinders or sleeves which form the basis of the system by utilizing substantially all of the rotor mass as a conductor thus making it possible to transfer substantially all the rotor kinetic energy electrically to the load coil in a highly economical and efficient manner. The rotor is divided into multiple separate cylinders or sleeves of modular design, connected in series and arranged to rotate in opposite directions but maintain the supply of current in a single direction to the machine terminals. A stator concentrically disposed around the sleeves consists of a hollow cylinder having a number of excitation coils each located radially outward from the ends of adjacent sleeves. Current collected at an end of each sleeve by sleeve slip rings and brushes is transferred through terminals to the magnetic load coil. Thereafter, electrical energy returned from the coil then flows through the machine which causes the sleeves to motor up to the desired speed in preparation for repetition of the cycle. To eliminate drag on the rotor between current pulses, the brush rigging is designed to lift brushes from all slip rings in the machine.

  17. Homopolar machine for reversible energy storage and transfer systems

    DOEpatents

    Stillwagon, Roy E.

    1978-01-01

    A homopolar machine designed to operate as a generator and motor in reversibly storing and transferring energy between the machine and a magnetic load coil for a thermo-nuclear reactor. The machine rotor comprises hollow thin-walled cylinders or sleeves which form the basis of the system by utilizing substantially all of the rotor mass as a conductor thus making it possible to transfer substantially all the rotor kinetic energy electrically to the load coil in a highly economical and efficient manner. The rotor is divided into multiple separate cylinders or sleeves of modular design, connected in series and arranged to rotate in opposite directions but maintain the supply of current in a single direction to the machine terminals. A stator concentrically disposed around the sleeves consists of a hollow cylinder having a number of excitation coils each located radially outward from the ends of adjacent sleeves. Current collected at an end of each sleeve by sleeve slip rings and brushes is transferred through terminals to the magnetic load coil. Thereafter, electrical energy returned from the coil then flows through the machine which causes the sleeves to motor up to the desired speed in preparation for repetition of the cycle. To eliminate drag on the rotor between current pulses, the brush rigging is designed to lift brushes from all slip rings in the machine.

  18. Collision Induced Dissociation and Energy Transfer in Molecular Hydroge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandy, Margot E.

    2006-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen is a significant constituent in giant molecular clouds in the interstellar medium. Shocks in these clouds are associated with star formation. The cooling of the shocks is governed by competition of collisional energy transfer and dissociation with radiative cooling by quadrupole emission. Thus a detailed understanding of collisional behaviour of molecular hydrogen is needed. Work in this group has examined energy transfer and dissociation in molecular energy transfer as the result of collisions with H, D, He, and H2. Using quasiclassical trajectories and chemically accurate ab initio potentials state-to-state rate coefficients have been determined. The uncertainties of the cross sections are propagated rigourously to give uncertainties of the rate coefficients and the rate coefficients are parameterized as a function of temperature. Comparisons with quantum calculations are discussed and the proposed website is described.This work was supported by a grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. The calculations were carried out using the high performance computing facility jointly supported by the Canadian Foundation for Innovation, the British Columbia Knowledge Development Fund, and Silicon Graphics at the University of Northern British Columbia.

  19. Resonant energy transfer based biosensor for detection of multivalent proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, X.; Swanson, Basil I.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a new fluorescence-based biosensor for sensitive detection of species involved in a multivslent interaction. The biosensor system utilizes specific interactions between proteins and cell surface receptors, which trigger a receptor aggregation process. Distance-dependent fluorescence self-quenching and resonant energy transfer mechanisms were coupled with a multivalent interaction to probe the receptor aggregation process, providing a sensitive and specific signal transduction method for such a binding event. The fluorescence change induced by the aggregation process can be monitored by different instrument platforms, e.g. fluorimetry and flow cytometry. In this article, a sensitive detection of pentavalent cholera toxin which recognizes ganglioside GM1 has been demonstrated through the resonant energy transfer scheme, which can achieve a double color change simultaneously. A detection sensitivity as high as 10 pM has been achieved within a few minutes (c.a. 5 minutes). The simultaneous double color change (an increase of acceptor fluorescence and a decrease of donor fluorescence intensity) of two similar fluorescent probes provides particularly high detection reliability owing to the fact that they act as each other's internal reference. Any external perturbation such as environmental temperature change causes no significant change in signal generation. Besides the application for biological sensing, the method also provides a useful tool for investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of a multivalent interaction. Keywords: Biosensor, Fluorescence resonant energy transfer, Multivalent interaction, Cholera Toxin, Ganglioside GM1, Signal Transduction

  20. Humic substances enhance chlorothalonil phototransformation via photoreduction and energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Porras, Jazmín; Fernández, Jhon J; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A; Richard, Claire

    2014-02-18

    The photodegradation of chlorothalonil, a polychlorinated aromatic fungicide widely used in agriculture, was investigated under ultraviolet-visible irradiation in the presence and absence of different humic substances that significantly enhance the chlorothalonil phototransformation. On the basis of a kinetic model, an analytical study, the effect of scavengers, the chlorothalonil phosphorescence measurement, and varying irradiation conditions, it was possible to demonstrate that this accelerating effect is due to their capacity to reduce the chlorothalonil triplet state via H-donor reaction and to energy transfer from the triplet humic to ground state chlorothalonil. Energy transfer occurs at wavelengths below 450 nm and accounts for up to 30% of the reaction in deoxygenated medium upon irradiation with polychromatic light (300-450 nm). This process is more important with Elliott humic and fulvic acids and with humic acids extracted from natural carbonaceous material than with Nordic NOM and Pahokee peat humic acids. The obtained results are of high relevance to understanding the processes involved in chlorothalonil phototransformation and the photoreactivity of humic substances. Chlorothalonil is one of the rare molecules shown to react by energy transfer from excited humic substances.

  1. Energy and charge transfer in ionized argon coated water clusters.

    PubMed

    Kočišek, J; Lengyel, J; Fárník, M; Slavíček, P

    2013-12-07

    We investigate the electron ionization of clusters generated in mixed Ar-water expansions. The electron energy dependent ion yields reveal the neutral cluster composition and structure: water clusters fully covered with the Ar solvation shell are formed under certain expansion conditions. The argon atoms shield the embedded (H2O)n clusters resulting in the ionization threshold above ≈15 eV for all fragments. The argon atoms also mediate more complex reactions in the clusters: e.g., the charge transfer between Ar(+) and water occurs above the threshold; at higher electron energies above ~28 eV, an excitonic transfer process between Ar(+)* and water opens leading to new products Ar(n)H(+) and (H2O)(n)H(+). On the other hand, the excitonic transfer from the neutral Ar* state at lower energies is not observed although this resonant process was demonstrated previously in a photoionization experiment. Doubly charged fragments (H2O)(n)H2(2+) and (H2O)(n)(2+) ions are observed and Intermolecular Coulomb decay (ICD) processes are invoked to explain their thresholds. The Coulomb explosion of the doubly charged cluster formed within the ICD process is prevented by the stabilization effect of the argon solvent.

  2. Energy transfer processes in semiconductor quantum dots: bacteriorhodopsin hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovich, Aliaksandra; Sukhanova, Alyona; Bouchonville, Nicolas; Molinari, Michael; Troyon, Michel; Cohen, Jacques H. M.; Rakovich, Yury; Donegan, John F.; Nabiev, Igor

    2009-05-01

    The potential impact of nanoscience on energy transfer processes in biomolecules was investigated on the example of a complex between fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals and photochromic membrane protein. The interactions between colloidal CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and bacteriorhodopsin (bR) protein were studied by a variety of spectroscopic techniques, including integrated and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies, zeta potential and size measurement, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. QDs' luminescence was found to be strongly modulated by bacteriorhodopsin, but in a controllable way. Decreasing emission lifetimes and blue shifts in QDs' emission at increasing protein concentrations suggest that quenching occurs via Förster resonance energy transfer. On the other hand, concave Stern-Volmer plots and sigmoidal photoluminescence quenching curves imply that the self-assembling of NCs and bR exists, and the number of nanocrystals (NCs) per bacteriorhodopsin contributing to energy transfer can be determined from the inflection points of sigmoidal curves. This number was found to be highly dependent not only on the spectral overlap between NC emission and bR absorption bands, but also on nanocrystal surface charge. These results demonstrate the potential of how inorganic nanoscale materials can be employed to improve the generic molecular functions of biomolecules. The observed interactions between CdTe nanocrystals and bacteriorhodopsin can provide the basis for the development of novel functional materials with unique photonic properties and applications in areas such as all-optical switching, photovoltaics and data storage.

  3. Energy and charge transfer in nanoscale hybrid materials.

    PubMed

    Basché, Thomas; Bottin, Anne; Li, Chen; Müllen, Klaus; Kim, Jeong-Hee; Sohn, Byeong-Hyeok; Prabhakaran, Prem; Lee, Kwang-Sup

    2015-06-01

    Hybrid materials composed of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots and π-conjugated organic molecules and polymers have attracted continuous interest in recent years, because they may find applications in bio-sensing, photodetection, and photovoltaics. Fundamental processes occurring in these nanohybrids are light absorption and emission as well as energy and/or charge transfer between the components. For future applications it is mandatory to understand, control, and optimize the wide parameter space with respect to chemical assembly and the desired photophysical properties. Accordingly, different approaches to tackle this issue are described here. Simple organic dye molecules (Dye)/quantum dot (QD) conjugates are studied with stationary and time-resolved spectroscopy to address the dynamics of energy and ultra-fast charge transfer. Micellar as well as lamellar nanostructures derived from diblock copolymers are employed to fine-tune the energy transfer efficiency of QD donor/dye acceptor couples. Finally, the transport of charges through organic components coupled to the quantum dot surface is discussed with an emphasis on functional devices.

  4. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer between Nanoparticles and Nanowires.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro L.; Govorov, Alexander O.

    2008-03-01

    We develop a theoretical model to describe Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) and nanowires (NWs). We obtain an analytical equation in the dipole limit and a numerical solution for the general case. We find that, for FRET between NPs and NW, the transfer time is proportional to 1/d̂5, where d is the distance between NP and NW. The calculated transfer time between CdTe NPs and NWs is 16.9 ns. This number agrees well with the experimental value, 16 ns [1]. We also found good agreement with the experimental data [1] for other NP-NW distances. For a NW material, we explore a semiconductor (CdTe) and metals (Au and Ag) [2]. In a NP-NW bio-conjugate, excitons flow from NPs to a NW and then become collected in a NW. When voltage is applied across a NW, this system is expected to demonstrate enhanced photo-current and photo-voltage responses. The enhancement effect comes from energy channeling from NPs to a NW due to FRET. This system can be used in optoelectronic devices and energy conversion systems. [1] J. Lee, A. O. Govorov, and N. A. Kotov, Nano Letters 5, 2063-2069 (2005). [2] J. Lee, P. Hernandez, J. Lee, A. O. Govorov, and N. A. Kotov, Nature Materials, 6, 291 -- 295 (2007)..

  5. Energy and charge transfer in ionized argon coated water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kočišek, J. E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz Lengyel, J.; Fárník, M. E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz; Slavíček, P. E-mail: michal.farnik@jh-inst.cas.cz

    2013-12-07

    We investigate the electron ionization of clusters generated in mixed Ar-water expansions. The electron energy dependent ion yields reveal the neutral cluster composition and structure: water clusters fully covered with the Ar solvation shell are formed under certain expansion conditions. The argon atoms shield the embedded (H{sub 2}O){sub n} clusters resulting in the ionization threshold above ≈15 eV for all fragments. The argon atoms also mediate more complex reactions in the clusters: e.g., the charge transfer between Ar{sup +} and water occurs above the threshold; at higher electron energies above ∼28 eV, an excitonic transfer process between Ar{sup +}* and water opens leading to new products Ar{sub n}H{sup +} and (H{sub 2}O){sub n}H{sup +}. On the other hand, the excitonic transfer from the neutral Ar* state at lower energies is not observed although this resonant process was demonstrated previously in a photoionization experiment. Doubly charged fragments (H{sub 2}O){sub n}H{sub 2}{sup 2+} and (H{sub 2}O){sub n}{sup 2+} ions are observed and Intermolecular Coulomb decay (ICD) processes are invoked to explain their thresholds. The Coulomb explosion of the doubly charged cluster formed within the ICD process is prevented by the stabilization effect of the argon solvent.

  6. Rotational And Rovibrational Energy Transfer In Electron Collisions With Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thuemmel, Helmar T.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Air flows around a hypervelocity reentry vehicle undergo dissociation, rovibrational excitation and ionization. More specifically the air, initially 80% N2 and 20% O2, in the shock layer consists of species such as N, O, N2, O2, NO, N+, O+, N+, O+, NO+ and 2 free electrons. It was pointed out in multi temperature models'' that the temperature of the rotational energy modes and the gas-kinetic translational temperature are quickly equilibrated by a few collisions and rise rapidly to high temperatures as 50000K before falling off to equilibrium value of 10000K. Contrary, the electronic and vibrational temperatures state energy distributions remain low (less than 15000K) because of the slow equilibration. Electron vibrational energy transfer is thought to play a crucial role in such a ionizing flow regime since chemical reaction rates and dissociation depend strongly on the vibrational temperatures. Modeling of these flowfields in principle require the rovibrational excitation and de-excitation cross section data for average electron energies from threshold up to several eV (leV=11605.4 K). In this lecture we focus on theoretical description of rotational effects i.e. energy transfer of electrons to molecules such that the molecular rotational (vojo goes to voj) or vibrational and rotational (v(sub 0)j(sub 0) goes to vj) states are changed. Excitation and de-excitation of electronic states was discussed in a previous talk at this conference.

  7. Micro-beam friction liner and method of transferring energy

    DOEpatents

    Mentesana, Charles

    2007-07-17

    A micro-beam friction liner adapted to increase performance and efficiency and reduce wear in a piezoelectric motor or actuator or other device using a traveling or standing wave to transfer energy in the form of torque and momentum. The micro-beam friction liner comprises a dense array of micro-beam projections having first ends fixed relative to a rotor and second ends projecting substantially toward a plurality of teeth of a stator, wherein the micro-beam projections are compressed and bent during piezoelectric movement of the stator teeth, thereby storing the energy, and then react against the stator teeth to convert the stored energy stored to rotational energy in the rotor.

  8. Stress relaxation via addition-fragmentation chain transfer in a thiol-ene photopolymerization

    PubMed Central

    Kloxin, Christopher J.; Scott, Timothy F.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2009-01-01

    Allyl sulfide addition-fragmentation chain transfer was employed concurrently with the radical-mediated formation of a thiol-ene network to enable network adaptation and mitigation of polymerization-induced shrinkage stress. This result represents the first demonstration of simultaneous polymerization and network adaptation in covalently crosslinked networks with significant implications for the fabrication of low stress polymer networks. For comparison, analogous networks incorporating propyl sulfide moieties, incapable of addition-fragmentation, were synthesized and evaluated in parallel. At the highest irradiation intensity, the allyl sulfide-containing material demonstrated a more than 75% reduction in the final stress when compared with the propyl sulfide-containing material. Analysis of the conversion evolution revealed that allyl sulfide addition-fragmentation decreased the polymerization rate owing to thiyl radical sequestration. Slow consumption of the allyl sulfide functional group suggests that intramolecular homolytic substitution occurs by a step-wise, rather than concerted, mechanism. Simultaneous stress and conversion measurements demonstrated that the initial stress evolution was identical for both the allyl and propyl sulfide-containing materials but diverged after gelation. While addition-fragmentation chain transfer was found to occur throughout the polymerization, its effect on the stress evolution was concentrated towards the end of polymerization when network rearrangement becomes the dominant mechanism for stress relaxation. Even after the polymerization reaction was completed, the polymerization-induced shrinkage stress in the allyl sulfide-containing material continued to decrease, exhibiting a maximum in the stress evolution and demonstrating the potential for continuing, longer term stress relaxation. PMID:20160931

  9. Energy transfer and constrained simulations in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, Javier

    1993-01-01

    The defining characteristic of turbulent flows is their ability to dissipate energy, even in the limit of zero viscosity. The Euler equations, if constrained in such a way that the velocity derivatives remain bounded, conserve energy. But when they arise as the limit of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations, when the Reynolds number goes to infinity, there is persuasive empirical evidence that the gradients become singular as just the right function of Re for the dissipation to remain non-zero and to approach a well defined limit. It is generally believed that this limiting value of the dissipation is a property of the Euler equations themselves, independent of the particular dissipative mechanism involved, and that it can be normalized with the large scale properties of the turbulent flow (e.g. the kinetic energy per unit volume u'(exp 2)/2, and the integral scale L) without reference to the Reynolds number or to other dissipative quantities. This is usually taken to imply that the low wave number end of the energy spectrum, far from the dissipative range, is also independent of the particular mechanism chosen to dispose of the energy transfer. In the following sections, we present some numerical experiments on the effect of substituting different dissipation models into the truncated Euler equations. We will see that the effect is mainly felt in the 'near dissipation' range of the energy spectrum, but that this range can be quite wide in some cases, contaminating a substantial range of wave numbers. In the process, we will develop a 'practical' approximation to the subgrid energy transfer in isotropic turbulence, and we will gain insight into the structure of the nonlinear interactions among turbulent scales of comparable size, and into the nature of energy backscatter. Some considerations on future research directions are offered at the end.

  10. Heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ben

    The demand for clean and environmentally benign energy resources has been a great concern in the last two decades. To alleviate the associated environmental problems, reduction of the use of fossil fuels by developing more cost-effective renewable energy technologies becomes more and more significant. Among various types of renewable energy sources, solar energy and bioenergy take a great proportion. This dissertation focuses on the heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems, specifically for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) systems in Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants and open-channel algal culture raceways for biofuel production. The first part of this dissertation is the discussion about mathematical modeling, numerical simulation and experimental investigation of solar TES system. First of all, in order to accurately and efficiently simulate the conjugate heat transfer between Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) and filler material in four different solid-fluid TES configurations, formulas of an e?ective heat transfer coe?cient were theoretically developed and presented by extending the validity of Lumped Capacitance Method (LCM) to large Biot number, as well as verifications/validations to this simplified model. Secondly, to provide design guidelines for TES system in CSP plant using Phase Change Materials (PCM), a general storage tank volume sizing strategy and an energy storage startup strategy were proposed using the enthalpy-based 1D transient model. Then experimental investigations were conducted to explore a novel thermal storage material. The thermal storage performances were also compared between this novel storage material and concrete at a temperature range from 400 °C to 500 °C. It is recommended to apply this novel thermal storage material to replace concrete at high operating temperatures in sensible heat TES systems. The second part of this dissertation mainly focuses on the numerical and experimental study of an open-channel algae

  11. Molding resonant energy transfer by colloidal crystal: Dexter transfer and electroluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Urbina, Luis; Kolaric, Branko; Libaers, Wim; Clays, Koen

    2010-05-01

    Building photonic crystals by combination of colloidal ordering and metal sputtering we were able to construct a system sensitive to an electrical field. In corresponding crystals we embedded the Dexter pair (Ir(ppy3) and BAlq) and investigated the influence of the band gap on the resonant energy transfer when the system is excited by light and by an electric field respectively. Our investigations extend applications of photonic crystals into the field of electroluminescence and LED technologies.

  12. Molecular mimicry of photosynthetic energy and electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gust, D.; Moore, T.A.; Moore, A.L. )

    1993-04-01

    Proper application of reaction design considerations can yield artificial photosynthetic devices which credibility mimic the three natural photochemical processes. One approach is to use pigments and electron donors and acceptors related to those found in natural photosynthesis (and thus presumably optimal for that system), but to replace the protein with covalent bonds as an organizing precept. Molecular pentads described herein exemplify the success of this approach. At the heart of these molecules, are two covalently linked synthetic porphyrin moieties (P-P). One of these models for chlorophyll is attached to a carotenoid polyene (C), whereas the other is linked to a rigid diquinone (Q-Q). As discussed later in this paper, excitation of such a pentad is followed by photoinitiated electron transfer steps which ultimately give a C[sup [center dot]+]-P-P-Q-Q[sup [center dot]-] charge-separated state. Depending upon the structure of the pentad and the conditions, these states are formed with quantum yields of up to 0.83, have lifetimes approaching 0.5 ms, and store about one-half of the energy of the exciting singlet state. Related photosynthesis mimics display singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to porphyrins and among porphyrin chromophores, and rapid quenching of porphyrin triplet states by attached carotenoids. How have the structures of these and other successful artificial reaction centers evolved, and what will be the next steps in their development The authors will address these questions from the point of view of photoinitiated electron transfer, and then singlet and triplet energy transfer will briefly be considered. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Low-energy lunar transfers using spatial transit orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yuan; Shan, Jinjun

    2014-03-01

    This paper is concerned with natural and artificial low-energy lunar transfers in three-dimensional space. The main contribution of this paper is that the limitations of the planar manifold assumption, which is adopted in previous low-energy orbit design methods, are avoided by describing the transfer orbits with more realistic spatial transit and non-transit orbits. To start, the limitations of the previous design methods for the low-energy trajectories are highlighted, and the boundaries of the spatial transit orbits, which can enter into or escape from the potential well near the Moon through the L1 or L2 bottleneck regions of the zero velocity surface, are defined on a Poincaré section by using the necessary and sufficient condition of transition. Next, by considering the dominant gravity bodies in different orbit segments the motion near the Moon is analyzed in the Earth-Moon circular restricted three-body problem (CR3BP). For natural celestial bodies, the statistical characteristics of the lunar collision trajectories are studied. For the artificial celestial bodies, the investigation is focused on the achievable range of inclination and height of the low lunar orbit (LLO). Then, the motion between the Earth and the Moon is studied in the Earth-Moon based Sun-perturbed bicircular four-body problem (B4BP). For natural and artificial celestial bodies, the Earth-origin trajectories and the trajectories from the low Earth orbits are analyzed. Compared to the current planar manifold based design methods, the technique introduced in this paper can evaluate the lunar transfer orbits more accurately. Also, some lunar transfer trajectories which do not exist in the manifold based models can be found, and the heights and inclinations of the parking orbits around the Earth and the Moon can also be analyzed.

  14. Vibrational energy transfer dynamics in ruthenium polypyridine transition metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Fedoseeva, Marina; Delor, Milan; Parker, Simon C; Sazanovich, Igor V; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W; Weinstein, Julia A

    2015-01-21

    Understanding the dynamics of the initial stages of vibrational energy transfer in transition metal complexes is a challenging fundamental question which is also of crucial importance for many applications, such as improving the performance of solar devices or photocatalysis. The present study investigates vibrational energy transport in the ground and the electronic excited state of Ru(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2-bpy)2(NCS)2, a close relative of the efficient "N3" dye used in dye-sensitized solar cells. Using the emerging technique of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, we show that, similarly to other transition-metal complexes, the central Ru heavy atom acts as a "bottleneck" making the energy transfer from small ligands with high energy vibrational stretching frequencies less favorable and thereby affecting the efficiency of vibrational energy flow in the complex. Comparison of the vibrational relaxation times in the electronic ground and excited state of Ru(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2-bpy)2(NCS)2 shows that it is dramatically faster in the latter. We propose to explain this observation by the intramolecular electrostatic interactions between the thiocyanate group and partially oxidised Ru metal center, which increase the degree of vibrational coupling between CN and Ru-N modes in the excited state thus reducing structural and thermodynamic barriers that slow down vibrational relaxation and energy transport in the electronic ground state. As a very similar behavior was earlier observed in another transition-metal complex, Re(4,4'-(COOEt)2-2,2'-bpy)(CO)3Cl, we suggest that this effect in vibrational energy dynamics might be common for transition-metal complexes with heavy central atoms.

  15. Extended Fluorescent Resonant Energy Transfer in DNA Constructs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Taeseok

    This study investigates the use of surfactants and metal cations for the enhancement of long range fluorescent resonant energy transfer (FRET) and the antenna effect in DNA structures with multiple fluorescent dyes. Double-stranded (ds) DNA structures were formed by hybridization of 21mer DNA oligonucleotides with different arrangements of three fluorescent TAMRA donor dyes with two different complementary 21mer oligonucleotides with one fluorescent TexasRed acceptor dye. In such DNA structures, hydrophobic interactions between the fluorescent dyes in close proximity produces dimerization which along with other quenching mechanisms leads to significant reduction of fluorescent emission properties. Addition of the surfactants Triton X-100, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) along with sodium cations (Na+) and divalent magnesium cations (Mg 2+) were tested for their ability to reduce quenching of the fluorescent dyes and improve overall fluorescent emission, the long range FRET and the antenna effect properties. When the neutral (uncharged) surfactant Triton X-100 was added to the FRET ds-DNA hybrid structures with three TAMRA donors and one TexasRed acceptor, dye dimerization and emission quenching remained unaffected. However, for the positively charged CTAB surfactant at concentrations of 100 uM or higher, the neutralization of the negatively charged ds-DNA backbone by the cationic surfactant micelles was found to reduce TAMRA dye dimerization and emission quenching and improve TexasRed quantum yield, resulting in much higher FRET efficiencies and an enhanced antenna effect. This improvement is likely due to the CTAB molecules covering or sheathing the fluorescent donor and acceptor dyes which breaks up the dimerized dye complexes and prevents further quenching from interactions with water molecules and guanine bases in the DNA structure. While the negatively charged SDS surfactant alone was not able to reduce dimerization and

  16. Excitation energy transfer in covalently bonded porphyrin heterodimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschenko, V. Z.; Konovalova, N. V.; Bagdashkin, A. L.; Gorokhov, V. V.; Tusov, V. B.; Yuzhakov, V. I.

    2012-04-01

    We describe the photophysical properties of heterodimers that are formed by the free base 2-(2-carboxyvinyl)-5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin and the zinc complex of 5-( p-aminophenyl)-10,15,20-triphenylporphyrin and that are covalently bonded by the amide link. These dimers differ in the configuration of the double bond in the spacer group. We determine fluorescence quantum yields of heterodimers and their porphyrin components. The energy transfer rate constants have been estimated from the measured fluorescence lifetimes and fluorescence excitation spectra and, also, they have been calculated from the steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectra according to the Förster theory. We have found that the efficiency of the intramolecular energy transfer in heterodimers is 0.97-0.99, and the energy migration rate constants have been found to be (1.82-4.49) × 1010 s-1. The results of our investigation show that synthesized heterodimers can be used as efficient light-harvesting elements in solar energy conversion devices.

  17. Gamma-ray transfer and energy deposition in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.; Sutherland, Peter G.; Harkness, Robert P.

    1995-01-01

    Solutions to the energy-independent (gray) radiative transfer equations are compared to results of Monte Carlo simulations of the Ni-56 and Co-56 decay gamma-ray energy deposition in supernovae. The comparison shows that an effective, purely absorptive, gray opacity, kappa(sub gamma) approximately (0. 06 +/- 0.01)Y(sub e) sq cm/g, where Y is the total number of electrons per baryon, accurately describes the interaction of gamma-rays with the cool supernova gas and the local gamma-ray energy deposition within the gas. The nature of the gamma-ray interaction process (dominated by Compton scattering in the relativistic regime) creates a weak dependence of kappa(sub gamma) on the optical thickness of the (spherically symmetric) supernova atmosphere: The maximum value of kappa(sub gamma) applies during optically thick conditions when individual gamma-rays undergo multiple scattering encounters and the lower bound is reached at the phase characterized by a total Thomson optical depth to the center of the atmosphere tau(sub e) approximately less than 1. Gamma-ray deposition for Type Ia supernova models to within 10% for the epoch from maximum light to t = 1200 days. Our results quantitatively confirm that the quick and efficient solution to the gray transfer problem provides an accurate representation of gamma-ray energy deposition for a broad range of supernova conditions.

  18. Firefly Luciferase-Based Sequential Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET)-Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) Protease Assays.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    We describe here the preparation of ratiometric luminescent probes that contain two well-separated emission peaks produced by a sequential bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. The probes are single soluble fusion proteins consisting of a thermostable firefly luciferase variant that catalyzes yellow-green (560 nm maximum) bioluminescence and a red fluorescent protein covalently labeled with a near-Infrared fluorescent dye. The two proteins are connected by a decapeptide containing a protease recognition site specific for factor Xa, thrombin, or caspase 3. The rates of protease cleavage of the fusion protein substrates were monitored by recording emission spectra and plotting the change in peak ratios over time. Detection limits of 0.41 nM for caspase 3, 1.0 nM for thrombin, and 58 nM for factor Xa were realized with a scanning fluorometer. This method successfully employs an efficient sequential BRET-FRET energy transfer process based on firefly luciferase bioluminescence to assay physiologically important protease activities and should be generally applicable to the measurement of any endoprotease lacking accessible cysteine residues.

  19. Neutral gas temperature estimates and metastable resonance energy transfer for argon-nitrogen discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Greig, A. Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.

    2016-01-15

    Rovibrational spectroscopy band fitting of the nitrogen (N{sub 2}) second positive system is a technique used to estimate the neutral gas temperature of N{sub 2} discharges, or atomic discharges with trace amounts of a N{sub 2} added. For mixtures involving argon and N{sub 2}, resonant energy transfer between argon metastable atoms (Ar*) and N{sub 2} molecules may affect gas temperature estimates made using the second positive system. The effect of Ar* resonance energy transfer is investigated here by analyzing neutral gas temperatures of argon-N{sub 2} mixtures, for N{sub 2} percentages from 1% to 100%. Neutral gas temperature estimates are higher than expected for mixtures involving greater than 5% N{sub 2} addition, but are reasonable for argon with less than 5% N{sub 2} addition when compared with an analytic model for ion-neutral charge exchange collisional heating. Additional spatiotemporal investigations into neutral gas temperature estimates with 10% N{sub 2} addition demonstrate that although absolute temperature values may be affected by Ar* resonant energy transfer, spatiotemporal trends may still be used to accurately diagnose the discharge.

  20. Optimal aeroassisted coplanar orbital transfer using an energy model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, Nesim; Taylor, Deborah B.

    1989-01-01

    The atmospheric portion of the trajectories for the aeroassisted coplanar orbit transfer was investigated. The equations of motion for the problem are expressed using reduced order model and total vehicle energy, kinetic plus potential, as the independent variable rather than time. The order reduction is achieved analytically without an approximation of the vehicle dynamics. In this model, the problem of coplanar orbit transfer is seen as one in which a given amount of energy must be transferred from the vehicle to the atmosphere during the trajectory without overheating the vehicle. An optimal control problem is posed where a linear combination of the integrated square of the heating rate and the vehicle drag is the cost function to be minimized. The necessary conditions for optimality are obtained. These result in a 4th order two-point-boundary-value problem. A parametric study of the optimal guidance trajectory in which the proportion of the heating rate term versus the drag varies is made. Simulations of the guidance trajectories are presented.

  1. Disk-to-disk transfer as the rate-limiting step for energy flow in phycobilisomes

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, A.N.; Yeh, S.W.; Webb, S.P.; Clark, J.H.

    1985-01-25

    A broadly tunable picosecond laser source and an ultrafast streak camera were used to measure temporally and spectrally resolved emission from intact phycobilisomes and from individual phycobiliproteins as a function of excitation wavelength. Both wild-type and mutant phycobilisomes of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6701 were examined, as well as two biliproteins, R-phycoerythrin (240 kilodaltons, 34 bilins) and allophycocyanin (100 kilodaltons, 6 bilins). Measurements of intact phycobilisomes with known structural differences showed that the addition of an average of 1.6 phycoerythrin disks in the phycobilisome rod increased the overall energy transfer time by 30 +/- 5 picoseconds. In the isolated phycobiliproteins the onset of emission was as prompt as that of a solution of rhodamine B laser dye and was independent of excitation wavelength. This imposes an upper limit of 8 picoseconds (instrument-limited) on the transfer time from sensitizing to fluorescing chromophores in these biliproteins. These results indicate that disk-to-disk transfer is the slowest energy transfer process in phycobilisomes and, in combination with previous structural analyses, show that with respect to energy transfer the lattice of approximately 625 light-harvesting chromophores in the Synechocystis 6701 wild-type phycobilisome functions as a linear five-point array.

  2. Preliminary investigation into the design of thermally responsive Forster resonance energy transfer colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, Monte Scott

    While nuclear imaging techniques (Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Computed Tomography, and Positron Emission Tomography) have proven effective for diagnosis and treatment of disease in the human body, fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging offers additional benefits. Fluorescent imaging provides high resolution with real-time response, persistent lifetime (hours to days), cell targeting, and transdermal penetration with minimal physical encumbrance. Malignant cells can be targeted by absorbance of exogenous fluorescent nanoprobe contrast agents. Imaging is improved by fluorescent enhancement, especially by energy transfer between attached dyes. Also for use against cancer are heat-active treatments, such as hyperthermal, photothermal, and chemothermal therapies. Helpful to these treatments is the thermal response from nanoprobes, within human cells, which provide real-time feedback. The present study investigates the design and feasibility of a nanoprobe molecular device, absorbable into malignant human cells, which provides real-time tracking and thermal response, as indicated by enhanced fluorescence by energy transfer. A poly(propargyl acrylate) colloidal suspension was synthesized. The particles were modified with a triblock copolymer, previously shown to be thermally responsive, and an end-attached fluorescent dye. A second dye was modeled for attachment in subsequent work. When two fluorescent dyes are brought within sufficiently close proximity, and excitation light is supplied, energy can be transferred between dyes to give enhanced fluorescence with a large Stokes shift (increase in wavelength between excitation and emission). The dye pair was modeled for overlap of emission and absorbance wavelengths, and energy transfer was demonstrated with 23% efficiency and a 209 nm Stokes shift. The quantum yield of the donor dye was determined at 70%, and the distance for 50% energy transfer was calculated at 2.9 nm, consistent with reports for similar compounds. When

  3. Information systems and technology transfer programs on geothermal energy and other renewable sources of energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.; Antunez, E.

    1996-01-01

    In order to remain competitive, it is necessary to stay informed and use the most advanced technologies available. Recent developments in communication, like the Internet and the World Wide Web, enormously facilitate worldwide data and technology transfer. A compilation of the most important sources of data on renewable energies, especially geothermal, as well as lists of relevant technology transfer programs are presented. Information on how to gain access to, and learn more about them, is also given.

  4. Information systems and technology transfer programs on geothermal energy and other renewable sources of energy

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, Marcelo J.; Antunez, Emilio u.

    1996-01-24

    In order to remain competitive it is necessary to stay informed and use the most advanced technologies available. Recent developments in communication, like the Internet and the World Wide Web, enormously facilitate worldwide data and technology transfer. A compilation of the most important sources of data on renewable energies, especially geothermal, as well as lists of relevant technology transfer programs are presented. Information on how to gain access to, and learn more about them is also given.

  5. Modulating the electronic structure of chromophores by chemical substituents for efficient energy transfer: application to fluorone.

    PubMed

    Sand, Andrew M; Liu, Claire; Valentine, Andrew J S; Mazziotti, David A

    2014-08-07

    Strong electron correlation within a quasi-spin model of chromophores was recently shown to enhance exciton energy transfer significantly. Here we investigate how the modulation of the electronic structure of the chromophores by chemical substitution can enhance energy-transfer efficiency. Unlike previous work that does not consider the direct effect of the electronic structure on exciton dynamics, we add chemical substituents to the fluorone dimer to study the effect of electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituents on exciton energy transfer. The exciton dynamics are studied from the solution of a quantum Liouville equation for an open system whose model Hamiltonian is derived from excited-state electronic structure calculations. Both van der Waals energies and coupling energies, arising from the Hellmann-Feynman force generated upon transferring the dimers from infinity to a finite separation, are built into the model Hamiltonian. Though these two effects are implicitly treated in dipole-based models, their explicit and separate treatment as discussed here is critical to forging the correct connection with the electronic structure calculations. We find that the addition of electron-donating substituents to the fluorone system results in an increase in exciton-transfer rates by factors ranging from 1.3-1.9. The computed oscillator strength is consistent with the recent experimental results on a larger heterodimer system containing fluorone. The oscillator strength increases with the addition of electron-donating substituents. Our results indicate that the study of chromophore networks via electronic structure will help in the future design of efficient synthetic light-harvesting systems.

  6. Rotational Energy Transfer and Collisional Induced Raman Linewidths in N2 Gas. 1; Energy Transfer Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Green, Sheldon; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Rotationally inelastic transitions of N2 have been studied in the coupled state (CS) and infinite-order-sudden (IOS) approximations, using the N2-N2 rigidrotor potential of van der Avoird et al. For benchmarking purposes, close coupling (CC) calculations have also been carried out over a limited energy range. The CC and CS cross sections have been obtained both with and without identical molecule exchange symmetry, whereas exchange was neglected in the IOS calculations. The CS results track the CC cross sections rather well; between 113 - 219 cm(exp -1) the average deviation is 14%. Comparison between the CS and IOS cross sections at the high energy end of the CS calculation, 500 - 680 cm(exp -1), shows that IOS is sensitive to the amount of inelasticity and the results for large DELTA J transitions are subject to larger errors. It is found that the state-to-state cross sections with even and odd exchange symmetry agree to better than 2% and are well represented as a sum of direct and exchange cross sections for distinguishable molecules, an indication of the applicability of a classical treatment for this system. This result, however, does not apply to partial cross sections for given total J, but arises from a near cancellation in summing over partial waves. In order to use rigid-rotor results for the calculation of effective rotational excitation rates of N2 in the v=1 vibrational level colliding with bath N2 molecules in the v=0 level, it is assumed that exchange scattering between molecules in different vibrational levels is negligible and direct scattering is independent of Y. Good agreement with room temperature experimental data is obtained. The effective rates determined using the IOS and energy corrected sudden (ECS) approximations are also in reasonable agreement with experiment, with the ECS results being somewhat better. The problem with a degeneracy factor in earlier cross section expressions for collisions between identical molecules is pointed out

  7. Energy migration and energy transfer processes in RE3+ doped nanocrystalline yttrium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutsenko, A. B.; Heber, J.; Kapphan, S. E.; Demirbilek, R.; Zakharchenya, R. I.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the dynamics of energy transfer processes involving lanthanide ions in the nanocrystalline matrix of Y2O3. A set of Yb3+ and Er3+ co-doped Y2O3 powder samples consisting of crystalline particles of nanometer size in a range of 15-90 nm with low size dispersion were prepared by multistage sol-gel technology (J. Sol-Gel Sci. Technol. 21, 135 (2001). [1]). The energy transfer phenomena were studied by means of time-resolved spectroscopy, which allows to measure fluorescence response selectively for donors (Yb3+) and acceptor (Er3+) ions after flash optical excitation. The experimental results can be fitted well by the diffusion-limited energy transfer model.

  8. Excitation energy transfer in vitro between phycobiliproteins and thylakoid photosystem II of higher plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaonan; Tseng, C. K.

    1992-12-01

    The excitation energy transfer from phycobiliproteins to thylakoid PSII of higher plants was investigated. When incubated with spinach thylakoids, phycobiliproteins isolated from red and blue-green algae transferred light energy absorbed to spinach PSII. The efficiency of energy transfer was dependent on the kind of phycobiliproteins used. If spinach thylakoids were replaced by the thylakoids of Brassica chinensis, R-phycoerythin or C-phycocyanin did not transfer their excitation energy to PSII of Brassica chinensis unless allophycocyanin was present.

  9. Energy Transfer Sensitization of Luminescent Gold Nanoclusters: More than Just the Classical Förster Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Eunkeu; Huston, Alan L.; Shabaev, Andrew; Efros, Alexander; Currie, Marc; Susumu, Kimihiro; Bussmann, Konrad; Goswami, Ramasis; Fatemi, Fredrik K.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2016-10-01

    Luminescent gold nanocrystals (AuNCs) are a recently-developed material with potential optic, electronic and biological applications. They also demonstrate energy transfer (ET) acceptor/sensitization properties which have been ascribed to Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and, to a lesser extent, nanosurface energy transfer (NSET). Here, we investigate AuNC acceptor interactions with three structurally/functionally-distinct donor classes including organic dyes, metal chelates and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). Donor quenching was observed for every donor-acceptor pair although AuNC sensitization was only observed from metal-chelates and QDs. FRET theory dramatically underestimated the observed energy transfer while NSET-based damping models provided better fits but could not reproduce the experimental data. We consider additional factors including AuNC magnetic dipoles, density of excited-states, dephasing time, and enhanced intersystem crossing that can also influence ET. Cumulatively, data suggests that AuNC sensitization is not by classical FRET or NSET and we provide a simplified distance-independent ET model to fit such experimental data.

  10. Energy Transfer Sensitization of Luminescent Gold Nanoclusters: More than Just the Classical Förster Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Eunkeu; Huston, Alan L.; Shabaev, Andrew; Efros, Alexander; Currie, Marc; Susumu, Kimihiro; Bussmann, Konrad; Goswami, Ramasis; Fatemi, Fredrik K.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent gold nanocrystals (AuNCs) are a recently-developed material with potential optic, electronic and biological applications. They also demonstrate energy transfer (ET) acceptor/sensitization properties which have been ascribed to Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and, to a lesser extent, nanosurface energy transfer (NSET). Here, we investigate AuNC acceptor interactions with three structurally/functionally-distinct donor classes including organic dyes, metal chelates and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). Donor quenching was observed for every donor-acceptor pair although AuNC sensitization was only observed from metal-chelates and QDs. FRET theory dramatically underestimated the observed energy transfer while NSET-based damping models provided better fits but could not reproduce the experimental data. We consider additional factors including AuNC magnetic dipoles, density of excited-states, dephasing time, and enhanced intersystem crossing that can also influence ET. Cumulatively, data suggests that AuNC sensitization is not by classical FRET or NSET and we provide a simplified distance-independent ET model to fit such experimental data. PMID:27774984

  11. Efficient quantum dot-quantum dot and quantum dot-dye energy transfer in biotemplated assemblies.

    PubMed

    Achermann, Marc; Jeong, Sohee; Balet, Laurent; Montano, Gabriel A; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A

    2011-03-22

    CdSe semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots are assembled into nanowire-like arrays employing microtubule fibers as nanoscale molecular "scaffolds." Spectrally and time-resolved energy-transfer analysis is used to assess the assembly of the nanoparticles into the hybrid inorganic biomolecular structure. Specifically, we demonstrate that a comprehensive study of energy transfer between quantum dot pairs on the biotemplate and, alternatively, between quantum dots and molecular dyes embedded in the microtubule scaffold comprises a powerful spectroscopic tool for evaluating the assembly process. In addition to revealing the extent to which assembly has occurred, the approach allows determination of particle-to-particle (and particle-to-dye) distances within the biomediated array. Significantly, the characterization is realized in situ, without need for further sample workup or risk of disturbing the solution-phase constructs. Furthermore, we find that the assemblies prepared in this way exhibit efficient quantum dot-quantum dot and quantum dot-dye energy transfer that affords faster energy-transfer rates compared to densely packed quantum dot arrays on planar substrates and to small-molecule-mediated quantum dot-dye couples, respectively.

  12. Energy transfer in mesoscopic vibrational systems enabled by eigenfrequency fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atalaya, Juan

    Energy transfer between low-frequency vibrational modes can be achieved by means of nonlinear coupling if their eigenfrequencies fulfill certain nonlinear resonance conditions. Because of the discreteness of the vibrational spectrum at low frequencies, such conditions may be difficult to satisfy for most low-frequency modes in typical mesoscopic vibrational systems. Fluctuations of the vibrational eigenfrequencies can also be relatively strong in such systems. We show that energy transfer between modes can occur in the absence of nonlinear resonance if frequency fluctuations are allowed. The case of three modes with cubic nonlinear coupling and no damping is particularly interesting. It is found that the system has a non-thermal equilibrium state which depends only on the initial conditions. The rate at which the system approaches to such state is determined by the parameters such as the noise strength and correlation time, the nonlinearity strength and the detuning from exact nonlinear resonance. We also discuss the case of many weakly coupled modes. Our results shed light on the problem of energy relaxation of low-frequency vibrational modes into the continuum of high-frequency vibrational modes. The results have been obtained with Mark Dykman. Alternative email: jatalaya2012@gmail.com.

  13. Transfer of mechanical energy during the shot put.

    PubMed

    Błażkiewicz, Michalina; Łysoń, Barbara; Chmielewski, Adam; Wit, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse transfer of mechanical energy between body segments during the glide shot put. A group of eight elite throwers from the Polish National Team was analysed in the study. Motion analysis of each throw was recorded using an optoelectronic Vicon system composed of nine infrared camcorders and Kistler force plates. The power and energy were computed for the phase of final acceleration of the glide shot put. The data were normalized with respect to time using the algorithm of the fifth order spline and their values were interpolated with respect to the percentage of total time, assuming that the time of the final weight acceleration movement was different for each putter. Statistically significant transfer was found in the study group between the following segments: Right Knee - Right Hip (p = 0.0035), Left Hip - Torso (p = 0.0201), Torso - Right Shoulder (p = 0.0122) and Right Elbow - Right Wrist (p = 0.0001). Furthermore, the results of cluster analysis showed that the kinetic chain used during the final shot acceleration movement had two different models. Differences between the groups were revealed mainly in the energy generated by the hips and trunk.

  14. Entanglement versus energy in the entanglement transfer problem

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalcanti, Daniel; Oliveira, J. G. Jr.; Santos, Marcelo Franca; Peixoto de Faria, J. G.; Terra Cunha, Marcelo O.

    2006-10-15

    We study the relation between energy and entanglement in an entanglement transfer problem. We first analyze the general setup of two entangled qubits ('a' and 'b') exchanging this entanglement with two other independent qubits ('A' and 'B'). Qubit 'a' ('b') interacts with qubit 'A' ('B') via a spin-exchange-like unitary evolution. A physical realization of this scenario could be the problem of two-level atoms transferring entanglement to resonant cavities via independent Jaynes-Cummings interactions. We study the dynamics of entanglement and energy for the second pair of qubits (tracing out the originally entangled ones) and show that these quantities are closely related. For example, the allowed quantum states occupy a restricted area in a phase diagram entanglement vs energy. Moreover, the curve which bounds this area is exactly the one followed if both interactions are equal and the entire four qubit system is isolated. We also consider the case when the target pair of qubits is subjected to losses and can spontaneously decay.

  15. Transfer of mechanical energy during the shot put

    PubMed Central

    Łysoń, Barbara; Chmielewski, Adam; Wit, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to analyse transfer of mechanical energy between body segments during the glide shot put. A group of eight elite throwers from the Polish National Team was analysed in the study. Motion analysis of each throw was recorded using an optoelectronic Vicon system composed of nine infrared camcorders and Kistler force plates. The power and energy were computed for the phase of final acceleration of the glide shot put. The data were normalized with respect to time using the algorithm of the fifth order spline and their values were interpolated with respect to the percentage of total time, assuming that the time of the final weight acceleration movement was different for each putter. Statistically significant transfer was found in the study group between the following segments: Right Knee – Right Hip (p = 0.0035), Left Hip - Torso (p = 0.0201), Torso – Right Shoulder (p = 0.0122) and Right Elbow – Right Wrist (p = 0.0001). Furthermore, the results of cluster analysis showed that the kinetic chain used during the final shot acceleration movement had two different models. Differences between the groups were revealed mainly in the energy generated by the hips and trunk. PMID:28149401

  16. Boosting infrared energy transfer in 3D nanoporous gold antennas.

    PubMed

    Garoli, D; Calandrini, E; Bozzola, A; Ortolani, M; Cattarin, S; Barison, S; Toma, A; De Angelis, F

    2017-01-05

    The applications of plasmonics to energy transfer from free-space radiation to molecules are currently limited to the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum due to the intrinsic optical properties of bulk noble metals that support strong electromagnetic field confinement only close to their plasma frequency in the visible/ultraviolet range. In this work, we show that nanoporous gold can be exploited as a plasmonic material for the mid-infrared region to obtain strong electromagnetic field confinement, co-localized with target molecules into the nanopores and resonant with their vibrational frequency. The effective optical response of the nanoporous metal enables the penetration of optical fields deep into the nanopores, where molecules can be loaded thus achieving a more efficient light-matter coupling if compared to bulk gold. In order to realize plasmonic resonators made of nanoporous gold, we develop a nanofabrication method based on polymeric templates for metal deposition and we obtain antenna arrays resonating at mid-infrared wavelengths selected by design. We then coat the antennas with a thin (3 nm) silica layer acting as the target dielectric layer for optical energy transfer. We study the strength of the light-matter coupling at the vibrational absorption frequency of silica at 1240 cm(-1) through the analysis of the experimental Fano lineshape that is benchmarked against identical structures made of bulk gold. The boost in the optical energy transfer from free-space mid-infrared radiation to molecular vibrations in nanoporous 3D nanoantenna arrays can open new application routes for plasmon-enhanced physical-chemical reactions.

  17. Energy transfer dynamics in an RC-LH1-PufX tubular photosynthetic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsin, J.; Strümpfer, J.; Şener, M.; Qian, P.; Hunter, C. N.; Schulten, K.

    2010-08-01

    Light absorption and the subsequent transfer of excitation energy are the first two steps in the photosynthetic process, carried out by protein-bound pigments, mainly bacteriochlorophylls (BChls), in photosynthetic bacteria. BChls are anchored in light-harvesting (LH) complexes, such as light-harvesting complex I (LH1), which directly associates with the reaction center (RC), forming the RC-LH1 core complex. In Rhodobacter sphaeroides, RC-LH1 core complexes contain an additional protein, PufX, and assemble into dimeric RC-LH1-PufX core complexes. In the absence of LH complex II (LH2), the former complexes can aggregate into a helically ordered tubular photosynthetic membrane. We have examined the excitation transfer dynamics in a single RC-LH1-PufX core complex dimer using the hierarchical equations of motion for dissipative quantum dynamics that accurately, yet in a computationally costly manner, treat the coupling between BChls and their protein environment. A widely employed description, the generalized Förster (GF) theory, was also used to calculate the transfer rates of the same excitonic system in order to verify the accuracy of this computationally cheap method. Additionally, in light of the structural uncertainties in the Rba. sphaeroides RC-LH1-PufX core complex, geometrical alterations were introduced into the BChl organization. It is shown that the energy transfer dynamics are not affected by the considered changes in the BChl organization and that the GF theory provides accurate transfer rates. An all-atom model for a tubular photosynthetic membrane is then constructed on the basis of electron microscopy data, and the overall energy transfer properties of this membrane are computed.

  18. Nonradiative energy transfer in colloidal CdSe nanoplatelet films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzelturk, Burak; Olutas, Murat; Delikanli, Savas; Kelestemur, Yusuf; Erdem, Onur; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2015-01-01

    Nonradiative energy transfer (NRET) has been extensively studied in colloidal nanocrystal (quantum dots) and nanorod (quantum wires) assemblies. In this work, we present the first account of spectroscopic evidence of NRET in solid thin films of CdSe based colloidal nanoplatelets (NPLs), also known as colloidal quantum wells. The NRET was investigated as a function of the concentration of two NPL populations with different vertical thicknesses via steady state and time resolved spectroscopy. NRET takes place from the NPLs with smaller vertical thickness (i.e., larger band gap) to the ones with a larger vertical thickness (i.e., smaller band gap) with efficiency up to ~60%. Here, we reveal that the NRET efficiency is limited in these NPL solid film assemblies due to the self-stacking of NPLs within their own population causing an increased distance between the donor-acceptor pairs, which is significantly different to previously studied colloidal quantum dot based architectures for nonradiative energy transfer.Nonradiative energy transfer (NRET) has been extensively studied in colloidal nanocrystal (quantum dots) and nanorod (quantum wires) assemblies. In this work, we present the first account of spectroscopic evidence of NRET in solid thin films of CdSe based colloidal nanoplatelets (NPLs), also known as colloidal quantum wells. The NRET was investigated as a function of the concentration of two NPL populations with different vertical thicknesses via steady state and time resolved spectroscopy. NRET takes place from the NPLs with smaller vertical thickness (i.e., larger band gap) to the ones with a larger vertical thickness (i.e., smaller band gap) with efficiency up to ~60%. Here, we reveal that the NRET efficiency is limited in these NPL solid film assemblies due to the self-stacking of NPLs within their own population causing an increased distance between the donor-acceptor pairs, which is significantly different to previously studied colloidal quantum dot based

  19. Rapid laser induced energy transfer in atomic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies of the rapid transfer of stored populations from metastable states to selected target states of a different species are reported. Both laser-induced or laser-switched collision and laser-induced two-photon spontaneous emission are described. It is shown that the laser-induced collision method is particularly useful in the visible and UV spectral regions. It has applications in photochemistry, gas-phase kinetics, and in high-power, high-energy gas-phase lasers. The anti-Stokes source is useful in the VUV and soft X-ray spectral regions.

  20. Heat transfer research for ocean thermal energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kreith, F.; Bharathan, D.

    1988-02-01

    In this lecture an overview of the heat and mass-transfer phenomena of importance in ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is presented with particular emphasis on open-cycle OTEC systems. Also included is a short historical review of OTEC developments in the past century and a comparison of open and closed-cycle thermodynamics. Finally, results of system analyses, showing the effect of plant size on cost and the near-term potential of using OTEC for combined power production and desalination systems, are briefly discussed.

  1. Heat transfer research for ocean thermal energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreith, F.; Bharathan, D.

    1987-03-01

    In this lecture an overview of the heat- and mass-transfer phenomena of importance in ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is presented with particular emphasis on open-cycle OTEC systems. Also included is a short historical review of OTEC developments in the past century and a comparison of open- and closed-cycle thermodynamics. Finally, results of system analyses, showing the effect of plant size on cost and the near-term potential of using OTEC for combined power production and desalination systems are briefly discussed.

  2. Radiative interactions in transient energy transfer in gaseous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.

    1985-01-01

    Analyses and numerical procedures are presented to investigate the radiative interactions in transient energy transfer processes in gaseous systems. The nongray radiative formulations are based on the wide-band model correlations for molecular absorption. Various relations for the radiative flux are developed; these are useful for different flow conditions and physical problems. Specific plans for obtaining extensive results for different cases are presented. The methods presented in this study can be extended easily to investigate the radiative interactions in realistic flows of hydrogen-air species in the scramjet engine.

  3. [Fluorescent energy transfer study of lysozyme complexes with liposomes].

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, G P

    1999-01-01

    The method of radiationless energy transfer was used to study the structure of lysozyme complexes with liposomes composed of phosphatidylcholine and diphosphatidylglycerol (4:3, mol:mol). 4-(n-Dimethylaminostyryl)-1-methylpyridinium n-toluenesulfonate, 4-(n-dimethylaminostyryl)-1-hexylpyridinium n-toluenesulfonate, 4-(n-dimethylaminostyryl)-1-dodecylpyridinium n-toluenesulfonate, and 3-metoxybenzanthrone were used as donors, and nile blue and rhodamine 6G, as acceptors. An increase in the surface area of model membranes upon binging of the protein to lipid bilayer was found.

  4. Power Loss Analysis and Comparison of Segmented and Unsegmented Energy Coupling Coils for Wireless Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Sai Chun; McDannold, Nathan J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigated the power losses of unsegmented and segmented energy coupling coils for wireless energy transfer. Four 30-cm energy coupling coils with different winding separations, conductor cross-sectional areas, and number of turns were developed. The four coils were tested in both unsegmented and segmented configurations. The winding conduction and intrawinding dielectric losses of the coils were evaluated individually based on a well-established lumped circuit model. We found that the intrawinding dielectric loss can be as much as seven times higher than the winding conduction loss at 6.78 MHz when the unsegmented coil is tightly wound. The dielectric loss of an unsegmented coil can be reduced by increasing the winding separation or reducing the number of turns, but the power transfer capability is reduced because of the reduced magnetomotive force. Coil segmentation using resonant capacitors has recently been proposed to significantly reduce the operating voltage of a coil to a safe level in wireless energy transfer for medical implants. Here, we found that it can naturally eliminate the dielectric loss. The coil segmentation method and the power loss analysis used in this paper could be applied to the transmitting, receiving, and resonant coils in two- and four-coil energy transfer systems. PMID:26640745

  5. Power Loss Analysis and Comparison of Segmented and Unsegmented Energy Coupling Coils for Wireless Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sai Chun; McDannold, Nathan J

    2015-03-01

    This paper investigated the power losses of unsegmented and segmented energy coupling coils for wireless energy transfer. Four 30-cm energy coupling coils with different winding separations, conductor cross-sectional areas, and number of turns were developed. The four coils were tested in both unsegmented and segmented configurations. The winding conduction and intrawinding dielectric losses of the coils were evaluated individually based on a well-established lumped circuit model. We found that the intrawinding dielectric loss can be as much as seven times higher than the winding conduction loss at 6.78 MHz when the unsegmented coil is tightly wound. The dielectric loss of an unsegmented coil can be reduced by increasing the winding separation or reducing the number of turns, but the power transfer capability is reduced because of the reduced magnetomotive force. Coil segmentation using resonant capacitors has recently been proposed to significantly reduce the operating voltage of a coil to a safe level in wireless energy transfer for medical implants. Here, we found that it can naturally eliminate the dielectric loss. The coil segmentation method and the power loss analysis used in this paper could be applied to the transmitting, receiving, and resonant coils in two- and four-coil energy transfer systems.

  6. Modular organization of cardiac energy metabolism: energy conversion, transfer and feedback regulation

    PubMed Central

    Guzun, R.; Kaambre, T.; Bagur, R.; Grichine, A.; Usson, Y.; Varikmaa, M.; Anmann, T.; Tepp, K.; Timohhina, N.; Shevchuk, I.; Chekulayev, V.; Boucher, F.; Santos, P. Dos; Schlattner, U.; Wallimann, T.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Dzeja, P.; Aliev, M.; Saks, V.

    2014-01-01

    To meet high cellular demands, the energy metabolism of cardiac muscles is organized by precise and coordinated functioning of intracellular energetic units (ICEUs). ICEUs represent structural and functional modules integrating multiple fluxes at sites of ATP generation in mitochondria and ATP utilization by myofibrillar, sarcoplasmic reticulum and sarcolemma ion-pump ATPases. The role of ICEUs is to enhance the efficiency of vectorial intracellular energy transfer and fine tuning of oxidative ATP synthesis maintaining stable metabolite levels to adjust to intracellular energy needs through the dynamic system of compartmentalized phosphoryl transfer networks. One of the key elements in regulation of energy flux distribution and feedback communication is the selective permeability of mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) which represents a bottleneck in adenine nucleotide and other energy metabolite transfer and microcompartmentalization. Based on the experimental and theoretical (mathematical modelling) arguments, we describe regulation of mitochondrial ATP synthesis within ICEUs allowing heart workload to be linearly correlated with oxygen consumption ensuring conditions of metabolic stability, signal communication and synchronization. Particular attention was paid to the structure–function relationship in the development of ICEU, and the role of mitochondria interaction with cytoskeletal proteins, like tubulin, in the regulation of MOM permeability in response to energy metabolic signals providing regulation of mitochondrial respiration. Emphasis was given to the importance of creatine metabolism for the cardiac energy homoeostasis. PMID:24666671

  7. Energy Transfer Dynamics of Formate Decomposition on Cu(110).

    PubMed

    Quan, Jiamei; Kondo, Takahiro; Wang, Guichang; Nakamura, Junji

    2017-03-20

    Energy transfer dynamics of formate (HCOOa ) decomposition on a Cu(110) surface has been studied by measuring the angle-resolved intensity and translational energy distributions of CO2 emitted from the surface in a steady-state reaction of HCOOH and O2 . The angular distribution of CO2 shows a sharp collimation with the direction perpendicular to the surface, as represented by cos(n) θ (n=6). The mean translational energy of CO2 is measured to be as low as 100 meV and is independent of the surface temperature (Ts ). These results clearly indicate that the decomposition of formate is a thermal non-equilibrium process in which a large amount of energy released by the decomposition reaction of formate is transformed into the internal energies of CO2 molecules. The thermal non-equilibrium features observed in the dynamics of formate decomposition support the proposed Eley-Rideal (ER)-type mechanism for formate synthesis on copper catalysts.

  8. Protein Transfer Free Energy Obeys Entropy-Enthalpy Compensation.

    PubMed

    Mills, Eric A; Plotkin, Steven S

    2015-11-05

    We have found significant entropy-enthalpy compensation for the transfer of a diverse set of two-state folding proteins from water into water containing a diverse set of cosolutes, including osmolytes, denaturants, and crowders. In extracting thermodynamic parameters from experimental data, we show the potential importance of accounting for the cosolute concentration-dependence of the heat capacity change upon unfolding, as well as the potential importance of the temperature-dependence of the heat capacity change upon unfolding. We introduce a new Monte Carlo method to estimate the experimental uncertainty in the thermodynamic data and use this to show by bootstrapping methods that entropy-enthalpy compensation is statistically significant, in spite of large, correlated scatter in the data. We show that plotting the data at the transition midpoint provides the most accurate experimental values by avoiding extrapolation errors due to uncertainty in the heat capacity, and that this representation exhibits the strongest evidence of compensation. Entropy-enthalpy compensation is still significant at lab temperature however. We also find that compensation is still significant when considering variations due to heat capacity models, as well as typical measurement discrepancies lab-to-lab when such data is available. Extracting transfer entropy and enthalpy along with their uncertainties can provide a valuable consistency check between experimental data and simulation models, which may involve tests of simulated unfolded ensembles and/or models of the transfer free energy; we include specific applications to cold shock protein and protein L.

  9. Technology transfer at the Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, B.J.; Good, M.S.; Lemon, D.K.; Morgen, G.P.

    1996-12-31

    Over the past 15 years, efforts to move technology generated from government-funded research and development activities at the Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories into commercial application by the private sector have faced an ever-changing environment. This environment has been primarily dictated by changes in the governing political philosophies of the Congress and the Administration that fund the laboratories and direct their activities. To review the role of the DOE laboratories, the following are discussed: the past, current, and potential future legislative and political environment impacting upon technology transfer from the laboratories; mechanisms of technology transfer; and three selected projects involving transfer of nondestructive evaluation technologies to the private sector. The technologies include computer-aided fabric evaluation (CAFE), measurement of the depth to which steel parts are hardened, and compensation for wear variations in the grinding wheel during the fabrication of wood shaper tools. These respectively deal with a large partnership of companies and institutes, a single but large manufacturing company, and a small business.

  10. Coherent control of Forster energy transfer in nanoparticle molecules: energy nanogates and plasmonic heat pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. M.; West, R. G.

    2011-10-01

    We study how Forster energy transfer from a semiconductor quantum dot to a metallic nanoparticle can be gated using quantum coherence in quantum dots. We show this allows us to use a laser field to open the flow of the energy transfer for a given period of time (on-state) before it is switched off to about zero. Utilizing such an energy gating process it is shown that quantum-dot-metallic-nanoparticle systems (meta-molecules) can act as functional nanoheaters capable of generating heat pulses with temporal widths determined by their environmental and physical parameters. We discuss the physics behind the energy nanogates using molecular states of such meta-molecules and the resonance fluorescence of the quantum dots.

  11. Electronic energy transfer: Localized operator partitioning of electronic energy in composite quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Yaser; Brumer, Paul

    2012-11-01

    A Hamiltonian based approach using spatially localized projection operators is introduced to give precise meaning to the chemically intuitive idea of the electronic energy on a quantum subsystem. This definition facilitates the study of electronic energy transfer in arbitrarily coupled quantum systems. In particular, the decomposition scheme can be applied to molecular components that are strongly interacting (with significant orbital overlap) as well as to isolated fragments. The result defines a consistent electronic energy at all internuclear distances, including the case of separated fragments, and reduces to the well-known Förster and Dexter results in their respective limits. Numerical calculations of coherent energy and charge transfer dynamics in simple model systems are presented and the effect of collisionally induced decoherence is examined.

  12. Crossed-beam energy transfer in direct-drive implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Seka, W; Edgell, D H; Michel, D T; Froula, D H; Goncharov, V N; Craxton, R S; Divol, L; Epstein, R; Follett, R; Kelly, J H; Kosc, T Z; Maximov, A V; McCrory, R L; Meyerhofer, D D; Michel, P; Myatt, J F; Sangster, T C; Shvydky, A; Skupsky, S; Stoeckl, C

    2012-05-22

    Direct-drive-implosion experiments on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have showed discrepancies between simulations of the scattered (non-absorbed) light levels and measured ones that indicate the presence of a mechanism that reduces laser coupling efficiency by 10%-20%. This appears to be due to crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET) that involves electromagnetic-seeded, low-gain stimulated Brillouin scattering. CBET scatters energy from the central portion of the incoming light beam to outgoing light, reducing the laser absorption and hydrodynamic efficiency of implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations including CBET show good agreement with all observables in implosion experiments on OMEGA. Three strategies to mitigate CBET and improve laser coupling are considered: the use of narrow beams, multicolor lasers, and higher-Z ablators. Experiments on OMEGA using narrow beams have demonstrated improvements in implosion performance.

  13. Estimating three-demensional energy transfer in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, K. S.; Helland, K. N.; Rosenblatt, M.

    1980-01-01

    To obtain an estimate of the spectral transfer function that indicates the rate of decay of energy, an x-wire probe was set at a fixed position, and two single wire probes were set at a number of locations in the same plane perpendicular to the mean flow in the wind tunnel. The locations of the single wire probes are determined by pseudo-random numbers (Monte Carlo). Second order spectra and cross spectra are estimated. The assumption of isotropy relative to second order spectra is examined. Third order spectra are also estimated corresponding to the positions specified. A Monte Carlo Fourier transformation of the downstream bispectra corresponding to integration across the plane perpendicular to the flow is carried out assuming isotropy. Further integration is carried out over spherical energy shells.

  14. Using DNA nanostructures to harvest light and create energy transfer and harvesting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Sebastián. A.; Buckhout-White, Susan; Brown, Carl W.; Samanta, Anirban; Klein, William P.; Ancona, Mario G.; Dwyer, Chris L.; Goldman, Ellen R.; Melinger, Joseph S.; Cunningham, Paul D.; Spillmann, Chris M.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2016-12-01

    DNA is a biocompatible scaffold that allows for the design of a variety of nanostructures, from straightforward double stranded DNA to more complex DNA origami and 3-D structures. By modifying the structures, with dyes, nanoparticles, or enzymes, they can be used to create light harvesting and energy transfer systems. We have focused on using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between organic fluorophores separated with nanometer precision based on the DNAs defined positioning. Using FRET theory we can control the direction of the energy flow and optimize the design parameters to increase the systems efficiency. The design parameters include fluorophore selection, separation, number, and orientation among others. Additionally the use of bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) allowed the use of chemical energy, as opposed to photonic, to activate the systems. Here we discuss a variety of systems, such as the longest reported DNA-based molecular photonic wires (> 30 nm), dendrimeric light harvesting systems, and semiconductor nanocrystals integrated systems where they act as both scaffold and antennae for the original excitation. Using a variety of techniques, a comparison of different types of structures as well as heterogeneous vs. homogenous FRET was realized.

  15. Microscopic energy transfer spectroscopy to determine mitochondrial malfunction in human myotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschwend, Michael H.; Strauss, Wolfgang S. L.; Brinkmeier, H.; Ruedel, R.; Steiner, Rudolf W.; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    1996-12-01

    A microscopic equipment is reported for examination of cellular autofluorescence and determination of energy transfer in vitro, which is proposed to be an appropriate tool to investigate mitochondrial malfunction. The method includes fluorescence microscopy combined with time-gated (nanosecond) fluorescence emission spectroscopy and is presently used to study mitochondrial metabolism of human myotube primary cultures Enzyme complexes of the respiratory chain, located at the inner mitochondrial membrane, were inhibited by various drugs, and fluorescence of the mitochondrial coenzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) as well as of the mitochondrial marker rhodamine 123 (R123) was examined. After inhibition of enzyme complex I (NADH-coenzyme Q reductase) by rotenone or enzyme complex III (coenzyme QH2-cytochrome c reductase) by antimycin a similar or increased NADH fluorescence was observed. In addition, energy transfer from excited states of NADH (energy donor) to R123 (energy acceptor) was deduced from a decrease of NADH fluorescence after coincubation with these inhibitors and R123. Application of microscopic energy transfer spectroscopy for diagnosis of congenital mitochondrial deficiencies is currently in preparation.

  16. On the use of Lineal Energy Measurements to Estimate Linear Energy Transfer Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, David A.; Howell, Leonard W., Jr.; Adam, James H., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the error resulting from using a lineal energy spectrum to represent a linear energy transfer spectrum for applications in the space radiation environment. Lineal energy and linear energy transfer spectra are compared in three diverse but typical space radiation environments. Different detector geometries are also studied to determine how they affect the error. LET spectra are typically used to compute dose equivalent for radiation hazard estimation and single event effect rates to estimate radiation effects on electronics. The errors in the estimations of dose equivalent and single event rates that result from substituting lineal energy spectra for linear energy spectra are examined. It is found that this substitution has little effect on dose equivalent estimates in interplanetary quiet-time environment regardless of detector shape. The substitution has more of an effect when the environment is dominated by solar energetic particles or trapped radiation, but even then the errors are minor especially if a spherical detector is used. For single event estimation, the effect of the substitution can be large if the threshold for the single event effect is near where the linear energy spectrum drops suddenly. It is judged that single event rate estimates made from lineal energy spectra are unreliable and the use of lineal energy spectra for single event rate estimation should be avoided.

  17. Energy transfer from lower energy to higher-energy electrons mediated by whistler waves in the radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shklyar, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    We study the problem of energy exchange between waves and particles, which leads to energization of the latter, in an unstable plasma typical of the radiation belts. The ongoing Van Allen Probes space mission brought this problem among the most discussed in space physics. A free energy which is present in an unstable plasma provides the indispensable condition for energy transfer from lower energy particles to higher-energy particles via resonant wave-particle interaction. This process is studied in detail by the example of electron interactions with whistler mode wave packets originated from lightning-induced emission. We emphasize that in an unstable plasma, the energy source for electron energization is the energy of other particles, rather than the wave energy as is often assumed. The way by which the energy is transferred from lower energy to higher-energy particles includes two processes that operate concurrently, in the same space-time domain, or sequentially, in different space-time domains, in which a given wave packet is located. In the first process, one group of resonant particles gives the energy to the wave. The second process consists in wave absorption by another group of resonant particles, whose energy therefore increases. We argue that this mechanism represents an efficient means of electron energization in the radiation belts.

  18. Photoinduced energy transfer in transition metal complex oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The work done over the past three years has been directed toward the preparation, characterization and photophysical examination of mono- and bimetallic diimine complexes. The work is part of a broader project directed toward the development of stable, efficient, light harvesting arrays of transition metal complex chromophores. One focus has been the synthesis of rigid bis-bidentate and bis-tridentate bridging ligands. The authors have managed to make the ligand bphb in multigram quantities from inexpensive starting materials. The synthetic approach used has allowed them to prepare a variety of other ligands which may have unique applications (vide infra). They have prepared, characterized and examined the photophysical behavior of Ru(II) and Re(I) complexes of the ligands. Energy donor/acceptor complexes of bphb have been prepared which exhibit nearly activationless energy transfer. Complexes of Ru(II) and Re(I) have also been prepared with other polyunsaturated ligands in which two different long lived (> 50 ns) excited states exist; results of luminescence and transient absorbance measurements suggest the two states are metal-to-ligand charge transfer and ligand localized {pi}{r_arrow}{pi}* triplets. Finally, the authors have developed methods to prepare polymetallic complexes which are covalently bound to various surfaces. The long term objective of this work is to make light harvesting arrays for the sensitization of large band gap semiconductors. Details of this work are provided in the body of the report.

  19. Photoinduced energy transfer in transition metal complex oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    The work we have done over the past three years has been directed toward the preparation, characterization and photophysical examination of mono- and bimetallic diimine complexes. The work is part of a broader project directed toward the development of stable, efficient, light harvesting arrays of transition metal complex chromophores. One focus has been the synthesis of rigid bis-bidentate and bis-tridentate bridging ligands. We have managed to make the ligand bphb in multigram quantities from inexpensive starting materials. The synthetic approach used has allowed us prepare a variety of other ligands which may have unique applications (vide infra). We have prepared, characterized and examined the photophysical behavior of Ru(II) and Re(I) complexes of the ligands. Energy donor/acceptor complexes of bphb have been prepared which exhibit nearly activationless energy transfer. Complexes of Ru(II) and Re(I) have also been prepared with other polyunsaturated ligands in which two different long lived ( > 50 ns) excited states exist; results of luminescence and transient absorbance measurements suggest the two states are metal-to-ligand charge transfer and ligand localized {pi}{r_arrow}{pi}* triplets. Finally, we have developed methods to prepare polymetallic complexes which are covalently bound to various surfaces. The long term objective of this work is to make light harvesting arrays for the sensitization of large band gap semiconductors. Details of this work are provided in the body of the report.

  20. Ultrafast Single and Multiexciton Energy Transfer in Semiconductor Nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Richard

    Photophysical processes such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) enable optical antennas, wavelength down-conversion in light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and optical bio-sensing schemes. The rate and efficiency of this donor to acceptor transfer of excitation between chromophores dictates the utility of FRET and can unlock new device operation motifs including quantum-funnel solar cells and reduced gain thresholds. However, the fastest reported FRET time constants involving spherical quantum dots (QDs) (0.12-1 ns), do not outpace biexciton Auger recombination (0.01-0.1 ns), which impedes multiexciton-driven applications including electrically-pumped lasers and carrier-multiplication-enhanced photovoltaics. Precisely controlled, few-monolayer thick semiconductor nano-platelets with tens-of-nanometer diameters exhibit intense optical transitions and hundreds-of-picosecond Auger recombination, but heretofore lack FRET characterizations. We examine binary CdSe NPL solids and show that inter-plate FRET (~6-23 ps, presumably for co-facial arrangements) can occur 15-50 times faster than Auger recombination and demonstrate multiexcitonic FRET, making such materials ideal candidates for advanced technologies. This work was performed at the Center for Nanoscale Materials, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  1. Miniature fiber optic sensor based on fluorescence energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, David L.; Schultz, Jerome S.

    1992-04-01

    Optical fiber biosensors based on fluorescence assays have several distinct advantages when measuring biological analytes such as metabolites, cofactors, toxins, etc. Not only are optical signals immune to electronic interferences, but the polychromatic nature of most fluorochemical assays provides more potentially useful data about the system being studied. One of the most common difficulties normally encountered with optical biosensors is the inability to routinely recalibrate the optical and electronic components of the system throughout the life of the sensor. With this in mind, we present an optical fiber assay system for glucose based on a homogeneous singlet/singlet energy transfer assay along with the electronic instrumentation built to support the sensor system. In the sensor probe, glucose concentrations are indirectly measured from the level of fluorescence quenching caused by the homogeneous competition assay between TRITC labeled concanavalin A (receptor) and FITC labeled Dextran (ligand). The FITC signal is used to indicate glucose concentrations and the TRITC signal is used for internal calibration. Data is also presented on a protein derivatization procedure that was used to prevent aggregation of the receptor protein in solution. Also, a molecular model is described for the singlet/singlet energy transfer interactions that can occur in a model system composed of a monovalent ligand (FITC labeled papain) and a monovalent receptor (TRITC labeled concanavalin A).

  2. Elementary Energy Transfer Pathways in Allochromatium vinosum Photosynthetic Membranes.

    PubMed

    Lüer, Larry; Carey, Anne-Marie; Henry, Sarah; Maiuri, Margherita; Hacking, Kirsty; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Cogdell, Richard J

    2015-11-03

    Allochromatium vinosum (formerly Chromatium vinosum) purple bacteria are known to adapt their light-harvesting strategy during growth according to environmental factors such as temperature and average light intensity. Under low light illumination or low ambient temperature conditions, most of the LH2 complexes in the photosynthetic membranes form a B820 exciton with reduced spectral overlap with LH1. To elucidate the reason for this light and temperature adaptation of the LH2 electronic structure, we performed broadband femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy as a function of excitation wavelength in A. vinosum membranes. A target analysis of the acquired data yielded individual rate constants for all relevant elementary energy transfer (ET) processes. We found that the ET dynamics in high-light-grown membranes was well described by a homogeneous model, with forward and backward rate constants independent of the pump wavelength. Thus, the overall B800→B850→B890→ Reaction Center ET cascade is well described by simple triexponential kinetics. In the low-light-grown membranes, we found that the elementary backward transfer rate constant from B890 to B820 was strongly reduced compared with the corresponding constant from B890 to B850 in high-light-grown samples. The ET dynamics of low-light-grown membranes was strongly dependent on the pump wavelength, clearly showing that the excitation memory is not lost throughout the exciton lifetime. The observed pump energy dependence of the forward and backward ET rate constants suggests exciton diffusion via B850→ B850 transfer steps, making the overall ET dynamics nonexponential. Our results show that disorder plays a crucial role in our understanding of low-light adaptation in A. vinosum.

  3. Elementary Energy Transfer Pathways in Allochromatium vinosum Photosynthetic Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lüer, Larry; Carey, Anne-Marie; Henry, Sarah; Maiuri, Margherita; Hacking, Kirsty; Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Allochromatium vinosum (formerly Chromatium vinosum) purple bacteria are known to adapt their light-harvesting strategy during growth according to environmental factors such as temperature and average light intensity. Under low light illumination or low ambient temperature conditions, most of the LH2 complexes in the photosynthetic membranes form a B820 exciton with reduced spectral overlap with LH1. To elucidate the reason for this light and temperature adaptation of the LH2 electronic structure, we performed broadband femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy as a function of excitation wavelength in A. vinosum membranes. A target analysis of the acquired data yielded individual rate constants for all relevant elementary energy transfer (ET) processes. We found that the ET dynamics in high-light-grown membranes was well described by a homogeneous model, with forward and backward rate constants independent of the pump wavelength. Thus, the overall B800→B850→B890→ Reaction Center ET cascade is well described by simple triexponential kinetics. In the low-light-grown membranes, we found that the elementary backward transfer rate constant from B890 to B820 was strongly reduced compared with the corresponding constant from B890 to B850 in high-light-grown samples. The ET dynamics of low-light-grown membranes was strongly dependent on the pump wavelength, clearly showing that the excitation memory is not lost throughout the exciton lifetime. The observed pump energy dependence of the forward and backward ET rate constants suggests exciton diffusion via B850→ B850 transfer steps, making the overall ET dynamics nonexponential. Our results show that disorder plays a crucial role in our understanding of low-light adaptation in A. vinosum. PMID:26536265

  4. Detection of Medium-Sized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons via Fluorescence Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Serio, Nicole; Prignano, Lindsey; Peters, Sean; Levine, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    Reported herein is the use of proximity-induced non-covalent energy transfer for the detection of medium-sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This energy transfer occurs within the cavity of γ-cyclodextrin in various aqueous environments, including human plasma and coconut water. Highly efficient energy transfer was observed, and the efficiency of the energy transfer is independent of the concentration of γ-cyclodextrin used, demonstrating the importance of hydrophobic binding in facilitating such energy transfer. Low limits of detection were also observed for many of the PAHs investigated, which is promising for the development of fluorescence-based detection schemes. PMID:25821390

  5. Triplet-triplet energy transfer between luminescent probes bound to albumins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mel'Nikov, A. G.; Saletskii, A. M.; Kochubey, V. I.; Pravdin, A. B.; Kurchatov, I. S.; Mel'Nikov, G. V.

    2010-08-01

    The interaction of polar and nonpolar luminescent probes with human blood serum albumins is studied by absorption and luminescence spectroscopy. It is found that the probes (polar eosin and nonpolar anthracene) can efficiently bind to proteins. The radii of the quenching spheres of energy-donor (eosin) triplet states in the presence of an acceptor (anthracene) in the process of the triplet-triplet energy transfer in proteins are determined for homogeneous and inhomogeneous distributions of acceptor molecules over the solution volume. It is shown that a decrease in the radius of the quenching sphere observed upon the addition of sodium dodecylsulfate surfactant is caused by structural changes in the protein.

  6. Size-Independent Energy Transfer in Biomimetic Nanoring Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Supramolecular antenna-ring complexes are of great interest due to their presence in natural light-harvesting complexes. While such systems are known to provide benefits through robust and efficient energy funneling, the relationship between molecular structure, strain (governed by nuclear coordinates and motion), and energy dynamics (arising from electronic behavior) is highly complex. We present a synthetic antenna-nanoring system based on a series of conjugated porphyrin chromophores ideally suited to explore such effects. By systematically varying the size of the acceptor nanoring, we reveal the interplay between antenna-nanoring binding, local strain, and energy dynamics on the picosecond time scale. Binding of the antenna unit creates a local strain in the nanoring, and this strain was measured as a function of the size of the nanoring, by UV–vis-NIR titration, providing information on the conformational flexibility of the system. Strikingly, the energy-transfer rate is independent of nanoring size, indicating the existence of strain-localized acceptor states, spread over about six porphyrin units, arising from the noncovalent antenna-nanoring association. PMID:27176553

  7. Optimum rocket propulsion for energy-limited transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuppero, Anthony; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    In order to effect large-scale return of extraterrestrial resources to Earth orbit, it is desirable to optimize the propulsion system to maximize the mass of payload returned per unit energy expended. This optimization problem is different from the conventional rocket propulsion optimization. A rocket propulsion system consists of an energy source plus reaction mass. In a conventional chemical rocket, the energy source and the reaction mass are the same. For the transportation system required, however, the best system performance is achieved if the reaction mass used is from a locally available source. In general, the energy source and the reaction mass will be separate. One such rocket system is the nuclear thermal rocket, in which the energy source is a reactor and the reaction mass a fluid which is heated by the reactor and exhausted. Another energy-limited rocket system is the hydrogen/oxygen rocket where H2/O2 fuel is produced by electrolysis of water using a solar array or a nuclear reactor. The problem is to choose the optimum specific impulse (or equivalently exhaust velocity) to minimize the amount of energy required to produce a given mission delta-v in the payload. The somewhat surprising result is that the optimum specific impulse is not the maximum possible value, but is proportional to the mission delta-v. In general terms, at the beginning of the mission it is optimum to use a very low specific impulse and expend a lot of reaction mass, since this is the most energy efficient way to transfer momentum. However, as the mission progresses, it becomes important to minimize the amount of reaction mass expelled, since energy is wasted moving the reaction mass. Thus, the optimum specific impulse will increase with the mission delta-v. Optimum I(sub sp) is derived for maximum payload return per energy expended for both the case of fixed and variable I(sub sp) engines. Sample missions analyzed include return of water payloads from the moons of Mars and of

  8. Near-field effects and energy transfer in hybrid metal-oxide nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Benel, Cahit; Papageorgiou, Giorgos; Goncalves, Manuel; Boneberg, Johannes; Leiderer, Paul; Ziemann, Paul; Marek, Peter; Hahn, Horst

    2013-01-01

    Summary One of the big challenges of the 21st century is the utilization of nanotechnology for energy technology. Nanoscale structures may provide novel functionality, which has been demonstrated most convincingly by successful applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells introduced by M. Grätzel. Applications in energy technology are based on the transfer and conversion of energy. Following the example of photosynthesis, this requires a combination of light harvesting, transfer of energy to a reaction center, and conversion to other forms of energy by charge separation and transfer. This may be achieved by utilizing hybrid nanostructures, which combine metallic and nonmetallic components. Metallic nanostructures can interact strongly with light. Plasmonic excitations of such structures can cause local enhancement of the electrical field, which has been utilized in spectroscopy for many years. On the other hand, the excited states in metallic structures decay over very short lifetimes. Longer lifetimes of excited states occur in nonmetallic nanostructures, which makes them attractive for further energy transfer before recombination or relaxation sets in. Therefore, the combination of metallic nanostructures with nonmetallic materials is of great interest. We report investigations of hybrid nanostructured model systems that consist of a combination of metallic nanoantennas (fabricated by nanosphere lithography, NSL) and oxide nanoparticles. The oxide particles were doped with rare-earth (RE) ions, which show a large shift between absorption and emission wavelengths, allowing us to investigate the energy-transfer processes in detail. The main focus is on TiO2 nanoparticles doped with Eu3+, since the material is interesting for applications such as the generation of hydrogen by photocatalytic splitting of water molecules. We use high-resolution techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy for the investigation of energy-transfer processes. The experiments

  9. Near-field effects and energy transfer in hybrid metal-oxide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Herr, Ulrich; Kuerbanjiang, Balati; Benel, Cahit; Papageorgiou, Giorgos; Goncalves, Manuel; Boneberg, Johannes; Leiderer, Paul; Ziemann, Paul; Marek, Peter; Hahn, Horst

    2013-01-01

    One of the big challenges of the 21st century is the utilization of nanotechnology for energy technology. Nanoscale structures may provide novel functionality, which has been demonstrated most convincingly by successful applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells introduced by M. Grätzel. Applications in energy technology are based on the transfer and conversion of energy. Following the example of photosynthesis, this requires a combination of light harvesting, transfer of energy to a reaction center, and conversion to other forms of energy by charge separation and transfer. This may be achieved by utilizing hybrid nanostructures, which combine metallic and nonmetallic components. Metallic nanostructures can interact strongly with light. Plasmonic excitations of such structures can cause local enhancement of the electrical field, which has been utilized in spectroscopy for many years. On the other hand, the excited states in metallic structures decay over very short lifetimes. Longer lifetimes of excited states occur in nonmetallic nanostructures, which makes them attractive for further energy transfer before recombination or relaxation sets in. Therefore, the combination of metallic nanostructures with nonmetallic materials is of great interest. We report investigations of hybrid nanostructured model systems that consist of a combination of metallic nanoantennas (fabricated by nanosphere lithography, NSL) and oxide nanoparticles. The oxide particles were doped with rare-earth (RE) ions, which show a large shift between absorption and emission wavelengths, allowing us to investigate the energy-transfer processes in detail. The main focus is on TiO2 nanoparticles doped with Eu(3+), since the material is interesting for applications such as the generation of hydrogen by photocatalytic splitting of water molecules. We use high-resolution techniques such as confocal fluorescence microscopy for the investigation of energy-transfer processes. The experiments are

  10. Nonphotochemical Hole-Burning Studies of Energy Transfer Dynamics in Antenna Complexes of Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Satoshi

    2001-01-01

    This thesis contains the candidate's original work on excitonic structure and energy transfer dynamics of two bacterial antenna complexes as studied using spectral hole-burning spectroscopy. The general introduction is divided into two chapters (1 and 2). Chapter 1 provides background material on photosynthesis and bacterial antenna complexes with emphasis on the two bacterial antenna systems related to the thesis research. Chapter 2 reviews the underlying principles and mechanism of persistent nonphotochemical hole-burning (NPHB) spectroscopy. Relevant energy transfer theories are also discussed. Chapters 3 and 4 are papers by the candidate that have been published. Chapter 3 describes the application of NPHB spectroscopy to the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex from the green sulfur bacterium Prosthecochloris aestuarii; emphasis is on determination of the low energy vibrational structure that is important for understanding the energy transfer process associated within three lowest energy Qy-states of the complex. The results are compared with those obtained earlier on the FMO complex from Chlorobium tepidum. In Chapter 4, the energy transfer dynamics of the B800 molecules of intact LH2 and B800-deficient LH2 complexes of the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila are compared. New insights on the additional decay channel of the B800 ring of bacteriochlorophylla (BChla) molecules are provided. General conclusions are given in Chapter 5. A version of the hole spectrum simulation program written by the candidate for the FMO complex study (Chapter 3) is included as an appendix. The references for each chapter are given at the end of each chapter.

  11. 78 FR 13661 - Energy Transfer Fuel, LP; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Energy Transfer Fuel, LP; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval Take notice that on February 15, 2013, Energy Transfer Fuel, LP filed for approval of rates for...

  12. Synthesis of carboxylic block copolymers via reversible addition fragmentation transfer polymerization for tooth erosion prevention.

    PubMed

    Lei, Y; Wang, T; Mitchell, J W; Qiu, J; Kilpatrick-Liverman, L

    2014-12-01

    Dental professionals are seeing a growing population of patients with visible signs of dental erosion. The approach currently being used to address the problem typically leverages the enamel protection benefits of fluoride. In this report, an alternative new block copolymer with a hydrophilic polyacrylic acid (PAA) block and a hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) block was developed to similarly reduce the mineral loss from enamel under acidic conditions. This series of PMMA-b-PAA block copolymers was synthesized by reversible addition fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Their structures were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. The molar fractions of acrylic acid (AA) in the final block copolymer were finely controlled from 0.25 to 0.94, and the molecular weight (Mn) of PMMA-b-PAA was controlled from 10 kDa to 90 kDa. The binding capability of the block copolymer with hydroxyapatite (HAP) was investigated by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. FTIR spectra confirmed that the PMMA-b-PAA block copolymer could bind to HAP via bridging bidentate bonds. Both UV-Vis and FTIR spectra additionally indicated that a high polymer concentration and low solution pH favored the polymer binding to HAP. The erosion-preventing efficacy of the PMMA-b-PAA block copolymer in inhibiting HAP mineral loss was quantitatively evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Based on the results, polymer treatment reduced the amount of calcium released by 27% to 30% in comparison with the unprotected samples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations indicated that PMMA-b-PAA polymer treatment protected enamel from acid erosion. This new amphiphilic block copolymer has significant potential to be integrated into dentifrices or mouthrinses as an alternative non-fluoride ingredient to reduce tooth erosion.

  13. Synthesis of Carboxylic Block Copolymers via Reversible Addition Fragmentation Transfer Polymerization for Tooth Erosion Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Y.; Wang, T.; Mitchell, J.W.; Qiu, J.; Kilpatrick-Liverman, L.

    2014-01-01

    Dental professionals are seeing a growing population of patients with visible signs of dental erosion. The approach currently being used to address the problem typically leverages the enamel protection benefits of fluoride. In this report, an alternative new block copolymer with a hydrophilic polyacrylic acid (PAA) block and a hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) block was developed to similarly reduce the mineral loss from enamel under acidic conditions. This series of PMMA-b-PAA block copolymers was synthesized by reversible addition fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Their structures were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. The molar fractions of acrylic acid (AA) in the final block copolymer were finely controlled from 0.25 to 0.94, and the molecular weight (Mn) of PMMA-b-PAA was controlled from 10 kDa to 90 kDa. The binding capability of the block copolymer with hydroxyapatite (HAP) was investigated by ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. FTIR spectra confirmed that the PMMA-b-PAA block copolymer could bind to HAP via bridging bidentate bonds. Both UV-Vis and FTIR spectra additionally indicated that a high polymer concentration and low solution pH favored the polymer binding to HAP. The erosion-preventing efficacy of the PMMA-b-PAA block copolymer in inhibiting HAP mineral loss was quantitatively evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Based on the results, polymer treatment reduced the amount of calcium released by 27% to 30% in comparison with the unprotected samples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations indicated that PMMA-b-PAA polymer treatment protected enamel from acid erosion. This new amphiphilic block copolymer has significant potential to be integrated into dentifrices or mouthrinses as an alternative non-fluoride ingredient to reduce tooth erosion. PMID:25248611

  14. EPR investigation on radiation-induced graft copolymerization of styrene onto polyethylene: Energy transfer effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salih, M. A.; Buttafava, A.; Ravasio, U.; Mariani, M.; Faucitano, A.

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, energy transfer phenomena concerning the in-source graft copolymerization of styrene onto LDPE were investigated through the EPR analysis of the radical intermediates. The model solution experiments have shown a substantial deviation of the experimental G (radicals) values with respect to the additivity law, which reflect the negative effect of the styrene monomer concentration on the initiation rate of the graft copolymerization. The EPR measurements performed on polyethylene- co-styrene graft copolymers of various composition following low-temperature vacuum gamma irradiation have confirmed the decrease of the total radical yields with increasing the styrene concentration. The effect was partly attributed to the heterogeneity of the graft copolymer matrix and to the lack of molecular mobility in the solid state at low temperature, which prevents the attainment of the favourable geometrical configurations in intermolecular energy and charge transfer events.

  15. A NVLAP Accredited Process for Transfer of Calibration to High Energy Laser Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Charest, M.R., Hampton, S., Marlett, K.

    2010-01-07

    Experiments conducted at national user facilities, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), employ state-of-the-art instrumentation including optical and X-ray streak cameras, gated imagers, CCDs, and diodes. These instruments are characterized to ensure the diagnostics perform reliably, and data collected during their use will be traceable to relevant standards. A process accredited by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) was developed for transferring the calibration of pulsed high energy laser probes from a standard calibrated by the National Institute of Standards and Testing (NIST) to additional energy probes for use as general working standards. We will discuss the unique challenges of developing the measurement methodologies associated with this calibration transfer, and the analysis of error propagation as it pertains to the expanded uncertainty of the calibration measurements.

  16. Photoluminescence and energy transfer process in Gd2O3:Eu3+, Tb3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvalakshmi, T.; Bose, A. Chandra

    2016-05-01

    Variation in photoluminescence (PL) properties of Eu3+ and Tb3+ as a function of co-dopant (Tb3+) concentration are studied for Gd2-x-yO3: Eu3+x Tb3+y (x = 0.02, y = 0.01, 0.03, 0.05). The crystal structure analysis is carried out by X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Absence of addition peaks corresponding europium or terbium phase confirms the phase purity. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) reveals the absorption peaks corresponding to host matrix, Eu3+ and Tb3+. The bandgap calculated from Kubelka - Munk function is also reported. PL spectra are recorded at the excitation wavelength of 307 nm and the emission peak corresponding to Eu3+ confirms the energy transfer from Tb3+ to Eu3+. The agglomeration of particles acts as quenching centres for energy transfer at higher concentrations.

  17. Transfer of energy between a pair of molecules near a plasmonic core-shell nanoparticle: Tunability and sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshfar, Nader; Yavari, Asghar

    2016-05-01

    Our model is applied to the calculation of interaction energy between a pair of dipolar molecules (point dipoles) in the vicinity of a nanoshell monomer with core-shell structure, based on the dipole quasi-electrostatic theory of classical electrodynamics and using the Drude and Maxwell-Garnett model. In other words, this work discusses the intermolecular energy transfer from a donor molecule to an acceptor molecule near a spherical nanoparticle that is important for practical applications like sensing. It is shown that the proximity of plasmonic nanoparticles can have a strong effect on the energy transfer between molecules. In addition to the influence of the size, composition, embedding medium, and the filling fraction of doped particles on the interaction energy, the contribution of the dipolar, quadrupolar, octupolar, hexadecapolar, triakontadipolar, and higher order multipole interactions is presented and analyzed. Briefly, we will show that it is possible to achieve enhanced energy transfer by manipulation of different parameters as mentioned above.

  18. The transfer between electron bulk kinetic energy and thermal energy in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, San; Lu, Quanming; Huang, Can; Wang, Shui

    2013-06-15

    By performing two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate the transfer between electron bulk kinetic and electron thermal energy in collisionless magnetic reconnection. In the vicinity of the X line, the electron bulk kinetic energy density is much larger than the electron thermal energy density. The evolution of the electron bulk kinetic energy is mainly determined by the work done by the electric field force and electron pressure gradient force. The work done by the electron gradient pressure force in the vicinity of the X line is changed to the electron enthalpy flux. In the magnetic island, the electron enthalpy flux is transferred to the electron thermal energy due to the compressibility of the plasma in the magnetic island. The compression of the plasma in the magnetic island is the consequence of the electromagnetic force acting on the plasma as the magnetic field lines release their tension after being reconnected. Therefore, we can observe that in the magnetic island the electron thermal energy density is much larger than the electron bulk kinetic energy density.

  19. Modeling and assessing the influence of linear energy transfer on multiple bit upset susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Chao; Liu, Jie; Xi, Kai; Zhang, Zhan-Gang; Gu, Song; Liu, Tian-Qi

    2013-10-01

    The influence of the metric of linear energy transfer (LET) on single event upset (SEU), particularly multiple bit upset (MBU) in a hypothetical 90-nm static random access memory (SRAM) is explored. To explain the odd point of higher LET incident ion but induced lower cross section in the curve of SEU cross section, MBUs induced by incident ions 132Xe and 209Bi with the same LET but different energies at oblique incidence are investigated using multi-functional package for single event effect analysis (MUFPSA). In addition, a comprehensive analytical model of the radial track structure is incorporated into MUFPSA, which is a complementation for assessing and interpreting MBU susceptibility of SRAM. The results show that (i) with the increase of incident angle, MBU multiplicity and probability each present an increasing trend; (ii) due to the higher ion relative velocity and longer range of δ electrons, higher energy ions trigger the MBU with less probability than lower energy ions.

  20. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between bovine serum albumin and fluoresceinamine.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhijun; Liu, Yushuang; Zhang, Ping; Guo, Jun; Ma, Yuxing; Yun, Xiaoling; Zhao, Xinmin; Zhong, Ruibo; Zhang, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Physical binding-mediated organic dye direct-labelling of proteins could be a promising technology for bio-nanomedical applications. Upon binding, it was found that fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurred between donor bovine serum albumin (BSA; an amphiphilic protein) and acceptor fluoresceinamine (FA; a hydrophobic fluorophore), which could explain fluorescence quenching found for BSA. FRET efficiency and the distance between FA and BSA tryptophan residues were determined to 17% and 2.29 nm, respectively. Using a spectroscopic superimposition method, the saturated number of FAs that bound to BSA was determined as eight to give a complex formula of FA8-BSA. Finally, molecular docking between BSA and FA was conducted, and conformational change that occurred in BSA upon binding to FA molecules was also studied by three-dimensional fluorescence microscopy.

  1. Resonance energy transfer: The unified theory via vector spherical harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinter, Roger; Jones, Garth A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we derive the well-established expression for the quantum amplitude associated with the resonance energy transfer (RET) process between a pair of molecules that are beyond wavefunction overlap. The novelty of this work is that the field of the mediating photon is described in terms of a spherical wave rather than a plane wave. The angular components of the field are constructed in terms of vector spherical harmonics while Hankel functions are used to define the radial component. This approach alleviates the problem of having to select physically correct solution from non-physical solutions, which seems to be inherent in plane wave derivations. The spherical coordinate system allows one to easily decompose the photon's fields into longitudinal and transverse components and offers a natural way to analyse near-, intermediate-, and far-zone RET within the context of the relative orientation of the transition dipole moments for the two molecules.

  2. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Youvan, Dougalas C.; Silva, Christopher M.; Bylina, Edward J.; Coleman, William J.; Dilworth, Michael R.; Yang, Mary M.

    2003-12-09

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  3. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Youvan, Douglas C.; Silva, Christopher M.; Bylina, Edward J.; Coleman, William J.; Dilworth, Michael R.; Yang, Mary M.

    2002-09-24

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  4. Adiabatic principles in atom-diatom collisional energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hovingh, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    This work describes the application of numerical methods to the solution of the time dependent Schroedinger equation for non-reactive atom-diatom collisions in which only one of the degrees of freedom has been removed. The basic method involves expanding the wave function in a basis set in two of the diatomic coordinates in a body-fixed frame (with respect to the triatomic complex) and defining the coefficients in that expansion as functions on a grid in the collision coordinate. The wave function is then propagated in time using a split operator method. The bulk of this work is devoted to the application of this formalism to the study of internal rotational predissociation in NeHF, in which quasibound states of the triatom predissociate through the transfer of energy from rotation of the diatom into translational energy in the atom-diatom separation coordinate. The author analyzes the computed time dependent wave functions to calculate the lifetimes for several quasibound states; these are in agreement with time independent quantum calculations using the same potential. Moreover, the time dependent behavior of the wave functions themselves sheds light on the dynamics of the predissociation processes. Finally, the partial cross sections of the products in those processes is determined with multiple exit channels. These show strong selectivity in the orbital angular momentum of the outgoing fragments, which the author explains with an adiabatic channel interpretation of the wave function's dynamics. The author also suggests that the same formalism might profitably be used to investigate the quantum dynamics of [open quotes]quasiresonant vibration-rotation transfer[close quotes], in which remarkably strong propensity rules in certain inelastic atom-diatom collision arise from classical adiabatic invariance theory.

  5. Energy Transfer Based Nanocomposite Scintillator for Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Soha; Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Ma, Lun; Kenarangui, Rasool

    2014-09-01

    Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum yield and size dependent emission, nanoparticles have attracted interested in various field of research. Here, we have studies the nanoparticles for radiation detection. We have synthesized nanoparticles of Cerium fluoride (CeF3), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Copper complex and Zinc sulfide (ZnS). We have used Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) principle to enhance the luminescence properties of nanocomposite scintillator. Nanocomposites scintillators are structurally characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Optical properties are studied using Photoluminescence, UV-Visible and X-ray. Enhancements in the luminescence are observed under UV and X-ray excitation. Preliminary studies shows nanocomposite scintillators are promising for radiation detection. Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum

  6. Energy transfer rates of KY3F10:Yb:Nd:Tm crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrol, L. C.; Linhares, H. M. S. M. D.; Librantz, A. F. H.; Baldochi, S. L.; Gomes, L.; Ranieri, I. M.

    2010-11-01

    In this work we present the spectroscopic properties of KY3F10 (KY3F) single crystals doped with thulium and also co-doped with ytterbium and/or neodymium, KY3F:Yb:Nd:Tm and KY3F:Nd:Tm. The most important processes that lead to the thulium up conversion emissions were identified. The absorption spectra of the samples were measured at room temperature in the range of 200 nm-1200 nm. The emission spectra were obtained by exciting the samples with a 797 nm laser diode and were analyzed using a lock-in amplifier technique. A time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy technique was employed to measure the luminescence decays and to determine the mechanisms involved in the energy transfer up-conversion processes. Analysis of the energy transfer processes dynamics in KY3F:Yb:Tm:Nd crystal, using selective pulsed-laser excitations, shows that the energy transfer from Nd3+ to Yb3+ ions is the mechanism responsible for the enhancement of the blue up-conversion efficiency when compared with the Yb:Tm system. In the case of KY3F:Nd:Tm it is observed emissions at 350, 355 and 452 nm excited by an additional Yb:Tm step cross relaxation, Yb (2F5/2) : Tm (1G4) that populates the 1D2 (Tm3+) excited level. A study of the energy transfer processes in KY3F:Yb:Tm:Nd crystal showed that the 1G4 excited level is mainly populated by the sequence of two nonradiative energy processes that starts well after the Nd3+ and Tm3+ excitation at 797nm: Nd (4F3/2) → Yb (2F7/2) followed by Yb (2F5/2) → Tm (3H4) → Tm (1G4).

  7. Early career: Templating of liquid crystal microstructures by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Heinen, Jennifer M.

    2014-12-31

    This research has shown that the microstructure of self-assembled copolymers can be decoupled from the polymer chemistry. The simplest polymer architecture, linear block copolymers, is valuable for a broad range of applications, including adhesives and coatings, medical devices, electronics and energy storage, because these block copolymers reproducibly self-assemble into microphase separated nanoscale domains. Unfortunately, the self-assembled microstructure is tuned by polymer composition, thus limiting the potential to simultaneously optimize chemical, mechanical, and transport properties for desired applications. To this end, much work was been put into manipulating block copolymer self-assembly independently of polymer composition. These efforts have included the use of additives or solvents to alter polymer chain conformation, the addition of a third monomer to produce ABC triblock terpolymers, architectures with mixed blocks, such as tapered/gradient polymers, and the synthesis of other nonlinear molecular architectures. This work has shown that the microstructures formed by linear ABC terpolymers can be altered by controlling the architecture of the polymer molecules at a constant monomer composition, so that the microstructure is tuned independently from the chemical properties.

  8. Trajectory study of energy transfer and unimolecular dissociation of highly excited allyl with argon.

    PubMed

    Conte, Riccardo; Houston, Paul L; Bowman, Joel M

    2014-09-11

    The influence of rotational excitation on energy transfer in single collisions of allyl with argon and on allyl dissociation is investigated. About 90,000 classical scattering simulations are performed in order to determine collision-induced changes in internal energy and in allyl rotational angular momentum. Dissociation is studied by means of about 50,000 additional trajectories evolved for the isolated allyl under three different conditions: allyl with no angular momentum (J = 0); allyl with the same microcanonically sampled initial conditions used for the collisions (J*); allyl evolving from the corresponding exit conditions after the collision. The potential energy surface is the sum of an intramolecular potential and an interaction one, and it has already been used in a previous work on allyl-argon scattering (Conte, R.; Houston, P. L.; Bowman, J. M. J. Phys. Chem. A 2013, 117, 14028-14041). Energy transfer data show that increased initial rotation favors, on average, increased relaxation of the excited molecule. The availability of a high-level intramolecular potential energy surface permits us to study the dependence of energy transfer on the type of starting allyl isomer. A turning point analysis is presented, and highly efficient collisions are detected. Collision-induced variations in the allyl rotational angular momentum may be quite large and are found to be distributed according to three regimes. The roles of rotational angular momentum, collision, and type of isomer on allyl unimolecular dissociation are considered by looking at dissociations times, kinetic energies of the fragments, and branching ratios. Generally, rotational angular momentum has a strong influence on the dissociation dynamics, while the single collision and the type of starting isomer are less influential.

  9. Corrosion and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Water Dispersed with Carboxylate Additives and Multi Walled Carbon Nano Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorthy, Chellapilla V. K. N. S. N.; Srinivas, Vadapalli

    2016-10-01

    This paper summarizes a recent work on anti-corrosive properties and enhanced heat transfer properties of carboxylated water based nanofluids. Water mixed with sebacic acid as carboxylate additive found to be resistant to corrosion and suitable for automotive environment. The carboxylated water is dispersed with very low mass concentration of carbon nano tubes at 0.025, 0.05 and 0.1 %. The stability of nanofluids in terms of zeta potential is found to be good with carboxylated water compared to normal water. The heat transfer performance of nanofluids is carried out on an air cooled heat exchanger similar to an automotive radiator with incoming air velocities across radiator at 5, 10 and 15 m/s. The flow Reynolds number of water is in the range of 2500-6000 indicating developing flow regime. The corrosion resistance of nanofluids is found to be good indicating its suitability to automotive environment. There is a slight increase in viscosity and marginal decrease in the specific heat of nanofluids with addition of carboxylate as well as CNTs. Significant improvement is observed in the thermal conductivity of nanofluids dispersed with CNTs. During heat transfer experimentation, the inside heat transfer coefficient and overall heat transfer coefficient has also improved markedly. It is also found that the velocity of air and flow rate of coolant plays an important role in enhancement of the heat transfer coefficient and overall heat transfer coefficient.

  10. Structural and orientation effects on electronic energy transfer between silicon quantum dots with dopants and with silver adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Vinson, N; Freitag, H; Micha, D A

    2014-06-28

    Starting from the atomic structure of silicon quantum dots (QDs), and utilizing ab initio electronic structure calculations within the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) treatment, a model has been developed to characterize electronic excitation energy transfer between QDs. Electronic energy transfer rates, KEET, between selected identical pairs of crystalline silicon quantum dots systems, either bare, doped with Al or P, or adsorbed with Ag and Ag3, have been calculated and analyzed to extend previous work on light absorption by QDs. The effects of their size and relative orientation on energy transfer rates for each system have also been considered. Using time-dependent density functional theory and the hybrid functional HSE06, the FRET treatment was employed to model electronic energy transfer rates within the dipole-dipole interaction approximation. Calculations with adsorbed Ag show that: (a) addition of Ag increases rates up to 100 times, (b) addition of Ag3 increases rates up to 1000 times, (c) collinear alignment of permanent dipoles increases transfer rates by an order of magnitude compared to parallel orientation, and (d) smaller QD-size increases transfer due to greater electronic orbitals overlap. Calculations with dopants show that: (a) p-type and n-type dopants enhance energy transfer up to two orders of magnitude, (b) surface-doping with P and center-doping with Al show the greatest rates, and (c) KEET is largest for collinear permanent dipoles when the dopant is on the outer surface and for parallel permanent dipoles when the dopant is inside the QD.

  11. Long-range excitation energy transfer in Langmuir-Blodgett multilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.; Aussenegg, Franz R.

    1989-07-01

    In Langmuir-Blodgett films containing organic dyes, efficient energy transfer over distances exceeding 100 nm is observed. This exceptionally long-range transfer is interpreted as due to special mutual orientation of the dye molecules.

  12. Picosecond energy transfer and multiexciton transfer outpaces Auger recombination in binary CdSe nanoplatelet solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, Clare E.; Fedin, Igor; Zhang, Hui; Gray, Stephen K.; Govorov, Alexander O.; Talapin, Dmitri V.; Schaller, Richard D.

    2015-05-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) enables photosynthetic light harvesting, wavelength downconversion in light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and optical biosensing schemes. The rate and efficiency of this donor to acceptor transfer of excitation between chromophores dictates the utility of FRET and can unlock new device operation motifs including quantum-funnel solar cells, non-contact chromophore pumping from a proximal LED, and markedly reduced gain thresholds. However, the fastest reported FRET time constants involving spherical quantum dots (0.12-1 ns; refs , , ) do not outpace biexciton Auger recombination (0.01-0.1 ns; ref. ), which impedes multiexciton-driven applications including electrically pumped lasers and carrier-multiplication-enhanced photovoltaics. Few-monolayer-thick semiconductor nanoplatelets (NPLs) with tens-of-nanometre lateral dimensions exhibit intense optical transitions and hundreds-of-picosecond Auger recombination, but heretofore lack FRET characterizations. We examine binary CdSe NPL solids and show that interplate FRET (˜6-23 ps, presumably for co-facial arrangements) can occur 15-50 times faster than Auger recombination and demonstrate multiexcitonic FRET, making such materials ideal candidates for advanced technologies.

  13. Variety in excitation energy transfer processes from phycobilisomes to photosystems I and II.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Aikawa, Shimpei; Niwa, Kyosuke; Abe, Tomoko; Murakami, Akio; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2017-02-09

    The light-harvesting antennas of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms capture light energy and transfer it to the reaction centers of their photosystems. The light-harvesting antennas of cyanobacteria and red algae, called phycobilisomes (PBSs), supply light energy to both photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). However, the excitation energy transfer processes from PBS to PSI and PSII are not understood in detail. In the present study, the energy transfer processes from PBS to PSs in various cyanobacteria and red algae were examined in vivo by selectively exciting their PSs or PBSs, and measuring the resulting picosecond to nanosecond time-resolved fluorescences. By observing the delayed fluorescence spectrum of PBS-selective excitation in Arthrospira platensis, we demonstrated that energy transfer from PBS to PSI via PSII (PBS→PSII→PSI transfer) occurs even for PSI trimers. The contribution of PBS→PSII→PSI transfer was species dependent, being largest in the wild-type of red alga Pyropia yezoensis (formerly Porphyra yezoensis) and smallest in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. Comparing the time-resolved fluorescence after PSs- and PBS-selective excitation, we revealed that light energy flows from CP43 to CP47 by energy transfer between the neighboring PSII monomers in PBS-PSII supercomplexes. We also suggest two pathways of energy transfer: direct energy transfer from PBS to PSI (PBS→PSI transfer) and indirect transfer through PSII (PBS→PSII→PSI transfer). We also infer that PBS→PSI transfer conveys light energy to a lower-energy red chlorophyll than PBS→PSII→PSI transfer.

  14. Energy transfer in reactive and non-reactive H/sub 2/ + OH collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rashed, O.; Brown, N.J.

    1985-04-01

    We have used the methods of quasi-classical dynamics to compute energy transfer properties of non-reactive and reactive H/sub 2/ + OH collisions. Energy transfer has been investigated as function of translational temperature, reagent rotational energy, and reagent vibrational energy. The energy transfer mechanism is complex with ten types of energy transfer possible, and evidence was found for all types. There is much more exchange between the translational degree of freedom and the H/sub 2/ vibrational degree of freedom than there is between translation and OH vibration. Translational energy is transferred to the rotational degrees of freedom of each molecule. There is a greater propensity for the transfer of translation to OH rotation than H/sub 2/ rotation. In reactive collisions, increases in reagent translational temperature predominantly appear as vibrational energy in the water molecule. Energy transfer in non-reactive and reactive collisions does not depend strongly on the initial angular momentum in either molecule. In non-reactive collisions, vibrational energy is transferred to translation, to the rotational degree of freedom of the same molecule, and to the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of the other molecule. In reactive collisions, the major effect of increasing the vibrational energy in reagent molecules is that, on the average, the vibrational energy of the reagents appears as product vibrational energy. 18 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. A spectroscopist's view of energy states, energy transfers, and chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Moore, C Bradley

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes a research career beginning at Berkeley in 1960, shortly after Sputnik and the invention of the laser. Following thesis work on vibrational spectroscopy and the chemical reactivity of small molecules, we studied vibrational energy transfers in my own lab. Collision-induced transfers among vibrations of a single molecule, from one molecule to another, and from vibration to rotation and translation were elucidated. My research group also studied the competition between vibrational relaxation and chemical reaction for potentially reactive collisions with one molecule vibrationally excited. Lasers were used to enrich isotopes by the excitation of a predissociative transition of a selected isotopomer. We also tested the hypotheses of transition-state theory for unimolecular reactions of ketene, formaldehyde, and formyl fluoride by (a) resolving individual molecular eigenstates above a dissociation threshold, (b) locating vibrational levels at the transition state, (c) observing quantum resonances in the barrier region for motion along a reaction coordinate, and (d) studying energy release to fragments.

  16. Internal energy distributions from nitrogen dioxide fluorescence. 2. Collisional energy transfer from excited nitrogen dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Patten, K.O. Jr.; Johnston, H.S. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1993-09-30

    We follow the collisional deactivation of laser-excited nitrogen dioxide through its dispersed fluorescence. The energy acceptor gases are NO[sub 2] at four excitation energies ranging from 18828 to 24989 cm[sup [minus]1] and five monatomic gases, four diatomic gases, and three polyatomic gases with 18828-cm[sup [minus]1] excitation energy. The nominal products are the shapes of the internal energy distributions, which are obtained and plotted for several representative cases. From these distributions, the first three moments of the internal energy distributions are derived as a function of molecular collisions and tabulated as (i) the average internal energy, (ii) energy spread, and (iii) skewness. These quantities are plotted against c(M)t, the product of buffer gas concentration c(M) and delay time after laser excitation t(0.5-2 [mu]s), which is a quantity proportional to number of collisions. The negative slope of average energy vs c(M)t is the macroscopic energy-transfer rate constant, k[sub [epsilon

  17. Dependence of the lifetime upon the excitation energy and intramolecular energy transfer rates: the 5D0Eu(III) emission case.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rute A S; Nolasco, Mariela; Roma, Ana C; Longo, Ricardo L; Malta, Oscar L; Carlos, Luis D

    2012-09-17

    In many Eu(III)-based materials, the presence of an intermediate energy level, such as ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) states or defects, that mediates the energy transfer mechanisms can strongly affect the lifetime of the (5)D(0) state, mainly at near-resonance (large transfer rates). We present results for the dependence of the (5)D(0) lifetime on the excitation wavelength for a wide class of Eu(III)-based compounds: ionic salts, polyoxometalates (POMs), core/shell inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) and nanotubes, coordination polymers, β-diketonate complexes, organic-inorganic hybrids, macro-mesocellular foams, functionalized mesoporous silica, and layered double hydroxides (LDHs). This yet unexplained behavior is successfully modelled by a coupled set of rate equations with seven states, in which the wavelength dependence is simulated by varying the intramolecular energy transfer rates. In addition, the simulations of the rate equations for four- and three-level systems show a strong dependence of the emission lifetime upon the excitation wavelength if near-resonant non-radiative energy transfer processes are present, indicating that the proposed scheme can be generalized to other trivalent lanthanide ions, as observed for Tb(III)/Ce(III). Finally, the proper use of lifetime definition in the presence of energy transfer is emphasized.

  18. Modeling excitation energy transfer in multi-BODIPY architectures.

    PubMed

    Azarias, Cloé; Russo, Roberto; Cupellini, Lorenzo; Mennucci, Benedetta; Jacquemin, Denis

    2017-02-15

    The excitation energy transfer (EET) allowing the concentration of the energy has been investigated in several multi-BODIPY architectures with the help of an approach coupling time dependent density functional theory to an implicit solvation scheme, the polarizable continuum model. We have first considered several strategies to compute the electronic coupling in a dyad varying the size of the donor/acceptor units, the bridge, the geometries and conformations. We have next studied the electronic coupling in three different architectures for which the EET rate constants have been experimentally measured both from luminescence and transient absorption data and from Förster theory. A good agreement with experimental values was obtained. Finally, in an effort to further improve these systems, we have designed several series of BODIPY triads, investigating the effect of acidochromism, core modifications, the position of the linkage and chemical substitutions on the EET coupling and rate constant. We show that several architectures allow us to increase the EET rate by one order of magnitude compared to the original compound.

  19. Proton Linear Energy Transfer measurement using Emulsion Cloud Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae-ik; Park, Seyjoon; Kim, Haksoo; Kim, Meyoung; Jeong, Chiyoung; Cho, Sungkoo; Lim, Young Kyung; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Morishima, Kunihiro; Naganawa, Naotaka; Sato, Osamu; Kwak, Jungwon; Kim, Sung Hyun; Cho, Jung Sook; Ahn, Jung Keun; Kim, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Chun Sil; Incerti, Sebastien

    2015-04-01

    This study proposes to determine the correlation between the Volume Pulse Height (VPH) measured by nuclear emulsion and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) calculated by Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4. The nuclear emulsion was irradiated at the National Cancer Center (NCC) with a therapeutic proton beam and was installed at 5.2 m distance from the beam nozzle structure with various thicknesses of water-equivalent material (PMMA) blocks to position with specific positions along the Bragg curve. After the beam exposure and development of the emulsion films, the films were scanned by S-UTS developed in Nagoya University. The proton tracks in the scanned films were reconstructed using the 'NETSCAN' method. Through this procedure, the VPH can be derived from each reconstructed proton track at each position along the Bragg curve. The VPH value indicates the magnitude of energy loss in proton track. By comparison with the simulation results obtained using Geant4, we found the correlation between the LET calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and the VPH measured by the nuclear emulsion.

  20. Ion-specific weak adsorption of salts and water/octanol transfer free energy of a model amphiphilic hexapeptide.

    PubMed

    Déjugnat, Christophe; Dufrêche, Jean-François; Zemb, Thomas

    2011-04-21

    An amphiphilic hexapeptide has been used as a model to quantify how specific ion effects induced by addition of four salts tune the hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance and induce temperature-dependant coacervate formation from aqueous solution. The hexapeptide chosen is present as a dimer with low transfer energy from water to octanol. Taking sodium chloride as the reference state in the Hofmeister scale, we identify water activity effects and therefore measure the free energy of transfer from water to octanol and separately the free energy associated to the adsorption of chaotropic ions or the desorption of kosmotropic ions for the same amphiphilic peptide. These effects have the same order of magnitude: therefore, both energies of solvation as well as transfer into octanol strongly depend on the nature of the electrolytes used to formulate any buffer. Model peptides could be used on separation processes based on criteria linked to "Hofmeister" but different from volume and valency.

  1. 76 FR 49764 - Steve Mason Enterprises, Inc., Green Energy Trans, LLC; Notice of Transfer of Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Steve Mason Enterprises, Inc., Green Energy Trans, LLC; Notice of Transfer... transferred ownership of its exempted project property and facilities for Project No. 7742 to Green...

  2. 48 CFR 204.470 - U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol. 204.470 Section 204.470 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... Information Within Industry 204.470 U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol....

  3. 48 CFR 204.470 - U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol. 204.470 Section 204.470 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... Information Within Industry 204.470 U.S.-International Atomic Energy Agency Additional Protocol....

  4. 77 FR 2293 - AmeriGas Propane, L.P., AmeriGas Propane, Inc., Energy Transfer Partners, L.P., and Energy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... AmeriGas Propane, L.P., AmeriGas Propane, Inc., Energy Transfer Partners, L.P., and Energy Transfer...'') with AmeriGas Propane, L.P. (``AmeriGas''), AmeriGas Propane, Inc., Energy Transfer Partners, L.P. (``ETP''), and Energy Transfer Partners GP, L.P. (``ETP GP''), which is designed to guard...

  5. 10 CFR 37.71 - Additional requirements for transfer of category 1 and category 2 quantities of radioactive...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... category 2 quantities of radioactive material. 37.71 Section 37.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF CATEGORY 1 AND CATEGORY 2 QUANTITIES OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL Physical Protection in... radioactive material. A licensee transferring a category 1 or category 2 quantity of radioactive material to...

  6. Crossed Beam Energy Transfer in the NIF ICF Target Design

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, E A; Hinkel, D E; Hittinger, J A

    2003-08-27

    In the National Ignition Facility (NIF) ICF point design, the cylindrical hohlraum target is illuminated by multiple laser beams through two laser entrance holes on the ends. According to simulations by LASNEX and HYDRA plasma created inside the hohlraum will stream out of the LEH, accelerate to supersonic speeds and then fan out radially. Inside the hohlraum, flows are subsonic. Forward Brillouin scattering can transfer energy between pairs of laser beams (0 and 1) if the following frequency matching condition is satisfied: {omega}{sub 0} - {omega}{sub 1} = (k{sub 0} - k{sub 1}) {center_dot} V + |k{sub 0} - k{sub 1}| c{sub s} (1) where {omega}{sub 0.1} and k{sub 0.1} are the frequencies and wave-numbers of the two laser beams, V is the plasma flow velocity and c{sub s} is the local ion sound speed. In the nominal case of equal frequency beams, this requires the component of the plasma flow velocity transverse to the bisector of the beam directions to be sonic, with the resulting transfer being to the downstream beam. In the NIF beam geometry, this is from the outer to inner cones of beams. The physics of this transfer is the same as in beam bending; the difference being that in the case of beam bending the effect is to redistribute power to the downstream side of the single beam. Were significant power transfer to occur in the point design, the delicately tuned implosion symmetry would be spoiled. To directly compensate for the transfer, the incident beam powers would have to be adjusted. The greatest vulnerability in the point design thus occurs at 15.2ns, when the inner beams are at their peak power and are at their nominal design power limit. In this situation, some other means of symmetry control would be required, such as re-pointing. At 15.2ns, the envelope focal intensities of the outer and inner beams are approximately 10{sup 15} and 6.7 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} respectively. There is little absorption or diffractive spreading of the beams in the crossing

  7. Energy transfer and energy level decay processes in Tm{sup 3+}-doped tellurite glass

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, Laercio; Lousteau, Joris; Milanese, Daniel; Scarpignato, Gerardo C.; Jackson, Stuart D.

    2012-03-15

    The primary excited state decay and energy transfer processes in singly Tm{sup 3+}-doped TeO{sub 2}:ZnO:Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}:GeO{sub 2} (TZBG) glass relating to the {sup 3}F{sub 4}{yields}{sup 3}H{sub 6}{approx}1.85 {mu}m laser transition have been investigated in detail using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Selective laser excitation of the {sup 3}H{sub 4} manifold at 794 nm, the {sup 3}H{sub 5} manifold at 1220 nm, and {sup 3}F{sub 4} manifold at 1760 nm has established that the {sup 3}H{sub 5} manifold is entirely quenched by multiphonon relaxation in tellurite glass. The luminescence from the {sup 3}H{sub 4} manifold with an emission peak at 1465 nm suffers strong suppression due to cross relaxation that populates the {sup 3}F{sub 4} level with a near quadratic dependence on the Tm{sup 3+} concentration. The {sup 3}F{sub 4} lifetime becomes longer as the Tm{sup 3+} concentration increases due to energy migration and decreases to 2.92 ms when [Tm{sup 3+}] = 4 mol. % as a result of quasi-resonant energy transfer to free OH{sup -} radicals present in the glass at concentrations between 1 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and 2 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. Judd-Ofelt theory in conjunction with absorption measurements were used to obtain the radiative lifetimes and branching ratios of the energy levels located below 25 000 cm{sup -1}. The spectroscopic parameters, the cross relaxation and Tm{sup 3+}({sup 3}F{sub 4}) {yields} OH{sup -} energy transfer rates were used in a numerical model for laser transitions emitting at 2335 nm and 1865 nm.

  8. Polymer-grafted lignin surfactants prepared via reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Chetali; Washburn, Newell R

    2014-08-12

    Kraft lignin grafted with hydrophilic polymers has been prepared using reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization and investigated for use as a surfactant. In this preliminary study, polyacrylamide and poly(acrylic acid) were grafted from a lignin RAFT macroinitiator at average initiator site densities estimated to be 2 per particle and 17 per particle. The target degrees of polymerization were 50 and 100, but analysis of cleaved polyacrylamide was consistent with a higher average molecular weight, suggesting not all sites were able to participate in the polymerization. All materials were readily soluble in water, and dynamic light scattering data indicate polymer-grafted lignin coexisted in isolated and aggregated forms in aqueous media. The characteristic size was 15-20 nm at low concentrations, and aggregation appeared to be a stronger function of degree of polymerization than graft density. These species were surface active, reducing the surface tension to as low as 60 dyn/cm at 1 mg/mL, and a greater decrease was observed than for polymer-grafted silica nanoparticles, suggesting that the lignin core was also surface active. While these lignin surfactants were soluble in water, they were not soluble in hexanes. Thus, it was unexpected that water-in-oil emulsions formed in all surfactant compositions and solvent ratios tested, with average droplet sizes of 10-20 μm. However, although polymer-grafted lignin has structural features similar to nanoparticles used in Pickering emulsions, its interfacial behavior was qualitatively different. While at air-water interfaces, the hydrophilic grafts promote effective reductions in surface tension, we hypothesize that the low grafting density in these lignin surfactants favors partitioning into the hexanes side of the oil-water interface because collapsed conformations of the polymer grafts improve interfacial coverage and reduce water-hexanes interactions. We propose that polymer-grafted lignin

  9. Monthly Variations of Low-Energy Ballistic Transfers to Lunar Halo Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of low-energy transfers between the Earth and Moon vary from one month to the next largely due to the Earth's and Moon's non-circular, non-coplanar orbits in the solar system. This paper characterizes those monthly variations as it explores the trade space of low-energy lunar transfers across many months. Mission designers may use knowledge of these variations to swiftly design desirable low-energy lunar transfers in any given month.

  10. Additive Manufacturing/Diagnostics via the High Frequency Induction Heating of Metal Powders: The Determination of the Power Transfer Factor for Fine Metallic Spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, Orlando; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Caravias, George; Holcomb, Matthew

    2015-03-11

    Grid Logic Inc. is developing a method for sintering and melting fine metallic powders for additive manufacturing using spatially-compact, high-frequency magnetic fields called Micro-Induction Sintering (MIS). One of the challenges in advancing MIS technology for additive manufacturing is in understanding the power transfer to the particles in a powder bed. This knowledge is important to achieving efficient power transfer, control, and selective particle heating during the MIS process needed for commercialization of the technology. The project s work provided a rigorous physics-based model for induction heating of fine spherical particles as a function of frequency and particle size. This simulation improved upon Grid Logic s earlier models and provides guidance that will make the MIS technology more effective. The project model will be incorporated into Grid Logic s power control circuit of the MIS 3D printer product and its diagnostics technology to optimize the sintering process for part quality and energy efficiency.

  11. Electronic energy transfer in model photosynthetic systems: Markovian vs. non-Markovian dynamics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Navinder; Brumer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    A simple numerical algorithm for solving the non-Markovian master equation in the second Born approximation is developed and used to propagate the traditional dimer system that models electronic energy transfer in photosynthetic systems. Specifically, the coupled integro-differential equations for the reduced density matrix are solved by an efficient auxiliary function method in both the energy and site representations. In addition to giving exact results to this order, the approach allows us to access the range of the reorganization energy and decay rates of the phonon auto-correlation function for which the Markovian Redfield theory and the second-order approximation is useful. For example, the use of Redfield theory for lambda > 10 cm(-1) in Fenna-Mathews-Olson (FMO) type systems is shown to be fundamentally inaccurate.

  12. Relaxation dynamics and exciton energy transfer in the low-temperature phase of MEH-PPV

    SciTech Connect

    Consani, Cristina; Koch, Federico; Panzer, Fabian; Unger, Thomas; Köhler, Anna; Brixner, Tobias

    2015-06-07

    Understanding the effects of aggregation on exciton relaxation and energy transfer is relevant to control photoinduced function in organic electronics and photovoltaics. Here, we explore the photoinduced dynamics in the low-temperature aggregated phase of a conjugated polymer by transient absorption and coherent electronic two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopy. Coherent 2D spectroscopy allows observing couplings among photoexcited states and discriminating band shifts from homogeneous broadening, additionally accessing the ultrafast dynamics at various excitation energies simultaneously with high spectral resolution. By combining the results of the two techniques, we differentiate between an initial exciton relaxation, which is not characterized by significant exciton mobility, and energy transport between different chromophores in the aggregate.

  13. Polymers suppress the inverse transfers of energy and the enstrophy flux fluctuations in two-dimensional turbulence.

    PubMed

    Kellay, H

    2004-09-01

    The addition of minute amounts of a flexible polymer to two-dimensional turbulence produced in fast-flowing soap films affects large scales and small scales differently. For large scales, the inverse transfers of energy are suppressed. For small scales, where mean quantities are barely affected, the enstrophy flux fluctuations are significantly reduced, making the flow less chaotic.

  14. Fluorescence energy transfer efficiency in labeled yeast cytochrome c: a rapid screen for ion biocompatibility in aqueous ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Sheila N; Zhao, Hua; Pandey, Siddharth; Heller, William T; Bright, Frank; Baker, Gary A

    2011-01-01

    A fluorescence energy transfer de-quenching assay was implemented to follow the equilibrium unfolding behaviour of site-specific tetramethylrhodamine-labelled yeast cytochrome c in aqueous ionic liquid solutions; additionally, this approach offers the prospect of naked eye screening for biocompatible ion combinations in hydrated ionic liquids.

  15. Organic solar cells: understanding the role of Förster resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Feron, Krishna; Belcher, Warwick J; Fell, Christopher J; Dastoor, Paul C

    2012-12-12

    Organic solar cells have the potential to become a low-cost sustainable energy source. Understanding the photoconversion mechanism is key to the design of efficient organic solar cells. In this review, we discuss the processes involved in the photo-electron conversion mechanism, which may be subdivided into exciton harvesting, exciton transport, exciton dissociation, charge transport and extraction stages. In particular, we focus on the role of energy transfer as described by F¨orster resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory in the photoconversion mechanism. FRET plays a major role in exciton transport, harvesting and dissociation. The spectral absorption range of organic solar cells may be extended using sensitizers that efficiently transfer absorbed energy to the photoactive materials. The limitations of F¨orster theory to accurately calculate energy transfer rates are discussed. Energy transfer is the first step of an efficient two-step exciton dissociation process and may also be used to preferentially transport excitons to the heterointerface, where efficient exciton dissociation may occur. However, FRET also competes with charge transfer at the heterointerface turning it in a potential loss mechanism. An energy cascade comprising both energy transfer and charge transfer may aid in separating charges and is briefly discussed. Considering the extent to which the photo-electron conversion efficiency is governed by energy transfer, optimisation of this process offers the prospect of improved organic photovoltaic performance and thus aids in realising the potential of organic solar cells.

  16. Organic Solar Cells: Understanding the Role of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Feron, Krishna; Belcher, Warwick J.; Fell, Christopher J.; Dastoor, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Organic solar cells have the potential to become a low-cost sustainable energy source. Understanding the photoconversion mechanism is key to the design of efficient organic solar cells. In this review, we discuss the processes involved in the photo-electron conversion mechanism, which may be subdivided into exciton harvesting, exciton transport, exciton dissociation, charge transport and extraction stages. In particular, we focus on the role of energy transfer as described by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory in the photoconversion mechanism. FRET plays a major role in exciton transport, harvesting and dissociation. The spectral absorption range of organic solar cells may be extended using sensitizers that efficiently transfer absorbed energy to the photoactive materials. The limitations of Förster theory to accurately calculate energy transfer rates are discussed. Energy transfer is the first step of an efficient two-step exciton dissociation process and may also be used to preferentially transport excitons to the heterointerface, where efficient exciton dissociation may occur. However, FRET also competes with charge transfer at the heterointerface turning it in a potential loss mechanism. An energy cascade comprising both energy transfer and charge transfer may aid in separating charges and is briefly discussed. Considering the extent to which the photo-electron conversion efficiency is governed by energy transfer, optimisation of this process offers the prospect of improved organic photovoltaic performance and thus aids in realising the potential of organic solar cells. PMID:23235328

  17. Conjugated-polymer-based energy-transfer systems for antimicrobial and anticancer applications.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Huanxiang; Wang, Bing; Lv, Fengting; Liu, Libing; Wang, Shu

    2014-10-29

    Conjugated polymers (CPs) attract a lot of attention in sensing, imaging, and biomedical applications because of recent achievements that are highlighted in this Research News article. A brief review of recent progress in the application of CP-based energy-transfer systems in antimicrobial and anticancer treatments is provided. The transfer of excitation energy from CPs to photosensitizers leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are able to efficiently kill pathogenic microorganisms and cancer cells in the surroundings. Both fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET) modes are discussed.

  18. Nonradiative resonant energy transfer between PbS QDs in porous matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, Elena V.; Litvin, Aleksandr P.; Parfenov, Peter S.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Cherevkov, Sergei A.; Baranov, Alexander V.

    2013-09-01

    Nonradiative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between lead sulfide quantum dots (QDs) of two different sizes embedded in porous matrix is observed by a fluorescence spectroscopy. Analysis of decays of photoluminescence from QD mixture shows that energy transfer in studied systems is determined by static quenching, specific for direct contact between QD-donor and QD-acceptor in the QDs close-packed ensembles. From steady-state spectral analysis it was found that efficiency of energy transfer depends on the molar ratio QD-donor/QD-acceptor and energy transfer from the donor to the acceptor passes by several channels.

  19. Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime Using Controlled Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Don W. Miller; Andrew Kauffmann; Eric Kreidler; Dongxu Li; Hanying Liu; Daniel Mills; Thomas D. Radcliff; Joseph Talnagi

    2001-12-31

    A comprehensive description of the accomplishments of the DOE grant titled, ''Local Measurement of Fuel Energy Deposition and Heat Transfer Environment During Fuel Lifetime using Controlled Calorimetry''.

  20. Non-Radiative Energy Transfer Mediated by Hybrid Light-Matter States.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaolan; Chervy, Thibault; Wang, Shaojun; George, Jino; Thomas, Anoop; Hutchison, James A; Devaux, Eloise; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2016-05-17

    We present direct evidence of enhanced non-radiative energy transfer between two J-aggregated cyanine dyes strongly coupled to the vacuum field of a cavity. Excitation spectroscopy and femtosecond pump-probe measurements show that the energy transfer is highly efficient when both the donor and acceptor form light-matter hybrid states with the vacuum field. The rate of energy transfer is increased by a factor of seven under those conditions as compared to the normal situation outside the cavity, with a corresponding effect on the energy transfer efficiency. The delocalized hybrid states connect the donor and acceptor molecules and clearly play the role of a bridge to enhance the rate of energy transfer. This finding has fundamental implications for coherent energy transport and light-energy harvesting.

  1. From membrane tension to channel gating: A principal energy transfer mechanism for mechanosensitive channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejun C; Liu, Zhenfeng; Li, Jie

    2016-11-01

    Mechanosensitive (MS) channels are evolutionarily conserved membrane proteins that play essential roles in multiple cellular processes, including sensing mechanical forces and regulating osmotic pressure. Bacterial MscL and MscS are two prototypes of MS channels. Numerous structural studies, in combination with biochemical and cellular data, provide valuable insights into the mechanism of energy transfer from membrane tension to gating of the channel. We discuss these data in a unified two-state model of thermodynamics. In addition, we propose a lipid diffusion-mediated mechanism to explain the adaptation phenomenon of MscS.

  2. Methods and kits for nucleic acid analysis using fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    DOEpatents

    Kwok, Pui-Yan; Chen, Xiangning

    1999-01-01

    A method for detecting the presence of a target nucleotide or sequence of nucleotides in a nucleic acid is disclosed. The method is comprised of forming an oligonucleotide labeled with two fluorophores on the nucleic acid target site. The doubly labeled oligonucleotide is formed by addition of a singly labeled dideoxynucleoside triphosphate to a singly labeled polynucleotide or by ligation of two singly labeled polynucleotides. Detection of fluorescence resonance energy transfer upon denaturation indicates the presence of the target. Kits are also provided. The method is particularly applicable to genotyping.

  3. The Synergism Between Heat and Mass Transfer Additive and Advanced Surfaces in Aqueous LiBr Horizontal Tube Absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.A.

    1999-03-24

    Experiments were conducted in a laboratory to investigate the absorption of water vapor into a falling-film of aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr). A mini-absorber test stand was used to test smooth tubes and a variety of advanced tube surfaces placed horizontally in a single-row bundle. The bundle had six copper tubes; each tube had an outside diameter of 15.9-mm and a length of 0.32-m. A unique feature of the stand is its ability to operate continuously and support testing of LiBr brine at mass fractions {ge} 0.62. The test stand can also support testing to study the effect of the failing film mass flow rate, the coolant mass flow rate, the coolant temperature, the absorber pressure and the tube spacing. Manufacturers of absorption chillers add small quantities of a heat and mass transfer additive to improve the performance of the absorbers. The additive causes surface stirring which enhances the transport of absorbate into the bulk of the film. Absorption may also be enhanced with advanced tube surfaces that mechanically induce secondary flows in the falling film without increasing the thickness of the film. Several tube geometry's were identified and tested with the intent of mixing the film and renewing the interface with fresh solution from the tube wall. Testing was completed on a smooth tube and several different externally enhanced tube surfaces. Experiments were conducted over the operating conditions of 6.5 mm Hg absorber pressure, coolant temperatures ranging from 20 to 35 C and LiBr mass fractions ranging from 0.60 through 0.62. Initially the effect of tube spacing was investigated for the smooth tube surface, tested with no heat and mass transfer additive. Test results showed the absorber load and the mass absorbed increased as the tube spacing increased because of the improved wetting of the tube bundle. However, tube spacing was not a critical factor if heat and mass transfer additive was active in the mini-absorber. The additive dramatically affected

  4. Single-collision studies of energy transfer and chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Valentini, J.J.

    1993-12-01

    The research focus in this group is state-to-state dynamics of reaction and energy transfer in collisions of free radicals such as H, OH, and CH{sub 3} with H{sub 2}, alkanes, alcohols and other hydrogen-containing molecules. The motivation for the work is the desire to provide a detailed understanding of the chemical dynamics of prototype reactions that are important in the production and utilization of energy sources, most importantly in combustion. The work is primarily experimental, but with an important and growing theoretical/computational component. The focus of this research program is now on reactions in which at least one of the reactants and one of the products is polyatomic. The objective is to determine how the high dimensionality of the reactants and products differentiates such reactions from atom + diatom reactions of the same kinematics and energetics. The experiments use highly time-resolved laser spectroscopic methods to prepare reactant states and analyze the states of the products on a single-collision time scale. The primary spectroscopic tool for product state analysis is coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. CARS is used because of its generality and because the extraction of quantum state populations from CARS spectra is straightforward. The combination of the generality and easy analysis of CARS makes possible absolute cross section measurements (both state-to-state and total), a particularly valuable capability for characterizing reactive and inelastic collisions. Reactant free radicals are produced by laser photolysis of appropriate precursors. For reactant vibrational excitation stimulated Raman techniques are being developed and implemented.

  5. Inter-and intraspecific variation in excited-state triplet energy transfer rates in reaction centers of photosynthetic bacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Laible, P. D.; Morris, Z. S.; Thurnauer, M. C.; Schiffer, M.; Hanson, D. K.

    2003-08-01

    In protein-cofactor reaction center (RC) complexes of purple photosynthetic bacteria, the major role of the bound carotenoid (C) is to quench the triplet state formed on the primary electron donor (P) before its sensitization of the excited singlet state of molecular oxygen from its ground triplet state. This triplet energy is transferred from P to C via the bacteriochlorophyll monomer B{sub B}. Using time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TREPR), we have examined the temperature dependence of the rates of this triplet energy transfer reaction in the RC of three wild-type species of purple nonsulfur bacteria. Species-specific differences in the rate of transfer were observed. Wild-type Rhodobacter capsulatus RCs were less efficient at the triplet transfer reaction than Rhodobacter sphaeroides RCs, but were more efficient than Rhodospirillum rubrum RCs. In addition, RCs from three mutant strains of R. capsulatus carrying substitutions of amino acids near P and B{sub B} were examined. Two of the mutant RCs showed decreased triplet transfer rates compared with wild-type RCs, whereas one of the mutant RCs demonstrated a slight increase in triplet transfer rate at low temperatures. The results show that site-specific changes within the RC of R. capsulatus can mimic interspecies differences in the rates of triplet energy transfer. This application of TREPR was instrumental in defining critical energetic and coupling factors that dictate the efficiency of this photoprotective process.

  6. Definition and determination of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Felipe; Marazzi, Marco; Castaño, Obis; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Acuña, A. Ulises

    2014-01-21

    A definition of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate within the very weak electronic coupling limit is proposed, and a novel theoretical formalism is developed for its quantitative determination in terms of internal coordinates The present formalism permits (i) the separation of donor and acceptor contributions to the reaction coordinate, (ii) the identification of the intrinsic role of donor and acceptor in the triplet energy transfer process, and (iii) the quantification of the effect of every internal coordinate on the transfer process. This formalism is general and can be applied to classical as well as to nonvertical triplet energy transfer processes. The utility of the novel formalism is demonstrated here by its application to the paradigm of nonvertical triplet-triplet energy transfer involving cis-stilbene as acceptor molecule. In this way the effect of each internal molecular coordinate in promoting the transfer rate, from triplet donors in the low and high-energy limit, could be analyzed in detail.

  7. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Analysis of Merlin Conformational Changes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hennigan, Robert F.; Foster, Lauren A.; Chaiken, Mary F.; Mani, Timmy; Gomes, Michelle M.; Herr, Andrew B.; Ip, Wallace

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 is an inherited autosomal disorder caused by biallelic inactivation of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene. The NF2 gene encodes a 70-kDa protein, merlin, which is a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family. ERM proteins are believed to be regulated by a transition between a closed conformation, formed by binding of their N-terminal FERM domain and C-terminal tail domain (CTD), and an open conformation, in which the two domains do not interact. Previous work suggests that the tumor suppressor function of merlin is similarly regulated and that only the closed form is active. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that control its conformation is crucial. We have developed a series of probes that measures merlin conformation by fluorescence resonance energy transfer, both as purified protein and in live cells. Using these tools, we find that merlin exists predominately as a monomer in a stable, closed conformation that is mediated by the central α-helical domain. The contribution from the FERM-CTD interaction to the closed conformation appears to be less important. Upon phosphorylation or interaction with an effector protein, merlin undergoes a subtle conformational change, suggesting a novel mechanism that modulates the interaction between the FERM domain and the CTD. PMID:19884346

  8. Universality of energy and electron transfer processes in photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Hastings, G; Hoshina, S; Webber, A N; Blankenship, R E

    1995-11-28

    Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy has been used to investigate the photoinduced energy and electron transfer processes in photosystem I (PS I) particles from cyanobacteria, green algae, and higher plants. At room temperature, the kinetics observed in all three species are very similar: Following 590 nm excitation, an equilibration process(es) with a 3.7-7.5 ps lifetime was observed, followed by a 19-24 ps process that is associated with trapping. In all three species long-wavelength pigments (pigments that absorb at longer wavelengths than the primary electron donor) were observed. The difference spectrum associated with reduction of the primary electron acceptor [Ao(-)-Ao) difference spectrum] was obtained for all three species. The (Ao(-)-Ao) difference spectra obtained from measurements using detergent-isolated PS I particles from spinach and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are similar but clearly membrane fragments. In all three species the reduced primary electron acceptor (Ao(-)) is reoxidized extremely rapidly, in about 20 ps. The difference spectrum associated with Ao reduction appears to contain contributions from more than a single chlorophyll pigment.

  9. Modeling the Transfer Function for the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE PAGES

    Chang, C.

    2015-03-04

    We present a forward-modeling simulation framework designed to model the data products from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). This forward-model process can be thought of as a transfer function—a mapping from cosmological/astronomical signals to the final data products used by the scientists. Using output from the cosmological simulations (the Blind Cosmology Challenge), we generate simulated images (the Ultra Fast Image Simulator) and catalogs representative of the DES data. In this work we demonstrate the framework by simulating the 244 deg2 coadd images and catalogs in five bands for the DES Science Verification data. The simulation output is compared with themore » corresponding data to show that major characteristics of the images and catalogs can be captured. We also point out several directions of future improvements. Two practical examples—star-galaxy classification and proximity effects on object detection—are then used to illustrate how one can use the simulations to address systematics issues in data analysis. With clear understanding of the simplifications in our model, we show that one can use the simulations side-by-side with data products to interpret the measurements. This forward modeling approach is generally applicable for other upcoming and future surveys. It provides a powerful tool for systematics studies that is sufficiently realistic and highly controllable.« less

  10. Modeling the Transfer Function for the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.

    2015-03-04

    We present a forward-modeling simulation framework designed to model the data products from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). This forward-model process can be thought of as a transfer function—a mapping from cosmological/astronomical signals to the final data products used by the scientists. Using output from the cosmological simulations (the Blind Cosmology Challenge), we generate simulated images (the Ultra Fast Image Simulator) and catalogs representative of the DES data. In this work we demonstrate the framework by simulating the 244 deg2 coadd images and catalogs in five bands for the DES Science Verification data. The simulation output is compared with the corresponding data to show that major characteristics of the images and catalogs can be captured. We also point out several directions of future improvements. Two practical examples—star-galaxy classification and proximity effects on object detection—are then used to illustrate how one can use the simulations to address systematics issues in data analysis. With clear understanding of the simplifications in our model, we show that one can use the simulations side-by-side with data products to interpret the measurements. This forward modeling approach is generally applicable for other upcoming and future surveys. It provides a powerful tool for systematics studies that is sufficiently realistic and highly controllable.

  11. Helicity Transfer and Energy Release in the Bastille Day Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Nicholas; Kazachenko, M.; Liu, W.; Qiu, J.

    2009-05-01

    Spatial and temporal analysis of the 2000 Bastille Day event observed with SOHO and TRACE instrumentation is viewed in light of a three-dimensional topological reconnection model. The model measures the injection of helicity into the active region in a 36-hour build-up to the flare as well as the evolution of connected segmented areas of the active region to calculate flux available for the reconnection process. Utilizing the spatial evolution of the flare, the model predicts a reconnection flux of 9.45 x 1021 Mx and a helicity transfer of -9.3 x 1042 Mx2 into a twisted flux rope subsequently ejected as a coronal mass ejection (CME). The results compare well with the flux swept out by the two flare ribbons (1.44 x 1022 Mx) as viewed in TRACE 1600Å images and the helicity in magnetic cloud measurements (-15.0 x 1042 Mx2). Further analyses also reveal spatial and temporal correlation between reconnection rate and X-ray emissions, yielding evidence that reconnection governs energy release in flares. This work was accomplished during the Solar REU program at Montana State University, which is in part supported by the National Science Foundation through contract ATM-0552958.

  12. Mutation induction by charged particles of defined linear energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Hei, T K; Chen, D J; Brenner, D J; Hall, E J

    1988-07-01

    The mutagenic potential of charged particles of defined linear energy transfer (LET) was assessed using the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus (HGPRT) in primary human fibroblasts. Exponentially growing cultures of early passaged fibroblasts were grown as monolayers on thin mylar sheets and were irradiated with accelerated protons, deuterons or helium-3 ions. The mutation rates were compared with those generated by 137Cs gamma-rays. LET values for charged particles accelerated at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility, using the track segment mode, ranged from 10 to 150 keV/micron. After irradiation, cells were trypsinized, subcultured and assayed for both cytotoxicity and 6-thioguanine resistance. For gamma-rays, and for the charged particles of lower LET, the dose-response curves for cell survival were characterized by a marked initial shoulder, but approximated to an exponential function of dose for higher LETs. Mutation frequencies, likewise, showed a direct correlation to LET over the dose range examined. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for mutagenesis, based on the initial slopes of the dose-response curves, ranged from 1.30 for 10 keV/micron protons to 9.40 for 150 keV/micron helium-3 ions. Results of the present studies indicate that high-LET radiations, apart from being efficient inducers of cell lethality, are even more efficient in mutation induction as compared to low-LET ionizing radiation. These data are consistent with results previously obtained with both rodent and human fibroblast cell lines.

  13. Mean rate of energy transfer in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyadarshana, Paththage; Klewicki, Joseph

    2002-11-01

    Recently Wyngaard(Phys. Fluids, 14, 2002) derived a physical space representation of the mean rate of energy transfer from resolvable scales to sub-filter scales in a turbulent flow field as Π = \\overlineu_i^ru_j^rs_ij^s - \\overlineu_i^su_j^ss_ij^r . Here, u_i^r , and u_i^r are the resolvable scale and sub-filter scale velocities and s_ij^r and s_ij^r are the respective strain rates. He also derived that the joint transport of turbulent kinetic energy(TKE) as -\\overlinefracpartialu_i^ru_i^su_jpartialx_j. In this research, some of the terms in the above expressions are explored using high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer data. The data were acquired under near-neutral conditions in the atmospheric surface layer that flows over the salt playa of western Utah. The momentum deficit thickness Reynolds number of the flow was approximately 5 × 10^6. Hot wire anemometry was used with custom designed six-wire probes. The spatial resolution of sensors, about 10 viscous units, was very good. Top-hat high-pass and low-pass temporal filtering is used to segregate the experimental time series into resolved and sub-filter scales. Contributions to the energy budget are computed for both scales and compared. In addition, results of the contributions to the mean energy transfer rate will be presented as a function of varying cut-off frequency.

  14. An ultrasensitive homogeneous aptasensor for kanamycin based on upconversion fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Sun, De-en; Liu, Yajie; Liu, Zhihong

    2014-05-15

    We developed an ultrasensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) aptasensor for kanamycin detection, using upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) as the energy donor and graphene as the energy acceptor. Oleic acid modified upconversion nanoparticles were synthesized through a hydrothermal process followed by a ligand exchange with hexanedioic acid. The kanamycin aptamer (5'-NH2-AGATGGGGGTTGAGGCTAAGCCGA-3') was tagged to UCNPs through an EDC-NHS protocol. The π-π stacking interaction between the aptamer and graphene brought UCNPs and graphene in close proximity and hence initiated the FRET process resulting in quenching of UCNPs fluorescence. The addition of kanamycin to the UCNPs-aptamer-graphene complex caused the fluorescence recovery because of the blocking of the energy transfer, which was induced by the conformation change of aptamer into a hairpin structure. A linear calibration was obtained between the fluorescence intensity and the logarithm of kanamycin concentration in the range from 0.01 nM to 3 nM in aqueous buffer solution, with a detection limit of 9 pM. The aptasensor was also applicable in diluted human serum sample with a linear range from 0.03 nM to 3 nM and a detection limit of 18 pM. The aptasensor showed good specificity towards kanamycin without being disturbed by other antibiotics. The ultrahigh sensitivity and pronounced robustness in complicated sample matrix suggested promising prospect of the aptasensor in practical applications.

  15. Simultaneous backward data transmission and power harvesting in an ultrasonic transcutaneous energy transfer link employing acoustically dependent electric impedance modulation.

    PubMed

    Ozeri, Shaul; Shmilovitz, Doron

    2014-09-01

    The advancement and miniaturization of body implanted medical devices pose several challenges to Ultrasonic Transcutaneous Energy Transfer (UTET), such as the need to reduce the size of the piezoelectric resonator, and the need to maximize the UTET link power-transfer efficiency. Accordingly, the same piezoelectric resonator that is used for energy harvesting at the body implant, may also be used for ultrasonic backward data transfer, for instance, through impedance modulation. This paper presents physical considerations and design guidelines of the body implanted transducer of a UTET link with impedance modulation for a backward data transfer. The acoustic matching design procedure was based on the 2×2 transfer matrix chain analysis, in addition to the Krimholtz Leedom and Matthaei KLM transmission line model. The UTET power transfer was carried out at a frequency of 765 kHz, continuous wave (CW) mode. The backward data transfer was attained by inserting a 9% load resistance variation around its matched value (550 Ohm), resulting in a 12% increase in the acoustic reflection coefficient. A backward data transmission rate of 1200 bits/s was experimentally demonstrated using amplitude shift keying, simultaneously with an acoustic power transfer of 20 mW to the implant.

  16. Distance dependence in photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer. Additional remarks and calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Sven; Volosov, Andrey

    1987-12-01

    Rate constants for photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer are calculated for four of the molecules studied by Hush et al. The electronic factor is obtained in quantum chemical calculations using the CNDO/S method. The results agree reasonably well with experiments for the forward reaction. Possible reasons for the disagreement for the charge recombination process are offered.

  17. Peculiarities of collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, V. A.; Gerasimov, V. V.; Pavlinskiy, A. V.

    2007-09-15

    We report an experimental discovery of deviations from the known regularities in collisional excitation transfer processes for metal atoms. The collisional excitation transfer with excited screened energy levels of thulium and dysprosium atoms is studied. The selecting role of the screening 6s shell in collisional excitation transfer is shown.

  18. Long GRB with Additional High Energy Maxima after the End of the Low Energy T90 Intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irene, Arkhangelskaja; Alexander, Zenin; Dmitry, Kirin; Elena, Voevodina

    2013-01-01

    Now GRB high energy γ-emission was observed mostly by detectors onboard Fermi and Agile satellites. During most part of GRB high energy γ-emission registered some later than low energy trigger and lasts several hundreds of seconds, but its maxima are within low energy t90 intervals both for short and long bursts. But GRB090323, GRB090328 and GRB090626 temporal profiles have additional maxima after low energy t90 intervals finished. These bursts temporal profile analysis have shown that faint peaks in low energy bands close to the ends of low energy t90 intervals preceded such maxima. Moreover, these events low energy spectral index β behavior differs from usual GRB one according to preliminary analysis. We suppose that these GRB could be separated as different GRB type. In presented article this new GRB type properties are discussed.

  19. Intramolecular triplet energy transfer in anthracene-based platinum acetylide oligomers.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongjun; Köse, Muhammet E; Schanze, Kirk S

    2013-08-01

    Platinum acetylide oligomers that contain an anthracene moiety have been synthesized and subjected to photophysical characterization. Spectroscopic measurement and DFT calculations reveal that both the singlet and triplet energy levels of the anthracene segment are lower than those of the platinum acetylide segment. Thus, the platinum acetylide segment acts as a sensitizer to populate the triplet state of the anthrancene segment via intramolecular triplet-triplet energy transfer. The objective of this work is to understand the mechanisms of energy-transfer dynamics in these systems. Fluorescence quenching and the dominant triplet absorption that arises from the anthracene segment in the transient absorption spectrum of Pt4An give clear evidence that energy transfer adopts an indirect mechanism, which begins with singlet-triplet energy transfer from the anthracene segment to the platinum acetylide segment followed by triplet-triplet energy transfer to the anthracene segment.

  20. Efficient near-field wireless energy transfer using adiabatic system variations

    DOEpatents

    Hamam, Rafif E.; Karalis, Aristeidis; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljacic, Marin

    2013-01-29

    Disclosed is a method for transferring energy wirelessly including transferring energy wirelessly from a first resonator structure to an intermediate resonator structure, wherein the coupling rate between the first resonator structure and the intermediate resonator structure is .kappa..sub.1B, transferring energy wirelessly from the intermediate resonator structure to a second resonator structure, wherein the coupling rate between the intermediate resonator structure and the second resonator structure is .kappa..sub.B2, and during the wireless energy transfers, adjusting at least one of the coupling rates .kappa..sub.1B and .kappa..sub.B2 to reduce energy accumulation in the intermediate resonator structure and improve wireless energy transfer from the first resonator structure to the second resonator structure through the intermediate resonator structure.

  1. Efficient near-field wireless energy transfer using adiabatic system variations

    DOEpatents

    Hamam, Rafif E; Karalis, Aristeidis; Joannopoulos, John D; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-16

    Disclosed is a method for transferring energy wirelessly including transferring energy wirelessly from a first resonator structure to an intermediate resonator structure, wherein the coupling rate between the first resonator structure and the intermediate resonator structure is .kappa..sub.1B, transferring energy wirelessly from the intermediate resonator structure to a second resonator structure, wherein the coupling rate between the intermediate resonator structure and the second resonator structure is .kappa..sub.B2, and during the wireless energy transfers, adjusting at least one of the coupling rates .kappa..sub.1B and .kappa..sub.B2 to reduce energy accumulation in the intermediate resonator structure and improve wireless energy transfer from the first resonator structure to the second resonator structure through the intermediate resonator structure.

  2. Switching individual quantum dot emission through electrically controlling resonant energy transfer to graphene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiye; Bao, Wei; Ju, Long; Schuck, P James; Wang, Feng; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander

    2014-12-10

    Electrically controlling resonant energy transfer of optical emitters provides a novel mechanism to switch nanoscale light sources on and off individually for optoelectronic applications. Graphene's optical transitions are tunable through electrostatic gating over a broad wavelength spectrum, making it possible to modulate energy transfer from a variety of nanoemitters to graphene at room temperature. We demonstrate photoluminescence switching of individual colloidal quantum dots by electrically tuning their energy transfer to graphene. The gate dependence of energy transfer modulation confirms that the transition occurs when the Fermi level is shifted over half the emitter's excitation energy. The modulation magnitude decreases rapidly with increasing emitter-graphene distance (d), following the 1/d(4) rate trend unique to the energy transfer process to two-dimensional materials.

  3. Modeling the efficiency of Förster resonant energy transfer from energy relay dyes in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hoke, Eric T; Hardin, Brian E; McGehee, Michael D

    2010-02-15

    Förster resonant energy transfer can improve the spectral breadth, absorption and energy conversion efficiency of dye sensitized solar cells. In this design, unattached relay dyes absorb the high energy photons and transfer the excitation to sensitizing dye molecules by Förster resonant energy transfer. We use an analytic theory to calculate the excitation transfer efficiency from the relay dye to the sensitizing dye accounting for dynamic quenching and relay dye diffusion. We present calculations for pores of cylindrical and spherical geometry and examine the effects of the Förster radius, the pore size, sensitizing dye surface concentration, collisional quenching rate, and relay dye lifetime. We find that the excitation transfer efficiency can easily exceed 90% for appropriately chosen dyes and propose two different strategies for selecting dyes to achieve record power conversion efficiencies.

  4. Rapid and facile ratiometric detection of an anthrax biomarker by regulating energy transfer process in bio-metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yihe; Li, Bin; Ma, Heping; Zhang, Liming; Zheng, Youxuan

    2016-11-15

    A ratiometric fluorescent sensor based on luminescent bio-metal-organic framework was prepared by exchanging both Tb(3+) and Eu(3+) cations into anionic bio-MOF-1. Due to a highly efficient energy transfer from Tb(3+) to Eu(3+) (>89%), emission color of Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1 was orange-red even though Tb(3+) was the dominant content in this Tb/Eu co-doping material. More interestingly, this energy transfer process could be modulated by dipicolinic acid (DPA), an unique biomarker for bacillus spores. With DPA addition, corresponding DPA-to-Tb(3+) energy transfer was gradually enhanced while the energy transfer from Tb(3+) to Eu(3+) was significantly weakened. By regulating the energy transfer process in Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1, visual colorimetric sensing of DPA in porous MOF was realized for the first time. Detection limit of Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1 for DPA was 34nM, which was much lower than an infectious dosage of Bacillus anthracis spores (60μM) for human being. Besides, Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1 showed a remarkable selectivity over other aromatic ligands and amino acids. More importantly, this porous ratiometric sensor worked equally well in human serum. These particularly attractive features of Tb/Eu@bio-MOF-1 made the direct, rapid and naked-eye detection of DPA for practical application possible.

  5. Low-energy plasma immersion ion implantation to induce DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwijit, K.; Yu, L. D.; Sarapirom, S.; Pitakrattananukool, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) at low energy was for the first time applied as a novel biotechnology to induce DNA transfer into bacterial cells. Argon or nitrogen PIII at low bias voltages of 2.5, 5 and 10 kV and fluences ranging from 1 × 1012 to 1 × 1017 ions/cm2 treated cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli). Subsequently, DNA transfer was operated by mixing the PIII-treated cells with DNA. Successes in PIII-induced DNA transfer were demonstrated by marker gene expressions. The induction of DNA transfer was ion-energy, fluence and DNA-size dependent. The DNA transferred in the cells was confirmed functioning. Mechanisms of the PIII-induced DNA transfer were investigated and discussed in terms of the E. coli cell envelope anatomy. Compared with conventional ion-beam-induced DNA transfer, PIII-induced DNA transfer was simpler with lower cost but higher efficiency.

  6. Effect of mass-addition distribution and injectant on heat transfer and transition criteria.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, J. J.; Mccloskey, M. H.; Stalmach, C. J., Jr.; Wright, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Surface pressures, heat-transfer rates, and transition locations for a sharp cone (whose semivertex angle is 12 deg) were obtained in a hypervelocity wind tunnel at a free-stream Mach number of 12 and a free-stream Re/ft range of 3,000,000 to 6,000,000. The effects of injecting either methane, nitrogen, or Freon-22 (at rates up to 2.1% of free-stream rate) were studied for a uniform injection-distribution and for a variable injection-distribution. Gaseous injection had little effect on the surface pressure measurements. For a given mass injection distribution, the laminar region heat-transfer decreases as the injection rate increases or as the molecular weight of the injectant decreases. For a given mass-injection rate (integrated over the surface of the entire cone), the transition location and heat-transfer rates were sensitive to the injection distribution. The transition Reynolds numbers were significantly greater when the local injection rate was constant over the surface of the cone.

  7. High resolution IR diode laser study of collisional energy transfer between highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene and CO2: the effect of donor fluorination on strong collision energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kilyoung; Johnson, Alan M; Powell, Amber L; Mitchell, Deborah G; Sevy, Eric T

    2014-12-21

    Collisional energy transfer between vibrational ground state CO2 and highly vibrationally excited monofluorobenzene (MFB) was studied using narrow bandwidth (0.0003 cm(-1)) IR diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Highly vibrationally excited MFB with E' = ∼41,000 cm(-1) was prepared by 248 nm UV excitation followed by rapid radiationless internal conversion to the electronic ground state (S1→S0*). The amount of vibrational energy transferred from hot MFB into rotations and translations of CO2 via collisions was measured by probing the scattered CO2 using the IR diode laser. The absolute state specific energy transfer rate constants and scattering probabilities for single collisions between hot MFB and CO2 were measured and used to determine the energy transfer probability distribution function, P(E,E'), in the large ΔE region. P(E,E') was then fit to a bi-exponential function and extrapolated to the low ΔE region. P(E,E') and the biexponential fit data were used to determine the partitioning between weak and strong collisions as well as investigate molecular properties responsible for large collisional energy transfer events. Fermi's Golden rule was used to model the shape of P(E,E') and identify which donor vibrational motions are primarily responsible for energy transfer. In general, the results suggest that low-frequency MFB vibrational modes are primarily responsible for strong collisions, and govern the shape and magnitude of P(E,E'). Where deviations from this general trend occur, vibrational modes with large negative anharmonicity constants are more efficient energy gateways than modes with similar frequency, while vibrational modes with large positive anharmonicity constants are less efficient at energy transfer than modes of similar frequency.

  8. An enzymatically-sensitized sequential and concentric energy transfer relay self-assembled around semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Anirban; Walper, Scott A; Susumu, Kimihiro; Dwyer, Chris L; Medintz, Igor L

    2015-05-07

    The ability to control light energy within de novo nanoscale structures and devices will greatly benefit their continuing development and ultimate application. Ideally, this control should extend from generating the light itself to its spatial propagation within the device along with providing defined emission wavelength(s), all in a stand-alone modality. Here we design and characterize macromolecular nanoassemblies consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), several differentially dye-labeled peptides and the enzyme luciferase which cumulatively demonstrate many of these capabilities by engaging in multiple-sequential energy transfer steps. To create these structures, recombinantly-expressed luciferase and the dye-labeled peptides were appended with a terminal polyhistidine sequence allowing for controlled ratiometric self-assembly around the QDs via metal-affinity coordination. The QDs serve to provide multiple roles in these structures including as central assembly platforms or nanoscaffolds along with acting as a potent energy harvesting and transfer relay. The devices are activated by addition of coelenterazine H substrate which is oxidized by luciferase producing light energy which sensitizes the central 625 nm emitting QD acceptor by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The sensitized QD, in turn, acts as a relay and transfers the energy to a first peptide-labeled Alexa Fluor 647 acceptor dye displayed on its surface. This dye then transfers energy to a second red-shifted peptide-labeled dye acceptor on the QD surface through a second concentric Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. Alexa Fluor 700 and Cy5.5 are both tested in the role of this terminal FRET acceptor. Photophysical analysis of spectral profiles from the resulting sequential BRET-FRET-FRET processes allow us to estimate the efficiency of each of the transfer steps. Importantly, the efficiency of each step within this energy transfer cascade can be controlled to

  9. Interplay between vibrational energy transfer and excited state deactivation in DNA components.

    PubMed

    West, Brantley A; Womick, Jordan M; Moran, Andrew M

    2013-07-25

    Femtosecond laser spectroscopies are used to examine a thymine family of systems chosen to expose the interplay between excited state deactivation and two distinct vibrational energy transfer (VET) pathways: (i) VET from the base to the deoxyribose ring; (ii) VET between neighboring units in a dinucleotide. We find that relaxation in the ground electronic state accelerates markedly as the molecular sizes increase from the nucleobase to the dinucleotide. This behavior directly reflects growth in the density of vibrational quantum states on the substituent of the base. Excited state lifetimes are studied at temperatures ranging from 100 to 300 K to characterize the thermal fluctuations that connect the Franck-Condon geometries and the conical intersections leading back to the ground state. An Arrhenius analysis yields an approximate excited state energy barrier of 13 meV in the thymine dinucleotide. In addition, we find that the transfer of vibrational energy from the base to the substituent suppresses thermal fluctuations across this energy barrier. The possibility that the solvent viscosity imposes friction on the reaction coordinate is examined by comparing thymine and adenine systems. Experiments suggest that the solvent viscosity has little effect on barrier crossing dynamics in thymine because the conical intersection is accessed through relatively small out-of-plane atomic displacements. Overall, we conclude that the transfer of vibrational quanta from thymine to the deoxyribose ring couples significantly to the internal conversion rate, whereas the neighboring unit in the dinucleotide serves as a secondary heat bath. In natural DNA, it follows that (local) thermal fluctuations in the geometries of subunits involving the base and deoxyribose ring are most important to this subpicosecond relaxation process.

  10. Study of elementary reactions and energy transfer processes involving the NH and CN free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdigian, Paul J.; Alexander, Millard H.

    1991-06-01

    Collaborative theoretical and experimental studies of a variety of elementary chemical reactions and collisional energy transfer processes involving small molecular free radicals, with particular emphasis on the NH and CN molecules, have been carried out. Specific topics studied include: molecular free radicals, collisional energy transfer, chemical reactions, excited states, and molecular decomposition.

  11. Ultrafast dynamics of nonequilibrium resonance energy transfer and probing globular protein flexibility of myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jeffrey A; Link, Justin J; Zang, Chen; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2012-03-22

    Protein structural plasticity is critical to many biological activities and accurate determination of its temporal and spatial fluctuations is challenging and difficult. Here, we report our extensive characterization of global flexibility of a globular heme protein of myoglobin using resonance energy transfer as a molecular ruler. With site-directed mutagenesis, we use a tryptophan scan to examine local structural fluctuations from B to H helices utilizing 10 tryptophan-heme energy transfer pairs with femtosecond resolution. We observed ultrafast resonance energy transfer dynamics by following a nearly single exponential behavior in 10-100 ps, strongly indicating that the globular structure of myoglobin is relatively rigid, with no observable static or slow dynamic conformational heterogeneity. The observation is against our molecular dynamics simulations, which show large local fluctuations and give multiple exponential energy transfer behaviors, suggesting too flexible of the global structure and thus raising a serious issue of the force fields used in simulations. Finally, these ultrafast energy transfer dynamics all occur on the similar time scales of local environmental relaxations (solvation), leading to nonexponential processes caused by energy relaxations, not structural fluctuations. Our analyses of such processes reveal an intrinsic compressed- and/or stretched-exponential behaviors and elucidate the nature of inherent nonequilibrium of ultrafast resonance energy transfer in proteins. This new concept of compressed nonequilibrium transfer dynamics should be applied to all protein studies by time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET).

  12. Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Studies of DNA Polymerase β

    PubMed Central

    Towle-Weicksel, Jamie B.; Dalal, Shibani; Sohl, Christal D.; Doublié, Sylvie; Anderson, Karen S.; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2014-01-01

    During DNA repair, DNA polymerase β (Pol β) is a highly dynamic enzyme that is able to select the correct nucleotide opposite a templating base from a pool of four different deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs). To gain insight into nucleotide selection, we use a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based system to monitor movement of the Pol β fingers domain during catalysis in the presence of either correct or incorrect dNTPs. By labeling the fingers domain with ((((2-iodoacetyl)amino)ethyl)amino)naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (IAEDANS) and the DNA substrate with Dabcyl, we are able to observe rapid fingers closing in the presence of correct dNTPs as the IAEDANS comes into contact with a Dabcyl-labeled, one-base gapped DNA. Our findings show that not only do the fingers close after binding to the correct dNTP, but that there is a second conformational change associated with a non-covalent step not previously reported for Pol β. Further analyses suggest that this conformational change corresponds to the binding of the catalytic metal into the polymerase active site. FRET studies with incorrect dNTP result in no changes in fluorescence, indicating that the fingers do not close in the presence of incorrect dNTP. Together, our results show that nucleotide selection initially occurs in an open fingers conformation and that the catalytic pathways of correct and incorrect dNTPs differ from each other. Overall, this study provides new insight into the mechanism of substrate choice by a polymerase that plays a critical role in maintaining genome stability. PMID:24764311

  13. Quasiclassical trajectory study of collisional energy transfer in toluene systems. I. Argon bath gas: Energy dependence and isotope effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kieran F.

    1994-05-01

    Experimental studies of collisional energy transfer from highly vibrationally excited toluene to various bath gases have recently been reported [Toselli and Barker, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 1809 (1992), and references therein]. A quasiclassical trajectory investigation for toluene in argon bath gas at 300 K for initial internal energies E'=41 000, 30 000, and 15 000 cm-1 is reported here. Collisional energy transfer is almost linearly dependent on E'. Predictions of energy transfer quantities are very sensitive to the average well depth of the assumed individual pairwise potentials, but is less sensitive to the detailed shape. Qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiment is obtained where the overall well depth is physically realistic. Isotope studies using 40Ar and pseudohelium (4Ar) bath gases indicate that energy transfer is independent of the mass of the bath-gas collider, but perdeuteration increases <ΔE2>1/2 by 13% over the undeuterated values.

  14. Cyanine dyes with high-absorbance cross section as donor chromophores in energy transfer labels

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, A.N.; Mathies, R.A.; Hung, S.C.; Ju, J.

    1998-12-29

    Cyanine dyes are used as the donor fluorophore in energy transfer labels in which light energy is absorbed by a donor fluorophore and transferred to an acceptor fluorophore which responds to the transfer by emitting fluorescent light for detection. The cyanine dyes impart an unusually high sensitivity to the labels thereby improving their usefulness in a wide variety of biochemical procedures, particularly nucleic acid sequencing, nucleic acid fragment sizing, and related procedures. 22 figs.

  15. Methods of sequencing and detection using energy transfer labels with cyanine dyes as donor chromophores

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Mathies, Richard A.; Hung, Su-Chun; Ju, Jingyue

    2000-01-01

    Cyanine dyes are used as the donor fluorophore in energy transfer labels in which light energy is absorbed by a donor fluorophore and transferred to an acceptor fluorophore which responds to the transfer by emitting fluorescent light for detection. The cyanine dyes impart an unusually high sensitivity to the labels thereby improving their usefulness in a wide variety of biochemical procedures, particularly nucleic acid sequencing, nucleic acid fragment sizing, and related procedures.

  16. Cyanine dyes with high-absorbance cross section as donor chromophores in energy transfer labels

    DOEpatents

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Mathies, Richard A.; Hung, Su-Chun; Ju, Jingyue

    1998-01-01

    Cyanine dyes are used as the donor fluorophore in energy transfer labels in which light energy is absorbed by a donor fluorophore and transferred to an acceptor fluorophore which responds to the transfer by emitting fluorescent light for detection. The cyanine dyes impart an unusually high sensitivity to the labels thereby improving their usefulness in a wide variety of biochemical procedures, particularly nucleic acid sequencing, nucleic acid fragment sizing, and related procedures.

  17. Crossed-Beam Energy Transfer in Direct-Drive Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.

    2011-10-01

    Direct-drive-implosion experiments on OMEGA have revealed the importance of crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET), which is caused by stimulated Brillouin scattering. The CBET reduces the laser absorption in a target corona by ~10% to 20% and, therefore, decreases the implosion performance. The signature of CBET is observed in time-resolved, reflected-light spectra as a suppression of red-shifted light during the main laser pulse. Simulations without CBET typically predict an earlier bang time and overestimate the laser absorption in high-compression, low-adiabat implosions. Simulations using a CBET model and a nonlocal heat-transport model explain well the scattered-light and bang-timing measurements. This talk will summarize the possible mitigation strategies for CBET required for robust ignition designs. CBET most effectively scatters incoming light that interacts with outgoing light originated from laser beam edges. This makes it possible to mitigate CBET by reducing the beam diameter with respect to the target diameter. Implosion experiments using large 1400- μm-diam plastic shells and in-focus and defocus laser beams have demonstrated the reduction of CBET in implosions with a smaller ratio of the beam-to-target diameters. Simulations predict the optimum range of this ratio to be 0.7 to 0.8. Another mitigation strategy involves splitting the incident light into two or more colors. This reduces CBET by shifting and suppressing the coupling resonances. The reduction in scattered light caused by CBET is predicted to be up to a factor of 2 when incident light colors are separated by δλ > 6 Ã. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302. In collaboration with W. Seka, D. H. Edgell, D. H. Froula, V. N. Goncharov, R. S. Craxton, R. L. McCrory, A. V. Maximov, D. D. Meyerhofer, J. F. Myatt, T. C. Sangster, A. Shvydky, S. Skupsky, and C. Stoeckl. I. V. Igumenshchevet

  18. Rotational Energy Transfer of N2 Determined Using a New Ab Initio Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A new N2-N2 rigid-rotor surface has been determined using extensive Ab Initio quantum chemistry calculations together with recent experimental data for the second virial coefficient. Rotational energy transfer is studied using the new potential energy surface (PES) employing the close coupling method below 200 cm(exp -1) and coupled state approximation above that. Comparing with a previous calculation based on the PES of van der Avoird et al.,3 it is found that the new PES generally gives larger cross sections for large (delta)J transitions, but for small (delta)J transitions the cross sections are either comparable or smaller. Correlation between the differences in the cross sections and the two PES will be attempted. The computed cross sections will also be compared with available experimental data.

  19. Ratio-metric sensor to detect riboflavin via fluorescence resonance energy transfer with ultrahigh sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jilong; Su, Siheng; Wei, Junhua; Bahgi, Roya; Hope-Weeks, Louisa; Qiu, Jingjing; Wang, Shiren

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a novel fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) ration-metric fluorescent probe based on heteroatom N, S doped carbon dots (N, S-CDs) was developed to determine riboflavin in aqueous solutions. The ratio of two emission intensities at different wavelengths is applied to determine the concentration of riboflavin (RF). This method is more effective in reducing the background interference and fluctuation of diverse conditions. Therefore, this probe obtains high sensitivity with a low limit of detection (LOD) of 1.9 nM (0.7 ng/ml) which is in the highest level of all riboflavin detection approaches and higher than single wavelength intensity detection (1.9 μM). In addition, this sensor has a high selectivity of detecting riboflavin in deionized water (pH=7) with other biochemical like amino acids. Moreover, riboflavin in aqueous solution is very sensitive to sunlight and can be degraded to lumiflavin, which is toxic. Because the N, S doped carbon dots cannot serve as an energy donor for N, S doped carbon dots and lumiflavin system, this system makes it easy to determine whether the riboflavin is degraded or not, which is first to be reported. This platform may provide possibilities to build a new and facile fluorescence resonance energy transfer based sensor to detect analytes and metamorphous analytes in aqueous solution.

  20. Equilibrium structure of solar magnetic flux tubes: Energy transport with multistream radiative transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, S. S.; Kalkofen, W.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the equilibrium structure of vertical intense magnetic flux tubes on the Sun. Assuming cylindrical geometry, we solve the magnetohydrostatic equations in the thin flux-tube approximation, allowing for energy transport by radiation and convection. The radiative transfer equation is solved in the six-stream approximation, assuming gray opacity and local thermodynamic equilibrium. This constitutes a significant improvement over a previous study, in which the transfer was solved using the multidimensional generalization of the Eddington approximation. Convection in the flux tube is treated using mixing-length theory, with an additional parameter alpha, characterizing the suppression of convective energy transport in the tube by the strong magnetic field. The equations are solved using the method of partial linearization. We present results for tubes with different values of the magnetic field strength and radius at a fixed depth in the atmosphere. In general, we find that, at equal geometric heights, the temperature on the tube axis, compared to the ambient medium, is higher in the photosphere and lower in the convection zone, with the difference becoming larger for thicker tubes. At equal optical depths the tubes are generally hotter than their surroundings. The results are comparatively insensitive to alpha but depend upon whether radiative and convective energy transport operate simultaneously or in separate layers. A comparison of our results with semiempirical models shows that the temperature and intensity contrast are in broad agreement. However, the field strengths of the flux-tube models are somewhat lower than the values inferred from observations.

  1. Geometry effect on energy transfer rate in a coupled-quantum-well structure: nonlinear regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavati-fard, T.; Vazifehshenas, T.

    2014-12-01

    We study theoretically the effect of geometry on the energy transfer rate at nonlinear regime in a coupled-quantum-well system using the balance equation approach. To investigate comparatively the effect of both symmetric and asymmetric geometry, different structures are considered. The random phase approximation dynamic dielectric function is employed to include the contributions from both quasiparticle and plasmon excitations. Also, the short-range exchange interaction is taken into account through the Hubbard approximation. Our numerical results show that the energy transfer rate increases by increasing the well thicknesses in symmetric structures. Furthermore, by increasing spatial asymmetry, the energy transfer rate decreases for the electron temperature range of interest. From numerical calculations, it is obtained that the nonlinear energy transfer rate is proportional to the square of electron drift velocity in all structures and also, found that the influence of Hubbard local field correction on the energy transfer rate gets weaker by increasing the strength of applied electric field.

  2. Rapid Energy Transfer Enabling Control of Emission Polarization in Perylene Bisimide Donor-Acceptor Triads.

    PubMed

    Menelaou, Christopher; ter Schiphorst, Jeroen; Kendhale, Amol M; Parkinson, Patrick; Debije, Michael G; Schenning, Albertus P H J; Herz, Laura M

    2015-04-02

    Materials showing rapid intramolecular energy transfer and polarization switching are of interest for both their fundamental photophysics and potential for use in real-world applications. Here, we report two donor-acceptor-donor triad dyes based on perylene-bisimide subunits, with the long axis of the donors arranged either parallel or perpendicular to that of the central acceptor. We observe rapid energy transfer (<2 ps) and effective polarization control in both dye molecules in solution. A distributed-dipole Förster model predicts the excitation energy transfer rate for the linearly arranged triad but severely underestimates it for the orthogonal case. We show that the rapid energy transfer arises from a combination of through-bond coupling and through-space transfer between donor and acceptor units. As they allow energy cascading to an excited state with controllable polarization, these triad dyes show high potential for use in luminescent solar concentrator devices.

  3. Energy transfer studies in binary laser dye mixtures in organically modified silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Maliki, Firas J.

    2014-08-01

    Energy transfer of binary dye mixture (Rhodamine110, as donor, and Oxizine1and/or Nile blue as acceptors) doped in organically modified silicates (ORMOSILs) matrix has been studied. The energy transfer process from donor molecules to acceptor molecules in the final bulk samples has been observed spectrally. Some of energy transfer parameters have been determined as a function of acceptor concentration. Stern-Volmer relation of energy transfer has been proved and the dominant mechanism of the energy transfer of dye mixture doped in such matrices has been determined. The results show that the emission properties of acceptor molecules (Ox1 and Nb) can be enhanced using the dye mixing recipe in sol-gel matrices.

  4. Quantum mechanical methods applied to excitation energy transfer: a comparative analysis on excitation energies and electronic couplings.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Losa, A; Curutchet, C; Fdez Galván, I; Mennucci, B

    2008-07-21

    We present a comparative study on the influence of the quantum mechanical (QM) method (including basis set) on the evaluation of transition energies, transition densities and dipoles, and excitation energy transfer (EET) electronic couplings for a series of chromophores (and the corresponding pairs) typically found in organic electro-optical devices and photosynthetic systems. On these systems we have applied five different QM levels of description of increasing accuracy (ZINDO, CIS, TD-DFT, CASSCF, and SAC-CI). In addition, we have tested the effects of a surrounding environment (either mimicking a solvent or a protein matrix) on excitation energies, transition dipoles, and electronic couplings through the polarizable continuum model (PCM) description. Overall, the results obtained suggest that the choice of the QM level of theory affects the electronic couplings much less than it affects excitation energies. We conclude that reasonable estimates can be obtained using moderate basis sets and inexpensive methods such as configuration interaction of single excitations or time-dependent density functional theory when appropriately coupled to realistic solvation models such as PCM.

  5. Anomalously high efficiencies for electronic energy transfer from saturated to aromatic hydrocarbons at low aromatic concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Yiming Wang; Johnston, D.B.; Lipsky, S. )

    1993-01-14

    The absolute efficiency of electric energy transfer from cis-decalin excited at 161 nm to 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) has been measured over a PPO concentration range from 1.0 [times] 10[sup [minus]2] to 2.0 [times] 10[sup [minus]5] M via measurements of both the cis-decalin and the PPO fluorescence. At concentrations above ca. 10[sup [minus]3] M, the normal fluorescing state of cis-decalin plays the dominant role in the energy transfer. At lower concentrations, however, there appears to be an important contribution from some other nonfluorescing state of cis-decalin. The fraction of PPO fluorescence generated by this dark state rises from ca.10% at 0.01 M to ca. 70% at 2 [times] 10[sup [minus]5] M. The effects of addition of O[sub 2] of dilution with isooctane, and of cooling to [minus]35[degrees]C on the quantum yield of this process are reported. The results obtained here confirm earlier results with other saturated hydrocarbon donor + aromatic acceptor systems that have suggested the existence of a dark donor state that dominates the transfer process at low acceptor concentrations via some anomalously efficient mechanism. For the system cis-decalin + PPO at 21[degrees]C, the transfer probability for this process at the lowest concentration studied of 2 [times] 10[sup [minus]5] M is 2.5 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] per photon absorbed and 0.060 per dark state produced. 34 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Energy transfers in large-scale and small-scale dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samtaney, Ravi; Kumar, Rohit; Verma, Mahendra

    2015-11-01

    We present the energy transfers, mainly energy fluxes and shell-to-shell energy transfers in small-scale dynamo (SSD) and large-scale dynamo (LSD) using numerical simulations of MHD turbulence for Pm = 20 (SSD) and for Pm = 0.2 on 10243 grid. For SSD, we demonstrate that the magnetic energy growth is caused by nonlocal energy transfers from the large-scale or forcing-scale velocity field to small-scale magnetic field. The peak of these energy transfers move towards lower wavenumbers as dynamo evolves, which is the reason for the growth of the magnetic fields at the large scales. The energy transfers U2U (velocity to velocity) and B2B (magnetic to magnetic) are forward and local. For LSD, we show that the magnetic energy growth takes place via energy transfers from large-scale velocity field to large-scale magnetic field. We observe forward U2U and B2B energy flux, similar to SSD.

  7. Immobilization of antimony in waste-to-energy bottom ash by addition of calcium and iron containing additives.

    PubMed

    Van Caneghem, Jo; Verbinnen, Bram; Cornelis, Geert; de Wijs, Joost; Mulder, Rob; Billen, Pieter; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    The leaching of Sb from waste-to-energy (WtE) bottom ash (BA) often exceeds the Dutch limit value of 0.32mgkg(-1) for recycling of BA in open construction applications. From the immobilization mechanisms described in the literature, it could be concluded that both Ca and Fe play an important role in the immobilization of Sb in WtE BA. Therefore, Ca and Fe containing compounds were added to the samples of the sand fraction of WtE BA, which in contrast to the granulate fraction is not recyclable to date, and the effect on the Sb leaching was studied by means of batch leaching tests. Results showed that addition of 0.5 and 2.5% CaO, 5% CaCl2, 2.5% Fe2(SO4)3 and 1% FeCl3 decreased the Sb leaching from 0.62±0.02mgkgDM(-1) to 0.20±0.02, 0.083±0.044, 0.25±0.01, 0.27±0.002 and 0.29±0.02mgkgDM(-1), respectively. Due to the increase in pH from 11.41 to 12.53 when 2.5% CaO was added, Pb and Zn leaching increased and exceeded the respective leaching limits. Addition of 5% CaCO3 had almost no effect on the Sb leaching, as evidenced by the resulting 0.53mgkgDM(-1) leaching concentration. This paper shows a complementary enhancement of the effect of Ca and Fe, by comparing the aforementioned Sb leaching results with those of WtE BA with combined addition of 2.5% CaO or 5% CaCl2 with 2.5% Fe2(SO4)3 or 1% FeCl3. These lab scale results suggest that formation of romeites with a high Ca content and formation of iron antimonate (tripuhyite) with a very low solubility are the main immobilization mechanisms of Sb in WtE BA. Besides the pure compounds and their mixtures, also addition of 10% of two Ca and Fe containing residues of the steel industry, hereafter referred to as R1 and R2, was effective in decreasing the Sb leaching from WtE BA below the Dutch limit value for reuse in open construction applications. To evaluate the long term effect of the additives, pilot plots of WtE BA with 10% of R1 and 5% and 10% of R2 were built and samples were submitted to leaching tests at

  8. Regulation of excitation energy transfer in diatom PSII dimer: How does it change the destination of excitation energy?

    PubMed

    Yokono, Makio; Nagao, Ryo; Tomo, Tatsuya; Akimoto, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    Energy transfer dynamics in dimeric photosystem II (PSII) complexes isolated from four diatoms, Chaetoceros gracilis, Cyclotella meneghiniana, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum, are examined. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements were conducted in the range of 0-80ns. Delayed fluorescence spectra showed a clear difference between PSII monomer and PSII dimer isolated from the four diatoms. The difference can be interpreted as reflecting suppressed energy transfer between PSII monomers in the PSII dimer for efficient energy trapping at the reaction center. The observation was especially prominent in C. gracilis and T. pseudonana. The pathways seem to be suppressed under a low pH condition in isolated PSII complexes from C. gracilis, and excitation energy may be quenched with fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c-binding protein (FCP) that was closely associated with PSII in C. gracilis. The energy transfer between PSII monomers in the PSII dimer may play a role in excitation energy regulation in diatoms.

  9. Syntheses, photophysical properties, and application of through-bond energy-transfer cassettes for biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Guan-Sheng; Thoresen, Lars H; Kim, Taeg Gyum; Haaland, Wade C; Gao, Feng; Topp, Michael R; Hochstrasser, Robin M; Metzker, Michael L; Burgess, Kevin

    2006-10-16

    We have designed fluorescent "through-bond energy-transfer cassettes" that can harvest energy of a relatively short wavelength (e.g., 490 nm), and emit it at appreciably longer wavelengths without significant loss of intensity. Probes of this type could be particularly useful in biotechnology for multiplexing experiments in which several different outputs are to be observed from a single excitation source. Cassettes 1-4 were designed, prepared, and studied as model systems to achieve this end. They were synthesized through convergent routes that feature coupling of specially prepared fluorescein- and rhodamine-derived fragments. The four cassettes were shown to emit strongly, with highly efficient energy transfer. Their emission maxima cover a broad range of wavelengths (broader than the four dye cassettes currently used for most high-throughput DNA sequencing), and they exhibit faster energy-transfer rates than a similar through-space energy-transfer cassette. Specifically, energy-transfer rates in these cassettes is around 6-7 ps, in contrast to a similar through-space energy-transfer system shown to have a decay time of around 35 ps. Moreover, the cassettes are considerably more stable to photobleaching than fluorescein, even though they each contain fluorescein-derived donors. This was confirmed by bulk fluorescent measurements, and in single-molecule-detection studies. Modification of a commercial automated DNA-sequencing apparatus to detect the emissions of these four energy-transfer cassettes enabled single-color dye-primer sequencing.

  10. Magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfers at the top of the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguet, Ludovic; Amit, Hagay; Alboussière, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    We develop the theory for the magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfer between different spherical harmonic degrees due to the interaction of fluid flow and radial magnetic field at the top of the Earth's core. We show that non-zero secular variation of the total magnetic energy could be significant and may provide evidence for the existence of stretching secular variation, which suggests the existence of radial motions at the top of the Earth's core-whole core convection or MAC waves. However, the uncertainties of the small scales of the geomagnetic field prevent a definite conclusion. Combining core field and flow models we calculate the detailed magnetic to magnetic and kinetic to magnetic energy transfer matrices. The magnetic to magnetic energy transfer shows a complex behaviour with local and non-local transfers. The spectra of magnetic to magnetic energy transfers show clear maxima and minima, suggesting an energy cascade. The kinetic to magnetic energy transfers, which are much weaker due to the weak poloidal flow, are either local or non-local between degree one and higher degrees. The patterns observed in the matrices resemble energy transfer patterns that are typically found in 3-D MHD numerical simulations.

  11. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer between Core/Shell Quantum Dots and Bacteriorhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    Griep, Mark H.; Winder, Eric M.; Lueking, Donald R.; Garrett, Gregory A.; Karna, Shashi P.; Friedrich, Craig R.

    2012-01-01

    An energy transfer relationship between core-shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) and the optical protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is shown, demonstrating a distance-dependent energy transfer with 88.2% and 51.1% of the QD energy being transferred to the bR monomer at separation distances of 3.5 nm and 8.5 nm, respectively. Fluorescence lifetime measurements isolate nonradiative energy transfer, other than optical absorptive mechanisms, with the effective QD excited state lifetime reducing from 18.0 ns to 13.3 ns with bR integration, demonstrating the Förster resonance energy transfer contributes to 26.1% of the transferred QD energy at the 3.5 nm separation distance. The established direct energy transfer mechanism holds the potential to enhance the bR spectral range and sensitivity of energies that the protein can utilize, increasing its subsequent photocurrent generation, a significant potential expansion of the applicability of bR in solar cell, biosensing, biocomputing, optoelectronic, and imaging technologies. PMID:22737583

  12. Ultrafast Non-Förster Intramolecular Donor-Acceptor Excitation Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, Stavros; Alfonso Hernandez, Laura; Beljonne, David; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Tretiak, Sergei

    2017-04-06

    Ultrafast intramolecular electronic energy transfer in a conjugated donor-acceptor system is simulated using nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics. After initial site-selective photoexcitation of the donor, transition density localization is monitored throughout the S2 → S1 internal conversion process, revealing an efficient unidirectional donor → acceptor energy-transfer process. Detailed analysis of the excited-state trajectories uncovers several salient features of the energy-transfer dynamics. While a weak temperature dependence is observed during the entire electronic energy relaxation, an ultrafast initially temperature-independent process allows the molecular system to approach the S2-S1 potential energy crossing seam within the first ten femtoseconds. Efficient energy transfer occurs in the absence of spectral overlap between the donor and acceptor units and is assisted by a transient delocalization phenomenon of the excited-state wave function acquiring Frenkel-exciton character at the moment of quantum transition.

  13. Enhancing intermolecular benzoyl-transfer reactivity in crystals by growing a "reactive" metastable polymorph by using a chiral additive.

    PubMed

    Murali, Chebrolu; Shashidhar, Mysore S; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Bhadbhade, Mohan M

    2009-01-01

    Racemic 2,4-di-O-benzoyl-myo-inositol-1,3,5-orthoacetate, which normally crystallizes in a monoclinic form (form I, space group P2(1)/n) could be persuaded to crystallize out as a metastable polymorph (form II, space group C2/c) by using a small amount of either D- or L- 2,4-di-O-benzoyl-myo-inositol-1,3,5-orthoformate as an additive in the crystallization medium. The structurally similar enantiomeric additive was chosen by the scrutiny of previous experimental results on the crystallization of racemic 2,4-di-O-benzoyl-myo-inositol-1,3,5-orthoacetate. Form II crystals can be thermally transformed to form I crystals at about 145 degrees C. The relative organization of the molecules in these dimorphs vary slightly in terms of the helical assembly of molecules, that is, electrophile (El)...nucleophile (Nu) and C-H...pi interactions, but these minor variations have a profound effect on the facility and specificity of benzoyl-group-transfer reactivity in the two crystal forms. While form II crystals undergo a clean intermolecular benzoyl-group-transfer reaction, form I crystals are less reactive and undergo non-specific benzoyl-group transfer leading to a mixture of products. The role played by the additive in fine-tuning small changes that are required in the molecular packing opens up the possibility of creating new polymorphs that show varied physical and chemical properties. Crystals of D-2,6-di-O-benzoyl-myo-inositol-1,3,5-orthoformate (additive) did not show facile benzoyl-group-transfer reactivity (in contrast to the corresponding racemic compound) due to the lack of proper juxtaposition and assembly of molecules.

  14. Biomolecular interactions probed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Daniela Charlotte

    2000-09-01

    This thesis describes how a physical phenomenon, Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), can be exploited for the study of interactions between biomolecules. The physical basis of this phenomenon is discussed and it is described how some of its characteristics can be exploited in measurement. A recently introduced method, photobleaching FRET microscopy, was implemented and its image analysis refined to suit our biological context. Further, a new technique is proposed, which combines FRET with confocal laser scanning microscopy to optimize resolution and to allow for 3D-studies in living cells. The first part of this thesis presents the application of FRET to the study of oligomerization of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which was performed at the Fraser Laboratories at McGill University in Montreal. It is demonstrated how FRET microscopy allowed us to circumvent problems of traditional biochemical approaches and provided the first direct evidence for GPCR oligomerization in intact cells. We found that somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) functionally interact by forming oligomers with their own kind, with different SSTR isoforms, and even with distantly related GPCRs, such as dopamine receptors, the latter of which is breaking with the dogma that GPCRs would only pair up with their own kind. The high sensitivity of the FRET technique allowed us to characterize these interactions under more physiological conditions, which lead to the observation that oligomerization is induced by receptor agonist. We further studied the differential effects of agonists and antagonists on receptor oligomerization, leading to a model for the molecular mechanism underlying agonist/antagonist function and receptor activation. The second part was carried out at the Neurobiology Laboratory of the VA Medical Center in Newington, CT. The objective was to further our understanding of Niemann- Pick type C disease, which is characterized by a defect in intracellular cholesterol

  15. Nanoscale heat transfer and thermoelectrics for alternative energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Richard

    2011-03-01

    In the area of alternative energy, thermoelectrics have experienced an unprecedented growth in popularity because of their ability to convert waste heat into electricity. Wired in reverse, thermoelectrics can act as refrigeration devices, where they are promising because they are small in size and lightweight, have no moving parts, and have rapid on/off cycles. However, due to their low efficiencies bulk thermoelectrics have historically been a niche market. Only in the last decade has thermoelectric efficiency exceeded ~ 20 % due to fabrication of nanostructured materials. Nanoscale materials have this advantage because electronic and acoustic confinement effects can greatly increase thermoelectric efficiency beyond bulk values. In this talk, I will introduce our work in the area of nanoscale heat transfer with the goal of more efficient thermoelectrics. I will discuss our experiments and methods to study acoustic confinement in nanostructures and present some of our new nanostructured thermoelectric materials. To study acoustic confinement we are building a nanoscale phonon spectrometer. The instrument can excite phonon modes in nanostructures in the ~ 100 s of GHz. Ballistic phonons from the generator are used to probe acoustic confinement and surface scattering effects. Transmission studies using this device will help optimize materials and morphologies for more efficient nanomaterial-based thermoelectrics. For materials, our group has synthesized nano-layer superlattices of Na x Co O2 . Sodium cobaltate was recently discovered to have a high Seebeck coeficent and is being studied as an oxide thermoelectric material. The thickness of our nano-layers ranges from 5 nm to 300 nm while the lengths can be varied between 10 μ m and 4 mm. Typical aspect ratios are 40 nm: 4 mm, or 1:100,000. Thermoelectric characterization of samples with tilted multiple-grains along the measurement axis indicate a thermoelectric efficiency on par with current polycrystalline samples

  16. Effect of ferrite addition above the base ferrite on the coupling factor of wireless power transfer for vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, T.; Schaltz, E.; Ahn, S.

    2015-05-01

    Power transfer capability of wireless power transfer systems is highly dependent on the magnetic design of the primary and secondary inductors and is measured quantitatively by the coupling factor. The inductors are designed by placing the coil over a ferrite base to increase the coupling factor and reduce magnetic emissions to the surroundings. Effect of adding extra ferrite above the base ferrite at different physical locations on the self-inductance, mutual inductance, and coupling factor is under investigation in this paper. The addition can increase or decrease the mutual inductance depending on the placement of ferrite. Also, the addition of ferrite increases the self-inductance of the coils, and there is a probability for an overall decrease in the coupling factor. Correct placement of ferrite, on the other hand, can increase the coupling factor relatively higher than the base ferrite as it is closer to the other inductor. Ferrite being a heavy compound of iron increases the inductor weight significantly and needs to be added judiciously. Four zones have been identified in the paper, which shows different sensitivity to addition of ferrite in terms of the two inductances and coupling factor. Simulation and measurement results are presented for different air gaps between the coils and at different gap distances between the ferrite base and added ferrite. This paper is beneficial in improving the coupling factor while adding minimum weight to wireless power transfer system.

  17. The determination of energy transfer rates in the Ho:Tm:Cr:YAG laser material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koker, Edmond B.

    1988-01-01

    Energy transfer processes occurring between atomic, ionic, or molecular systems are very widespread in nature. The applications of such processes range form radiation physics and chemistry to biology. In the field of laser physics, energy transfer processes have been used to extend the lasing range, increase the output efficiency, and influence the spectral and temporal characteristics of the output pulses of energy transfer dye lasers or solid-state laser materials. Thus in the development of solid state lasers, it is important to investigate the basic energy transfer (ET) mechanisms and processes in order to gain detailed knowledge so that successful technical utilization can be achieved. The aim of the present research is to measure the ET rate from a given manifold associated with the chromium sensitizer atom to a given manifold in the holmium activator atom via the thulium transfer atom, in the Ho:Cr:YAG laser material.

  18. Formation of C-C Bonds via Ruthenium Catalyzed Transfer Hydrogenation: Carbonyl Addition from the Alcohol or Aldehyde Oxidation Level.

    PubMed

    Shibahara, Fumitoshi; Krische, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Under the conditions of ruthenium catalyzed transfer hydrogenation employing isopropanol as terminal reductant, π-unsaturated compounds (1,3-dienes, allenes, 1,3-enynes and alkynes) reductively couple to aldehydes to furnish products of carbonyl addition. In the absence of isopropanol, π-unsaturated compounds couple directly from the alcohol oxidation level to form identical products of carbonyl addition. Such "alcohol-unsaturate C-C couplings" enable carbonyl allylation, propargylation and vinylation from the alcohol oxidation level in the absence of stoichiometric organometallic reagents or metallic reductants. Thus, direct catalytic C-H functionalization of alcohols at the carbinol carbon is achieved.

  19. Analysis on spatial transfer model of energy development layout and the ecological footprint affection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Jinfang

    2017-01-01

    Consider the global energy interconnection, the global is concentrating on carrying out clean energy alternative, which is mainly focusing on using the clean energy to take place of fossil energy, and change the global energy layout and ecological atmosphere condition. This research gives the energy spatial transfer model of energy development layout to analyse the global energy development layout condition and ecological affection. And it is a fast and direct method to analyse its energy usage process and environmental affection. The paper also gives out a system dynamics model of energy spatial transfer shows, which electric power transmission is better than original energy usage and transportation. It also gives the comparison of different parameters. The energy spatial transfer can affect the environment directly. Consider its three environmental factors, including energy saving, climate changing and conventional pollutant emission reduction, synthetic combine with the spatial transfer model, it can get the environmental change parameters, which showed that with the clean energy wide usage, the ecological footprint affection will be affected significantly.

  20. Plasmon Enhancement of Electronic Energy Transfer Between Quantum Dots on the Surface of Nanoporous Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirova, N. S.; Myslitskaya, N. A.; Samusev, I. G.; Bryukhanov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    We use spectral kinetic methods to study electronic energy transfer processes between semiconductor quantum dots on the surface of wide-pore silica in the absence of and in the presence of silver nanoparticles, obtained by laser ablation methods. We have determined the efficiencies of dipole-dipole energy transfer between two-shell (CdSe/CdS/ZnS) and one-shell (CdSe/ZnS) quantum dots on the surface, the luminescence lifetimes and quantum yields, transfer distances and transfer rate constants. We have studied enhancement of photoprocesses in individual quantum dots and in a pair under the influence of resonant localized plasmons of ablative silver nanoparticles.

  1. Analytic Methods for Predicting Significant Multi-Quanta Effects in Collisional Molecular Energy Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bieniek, Ronald J.

    1996-01-01

    Collision-induced transitions can significantly affect molecular vibrational-rotational populations and energy transfer in atmospheres and gaseous systems. This, in turn. can strongly influence convective heat transfer through dissociation and recombination of diatomics. and radiative heat transfer due to strong vibrational coupling. It is necessary to know state-to-state rates to predict engine performance and aerothermodynamic behavior of hypersonic flows, to analyze diagnostic radiative data obtained from experimental test facilities, and to design heat shields and other thermal protective systems. Furthermore, transfer rates between vibrational and translational modes can strongly influence energy flow in various 'disturbed' environments, particularly where the vibrational and translational temperatures are not equilibrated.

  2. Sequential energy and electron transfer in a three-component system aligned on a clay nanosheet.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Takuya; Ramasamy, Elamparuthi; Ishida, Yohei; Shimada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Shinsuke; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan

    2016-02-21

    To achieve the goal of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer across three molecules, a phenomenon often utilized in artificial light harvesting systems, we have assembled a light absorber (that also serves as an energy donor), an energy acceptor (that also serves as an electron donor) and an electron acceptor on the surface of an anionic clay nanosheet. Since neutral organic molecules have no tendency to adsorb onto the anionic surface of clay, a positively charged water-soluble organic capsule was used to hold neutral light absorbers on the above surface. A three-component assembly was prepared by the co-adsorption of a cationic bipyridinium derivative, cationic zinc porphyrin and cationic octaamine encapsulated 2-acetylanthracene on an exfoliated anionic clay surface in water. Energy and electron transfer phenomena were monitored by steady state fluorescence and picosecond time resolved fluorescence decay. The excitation of 2-acetylanthracene in the three-component system resulted in energy transfer from 2-acetylanthracene to zinc porphyrin with 71% efficiency. Very little loss due to electron transfer from 2-acetylanthracene in the cavitand to the bipyridinium derivative was noticed. Energy transfer was followed by electron transfer from the zinc porphyrin to the cationic bipyridinium derivative with 81% efficiency. Analyses of fluorescence decay profiles confirmed the occurrence of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer. Merging the concepts of supramolecular chemistry and surface chemistry we realized sequential energy and electron transfer between three hydrophobic molecules in water. Exfoliated transparent saponite clay served as a matrix to align the three photoactive molecules at a close distance in aqueous solutions.

  3. Real-space investigation of energy transfer in heterogeneous molecular dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Hiroshi; Miwa, Kuniyuki; Imai-Imada, Miyabi; Kawahara, Shota; Kimura, Kensuke; Kim, Yousoo

    2016-10-01

    Given its central role in photosynthesis and artificial energy-harvesting devices, energy transfer has been widely studied using optical spectroscopy to monitor excitation dynamics and probe the molecular-level control of energy transfer between coupled molecules. However, the spatial resolution of conventional optical spectroscopy is limited to a few hundred nanometres and thus cannot reveal the nanoscale spatial features associated with such processes. In contrast, scanning tunnelling luminescence spectroscopy has revealed the energy dynamics associated with phenomena ranging from single-molecule electroluminescence, absorption of localized plasmons and quantum interference effects to energy delocalization and intervalley electron scattering with submolecular spatial resolution in real space. Here we apply this technique to individual molecular dimers that comprise a magnesium phthalocyanine and a free-base phthalocyanine (MgPc and H2Pc) and find that locally exciting MgPc with the tunnelling current of the scanning tunnelling microscope generates a luminescence signal from a nearby H2Pc molecule as a result of resonance energy transfer from the former to the latter. A reciprocating resonance energy transfer is observed when exciting the second singlet state (S2) of H2Pc, which results in energy transfer to the first singlet state (S1) of MgPc and final funnelling to the S1 state of H2Pc. We also show that tautomerization of H2Pc changes the energy transfer characteristics within the dimer system, which essentially makes H2Pc a single-molecule energy transfer valve device that manifests itself by blinking resonance energy transfer behaviour.

  4. Real-space investigation of energy transfer in heterogeneous molecular dimers.

    PubMed

    Imada, Hiroshi; Miwa, Kuniyuki; Imai-Imada, Miyabi; Kawahara, Shota; Kimura, Kensuke; Kim, Yousoo

    2016-10-20

    Given its central role in photosynthesis and artificial energy-harvesting devices, energy transfer has been widely studied using optical spectroscopy to monitor excitation dynamics and probe the molecular-level control of energy transfer between coupled molecules. However, the spatial resolution of conventional optical spectroscopy is limited to a few hundred nanometres and thus cannot reveal the nanoscale spatial features associated with such processes. In contrast, scanning tunnelling luminescence spectroscopy has revealed the energy dynamics associated with phenomena ranging from single-molecule electroluminescence, absorption of localized plasmons and quantum interference effects to energy delocalization and intervalley electron scattering with submolecular spatial resolution in real space. Here we apply this technique to individual molecular dimers that comprise a magnesium phthalocyanine and a free-base phthalocyanine (MgPc and H2Pc) and find that locally exciting MgPc with the tunnelling current of the scanning tunnelling microscope generates a luminescence signal from a nearby H2Pc molecule as a result of resonance energy transfer from the former to the latter. A reciprocating resonance energy transfer is observed when exciting the second singlet state (S2) of H2Pc, which results in energy transfer to the first singlet state (S1) of MgPc and final funnelling to the S1 state of H2Pc. We also show that tautomerization of H2Pc changes the energy transfer characteristics within the dimer system, which essentially makes H2Pc a single-molecule energy transfer valve device that manifests itself by blinking resonance energy transfer behaviour.

  5. Additive Fabrication of Conductive Patterns by a Template Transfer Process Based on Benzotriazole Adsorption As a Separation Layer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu; Yang, Zhen-Guo

    2016-06-08

    The traditional subtractive process to fabricate conductive patterns is environmentally harmful, wasteful, and limited in line width. The additive process, including direct printing of conductive paste or ink, direct printing of catalytic ink, laser-induced forward transfer, etc., can solve these problems. However, the current additive process also faces many difficulties such as low electrical and adhesion properties, low pattern thickness, high cost, etc. Benzotriazole (BTA), as widely used corrosion inhibitor, can be adsorbed onto a copper surface. The electroplated copper film on BTA-adsorbed copper foil shows poor adhesion. On the basis of this phenomenon, a novel template transfer process to additively fabricate conductive patterns has been developed. A permeant antiadhesive mask is printed on carrier copper foil, and then, BTA is adsorbed onto the exposed area of the carrier foil, thus forming the template. The template is electroplated to grow conductive patterns in the exposed parts, and then can be adhered to the flexible substrate. The substrate is peeled off, with the transfer of the conductive patterns to the substrate, to form the designed conductive patterns on PET. By reimmersing the template into BTA solution, the template can be used again. The mechanism of BTA adsorption and the reason for the low peeling strength are researched using Raman spectra, XPS and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Copper patterns more than 20 μm in thickness can be prepared on PET, the resistivity of the prepared copper patterns is 2.01 μΩ cm, which is about the same as bulk copper, and the peeling strength of the pattern on PET is measured to be 6.97 N/cm. This template transfer process, with no waste, low pollution, high electrical and adhesion properties, and low cost, shows high potential in the large scale manufacturing of electronic devices, such as RFID circuitry, FPCs, etc.

  6. Energy transfer properties of Rhodobacter sphaeroides chromatophores during adaptation to low light intensity.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, B; Lunceford, C; Lin, S; Woronowicz, K; Niederman, R A; Woodbury, N W

    2014-08-28

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used to explore the pathway and kinetics of energy transfer in photosynthetic membrane vesicles (chromatophores) isolated from Rhodobacter (Rba.) sphaeroides cells harvested 2, 4, 6 or 24 hours after a transition from growth in high to low level illumination. As previously observed, this light intensity transition initiates the remodeling of the photosynthetic apparatus and an increase in the number of light harvesting 2 (LH2) complexes relative to light harvesting 1 (LH1) and reaction center (RC) complexes. It has generally been thought that the increase in LH2 complexes served the purpose of increasing the overall energy transmission to the RC. However, fluorescence lifetime measurements and analysis in terms of energy transfer within LH2 and between LH2 and LH1 indicate that, during the remodeling time period measured, only a portion of the additional LH2 generated are well connected to LH1 and the reaction center. The majority of the additional LH2 fluorescence decays with a lifetime comparable to that of free, unconnected LH2 complexes. The presence of large LH2-only domains has been observed by atomic force microscopy in Rba. sphaeroides chromatophores (Bahatyrova et al., Nature, 2004, 430, 1058), providing structural support for the existence of pools of partially connected LH2 complexes. These LH2-only domains represent the light-responsive antenna complement formed after a switch in growth conditions from high to low illumination, while the remaining LH2 complexes occupy membrane regions containing mixtures of LH2 and LH1-RC core complexes. The current study utilized a multi-parameter approach to explore the fluorescence spectroscopic properties related to the remodeling process, shedding light on the structure-function relationship of the photosynthetic assembles. Possible reasons for the accumulation of these largely disconnected LH2-only pools are discussed.

  7. An enzymatically-sensitized sequential and concentric energy transfer relay self-assembled around semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Anirban; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Dwyer, Chris L.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to control light energy within de novo nanoscale structures and devices will greatly benefit their continuing development and ultimate application. Ideally, this control should extend from generating the light itself to its spatial propagation within the device along with providing defined emission wavelength(s), all in a stand-alone modality. Here we design and characterize macromolecular nanoassemblies consisting of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), several differentially dye-labeled peptides and the enzyme luciferase which cumulatively demonstrate many of these capabilities by engaging in multiple-sequential energy transfer steps. To create these structures, recombinantly-expressed luciferase and the dye-labeled peptides were appended with a terminal polyhistidine sequence allowing for controlled ratiometric self-assembly around the QDs via metal-affinity coordination. The QDs serve to provide multiple roles in these structures including as central assembly platforms or nanoscaffolds along with acting as a potent energy harvesting and transfer relay. The devices are activated by addition of coelenterazine H substrate which is oxidized by luciferase producing light energy which sensitizes the central 625 nm emitting QD acceptor by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). The sensitized QD, in turn, acts as a relay and transfers the energy to a first peptide-labeled Alexa Fluor 647 acceptor dye displayed on its surface. This dye then transfers energy to a second red-shifted peptide-labeled dye acceptor on the QD surface through a second concentric Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) process. Alexa Fluor 700 and Cy5.5 are both tested in the role of this terminal FRET acceptor. Photophysical analysis of spectral profiles from the resulting sequential BRET-FRET-FRET processes allow us to estimate the efficiency of each of the transfer steps. Importantly, the efficiency of each step within this energy transfer cascade can be controlled to

  8. Theory and applications of surface energy transfer for 2-20 nm diameter metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riskowski, Ryan A.

    The development and experimental validation of a mathematical model for nanoparticle-based surface energy transfer (SET) between gold nanoparticles and fluorescent dye labels, has enabled biophysical studies of nucleic acid structure and function previously inaccessible by other methods. The main advantages of SET for optical distance measurements are that it can operate over longer distances than other similar methods, such as Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), thus enabling measurements across biological structures much larger than otherwise possible. This work discusses the fundamental theory for the SET interaction and expansion of SET theory to account for multiple interacting dye labels and demonstrated on DNA and RNA in order to allow 3D triangulation of labeled structures. SET theory has also been expanded to core shell structures which represent a new class of designer SET platforms with dramatically increased spectral windows; allowing for a multitude of dye labels to be used simultaneously over a broad range of wavelengths. Additionally, these designer nanostructures can incorporate the material properties of the core. So that , for example Ni Au, can provide a SET measurement platform coupled with a magnetic moment for sample purification and manipulation. These efforts to develop and establish optical SET methods lays a foundation of a powerful methodology for biophysical characterization, and allows researchers to study biological structures previously too large or complex to be easily studied, such as the unknown tertiary structures of large RNA elements.

  9. Intra-molecular Triplet Energy Transfer is a General Approach to Improve Organic Fluorophore Photostability

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qinsi; Jockusch, Steffen; Rodríguez-Calero, Gabriel G.; Zhou, Zhou; Zhao, Hong; Altman, Roger B.; Abruña, Héctor D.; Blanchard, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    Bright, long-lasting and non-phototoxic organic fluorophores are essential to the continued advancement of biological imaging. Traditional approaches towards achieving photostability, such as the removal of molecular oxygen and the use of small-molecule additives in solution, suffer from potentially toxic side effects, particularly in the context of living cells. The direct conjugation of small-molecule triplet state quenchers, such as cyclooctatetraene (COT), to organic fluorophores has the potential to bypass these issues by restoring reactive fluorophore triplet states to the ground state through intra-molecular triplet energy transfer. Such methods have enabled marked improvement in cyanine fluorophore photostability spanning the visible spectrum. However, the generality of this strategy to chemically and structurally diverse fluorophore species has yet to be examined. Here, we show that the proximal linkage of COT increases the photon yield of a diverse range of organic fluorophores widely used in biological imaging applications, demonstrating that the intra-molecular triplet energy transfer mechanism is a potentially general approach for improving organic fluorophore performance and photostability. PMID:26700693

  10. Intramolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer and living cell imaging of novel pyridyltriphenylamine dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Duojun; Qian, Ying

    2016-07-01

    A novel pyridyltriphenylamine-rhodamine dye PTRh and a pyridyltriphenylamine derivative PTO were synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and HRMS-MALDI-TOF. PTRh performed typical fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signal from pyridyltriphenylamine to rhodamine along with notable color change from green to rose when interacting with Hg2+ in EtOH/H2O. And PTRh as a ratiometric probe for Hg2+ based on FRET could achieve a very low detection limit of 32 nM and energy transfer efficiency of 83.7% in aqueous organic system. On the other hand, spectra properties of PTO in its aggregates, THF/H2O mixed solution and silica nanoparticles (Si-NPs) dispersed in water were investigated. And the results indicated PTO exhibited bright green fluorescence in solid state, and PTO was successfully encapsulated in silica matrix (30-40 nm), emitting bright blue fluorescence with 11.7% quantum yield. Additionally, living cell imaging experiments demonstrated that PTRh could effectively response to intracellular Hg2+ and PTO-doped Si-NPs were well uptaken by MCF-7 breast cancer cells. It could be concluded that the chromophores are promising materials used as biosensors.

  11. Wavelet multi-resolution analysis of energy transfer in turbulent premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeonglae; Bassenne, Maxime; Towery, Colin; Poludnenko, Alexei; Hamlington, Peter; Ihme, Matthias; Urzay, Javier

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent premixed flames are examined using wavelet multi-resolution analyses (WMRA) as a diagnostics tool to evaluate the spatially localized inter-scale energy transfer in reacting flows. In non-reacting homogeneous-isotropic turbulence, the net energy transfer occurs from large to small scales on average, thus following the classical Kolmogorov energy cascade. However, in turbulent flames, our prior work suggests that thermal expansion leads to a small-scale pressure-work contribution that transfers energy in an inverse cascade on average, which has important consequences for LES modeling of reacting flows. The current study employs WMRA to investigate, simultaneously in physical and spectral spaces, the characteristics of this combustion-induced backscatter effect. The WMRA diagnostics provide spatial statistics of the spectra, scale-conditioned intermittency of velocity and vorticity, along with energy-transfer fluxes conditioned on the local progress variable.

  12. Product distributions for some thermal energy charge transfer reactions of rare gas ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anicich, V. G.; Laudenslager, J. B.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.; Futrell, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance methods were used to measure the product distributions for thermal-energy charge-transfer reactions of He(+), Ne(+), and Ar(+) ions with N2, O2, CO, NO, CO2, and N2O. Except for the He(+)-N2 reaction, no molecular ions were formed by thermal-energy charge transfer from He(+) and Ne(+) with these target molecules. The propensity for dissociative ionization channels in these highly exothermic charge-transfer reactions at thermal energies contrasts with the propensity for formation of parent molecular ions observed in photoionization experiments and in high-energy charge-transfer processes. This difference is explained in terms of more stringent requirements for energy resonance and favorable Franck-Condon factors at thermal ion velocities.

  13. Spectroscopic investigation on the energy transfer process in photosynthetic apparatus of cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ye; Wang, Bei; Ai, Xi-Cheng; Zhang, Xing-Kang; Zhao, Jing-Quan; Jiang, Li-Jin

    2004-06-01

    In this work, we employ cyanobacteria, Spirulina platensis, and separate their photosynthetic apparatus, phycobilisome (PBS), thylakoid membrane and phycobilisome-thylakoid membrane complex. The steady state absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra and corresponding deconvoluted spectra and picosecond time-resolved spectra are used to investigate the energy transfer process in phycobilisome-thylakoid membrane complex. The results on steady state spectra show chlorophylls of the photosystem II are able to transfer excitation energy to phycobilisome with Chl a molecules selectively excited. The decomposition of the steady state spectra further suggest the uphill energy transfer originate from chlorophylls of photosystem II to cores of phycobilisome, while rods and cores of phycobilisome cannot receive energy from the chlorophylls of photosystem I. The time constant for the back energy transfer process is 18 ps.

  14. Selective detection of mitochondrial malfunction in situ by energy transfer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneckenburger, Herbert; Gschwend, Michael H.; Sailer, Reinhard; Strauss, Wolfgang S. L.; Schoch, Lars; Schuh, Alexander; Stock, Karl; Steiner, Rudolf W.; Zipfl, Peter

    1999-01-01

    To establish optical in situ detection of mitochondrial malfunction, non-radiative energy transfer from the coenzyme NADH to the mitochondrial marker rhodamine 123 (R123) was examined. Dual excitation of R123 via energy transfer from excited NADH molecules as well as by direct absorption of light results in two fluorescence signals whose ratio is a measure of mitochondrial NADH. These signals are detected simultaneously using a time-gated (nanosecond) technique for energy transfer measurements and a frequency selective technique for direct excitation and fluorescence monitoring of R123. Optical and electronic components of the experimental setup are described and compared with a previously established microscopic system.

  15. Analysis of resonance energy transfer in model membranes: role of orientational effects.

    PubMed

    Domanov, Yegor A; Gorbenko, Galina P

    2002-10-16

    The model of resonance energy transfer (RET) in membrane systems containing donors randomly distributed over two parallel planes separated by fixed distance and acceptors confined to a single plane is presented. Factors determining energy transfer rate are considered with special attention being given to the contribution from orientational heterogeneity of the donor emission and acceptor absorption transition dipoles. Analysis of simulated data suggests that RET in membranes, as compared to intramolecular energy transfer, is substantially less sensitive to the degree of reorientational freedom of chromophores due to averaging over multiple donor-acceptor pairs. The uncertainties in the distance estimation resulting from the unknown mutual orientation of the donor and acceptor are analyzed.

  16. Near IR-emitting DNA-probes exploiting stepwise energy transfer processes.

    PubMed

    Bodi, Andras; Borbas, K Eszter; Bruce, James I

    2007-10-10

    The synthesis and characterisation of two new cyclen-based near IR-emitting lanthanide complexes is reported; the lanthanides are sensitised by rhodamine, which in turn is excited by energy transfer from a coumarin 2 moiety. The three lumophores function as an energy transfer cascade spanning the UV-visible-near IR region of the spectrum, resulting in large Stokes shifts. Double stranded DNA selectively switches one of the two energy transfer processes off, enabling luminescent DNA-sensing in the near IR region. The regioselective di-alkylation of the cyclen scaffold is explained with the help of DFT calculations.

  17. Excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic protein-pigment complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Shu-Hao

    Quantum biology is a relatively new research area which investigates the rules that quantum mechanics plays in biology. One of the most intriguing systems in this field is the coherent excitation energy transport (EET) in photosynthesis. In this document I will discuss the theories that are suitable for describing the photosynthetic EET process and the corresponding numerical results on several photosynthetic protein-pigment complexes (PPCs). In some photosynthetic EET processes, because of the electronic coupling between the chromophores within the system is about the same order of magnitude as system-bath coupling (electron-phonon coupling), a non-perturbative method called hierarchy equation of motion (HEOM) is applied to study the EET dynamics. The first part of this thesis includes brief introduction and derivation to the HEOM approach. The second part of this thesis the HEOM method will be applied to investigate the EET process within the B850 ring of the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from purple bacteria, Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. The dynamics of the exciton population and coherence will be analyzed under different initial excitation configurations and temperatures. Finally, how HEOM can be implemented to simulate the two-dimensional electronic spectra of photosynthetic PPCs will be discussed. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy is a crucial experimental technique to probe EET dynamics in multi-chromophoric systems. The system we are interested in is the 7-chromophore Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex from green sulfur bacteria, Prosthecochloris aestuarii. Recent crystallographic studies report the existence of an additional (eighth) chromophore in some of the FMO monomers. By applying HEOM we are able to calculate the two-dimensional electronic spectra of the 7-site and 8-site FMO complexes and investigate the functionality of the eighth chromophore.

  18. Non-pairwise additivity of the leading-order dispersion energy.

    PubMed

    Hollett, Joshua W

    2015-02-28

    The leading-order (i.e., dipole-dipole) dispersion energy is calculated for one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) infinite lattices, and an infinite 1D array of infinitely long lines, of doubly occupied locally harmonic wells. The dispersion energy is decomposed into pairwise and non-pairwise additive components. By varying the force constant and separation of the wells, the non-pairwise additive contribution to the dispersion energy is shown to depend on the overlap of density between neighboring wells. As well separation is increased, the non-pairwise additivity of the dispersion energy decays. The different rates of decay for 1D and 2D lattices of wells is explained in terms of a Jacobian effect that influences the number of nearest neighbors. For an array of infinitely long lines of wells spaced 5 bohrs apart, and an inter-well spacing of 3 bohrs within a line, the non-pairwise additive component of the leading-order dispersion energy is -0.11 kJ mol(-1) well(-1), which is 7% of the total. The polarizability of the wells and the density overlap between them are small in comparison to that of the atomic densities that arise from the molecular density partitioning used in post-density-functional theory (DFT) damped dispersion corrections, or DFT-D methods. Therefore, the nonadditivity of the leading-order dispersion observed here is a conservative estimate of that in molecular clusters.

  19. Energy spectrum transfer equations of solar wind turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, C.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    The recent studies of transfer equations for solar wind magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are reviewed with emphasis on the comparison with the statistical observational results. Helios and Voyager missions provide an opportunity to study the the radial evolution of the power spectrum. the cross-helicity the Alfven ratio and the minimum variance direction. Spectrum transfer equations are considered as a tool to explore the nature of this radial evolution of the fluctuations. The transfer equations are derived from incompressible MHD equations. Generally one needs to make assumptions about the nature of the fluctuations and the nature of the turbulent non-linear interactions to obtain numerical results which can be compared with the observations. Some special model results for several simple cases SUCH as for structures or strong mixing. for Alfven waves with weak turbulent interactions. and for a superposition of structures and Alfven waves. are discussed. The difference between the various approaches to derive and handle the transfer equations are also addressed. Finally some theoretical description of the compressible fluctuations are also briefly reviewed.

  20. Development of flexible, free-standing, thin films for additive manufacturing and localized energy generation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Billy; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Daniels, Michael A.

    2015-08-01

    Film energetics are becoming increasingly popular because a variety of technologies are driving a need for localized energy generation in a stable, safe and flexible form. Aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO₃) composites were mixed into a silicon binder and extruded using a blade casting technique to form flexible free-standing films ideal for localized energy generation. Since this material can be extruded onto a surface it is well suited to additive manufacturing applications. This study examines the influence of 0-35% by mass potassium perchlorate (KClO₄) additive on the combustion behavior of these energetic films. Without KClO₄ the film exhibits thermal instabilities that produce unsteady energy propagation upon reaction. All films were cast at a thickness of 1 mm with constant volume percent solids to ensure consistent rheological properties. The films were ignited and flame propagation was measured. The results show that as the mass percent KClO₄ increased, the flame speed increased and peaked at 0.43 cm/s and 30 wt% KClO₄. Thermochemical equilibrium simulations show that the heat of combustion increases with increasing KClO₄ concentration up to a maximum at 20 wt% when the heat of combustion plateaus, indicating that the increased chemical energy liberated by the additional KClO₄ promotes stable energy propagation. Differential scanning calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis show that the silicone binder participates as a fuel and reacts with KClO₄ adding energy to the reaction and promoting propagation.

  1. Quasiclassical trajectory study of collisional energy transfer in toluene systems. II. Helium bath gas: Energy and temperature dependences, and angular momentum transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kieran F.

    1994-11-01

    The collisional deactivation of highly vibrationally excited toluene-d0 and toluene-d8 by helium bath gas has been investigated using quasiclassical trajectory simulations. Collisional energy transfer was found to increase with initial toluene internal energy, in agreement with the experiments of Toselli and Barker [J. Chem. Phys. 97, 1809 (1992), and references therein]. The temperature dependence of <ΔE2>1/2 is predicted to be T(0.44±0.10), in agreement with the experiments of Heymann, Hippler, and Troe [J. Chem. Phys. 80, 1853 (1984)]. Toluene is found to have no net angular-momentum (rotational-energy) transfer to helium bath gas, although <ΔJ2>1/2 has a temperature dependence of T(0.31±0.07). Re-evaluation of earlier calculations [``Paper I:'' Lim, J. Chem. Phys. 100, 7385 (1994)] found that rotational energy transfer could be induced by increasing the mass of the collider, or by increasing the strength of the intermolecular interaction: in these cases, angular-momentum transfer depended on the initial excitation energy. In all cases, the final rotational distributions remained Boltzmann.

  2. Biodegradable Multiblock Poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide] via Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer Polymerization and Click Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kui; Yang, Jiyuan; Kopečková, Pavla; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2011-04-26

    A new bifunctional chain transfer agent (CTA) containing alkyne end groups was designed, synthesized and used for direct synthesis of clickable telechelic polymers. Good control of reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) was achieved by using the new CTA, as indicated by a linear increase of number average molecular weight (Mn) with conversion and low polydispersity (PDI) (<1.1). In particular, enzymatically degradable multiblock HPMA polymers were readily prepared by subsequent reaction with αω, -diazido oligopeptide (GFLG) sequence via Cu(I) catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition. Upon exposure of high molecular weight fractions of multiblock polyHPMA to papain or cathepsin B, the polymer was degraded into segments of molecular weight and narrow polydispersity similar to those of the initial telechelic polyHPMA.

  3. Carprofen-imprinted monolith prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization in room temperature ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Ban, Lu; Han, Xu; Wang, Xian-Hua; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    To obtain fast separation, ionic liquids were used as porogens first in combination with reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization to prepare a new type of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) monolith. The imprinted monolithic column was synthesized using a mixture of carprofen (template), 4-vinylpyridine, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, [BMIM]BF4, and chain transfer agent (CTA). Some polymerization factors, such as template-monomer molar ratio, the degree of crosslinking, the composition of the porogen, and the content of CTA, on the column efficiency and imprinting effect of the resulting MIP monolith were systematically investigated. Affinity screening of structurally similar compounds with the template can be achieved in 200 s on the MIP monolith due to high column efficiency (up to 12,070 plates/m) and good column permeability. Recognition mechanism of the imprinted monolith was also investigated.

  4. 78 FR 2985 - Moretown Hydro Energy Company; Ampersand Moretown Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Moretown Hydro Energy Company; Ampersand Moretown Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License, and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On September 25,...

  5. Yield Improvement and Energy Savings Uing Phosphonates as Additives in Kraft pulping

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrike W. Tschirner; Timothy Smith

    2007-03-31

    Project Objective: Develop a commercially viable modification to the Kraft process resulting in energy savings, increased yield and improved bleachability. Evaluate the feasibility of this technology across a spectrum of wood species used in North America. Develop detailed fundamental understanding of the mechanism by which phosphonates improve KAPPA number and yield. Evaluate the North American market potential for the use of phosphonates in the Kraft pulping process. Examine determinants of customer perceived value and explore organizational and operational factors influencing attitudes and behaviors. Provide an economic feasibility assessment for the supply chain, both suppliers (chemical supply companies) and buyers (Kraft mills). Provide background to most effectively transfer this new technology to commercial mills.

  6. Sensitisation of Eu(III)- and Tb(III)-based luminescence by Ir(III) units in Ir/lanthanide dyads: evidence for parallel energy-transfer and electron-transfer based mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Daniel; Cankut, Ahmet J; Ali, Noorshida Mohd; Stephenson, Andrew; Spall, Steven J P; Parker, Simon C; Weinstein, Julia A; Ward, Michael D

    2014-05-07

    A series of blue-luminescent Ir(III) complexes with a pendant binding site for lanthanide(III) ions has been synthesized and used to prepare Ir(III)/Ln(III) dyads (Ln = Eu, Tb, Gd). Photophysical studies were used to establish mechanisms of Ir→Ln (Ln = Tb, Eu) energy-transfer. In the Ir/Gd dyads, where direct Ir→Gd energy-transfer is not possible, significant quenching of Ir-based luminescence nonetheless occurred; this can be ascribed to photoinduced electron-transfer from the photo-excited Ir unit (*Ir, (3)MLCT/(3)LC excited state) to the pendant pyrazolyl-pyridine site which becomes a good electron-acceptor when coordinated to an electropositive Gd(III) centre. This electron transfer quenches the Ir-based luminescence, leading to formation of a charge-separated {Ir(4+)}˙-(pyrazolyl-pyridine)˙(-) state, which is short-lived possibly due to fast back electron-transfer (<20 ns). In the Ir/Tb and Ir/Eu dyads this electron-transfer pathway is again operative and leads to sensitisation of Eu-based and Tb-based emission using the energy liberated from the back electron-transfer process. In addition direct Dexter-type Ir→Ln (Ln = Tb, Eu) energy-transfer occurs on a similar timescale, meaning that there are two parallel mechanisms by which excitation energy can be transferred from *Ir to the Eu/Tb centre. Time-resolved luminescence measurements on the sensitised Eu-based emission showed both fast and slow rise-time components, associated with the PET-based and Dexter-based energy-transfer mechanisms respectively. In the Ir/Tb dyads, the Ir→Tb energy-transfer is only just thermodynamically favourable, leading to rapid Tb→Ir thermally-activated back energy-transfer and non-radiative deactivation to an extent that depends on the precise energy gap between the *Ir and Tb-based (5)D4 states. Thus, the sensitised Tb(iii)-based emission is weak and unusually short-lived due to back energy transfer, but nonetheless represents rare examples of Tb(III) sensitisation by

  7. Inter-phase heat transfer and energy coupling in turbulent dispersed multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Y.; Balachandar, S.; Parmar, M.

    2016-03-01

    The present paper addresses important fundamental issues of inter-phase heat transfer and energy coupling in turbulent dispersed multiphase flows through scaling analysis. In typical point-particle or two-fluid approaches, the fluid motion and convective heat transfer at the particle scale are not resolved and the momentum and energy coupling between fluid and particles are provided by proper closure models. By examining the kinetic energy transfer due to the coupling forces from the macroscale to microscale fluid motion, closure models are obtained for the contributions of the coupling forces to the energy coupling. Due to the inviscid origin of the added-mass force, its contribution to the microscale kinetic energy does not contribute to dissipative transfer to fluid internal energy as was done by the quasi-steady force. Time scale analysis shows that when the particle is larger than a critical diameter, the diffusive-unsteady kernel decays at a time scale that is smaller than the Kolmogorov time scale. As a result, the computationally costly Basset-like integral form of diffusive-unsteady heat transfer can be simplified to a non-integral form. Conventionally, the fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio is used to evaluate the relative importance of the unsteady heat transfer to the energy balance of the particles. Therefore, for gas-particle flows, where the fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio is small, unsteady heat transfer is usually ignored. However, the present scaling analysis shows that for small fluid-to-particle volumetric heat capacity ratio, the importance of the unsteady heat transfer actually depends on the ratio between the particle size and the Kolmogorov scale. Furthermore, the particle mass loading multiplied by the heat capacity ratio is usually used to estimate the importance of the thermal two-way coupling effect. Through scaling argument, improved estimates are established for the energy coupling parameters of each

  8. Chemical Dynamics Simulations of Intermolecular Energy Transfer: Azulene + N2 Collisions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsik; Paul, Amit K; Pratihar, Subha; Hase, William L

    2016-07-14

    Chemical dynamics simulations were performed to investigate collisional energy transfer from highly vibrationally excited azulene (Az*) in a N2 bath. The intermolecular potential between Az and N2, used for the simulations, was determined from MP2/6-31+G* ab initio calculations. Az* is prepared with an 87.5 kcal/mol excitation energy by using quantum microcanonical sampling, including its 95.7 kcal/mol zero-point energy. The average energy of Az* versus time, obtained from the simulations, shows different rates of Az* deactivation depending on the N2 bath density. Using the N2 bath density and Lennard-Jones collision number, the average energy transfer per collision ⟨ΔEc⟩ was obtained for Az* as it is collisionally relaxed. By comparing ⟨ΔEc⟩ versus the bath density, the single collision limiting density was found for energy transfer. The resulting ⟨ΔEc⟩, for an 87.5 kcal/mol excitation energy, is 0.30 ± 0.01 and 0.32 ± 0.01 kcal/mol for harmonic and anharmonic Az potentials, respectively. For comparison, the experimental value is 0.57 ± 0.11 kcal/mol. During Az* relaxation there is no appreciable energy transfer to Az translation and rotation, and the energy transfer is to the N2 bath.

  9. Numerical Simulations of the Kinetic Energy Transfer in the Bath of a BOF Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaobin; Ersson, Mikael; Zhong, Liangcai; Jönsson, Pär

    2016-02-01

    The paper focuses on the fundamental aspects of the kinetic energy transfer from a top and bottom gas injection to the bath of the basic oxygen furnace (BOF) by applying a mathematical model. The analyses revealed that the energy transfer is less efficient when top lance height is lowered or the flowrate is increased in the top blowing operations. However, an inverse trend was found that the kinetic energy transfer is increased when the bottom flowrate is increased for the current bottom blowing operation conditions. The kinetic energy transfer index results indicated that the energy transfer for the bottom blowing is much more efficient than that of the top blowing operations. To understand the effects of the upper buoyant phase on the energy dissipation of the bulk liquid in the bath, different mass and physical properties of slag and foam were considered in the bottom blowing simulations. The slag on top of the bath is found to dissipate by 6.6, 9.4, and 11.2 pct for slag mass values of 5, 9, and 15 t compared to the case without slag atop the surface of the bath, respectively. The results showed that the kinetic energy transfer is not largely influenced by the viscosity of the upper slag or the foaming phases.

  10. A model for energy transfer in collisions of atoms with highly excited molecules.

    PubMed

    Houston, Paul L; Conte, Riccardo; Bowman, Joel M

    2015-05-21

    A model for energy transfer in the collision between an atom and a highly excited target molecule has been developed on the basis of classical mechanics and turning point analysis. The predictions of the model have been tested against the results of trajectory calculations for collisions of five different target molecules with argon or helium under a variety of temperatures, collision energies, and initial rotational levels. The model predicts selected moments of the joint probability distribution, P(Jf,ΔE) with an R(2) ≈ 0.90. The calculation is efficient, in most cases taking less than one CPU-hour. The model provides several insights into the energy transfer process. The joint probability distribution is strongly dependent on rotational energy transfer and conservation laws and less dependent on vibrational energy transfer. There are two mechanisms for rotational excitation, one due to motion normal to the intermolecular potential and one due to motion tangential to it and perpendicular to the line of centers. Energy transfer is found to depend strongly on the intermolecular potential and only weakly on the intramolecular potential. Highly efficient collisions are a natural consequence of the energy transfer and arise due to collisions at "sweet spots" in the space of impact parameter and molecular orientation.

  11. Plasmonic Nanoantennas Enable Forbidden Förster Dipole-Dipole Energy Transfer and Enhance the FRET Efficiency.

    PubMed

    de Torres, Juan; Mivelle, Mathieu; Moparthi, Satish Babu; Rigneault, Hervé; Van Hulst, Niek F; García-Parajó, María F; Margeat, Emmanuel; Wenger, Jérôme

    2016-10-12

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) plays a key role in biochemistry, organic photovoltaics, and lighting sources. FRET is commonly used as a nanoruler for the short (nanometer) distance between donor and acceptor dyes, yet FRET is equally sensitive to the mutual dipole orientation. The orientation dependence complicates the FRET analysis in biological samples and may even lead to the absence of FRET for perpendicularly oriented donor and acceptor dipoles. Here, we exploit the strongly inhomogeneous and localized fields in plasmonic nanoantennas to open new energy transfer routes, overcoming the limitations from the mutual dipole orientation to ultimately enhance the FRET efficiency. We demonstrate that the simultaneous presence of perpendicular near-field components in the nanoantenna sets favorable energy transfer routes that increase the FRET efficiency up to 50% for nearly perpendicular donor and acceptor dipoles. This new facet of plasmonic nanoantennas enables dipole-dipole energy transfer that would otherwise be forbidden in a homogeneous environment. As such, our approach further increases the applicability of single-molecule FRET over diffraction-limited approaches, with the additional benefits of higher sensitivities and higher concentration ranges toward physiological levels.

  12. Depolarization after resonance energy transfer (DARET): a sensitive fluorescence-based assay for botulinum neurotoxin protease activity.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Marcella A; Williams, Dudley; Okawa, Yumiko; Holguin, Bret; James, Nicholas G; Ross, Justin A; Roger Aoki, K; Jameson, David M; Steward, Lance E

    2011-06-01

    The DARET (depolarization after resonance energy transfer) assay is a coupled Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-fluorescence polarization assay for botulinum neurotoxin type A or E (BoNT/A or BoNT/E) proteolytic activity that relies on a fully recombinant substrate. The substrate consists of blue fluorescent protein (BFP) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) flanking SNAP-25 (synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa) residues 134-206. In this assay, the substrate is excited with polarized light at 387 nm, which primarily excites the BFP, whereas emission from the GFP is monitored at 509 nm. Energy transfer from the BFP to the GFP in the intact substrate results in a substantial depolarization of the GFP emission. The energy transfer is eliminated when the fluorescent domains separate on cleavage by the endopeptidase, and emission from the directly excited GFP product fragment is then highly polarized, resulting in an overall increase in polarization. This increase in polarization can be monitored to assay the proteolytic activity of BoNT/A and BoNT/E in real time. It allows determination of the turnover rate of the substrate and the kinetic constants (V(max) and k(cat)) based on the concentration of cleaved substrate determined directly from the measurements using the additivity properties of polarization. The assay is amenable to high-throughput applications.

  13. Excitation energy transfer from long-persistent phosphors for enhancing power conversion of dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puntambekar, Ajinkya; Chakrapani, Vidhya

    2016-06-01

    Incorporation of inorganic phosphors to improve the spectral absorption range of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is a promising strategy to enhance efficiency beyond 15%. However, only marginal improvements have been achieved so far, which is mainly due to the use of nonoptimized device architecture and the lack of understanding of the energy transfer mechanism. Here we report results of DSSCs employing long-persistence phosphor coupled to the sensitizing dye. Detailed time-resolved photoluminescence measurements suggest that excitation energy is transferred radiatively as opposed to Förster resonance energy transfer. As a result of efficient energy transfer, large-area solar cells show a 63% increase in the photocurrent density along with a 54% increase in power conversion efficiency. In addition, the device works as a "nighttime solar cell" with generation of 52 μ W c m-2 power density in the dark. Under short-circuit conditions, the device can output 300 mV for 30 h in the dark.

  14. Can the Excited State Energy of a Pyrenyl Unit Be Directly Transferred to a Perylene Bisimide Moiety?

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Shang, Congdi; Wang, Li; Peng, Haonan; Yin, Shiwei; Fang, Yu

    2016-11-23

    A pyrenyl unit (Py) was chemically connected to a perylene bisimide (PBI) moiety through a long and flexible linker, 4,7,10-trioxa-1,13-tridecanediamine (TOA), resulting in a fluorescent dyad, PBI-TOA-Py. Ultraviolet-visible absorption and fluorescence studies revealed that the two fluorescent units of PBI-TOA-Py behave independently. However, efficient Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the Py unit to the PBI moiety in solution state was also observed. Temperature and solvent effect studies demonstrated that the energy transfer efficiency is highly dependent upon solution temperature and solvent nature. Specifically, for the dimethylformamide (DMF) solution of PBI-TOA-Py, the FRET efficiency is close to 88% at temperatures below ∼40 °C, but the efficiency greatly decreases to nearly zero when the temperature exceeds ∼80 °C. Moreover, addition of HAc into the DMF solution at room temperature could reduce the energy transfer efficiency to nearly zero, suggesting that the excited state energy of Py cannot be directly transferred to the PBI structure even though they are properly and chemically bonded. On the basis of the observations and time-resolved studies, it is believed that the observed efficient FRET from the Py unit to the PBI moiety occurs mainly through Py excimer formation, which could be a result of intermolecular association of the compound. Thus, the applications of the fluorescent dyad in solvent discrimination and trace water determination in organic solvents were verified through example studies.

  15. Design, Development and Testing of an Energy-Environment Information Transfer System: Final Report August 16, 1977 through October 15, 1978. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornog, Martha; And Others

    Documented in this project report are efforts to create and evaluate an Energy-Environment Information Transfer System (EEITS) for Region VIII of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This system is designed to support government policy-making and implementation decisions regarding energy and the environment. In addition to assisting federal,…

  16. The energy transfer in the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Isakova, Y. I.; Pushkarev, A. I.; Khaylov, I. P.

    2013-07-15

    The results of a study of the energy transfer in the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator are presented. The energy transfer efficiency in the Blumlein and a self-magnetically insulated ion diode was analyzed. Optimization of the design of the accelerator allows for 85% of energy transferred from Blumlein to the diode (including after-pulses), which indicates that the energy loss in Blumlein and spark gaps is insignificant and not exceeds 10%–12%. Most losses occur in the diode. The efficiency of energy supplied to the diode to the energy of accelerated ions is 8%–9% for a planar strip self-magnetic MID, 12%–15% for focusing diode and 20% for a spiral self-magnetic MID.

  17. Time-resolved observation of interatomic excitation-energy transfer in argon dimers.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Tomoya; Cörlin, Philipp; Miteva, Tsveta; Gokhberg, Kirill; Kuleff, Alexander; Cederbaum, Lorenz S; Pfeifer, Thomas; Fischer, Andreas; Moshammer, Robert

    2017-03-14

    The ultrafast transfer of excitation energy from one atom to its neighbor is observed in singly charged argon dimers in a time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV)-pump IR-probe experiment. In the pump step, bound 3s-hole states in the dimer are populated by single XUV-photon ionization. The excitation-energy transfer at avoided crossings of the potential-energy curves leads to dissociation of the dimer, which is experimentally observed by further ionization with a time-delayed IR-probe pulse. From the measured pump-probe delay-dependent kinetic-energy release of coincident Ar(+) + Ar(+) ions, we conclude that the transfer of energy occurs on a time scale of about 800fs. This mechanism represents a fast relaxation process below the energy threshold for interatomic Coulombic decay.

  18. Time-resolved spectroscopy of energy and electron transfer processes in the photosynthetic bacterium Heliobacillus mobilis.

    PubMed

    Lin, S; Chiou, H C; Kleinherenbrink, F A; Blankenship, R E

    1994-02-01

    The kinetics of excitation energy transfer and electron transfer processes within the membrane of Heliobacillus mobilis were investigated using femtosecond transient absorption difference spectroscopy at room temperature. The kinetics in the 725- to 865-nm region, upon excitation at 590 and 670 nm, were fit using global analysis. The fits returned three kinetic components with lifetimes of 1-2 ps and 27-30 ps, and a component that does not decay within several nanoseconds. The 1- to 2-ps component is attributed to excitation equilibration to form a thermally relaxed excited state. The 27- to 30-ps phase corresponds to the decay of the relaxed excited state to form a charge-separated state. The intrinsic energy and electron transfer rates were estimated using the experimental results and theoretical models for excitation migration and trapping dynamics. Taking into account the number of antenna pigments and their spectral distribution, an upper limit of 1.2 ps for the intrinsic time constant for charge separation in the reaction center is calculated. This upper limit corresponds with the trapping-limited case for excitation migration and trapping. Reduction of the primary electron acceptor A0 was observed in the 640 to 700 nm region using excitation at 780 nm. An instantaneous absorbance increase followed by a decay of about 30 ps was observed over a broad wavelength region due to the excited state absorption and decay of BChl g molecules in the antenna. In addition, a narrow bleaching band centered at 670 nm grows in with an apparent time constant of about 1.0 ps, superimposed on the 30-ps absorbance increase due to excited state absorption. Measurements on a longer time scale showed that besides the 670 nm pigment a BChl g molecule absorbing near 785 nm may be involved in the primary charge separation, and that this pigment may be in equilibrium with the 670 nm pigment. The bleaching bands at 670 nm and 785nm recovered with a time constant of about 600 ps, due to

  19. Potential energy curves crossing and low-energy charge transfer dynamics in (BeH2O)2+ complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, QiXiang; Yan, Bing

    2012-07-01

    The singlet rigid Be—O dissociation potential energy curves correlating to the first four molecular limits of (BeH2O)2+ complex were calculated using the multi-reference single and double excitation configuration interaction theory. The radial couplings of three low-lying 1A1 states were calculated and combined with adiabatic potential energy curves to investigate and charge-transfer collision dynamics by using quantum-mechanical molecular orbital close-coupling methods. It is found that the total charge-transfer cross sections are dominated by the Be+(2S)+H2O+(Ã2A1) channel. The rate coefficients in the range of 10-17-10-12 cm3/s are very sensitive to temperature below 1000 K. The complexation energy without charge-transfer was determined to be 143.6 kcal/mol, including zero-point vibration energy corrections. This is in good agreement with the previous results.

  20. Electronic coherence and the kinetics of energy transfer in light-harvesting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David; Miller, Thomas

    Recent 2D-spectroscopy experiments have observed transient electronic coherence in natural and artificial light harvesting systems, which raises questions about the role of electronic coherence in facilitating excitation energy transfer (EET) processes. In this talk, we introduce the recently developed partial linearized path-integral (PLPI) method, which can accurately simulate exciton transfer dynamics across multiple reaction regimes, as well as reliably describe the electronic coherence among excitonic states. Further, we develop a strategy that enables the analysis of the relative impact of static and dynamic electronic coherence. With PLPI simulations, we find that energy transfer dynamics are almost entirely dominated by static coherence effects; dynamic coherence is found to cause only minor effects. These conclusions are consistent with the historical view that emphasizes the importance of energy-level alignment for efficient incoherent energy transfer,while suggesting a less important role for more exotic electronic coherence effects that have been recently emphasized.

  1. Temperature dependence of vibrational energy transfer between vibrationally excited polyatomic molecules and bath gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Yakovlev, D. L.; Sambor, E. G.

    2000-08-01

    Efficiency of vibrational energy transfer (VET) in vibrational quasicontinuum of triplet states was estimated from the dependence of time-resolved delayed fluorescence of benzophenone and anthraquinone on bath gas pressure. The negative temperature dependence for vibration-vibration (V-V) and positive for vibration-translation (V-T) energy transfers from benzophenone and anthraquinone to bath gases (C 2H 4, SF 6, CCl 4, C 5H 12) were obtained between 373 and 553 K. Polarizability and dipole moment of colliding molecules seem to affect the efficiency of V-V relaxation. These data reflect the dominance of long-range attractive interactions in V-V energy transfer and short-range repulsive interactions in V-T energy transfer.

  2. Simple Model for Gold Nano Particles Concentration Dependence of Resonance Energy Transfer Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa, N. M.; Ha, C. V.; Nga, D. T.; Lan, N. T.; Nhung, T. H.; Viet, N. A.

    2016-06-01

    Gold nano particles (GNPs) concentration dependence of the energy transfer occurs between the fluorophores and GNPs is investigated. In the case of theses pairs, GNPs can enhance or quench the fluorescence of fluorophores depending upon the relative magnitudes of two energy transfer mechanisms: i) the plasmonic field enhancement at the fluorophores emission frequencies (plasmon coupled fluorescence enhancement) and ii) the localized plasmon coupled Forster energy transfer from fluorescent particles to gold particles, which quenches the fluorescence. The competition of these mechanisms is depending on the spectral overlap of fluorophores and GNPs, their relative concentration, excitation wavelength. Simple two branches surface plasmon polariton model for GNPs concentration dependence of the energy transfer is proposed. The experimental data and theoretical results confirm our findings.

  3. Color-Tunable Resonant Photoluminescence and Cavity-Mediated Multistep Energy Transfer Cascade.

    PubMed

    Okada, Daichi; Nakamura, Takashi; Braam, Daniel; Dao, Thang Duy; Ishii, Satoshi; Nagao, Tadaaki; Lorke, Axel; Nabeshima, Tatsuya; Yamamoto, Yohei

    2016-07-26

    Color-tunable resonant photoluminescence (PL) was attained from polystyrene microspheres doped with a single polymorphic fluorescent dye, boron-dipyrrin (BODIPY) 1. The color of the resonant PL depends on the assembling morphology of 1 in the microspheres, which can be selectively controlled from green to red by the initial concentration of 1 in the preparation process of the microspheres. Studies on intersphere PL propagation with multicoupled microspheres, prepared by micromanipulation technique, revealed that multistep photon transfer takes place through the microspheres, accompanying energy transfer cascade with stepwise PL color change. The intersphere energy transfer cascade is direction selective, where energy donor-to-acceptor down conversion direction is only allowed. Such cavity-mediated long-distance and multistep energy transfer will be advantageous for polymer photonics device application.

  4. Resonant electronic excitation energy transfer by Dexter mechanism in the quantum dot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samosvat, D. M.; Chikalova-Luzina, O. P.; Vyatkin, V. M.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2016-11-01

    In present work the energy transfer between quantum dots by the exchange (Dexter) mechanism is analysed. The interdot Coulomb interaction is taken into consideration. It is assumed that the quantum dot-donor and the quantum dot-acceptor are made from the same compound A3B5 and embedded in the matrix of other material creating potential barriers for electron and holes. The dependences of the energy transfer rate on the quantum-dot system parameters are found using the Kane model that provides the most adequate description spectra of semiconductors A3B5. Numerical calculations show that the rate of the energy transfer by Dexter mechanism is comparable to the rate of the energy transfer by electrostatic mechanism at the distances approaching to the contact ones.

  5. RE 3+ emission in garnets: multisites, energy transfer and quantum efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupei, V.

    2002-02-01

    The connection between the high-resolution spectral disordering of the rare earth-doped garnets and the manifestation of the energy transfer in the global or selective emission decay is discussed. It is shown that the identification of the pair satellites and the investigation of their decay properties are important for determination or verification of the mechanisms of interaction that determine the energy transfer in simply activated or in sensitized crystals. The competition of various energy transfer processes in de-excitation of the metastable levels such as down-conversion and up-conversion in Nd: YAG under high intensity pump is discussed. It is shown that the energy transfer parameters determined from the emission decay could give a consistent description of data on quantum efficiency or heating effects.

  6. Hierarchical Corannulene-Based Materials: Energy Transfer and Solid-State Photophysics.

    PubMed

    Rice, Allison M; Fellows, W Brett; Dolgopolova, Ekaterina A; Greytak, Andrew B; Vannucci, Aaron K; Smith, Mark D; Karakalos, Stavros G; Krause, Jeanette A; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M; Popov, Alexey A; Shustova, Natalia B

    2017-04-10

    We report the first example of a donor-acceptor corannulene-containing hybrid material with rapid ligand-to-ligand energy transfer (ET). Additionally, we provide the first time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) data for any corannulene-based compounds in the solid state. Comprehensive analysis of PL data in combination with theoretical calculations of donor-acceptor exciton coupling was employed to estimate ET rate and efficiency in the prepared material. The ligand-to-ligand ET rate calculated using two models is comparable with that observed in fullerene-containing materials, which are generally considered for molecular electronics development. Thus, the presented studies not only demonstrate the possibility of merging the intrinsic properties of π-bowls, specifically corannulene derivatives, with the versatility of crystalline hybrid scaffolds, but could also foreshadow the engineering of a novel class of hierarchical corannulene-based hybrid materials for optoelectronic devices.

  7. Proposal for probing energy transfer pathway by single-molecule pump-dump experiment

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ming-Jie; Ai, Qing; Deng, Fu-Guo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung

    2016-01-01

    The structure of Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) light-harvesting complex had long been recognized as containing seven bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. Recently, an additional BChl molecule was discovered in the crystal structure of the FMO complex, which may serve as a link between baseplate and the remaining seven molecules. Here, we investigate excitation energy transfer (EET) process by simulating single-molecule pump-dump experiment in the eight-molecules complex. We adopt the coherent modified Redfield theory and non-Markovian quantum jump method to simulate EET dynamics. This scheme provides a practical approach of detecting the realistic EET pathway in BChl complexes with currently available experimental technology. And it may assist optimizing design of artificial light-harvesting devices. PMID:27277702

  8. Energy transfer between the shape and volume modes of a nonspherical gas bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkin, Anthony A.; Kaper, Tasso J.; Nadim, Ali

    2013-06-01

    A model of a nonspherical gas bubble is developed in which the Rayleigh-Plesset equation is augmented with second order terms that back-couple the volume mode to a single shape mode. These additional terms in the Rayleigh-Plesset equation permit oscillation energy to be transferred back and forth between the shape and volume modes. The parametric stability of the shape mode is analyzed for a driven bubble, and it is seen that the bidirectional coupling yields an enhanced, albeit minor, stabilizing effect on the shape mode when compared with a model where the shape-volume coupling is unidirectional. It is also demonstrated how a pure shape distortion can excite significant volume pulsations when the volume mode is in 2:1 internal resonance with the shape mode.

  9. Time-resolved Förster-resonance-energy-transfer DNA assay on an active CMOS microarray

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, David Eric; Gong, Ping; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2008-01-01

    We present an active oligonucleotide microarray platform for time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) assays. In these assays, immobilized probe is labeled with a donor fluorophore and analyte target is labeled with a fluorescence quencher. Changes in the fluorescence decay lifetime of the donor are measured to determine the extent of hybridization. In this work, we demonstrate that TR-FRET assays have reduced sensitivity to variances in probe surface density compared with standard fluorescence-based microarray assays. Use of an active array substrate, fabricated in a standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process, provides the additional benefits of reduced system complexity and cost. The array consists of 4096 independent single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) pixel sites and features on-chip time-to-digital conversion. We demonstrate the functionality of our system by measuring a DNA target concentration series using TR-FRET with semiconductor quantum dot donors. PMID:18515059

  10. Excitation of torsional modes of proteins via collisional energy transfer: A quantum dynamical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, David C.; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.

    2002-06-01

    Quantum dynamical calculations have been carried out on the excitation of the torsional vibrations of a protein by collision with a solvent molecule. This energy transfer process represents the first step in the unfolding of the protein. The method developed for this purpose is the torsional close coupling, infinite order sudden approximation. Both time-independent and time dependent methods are used to solve the scattering problem and individual excitation of all the torsional modes of the protein is treated. The method is applied to the excitation of the HIV protein gp41 colliding with a water molecule. This protein has 1101 atoms, 56 amino acids, and 452 torsional modes. A major mode-selective effect is found in the computations: it is much easier to excite backbone torsions than sidechain torsions in the protein. In addition, resonances arise in the collisional process and these complexes involve temporary trapping of the water molecule inside the pockets of the protein.

  11. Efficient host-guest energy transfer in polycationic cyclophane-perylene diimide complexes in water.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Seán T J; Del Barrio, Jesús; Ghosh, Indrajit; Biedermann, Frank; Lazar, Alexandra I; Lan, Yang; Coulston, Roger J; Nau, Werner M; Scherman, Oren A

    2014-06-25

    We report the self-assembly of a series of highly charged supramolecular complexes in aqueous media composed of cyclobis(4,4'-(1,4-phenylene)bispyridine-p-phenylene)tetrakis(chloride) (ExBox) and three dicationic perylene diimides (PDIs). Efficient energy transfer (ET) is observed between the host and guests. Additionally, we show that our hexacationic complexes are capable of further complexation with neutral cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]), producing a 3-polypseudorotaxane via the self-assembly of orthogonal recognition moieties. ExBox serves as the central ring, complexing to the PDI core, while two CB[7]s behave as supramolecular stoppers, binding to the two outer quaternary ammonium motifs. The formation of the 3-polypseudorotaxane results in far superior photophysical properties of the central PDI unit relative to the binary complexes at stoichiometric ratios. Lastly, we also demonstrate the ability of our binary complexes to act as a highly selective chemosensing ensemble for the neurotransmitter melatonin.

  12. Proposal for probing energy transfer pathway by single-molecule pump-dump experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Ming-Jie; Ai, Qing; Deng, Fu-Guo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung

    2016-06-01

    The structure of Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) light-harvesting complex had long been recognized as containing seven bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. Recently, an additional BChl molecule was discovered in the crystal structure of the FMO complex, which may serve as a link between baseplate and the remaining seven molecules. Here, we investigate excitation energy transfer (EET) process by simulating single-molecule pump-dump experiment in the eight-molecules complex. We adopt the coherent modified Redfield theory and non-Markovian quantum jump method to simulate EET dynamics. This scheme provides a practical approach of detecting the realistic EET pathway in BChl complexes with currently available experimental technology. And it may assist optimizing design of artificial light-harvesting devices.

  13. 40 CFR 74.47 - Transfer of allowances from the replacement of thermal energy-combustion sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and End of Year Compliance § 74.47 Transfer of allowances from the replacement of thermal energy... seeking to transfer allowances based on the replacement of thermal energy. (3) Contents. Each thermal... energy plan, the Administrator will annually transfer allowances to the compliance account of each...

  14. Quantitation of fluorescence energy transfer between cell surface proteins via fluorescence donor photobleaching kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Young, R M; Arnette, J K; Roess, D A; Barisas, B G

    1994-01-01

    We describe practical aspects of photobleaching fluorescence energy transfer measurements on individual living cells. The method introduced by T. M. Jovin and co-workers (see, most recently, Kubitscheck et al. 1993. Biophys. J. 64:110) is based on the reduced rate of irreversible photobleaching of donor fluorophores when acceptor fluorophores are present. Measuring differences in donor photobleaching rates on cells labeled with donor only (fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated proteins) and with both donor and acceptor (tetramethylrhodamine-conjugated proteins) allows calculation of the fluorescence energy transfer efficiency. We assess possible methods of data analysis in light of the underlying processes of photobleaching and energy transfer and suggest optimum strategies for this purpose. Single murine B lymphocytes binding various ratios of donor and acceptor conjugates of tetravalent concanavalin A (Con A) and divalent succinyl Con A were examined for interlectin energy transfer by these methods. For Con A, a maximum transfer efficiency of 0.49 +/- 0.02 was observed. Under similar conditions flow cytometric measurements of donor quenching yielded a value of 0.54 +/- 0.03. For succinyl Con A, the maximum transfer efficiency was 0.36. To provide concrete examples of quantities arising in such energy transfer determinations, we present examples of individual cell data and kinetic analyses, population rate constant distributions, and error estimates for the various quantities involved. PMID:7948701

  15. Energy deposition by heavy ions: Additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Grygiel, C.; Dufour, C.; Sun, J. R.; Wang, Z. G.; Zhao, Y. T.; Xiao, G. Q.; Cheng, R.; Zhou, X. M.; Ren, J. R.; Liu, S. D.; Lei, Y.; Sun, Y. B.; Ritter, R.; Gruber, E.; Cassimi, A.; Monnet, I.; Bouffard, S.; Aumayr, F.; Toulemonde, M.

    2014-07-01

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe22+ to Xe30+) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshold in potential energy (Ep) while for swift heavy ions a minimum electronic energy loss per unit length (Se) is necessary. With our results we bridge the gap between these two extreme cases and demonstrate, that with increasing energy deposition via Se the Ep-threshold for hillock production can be lowered substantially. Surprisingly, both mechanisms of energy deposition in the target surface seem to contribute in an additive way, which can be visualized in a phase diagram. We show that the inelastic thermal spike model, originally developed to describe such material modifications for swift heavy ions, can be extended to the case where both kinetic and potential energies are deposited into the surface.

  16. Energy deposition by heavy ions: additivity of kinetic and potential energy contributions in hillock formation on CaF2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Y; Grygiel, C; Dufour, C; Sun, J R; Wang, Z G; Zhao, Y T; Xiao, G Q; Cheng, R; Zhou, X M; Ren, J R; Liu, S D; Lei, Y; Sun, Y B; Ritter, R; Gruber, E; Cassimi, A; Monnet, I; Bouffard, S; Aumayr, F; Toulemonde, M

    2014-07-18

    Modification of surface and bulk properties of solids by irradiation with ion beams is a widely used technique with many applications in material science. In this study, we show that nano-hillocks on CaF2 crystal surfaces can be formed by individual impact of medium energy (3 and 5 MeV) highly charged ions (Xe(22+) to Xe(30+)) as well as swift (kinetic energies between 12 and 58 MeV) heavy xenon ions. For very slow highly charged ions the appearance of hillocks is known to be linked to a threshold in potential energy (Ep) while for swift heavy ions a minimum electronic energy loss per unit length (Se) is necessary. With our results we bridge the gap between these two extreme cases and demonstrate, that with increasing energy deposition via Se the Ep-threshold for hillock production can be lowered substantially. Surprisingly, both mechanisms of energy deposition in the target surface seem to contribute in an additive way, which can be visualized in a phase diagram. We show that the inelastic thermal spike model, originally developed to describe such material modifications for swift heavy ions, can be extended to the case where both kinetic and potential energies are deposited into the surface.

  17. Characterization of Iodine Quenching and Energy Transfer Rate Constants for Supersonic Flow Visualization Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-28

    SUBTITLE Sm. CONTRACTNUBER Characterization of iodine quenching and energy transfer rate FA9550-41-- o3G Sb. GRANT NUMBER constants for supersonic flow...in the nozzle from a chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL). PLIF images are recorded using laser excitation of the I= B-X transition. Data for the...Preacolbed byANSI Sad Z30.16 20071015188 Final report for the project, "Characterization of iodine quenching and energy transfer rate constants for

  18. A BODIPY-luminol chemiluminescent resonance energy-transfer (CRET) cassette for imaging of cellular superoxide.

    PubMed

    Bag, S; Tseng, J-C; Rochford, J

    2015-02-14

    Spectroscopic and in cellulo studies are here reported on the very first BODIPY-luminol chemiluminescent resonance energy-transfer (CRET) cassette where the luminol CL agent is covalently linked to the BODIPY energy-transfer acceptor in a molecular dyad. The efficiency of intramolecular CRET investigated for the BODIPY-luminol dyad was found to be 64% resulting in a dual emissive response. Successful in cellulo biochemiluminescence via CRET was achieved in PMA activated splenocytes.

  19. Effect of energy transfer from atomic electron shell to an α particle emitted by decaying nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igashov, S. Yu.; Tchuvil'sky, Yu. M.

    2016-12-01

    The process of energy transfer from the electron shell of an atom to an α particle propagating through the shell is formulated mathematically. Using the decay of the 226Ra nucleus as an example, it is demonstrated that this phenomenon increases the α-decay intensity in contrast with other known effects of similar type. Moreover, the α decay of the nucleus is more strongly affected by the energy transfer than by all other effects taken together.

  20. Nonlinear Electromagnetics and Coherent Energy Transfer in Negative-Index metamaterials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-07

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0176 NONLINEAR ELECTROMAGNETICS AND COHERENT ENERGY TRANSFER IN NEGATIVE INDEX METAMATERIALS Alexander Popov UNIVERSITY OF...COHERENT ENERGY TRANSFER IN NEGATIVE-INDEX METAMATERIALS FA9550-12-1-0298 Popov, Alexander K. UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-STEVENS POINT 2100 MAIN ST STEVENS...understanding was advanced of nonlinear propagation properties of electromagnetic (EM) waves in double-domain negative/positive index metamaterials (MMs

  1. Universal characteristics of transverse momentum transfer in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, F.; Townsend, L. W.; Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    1993-01-01

    A microscopic optical model formalism for estimating momentum transfer in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions predicts universal behavior of the transverse component. In particular, for symmetric systems heavier than niobium, it appears that values of P(perpendicular)/A are independent of the mass and charge of the colliding nuclei and vary only with impact parameter and incident beam energy. This suggests that momentum transfer per nucleon saturates to some limiting value with increasing mass.

  2. Fluorescence energy transfer in quantum dot/azo dye complexes in polymer track membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromova, Yulia A.; Orlova, Anna O.; Maslov, Vladimir G.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Baranov, Alexander V.

    2013-10-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer in complexes of semiconductor CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with molecules of heterocyclic azo dyes, 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol and 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol, formed at high quantum dot concentration in the polymer pore track membranes were studied by steady-state and transient PL spectroscopy. The effect of interaction between the complexes and free quantum dots on the efficiency of the fluorescence energy transfer and quantum dot luminescence quenching was found and discussed.

  3. Fluorescence energy transfer in quantum dot/azo dye complexes in polymer track membranes.

    PubMed

    Gromova, Yulia A; Orlova, Anna O; Maslov, Vladimir G; Fedorov, Anatoly V; Baranov, Alexander V

    2013-10-31

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer in complexes of semiconductor CdSe/ZnS quantum dots with molecules of heterocyclic azo dyes, 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol and 4-(2-pyridylazo) resorcinol, formed at high quantum dot concentration in the polymer pore track membranes were studied by steady-state and transient PL spectroscopy. The effect of interaction between the complexes and free quantum dots on the efficiency of the fluorescence energy transfer and quantum dot luminescence quenching was found and discussed.

  4. Energy transfer enhancement by oxygen perturbation of spin-forbidden electronic transitions in aromatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monguzzi, A.; Tubino, R.; Salamone, M. M.; Meinardi, F.

    2010-09-01

    Triplet-triplet energy transfer in multicomponent organic systems is usually entirely ascribed to a Dexter-type mechanism involving only short-range donor/acceptor interactions. We demonstrate that the presence of molecular oxygen introduces a perturbation to the electronic structure of one of the involved moieties which can induce a large increase in the spin-forbidden transition oscillator strength so that the otherwise negligible Förster contribution dominates the overall energy transfer rate.

  5. Structure of cytochrome c complexes with phospholipids as revealed by resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, G P

    1999-08-20

    Resonance energy transfer between a series of lipid-bound fluorescent probes as donors and the heme group of cytochrome c as acceptor has been used to obtain structural information on the protein complexes with model membranes, composed of phosphatidylcholine and cardiolipin. Analysis of experimental data in terms of the model of energy transfer in two-dimensional systems provides further evidence for preferential cytochrome c orientation with respect to the lipid bilayer and penetration of the protein into the membrane interior.

  6. Energy transfer method in membrane studies: some theoretical and practical aspects.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galina P; Domanov, Yegor A

    2002-06-28

    Some applications of resonance energy transfer (RET) method to distance estimation in membrane systems are considered. The model of energy transfer between donors and acceptors randomly distributed over parallel planes localized at the outer and inner membrane leaflets is presented. It is demonstrated that RET method can provide evidence for specific orientation of the fluorophore relative to the lipid-water interface. An approach to estimating the depth of the protein penetration in lipid bilayer is suggested.

  7. Experimental evidence for quantum cutting co-operative energy transfer process in Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) ions co-doped fluorotellurite glass: dispute over energy transfer mechanism.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Sathravada; Ghosh, Debarati; Biswas, Kaushik; Gupta, Gaurav; Annapurna, Kalyandurg

    2016-12-07

    Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) doped materials have been widely reported as quantum-cutting materials in recent times. However, the question of the energy transfer mechanism in the Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) pair in light of the quantum-cutting phenomenon still remains unanswered. In view of that, we explored a series of Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) co-doped low phonon fluorotellurite glass systems to estimate the probability of different energy transfer mechanisms. Indeed, a novel and simple way to predict the probability of the proper energy transfer mechanism in the Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) pair is possible by considering the donor Pr(3+) ion emission intensities and the relative ratio dependence in the presence of acceptor Yb(3+) ions. Moreover, the observed results are very much in accordance with other estimated results that support the quantum-cutting phenomena in Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) pairs, such as sub-linear power dependence of Yb(3+) NIR emission upon visible ∼450 nm laser excitation, integrated area of the donor Pr(3+) ion's visible excitation spectrum recorded by monitoring the acceptor Yb(3+) ion's NIR emission, and the experimentally obtained absolute quantum yield values using an integrating sphere setup. Our results give a simple way of estimating the probability of an energy transfer mechanism and the factors to be considered, particularly for the Pr(3+)/Yb(3+) pair.

  8. Drag Reduction by Laser-Plasma Energy Addition in Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, A. C.; Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr; Myrabo, L. N.

    2008-04-28

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the drag reduction by laser-plasma energy addition in a low density Mach 7 hypersonic flow. The experiments were conducted in a shock tunnel and the optical beam of a high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA laser operating with 7 J of energy and 30 MW peak power was focused to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The non-intrusive schlieren optical technique was used to visualize the effects of the energy addition to hypersonic flow, from the plasma generation until the mitigation of the shock wave profile over the model surface. Aside the optical technique, a piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to measure the impact pressure at stagnation point of the hemispherical model and the pressure reduction could be observed.

  9. Gibbs energy additivity approaches to QSRR in generating gas chromatographic retention time for identification of fatty acid methyl ester.

    PubMed

    Pojjanapornpun, Siriluck; Aryusuk, Kornkanok; Lilitchan, Supathra; Krisnangkura, Kanit

    2017-02-06

    The Gibbs energy additivity method was used to correlate the retention time (t R) of common fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) to their chemical structures. The t R of 20 standard FAMEs eluted from three capillary columns of different polarities (ZB-WAXplus, BPX70, and SLB-IL111) under both isothermal gas chromatography and temperature-programmed gas chromatography (TPGC) conditions were accurately predicted. Also, the predicted t R of FAMEs prepared from flowering pak choi seed oil obtained by multistep TPGC with the BPX70 column were within 1.0% of the experimental t R. The predicted t R or mathematical t R (t R(math)) values could possibly be used as references in identification of common FAMEs. Hence, FAMEs prepared from horse mussel and fish oil capsules were chromatographed on the BPX70 and ZB-WAXplus columns in single-step and multistep TPGC. Identification was done by comparison of t R with the t R of standard FAMEs and with t R(math). Both showed correct identifications. The proposed model has six numeric constants. Five of six could be directly transferred to other columns of the same stationary phase. The first numeric constant (a), which contained the column phase ratio, could also be transferred with the adjustment of the column phase ratio to the actual phase ratio of the transferred column. Additionally, the numeric constants could be transferred across laboratories, with similar correction of the first numeric constant. The TPGC t R predicted with the transferred column constants were in good agreement with the reported experimental t R of FAMEs. Moreover, hexane was used in place of the conventional t M marker in the calculation. Hence, the experimental methods were much simplified and practically feasible. The proposed method for using t R(math) as the references would provide an alternative to the uses of real FAMEs as the references. It is simple and rapid and with good accuracy compared with the use of experimental t R as references.

  10. Linker proteins enable ultrafast excitation energy transfer in the phycobilisome antenna system of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus.

    PubMed

    Nganou, C; David, L; Adir, N; Mkandawire, M

    2016-01-01

    We applied a femtosecond flash method, using induced transient absorption changes, to obtain a time-resolved view of excitation energy transfer in intact phycobilisomes of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus at room temperature. Our measurement of an excitation energy transfer rate of 888 fs in phycobilisomes shows the existence of ultrafast kinetics along the phycocyanin rod subcomplex to the allophycocyanin core that is faster than expected for previous excitation energy transfer based on Förster theory in phycobilisomes. Allophycocyanin in the core further transfers energy to the terminal emitter(s) in 17 ps. In the phycobilisome, rod doublets composed of hexameric phycocyanin discs and internal linker proteins are arranged in a parallel fashion, facilitating direct rod-rod interactions. Excitonic splitting likely drives rod absorption at 635 nm as a result of strong coupling between β84 chromophores (20 ± 1 Å) in adjacent hexamers. In comparison to the absorbance of the phycobilisome antenna system of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina, which possesses a single rod structure, the linkers in T. vulcanus rods induce a 17 nm red shift in the absorbance spectrum. Furthermore, the kinetics of 888 fs indicates that the presence of the linker protein induces ultrafast excitation energy transfer between phycocyanin and allophycocyanin inside the phycobilisome, which is faster than all previous excitation energy transfer in phycobilisome subunits or sub-complexes reported to date.

  11. Effect of directional distribution on non-linear energy transfer in wind wave spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrenov, I.; Krogstad, H.

    2003-04-01

    Different directional distribution is investigated from the point of view a non-linear energy transfer in wind wave spectrum. In order to produce a numerical simulation of the non-linear interaction in wind wave spectrum a method of numerical integration of the highest accuracy is used. It is shown that the value of non-linear energy transfer is very sensitive to details of frequency-angular approximation of wave spectrum. The non-linear energy transfer is non-zero in wide frequency - angular range, depending on spectrum angular distribution. The calculation results reveal the presence of non-linear energy transfer to spectral components, which propagation is opposite to wind direction for a wide spectrum angular distribution. It should be noted that neither the discrete interaction approximation (DIA) used in the WAM model (Komen et al., 1994), no diffusive approximation of the non-linear transfer (Pushkarev and Zakharov, 1999) are able not to produce this effect. Numerical results show that the bi-model angular distribution, obtained by Hwang et al. (2000) in field experiments, can be generated by the non-linear energy transfer, sending energy in side direction. Present study has been supported by the INTAS-99-666, INTAS-01-25, INTAS-01-234, INTAS-01-2156, RFBR- 01- 05-64846 Grants.

  12. GW-BSE approach on S1 vertical transition energy of large charge transfer compounds: A performance assessment.

    PubMed

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2016-11-07

    In this work, we apply many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) on large critical charge transfer (CT) complexes to assess its performance on the S1 excitation energy. Since the S1 energy of CT compounds is heavily dependent on the Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange fraction in the reference density functional, MBPT opens a new way for reliable prediction of CT S1 energy without explicit knowledge of suitable amount of HF-exchange, in contrary to the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT), where depending on various functionals, large errors can arise. Thus, simply by starting from a (semi-)local reference functional and performing update of Kohn-Sham (KS) energies in the Green's function G while keeping dynamical screened interaction (W(ω)) frozen to the mean-field level, we obtain impressingly highly accurate S1 energy at slightly higher computational cost in comparison to TD-DFT. However, this energy-only updating mechanism in G fails to work if the initial guess contains a fraction or 100% HF-exchange, and hence considerably inaccurate S1 energy is predicted. Furthermore, eigenvalue updating both in G and W(ω) overshoots the S1 energy due to enhanced underscreening of W(ω), independent of the (hybrid-)DFT starting orbitals. A full energy-update on top of HF orbitals even further overestimates the S1 energy. An additional update of KS wave functions within the Quasi-Particle Self-Consistent GW (QSGW) deteriorates results, in stark contrast to the good results obtained from QSGW for periodic systems. For the sake of transferability, we further present data of small critical non-charge transfer systems, confirming the outcomes of the CT-systems.

  13. GW-BSE approach on S1 vertical transition energy of large charge transfer compounds: A performance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we apply many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) on large critical charge transfer (CT) complexes to assess its performance on the S1 excitation energy. Since the S1 energy of CT compounds is heavily dependent on the Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange fraction in the reference density functional, MBPT opens a new way for reliable prediction of CT S1 energy without explicit knowledge of suitable amount of HF-exchange, in contrary to the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT), where depending on various functionals, large errors can arise. Thus, simply by starting from a (semi-)local reference functional and performing update of Kohn-Sham (KS) energies in the Green's function G while keeping dynamical screened interaction (W(ω)) frozen to the mean-field level, we obtain impressingly highly accurate S1 energy at slightly higher computational cost in comparison to TD-DFT. However, this energy-only updating mechanism in G fails to work if the initial guess contains a fraction or 100% HF-exchange, and hence considerably inaccurate S1 energy is predicted. Furthermore, eigenvalue updating both in G and W(ω) overshoots the S1 energy due to enhanced underscreening of W(ω), independent of the (hybrid-)DFT starting orbitals. A full energy-update on top of HF orbitals even further overestimates the S1 energy. An additional update of KS wave functions within the Quasi-Particle Self-Consistent GW (QSGW) deteriorates results, in stark contrast to the good results obtained from QSGW for periodic systems. For the sake of transferability, we further present data of small critical non-charge transfer systems, confirming the outcomes of the CT-systems.

  14. Global potential energy hypersurface for dynamical studies of energy transfer in HF--HF collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Redmon, M.J.; Binkley, J.S.

    1987-07-15

    The interaction energy of two HF molecules at 1332 individual points has been calculated with Moeller--Plesset (many--body) perturbation theory at the MP4-SDTQ level using a 6-311G** basis set. 293 of the points correspond to stretching of one HF molecule from its equilibrium geometry. No attempt was made to use a sufficiently fine grid to accurately describe the well region corresponding to hydrogen bonding. However, the location and minimum energy are consistent with experiment and other accurate theoretical results. An extensive global fit (rms error of 1 kcal/mol) is reported of 1319 points (below 10 eV of potential energy) using a modified London potential with corrections obtained using polynomials through four-body interactions. A model electrostatic potential represents the long-range interaction. In addition, the use of an expansion in products of three Legendre functions is discussed. It is shown that the latter approach, although accurately fitting the ab initio data, has difficulties interpolating in regions of the surface exhibiting diverse magnitudes of potential energy, and therefore must be used with caution. This surface should be useful for studies of T--V--R processes in this system.

  15. Activation energies for addition of O/3P/ to simple olefins.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Description of relative rate measurements for the addition of O(3P) to C2H4, C2F4, C3H6, and C4H8-1 in liquid argon at 87.5 K. The data strongly indicate that the activation energies for the addition of O(3P) to the double bonds of propylene and butene-1 are identical, probably to within 0.1 kcal/mole. It is very doubtful that differences in pre-exponential factors or other factors such as solvent effects, could invalidate this conclusion. A similar argument holds for the C2H4 and C2F4 reactions. Furthermore, the experiments suggest that the activation energy for addition of O(3P) to the double bond of butene-1 is about 0.1 kcal/mole.

  16. Molecular level energy and electron transfer processes at nanocrystalline titanium dioxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzad, Fereshteh

    This thesis describes photo-induced molecular electron and energy transfer processes occurring at nanocrystalline semiconductor interfaces. The Introductory Chapter provides background and describes how these materials may be useful for solar energy conversion. In Chapter 2, results describing excitation of Ru(deeb)(bpy)2 2+, bis(2,2'-bipyridine)(2,2'-bipyridine-4,4 '-diethylester)ruthenium(II) hexafluorophosphate, bound to nanocrystalline TiO2 thin films, immersed in an acetonitrile bath are presented. The data indicates that light excitation forms predominately long-lived metal-to-ligand charge-transfer, MLCT, excited states under these conditions. Modeling of the data as a function of irradiance has been accomplished assuming parallel unimolecular and bimolecular excited state deactivation processes. The quantum yield for excited state formation depends on the excitation irradiance, consistent with triplet-triplet annihilation processes that occur with k > 1 x 108 s-1. Chapter 3 extends the work described in Chapter 2 to LiClO4 acetonitrile solutions. Li+ addition results in a red shift in the MLCT absorption and photoluminescence, PL, and a concentration dependent quenching of the PL intensity on TiO2. The Li+ induced spectroscopic changes were found to be reversible by varying the electrolyte composition. A second-order kinetic model quantified charge recombination transients. A model is proposed wherein Li+ ion adsorption stabilizes TiO2 acceptor states resulting in energetically more favorable interfacial electron transfer. The photophysical and photoelectrochemical properties of porous nanocrystalline anatase TiO2 electrodes modified with Ru(deeb)(bpy)2 2+, Os(deeb)(bpy)22+, and mixtures of both are described in Chapters 4 and 5. In regenerative solar cells with 0.5 M LiI/0.05 M I2 acetonitrile electrolyte, both compounds efficiently inject electrons into TiO2 producing monochromatic incident photon-to-current efficiencies (IPCE), IPCE (460 nm) = 0.70 + 0

  17. Electrochemical Electron Transfer and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer: Effects of Double Layer and Ionic Environment on Solvent Reorganization Energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Soumya; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-06-14

    Electron transfer and proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions at electrochemical interfaces play an essential role in a broad range of energy conversion processes. The reorganization energy, which is a measure of the free energy change associated with solute and solvent rearrangements, is a key quantity for calculating rate constants for these reactions. We present a computational method for including the effects of the double layer and ionic environment of the diffuse layer in calculations of electrochemical solvent reorganization energies. This approach incorporates an accurate electronic charge distribution of the solute within a molecular-shaped cavity in conjunction with a dielectric continuum treatment of the solvent, ions, and electrode using the integral equations formalism polarizable continuum model. The molecule-solvent boundary is treated explicitly, but the effects of the electrode-double layer and double layer-diffuse layer boundaries, as well as the effects of the ionic strength of the solvent, are included through an external Green’s function. The calculated total reorganization energies agree well with experimentally measured values for a series of electrochemical systems, and the effects of including both the double layer and ionic environment are found to be very small. This general approach was also extended to electrochemical PCET and produced total reorganization energies in close agreement with experimental values for two experimentally studied PCET systems. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  18. Predicting signatures of anisotropic resonance energy transfer in dye-functionalized nanoparticles† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Molecular structure and TDM of Cy3B. Table of dielectric constants. Dielectric mismatch at the surface of the NP: excitonic states and TEF of the NP. Additional data in RET rates calculation. Experimental absorption and PL spectra of the dye and the NP. Master equations and time-dependent populations. Steady-state rates and spectra. Blocking and back-transfer effects. Octahedral tessellation. Average RET rates. Details on Fig. 5 inset of the main text. Poisson distribution of the number of dyes per NP. See DOI: 10.1039/c6ra22433d Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Corni, Stefano; Delgado, Alain; Bertoni, Andrea; Goldoni, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) is an inherently anisotropic process. Even the simplest, well-known Förster theory, based on the transition dipole–dipole coupling, implicitly incorporates the anisotropic character of RET. In this theoretical work, we study possible signatures of the fundamental anisotropic character of RET in hybrid nanomaterials composed of a semiconductor nanoparticle (NP) decorated with molecular dyes. In particular, by means of a realistic kinetic model, we show that the analysis of the dye photoluminescence difference for orthogonal input polarizations reveals the anisotropic character of the dye–NP RET which arises from the intrinsic anisotropy of the NP lattice. In a prototypical core/shell wurtzite CdSe/ZnS NP functionalized with cyanine dyes (Cy3B), this difference is predicted to be as large as 75% and it is strongly dependent in amplitude and sign on the dye–NP distance. We account for all the possible RET processes within the system, together with competing decay pathways in the separate segments. In addition, we show that the anisotropic signature of RET is persistent up to a large number of dyes per NP. PMID:28066545

  19. Evidence of energy transfer in nanoparticle-porphyrins conjugates for radiation therapy enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinov, Konstantin; Cooper, Daniel; Tyagi, Pooja; Bekah, Devesh; Bhattacharyya, Dhrittiman; Hill, Colin; Ha, Jonathan Kin; Nadeau, Jay; Bradforth, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    We report progress towards combining radiation therapy (RT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) using scintillating nanoparticle (NP)-photosensitizer conjugates. In this approach, scintillating NPs are excited by clinically relevant ionizing radiation sources and subsequently transfer energy to conjugated photosensitizers via FRET, acting as an energy mediator between ionizing radiation and photosensitizer molecules. The excited photosensitizers generate reactive oxygen species that can induce local damage and immune response. Advantages of the scheme include: 1) Compared with traditional radiation therapy, a possible decrease of the total radiation dose needed to eliminate the lesion; 2) Compared with traditional PDT, the ability to target deeper and more highly pigmented lesions; 3) The possibility of additional photosensitizing effects due to the scintillation of the nanoparticles. In this work, the photosensitizer molecule chlorin e6 was covalently bound to the surface of LaF3:Ce NPs. After conjugation, the photoluminescence intensity of NPs decreased, and fluorescence lifetime of conjugated chlorin e6 became sensitive to excitation wavelength, suggesting rapid FRET. In addition, scintillation spectra of nanoparticles were measured. Preliminary calculations suggest that the observed scintillation efficiencies are sufficient to enhance RT. In vitro cancer cell studies suggest conjugates are taken up by cells. Survival curves with radiation exposure suggest that the particles alone cause radiosensitization comparable to that seen with gold nanoparticles.

  20. Non-contact pumping of light emitters via non-radiative energy transfer

    DOEpatents

    Klimov, Victor I.; Achermann, Marc

    2010-01-05

    A light emitting device is disclosed including a primary light source having a defined emission photon energy output, and, a light emitting material situated near to said primary light source, said light emitting material having an absorption onset equal to or less in photon energy than the emission photon energy output of the primary light source whereby non-radiative energy transfer from said primary light source to said light emitting material can occur yielding light emission from said light emitting material.

  1. Energy-Efficient Information Transfer by Visual Pathway Synapses.

    PubMed

    Harris, Julia J; Jolivet, Renaud; Engl, Elisabeth; Attwell, David

    2015-12-21

    The architecture of computational devices is shaped by their energy consumption. Energetic constraints are used to design silicon-based computers but are poorly understood for neural computation. In the brain, most energy is used to reverse ion influxes generating excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and action potentials. Thus, EPSCs should be small to minimize energy use, but not so small as to impair information transmission. We quantified information flow through the retinothalamic synapse in the visual pathway in brain slices, with cortical and inhibitory input to the postsynaptic cell blocked. Altering EPSC size with dynamic clamp, we found that a larger-than-normal EPSC increased information flow through the synapse. Thus, the evolutionarily selected EPSC size does not maximize retinal information flow to the cortex. By assessing the energy used on postsynaptic ion pumping and action potentials, we show that, instead, the EPSC size optimizes the ratio of retinal information transmitted to energy consumed. These data suggest maximization of information transmission per energy used as a synaptic design principle.

  2. Energy-Efficient Information Transfer by Visual Pathway Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Julia J.; Jolivet, Renaud; Engl, Elisabeth; Attwell, David

    2015-01-01

    Summary The architecture of computational devices is shaped by their energy consumption. Energetic constraints are used to design silicon-based computers but are poorly understood for neural computation. In the brain, most energy is used to reverse ion influxes generating excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and action potentials. Thus, EPSCs should be small to minimize energy use, but not so small as to impair information transmission. We quantified information flow through the retinothalamic synapse in the visual pathway in brain slices, with cortical and inhibitory input to the postsynaptic cell blocked. Altering EPSC size with dynamic clamp, we found that a larger-than-normal EPSC increased information flow through the synapse. Thus, the evolutionarily selected EPSC size does not maximize retinal information flow to the cortex. By assessing the energy used on postsynaptic ion pumping and action potentials, we show that, instead, the EPSC size optimizes the ratio of retinal information transmitted to energy consumed. These data suggest maximization of information transmission per energy used as a synaptic design principle. PMID:26671670

  3. Spectroscopic properties, energy transfer dynamics, and laser performance of thulium-holmium doped laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisky, Yehoshua Y.; Rotman, Stanley R.; Boulon, Georges; Pedrini, Christian; Brenier, Alain

    1994-07-01

    Spectroscopic studies using laser induced fluorescence and numerical modelling of energy transfer and back transfer mechanism are reported in Er:Tm:Ho:YLF, Cr:Tm:Ho:YAG and Cr:Tm:YAG laser crystals at various temperatures (10 K - 300 K). Direct energy transfer from Tm3+ excited states to Ho3+ 5I7 emitting level was observed and analyzed both in YAG and YLF. Further analysis of Cr3+ and Tm3+ time-dependent emission curves indicate a strong correlation of chromium- thulium pairs. Pulsed operation of holmium laser at high temperature will be presented.

  4. An electron energy-loss study of picene and chrysene based charge transfer salts

    SciTech Connect

    Müller, Eric; Mahns, Benjamin; Büchner, Bernd; Knupfer, Martin

    2015-05-14

    The electronic excitation spectra of charge transfer compounds built from the hydrocarbons picene and chrysene, and the strong electron acceptors F{sub 4}TCNQ (2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) and TCNQ (7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethan) have been investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The corresponding charge transfer compounds have been prepared by co-evaporation of the pristine constituents. We demonstrate that all investigated combinations support charge transfer, which results in new electronic excitation features at low energy. This might represent a way to synthesize low band gap organic semiconductors.

  5. Degrees of locality of energy transfer in the inertial range. [Kolmogoroff notion in turbulence theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, YE

    1993-01-01

    Measured raw transfer interactions from which local energy transfer is argued to result are summed in a way that directly indicates the scale disparity (s) of contributions to the net energy flux across the spectrum. It is found that the dependence upon s closely follows the s exp -4/3 form predicted by classical arguments. As a result, it is concluded that direct numerical simulation measurements lend support to the classical Kolmogorov phenomenology of local interactions and local transfer in an inertial range.

  6. A rapid multi-device wireless power transfer scheme using an intermediate energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, C. S.; Nam, S. S.; Cho, S. H.

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a new time-division multiplex wireless power transfer (TDM-WPT) scheme for charging multiple devices with a single transmitter. More specifically, our proposed scheme adopts the intermediate energy storage (IES) circuit which enables storing the received energy from the source temporarily and then supplying it to the load. Thus, by adopting the IES, the receiver can charge the battery with the stored energy in the IES even while the receiver is not performing the direct charging process (from the transmitter). This allows charging multiple receivers simultaneously in a virtual manner, and it eventually leads to the reduction of overall charging time. For the theoretical verification, we analyse the performance of our proposed scheme based on the identical environment and in some selected results. We show that with our proposed scheme the required total charging time can be reduced compared to the conventional TDM-WPT. We also consider practical load (battery charger) requirements which change continuously. We present the simple guidelines for some key design parameters such as the optimal capacity of the IES and the proper number of receivers. Note that we additionally present the sample IES circuit and the related circuit simulation to show the detailed operation and the feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  7. Ultrafast Charge- and Energy-Transfer Dynamics in Conjugated Polymer: Cadmium Selenide Nanocrystal Blends

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid nanocrystal–polymer systems are promising candidates for photovoltaic applications, but the processes controlling charge generation are poorly understood. Here, we disentangle the energy- and charge-transfer processes occurring in a model system based on blends of cadmium selenide nanocrystals (CdSe-NC) with poly[2-methoxy-5-(3′,7′-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MDMO-PPV) using a combination of time-resolved absorption and luminescence measurements. The use of different capping ligands (n-butylamine, oleic acid) as well as thermal annealing allows tuning of the polymer–nanocrystal interaction. We demonstrate that energy transfer from MDMO-PPV to CdSe-NCs is the dominant exciton quenching mechanism in nonannealed blends and occurs on ultrafast time scales (<1 ps). Upon thermal annealing electron transfer becomes competitive with energy transfer, with a transfer rate of 800 fs independent of the choice of the ligand. Interestingly, we find hole transfer to be much less efficient than electron transfer and to extend over several nanoseconds. Our results emphasize the importance of tuning the organic–nanocrystal interaction to achieve efficient charge separation and highlight the unfavorable hole-transfer dynamics in these blends. PMID:24490650

  8. Ultrafast charge- and energy-transfer dynamics in conjugated polymer: cadmium selenide nanocrystal blends.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Frederik S F; Rao, Akshay; Böhm, Marcus L; Kist, René J P; Vaynzof, Yana; Greenham, Neil C

    2014-02-25

    Hybrid nanocrystal-polymer systems are promising candidates for photovoltaic applications, but the processes controlling charge generation are poorly understood. Here, we disentangle the energy- and charge-transfer processes occurring in a model system based on blends of cadmium selenide nanocrystals (CdSe-NC) with poly[2-methoxy-5-(3',7'-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MDMO-PPV) using a combination of time-resolved absorption and luminescence measurements. The use of different capping ligands (n-butylamine, oleic acid) as well as thermal annealing allows tuning of the polymer-nanocrystal interaction. We demonstrate that energy transfer from MDMO-PPV to CdSe-NCs is the dominant exciton quenching mechanism in nonannealed blends and occurs on ultrafast time scales (<1 ps). Upon thermal annealing electron transfer becomes competitive with energy transfer, with a transfer rate of 800 fs independent of the choice of the ligand. Interestingly, we find hole transfer to be much less efficient than electron transfer and to extend over several nanoseconds. Our results emphasize the importance of tuning the organic-nanocrystal interaction to achieve efficient charge separation and highlight the unfavorable hole-transfer dynamics in these blends.

  9. Quantum coherent energy transfer over varying pathways in single light-harvesting complexes.

    PubMed

    Hildner, Richard; Brinks, Daan; Nieder, Jana B; Cogdell, Richard J; van Hulst, Niek F

    2013-06-21

    The initial steps of photosynthesis comprise the absorption of sunlight by pigment-protein antenna complexes followed by rapid and highly efficient funneling of excitation energy to a reaction center. In these transport processes, signatures of unexpectedly long-lived coherences have emerged in two-dimensional ensemble spectra of various light-harvesting complexes. Here, we demonstrate ultrafast quantum coherent energy transfer within individual antenna complexes of a purple bacterium under physiological conditions. We find that quantum coherences between electronically coupled energy eigenstates persist at least 400 femtoseconds and that distinct energy-transfer pathways that change with time can be identified in each complex. Our data suggest that long-lived quantum coherence renders energy transfer in photosynthetic systems robust in the presence of disorder, which is a prerequisite for efficient light harvesting.

  10. Observation of the one- to six-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C.L.; Rehm, K.E.; Gehring, J.

    1995-08-01

    It was suggested many years ago that when two heavy nuclei are in contact during a grazing collision, the transfer of several correlated neutron-pairs could occur. Despite considerable experimental effort, however, so far only cross sections for up to four-neutron transfers have been uniquely identified. The main difficulties in the study of multi-neutron transfer reactions are the small cross sections encountered at incident energies close to the barrier, and various experimental uncertainties which can complicate the analysis of these reactions. We have for the first time found evidence for multi-neutron transfer reactions covering the full sequence from one- to six-neutron transfer reactions at sub-barrier energies in the system {sup 58}Ni + {sup 100}Mo.

  11. Laboratory Studies of Thermal Energy Charge Transfer of Silicon and Iron Ions in Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, Victor H. S.

    1996-01-01

    Charge transfer at electron-volt energies between multiply charged atomic ions and neutral atoms and molecules is of considerable importance in astrophysics, plasma physics, and in particular, fusion plasmas. In the year covered by this report, several major tasks were completed. These include: (1) the re-calibration of the ion gauge to measure the absolute particle densities of H2, He, N2, and CO for our current measurements; (2) the analysis of data for charge transfer reactions of N(exp 2 plus) ion and He, H2, N2, and CO; (3) measurement and data analysis of the charge transfer reaction of (Fe(exp 2 plus) ion and H2; (4) charge transfer measurement of Fe(exp 2 plus) ion and H2; and (5) redesign and modification of the ion detection and data acquisition system for the low energy beam facility (reflection time of flight mass spectrometer) dedicated to the study of state select charge transfer.

  12. The role of the concentration scale in the definition of transfer free energies.

    PubMed

    Moeser, Beate; Horinek, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    The Gibbs free energy of transferring a solute at infinite dilution between two solvents quantifies differences in solute-solvent interactions - if the transfer takes place at constant molarity of the solute. Yet, many calculation formulae and measuring instructions that are commonly used to quantify solute-solvent interactions correspond to transfer processes in which not the molarity of the solute but its concentration measured in another concentration scale is constant. Here, we demonstrate that in this case, not only the change in solute-solvent interactions is quantified but also the entropic effect of a volume change during the transfer. Consequently, the "phenomenon" which is known as "concentration-scale dependence" of transfer free energies is simply explained by a volume-entropy effect. Our explanations are of high importance for the study of cosolvent effects on protein stability.

  13. Energy transfer pathways in semiconducting carbon nanotubes revealed using two-dimensional white-light spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehlenbacher, Randy D.; McDonough, Thomas J.; Grechko, Maksim; Wu, Meng-Yin; Arnold, Michael S.; Zanni, Martin T.

    2015-04-01

    Thin film networks of highly purified semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being explored for energy harvesting and optoelectronic devices because of their exceptional transport and optical properties. The nanotubes in these films are in close contact, which permits energy to flow through the films, although the pathways and mechanisms for energy transfer are largely unknown. Here we use a broadband continuum to collect femtosecond two-dimensional white-light spectra. The continuum spans 500 to 1,300 nm, resolving energy transfer between all combinations of bandgap (S1) and higher (S2) transitions. We observe ultrafast energy redistribution on the S2 states, non-Förster energy transfer on the S1 states and anti-correlated energy levels. The two-dimensional spectra reveal competing pathways for energy transfer, with S2 excitons taking routes depending on the bandgap separation, whereas S1 excitons relax independent of the bandgap. These observations provide a basis for understanding and ultimately controlling the photophysics of energy flow in CNT-based devices.

  14. Non-pairwise additivity of the leading-order dispersion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hollett, Joshua W.

    2015-02-28

    The leading-order (i.e., dipole-dipole) dispersion energy is calculated for one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) infinite lattices, and an infinite 1D array of infinitely long lines, of doubly occupied locally harmonic wells. The dispersion energy is decomposed into pairwise and non-pairwise additive components. By varying the force constant and separation of the wells, the non-pairwise additive contribution to the dispersion energy is shown to depend on the overlap of density between neighboring wells. As well separation is increased, the non-pairwise additivity of the dispersion energy decays. The different rates of decay for 1D and 2D lattices of wells is explained in terms of a Jacobian effect that influences the number of nearest neighbors. For an array of infinitely long lines of wells spaced 5 bohrs apart, and an inter-well spacing of 3 bohrs within a line, the non-pairwise additive component of the leading-order dispersion energy is −0.11 kJ mol{sup −1} well{sup −1}, which is 7% of the total. The polarizability of the wells and the density overlap between them are small in comparison to that of the atomic densities that arise from the molecular density partitioning used in post-density-functional theory (DFT) damped dispersion corrections, or DFT-D methods. Therefore, the nonadditivity of the leading-order dispersion observed here is a conservative estimate of that in molecular clusters.

  15. Influence of confined fluids on nanoparticle-to-surroundings energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Dowgiallo, Anne-Marie; Knappenberger, Kenneth L

    2012-11-28

    Energy transfer from photoexcited nanoparticles to their surroundings was studied for both hollow and solid gold nanospheres (HGNs and SGNs, respectively) using femtosecond time-resolved transient extinction spectroscopy. HGNs having outer diameters ranging from 17 to 78 nm and fluid-filled cavities were synthesized by a sacrificial galvanic replacement method. The HGNs exhibited energy transfer half times that ranged from 105 ± 10 ps to 1010 ± 80 ps as the total particle surface area increased from 1005 to 28,115 nm(2). These data showed behaviors that were categorized into two classes: energy transfer from HGNs to interior fluids that were confined to cavities with radii <15 nm and ≥15 nm. Energy transfer times were also determined for solid gold nanospheres (SGNs) having radii spanning 9-30 nm, with a similar size dependence where the relaxation times increased from 140 ± 10 to 310 ± 15 ps with increasing nanoparticle size. Analysis of the size-dependent energy transfer half times revealed that the distinct relaxation rate constants observed for particle-to-surroundings energy transfer for HGNs with small cavities were the result of reduced thermal conductivity of confined fluids. These data indicate that the thermal conductivity of HGN cavity-confined fluids is approximately one-half as great as it is for bulk liquid water. For all HGNs and SGNs studied, energy dissipation through the solvent and transfer across the particle/surroundings interface both contributed to the energy relaxation process. The current data illustrated the potential of fluid-filled hollow nanostructures to gain insight into the properties of confined fluids.

  16. Bond-Specific Dissociation Following Excitation Energy Transfer for Distance Constraint Determination in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report chemistry that enables excitation energy transfer (EET) to be accurately measured via action spectroscopy on gaseous ions in an ion trap. It is demonstrated that EET between tryptophan or tyrosine and a disulfide bond leads to excited state, homolytic fragmentation of the disulfide bond. This phenomenon exhibits a tight distance dependence, which is consistent with Dexter exchange transfer. The extent of fragmentation of the disulfide bond can be used to determine the distance between the chromophore and disulfide bond. The chemistry is well suited for the examination of protein structure in the gas phase because native amino acids can serve as the donor/acceptor moieties. Furthermore, both tyrosine and tryptophan exhibit unique action spectra, meaning that the identity of the donating chromophore can be easily determined in addition to the distance between donor/acceptor. Application of the method to the Trpcage miniprotein reveals distance constraints that are consistent with a native-like fold for the +2 charge state in the gas phase. This structure is stabilized by several salt bridges, which have also been observed to be important previously in proteins that retain native-like structures in the gas phase. The ability of this method to measure specific distance constraints, potentially at numerous positions if combined with site-directed mutagenesis, significantly enhances our ability to examine protein structure in the gas phase. PMID:25174489

  17. Bond-specific dissociation following excitation energy transfer for distance constraint determination in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Nathan G; Lareau, Nichole M; Stow, Sarah M; McLean, John A; Julian, Ryan R

    2014-09-24

    Herein, we report chemistry that enables excitation energy transfer (EET) to be accurately measured via action spectroscopy on gaseous ions in an ion trap. It is demonstrated that EET between tryptophan or tyrosine and a disulfide bond leads to excited state, homolytic fragmentation of the disulfide bond. This phenomenon exhibits a tight distance dependence, which is consistent with Dexter exchange transfer. The extent of fragmentation of the disulfide bond can be used to determine the distance between the chromophore and disulfide bond. The chemistry is well suited for the examination of protein structure in the gas phase because native amino acids can serve as the donor/acceptor moieties. Furthermore, both tyrosine and tryptophan exhibit unique action spectra, meaning that the identity of the donating chromophore can be easily determined in addition to the distance between donor/acceptor. Application of the method to the Trpcage miniprotein reveals distance constraints that are consistent with a native-like fold for the +2 charge state in the gas phase. This structure is stabilized by several salt bridges, which have also been observed to be important previously in proteins that retain native-like structures in the gas phase. The ability of this method to measure specific distance constraints, potentially at numerous positions if combined with site-directed mutagenesis, significantly enhances our ability to examine protein structure in the gas phase.

  18. Development of flexible, free-standing, thin films for additive manufacturing and localized energy generation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Billy; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Heaps, Ronald J.; Daniels, Michael A.

    2015-08-15

    Film energetics are becoming increasingly popular because a variety of technologies are driving a need for localized energy generation in a stable, safe and flexible form. Aluminum (Al) and molybdenum trioxide (MoO{sub 3}) composites were mixed into a silicon binder and extruded using a blade casting technique to form flexible free-standing films ideal for localized energy generation. Since this material can be extruded onto a surface it is well suited to additive manufacturing applications. This study examines the influence of 0-35% by mass potassium perchlorate (KClO{sub 4}) additive on the combustion behavior of these energetic films. Without KClO{sub 4} the film exhibits thermal instabilities that produce unsteady energy propagation upon reaction. All films were cast at a thickness of 1 mm with constant volume percent solids to ensure consistent rheological properties. The films were ignited and flame propagation was measured. The results show that as the mass percent KClO{sub 4} increased, the flame speed increased and peaked at 0.43 cm/s and 30 wt% KClO{sub 4}. Thermochemical equilibrium simulations show that the heat of combustion increases with increasing KClO{sub 4} concentration up to a maximum at 20 wt% when the heat of combustion plateaus, indicating that the increased chemical energy liberated by the additional KClO{sub 4} promotes stable energy propagation. Differential scanning calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis show that the silicone binder participates as a fuel and reacts with KClO{sub 4} adding energy to the reaction and promoting propagation.

  19. Development of flexible, free-standing, thin films for additive manufacturing and localize