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Sample records for addition fundamental studies

  1. A fundamental study of the oxidation behavior of SI primary reference fuels with propionaldehyde and DTBP as an additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Rodney

    In an effort to combine the benefits of SI and CI engines, Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines are being developed. HCCI combustion is achieved by controlling the temperature, pressure, and composition of the fuel and air mixture so that autoignition occurs in proper phasing with the piston motion. This control system is fundamentally more challenging than using a spark plug or fuel injector to determine ignition timing as in SI and CI engines, respectively. As a result, this is a technical barrier that must be overcome to make HCCI engines applicable to a wide range of vehicles and viable for high volume production. One way to tailor the autoignition timing is to use small amounts of ignition enhancing additives. In this study, the effect of the addition of DTBP and propionaldehyde on the autoignition behavior of SI primary reference fuels was investigated. The present work was conducted in a new research facility built around a single cylinder Cooperative Fuels Research (CFR) octane rating engine but modified to run in HCCI mode. It focused on the effect of select oxygenated hydrocarbons on hydrocarbon fuel oxidation, specifically, the primary reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane. This work was conducted under HCCI operating conditions. Previously, the operating parameters for this engine were validated for stable combustion under a wide range of operating parameters such as engine speeds, equivalence ratios, compression ratios and inlet manifold temperature. The stable operating range under these conditions was recorded and used for the present study. The major focus of this study was to examine the effect of the addition of DTBP or propionaldehyde on the oxidation behavior of SI primary reference fuels. Under every test condition the addition of the additives DTBP and propionaldehyde caused a change in fuel oxidation. DTBP always promoted fuel oxidation while propionaldehyde promoted oxidation for lower octane number fuels and delayed

  2. Fundamental studies in geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.; Hager, B. H.; Kanamori, H.

    1981-01-01

    Research in fundamental studies in geodynamics continued in a number of fields including seismic observations and analysis, synthesis of geochemical data, theoretical investigation of geoid anomalies, extensive numerical experiments in a number of geodynamical contexts, and a new field seismic volcanology. Summaries of work in progress or completed during this report period are given. Abstracts of publications submitted from work in progress during this report period are attached as an appendix.

  3. Fundamental Pyrolysis Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Milne, T. A.; Evans, R. J.; Soltys, M. N.

    1983-03-01

    Progress on the direct mass spectrometric sampling of pyrolysis products from wood and its constituents is described for the period from June 1982 to February 1983. A brief summary and references to detailed reports, of the qualitative demonstration of our approach to the study of the separated processes of primary and secondary pyrolysis is presented. Improvements and additions to the pyrolysis and data acquisition systems are discussed and typical results shown. Chief of these are a heated-grid pyrolysis system for controlled primary pyrolysis and a sheathed flame arrangement for secondary cracking studies. Qualitative results of the secondary cracking of cellulose, lignin, and wood are shown as are comparisons with the literature for the pyrolysis spectra of cellulose, lignin, and levoglucosan. 'Fingerprints' for a number of materials are shown, with spectra taken under carefully controlled conditions so that sensitivity calibrations for different compounds, now being determined, can be applied.

  4. Fundamental studies in geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Progress in modeling instantaneous plate kinematics is reviewed, with emphasis on recently developed models of present day plate motions derived by the systematic inversion of globally distributed data sets. Rivera plate motions, the Caribbean South American boundary, Indian plate deformation, Pacific-North America, seismicity and subduction processes, and the study of slow earthquakes and free oscillations are discussed.

  5. Fundamental Aspects of Selective Melting Additive Manufacturing Processes

    SciTech Connect

    van Swol, Frank B.; Miller, James E.

    2014-12-01

    Certain details of the additive manufacturing process known as selective laser melting (SLM) affect the performance of the final metal part. To unleash the full potential of SLM it is crucial that the process engineer in the field receives guidance about how to select values for a multitude of process variables employed in the building process. These include, for example, the type of powder (e.g., size distribution, shape, type of alloy), orientation of the build axis, the beam scan rate, the beam power density, the scan pattern and scan rate. The science-based selection of these settings con- stitutes an intrinsically challenging multi-physics problem involving heating and melting a metal alloy, reactive, dynamic wetting followed by re-solidification. In addition, inherent to the process is its considerable variability that stems from the powder packing. Each time a limited number of powder particles are placed, the stacking is intrinsically different from the previous, possessing a different geometry, and having a different set of contact areas with the surrounding particles. As a result, even if all other process parameters (scan rate, etc) are exactly the same, the shape and contact geometry and area of the final melt pool will be unique to that particular configuration. This report identifies the most important issues facing SLM, discusses the fundamental physics associated with it and points out how modeling can support the additive manufacturing efforts.

  6. Fundamental studies of fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Aamodt, R.E.; Catto, P.J.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Myra, J.R.; Russell, D.A.

    1992-05-26

    The major portion of this program is devoted to critical ICH phenomena. The topics include edge physics, fast wave propagation, ICH induced high frequency instabilities, and a preliminary antenna design for Ignitor. This research was strongly coordinated with the world's experimental and design teams at JET, Culham, ORNL, and Ignitor. The results have been widely publicized at both general scientific meetings and topical workshops including the speciality workshop on ICRF design and physics sponsored by Lodestar in April 1992. The combination of theory, empirical modeling, and engineering design in this program makes this research particularly important for the design of future devices and for the understanding and performance projections of present tokamak devices. Additionally, the development of a diagnostic of runaway electrons on TEXT has proven particularly useful for the fundamental understanding of energetic electron confinement. This work has led to a better quantitative basis for quasilinear theory and the role of magnetic vs. electrostatic field fluctuations on electron transport. An APS invited talk was given on this subject and collaboration with PPPL personnel was also initiated. Ongoing research on these topics will continue for the remainder fo the contract period and the strong collaborations are expected to continue, enhancing both the relevance of the work and its immediate impact on areas needing critical understanding.

  7. Fundamental studies and development of nickel-catalyzed trifluoromethylthiolation of aryl chlorides: active catalytic species and key roles of ligand and traceless MeCN additive revealed.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guoyin; Kalvet, Indrek; Englert, Ulli; Schoenebeck, Franziska

    2015-04-01

    A catalytic protocol to convert aryl and heteroaryl chlorides to the corresponding trifluoromethyl sulfides is reported herein. It relies on a relatively inexpensive Ni(cod)2/dppf (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene; dppf = 1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene) catalyst system and the readily accessible coupling reagent (Me4N)SCF3. Our computational and experimental mechanistic data are consistent with a Ni(0)/Ni(II) cycle and inconsistent with Ni(I) as the reactive species. The relevant intermediates were prepared, characterized by X-ray crystallography, and tested for their catalytic competence. This revealed that a monomeric tricoordinate Ni(I) complex is favored for dppf and Cl whose role was unambiguously assigned as being an off-cycle catalyst deactivation product. Only bidentate ligands with wide bite angles (e.g., dppf) are effective. These bulky ligands render the catalyst resting state as [(P-P)Ni(cod)]. The latter is more reactive than Ni(P-P)2, which was found to be the resting state for ligands with smaller bite angles and suffers from an initial high-energy dissociation of one ligand prior to oxidative addition, rendering the system unreactive. The key to effective catalysis is hence the presence of a labile auxiliary ligand in the catalyst resting state. For more challenging substrates, high conversions were achieved via the employment of MeCN as a traceless additive. Mechanistic data suggest that its beneficial role lies in decreasing the energetic span, therefore accelerating product formation. Finally, the methodology has been applied to synthetic targets of pharmaceutical relevance. PMID:25790253

  8. The Fundamental Ontology of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Tyson E.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to disrupt the hegemonic dominance of learning theory, in this article Tyson Lewis explores the unique educational logic of studying. Drawing on the work of Giorgio Agamben, we can understand the operation of study as one of suspension through three modes: preferring not; no longer, not yet; and as not. But the relationship between…

  9. Fundamental studies of spray combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.C.; Libby, P.A.; Williams, F.A.

    1997-12-31

    Our research on spray combustion involves both experiment and theory and addresses the characteristics of individual droplets and of sprays in a variety of flows: laminar and turbulent, opposed and impinging. Currently our focus concerns water and fuel sprays in two stage laminar flames, i.e., flames arising, for example from a stream of fuel and oxidizer flowing opposite to an air stream carrying a water spray. Our interest in these flames is motivated by the goals of reducing pollutant emissions and extending the range of stable spray combustion. There remains considerable research to be carried out in order to achieve these goals. Thus far our research on the characteristics of sprays in turbulent flows has been limited to nonreacting jets impinging on a plate but this work will be extended to opposed flows with and without a flame. In the following we discuss details of these studies and our plans for future work.

  10. Fundamental studies of coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The authors have examined the pyrolysis of Argonne samples of Wyodak and Illinois No. 6 coal in argon, undecane, Tetralin, and water. The effects of the pyrolysis on individual particles of coal were monitored visually in a cell with diamond windows capable of operation to temperature and pressures in excess of 500{degrees}C and 3000 psi. The changes in the particles from ambient to 460{degrees}C were recorded in real time on video tape, and images were then taken from the tape record and analyzed. The study showed that in argon both coals developed tars at 350{degrees}-370{degrees}C. The tars then quickly evaporated, leaving core particles remarkably similar in size and shape to the initial particles. These observations suggest that coal does not melt nor become fully liquid when heated. Nor does the softened coal undergo crosslinking to generate coke. Rather the simple loss of volatiles leaves behind the core residue as coke. Contrary to the common view, there appears to be no link between the bond-breaking processes yielding tar and the interaction of the coal with H-donors leading to liquefaction. Water as a medium was surprising in its effect. Both coals began to shrink at 300{degrees}-350{degrees}C, with the effect appearing to be more of an erosion rather than a uniform loss of substance as seen in Tetralin. The Wyodak continued to shrink to 460{degrees}C to about half its initial size. With the Illinois No. 6 coal, however, the process reversed at around 420{degrees}C, and the particles appeared to grow with the evolution of a tar, continuing to 460{degrees}C. The authors submit that this final observation is evidence for hydrothermal synthesis of hydrocarbons at these conditions.

  11. Fundamental Studies of Recombinant Hydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Michael W

    2014-01-25

    This research addressed the long term goals of understanding the assembly and organization of hydrogenase enzymes, of reducing them in size and complexity, of determining structure/function relationships, including energy conservation via charge separation across membranes, and in screening for novel H2 catalysts. A key overall goal of the proposed research was to define and characterize minimal hydrogenases that are produced in high yields and are oxygen-resistant. Remarkably, in spite of decades of research carried out on hydrogenases, it is not possible to readily manipulate or design the enzyme using molecular biology approaches since a recombinant form produced in a suitable host is not available. Such resources are essential if we are to understand what constitutes a “minimal” hydrogenase and design such catalysts with certain properties, such as resistance to oxygen, extreme stability and specificity for a given electron donor. The model system for our studies is Pyrococcus furiosus, a hyperthermophile that grows optimally at 100°C, which contains three different nickel-iron [NiFe-] containing hydrogenases. Hydrogenases I and II are cytoplasmic while the other, MBH, is an integral membrane protein that functions to both evolve H2 and pump protons. Three important breakthroughs were made during the funding period with P. furiosus soluble hydrogenase I (SHI). First, we produced an active recombinant form of SHI in E. coli by the co-expression of sixteen genes using anaerobically-induced promoters. Second, we genetically-engineered P. furiosus to overexpress SHI by an order of magnitude compared to the wild type strain. Third, we generated the first ‘minimal’ form of SHI, one that contained two rather than four subunits. This dimeric form was stable and active, and directly interacted with a pyruvate-oxidizing enzyme with any intermediate electron carrier. The research resulted in five peer-reviewed publications.

  12. Fundamental studies of molecular multiphoton ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.C.; Compton, R.N.

    1984-04-01

    For several years the authors have performed fundamental studies of molecular multiphoton ionization (MPI). We will present a potpourri of techniques and results chosen to illustrate the interesting complexities of molecular MPI. Techniques used include time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, supersonic expansion cooling of molecular beams, harmonic generation, two-color laser MPI, and polarization spectroscopy. Whenever possible the relevance of these results to resonance ionization spectroscopy schemes will be delineated. 23 references, 10 figures.

  13. [Fundamental ophthalmology: the role of electrophysiological studies].

    PubMed

    Zueva, M V

    2014-01-01

    Studying of functional aspects of eye disease pathogenesis by electrophysiological methods is widely demanded in fundamental ophthalmology. Introduction of modern methods of functional assessment into experimental and clinical projects significantly broadens knowledge of normal and pathological functioning of the visual system and is the basis for further development of new strategies of pathogenetic treatment, diagnostics and expert evaluation. Some problems of ophthalmology, including those that concern age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and other diseases, are considered in the context of how much electrophysiology contributes to their solution. The role of functional examinations of the retina in studying pathophysiology of neurodegenerative brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, is also discussed. PMID:25715550

  14. Fundamental studies on cavitation melt processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanakis, I.; Hodnett, M.; Lebon, G. S. B.; Eskin, D. G.; Pericleous, K.

    2016-05-01

    The application of ultrasound to industrial casting processes has attracted research interest during the last 50 years. However, the transfer and scale-up of this advanced and promising technology to industry has been hindered by difficulties in treating large volumes of liquid metal due to the lack of understanding of certain fundamentals. In the current study experimental results on ultrasonic processing in deionised water and in liquid aluminium (Al) are reported. Cavitation activity was determined in both liquid environments and acoustic pressures were successfully measured using an advanced high-temperature cavitometer sensor. Results showed that highest cavitation intensity in the liquid bulk is achieved at lower amplitudes of the sonotrode tip than the maximum available, suggesting nonlinearity in energy transfer to the liquid, while the location of the sonotrode is seen to substantially affect cavitation activity within the liquid. Estimation of real-time acoustic pressures distributed inside a crucible with liquid Al was performed for the first time.

  15. Fundamental study on gas monitoring in celss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishi, I.; Tateishi, T.; Tomizawa, G.; Nitta, K.; Oguchi, M.

    A mass spectrometer and computer system was developed for conducting a fundamental study on gas monitoring in CELSS. Respiration and metabolism of the hamster and photosynthesis of the Spirulina were measured in a combination system consisting of a hamster chamber and a Spirulina cultivator. They are connected through a membrane gas exchanger. Some technical problems were examined. In the mass spectrometric gas monitoring, a simultaneous multi-sample measurement was developed by employing a rotating exchange valve. Long term precise measurement was obtained by employing an automatic calibration system. The membrane gas sampling probe proved to be useful for long term measurement. The cultivation rate of the Spirulina was effectively changed by controlling CO2 and light supply. The experimental results are helpful for improving the hamster-spirulina system.

  16. Fundamental study on gas monitoring in CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishi, I.; Tateishi, T.; Tomizawa, G.; Nitta, K.; Oguchi, M.

    1987-01-01

    A mass spectrometer and computer system was developed for conducting a fundamental study on gas monitoring in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System. Respiration and metabolism of the hamster and photosynthesis of the Spirulina were measured in a combination system consisting of a hamster chamber and a Spirulina cultivator. They are connected through a membrane gas exchanger. Some technical problems were examined. In the mass spectrometric gas monitoring, a simultaneous multisample measurement was developed by employing a rotating exchange valve. Long term precise measurement was obtained by employing an automatic calibration system. The membrane gas sampling probe proved to be useful for long term measurement. The cultivation rate of the Spirulina was effectively changed by controlling CO2 and light supply. The experimental results are helpful for improving the hamster-spirulina system.

  17. Fundamental and Applied Studies of Polymer Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbrogno, Joseph

    Four major areas have been studied in this research: 1) synthesizing novel monomers, e.g. chiral monomers, to produce new types of functionalized membranes for the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries, 2) hydrophobic brush membranes for desalinating brackish water, sea water, and separating organics, 3) fundamental studies of water interactions at surfaces using sum frequency generation (SFG), and 4) discovering new surface chemistries that will control the growth and differentiation of stem cells. We have developed a novel synthesis method in order to increase the breadth of our high throughput screening library. This library was generated using maleimide chemistry to react a common methacrylate linker with a variety of different functions groups (R groups) in order to form new monomers that were grafted from the surface of PES ultrafiltration membranes. From this work, we discovered that the chirality of a membrane can affect performance when separating chiral feed streams. This effect was observed when filtering bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ovalbumin in a high salt phosphate buffered saline (PBS, 150 mM salt). The Phe grafted membranes showed a large difference in performance when filtering BSA with selectivity of 1.13 and 1.00 for (S) and (R) Phe, respectively. However, when filtering ovalbumin, the (S) and (R) modified surfaces showed selectivity of 2.06 and 2.31, respectively. The higher selectivity enantiomer switched for the two different proteins. Permeability when filtering BSA was 3.06 LMH kPa-1 and 4.31 LMH kPa -1 for (S)- and (R)- Phe, respectively, and 2.65 LMH kPa -1 and 2.10 LMH kPa-1 when filtering ovalbumin for (S)- and (R)- Phe, respectively. Additionally, these effects were no longer present when using a low salt phosphate buffer (PB, 10 mM salt). Since, to our knowledge, membrane chirality is not considered in current industrial systems, this discovery could have a large impact on the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. We

  18. Fundamental and Applied Studies of Polymer Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbrogno, Joseph

    Four major areas have been studied in this research: 1) synthesizing novel monomers, e.g. chiral monomers, to produce new types of functionalized membranes for the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries, 2) hydrophobic brush membranes for desalinating brackish water, sea water, and separating organics, 3) fundamental studies of water interactions at surfaces using sum frequency generation (SFG), and 4) discovering new surface chemistries that will control the growth and differentiation of stem cells. We have developed a novel synthesis method in order to increase the breadth of our high throughput screening library. This library was generated using maleimide chemistry to react a common methacrylate linker with a variety of different functions groups (R groups) in order to form new monomers that were grafted from the surface of PES ultrafiltration membranes. From this work, we discovered that the chirality of a membrane can affect performance when separating chiral feed streams. This effect was observed when filtering bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ovalbumin in a high salt phosphate buffered saline (PBS, 150 mM salt). The Phe grafted membranes showed a large difference in performance when filtering BSA with selectivity of 1.13 and 1.00 for (S) and (R) Phe, respectively. However, when filtering ovalbumin, the (S) and (R) modified surfaces showed selectivity of 2.06 and 2.31, respectively. The higher selectivity enantiomer switched for the two different proteins. Permeability when filtering BSA was 3.06 LMH kPa-1 and 4.31 LMH kPa -1 for (S)- and (R)- Phe, respectively, and 2.65 LMH kPa -1 and 2.10 LMH kPa-1 when filtering ovalbumin for (S)- and (R)- Phe, respectively. Additionally, these effects were no longer present when using a low salt phosphate buffer (PB, 10 mM salt). Since, to our knowledge, membrane chirality is not considered in current industrial systems, this discovery could have a large impact on the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. We

  19. Fundamental study of impact ionization plasma detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, H.; Muranaga, K.; Sasaki, S.; Nogami, K.; Shibata, H.

    Impact ionization plasma detectors are commonly used for cosmic dust research on board spacecraft. There seems to be no scientific background on their shape, area, and applied high voltage; they are determined empirically. To design a dust detector having large aperture and lightweight to collect dust effectively for the future mission, we are to study fundamental physics of dust impact ionization phenomena. To determine parameters of impact ionization, a simple detector is designed; metal target, two grids, with/without sidewall. Distance from target to grid, grid to grid, applied voltages are variable. Each electrode is connected to charge sensitive preamplifiers, signals are observed with a digital oscilloscope. Experiments using micro-particle accelerators are made at HIT, Univ. Tokyo in Japan, and at MPI-K in Germany. Time difference of two grid signals (plasma expansion velocity), and target signal rise time are determined from observed signals. Preliminary study shows, plasma expansion velocity is dependent on applied high voltage, not dependent on dust velocity. There is a clear correlation between dust particle velocity and target signal rise time. Sidewall effect is to be studied in the near future experiment.

  20. Precision laser spectroscopy in fundamental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolachevsky, N. N.; Khabarova, K. Yu

    2014-12-01

    The role of precision spectroscopic measurements in the development of fundamental theories is discussed, with particular emphasis on the hydrogen atom, the simplest stable atomic system amenable to the accurate calculation of energy levels from quantum electrodynamics. Research areas that greatly benefited from the participation of the Lebedev Physical Institute are reviewed, including the violation of fundamental symmetries, the stability of the fine-structure constant α, and sensitive tests of quantum electrodynamics.

  1. A Study of Fundamental Shock Noise Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Kristine R.

    1997-01-01

    This paper investigates two mechanisms fundamental to sound generation in shocked flows: shock motion and shock deformation. Shock motion is modeled numerically by examining the interaction of a sound wave with a shock. This numerical approach is validated by comparison with results obtained by linear theory for a small-disturbance case. Analysis of the perturbation energy with Myers' energy corollary demonstrates that acoustic energy is generated by the interaction of acoustic disturbances with shocks. This analysis suggests that shock motion generates acoustic and entropy disturbance energy. Shock deformation is modeled numerically by examining the interaction of a vortex ring with a shock. These numerical simulations demonstrate the generation of both an acoustic wave and contact surfaces. The acoustic wave spreads cylindrically. The sound intensity is highly directional and the sound pressure increases with increasing shock strength. The numerically determined relationship between the sound pressure and the Mach number is found to be consistent with experimental observations of shock noise. This consistency implies that a dominant physical process in the generation of shock noise is modeled in this study.

  2. Fundamental studies on passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1993-06-01

    Using photoelectrochemical impedance and admittance spectroscopies, a fundamental and quantitative understanding of the mechanisms for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal and alloy surfaces in contact with aqueous environments is being developed. A point defect model has been extended to explain the breakdown of passive films, leading to pitting and crack growth and thus development of damage due to localized corrosion.

  3. Fundamental Ice Crystal Accretion Physics Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Broeren, Andy P.; Tsao, Jen-Ching; Vargas, Mario; Wright, William B.; Currie, Tom; Knezevici, Danny; Fuleki, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Due to numerous engine power-loss events associated with high-altitude convective weather, ice accretion within an engine due to ice crystal ingestion is being investigated. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada are starting to examine the physical mechanisms of ice accretion on surfaces exposed to ice-crystal and mixed-phase conditions. In November 2010, two weeks of testing occurred at the NRC Research Altitude Facility utilizing a single wedge-type airfoil designed to facilitate fundamental studies while retaining critical features of a compressor stator blade or guide vane. The airfoil was placed in the NRC cascade wind tunnel for both aerodynamic and icing tests. Aerodynamic testing showed excellent agreement compared with CFD data on the icing pressure surface and allowed calculation of heat transfer coefficients at various airfoil locations. Icing tests were performed at Mach numbers of 0.2 to 0.3, total pressures from 93 to 45 kPa, and total temperatures from 5 to 15 C. Ice and liquid water contents ranged up to 20 and 3 g/m3, respectively. The ice appeared well adhered to the surface in the lowest pressure tests (45 kPa) and, in a particular case, showed continuous leading-edge ice growth to a thickness greater than 15 mm in 3 min. Such widespread deposits were not observed in the highest pressure tests, where the accretions were limited to a small area around the leading edge. The suction surface was typically ice-free in the tests at high pressure, but not at low pressure. The icing behavior at high and low pressure appeared to be correlated with the wet-bulb temperature, which was estimated to be above 0 C in tests at 93 kPa and below 0 C in tests at lower pressure, the latter enhanced by more evaporative cooling of water. The authors believe that the large ice accretions observed in the low pressure tests would undoubtedly cause the aerodynamic performance of a compressor component

  4. Fundamental Ice Crystal Accretion Physics Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Tom; Knezevici, Danny; Fuleki, Dan; Struk, Peter M.; Broeren, Andy P.; Tsao, Jen-ching; Vargas, Mario; Wright, William

    2011-01-01

    Due to numerous engine power-loss events associated with high-altitude convective weather, ice accretion within an engine due to ice-crystal ingestion is being investigated. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada are starting to examine the physical mechanisms of ice accretion on surfaces exposed to ice-crystal and mixed-phase conditions. In November 2010, two weeks of testing occurred at the NRC Research Altitude Facility utilizing a single wedge-type airfoil designed to facilitate fundamental studies while retaining critical features of a compressor stator blade or guide vane. The airfoil was placed in the NRC cascade wind tunnel for both aerodynamic and icing tests. Aerodynamic testing showed excellent agreement compared with CFD data on the icing pressure surface and allowed calculation of heat transfer coefficients at various airfoil locations. Icing tests were performed at Mach numbers of 0.2 to 0.3, total pressures from 93 to 45 kPa, and total temperatures from 5 to 15 C. Ice and liquid water contents ranged up to 20 and 3 grams per cubic meter, respectively. The ice appeared well adhered to the surface in the lowest pressure tests (45 kPa) and, in a particular case, showed continuous leading-edge ice growth to a thickness greater than 15 millimeters in 3 minutes. Such widespread deposits were not observed in the highest pressure tests, where the accretions were limited to a small area around the leading edge. The suction surface was typically ice-free in the tests at high pressure, but not at low pressure. The icing behavior at high and low pressure appeared to be correlated with the wet-bulb temperature, which was estimated to be above 0 C in tests at 93 kPa and below 0 C in tests at lower pressure, the latter enhanced by more evaporative cooling of water. The authors believe that the large ice accretions observed in the low pressure tests would undoubtedly cause the aerodynamic

  5. Cable Discharge System for fundamental detonator studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peevy, Gregg R.; Barnhart, Steven G.; Brigham, William P.

    1994-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently completed the modification and installation of a cable discharge system (CDS) which will be used to study the physics of exploding bridgewire (EBW) detonators and exploding foil initiators (EFI or slapper). Of primary interest are the burst characteristics of these devices when subjected to the constant current pulse delivered by this system. The burst process involves the heating of the bridge material to a conductive plasma and is essential in describing the electrical properties of the bridgewire foil for use in diagnostics or computer models. The CDS described herein is capable of delivering up to an 8000 A pulse of 3 micron duration. Experiments conducted with the CDS to characterize the EBW and EFI burst behavior are also described. In addition, the CDS simultaneous VISAR capability permits updating the EFI electrical Gurney analysis parameters used in our computer simulation codes. Examples of CDS generated data for a typical EFI and EBW detonator are provided.

  6. Fundamental studies of fusion plasmas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Aamodt, R.E.

    1998-01-30

    Lodestar has carried out a vigorous research program in the areas of rf, edge plasma and divertor physics, with emphasis largely geared towards improving the understanding and performance of ion-cyclotron heating and current drive (ICRF) systems. Additionally, a research program in the field of edge plasma and divertor modeling was initiated. Theoretical work on high power rf sheath formation for multi-strap rf arrays was developed and benchmarked against recent experimental data from the new JET A2 antennas. Sophisticated modeling tools were employed to understand the sheath formation taking into account realistic three-dimensional antenna geometry. A novel physics explanation of an observed anomaly in the low power loading of antennas was applied to qualitatively interpret data on DIII-D in terms of rf sheaths, and potential applications of the idea to develop a near-field sheath diagnostic were explored. Other rf-wave related topics were also investigated. Full wave ICRF modeling studies were carried out in support of ongoing and planned tokamaks experiments, including the investigation of low frequency plasma heating and current drive regimes for IGNITOR. In a cross-disciplinary study involving both MHD and ICRF physics, ponderomotive feedback stabilization by rf was investigated as a potential means of controlling external kink mode disruptions. In another study, the instability of the ion hybrid wave (IHW) in the presence of fusion alpha particles was studied. In the field of edge plasma and divertor modeling studies, Lodestar began the development of a theory of generalized ballooning and sheath instabilities in the scrape off layer (SOL) of divertor tokamaks. A detailed summary of the technical progress in these areas during the contract period is included, as well as where references to published work can be found. A separate listing of publications, meeting abstracts, and other presentations is also given at the end of this final report.

  7. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed point defects models'' (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  8. Fundamental studies of water pretreatment of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Kroo, E.; Charpenay, S.; Bassilakis, R.

    1991-10-25

    During the seventh quarter, water pretreatment experiments were done at lower pressures (1000 psig), with early H{sub 2}O injection or continuous H{sub 2}O injection, and with demineralized coals. In addition, a set of blank experiments was done with all four coals in helium at the following conditions: 350{degrees}C; 4000 psig; 20 minutes. An additional experiment was done with the Zap lignite at atmospheric pressure. Helium was used instead of nitrogen since it can be obtained in highly pure grades. The purpose of the blank experiments is to determine how much of the water pretreatment process is a thermal and/or pressure effort. The residues from the standard water pretreatment experiments with Illinois and Pittsburgh coals were subjected to analysis by TG-FTIR, solvent extraction, solvent swelling, oxygen reactivity index and donor solvent liquefaction. The pyridine extractables were analyzed. With regard to liquefaction behavior, improvements in the yields of oils and toluene solubles are observed for selected Illinois and Pittsburgh coals at longer pretreatment times ({ge} 60 minutes).

  9. Fundamental studies on a heat driven lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed theoretical study of a heat-driven lamp has been performed. This lamp uses a plasma produced in a thermionic diode. The light is produced by the resonance transition of cesium. An important result of this study is that up to 30% of the input heat is predicted to be converted to light in this device. This is a major improvement over ordinary thermionic energy converters in which only approx. 1% is converted to resonance radiation. Efficiencies and optimum inter-electrode spacings have been found as a function of cathode temperature and the radiative escape factor. The theory developed explains the operating limits of the device.

  10. Fundamental studies concerning planetary quarantine in space.

    PubMed

    Koike, J; Hori, T; Katahira, Y; Koike, K A; Tanaka, K; Kobayashi, K; Kawasaki, Y

    1996-01-01

    If there is a possibility that the organisms carried from Earth to space can live for a significant period on planets, the contamination of planets should be prevented for the purpose of future life-detection experiments. In connection with quarantine for interplanetary missions, we have examined the survivabilities of terrestrial microorganisms under simulated space conditions. In this study, examined the survivabilities of terrestrial organisms under simulated Mars conditions. The Mars conditions were simulated by ultraviolet (UV) and proton irradiation under low temperature, high vacuum, and simulated gaseous conditions. After exposure to the simulated Mars condition, the survivabilities of the organisms were examined. The spores of Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus niger, some anaerobic bacterias and algaes, showed considerably high survivabilities even after UV and proton irradiation corresponding to 200 years on Mars. This subject is not restricted to academic curiosity but concerns problems involving the contamination of Mars with terrestrial organisms carried by space-probes. PMID:11538982

  11. Fundamental studies concerning planetary quarantine in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, J.; Hori, T.; Katahira, Y.; Koike, K. A.; Tanaka, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Kawasaki, Y.

    If there is a possibility that the organisms carried from Earth to space can live for a significant period on planets, the contamination of planets should be prevented for the purpose of future life-detection experiments. In connection with quarantine for interplanetary missions, we have examined the survivabilities of terrestrial microorganisms under simulated space conditions /1-8/. In this study, examined the survivabilities of terrestrial organisms under simulated Mars conditions. The Mars conditions were simulated by ultraviolet (UV) and proton irradiation under low temperature, high vacuum, and simulated gaseous conditions. After exposure to the simulated Mars condition, the survivabilities of the organisms were examined. The spores of Bacillus subtilis andAspergillus niger , some anaerobic bacterias and algaes, showed considerably high survivabilities even after UV and proton irradiation corresponding to 200 years on Mars. This subject is not restricted to academic curiosity but concerns problems involving the contamination of Mars with terrestrial organisms carried by space-probes.

  12. Fundamental studies of water pretreatment of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Kroo, E.; Charpenay, S.; Bassilakis, R.

    1990-01-01

    The goals of this project are to gain understanding of the chemistry of water or steam coal pretreatments and to assess the importance of such pretreatments on subsequent coal liquefaction. For the achievement of these goals, coals, modified coals and model-polymers will be treated with water or stream. This study will include three coals, five modifications (dried, demineralized, ion-exchanged, Ca-loaded, Ba-loaded), three polymers and two polymer modifications (e.g. acid chlorides, amides). Experiments will be performed to investigate both conventional steam pretreatment and the possibility of using the CO/H{sub 2}O system of Ross and coworkers as a pretreatment method. The main experimental variables will be sample type and temperature. Detailed characterization of the gas, liquid and solid products from the pretreatment stage will be done. This will include analysis of gases of GC or FT-IR, liquids by capillary GC, FT-IR and FIMS, and residues by solvent swelling, solvent extraction, and elemental analysis. Selected residues will also be evaluated by a standard liquefaction test. Analysis of the raw coals and pretreatment samples will be performed using the above techniques to study changes in the crosslinking, donatable hydrogen, heteroatom composition, evolved gases, functional group composition, extraction yields, molecular weight distributions, etc. Standard tubing bomb liquefaction tests will be used to determine the effect of pretreatment on coal reactivity toward coal liquefaction. A previously developed model for coal liquefaction, the FG-DVC liquefaction model, will be used (after appropriate modifications) to model the physics and chemistry of water pretreatment. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Fundamental studies of water pretreatment of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Kroo, E.; Charpenay, S.; Bassilakis, R.

    1990-01-01

    The goals of this project are to gain understanding of the chemistry of water or steam coal pretreatments and to assess the importance of such pretreatments on subsequent coal liquefaction. Coals, modified coals and model-polymers will be treated with water or steam. This study will include three coals, five modifications (dried, demineralized, ion-exchanged, Ca-loaded, Ba-loaded), three polymers and two polymer modifications (e.g. acid chlorides, amides). Experiments will be performed to investigate both conventional steam pretreatment and the possibility of using the CO/H{sub 2}O system of Ross and coworkers as a pretreatment method. The main experimental variables will be sample type and temperature. Detailed characterization of the gas, liquid and solid products from the pretreatment stage will be done. This will include analysis of gases by GC or FT-IR, liquids by capillary GC, FT-IR and FIMS, and residues by solvent swelling, solvent extraction, and elemental analysis. Selected residues will also be evaluated by a standard liquefaction test. Analysis of the raw coals and pretreatment samples will be performed using the above techniques to study changes in the crosslinking, donatable hydrogen, heteroatom composition, evolved gases, functional group composition, extraction yields, molecular weight distributions, etc. Standard tubing bomb liquefaction tests will be used to determine the effect of pretreatment on coal reactivity toward coal liquefaction. A previously developed model for coal liquefaction, the FG-DVC liquefaction model, will be used (after appropriate modifications) to model the physics and chemistry of water pretreatment. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Fundamental studies of water pretreatment of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Kroo, E.; Solomon, P.R.; Charpenay, S.; Bassilakis, R.

    1991-01-01

    The goals of this project are to gain an understanding of the chemistry of water or steam coal pretreatments and to assess the importance of such pretreatments on subsequent coal liquefaction. For the achievement of these goals, coals, modified coals and model-polymers will be treated with water or steam. This study will include three coals, five modifications (dried, demineralized, ion-exchanged, Ca-loaded, Ba-loaded), three polymers and two polymer modifications (e.g., acid chlorides, amides). Experiments will be performed to investigate both conventional steam pretreatment and the possibility of using the CO/H{sub 2}O system of Ross and coworkers as a pretreatment method. The main experimental variables will be sample type and temperature. Detailed characterization of the gas, liquid and solid products from the pretreatment stage will be done. This will include analysis of gases by GC or FT-IR, liquids by capillary GC, FT-IR and FIMS, and residues by solvent swelling, solvent extraction, and elemental analysis. Selected residues will also be evaluated by a standard liquefaction test. Analysis of the raw coals and pretreatment samples will be performed using the above techniques to study changes in the crosslinking, donatable hydrogen, heteroatom composition, evolved gases, functional group composition, extraction yields, molecular weight distributions, etc. Standard tubing bomb liquefaction tests will be used to determine the effect of pretreatment on coal reactivity toward coal liquefaction. A previously developed model for coal liquefaction, the FG-DVC liquefaction model, will be used (after appropriate modifications) to model the physics and chemistry of water pretreatment.

  15. Addition polyimide end cap study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    The characterization of addition polyimides with various end caps for adhesive applications at 120-250 C environments is discussed. Oligometric polyimides were prepared from 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,3'-methylenedianiline which were end-capped with functionally reactive moities which cause crosslinking when the oligomers are heated to 200-400 C. The syntheses of the oligomers are outlined. The thermolysis of the oligomers was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and the resulting polymers were characterized by differential thermal analysis and adhesive performance. The adhesive data include lap shear strengths on titanium 6-4 adherends both before and after aging for 1000 hours at 121 C and/or 232 C.

  16. Fundamental studies of supported bimetallic catalysts by NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Savargaonkar, N.

    1996-10-17

    Various hydrogenation reactions on transition metals are important commercially whereas certain hydrogenolysis reactions are useful from fundamental point of view. Understanding the hydrogen mobility and kinetics of adsorption-desorption of hydrogen is important in understanding the mechanisms of such reactions involving hydrogen. The kinetics of hydrogen chemisorption was studied by means of selective excitation NMR on silica supported Pt, Rh and Pt-Rh catalysts. The activation energy of hydrogen desorption was found to be lower on silica supported Pt catalysts as compared to Rh and Pt-Rh catalysts. It was found that the rates of hydrogen adsorption and desorption on Pt-Rh catalyst were similar to those on Rh catalyst and much higher as compared to Pt catalyst. The Ru-Ag bimetallic system is much simpler to study than the Pt-Rh system and serves as a model system to characterize more complicated systems such as the K/Ru system. Ag was found to decrease the amounts of adsorbed hydrogen and the hydrogen-to-ruthenium stoichiometry. Ag reduced the populations of states with low and intermediate binding energies of hydrogen on silica supported Ru catalyst. The rates of hydrogen adsorption and desorption were also lower on silica supported Ru-Ag catalyst as compared to Ru catalyst. This report contains introductory information, the literature review, general conclusions, and four appendices. An additional four chapters and one appendix have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  17. Unraveling the Fundamental Mechanisms of Solvent-Additive-Induced Optimization of Power Conversion Efficiencies in Organic Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Herath, Nuradhika; Das, Sanjib; Zhu, Jiahua; Kumar, Rajeev; Chen, Jihua; Xiao, Kai; Gu, Gong; Browning, James F; Sumpter, Bobby G; Ivanov, Ilia N; Lauter, Valeria

    2016-08-10

    The realization of controllable morphologies of bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) in organic photovoltaics (OPVs) is one of the key factors enabling high-efficiency devices. We provide new insights into the fundamental mechanisms essential for the optimization of power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) with additive processing to PBDTTT-CF:PC71BM system. We have studied the underlying mechanisms by monitoring the 3D nanostructural modifications in BHJs and correlated the modifications with the optical analysis and theoretical modeling of charge transport. Our results demonstrate profound effects of diiodooctane (DIO) on morphology and charge transport in the active layers. For small amounts of DIO (<3 vol %), DIO promotes the formation of a well-mixed donor-acceptor compact film and augments charge transfer and PCE. In contrast, for large amounts of DIO (>3 vol %), DIO facilitates a loosely packed mixed morphology with large clusters of PC71BM, leading to deterioration in PCE. Theoretical modeling of charge transport reveals that DIO increases the mobility of electrons and holes (the charge carriers) by affecting the energetic disorder and electric field dependence of the mobility. Our findings show the implications of phase separation and carrier transport pathways to achieve optimal device performances. PMID:27403964

  18. Fundamental studies of nanoarchitectured dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenzhen

    2011-12-01

    lifetime due to the short electron transport distance. Apparently, in contrast to the surface roughness factor of a TiO 2 nanoparticulate film, typically well above 1000, the surface roughness factor of our Zn-microtip|ZnO-nanotip electrode is still very low. Thus, we integrated the above idea in the conventional TiO2-based DSSCs such that the advantage of high surface roughness in conventional NP-based DSSC can be retained. We designed and fabricated an array of metal micropillars by a lithographic method as additional electron collection pathways on a planar TCO anode. The surface roughness is distributed between the collecting electrode and the semiconductor layer. The electron transport kinetics was insightfully studied by electrochemical impedance technique, which suggests that the charge collection efficiency can be enhanced without sacrificing the thickness of TiO2 nanoparticle layer. Furthermore, novel TCO nanoarchitectures were explored by converting the 2-D planar TCO to 3-D structure with intentional incorporation of functional optical structures, e.g., photonic crystals in the cell, to synergistically enhance light harvesting efficiency by light trapping effect, while still keep the short charge transport path length at the TCO/semiconductor interface. A novel 3-D nanophotonic crystal TCO electrode was synthesized using a 3-D template-assisted and solution-chemistry-based method. The optical and electrical properties of the 3-D photonic crystal FTO electrodes are studied by UV-Vis transmittance spectroscopy, Hall effect and sheet resistance measurement. In addition, an ultrathin TiO2 layer is coated on all surfaces of the IO-FTO electrodes using the atomic layer deposition technique. Cyclic voltammetry study indicates that the resulting TiO2-coated 3-D FTO shows excellent potentials as electrodes for electrolyte-based DSSCs.

  19. Focus on Fundamentals: A Longitudinal Study of Students Attending a Fundamental School. ERS Relevant Research for School Decisions, Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, LouAnn S.; And Others

    A longstanding debate in education pits advocates of liberal curricula against advocates of "back-to-basics," fundamental education. The study described in this publication examined the long term results of a fundamental elementary school that began operating in August 1978 with 347 students. During the 1989-90 school year, the first group of…

  20. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    Very Large Telescope sets stringent limit on possible variation of the fine-structure constant over cosmological time Summary Detecting or constraining the possible time variations of fundamental physical constants is an important step toward a complete understanding of basic physics and hence the world in which we live. A step in which astrophysics proves most useful. Previous astronomical measurements of the fine structure constant - the dimensionless number that determines the strength of interactions between charged particles and electromagnetic fields - suggested that this particular constant is increasing very slightly with time. If confirmed, this would have very profound implications for our understanding of fundamental physics. New studies, conducted using the UVES spectrograph on Kueyen, one of the 8.2-m telescopes of ESO's Very Large Telescope array at Paranal (Chile), secured new data with unprecedented quality. These data, combined with a very careful analysis, have provided the strongest astronomical constraints to date on the possible variation of the fine structure constant. They show that, contrary to previous claims, no evidence exist for assuming a time variation of this fundamental constant. PR Photo 07/04: Relative Changes with Redshift of the Fine Structure Constant (VLT/UVES) A fine constant To explain the Universe and to represent it mathematically, scientists rely on so-called fundamental constants or fixed numbers. The fundamental laws of physics, as we presently understand them, depend on about 25 such constants. Well-known examples are the gravitational constant, which defines the strength of the force acting between two bodies, such as the Earth and the Moon, and the speed of light. One of these constants is the so-called "fine structure constant", alpha = 1/137.03599958, a combination of electrical charge of the electron, the Planck constant and the speed of light. The fine structure constant describes how electromagnetic forces hold

  1. New Quasar Studies Keep Fundamental Physical Constant Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    a function of the redshift and the corresponding look-back time. The open circle is the measurement from the Oklo natural reactor. The horizontal long dashed lines show the area of the previous claim of variation of the fine structure constant. Clearly, the new UVES data are inconsistent with this range. A team of astronomers [1], led by Patrick Petitjean (Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris and Observatoire de Paris, France) and Raghunathan Srianand (IUCAA Pune, India) very carefully studied a homogeneous sample of 50 absorption systems observed with UVES and Kueyen along 18 distant quasars lines of sight. They recorded the spectra of quasars over a total of 34 nights to achieve the highest possible spectral resolution and the best signal-to-noise ratio. Sophisticated automatic procedures specially designed for this programme were applied. In addition, the astronomers used extensive simulations to show that they can correctly model the line profiles to recover a possible variation of alpha. The result of this extensive study is that over the last 10,000 million years, the relative variation of alpha must be less than 0.6 part per million. This is the strongest constraint from quasar absorption lines studies to date. More importantly, this new result does not support previous claims of a statistically significant change of alpha with time. Interestingly, this result is supported by another - less extensive - analysis, also conducted with the UVES spectrometer on the VLT [2]. Even though those observations were only concerned with one of the brightest known quasar HE 0515-4414, this independent study lends further support to the hypothesis of no variation of alpha. Even though these new results represent a significant improvement in our knowledge of the possible (non-) variation of one of the fundamental physical constants, the present set of data would in principle still allow variations that are comparatively large compared to those resulting from the measurements

  2. High-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental studies.

    PubMed

    Kluge, H-Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Mass spectrometry for fundamental studies in metrology and atomic, nuclear and particle physics requires extreme sensitivity and efficiency as well as ultimate resolving power and accuracy. An overview will be given on the global status of high-accuracy mass spectrometry for fundamental physics and metrology. Three quite different examples of modern mass spectrometric experiments in physics are presented: (i) the retardation spectrometer KATRIN at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, employing electrostatic filtering in combination with magnetic-adiabatic collimation-the biggest mass spectrometer for determining the smallest mass, i.e. the mass of the electron anti-neutrino, (ii) the Experimental Cooler-Storage Ring at GSI-a mass spectrometer of medium size, relative to other accelerators, for determining medium-heavy masses and (iii) the Penning trap facility, SHIPTRAP, at GSI-the smallest mass spectrometer for determining the heaviest masses, those of super-heavy elements. Finally, a short view into the future will address the GSI project HITRAP at GSI for fundamental studies with highly-charged ions. PMID:20530821

  3. Fundamental Mechanistic Investigations of Silane and Chlorocarbon Addition to Low Valent Palladium Species and their Application to Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, Mark J.

    2009-01-27

    The collaboration between Mark Fink (Tulane University) and R. Morris Bullock (Brookhaven National Laboratory, currently at PNL) is an effort to understand some of the fundamental processes involved in catalytic bond activations with low coordinate palladium species. The project involves the photochemical generation of reactive low-valent palladium species as transients using nanosecond laser flash photolysis and the subsequent investigation of their reactions with chloroarenes and hydrosilanes. In the case of Si-H activation of hydrosilanes, relatively long-lived sigma complexes are implicated. These complexes may be important models for C-H activation in hydrocarbons. The information obtained from these studies will help in the understanding of fundamental processes involved in a number of important catalytic reactions in the petrochemical and environmental areas.

  4. STOL aircraft transient ground effects. Part 1: Fundamental analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhammer, M. I.; Crowder, J. P.; Smyth, D. N.

    1975-01-01

    The first phases of a fundamental analytical study of STOL ground effects were presented. Ground effects were studied in two dimensions to establish the importance of nonlinear effects, to examine transient aspects of ascent and descent near the ground, and to study the modelling of the jet impingement on the ground. Powered lift system effects were treated using the jet-flap analogy. The status of a three-dimensional jet-wing ground effect method was presented. It was shown, for two-dimensional unblown airfoils, that the transient effects are small and are primarily due to airfoil/freestream/ground orientation rather than to unsteady effects. The three-dimensional study showed phenomena similar to the two-dimensional results. For unblown wings, the wing/freestream/ground orientation effects were shown to be of the same order of magnitude as for unblown airfoils. This may be used to study the nonplanar, nonlinear, jet-wing ground effect.

  5. A study of fundamental limitations of small antennas: MIMO approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattigiri, S.; Warty, C.

    In this area of high performance systems and sophistication, the antenna size is shrinking drastically. This paper reviews the fundamental limitations in electrically instigated small antennas and their implications on multiple input multiple output (MIMO) systems. An optimum performance of the antenna can be obtained by considering three main factors. (1) maximum gain for given frequency (2) minimum Q factor (3) maximum ratio of G/Q. It is essential to understand the basic concepts of these small antennas to counter the limitations for next generational systems. In this paper works of three prominent scientists like Wheeler, Hansen and Chu have been studied to understand these limitations. This study can be further expanded to accumulate various space time diverse MIMO systems specified in long Term Evolution-Advanced (LTE-A) standards. The impact of limitations of small antennas can be very significant on the performance of the given node.

  6. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Kroo, E.; Charpenay, S.; Bassilakis, R.

    1991-12-17

    The overall objective of the program was to improve the understanding of retrograde reactions and their dependencies on coal rank and structure, and/or coal modifications and reaction conditions. Because retrograde reactions are competitive with bond breaking reactions, an understanding of both is required to shift the competition in favor of the latter. Related objectives were to clarify the conflicting observations reported in literature on such major topics as the role of oxygen groups in retrograde reactions and to provide a bridge from very fundamental studies on pure compounds to phenomenological studies on actual coal. This information was integrated into the FG-DVC model, which was improved and extended to the liquefaction context.

  7. Fundamental and clinical studies on tumor control by TBI

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Kiyohiko; Myojin, Miyako

    1996-12-31

    Total body irradiation (TBI) has been considered to bring about immunosuppressive effects on organisms. The conclusion is derived from data obtained by sublethal doses of TBI, but there are no data on how low doses of TBI act on organisms. On the other hand, it is known that low doses of TBI are effective on some malignant lymphoma or chronic myelogenous leukemia. However, the effect of low doses of TBI is rarely investigated radiobiologically. For 15 yr, the authors have studied the effects of low doses of TBI on normal or tumor-bearing mice and its immunological background. In this paper, they show the results of fundamental and clinical studies on tumor control by low doses of TBI.

  8. Fundamental studies on the Cs dynamics under ion source conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Friedl, R. Fantz, U.

    2014-02-15

    The performance of surface conversion based negative hydrogen ion sources is mainly determined by the caesium dynamics. Therefore, fundamental investigations in vacuum and plasma are performed at a flexible laboratory setup with ion source parameters. Studies on the influence of Cs on the plasma parameters of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} plasmas showed that n{sub e} and T{sub e} in the bulk plasma are not affected by relevant amounts of Cs and no isotopic differences could be observed. The coating of the vessel surfaces with Cs, however, leads to a considerable gettering of hydrogen atoms from the plasma volume and to the decrease of n{sub e} close to a sample surface due to the formation of negative ions.

  9. Fundamental studies of fusion plasmas. Annual performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Aamodt, R.E.; Catto, P.J.; D`Ippolito, D.A.; Myra, J.R.; Russell, D.A.

    1992-05-26

    The major portion of this program is devoted to critical ICH phenomena. The topics include edge physics, fast wave propagation, ICH induced high frequency instabilities, and a preliminary antenna design for Ignitor. This research was strongly coordinated with the world`s experimental and design teams at JET, Culham, ORNL, and Ignitor. The results have been widely publicized at both general scientific meetings and topical workshops including the speciality workshop on ICRF design and physics sponsored by Lodestar in April 1992. The combination of theory, empirical modeling, and engineering design in this program makes this research particularly important for the design of future devices and for the understanding and performance projections of present tokamak devices. Additionally, the development of a diagnostic of runaway electrons on TEXT has proven particularly useful for the fundamental understanding of energetic electron confinement. This work has led to a better quantitative basis for quasilinear theory and the role of magnetic vs. electrostatic field fluctuations on electron transport. An APS invited talk was given on this subject and collaboration with PPPL personnel was also initiated. Ongoing research on these topics will continue for the remainder fo the contract period and the strong collaborations are expected to continue, enhancing both the relevance of the work and its immediate impact on areas needing critical understanding.

  10. Amphitropic liquid crystal phases from polyhydroxy sugar surfactants: Fundamental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Zied, Osama K.; Hashim, Rauzah; Timimi, B. A.

    2015-03-01

    The self-assembly phenomena on a special class of poly-hydroxy sugar surfactant have been studied extensively. This class of material is classified as amphitropic liquid crystals since they exhibit both thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystalline properties. Hence the potential applications of these non-ionic surfactants are more versatile than those from the conventional lyotropic liquid crystals including those from thermotropic phases, but the latters are yet to be realized. Unfortunately, due to the lack of interest (or even awareness), fundamental studies in thermotropic glycolipids are scanty to support application development, and any tangible progress is often mired by the complexity of the sugar stereochemistry. However, some applications may be pursued from these materials by taking the advantage of the sugar chirality and the tilted structure of the lipid organization which implies ferroelectric behavior. Here, we present our studies on the stereochemical diversity of the sugar units in glycosides that form the thermotropic/lyotropic phases. The structure to property relationship compares different chain designs and other popular polyhydroxy compounds, such as monooleins and alkylpolyglucosides. Different structural properties of these glycosides are discussed with respect to their self-assembly organization and potential applications, such as delivery systems and membrane mimetic study.

  11. Fundamental combustion studies of emulsified fuels. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dryer, F.L.

    1982-08-01

    An experimental apparatus was designed and built in order to study the combustion of free, isolated fuel droplets at low Reynolds number conditions. Studies were conducted into the disruptive combustion behavior of n-paraffin/water emulsions and binary solutions of n-paraffins. A lower limiting paraffin boiling point was determined so that nucleation of water in emulsions was achieved. Solutions exhibited a limited range of composition for which disruption of the droplets was observed. A minimum difference in boiling points of the components was necessary to achieve disruption. Analysis of vapor bubble growth indicated fundamental differences between the behavior of emulsions and solutions. The work on binary paraffin solutions was extended to alcohol/paraffin solutions which also exhibited disruptive activity within a range of composition. Studies of emulsified No. 2 oil and ethanol/No. 2 oil solutions indicated the existence of microexplosions wih the combustion of these fuel blends. Finally, a full scale boiler test was conducted to determine the impact of heavy oil/water emulsification on boiler operating characteristics. The most significant effect was the reduction of large carbon particulate emissions.

  12. Fundamental studies of the chemical vapor deposition of diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    The plasma or thermally enhanced low pressure chemical vapor deposition of diamond films is an exciting development with many challenging fundamental problems. The early stages of nucleation is relevant to the initial growth rate and the perfection and morphology of the deposit. To isolate one of the factors that influence nucleation, we have studied the effect of surface topography on the nucleation process. Our earlier work has shown preferential nucleation on sharp convex features and we have proposed several possible reasons for this behavior, including dangling bonds at the convex features. In our recent work, we have extended our investigation to include a novel patterning of silicon substrates used to pattern silicon solar cells. The results are consistent with our earlier observations that the majority of nucleation events occur on protruding surface features. In an effort to establish whether dangling bonds at the protruding surfaces may be responsible for the selective nucleation, we have evaluated the dangling bond concentration using electron spin resonance. We have carried out deposition under nominally identical surface topography, but with different concentrations of dangling bonds at or near the surface. The results of this study indicate that dangling bonds play a minor role in enhancing nucleation, in contrast to a substantial role played by special surface topographical features. In the course of the past year, we have submitted four manuscripts for publication and have made six presentations.

  13. Fundamental Studies of Fluid Mechanics: Stability in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    George M. Homsy

    2005-04-28

    This work has been concerned with theoretical, computational and experimental studies of a variety of flow and transport problems that are of generic interest and applicability in energy-related and energy-intensive processes. These include the following. (1) Problems associated with oil recovery: the global economy continues to be dependent on the stable and predictable supply of oil and fossil fuels. This will remain the case for the near term, as current estimates are that world production of oil will peak between 2025 and 2100, depending on assumptions regarding growth. Most of these resources reside in porous rocks and other naturally occurring media. Studies of flow-induced instabilities are relevant to the areas of secondary and enhanced oil recovery. (2) Small scale and Stokes flows: flows in microgeometries and involving interfaces and surfactants are of interest in a myriad of energy-related contexts. These include: pore-level modeling of the fundamental processes by which oil held in porous materials is mobilized and produced; heating and cooling energy cycles involving significant expenditure of energy in conditioning of human environments, heat pipes, and compact heat exchangers; and energy efficiency in large scale separation processes such as distillation and absorption-processes that underlie the chemical process industries. (3) Coating flows: these are of interest in information technologies, including the manufacture of integrated circuits and data storage and retrieval devices. It is estimated that 50-70% of the starting raw materials and intermediate devices in information technology processes must be discarded as a result of imperfections and failure to meet specifications. These in turn are often the result of the inability to control fluid-mechanical processes and flow instabilities. Our work over the grant period is primarily fundamental in nature. We are interested in establishing general principles and behaviors that relate to a variety of

  14. Fundamental studies of chalcogenide nanocrystals, carbonaceous nanoparticles, and chromatographic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Jared Scott

    2011-12-01

    The development of novel nanomaterials and the understanding of their fundamental physical and chemical properties represent an exciting area of research. These materials are continuously being sought for ever-increasing applications; finding their way into uses that influence mankind on a daily basis. Combining elements from traditional nanoparticle characterization with electrophoretic-based techniques, this dissertation presents the analysis of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) generated from a novel source (candle soot) as well as a unique perspective on the reactivity and degradation process of magic-sized cadmium chalcogenide nanocrystals. One potential application of CNPs is their use as an alternative fluorophore in a separation-based sensor system. Laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) is a commonly used manner of detection in this type of platform, but is limited in many cases by problems associated with the fluorophore. Carbon-based nanoparticles have the potential to improve upon traditional fluorophores in applications that make use of LIF as the detection scheme. CNPs were extracted from the carbonaceous material produced by the incomplete combustion of a candle. The soot was submitted to an oxidizing treatment and extraction/filtration procedures rendering watersoluble luminescent species. Electron microscopy was used to identify globular, amorphous structures in the nanometer size-range. An aqueous suspension of CNPs demonstrated excellent stability in terms of its electronic properties, showing little change in absorption and emission spectra upon storage under ambient conditions over a two-year period. Capitalizing on the strengths of capillary electrophoresis (CE) as a characterization technique, we have analyzed the negatively-charged CNPs in terms of charge and size by studying the influence of variable CE conditions on the resulting separation. Separations at different pH revealed a highly complex mixture of CNPs, containing species with large

  15. Program for studying fundamental interactions at the PIK reactor facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Vassiljev, A. V.; Varlamov, V. E.; Geltenbort, P.; Gridnev, K. A.; Dmitriev, S. P.; Dovator, N. A.; Egorov, A. I.; Ezhov, V. F.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Zinoviev, V. G.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Ivanov, S. N.; Ivanov, S. A.; Kolomensky, E. A.; Konoplev, K. A.; Krasnoschekova, I. A.; Lasakov, M. S.; Lyamkin, V. A.; Martemyanov, V. P.; Murashkin, A. N.; Neustroev, P. V.; Onegin, M. S.; Petelin, A. L.; Pirozhkov, A. N.; Polyushkin, A. O.; Prudnikov, D. V.; Ryabov, V. L.; Samoylov, R. M.; Sbitnev, S. V.; Fomin, A. K.; Fomichev, A. V.; Zimmer, O.; Cherniy, A. V.; Shoka, I. V.

    2016-05-01

    A research program aimed at studying fundamental interactions by means of ultracold and polarized cold neutrons at the GEK-4-4' channel of the PIK reactor is presented. The apparatus to be used includes a source of cold neutrons in the heavy-water reflector of the reactor, a source of ultracold neutrons based on superfluid helium and installed in a cold-neutron beam extracted from the GEK-4 channel, and a number of experimental facilities in neutron beams. An experiment devoted to searches for the neutron electric dipole moment and an experiment aimed at a measurement the neutron lifetime with the aid of a large gravitational trap are planned to be performed in a beam of ultracold neutrons. An experiment devoted to measuring neutron-decay asymmetries with the aid of a superconducting solenoid is planned in a beam of cold polarized neutrons from the GEK-4' channel. The second ultracold-neutron source and an experiment aimed at measuring the neutron lifetime with the aid of a magnetic trap are planned in the neutron-guide system of the GEK-3 channel. In the realms of neutrino physics, an experiment intended for sterile-neutrino searches is designed. The state of affairs around the preparation of the experimental equipment for this program is discussed.

  16. Fundamental studies of catalytic processing of synthetic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.R.

    1991-04-24

    This project revolves around understanding the fundamental processes involved in the catalytic removal of harmful oxygenated organics present in coal liquids. We are modelling the complex type of sulfided Mo catalyst proposed for these reactions with simple single crystal surfaces. These display a controlled range and number of reaction sites and can be extensively characterized by surface science techniques. We then investigate the reaction pathways for representative simple oxygenates upon these surfaces. The reaction of furan on sulfided Mo(110) closely resembles that on the (100) surface, consisting mainly of fragmentation. Some differences in detail are apparent that need further study. After pre-dosing with hydrogen, or in a hydrogen (deuterium) atmosphere (up to 5 {times} 10 {sup {minus}7} torr), the reaction pathways for furan change little, though there is evidence for the production of surface formyl radicals. We will attempt to induce HDO activity by using (a) using higher H{sub 2} pressures and (b) performing reactions on a preformed C/S/H{sub x} surface layer. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Fundamental studies of catalytic processing of synthetic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.R.

    1991-01-24

    This project revolves around understanding the fundamental processes involved in the catalytic removal of harmful oxygenated organics present in coal liquids. The investigators are modelling the complex type of sulfided Mo catalyst proposed for these reactions with simple single crystal surfaces. They then investigate the reaction pathways for representative simple oxygenates upon these surfaces. The original plans for this quarter called for continuing study of the interesting reactions of furan on sulfided Mo(100) surfaces presented in the last report. Due to the unfortunate accidental destruction of this sample, the investigators have in fact proceeded on two alternate fronts. First they have improved the sample heating system, the malfunction of which caused the loss of the Mo crystal. Secondly, they have prepared a Mo(110) surface and performed initial experiments to understand the sulfur phases that form on this surface of Mo. These efforts have been worthwhile - they have accomplished on the (110) surface in two months what required almost six months on the (100) surface, and are in a good position to repeat the furan reaction experiments on Mo(110) surfaces. The heating system design is described and results of surface properties are given. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Fundamental study of contact resistance behavior in RSW aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ta-Chien

    2003-06-01

    This dissertation study has developed a fundamental understanding of the contact resistance behavior using the virtual contact volume concept and the equivalent contact resistivity definition. In this research, an integrated experimental-numerical approach was used to demonstrate the proposed equivalent contact resistivity versus temperature relationship. Such relationship was further used to study the expulsion behavior of the resistance spot welding aluminum alloy. A concept of using the constriction ring was demonstrated to be effective in preventing weld expulsion in resistance spot aluminum welds. The a-spot model simulated a single ball contact to define the equivalent contact resistivity. For a specific loading range, the generic equivalent contact resistivity versus temperature relationship, consisting of a proportional term and a exponential term, was derived. The proportionality term represents the increasing contact resistivity with temperature reflecting the Wiedemann-Franz-Lorentz behavior. The exponential term represents the softening effect of the contact surface as temperature increases. With the generic equivalent contact resistivity versus temperature relationship established, an a-spot welding which incorporated the contact pairs with the resistivity relationship leaving three factors as parametric variables and an experimental a-spot welding model were conducted. Both the numerical and experimental analyses show the same relationship that is defined by the theoretical hypothesis of a-spot model. The parametric study was conducted to quantify the parametric factors based on comparisons on nugget size and electrical potential drops across the electrodes. For an ideal combination of parameters at the Cu/Al interface and the Al/Al faying surface, both the comparisons of weld nugget size and potential drops are satisfactory. The mechanical analysis proposed a concept that expulsion would occur when the crack tip is within the solidus nugget zone at

  19. Why Do We Need to Study the Fundamentals of Care?

    PubMed

    Kitson, Alison

    2016-01-01

    This paper makes the case for revisiting our understanding and valuing of basic or fundamental nursing care. Despite the interest in movements such as the person-centred or patient-centred care agenda, there continues to be concern about patient safety, quality of experience and getting the simple things right. Part of this debate is around whether meeting patients' fundamental care needs (such as personal hygiene, elimination and eating and drinking) within acute care settings constitutes legitimate nursing responsibilities or whether these needs ought to become part of "hotel services" executed by care assistants with elementary training or, as in many lower-income health systems, undertaken by relatives. PMID:27309637

  20. A numerical study of fundamental shock noise mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, Kristine R.

    1995-05-01

    The results of this thesis demonstrate that direct numerical simulation can predict sound generation in unsteady aerodynamic flows containing shock waves. Shock waves can be significant sources of sound in high speed jet flows, on helicopter blades, and in supersonic combustion inlets. Direct computation of sound permits the prediction of noise levels in the preliminary design stage and can be used as a tool to focus experimental studies, thereby reducing cost and increasing the probability of a successfully quiet product in less time. This thesis reveals and investigates two mechanisms fundamental to sound generation by shocked flows: shock motion and shock deformation. Shock motion is modeled by the interaction of a sound wave with a shock. During the interaction, the shock wave begins to move and the sound pressure is amplified as the wave passes through the shock. The numerical approach presented in this thesis is validated by the comparison of results obtained in a quasi-one dimensional simulation with linear theory. Analysis of the perturbation energy demonstrated for the first time that acoustic energy is generated by the interaction. Shock deformation is investigated by the numerical simulation of a ring vortex interacting with a shock. This interaction models the passage of turbulent structures through the shock wave. The simulation demonstrates that both acoustic waves and contact surfaces are generated downstream during the interaction. Analysis demonstrates that the acoustic wave spreads cylindrically, that the sound intensity is highly directional, and that the sound pressure level increases significantly with increasing shock strength. The effect of shock strength on sound pressure level is consistent with experimental observations of shock noise, indicating that the interaction of a ring vortex with a shock wave correctly models a dominant mechanism of shock noise generation.

  1. Fundamental Studies of Crystal Growth of Microporous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, P.; George, M.; Ramachandran, N.; Schoeman, B.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Microporous materials are framework structures with well-defined porosity, often of molecular dimensions. Zeolites contain aluminum and silicon atoms in their framework and are the most extensively studied amongst all microporous materials. Framework structures with P, Ga, Fe, Co, Zn, B, Ti and a host of other elements have also been made. Typical synthesis of microporous materials involve mixing the framework elements (or compounds, thereof) in a basic solution, followed by aging in some cases and then heating at elevated temperatures. This process is termed hydrothermal synthesis, and involves complex chemical and physical changes. Because of a limited understanding of this process, most synthesis advancements happen by a trial and error approach. There is considerable interest in understanding the synthesis process at a molecular level with the expectation that eventually new framework structures will be built by design. The basic issues in the microporous materials crystallization process include: (1) Nature of the molecular units responsible for the crystal nuclei formation; (2) Nature of the nuclei and nucleation process; (3) Growth process of the nuclei into crystal; (4) Morphological control and size of the resulting crystal; (5) Surface structure of the resulting crystals; (6) Transformation of frameworks into other frameworks or condensed structures. The NASA-funded research described in this report focuses to varying degrees on all of the above issues and has been described in several publications. Following is the presentation of the highlights of our current research program. The report is divided into five sections: (1) Fundamental aspects of the crystal growth process; (2) Morphological and Surface properties of crystals; (3) Crystal dissolution and transformations; (4) Modeling of Crystal Growth; (5) Relevant Microgravity Experiments.

  2. FUNDAMENTAL COMBUSTION RESEARCH APPLIED TO POLLUTION FORMATION. VOLUME 3. SUPPORT STUDIES: MEASUREMENT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report, one of four volumes describing research performed under EPA's Fundamental Combustion Research (FCR) Applied to Pollution Formation Program, gives results of three studies related to measurement system evaluations. Section I documents an evaluation of the performance a...

  3. Fundamental studies of superconductors using scanning magnetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtley, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    In this review I discuss the application of scanning magnetic imaging to fundamental studies of superconductors, concentrating on three scanning magnetic microscopies—scanning SQUID microscopy (SSM), scanning Hall bar microscopy (SHM) and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). I briefly discuss the history, sensitivity, spatial resolution, invasiveness and potential future developments of each technique. I then discuss a selection of applications of these microscopies. I start with static imaging of magnetic flux: an SSM study provides deeper understanding of vortex trapping in narrow strips, which are used to reduce noise in superconducting circuitry. Studies of vortex trapping in wire lattices, clusters and arrays of rings and nanoholes show fascinating ordering effects. The cuprate high-Tc superconductors are shown to have predominantly d-wave pairing symmetry by magnetic imaging of the half-integer flux quantum effect. Arrays of superconducting rings act as a physical analog for the Ising spin model, with the half-integer flux quantum effect helping to eliminate one source of disorder in antiferromagnetic arrangements of the ring moments. Tests of the interlayer tunneling model show that the condensation energy available from this mechanism cannot account for the high critical temperatures observed in the cuprates. The strong divergence in the magnetic fields of Pearl vortices allows them to be imaged using SSM, even for penetration depths of a millimeter. Unusual vortex arrangements occur in samples comparable in size to the coherence length. Spontaneous magnetization is not observed in Sr2RuO4, which is believed to have px ± ipy pairing symmetry, although effects hundreds of times bigger than the sensitivity limits had been predicted. However, unusual flux trapping is observed in this superconductor. Finally, unusual flux arrangements are also observed in magnetic superconductors. I then turn to vortex dynamics: imaging of vortices in rings of highly underdoped

  4. Fundamental studies of catalytic processing of synthetic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.R.

    1992-01-22

    This project revolves around understanding the fundamental processes involved in the catalytic removal of harmful oxygenated organics present in coal liquids. We are modelling the complex type of sulfided Mo catalyst proposed for these reactions with simple single crystal surfaces. These display a controlled range and number of reaction sites and can be extensively characterized by surface science techniques. We then investigate the reaction pathways for representative simple oxygenates upon these surfaces.

  5. Fundamental Studies of Hydroporphyrin Architectures for Solar-Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, Jonathan S.; Bocian, David F.; Holten, Dewey; Kirmaier, Christine

    2013-10-30

    /electron transfer between (hydro)porphyrins as a function of array size, distance between components, linker type, site of linker connection, and frontier molecular orbital composition. (iv) Build upon the results of the aforementioned studies to design, synthesize, and characterize integrated architectures that incorporate a panchromatic absorber and other molecular components that that afford efficient hole/electron migration and long-lived charge separation. Such architectures will be examined on solid substrates to explore the viability of the component parts and processes under application-oriented conditions. Such architectures or successors may prove directly useful for solar-energy conversion systems. An equally important attribute is to serve as a test-bed for successful integration of the requisite properties and processes, some of which require rather weak coupling between constituents, some of which require very strong electronic interactions to elicit the desired behavior, and all of which should be tunable under molecular design control to the extent possible. Collectively, the proposed studies will provide fundamental insights into molecular properties, interactions, and processes relevant to the design of molecular architectures for solar-energy conversion. The accomplishment of these goals is only possible through a highly synergistic program that encompasses molecular design, synthesis, and in-depth characterization.

  6. Fundamental studies of chemical vapor deposition diamond growth processes

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R.W.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.; Heatherly, L.

    1991-01-01

    We are developing laser spectroscopic techniques to foster a fundamental understanding of diamond film growth by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Several spectroscopic techniques are under investigation to identify intermediate species present in the bulk reactor volume, the thin active volume immediately above the growing film, and the actual growing surface. Such a comprehensive examination of the overall deposition process is necessary because a combination of gas phase and surface chemistry is probably operating. Resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) techniques have been emphasized. A growth rector that permits through-the-substrate gas sampling for REMPI/time-of-flight mass spectroscopy has been developed. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.; Song, H.; Biaggio-Rocha, S.; Searson, P.

    1991-11-01

    This report summarizes the findings of our fundamental research program on passivity and passivity breakdown. During the past three and one half years in this program (including the three year incrementally-funded grant prior to the present grant), we developed and experimentally tested various physical models for the growth and breakdown of passive films on metal surfaces. These models belong to a general class termed ``point defects models`` (PDMs), in which the growth and breakdown of passive films are described in terms of the movement of anion and cation vacancies.

  8. Fundamental Study of Low NOx Combustion Fly Ash Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    E. M. Suubert; I. Kuloats; K. Smith; N. Sabanegh; R.H. Hurt; W. D. Lilly; Y. M. Gao

    1997-05-01

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

  9. FUNDAMENTAL STUDY OF LOW-NOx COMBUSTION FLY ASH UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    ERIC M. SUUBERG; ROBERT H. HURT

    1998-10-19

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over fifty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

  10. Fundamental Study of Low-Nox Combustion Fly Ash Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    E. M. Suuberg; I. Kuloats; K. Smith; N. Sabanegh; R. H. Hurt; W. D. Lilly; Y. M. Gao

    1997-11-01

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

  11. Free Mesh Method: fundamental conception, algorithms and accuracy study

    PubMed Central

    YAGAWA, Genki

    2011-01-01

    The finite element method (FEM) has been commonly employed in a variety of fields as a computer simulation method to solve such problems as solid, fluid, electro-magnetic phenomena and so on. However, creation of a quality mesh for the problem domain is a prerequisite when using FEM, which becomes a major part of the cost of a simulation. It is natural that the concept of meshless method has evolved. The free mesh method (FMM) is among the typical meshless methods intended for particle-like finite element analysis of problems that are difficult to handle using global mesh generation, especially on parallel processors. FMM is an efficient node-based finite element method that employs a local mesh generation technique and a node-by-node algorithm for the finite element calculations. In this paper, FMM and its variation are reviewed focusing on their fundamental conception, algorithms and accuracy. PMID:21558752

  12. Microfluidic platforms and fundamental electrocatalysis studies for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Jamie Lee

    The fabrication and testing of a planar membraneless microchannel fuel cell, based on a silicon microchannel, is described in detail. Laminar flow of fuel and oxidant streams, one on top of the other, prevents fuel crossover while allowing ionic transport at the interface between the two solutions. By employing laminar flow, the useful functions of a membrane are retained, while bypassing its inherent limitations. The planar design maximizes the anode and cathode areas, and elimination of the membrane affords broad flexibility in the choice of fuel and oxidant. Fuels including formic acid, methanol, ethanol, sodium borohydride and hydrogen were tested along with oxidants such as oxygen, hydrogen peroxide and potassium permanganate. Steps taken to improve voltage, current density, and overall power output have been addressed, including the testing of a dual electrolyte system and the use of micro-patterned electrode surfaces to enhance fuel utilization. As the complexity of the fuels studied in the microchannel fuel cell increased, it was imperative to characterize these fuels using electrochemical techniques prior to utilization in the fuel cell. The oxidation pathway of the liquid fuel methanol was studied rigorously because of its importance for micro-fuel cell applications. Activation energies for methanol oxidation at a Ptpoly surface were determined using electrochemical techniques, providing a benchmark for the comparison of activation energies of other Pt-based electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation at a given potential. A protocol to obtain Ea values was established in three different electrolytes and experimental parameters that influence the magnitude of these values are discussed in detail. The oxidation pathways of sodium borohydride were also examined at Au, Pt, and Pd surfaces using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and rotating disk electrode voltammetry. In addition to studies on bulk Ptpoly surfaces, new bulk intermetallic catalysts were

  13. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  14. Fundamental studies of catalytic processing of synthetic liquids. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.R.

    1994-06-15

    Liquids derived from coal contain relatively high amounts of oxygenated organic compounds, mainly in the form of phenols and furans that are deleterious to the stability and quality of these liquids as fuels. Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) using Mo/W sulfide catalysts is a promising method to accomplish this removal, but our understanding of the reactions occurring on the catalyst surface during HDO is very limited. Rather than attempting to examine the complexities of real liquids and catalysts we have adopted an approach here using model systems amenable to surface-sensitive techniques that enable us to probe in detail the fundamental processes occurring during HDO at the surfaces of well-defined model catalysts. The results of this work may lead to the development of more efficient, selective and stable catalysts. Above a S/Mo ratio of about 0.5 ML, furan does not adsorb on sulfided Mo surfaces; as the sulfur coverage is lowered increasing amounts of furan can be adsorbed. Temperature-programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS) reveals that C-H, C-C and C-O bond scission occurs on these surfaces. Auger spectra show characteristic changes in the nature and amount of surface carbon. Comparisons with experiments carried out with CO, H{sub 2} and alkenes show that reaction pathways include -- direct abstraction of CO at low temperatures; cracking and release of hydrogen below its normal desorption temperature; dehydrogenatin of adsorbed hydrocarbon fragments; recombination of C and O atoms and dissolution of carbon into the bulk at high temperatures. Performing the adsorption or thermal reaction in 10{sup {minus}5} torr of hydrogen does not change the mode of reaction significantly.

  15. Fundamental studies of X-ray and secondary electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulapudi, Satya Prasad

    Microanalysis of submicron particles in the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is only possible by using low incident electron beam energies due to smaller interaction volume and suppressed beam induced charging. Such low beam energies must use L- and M-lines rather than the familiar K-lines. The information about the fundamental parameters of X-ray emission and transport at low energies is limited, so the use of L- and M-lines is problematic. The rate of generation of X-rays from an element irradiated at some energy E depends on the product of the ionization cross-section sigma(E) and the fluorescent yield o. Unfortunately neither of these quantities is well established independently, especially outside of the K-series of lines. Therefore the absolute X-ray generation efficiencies (photons/electron) were directly measured and parameterized for a wide range of K, L , and M lines from different elements. It is anticipated that a complete set of such data would be of great value in applications such as spectrum simulation and standardless analysis. Secondary electron spectra have been collected from both pure elements and from compounds examined under conditions approximating those found in a scanning electron microscope. Despite the presence of substantial surface contamination these spectra are found to be reproducible and characteristic of the underlying material. Typically the peak in such spectra is found to be at an energy of about 5 eV, and 50% of the total secondary electron emission falls within the range 0--12 eV. These data may be of value for the design of detectors for scanning microscopy and might have applications for microanalysis.

  16. Additional EIPC Study Analysis. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Stanton W; Gotham, Douglas J.; Luciani, Ralph L.

    2014-12-01

    Between 2010 and 2012 the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) conducted a major long-term resource and transmission study of the Eastern Interconnection (EI). With guidance from a Stakeholder Steering Committee (SSC) that included representatives from the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) among others, the project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 involved a long-term capacity expansion analysis that involved creation of eight major futures plus 72 sensitivities. Three scenarios were selected for more extensive transmission- focused evaluation in Phase 2. Five power flow analyses, nine production cost model runs (including six sensitivities), and three capital cost estimations were developed during this second phase. The results from Phase 1 and 2 provided a wealth of data that could be examined further to address energy-related questions. A list of 14 topics was developed for further analysis. This paper brings together the earlier interim reports of the first 13 topics plus one additional topic into a single final report.

  17. Fundamental studies of fluid mechanics and stability in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Homsy, G.M.

    1992-07-01

    We have been active in four areas: Numerical and analytical studies of viscous fingering in miscible displacements, including non- monotonic mobility profiles; numerical and analytical studies of the effect of non-Newtonian fluid characteristics on instabilities; experimental studies of instabilities of moving contact lines for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids; and studies of natural convective energy transport due to time-dependent body forces.

  18. Fundamental studies of tin whiskering in microelectronics finishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinol, Lesly Agnes

    Common electronics materials, such as tin, copper, steel, and brass, are ambient reactive under common use conditions, and as such are prone to corrosion. During the early 1940s, reports of failures due to electrical shorting of components caused by 'whisker' (i.e., filamentary surface protrusion) growth on many surface types---including the aforementioned metals---began to emerge. Lead alloying of tin (3--10% by weight, typically in the eutectic proportion) eliminated whiskering risk for decades, until the July 2006 adoption of the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) directive was issued by the European Union. This directive, which has since been adopted by California and parts of China, severely restricted the use of lead (<1000 ppm) in all electrical and electronics equipment being placed on the EU market, imposing the need for developing reliable new "lead-free" alternatives to SnPb. In spite of the abundance of modern-day anecdotes chronicling whisker-related failures in satellites, nuclear power stations, missiles, pacemakers, and spacecraft navigation equipment, pure tin finishes are still increasingly being employed today, and the root cause(s) of tin whiskering remains elusive. This work describes a series of structured experiments exploring the fundamental relationships between the incidence of tin whiskering (as dependent variable) and numerous independent variables. These variables included deposition method (electroplating, electroless plating, template-based electrochemical synthesis, and various physical vapor deposition techniques, including resistive evaporation, electron beam evaporation, and sputtering), the inclusion of microparticles and organic contamination, the effects of sample geometry, and nanostructuring. Key findings pertain to correlations between sample geometry and whisker propensity, and also to the stress evolution across a series of 4"-diameter silicon wafers of varying thicknesses with respect to the degree of post

  19. Fundamental studies on the metal chloride cathodes in sodium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Attia, A.; Halpert, G.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report studies of the passivation of the NiCl2 electrode during reduction, its effect on the electrochemical rate kinetics for the reduction, and its dependence on the state of charge of the electrode. NiCl2 exhibits passive behavior more readily at lower states of charge due to a decrease in the electrochemical area, resulting from NaCl deposited during reduction. The passive behavior is evident from the DC polarization curves as well as AC impedance plots at the same potentials, implying a correlation between them. The results of the studies are presented in detail.

  20. Fundamental studies and applications of strong field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lu

    In an intense laser field, atoms and molecules experience tunneling ionization directly to the continuum. We used this method to study several aspects and applications of strong field ionization (SFI) in atoms and molecules. One study used SFI to probe the photofragments produced by photodissociation using DC sliced imaging. The photodissociation mechanism of two polyatomic molecules (sulfur dioxide and nitromethane) were investigated. In a second study, we show the strong field ionization rate depends on the sign of the magnetic number distribution. We detect the signal of sequential double ionization of argon dications by a pump-probe method to investigate the ionization rate sensitivity to circularly polarized light. In a third study, we also found that the modest fragmentation that accompanies strong field ionization may be used to identify isomers and molecules in a complex mixture based on their mass spectral "finger print". The experiments were carried out in a DC sliced imaging apparatus. For the isomer selective detection experiment, the machine was used simply as a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The mass spectrum of each isomer was used as "basis function" to characterize the complex mixtures quantitatively.

  1. Fundamental spectroscopic studies of carbenes and hydrocarbon radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, C.A.; Thaddeus, P.

    1993-12-01

    Highly reactive carbenes and carbon-chain radicals are studied at millimeter wavelengths by observing their rotational spectra. The purpose is to provide definitive spectroscopic identification, accurate spectroscopic constants in the lowest vibrational states, and reliable structures of the key intermediates in reactions leading to aromatic hydrocarbons and soot particles in combustion.

  2. FUNDAMENTAL STUDY OF SULFATE AEROSOL FORMATION, CONDENSATION, AND GROWTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the formation and growth of sulfate particles. Existing theoretical models on acid particle formation and growth were reviewed and evaluated. The formation and growth of sulfate particles during slow cooling, rapid cooling, and dilution cool...

  3. A study of the fundamental characteristics of 2175A extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelli, Jason A.; Savage, Blair D.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of interstellar extinction were studied in the region of the 2175 A feature for lines of sight which appear to exhibit unusually weak ultraviolet extinction. The analysis was based upon a parameterization of the observed extinction via fitting specific mathematical functions in order to determine the position and width of the 2175 A feature. The data are currently being analyzed.

  4. Plasma Assisted Combustion: Fundamental Studies and Engine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefkowitz, Joseph K.

    Successful and efficient ignition in short residence time environments or ultra-lean mixtures is a key technological challenge for the evolution of advanced combustion devices in terms of both performance and efficiency. To meet this challenge, interest in plasma assisted combustion (PAC) has expanded over the past 20 years. However, understanding of the underlying physical processes of ignition by plasma discharge remains elementary. In order to shed light on the key processes involved, two main thrusts of research were undertaken in this dissertation. First, demonstration of the applicability of plasma discharges in engines and engine-like environments was carried out using a microwave discharge and a nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharge in an internal combustion engine and a pulsed detonation engine, respectively. Major conclusions include the extension of lean ignition limits for both engines, significant reduction of ignition time for mixtures with large minimum ignition energy, and the discovery of the inter-pulse coupling effect of nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges at high frequency. In order to understand the kinetic processes that led to these improvements, the second thrust of research directly explored the chemical kinetic processes of plasma discharges with hydrocarbon fuels. For this purpose, a low pressure flow reactor with a NRP dielectric barrier discharge cell was assembled. The discharge cell was fitted with a Herriott type multipass mirror arrangement, which allowed quantitative laser absorption spectroscopy to be performed in situ during the plasma discharge. Experiments on methane and ethylene mixtures with oxygen, argon, and helium revealed the importance of low temperature oxidation pathways in PAC. In particular, oxygen addition reactions were shown to be of primary importance in the oxidation of these small hydrocarbons in the temperature range of 300-600 K. Kinetic modeling tools, including both a coupled plasma and

  5. Fundamental Studies of Fluid Mechanics: Stability in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Homsy, George M.

    2014-02-12

    We summarize our research results in three main areas: coating flows; electrohydrodynamics of drops; and wetting and spreading of drops. Experimental, computational and analytical methods are used to address a variety of issues. Coating flow studies include the effect of roughness, surfactants, and adsorbed particles on the dynamics of dip-coating. Electrohydrodynamic studies include drop deformation in uniform electric fields, shape distortion due to charge convection in sedimenting drops, and driving chaotic advection by either an electric field inclined to the direction of drop motion or time-periodic changes in the direction of the electric field. Heat and mass transport from chaotically mixed droplets exhibit unexpected and remarkable increases in the rates of transport. Finally, we develop an analytical solution to the problem of a static droplet, and use numerical techniques to predict its migration due to surface tension gradients.

  6. Overview of fundamental study of pazopanib in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong-Lin; Yang, Fan; Huang, Xin; Zhou, Qing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an indispensible process for tumor growth and metastasis. Anti-angiogenesis based therapy is one of the most promising treatments for inhibiting cancer progression. Through the exploration of inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2, deemed as the major angiogenesis pathway, pazopanib was found as a small molecular pan-VEGFR and pan-platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) inhibitor, with suitable pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic parameters to be an oral drug. In an vitro study, pazopanib exerted anti-tumor effect through mechanisms including the Raf-MAPK/ERK (MEK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, and directly targeted on v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (B-raf) as well. It inhibited the proliferation of cell lines, such as DU-145 and HRC-45 in hepatocellular carcinoma, through mechanisms like “cell cycle arrest.” In vivo xenograft studies and phase I/II clinical trials revealed a series of plasma cytokine and angiogenic factors, such as interleukin (IL)-6, IL-12, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and soluble VEGFR2, which have significant association with clinical curative effect. Pazopanib has been shown to be effective in solid tumors and some hematological malignancies. Future studies should focus on the exploration of biomarkers to screen sensitive patients and concomitant or metronomic dosage with other kinds of medicines. PMID:26767042

  7. Fundamental Approaches to the Study of Zebrafish Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Stephen A.; Powell, Mickie; D’Abramo, Louis R.

    2014-01-01

    The value of the zebrafish model has been well established. However, culture variability within and among laboratories remains a concern, particularly as it relates to nutrition. Investigators using rodent models addressed this concern several decades ago and have developed strict nutritional regimes to which their models adhere. These investigators decreased the variability associated with nutrition in most studies by developing standardized reference and open formulation diets. Zebrafish investigators have not embraced this approach. In this article, we address the problems associated with the lack of nutritional information and standardization in the zebrafish research community. Based on the knowledge gained from studies of other animals, including traditional research models, other fish species, domesticated and companion animals, and humans, we have proposed an approach that seeks to standardize nutrition research in zebrafish. We have identified a number of factors for consideration in zebrafish nutrition studies and have suggested a number of proposed outcomes. The long term-goal of nutrition research will be to identify the daily nutritional requirements of the zebrafish and to develop appropriate standardized reference and open formulation diets. PMID:23382346

  8. New Mexico Center for Particle Physics: Studies of fundamental interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, J.A.J.

    1992-01-01

    The New Mexico Center/UNM group research program includes the CDF experiment at Fermilab and the SDC experiment at the SSC. In both experiments the UNM group research focuses on silicon strip tracking systems. The present research goals are to develop and utilize precision silicon tracking to increase significantly the physics reach of the Tevatron, and to make possible the study of high-P[sub t] physics at the SSC. The search for the t-quark in CDF is the primary goal of the upcoming Tevatron runs. This Progress Report summarizes our research accomplishments from the last year.

  9. Fundamental study of phosphor separation by controlling magnetic force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Kohei; Mishima, Fumihito; Akiyama, Yoko; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2013-11-01

    The phosphor wastes consist of phosphors with different emission colors, green (LAP), red (YOX), blue (BAM) and white (HP). It is required to recover and reuse the rare earth phosphors with high market value. In this study, we tried to separate the phosphor using the magnetic separation by HTS bulk magnet utilizing the differences of magnetic susceptibility by the type of phosphors. We succeeded in the successive separation of HP with low market value from YOX and BAM including the rare earth using the magnetic Archimedes method. In this method, vertical and radial components of the magnetic force were used.

  10. Fundamental Study about the Landscape Estimation and Analysis by CG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Yoshio; Miyagoshi, Takashi; Takamatsu, Mamoru; Sassa, Kazuhiro

    In recent years, the color of advertising signboards or vending machines on the streets should be harmonized with the surrounding landscape. In this study, we investigated how the colors (red and white) of the vending machines virtually installed by CG would affect the traditional landscape. 20 subjects estimated landscape samples in Hida-Furukawa by the SD technique. The result of our experiment shows that the vending machines have great influence on the surrounding landscape. On the other hand, we have confirmed that they can harmonize with the circumference landscape by the color to use.

  11. Fundamental Study for Introduction of Renewable Energy into Syowa Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Shogo; Abiko, Haruhiko; Kurihara, Junichi; Ishizawa, Kenji; Endo, Nobuhiko

    To reduce the volume of fuel consumed at Syowa base in Antarctica, we study the proper renewable energy system (RE system) to supply both electrical and thermal energy. Though a lot of photovoltaic power generation systems (PV systems) and wind power generation systems (WG systems) have already been installed all over the world, climate is quite different from other area and we have few experiences on renewable energy system in Antarctica. Moreover, though thermal load is much bigger than electrical load all the year round, both PV system and WG system generate only electrical energy. Therefore we proposed a power supply system composed of PV, WG and heat pump to convert a part of electrical energy to thermal energy. It is important to clear the proper system capacity, operational method of heat pump in this system. As a first step, we studied those items on this system without energy storage system by a simulation. We found that proper operational method of heat pump is affected by capacity of RE system and WG system is useful more than PV system.

  12. Fundamentals of Mold Free Casting: Experimental and Computational Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Ceccio, Steven

    1997-01-01

    Researchers are developing the technology of 'Ballistic Particle Manufacturing' (BPM) in which individual drops are precisely layered onto a substrate, and the drops are deposited so as to prevent splatting. These individual drops will ultimately be combined to form a net-shape, three-dimensional object. Our understanding of controlled drop deposition as applied to BPM is far from complete. Process parameters include the size and temperature of the liquid metal drop, its impact velocity and trajectory, and the condition and temperature of the substrate. Quantitative knowledge of the fluid mechanics and heat transfer of drop deposition and solidification are necessary to fully optimize the manufacturing process and to control the material microstructure of the final part. The object of this study is to examine the dynamics of liquid metal drops as they impinge upon a solid surface and solidify under conditions consistent with BPM (i.e. conditions which produce non-splatting drops). A program of both numerical simulations and experiments will be conducted. Questions this study will address include the following: How do the deformation and solidification of the drop depend on the properties of the fluid drop and the solid substrate? How does the presence of previously deposited drops affect the impingement and solidification process? How does the impingement of the new drop affect already deposited material? How does the cooling rate and solidification of the drops influence the material microstructure?

  13. Fundamental studies of biodegradable hydrogels as cartilage replacement materials.

    PubMed

    Metters, A T; Anseth, K S; Bowman, C N

    1999-01-01

    Through intelligent control of monomer chemistry and gelling techniques, biodegradable hydrogels with a range of mechanical strengths and degradation timescales have been constructed. A diacrylated, copoly(ethylene glycol-b-dl-lactic acid) (PEG-b-PLA) macromer was used to produce synthetic networks with equilibrium water contents (EWC) above 70% and initial compressive moduli values exceeding 1 MPa, demonstrating its viability as a cartilage replacement material. Experiments have shown that the mechanical strengths, EWCs, and useful lifetimes of these water-swellable networks are coupled to their copolymer chemistry as well as their processing conditions. A systematic study utilizing photopolymerized gels has been undertaken to elucidate the controlling factors behind the bulk-degradation process, as well as monitor changes in network structure with degradation. A statistical model will be used in conjunction with the experimental data to explain the exponential modulus decay and complex mass loss behavior observed during degradation for these hydrogels. PMID:11143373

  14. Fundamental ignition study for material fire safety improvement, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K. L.; Zung, L. B.

    1970-01-01

    The investigation of preignition, ignition, and combustion characteristics of Delrin (acetate terminated polyformaldehyde) and Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene) resins in air and oxygen are presented. The determination of ignition limits and their dependence on temperature and the oxidizing media, as well as the analyses of the volatiles produced, were studied. Tests were conducted in argon, an inert medium in which only purely pyrolytic reactions can take place, using the stagnation burner arrangement designed and constructed for this purpose. A theoretical treatment of the ignition and combination phenomena was devised. In the case of Delrin the ignition and ignition delays are apparently independent of the gas (air, oxygen) temperatures. The results indicate that hydrogen is the ignition triggering agent. Teflon ignition limits were established in oxygen only.

  15. Fundamental studies of the solid-particle erosion of silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Routbort, J. L.; Scattergood, R. O.

    1982-01-01

    The predictions of the theories of solid-particle erosion of brittle materials are compared to experimental results of studies in which angular Al2O3 particles with mean diameters D of 23 to 270 microns are used to erode (111) surfaces of silicon single crystals at impact angles alpha from 20 to 90 deg and velocities v from 30 to 150 m/s. The description of the steady state erosion rate by a power law, delta W varies directly as (v sin alpha)(n)D(m) must be modified to include threshold and plasticity effects. Furthermore the velocity exponent n depends on D. Results using abrasives of different sizes mixed together can be explained using a logarithmic-normal distribution. The results of transient experiments can be used to explain the synergistic effects which are observed using a biomodal distribution of abrasives.

  16. Fundamental study of evaporation model in micron pore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oinuma, Ryoji

    As the demand for high performance small electronic devices has increased, heat removal from these devices for space use is approaching critical limits. A heat pipe is a promising device to enhance the heat removal performance due to the phase change phenomena for space thermal management system. Even though a heat pipe has a big potential to remove the thermal energy from a high heat flux source, the heat removal performance of heat pipes cannot be predicted well since the first principle of evaporation has not been established. The purpose of this study is to establish a method to apply the evaporation model based on the statistical rate theory for engineering application including vapor-liquid-structure intermolecular effect. The evaporation model is applied to the heat pipe performance analysis through a pressure balance and an energy balance in the loop heat pipe.

  17. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Bassilakis, R.; Kroo, E.

    1989-01-01

    Most of the proposed processing schemes for improving liquefaction yields involve favoring bond-breaking and radical stabilization reactions over the retrograde reactions. The retrograde reactions are often encountered before liquefaction temperatures are reached. The objective of this program is to elucidate and model the retrograde reaction chemistry in direct coal liquefaction through the application of experimental techniques and theoretical models which have been successfully employed at Advanced Fuel Research (AFR) and SRI International (a subcontractor) to understand and predict coal reaction behavior. The study of retrograde reactions is being done using an integrated approach using extensive characterization of the liquefaction chemistry of three kinds of systems: (1) model polymers; (2) coal; and (3) modified coals.

  18. A fundamental aeroservoelastic study combining unsteady CFD with adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, P.; Guillot, Damien M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a two-dimensional aeroservoelastic study in the time domain. The model, which is based on exact inviscid aerodynamics, correctly represents the large amplitude motions and the associated strong shock dynamics in the transonic regime. The aeroservoelastic system consists of a two degree-of-freedom airfoil with a trailing edge control surface. Using first-order actuator dynamics, a digital adaptive controller is applied to provide active flutter suppression. Comparisons between time-responses of the open-loop and closed loop systems show the ability of the trailing edge control surface to suppress non-linear transonic aeroelastic phenomena. A relation between actuator dynamics, sampling time-step and limits on the flap deflection angle to guarantee the effectiveness of the adaptive controller was demonstrated by the results generated.

  19. Fundamental limits of optical critical dimension metrology: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, Richard; Germer, Thomas; Attota, Ravikiran; Barnes, Bryan M.; Bunday, Benjamin; Allgair, John; Marx, Egon; Jun, Jay

    2007-03-01

    This paper is a comprehensive summary and analysis of a SEMATECH funded project to study the limits of optical critical dimension scatterometry (OCD). The project was focused on two primary elements: 1) the comparison, stability, and validity of industry models and 2) a comprehensive analysis of process stacks to evaluate the ultimate sensitivity and limits of OCD. Modeling methods are a requirement for the interpretation and quantitative analysis of scatterometry data. The four models evaluated show good agreement over a range of targets and geometries for zero order specular reflection as well as higher order diffraction. A number of process stacks and geometries representing semiconductor manufacturing nodes from the 45 nm node to the 18 nm node were simulated using several measurement modalities including angle-resolved scatterometry and spectrally-resolved scatterometry, measuring various combinations of intensity and polarization. It is apparent in the results that large differences are observed between those methods that rely upon unpolarized and single polarization measurements. Using the three parameter fits and assuming that the sensitivity of scatterometry must meet the criterion that the 3σ uncertainty in the bottom dimension must be less than 2% of the linewidth, specular scatterometry solutions exist for all but the isolated lines at 18 nm node. Scatterometry does not have sufficient sensitivity for isolated and semi-isolated lines at the 18 nm node unless the measurement uses wavelengths as short as 200 nm or 150 nm and scans over large angle ranges.

  20. Fundamental Studies of Crystal Growth of Microporous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Ramsharan; Doolittle, John, Jr.; Payra, Pramatha; Dutta, Prabir K.; George, Michael A.; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Schoeman, Brian J.

    2003-01-01

    Microporous materials are framework structures with well-defined porosity, often of molecular dimensions. Zeolites contain aluminum and silicon atoms in their framework and are the most extensively studied amongst all microporous materials. Framework structures with P, Ga, Fe, Co, Zn, B, Ti and a host of other elements have also been made. Typical synthesis of microporous materials involve mixing the framework elements (or compounds, thereof) in a basic solution, followed by aging in some cases and then heating at elevated temperatures. This process is termed hydrothermal synthesis, and involves complex chemical and physical changes. Because of a limited understanding of this process, most synthesis advancements happen by a trial and error approach. There is considerable interest in understanding the synthesis process at a molecular level with the expectation that eventually new framework structures will be built by design. The basic issues in the microporous materials crystallization process include: (a) Nature of the molecular units responsible for the crystal nuclei formation; (b) Nature of the nuclei and nucleation process; (c) Growth process of the nuclei into crystal; (d) Morphological control and size of the resulting crystal; (e) Surface structure of the resulting crystals; and (f) Transformation of frameworks into other frameworks or condensed structures.

  1. Fundamental studies of MALDI with an orthogonal TOF mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Hui

    The interaction between the matrix and analyte molecules are studied with a high resolution MALDI imaging technique in an orthogonal-injection time of flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The analyte incorporation and distribution patterns have been clearly demonstrated. Purified protein analytes were found to be homogeneously incorporated in large single crystals of DHB and sinapinic acid matrices, with no evidence for preferred crystal faces. Segregation of some species was observed and appeared to correlate with analyte hydrophobicity, and to a lesser extent analyte mass or mobility. Similar segregation phenomena were observed with confocal laser scanning microscopy of the same analytes labeled with fluorescent dyes in 2,5-DHB single crystals. The above investigations may shed some light on optimizing sample preparation with different matrices. The influence of incident laser parameters on sensitivity in MALDI has been investigated using orthogonal-injection TOF instruments. A qualitative comparison was first made between the beam profiles obtained with a N 2 laser and a Nd:YAG laser using 2-m long optical fibers. The N 2 laser gives better sensitivity, consistent with a more uniform fluence distribution and therefore better coverage of the N2 laser profile. Most of the difference disappears when a 30-m long fiber is used or when the fibers are twisted during irradiation to smooth out the fluence distribution. In more systematic measurements, the total integrated ion yield from a single spot (a measure of sensitivity) was found to increase rapidly with fluence to a maximum, and then saturate or decrease slightly. Thus, the optimum sensitivity is achieved at high fluence. For a fluence near threshold, the integrated yield has a steep (cubic) dependence on the spot size, but the yield saturates at higher fluence for smaller spots. The area dependence is much weaker (close to linear) for fluence values above saturation, with the result that the highest integrated yields

  2. A Fundamental Study of Nucleate Pool Boiling Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ervin, Jamie S.; Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study of incipient boiling in short-term microgravity and with a/g = +/- 1 for pool boiling was performed. Calibrated thin gold films sputtered on a smoothly polished quartz surface were used simultaneously for thermal-resistance measurements and heating of the boiling surface. The gold films were used for both transient and quasi-steady heating surface temperature measurements. Two test vessels were constructed for precise measurement and control of fluid temperature and pressure: a laboratory pool boiling vessel for the a/g = +/- 1 experiments and a pool boiling vessel designed for the 131 m free-fall in the NASA Lewis Research Center Microgravity Research Facility for the microgravity tests. Measurements included the heater surface temperature, the pressure near the heating surface, the bulk liquid temperatures. High speed photography (up to 1,000 frames per second) was used in the experiments. With high quality microgravity and the measured initial temperature of the quiescent test fluid, R113, the temperature distribution in the liquid at the moment of boiling inception resulting from an imposed step in heat flux is known with a certainty not possible previously. The types of boiling propagation across the large flat heating surface, some observed here for the first time, are categorized; the conditions necessary for their occurrence are described. Explosive boiling propagation with a striking pattern of small scale protuberances over the entire vapor mass periphery not observed previously at low heat flux levels (on the order of 5 W/cm(exp 2)) is described. For the heater surface with a/g = -1, a step in the heater surface temperature of short duration was imposed. The resulting liquid temperature distribution at the moment of boiling inception was different from that obtained with a step in heat flux.

  3. A fundamental study of nucleate pool boiling under microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ervin, Jamie S.; Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study of incipient boiling in short-term microgravity and with a/g = +/- 1 for pool boiling was performed. Calibrated thin gold films sputtered on a smoothly polished quartz surface were used simultaneously for thermal resistance measurements and heating of the boiling surface. The gold films were used for both transient and quasi-steady heating surface temperature measurements. Two test vessels were constructed for precise measurement and control of fluid temperature and pressure: a laboratory pool boiling vessel for the a/g = +/- experiments and a pool boiling vessel designed for the 131 m free-fall in the NASA Lewis Research Center Microgravity Research Facility for the microgravity tests. Measurements included the heater surface temperature, the pressure near the heating surface, and the bulk liquid temperatures. High speed photography was used in the experiments. With high quality microgravity and the measured initial temperature of the quiescent test fluid, R113, the temperature distribution in the liquid at the moment of boiling inception resulting from an imposed step in heat flux is known with a certainty not possible previously. The types of boiling propagation across the large flat heating surface are categorized; the conditions necessary for their occurrence are described. Explosive boiling propagation with a striking pattern of small scale protuberances over the entire vapor mass periphery not observed previously at low heat flux levels is described. For the heater surface with a/g = -1, a step in the heater surface temperature of short duration was imposed. The resulting liquid temperature distribution at the moment of boiling inception was different from that obtained with a step in heat flux.

  4. Fundamental Study of Material Flow in Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Anthony P.

    1999-01-01

    The presented research project consists of two major parts. First, the material flow in solid-state, friction stir, butt-welds as been investigated using a marker insert technique. Changes in material flow due to welding parameter as well as tool geometry variations have been examined for different materials. The method provides a semi-quantitative, three-dimensional view of the material transport in the welded zone. Second, a FSW process model has been developed. The fully coupled model is based on fluid mechanics; the solid-state material transport during welding is treated as a laminar, viscous flow of a non-Newtonian fluid past a rotating circular cylinder. The heat necessary for the material softening is generated by deformation of the material. As a first step, a two-dimensional model, which contains only the pin of the FSW tool, has been created to test the suitability of the modeling approach and to perform parametric studies of the boundary conditions. The material flow visualization experiments agree very well with the predicted flow field. Accordingly, material within the pin diameter is transported only in the rotation direction around the pin. Due to the simplifying assumptions inherent in the 2-D model, other experimental data such as forces on the pin, torque, and weld energy cannot be directly used for validation. However, the 2-D model predicts the same trends as shown in the experiments. The model also predicts a deviation from the "normal" material flow at certain combinations of welding parameters, suggesting a possible mechanism for the occurrence of some typical FSW defects. The next step has been the development of a three-dimensional process model. The simplified FSW tool has been designed as a flat shoulder rotating on the top of the workpiece and a rotating, cylindrical pin, which extends throughout the total height of the flow domain. The thermal boundary conditions at the tool and at the contact area to the backing plate have been varied

  5. Structure Property Studies for Additively Manufactured Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Milenski, Helen M; Schmalzer, Andrew Michael; Kelly, Daniel

    2015-08-17

    Since the invention of modern Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes engineers and designers have worked hard to capitalize on the unique building capabilities that AM allows. By being able to customize the interior fill of parts it is now possible to design components with a controlled density and customized internal structure. The creation of new polymers and polymer composites allow for even greater control over the mechanical properties of AM parts. One of the key reasons to explore AM, is to bring about a new paradigm in part design, where materials can be strategically optimized in a way that conventional subtractive methods cannot achieve. The two processes investigated in my research were the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process and the Direct Ink Write (DIW) process. The objectives of the research were to determine the impact of in-fill density and morphology on the mechanical properties of FDM parts, and to determine if DIW printed samples could be produced where the filament diameter was varied while the overall density remained constant.

  6. A Fundamental Study of Laser Beam Welding Aluminum-Lithium Alloy 2195 for Cryogenic Tank Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martukanitz, R. P.; Jan. R.

    1996-01-01

    Based on the potential for decreasing costs of joining stiffeners to skin by laser beam welding, a fundamental research program was conducted to address the impediments identified during an initial study involving laser beam welding of aluminum-lithium alloys. Initial objectives of the program were the identification of governing mechanism responsible for process related porosity while establishing a multivariant relationship between process parameters and fusion zone geometry for laser beam welds of alloy 2195. A three-level fractional factorial experiment was conducted to establish quantitative relationships between primary laser beam processing parameters and critical weld attributes. Although process consistency appeared high for welds produced during partial completion of this study, numerous cracks on the top-surface of the welds were discovered during visual inspection and necessitated additional investigations concerning weld cracking. Two experiments were conducted to assess the effect of filler alloy additions on crack sensitivity: the first experiment was used to ascertain the effects of various filler alloys on cracking and the second experiment involved modification to process parameters for increasing filler metal dilution. Results indicated that filler alloys 4047 and 4145 showed promise for eliminating cracking.

  7. Fundamental combustion studies of emulsified fuels. Annual progress report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, I M

    1980-01-01

    A research program in the Fuels Research Laboratory at Princeton University has provided fundamental information on the combustion properties of emulsions and multi-component fuel mixtures. Particular attention has been given to understanding the phenomenon of micro-explosions and disruptive combustion. Earlier work which investigated the behavior of n-paraffin and water emulsions, binary mixtures of n-paraffins, and solutions of alcohol with n-paraffins has been completed and is now published in the open literature. This work has been extended during the current contract period to the study of the droplet combustion of a No. 2 fuel oil. Both emulsions with water and solutions of alcohols were investigated and very useful data were generated with regard to the optimization of the disruption phenomenon in terms of additive content. In addition, some preliminary work has been done with micro-emulsions. This indicated the importance of further work to elucidate the role of surfactant loading. Theoretical work on the growth of gaseous bubbles in fuel droplets has helped to define some of the controlling parameters in the disruption phenomenon. Finally the design of a new free droplet apparatus has been completed and a novel optical diagnostic technique for droplet sizing is near completion. This program has generated information which is of general interest in the field of droplet combustion and represents a considerable advance in our understanding of fuel related combustion phenomena.

  8. A Study of 8 Fundamental Moral Characteristics among Thai Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngammuk, Patariya

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the eight fundamental moral characteristics of undergraduate students in order to benefit instructional model development. The eight moral characteristics are diligence, frugality, honesty, discipline, politeness, cleanliness, unity and generosity. The study findings rank these eight moral characteristics…

  9. Fundamental study on the application of liquid crystals to actuator devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan; Tsuji, Tomohiro; Chono, Shigeomi

    2016-07-01

    In a fundamental study to develop liquid crystal microactuators, we prepared a sandwich cell with a movable upper plate and used backflow induced by applying repetitively a rectangular wave voltage to drive the upper plate in its plane. We used 4-cyano-4'-pentyl biphenyl, a low-molar-mass nematic liquid crystal. The speed of the plate depends significantly on the frequency of the applied voltage. With specific settings of applied voltage, duty ratio, plate gap, and upper plate mass, the speed increases with increasing frequency, attaining a maximum value of 120 μm/s at 175 Hz. Further increases in frequency, however, produce a gradual decrease in plate speed because the molecules of the liquid crystal respond too slowly to the change in voltage at the higher frequencies. In addition, to expand the field of application of liquid crystal actuators, we performed an experiment to control the direction of movement of the upper plate by patterning the electrodes and the alignment layer to govern the orientation of molecules at the walls. The plate changes its direction smoothly with quick responses at each switching, but its speed is reduced compared with the unidirectional actuators over the entire frequency range.

  10. Fundamental mechanistic studies in formic acid decomposition on transition metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-03-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is a simple molecule that is an abundant product of biomass processing and can serve as an internal source of hydrogen for oxygen removal and upgrading of biomass to chemicals and fuels. In addition, HCOOH can be used as a fuel for low temperature direct fuel cells. We present a systematic study of the HCOOH decomposition reaction mechanism starting from first-principles and including reactivity experiments and microkinetic modeling. In particular, periodic self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations are performed to determine the stability of reactive intermediates and activation energy barriers of elementary steps. Pre-exponential factors are determined from vibrational frequency calculations. Mean-field microkinetic models are developed and calculated reaction rates and reaction orders are then compared with experimentally measured ones. These comparisons provide useful insights on the nature of the active site, most-abundant surface intermediates as a function of reaction conditions and feed composition. Trends across metals on the fundamental atomic-scale level up to selectivity trends will be discussed. Finally, we identify from first-principles alloy surfaces, which may possess better catalytic properties for selective dehydrogenation of HCOOH than monometallic surfaces, thereby guiding synthesis towards promising novel catalytic materials. Work supported as part of the Institute of Atom-efficient Chemical Transformation (IACT), an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  11. A Study of Thermal Analyses and Fundamental Combustion Characteristics for Thermal Utility with Biomass Volatile Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, Tamio; Namba, Kunihiko; Sano, Hiroshi

    Based on un-use biomass utilities, Carbonized technology is noticed as material utilities and solid fuel. Therefore, this technology is tackling by national project as large-scale utilities. But, this technology is dehydrated volatiles matter during carbonized from biomass. Especially, Woody tar into one of volatile matter has vicious handling to get into trouble in carbonized equipment. In this study, we propose to get fundamental knowledge for effective thermal utility through thermal decompositions and fundamental combustion properties on experimental results. Woody tar has high caloric value (approximately 30MJ/kg) and high carbon ration. On the other hand, a woody vinegar liquid has thermal decomposition property close to water property with heat absorption as evaporation latent heat of water. In fundamental combustion experimental result, a woody tar has fl ammable combustion and surface combustion. Especially, a total combustion and ignition time properties has hyperbola relation to environment temperatures in furnace.

  12. Fundamental study of the austenite formation and decomposition in low-silicon, aluminum added TRIP steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Enrique

    2005-11-01

    TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels are under development for automotive applications that require high strength and excellent formability. Conventional TRIP steels consist of a multiphase microstructure comprised of a ferrite matrix with a dispersion of bainite and metastable retained austenite. The high ductility exhibited by these steels results from the transformation of the metastable retained austenite to martensite during straining. In conventional TRIP steel processing, the multiphase microstructure is obtained by controlled cooling from the alpha + gamma region to an isothermal holding temperature. During this holding, bainite forms and carbon is rejected out into the austenite, which lowers the Ms temperature and stabilizes the austenite to room temperature. In this research project, a fundamental study of a low-Si, Mo-Nb added cold rolled TRIP steel with and without Al additions was conducted. In this study, the recrystallization of cold-rolled ferrite, the formation of austenite during intercritical annealing and the characteristics of the decomposition of the intercritically annealed austenite by controlled cooling rates were systematically assessed. Of special interest were: (i) the effect of the initial hot band microstructure, (ii) the formation of epitaxial ferrite during cooling from the intercritical annealing temperature to the isothermal holding temperature, (iii) the influence of the intercritically annealed austenite on the formation of bainite during the isothermal holding temperature, and (iv) the influence of the processing variables on the type, amount, composition and stability of the retained austenite. During this research study, techniques such as OM, SEM, EBSD, TEM, XRD and Magnetometry were used to fully characterize the microstructures. Furthermore, a Gleeble 3500 unit at US Steel Laboratories was used for dilatometry studies and to simulate different CGL processing routes, from which specimens were obtained to evaluate

  13. Damage analysis and fundamental studies. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    This report is the twelfth in a series of Quarterly Technical Progress Reports on Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies (DAFS) which is one element of the Fusion Reactor Materials Program, conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The first eight reports in this series were numbered DOE/ET-0065/1 through 8.

  14. Organic Chemistry Educators' Perspectives on Fundamental Concepts and Misconceptions: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duis, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    An exploratory study was conducted with 23 organic chemistry educators to discover what general chemistry concepts they typically review, the concepts they believe are fundamental to introductory organic chemistry, the topics students find most difficult in the subject, and the misconceptions they observe in undergraduate organic chemistry…

  15. Fundamental Frequency Variation with an Electrolarynx Improves Speech Understanding: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Peter J.; Schlauch, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the effect of fundamental frequency (F0) variation on the intelligibility of speech in an alaryngeal talker who used an electrolarynx (EL). Method: One experienced alaryngeal talker produced variable F0 and a constant F0 with his EL as he read sentences aloud. As a control, a group of sentences with variable F0 was…

  16. IR spectroscopic study of hydroxyl groups of molecular sieves in the fundamental and combination tone regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, E.; Zscherpel, U.; Peuker, Ch.; Staudte, B.

    1993-03-01

    The fundamental and combination vibrations of hydroxyl groups in zeolites (Y, ZSM-5) and silicoaluminophosphates (SAPO-5, -17, -34) are investigated. The influence of adsorbed molecules (C 6F 6, n-hexane) on the combination vibrations is also studied. Finally, remarks on quantitative evaluation of DRIFT spectra of NaHZSM-5 containing different amounts of bridging OH groups are given.

  17. Additional Treatments Offer Little Benefit for Pancreatic Cancer: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... 158633.html Additional Treatments Offer Little Benefit for Pancreatic Cancer: Study Neither extra chemotherapy drug nor add-on ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Additional treatments for locally advanced pancreatic cancer don't appear to boost survival, a new ...

  18. First Principles Studies of Tapered Silicon Nanowires: Fundamental Insights and Practical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhigang

    2008-03-01

    Nanowires (NWs) are often observed experimentally to be tapered rather than straight-edged, with diameters (d) shrinking by as much as 1 nm per 10 nm of vertical growth. Previous theoretical studies have examined the electronic properties of straight-edged nanowires (SNWs), although the effects of tapering on quantum confinement may be of both fundamental and practical importance. We have employed ab initio calculations to study the structural and electronic properties of tapered Si NWs. As one may expect, tapered nanowires (TNWs) possess axially-dependent electronic properties; their local energy gaps vary along the wire axis, with the largest gap occurring at the narrowest point of the wire. In contrast to SNWs, where confinement tends to shift valence bands more than conduction bands away from the bulk gap, the unoccupied states in TNWs are much more sensitive to d than the occupied states. In addition, tapering causes the band-edge states to be spatially separated along the wire axis, a consequence of the interplay between a strong variation in quantum confinement strength with diameter and the tapering-induced charge transfer. This property may be exploited in electronic and optical applications, for example, in photovoltaic devices where the separation of the valence and conduction band states could be used to transport excited charges during the thermalization process. In order to gain insight into TNW photovoltaic properties, we have also carried out calculations of the dipole matrix elements near the band edges as well as the role of metal contacts on TNW electronic properties. Finally, a combination of ab initio total energy calculations and classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are employed to suggest a new technique for bringing nanoscale objects together to form ordered, ultra high-aspect ratio nanowires. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  19. A Study of Additional Costs of Second Language Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Nelly

    A study was conducted whose primary aim was to identify and explain additional costs incurred by Alberta, Canada school jurisdictions providing second language instruction in 1980. Additional costs were defined as those which would not have been incurred had the second language program not been in existence. Three types of additional costs were…

  20. Fundamental study about CO2 laser welding of titanium aluminide intermetallic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Gaku; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Nanri, Kenzo; Ootani, Masanori; Tetsuka, Masato; Seto, Sachio; Arai, Mikiya; Fujioka, Tomoo

    2000-11-01

    Titanium aluminide intermetallic compound is attracting attentions as heat-resistant and high-specific strength material in the next generation, especially, it is promising material in the field of aerospace components. Conventional machining process including welding, however, can be hardly applied due to its very low ductility. The objective of this study, as a first stage, is to find out paying attention to crack and hardness the fundamental good conditions of the bead-on-plate welding of TiAl intermetallic compound using CO2 laser irradiation. In the experiment, we used the casting gamma titanium aluminide contained iron, vanadium and boron with a thickness of 2mm. We carried out bead-on-plate laser welding in the titanium aluminide material in inert gas environment filled with argon. We measured fused depth, Vickers hardness, transverse crack numbers and so on as major parameters of welding speed from 1000 to 4600 mm/min and initial temperature of specimen from R.T. to 873 K with a beam spot size of 0.5 mm and an output power of 1.5 kW. In addition, the specimens were analyzed by Electron Probe X-ray Micro Analyzer, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffractometry. As a result of experiments, transverse crack-free welding was achieved, when initial temperature was at 873 K. In every condition, the value of Vickers hardness of fused zone increased compared with base. We think the reason of it is an increase of (alpha) 2(Ti3Al) phase, which is caused by rapid cooling, taking in Oxygen, fine structure and so on.

  1. Feasibility Study for a Plasma Dynamo Facility to Investigate Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Cary B.

    2013-09-19

    The scientific equipment purchased on this grant was used on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment as part of Professor Forest's feasibility study for determining if it would be worthwhile to propose building a larger plasma physics experiment to investigate various fundamental processes in plasma astrophysics. The initial research on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment was successful so Professor Forest and Professor Ellen Zweibel at UW-Madison submitted an NSF Major Research Instrumentation proposal titled "ARRA MRI: Development of a Plasma Dynamo Facility for Experimental Investigations of Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics." They received funding for this project and the Plasma Dynamo Facility also known as the "Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment" was constructed. This experiment achieved its first plasma in the fall of 2012 and U.S. Dept. of Energy Grant No. DE-SC0008709 "Experimental Studies of Plasma Dynamos," now supports the research.

  2. Fundamental study of droplet spray characteristics in photomask cleaning for advanced lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C. L.; Yu, C. H.; Liu, W. H.; Hsu, Luke; Chin, Angus; Lee, S. C.; Yen, Anthony; Lee, Gaston; Dress, Peter; Singh, Sherjang; Dietze, Uwe

    2010-09-01

    The fundamentals of droplet-based cleaning of photomasks are investigated and performance regimes that enable the use of binary spray technologies in advanced mask cleaning are identified. Using phase Doppler anemometry techniques, the effect of key performance parameters such as liquid and gas flow rates and temperature, nozzle design, and surface distance on droplet size, velocity, and distributions were studied. The data are correlated to particle removal efficiency (PRE) and feature damage results obtained on advanced photomasks for 193-nm immersion lithography.

  3. Fundamental Symmetries and Interactions Studied with Radioactive Isotopes in Atom Traps

    SciTech Connect

    Wilschut, H.W.

    2005-11-21

    The structure of certain nuclei and atoms allow one to study fundamental symmetries and interactions. In this review we consider the search for Time-Reversal invariance Violation (TRV). We consider two options: TRV in {beta} decay or the search for the forbidden Electric Dipole Moment (EDM). In both cases atomic trapping can be an appropriate tool. For {beta} decay radioactive isotopes are necessary, but also for EDM searches they appear to be useful.

  4. Real-Time X-Ray Transmission Microscopy for Fundamental Studies Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William F.; Sen, Subhayu; Peters, Palmer

    1998-01-01

    High resolution real-time X-ray Transmission Microscopy, XTM, has been applied to obtain information fundamental to solidification of optically opaque metallic systems. We have previously reported the measurement of solute profile in the liquid, phase growth, and detailed solid-liquid interfacial morphology of aluminum based alloys with exposure times less than 2 seconds. Recent advances in XTM furnace design have provided an increase in real-time magnification (during solidification) for the XTM from 4OX to 16OX. The increased magnification has enabled for the first time the XTM imaging of real-time growth of fibers and particles with diameters of 5 micrometers. We have applied this system to study of the kinetics of formation and morphological evolution of secondary fibers and particles in Al-Bi monotectic alloys to observe a previously unreported velocity dependent thermo-capillary depletion mechanism for Bi rich liquid which can penetrate many fiber diameters into the solid-liquid interface. In this talk we will discuss application of the XTM to the study the fundamentals of monotectic and eutectic solidification, the enhancement of XTM data with precise solid liquid interfacial temperature and thermal gradient measurement techniques, and the application of this technology to the study of the fundamentals of solidification in microgravity,

  5. Fundamental Studies of the Durability of Materials for Interconnects in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick S. Pettit; Gerald H. Meier

    2006-06-30

    Ferritic stainless steels are a leading candidate material for use as an SOFC interconnect, but have the problem of forming volatile chromia species that lead to cathode poisoning. This project has focused both on optimization of ferritic alloys for SOFC applications and evaluating the possibility of using alternative materials. The initial efforts involved studying the oxidation behavior of a variety of chromia-forming ferritic stainless steels in the temperature range 700-900 C in atmospheres relevant to solid oxide fuel cell operation. The alloys exhibited a wide variety of oxidation behavior based on composition. A method for reducing the vaporization is to add alloying elements that lead to the formation of a thermally grown oxide layer over the protective chromia. Several commercial steels form manganese chromate on the surface. This same approach, combined with observations of TiO{sub 2} overlayer formation on the chromia forming, Ni-based superalloy IN 738, has resulted in the development of a series of Fe-22 Cr-X Ti alloys (X=0-4 wt%). Oxidation testing has indicated that this approach results in significant reduction in chromia evaporation. Unfortunately, the Ti also results in accelerated chromia scale growth. Fundamental thermo-mechanical aspects of the durability of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnect alloys have also been investigated. A key failure mechanism for interconnects is the spallation of the chromia scale that forms on the alloy, as it is exposed to fuel cell environments. Indentation testing methods to measure the critical energy release rate (Gc) associated with the spallation of chromia scale/alloy systems have been evaluated. This approach has been used to evaluate the thermomechanical stability of chromia films as a function of oxidation exposure. The oxidation of pure nickel in SOFC environments was evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to determine the NiO scaling kinetics and a four-point probe was used to measure

  6. Fundamental and magnetic-hardening studies of nanocrystalline and nanocomposite magnets. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sellmyer, D.J.; Hadjipanayis, G.C.

    1998-12-19

    In this project the authors study new nanocrystalline and nanocomposite structures that have high potential for permanent-magnet development. These materials, which can be synthesized to have either very high or intermediate coercivities, have many applications in electric power, transportation, and information-storage industries. There is great interest in further development of understanding and application of these materials. Brief discussions are given for the following research highlights: (A) Fundamental electronic, magnetic and micromagnetic studies; (B) Intrinsic and magnet hardening studies of carbides and alloys; and (C) Nanostructured and nanocomposite films.

  7. Fundamental studies of water oxidation at model hematite electrodes prepared by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klahr, Benjamin M.

    water oxidation mechanism is proposed to interpret these results. In addition, fundamental studies of hematite electrodes coated with the phosphate mediated cobalt oxide catalyst were performed. The catalyst was found to reduce the surface recombination mentioned above. However, oxidized cobalt oxide was still subject to electron recombination at low applied potentials. This recombination was reduced with the use of an alumina blocking layer, which resulted in a modified hematite electrode capable of oxidizing water with a near unity charge collection efficiency at low applied potentials.

  8. Fundamental Study on the Effect of High Frequency Vibration on Ride Comfort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Chizuru; Shimamune, Ryohei; Watanabe, Ken; Suzuki, Erimitsu

    To develop a more suitable method of evaluating ride comfort of high speed trains, a fundamental study was conducted on sensitivity of passengers to various frequencies of vibration with respect to ride comfort. Experiments were performed on 55 subjects using an electrodynamic vibration system that can generate vibrations in the frequency range of 1 to 80 Hz in the vertical direction. Results of experiments indicated that the subjects tend to experience greater discomfort when exposed to high frequency vibrations than that presumed by the conventional Japanese ride comfort assessment method, the "Ride Comfort Level."

  9. Long-term field study of sea kraits in New Caledonia: fundamental issues and conservation.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Xavier

    2012-08-01

    This short review focuses on the findings associated with a long-term field study on two species of sea kraits in New Caledonia. Since 2002, more than 30 sites in the lagoon have been sampled, and in most places mark-recapture was implemented. We collected detailed data on more than 14,000 marked individuals (>6000 recaptures) and used different techniques (stable isotopes, bio-logging, analyses of diet). The objective was fundamental: to examine how amphibious snakes cope with both terrestrial and aquatic environments. As access to abundant food is likely the main evolutionary driver for the return transition toward the sea in marine tetrapods, foraging ecology was an important part of the research and novel information was obtained on this subject. Rapidly however, field observations revealed the potential interest of sea kraits for conservation issues. Our results show that these snakes are useful bio-indicators of marine biodiversity; they also provide a useful signal to monitor levels of contamination by heavy metals in the lagoon, and more generally as a means of studying the functioning of reef ecosystems. Importantly, anecdotal observations (e.g., a krait drinking during rain) provided unsuspected physiological insights of general importance to fundamental problems and conservation. One of the lessons of this long-term study is that key results emerged in an unexpected way, but all were dependent on intensive field work. PMID:22576814

  10. Fundamental Study of Micro-Defects in Electropolished EB-Welded and Hydroformed SRF Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sumption, Mike

    2014-08-29

    In the area of niobium elecropolishing fundamentals, we focused on understanding the influence of the surface topology, and geometry (with effects from gravity included. The formation of a viscous film is essential for the electropolishing process to take place. The exact nature and composition of the film formed on niobium is still unknown because of its solubility in the electrolyte. Extensive pitting may take place at surface where a stable film cannot form. This has to be taken into consideration while determining the speed with which the SRF cavities are rotated while EP. Hydrodynamic aspects must be taken into consideration while optimizing the polishing parameters. There is improvement in surface finish with polishing time. There is a huge change in surface quality when the EP time is increased from 2 hours to 4 hours but not much change takes place when the time is further increased to 6 hours. So keeping the economic points in view, about 100 um defect layer removal may be sufficient to get the desired performance. In the area of Electropolishing of untreated and treated niobium with Weld Joints we studied untreated and treated Nb, especially for the heat affected areas next to welded bumps, electropolished for different durations. The electropolishing of the untreated Nb caused the formation of pits on the surface at about 15 min but they disappeared when the electropolishing duration was more than 15 min. Electropolishing for 120 min smoothened the surface of untreated Nb by levelling the surface, but the severe formation of pits on the whole surface was found after 240 min. The treatment of Nb significantly changed the Nb surface morphology which was covered by grains of different size that looked light or dark in the optical microscope. The treated Nb was susceptible to pitting during the entire electropolishing starting from 15 min and the dark grains had more susceptibility to pitting than the light grains. In addition, electropolishing for 240 min

  11. CrossFit athletes exhibit high symmetry of fundamental movement patterns. A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Tafuri, Silvio; Notarnicola, Angela; Monno, Antonello; Ferretti, Francesco; Moretti, Biagio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background even if CrossFit training programs accounted actually more than 7500 gyms affiliated in the USA and more than 2000 in Europe and involved today more than 1 million of people, actually there were not several studies about the effect of the CrossFit on the health and sport performance. The aim of these research was to evaluate the performance in 7 fundamental movement patterns using a standardized methods, the Functional Movement Screen (FMS). Methods we enrolled three groups of athletes (age 17–40 years; >6 months of training programs): CrossFitters, body builders and professional weightlifters. FMS test was performed to all people enrolled. Scores of FMS test was examined comparing three groups. Results no differences in the three groups were showed in the mean score values of each test and in total score, except for shoulder mobility test (higher among CrossFitters) and trunk stability push-up test (higher among weightlifter). Agreement between the test performed on the two sides was higher in CrossFit groups for hurdle step (93.2%), in line lung (86%), rotary stability test (95.3%) and shoulder mobility (90.7%; p<0.001). Conclusions CrossFitters seem to have a high level of concordance in the scores achieved in bilateral test. CrossFit seems to produce marked symmetry in some fundamental movements compared to weightlifting and bodybuilding. PMID:27331045

  12. Status of efforts on fundamental and applied studies with tritium at RFNC-VNIIEF

    SciTech Connect

    Yukhimchuk, A.A.; Ilkaev, R.I.

    2015-03-15

    This paper gives an overview of the efforts in the field of fundamental and applied physics with tritium carried out with the participation of RFNC-VNIIEF in 2007-2013. New physical results in the study of muon-catalyzed fusion and neutron-excess nuclei are presented; a project of a new experiment on searching for a magnetic moment of the neutrino using a tritium source and helium detector is discussed. The description of a tritium support test-bed for a plasma focus-type neutron source with intensity of 10{sup 13} s{sup -1} is given. Results of studies in the area of interaction of hydrogen isotopes with structural materials such as nickel, stainless steels, high-strength austenitic alloys and alumina-based ceramics are summarized. (authors)

  13. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction. Final report, September 20, 1988--November 20, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Kroo, E.; Charpenay, S.; Bassilakis, R.

    1991-12-17

    The overall objective of the program was to improve the understanding of retrograde reactions and their dependencies on coal rank and structure, and/or coal modifications and reaction conditions. Because retrograde reactions are competitive with bond breaking reactions, an understanding of both is required to shift the competition in favor of the latter. Related objectives were to clarify the conflicting observations reported in literature on such major topics as the role of oxygen groups in retrograde reactions and to provide a bridge from very fundamental studies on pure compounds to phenomenological studies on actual coal. This information was integrated into the FG-DVC model, which was improved and extended to the liquefaction context.

  14. Fundamental study of failure mechanisms of pressure vessels under thermo-mechanical cycling in multiphase environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penso Mula, Jorge Antonio

    Cracking and bulging in welded and internally lined pressure vessels that work in thermal-mechanical cycling services have been well known problems in the petrochemical, power and nuclear industries. Published literature and industry surveys show that similar problems have been occurring during the last 50 years. Understanding the causes of cracking and bulging would lead to improvements in the reliability of these pressure vessels. This study attempts to add information required for improving the knowledge and fundamental understanding of these problems. Cracking and bulging, most often in the weld areas, commonly experienced in delayed coking units (e.g. coke drums) in oil refineries are typical examples. The coke drum was selected for this study because of the existing field experience and past industrial investigation results that were available to serve as the baseline references for the analytical studies performed for this dissertation. Another reason for selecting the delayed coking units for this study was due to their high economical yields. Shutting down these units would cause a high negative economic impact on the refinery operations. Several failure mechanisms were hypothesized. The finite element method was used to analyze these significant variables and to verify the hypotheses. In conclusion, a fundamental explanation of the occurrence of bulging and cracking in pressure vessels in multiphase environments has been developed. Several important factors have been identified, including the high convection coefficient of the boiling layer during filling and quenching, the mismatch in physical, thermal and mechanical properties in the dissimilar weld of the clad plates and process conditions such as heating and quenching rate and warming time. Material selection for coke drums should consider not only fatigue strength but also corrosion resistance at high temperatures and low temperatures. Cracking occurs due to low cycle fatigue and corrosion. The FEA

  15. NMR Computational Studies of Solid Acidity/Fundamental Studies of Catalysis by Solid Acids

    SciTech Connect

    James F. Haw

    2008-06-28

    This project focused on catalysis by zeolites and the synergy of spectroscopic characterization and theoretical modeling. In collaboration with the Waroquier group in Belgium we used state-of-the-art quantum chemical simulations on a supramolecular model of both the HZSM-5 zeolite and the co-catalytic hydrocarbon pool species and calculated a full catalytic cycle (including all rate constants) for methanol-to-olefin (MTO) catalysis involving a hydrocarbon pool species. This work not only represents the most robust computational analysis of a successful MTO route to date, but it also succeeds in tying together the many experimental clues. That work was featured on the cover of Angewandte Chemie. More recently we elucidated several unsuspected roles for formaldehyde in methanol to olefin catalysis. Formaldehyde proves to be a key species responsible for both the growth of the catalytically active hydrocarbon pool and its inevitable aging into deactivated polycyclic aromatic species. The apparent inevitability of formaldehyde formation at high temperatures, in particular in contact with active metal or metal oxide surfaces, may put some fundamental limitations on the economic potential of conversion of methanol to olefins.

  16. A Long Journey in Lanthanide Chemistry: From Fundamental Crystallogenesis Studies to Commercial Anticounterfeiting Taggants.

    PubMed

    Guillou, Olivier; Daiguebonne, Carole; Calvez, Guillaume; Bernot, Kevin

    2016-05-17

    Lanthanide ions have unique physical properties and are essential for numerous technological devices. Indeed, much research has been undertaken in order to understand and optimize their luminescent behavior. From a chemical and more specific point of view, lanthanides can be used to build coordination polymers (CPs). CPs are materials in which metal ions are associated with organic molecules (ligands) to form extended networks. They present great structural diversity and a wide range of unique properties such as great porosity, strong catalytic activities, and original magnetic and luminescent behaviors. In this Account, we highlight recent research advances obtained by our team in the field of lanthanide-based CPs. However, rather than present a simple chronological description of successive investigations, we have chosen present our own experience in order to show how standard academic studies can be successfully turned into applied research and finally into a viable startup that commercializes these products as anticounterfieting taggants. A taggant is a compound that can be dispersed in a host matrix at parts per million rates for it to be labeled. Its economic advantages over traditional anticounterfeiting techniques (labels, chips, etc.) are its very low cost and its ability to label a raw material at every stage of its processing, unlike traditional techniques that label only the final product. It thus permits traceability of a given material over a wide range of suppliers/subcontractors/sellers or customers at every step of its life. After 15 years of fundamental crystallogenesis research, we identified a very stable phase of lanthanide-based CPs in which strong lanthanide luminescence can be observed. We investigated this phase further and showed that a heteronuclear approach can give access to billions of different compositions and makes it possible to turn these powders into taggants. After the creation of a startup, we refocused on fundamental studies

  17. Fundamental Studies of Charge Migration and Delocalization Relevant to Solar Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Therien

    2012-06-01

    This program aimed to understand the molecular-level principles by which complex chemical systems carry out photochemical charge separation, transport, and storage, and how these insights could impact the design of practical solar energy conversion and storage devices. Towards these goals, this program focused on: (1) carrying out fundamental mechanistic and transient dynamical studies of proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) reactions; (2) characterizing and interrogating via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic methods novel conjugated materials that feature large charge delocalization lengths; and (3) exploring excitation delocalization and migration, as well as polaron transport properties of meso-scale assemblies that are capable of segregating light-harvesting antennae, nanoscale wire-like conduction elements, and distinct oxidizing and reducing environments.

  18. Fundamental studies of methyl iodide adsorption in DABCO impregnated activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Herdes, Carmelo; Prosenjak, Claudia; Román, Silvia; Müller, Erich A

    2013-06-11

    Methyl iodide capture from a water vapor stream using 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO)-impregnated activated carbons is, for the first time, fundamentally described here on the atomic level by means of both molecular dynamics and grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. A molecular dynamics annealing strategy was adopted to mimic the DABCO experimental impregnation procedure in a selected slitlike carbon pore. Predictions, restricted to the micropore region, are made about the adsorption isotherms of methyl iodide, water, and nitrogen on both impregnated and bare activated carbon models. Experimental and simulated nitrogen adsorption isotherms are compared for the validation of the impregnation strategy. Selectivity analyses of the preferential adsorption toward methyl iodide over water are also reported. These simulated adsorption isotherms sum up to previous experimental studies to provide an enhanced picture for this adsorption system of widespread use at nuclear plant HVAC facilities for the capture of radioactive iodine compounds. PMID:23679202

  19. Fundamental studies for the proton polarization technique in neutron protein crystallography.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ichiro; Kusaka, Katsuhiro; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Niimura, Nobuo

    2013-11-01

    The isotope effect in conventional neutron protein crystallography (NPC) can be eliminated by the proton polarization technique (ppt). Furthermore, the ppt can improve detection sensitivity of hydrogen (relative neutron scattering length of hydrogen) by approximately eight times in comparison with conventional NPC. Several technical difficulties, however, should be overcome in order to perform the ppt. In this paper, two fundamental studies to realise ppt are presented: preliminary trials using high-pressure flash freezing has shown the advantage of making bulk water amorphous without destroying the single crystal; and X-ray diffraction and liquid-chromatography/mass-spectrometry analyses of standard proteins after introducing radical molecules into protein crystals have shown that radical molecules could be distributed non-specifically around proteins, which is essential for better proton polarization. PMID:24121348

  20. Fundamental studies for the proton polarization technique in neutron protein crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Ichiro; Kusaka, Katsuhiro; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Niimura, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    The isotope effect in conventional neutron protein crystallography (NPC) can be eliminated by the proton polarization technique (ppt). Furthermore, the ppt can improve detection sensitivity of hydrogen (relative neutron scattering length of hydrogen) by approximately eight times in comparison with conventional NPC. Several technical difficulties, however, should be overcome in order to perform the ppt. In this paper, two fundamental studies to realise ppt are presented: preliminary trials using high-pressure flash freezing has shown the advantage of making bulk water amorphous without destroying the single crystal; and X-ray diffraction and liquid-chromatography/mass-spectrometry analyses of standard proteins after introducing radical molecules into protein crystals have shown that radical molecules could be distributed non-specifically around proteins, which is essential for better proton polarization. PMID:24121348

  1. Damage analysis and fundamental studies. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The DAFS program element is a national effort composed of contributions from a number of National Laboratories and other government laboratories, universities, and industrial laboratories. It was organized by the Materials and Radiation Effects Branch, Office of Fusion Energy, DOE, and a Task Group on Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies which operates under the auspices of that Branch. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record of that effort for the use of the program participants, for the fusion energy program in general, and for the Department of Energy. This report is organized along topical lines in parallel to a Program Plan of the same title so that activities and accomplishments may be followed readily, relative to that Program Plan.

  2. Damage analysis and fundamental studies. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The DAFS program element is a national effort composed of contributions from a number of National Laboratories and other government laboratories, universities, and industrial laboratories. It was organized by the Materials and Radiation Effects Branch, Office of Fusion Energy, DOE, and a Task Group on Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies which operates under the auspices of that Branch. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record of that effort for the use of the program participants, for the fusion energy program in general, and for the Department of Energy. This report is organized along topical lines in parallel to a Program Plan of the same title so that activities and accomplishments may be followed readily, relative to that Program Plan. Thus, the work of a given laboratory may appear throughout the report. The Table of Contents is annotated for the convenience of the reader.

  3. Fundamental studies to develop certified reference material to calibrate spectrophotometer in the ultraviolet region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Conceição, F. C.; Borges, P. P.; Gomes, J. F. S.

    2016-07-01

    Spectrophotometry is the technique used in a great number of laboratories around the world. Quantitative determination of a high number of inorganic, organic and biological species can be made by spectrophotometry using calibrated spectrophotometers. International standards require the use of optical filters to perform the calibration of spectrophotometers. One of the recommended materials is the crystalline potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7), which is used to prepare solutions in specific concentrations for calibration or verification of spectrophotometers in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral regions. This paper presents the results concerning the fundamental studies for developing a certified reference material (CRM) of crystalline potassium dichromate to be used as standard of spectrophotometers in order to contribute to reliable quantitative analyses.

  4. Fundamental Study on Inspection of Steel Pipe Covered with Insulator in Oil Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Youhei; Noro, Kosuke; Ko, Takanari; Mizutani, Koichi; Aoshima, Nobuharu

    2006-05-01

    In a steel pipe composed of a three layer structure, an insulator material is rolled around the initial pipe and another pipe is rolled around the whole pipe used in an oil complex. The insulator material becomes an obstacle for inspecting initial pipe. Thus, in this study, a new inspection method is proposed. An ultrasonic waveform is inputted into the transport pipe that is used for transferring fluid such as oil using a transducer. Its propagation path was inspected and it was found that the wave behaves as a cylindrical wave known as the Lamb wave. Two fundamental experiments for a steel plate and a steel pipe were carried out for its verification. Cross-correlation analysis was used to obtain propagation time, then propagation velocity was calculated. Whether both can be regarded as an equivalent of the theory was confirmed by experiments for propagation velocity in each frequency when there was no welding on the pipe structure.

  5. FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES OF IGNITION PROCESSES IN LARGE NATURAL GAS ENGINES USING LASER SPARK IGNITION

    SciTech Connect

    Azer Yalin; Morgan Defoort; Bryan Willson

    2005-01-01

    The current report details project progress made during the first quarterly reporting period of the DOE sponsored project ''Fundamental studies of ignition processes in large natural gas engines using laser spark ignition''. The goal of the overall research effort is to develop a laser ignition system for natural gas engines, with a particular focus on using fiber optic delivery methods. In this report we present our successful demonstration of spark formation using fiber delivery made possible though the use of novel coated hollow fibers. We present results of (high power) experimental characterizations of light propagation using hollow fibers using both a high power research grade laser as well as a more compact laser. Finally, we present initial designs of the system we are developing for future on-engine testing using the hollow fibers.

  6. Advancing Model Systems for Fundamental Laboratory Studies of Sea Spray Aerosol Using the Microbial Loop.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher; Sultana, Camille M; Collins, Douglas B; Santander, Mitchell V; Axson, Jessica L; Malfatti, Francesca; Cornwell, Gavin C; Grandquist, Joshua R; Deane, Grant B; Stokes, M Dale; Azam, Farooq; Grassian, Vicki H; Prather, Kimberly A

    2015-08-20

    Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles represent one of the most abundant surfaces available for heterogeneous reactions to occur upon and thus profoundly alter the composition of the troposphere. In an effort to better understand tropospheric heterogeneous reaction processes, fundamental laboratory studies must be able to accurately reproduce the chemical complexity of SSA. Here we describe a new approach that uses microbial processes to control the composition of seawater and SSA particle composition. By inducing a phytoplankton bloom, we are able to create dynamic ecosystem interactions between marine microorganisms, which serve to alter the organic mixtures present in seawater. Using this controlled approach, changes in seawater composition become reflected in the chemical composition of SSA particles 4 to 10 d after the peak in chlorophyll-a. This approach for producing and varying the chemical complexity of a dominant tropospheric aerosol provides the foundation for further investigations of the physical and chemical properties of realistic SSA particles under controlled conditions. PMID:26196268

  7. Electrostatic Levitation for Studies of Additive Manufactured Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Tramel, Terri

    2014-01-01

    The electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is a unique facility for investigators studying high temperature materials. The laboratory boasts two levitators in which samples can be levitated, heated, melted, undercooled, and resolidified. Electrostatic levitation minimizes gravitational effects and allows materials to be studied without contact with a container or instrumentation. The lab also has a high temperature emissivity measurement system, which provides normal spectral and normal total emissivity measurements at use temperature. The ESL lab has been instrumental in many pioneering materials investigations of thermophysical properties, e.g., creep measurements, solidification, triggered nucleation, and emissivity at high temperatures. Research in the ESL lab has already led to the development of advanced high temperature materials for aerospace applications, coatings for rocket nozzles, improved medical and industrial optics, metallic glasses, ablatives for reentry vehicles, and materials with memory. Modeling of additive manufacturing materials processing is necessary for the study of their resulting materials properties. In addition, the modeling of the selective laser melting processes and its materials property predictions are also underway. Unfortunately, there is very little data for the properties of these materials, especially of the materials in the liquid state. Some method to measure thermophysical properties of additive manufacturing materials is necessary. The ESL lab is ideal for these studies. The lab can provide surface tension and viscosity of molten materials, density measurements, emissivity measurements, and even creep strength measurements. The ESL lab can also determine melting temperature, surface temperatures, and phase transition temperatures of additive manufactured materials. This presentation will provide background on the ESL lab and its capabilities, provide an approach to using the ESL

  8. A Fundamental Study of Smoldering with Emphasis on Experimental Design for Zero-G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Pagni, Patrick J.

    1995-01-01

    A research program to study smoldering combustion with emphasis on the design of an experiment to be conducted in the space shuttle was conducted at the Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley. The motivation of the research is the interest in smoldering both as a fundamental combustion problem and as a serious fire risk. Research conducted included theoretical and experimental studies that have brought considerable new information about smolder combustion, the effect that buoyancy has on the process, and specific information for the design of a space experiment. Experiments were conducted at normal gravity, in opposed and forward mode of propagation and in the upward and downward direction to determine the effect and range of influence of gravity on smolder. Experiments were also conducted in microgravity, in a drop tower and in parabolic aircraft flights, where the brief microgravity periods were used to analyze transient aspects of the problem. Significant progress was made on the study of one-dimensional smolder, particularly in the opposed-flow configuration. These studies provided enough information to design a small-scale space-based experiment that was successfully conducted in the Spacelab Glovebox in the June 1992 USML-1/STS-50 mission of the Space Shuttle Columbia.

  9. Combustion Fundamentals Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Increased emphasis is placed on fundamental and generic research at Lewis Research Center with less systems development efforts. This is especially true in combustion research, where the study of combustion fundamentals has grown significantly in order to better address the perceived long term technical needs of the aerospace industry. The main thrusts for this combustion fundamentals program area are as follows: analytical models of combustion processes, model verification experiments, fundamental combustion experiments, and advanced numeric techniques.

  10. Fundamental studies of black liquor combustion: Report No. 2, Phase 1 (October 1984-November 1986)

    SciTech Connect

    Clay, D. T.; Lien, S. J.; Grace, T. M.; Macek, A.; Semerjian, H. G.; Amin, N.; Charagundla, S. R.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamentals of kraft black liquor combustion are being studied in a five year project. This report covers the second and third years of work by The Institute of Paper Chemistry (IPC) and the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) for the US Department of Energy. The burning processes are being studied in two continuous flow reactor systems designed to both study overall process and single particle phenomena. Black liquor burning is divided into four distinct phases: drying, volatiles burning, char burning, and smelt coalescence. Phase 1, In-flight Processes, is the main focus of this report. In-flight processes include mainly the stages of drying and volatiles burning. Testing results in both flow reactors and in two specially designed single particle reactors are presented. Dynamic droplet velocity and swelling have been measured for the first time. A direct link between initial liquor viscosity and burning behavior in the early stages has also been identified. During the fourth year Phase 1 will be completed and Phases 2 (Char Burning) and 3 (Fume Processes) will begin.

  11. [TG-FTIR study on pyrolysis of wheat-straw with abundant CaO additives].

    PubMed

    Han, Long; Wang, Qin-Hui; Yang, Yu-Kun; Yu, Chun-Jiang; Fang, Meng-Xiang; Luo, Zhong-Yang

    2011-04-01

    Biomass pyrolysis in presence of abundant CaO additives is a fundamental process prior to CaO sorption enhanced gasification in biomass-based zero emission system. In the present study, thermogravimetric Fourier transform infrared (TG-FTIR) analysis was adopted to examine the effects of CaO additives on the mass loss process and volatiles evolution of wheat-straw pyrolysis. Observations from TG and FTIR analyses simultaneously demonstrated a two-stage process for CaO catalyzed wheat-straw pyrolysis, different from the single stage process for pure wheat-straw pyrolysis. CaO additives could not only absorb the released CO2 but also reduce the yields of tar species such as toluene, phenol, and formic acid in the first stage, resulting in decreased mass loss and maximum mass loss rate in this stage with an increase in CaO addition. The second stage was attributed to the CaCO3 decomposition and the mass loss and maximum mass loss rate increased with increasing amount of CaO additives. The results of the present study demonstrated the great potential of CaO additives to capture CO2 and reduce tars yields in biomass-based zero emission system. The gasification temperature in the system should be lowered down to avoid CaCO3 decomposition. PMID:21714234

  12. BIG FROG WILDERNESS STUDY AREA AND ADDITIONS, TENNESSEE AND GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, John F.; Gazdik, Gertrude C.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey was made of the Big Frog Wilderness Study Area and additions, Tennessee-Georgia. Geochemical sampling found traces of gold, zinc, copper, and arsenic in rocks, stream sediments, and panned concentrates, but not in sufficient quantities to indicate the presence of deposits of these metals. The results of the survey indicate that there is little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral deposits within the study area. The only apparent resources are nonmetallic commodities including rock suitable for construction materials, and small amounts of sand and gravel; however, these commodities are found in abundance outside the study area. A potential may exist for oil and natural gas at great depths, but this cannot be evaluated by the present study.

  13. Recommended Protocol for Round Robin Studies in Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, Shawn; Brown, Christopher U.; Slotwinski, John

    2016-01-01

    One way to improve confidence and encourage proliferation of additive manufacturing (AM) technologies and parts is by generating more high quality data describing the performance of AM processes and parts. Many in the AM community see round robin studies as a way to generate large data sets while distributing the cost among the participants, thereby reducing the cost to individual users. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has conducted and participated in several of these AM round robin studies. While the results of these studies are interesting and informative, many of the lessons learned in conducting these studies concern the logistics and methods of the study and unique issues presented by AM. Existing standards for conducting interlaboratory studies of measurement methods, along with NIST’s experience, form the basis for recommended protocols for conducting AM round robin studies. The role of round robin studies in AM qualification, some of the limitations of round robin studies, and the potential benefit of less formal collaborative experiments where multiple factors, AM machine being only one, are varied simultaneously are also discussed. PMID:27274602

  14. Racism in Interracial Dating: A Case Study in Southern Culture and Fundamentalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Stephanie Firebaugh; Firmin, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a case study of Bob Jones University (BJU), a fundamentalist Christian institution located in South Carolina that is known within the context of U.S. higher education for its conservatism on multiple levels. Our analysis traces the beliefs of the institution's founder and subsequent leaders, in addition to particular…

  15. Hydrate-phobic surfaces: fundamental studies in clathrate hydrate adhesion reduction.

    PubMed

    Smith, J David; Meuler, Adam J; Bralower, Harrison L; Venkatesan, Rama; Subramanian, Sivakumar; Cohen, Robert E; McKinley, Gareth H; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2012-05-01

    Clathrate hydrate formation and subsequent plugging of deep-sea oil and gas pipelines represent a significant bottleneck for deep-sea oil and gas operations. Current methods for hydrate mitigation are expensive and energy intensive, comprising chemical, thermal, or flow management techniques. In this paper, we present an alternate approach of using functionalized coatings to reduce hydrate adhesion to surfaces, ideally to a low enough level that hydrodynamic shear stresses can detach deposits and prevent plug formation. Systematic and quantitative studies of hydrate adhesion on smooth substrates with varying solid surface energies reveal a linear trend between hydrate adhesion strength and the practical work of adhesion (γ(total)[1 + cos θ(rec)]) of a suitable probe liquid, that is, one with similar surface energy properties to those of the hydrate. A reduction in hydrate adhesion strength by more than a factor of four when compared to bare steel is achieved on surfaces characterized by low Lewis acid, Lewis base, and van der Waals contributions to surface free energy such that the practical work of adhesion is minimized. These fundamental studies provide a framework for the development of hydrate-phobic surfaces, and could lead to passive enhancement of flow assurance and prevention of blockages in deep-sea oil and gas operations. PMID:22441203

  16. Radiation Hydrodynamic Simulations in the Planar Scheme for the Fundamental Studies of Shock Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yunsong; Yang, Jiamin; Song, Tianming; Zhu, Tuo; Huang, Chengwu

    2016-04-01

    As a fundamental and crucial research topic in the direct-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF), especially for shock ignition (SI), investigation on the laser coupling with planar low-Z targets is beneficial for deep physical comprehension at the primary phase of SI. The production of the intense shock and the shock coalescence in the multi-layer targets, driven by the 3ω intense laser (351 nm the wavelength), were studied in detail with the 1D and 2D radiation hydrodynamic simulations. It was inferred that the 1D simulation would overrate the shock velocity and the ablation pressure of the spike; the coalescence time and the velocity of the coalescence shock depended evidently on the pulse shape and the start time of the spike. The present study can also provide a semi-quantitative reference for the design of the SI decomposition experiments on the Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. supported by the National High-Tech R&D Program (863 Program) of China and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11205143, 11505167)

  17. Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Swain; Greg M.

    2009-04-13

    The original funding under this project number was awarded for a period 12/1999 until 12/2002 under the project title Diamond and Hydrogenated Carbons for Advanced Batteries and Fuel Cells: Fundamental Studies and Applications. The project was extended until 06/2003 at which time a renewal proposal was awarded for a period 06/2003 until 06/2008 under the project title Metal/Diamond Composite Thin-Film Electrodes: New Carbon Supported Catalytic Electrodes. The work under DE-FG02-01ER15120 was initiated about the time the PI moved his research group from the Department of Chemistry at Utah State University to the Department of Chemistry at Michigan State University. This DOE-funded research was focused on (i) understanding structure-function relationships at boron-doped diamond thin-film electrodes, (ii) understanding metal phase formation on diamond thin films and developing electrochemical approaches for producing highly dispersed electrocatalyst particles (e.g., Pt) of small nominal particle size, (iii) studying the electrochemical activity of the electrocatalytic electrodes for hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction and (iv) conducting the initial synthesis of high surface area diamond powders and evaluating their electrical and electrochemical properties when mixed with a Teflon binder.

  18. Affection of Fundamental Brain Activity By Using Sounds For Patients With Prosodic Disorders: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Emiko; Katagiri, Yoshitada; Seki, Keiko; Kawamata, Toshio

    2011-06-01

    We present a neural model of the production of modulated speech streams in the brain, referred to as prosody, which indicates the limbic structure essential for producing prosody both linguistically and emotionally. This model suggests that activating the fundamental brain including monoamine neurons at the basal ganglia will potentially contribute to helping patients with prosodic disorders coming from functional defects of the fundamental brain to overcome their speech problem. To establish effective clinical treatment for such prosodic disorders, we examine how sounds affect the fundamental activity by using electroencephalographic measurements. Throughout examinations with various melodious sounds, we found that some melodies with lilting rhythms successfully give rise to the fast alpha rhythms at the electroencephalogram which reflect the fundamental brain activity without any negative feelings.

  19. Genotoxicity studies of the food additive ester gum.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, A; Agarwal, K; Chakrabarti, J

    1992-07-01

    Ester gum (EG) is used in citrus oil-based beverage flavourings as a weighting or colouring agent. In the present study, concentrations of 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight were administered orally to male Swiss albino mice, and sister chromatid exchange and chromosomal aberration were used as the cytogenetic endpoints to determine the genotoxic and clastogenic potential of the food additive. Although EG was weakly clastogenic and could induce a marginal increase in sister chromatid exchange frequencies, it was not a potential health hazard at the doses tested. PMID:1521837

  20. Making intelligent systems team players: Additional case studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schreckenghost, Debra L.; Rhoads, Ron W.

    1993-01-01

    Observations from a case study of intelligent systems are reported as part of a multi-year interdisciplinary effort to provide guidance and assistance for designers of intelligent systems and their user interfaces. A series of studies were conducted to investigate issues in designing intelligent fault management systems in aerospace applications for effective human-computer interaction. The results of the initial study are documented in two NASA technical memoranda: TM 104738 Making Intelligent Systems Team Players: Case Studies and Design Issues, Volumes 1 and 2; and TM 104751, Making Intelligent Systems Team Players: Overview for Designers. The objective of this additional study was to broaden the investigation of human-computer interaction design issues beyond the focus on monitoring and fault detection in the initial study. The results of this second study are documented which is intended as a supplement to the original design guidance documents. These results should be of interest to designers of intelligent systems for use in real-time operations, and to researchers in the areas of human-computer interaction and artificial intelligence.

  1. Exploiting the Temperature Dependence of Magnetic Susceptibility to Control Convective in Fundamental Studies of Solidification Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, C.; Evans, J. W.; Leslie, F.; Jones, W. K., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    It is well known that convection is a dominant mass transport mechanism when materials are solidified on Earth's surface. This convection is caused by gradients in density (and therefore gravitational force) that are brought about by gradients in temperature, composition or both. Diffusion of solute is therefore dwarfed by convection and the study of fundamental parameters, such as dendrite tip shape and growth velocity in the absence of convection is nearly impossible. Significant experimental work has therefore been carried out in orbiting laboratories with the intent of minimizing convection by minimizing gravity. One of the best known experiments of this kind is the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), supported by NASA. Naturally such experiments are costly and one objective of the present investigation is to develop an experimental method whereby convection can be halted, in solidification and other experiments, on the Earth's surface. A second objective is to use the method to minimize convection resulting from the residual accelerations suffered by experiments in microgravity.

  2. Fundamental Study on Vibration Diagnosis for High Speed Rotational Machine using Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawada, Masatake; Yamada, Koji; Yamashita, Katsuya

    In this paper we presented results of fundamental study to introduce the wavelet transform to vibration diagnosis for high-speed rotational machine such as steam turbine, gas turbine, and generator and so on. It is required to detect and distinguish typical vibration of high-speed rotational machine accurately in order to diagnose the machine. The wavelet transform is used in many fields because it is able to visualize phenomenon in time-frequency domain and to detect the beginning time and the duration of it. We made a model rotor supported with two journal bearings to simulate contact vibration, clearance vibration, and oil whip. The vibration phenomena were measured with vertical and horizontal displacement meters at the rotor and vertical and horizontal accelerometers at the rotor bearing and visualized in the time-frequency domain by the wavelet transform. It is found that the dynamic spectra obtained by the wavelet transform of the vertical and horizontal components of displacement and acceleration signals are different for each vibration phenomenon, therefore, this method is able to distinguish each kind of vibration phenomenon. Each vibration phenomenon can be detected and distinguished at the early stage.

  3. Fundamental studies of the mechanical behavior of microelectronic thin film materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nix, William D.

    1987-03-01

    A fundamental program of research on the mechanical properties of microelectronic thin film material has been initiated at Stanford University. The work is being supported under AFOSR Grant No. 86-0051. In this interim Scientific Report, some of the progress made during the first year of the program is reviewed. We have made very rapid progress,expecially in the development of new experimental techniques for measuring mechanical properties. The work has already led to several publications and to an equal number of invited oral presentations, both of which are listed at the end of this report. The primary motivation of this work is to understand the mechanical properties of microelectronic this film materials. Although these materials are not structural materials as such, they are, nevertheless, expected to withstand very high stresses, both during manufacturing and in service. As a consequence, the mechanical properties of these materials are almost as important as their electronic properties for successful device applicaitions. because these materials often exist only as thin films bonded to substrates, it is necessary to study their mechanical properties in that state.

  4. Concentration studies of collision-induced fundamental absorption of hydrogen dissolved in liquid neon.

    PubMed

    Herrebout, W A; van der Veken, B J; Kouzov, A P

    2012-08-28

    We report further and more detailed results of our recent investigation [W. A. Herrebout, B. J. van der Veken, and A. P. Kouzov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 093001 (2008)] on the collision-induced fundamental absorption by hydrogen dissolved in liquid neon (T ≈ 25 K). The band shapes were studied in a wide range of concentrations (0.003-0.05 mole fractions) as well as for different ortho/para ratios and at much higher level of accuracy and resolution than before. Due to almost unhindered rotation of the hydrogen molecule and low temperature, an unprecedently rich frequency-domain picture produced by different terms of the interaction-induced polarization was observed. While some of them are conspicuous via fast intracell motion of a light guest (H(2)), others--induced by the electrostatic field of the guest--give rise to lines whose shapes are imprinted by fluctuations of the nearest surrounding. Strong motional narrowing observed on the guest-guest induced lines shows up in their Lorentzian shapes which are signatures of microscopic-scale diffusion. Near-Lorentzian peaks were also detected at the tops of the diffuse lines induced by isolated guests. Their formation may be associated with a long-living defect (vacancy) emerging in the vicinity of the polarization inductor. Altogether, our results give the first unambiguous spectroscopic evidence on the diffusional evolution of isolated binary interactions that emerge in dense chaotic media. PMID:22938252

  5. Fundamental studies of interfacial rheology at multilayered model polymers for coextrusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huagui; Lamnawar, Khalid; Maazouz, Abderrahim

    2015-05-01

    Fundamental studies have been devoted to the interfacial phenomena at multilayered systems based on two model compatible polymers of PVDF and PMMA with varying molar masses. Linear and nonlinear rheology are demonstrated to be sensitive to the presence of diffuse interphase triggered at polymer/polymer interface. Firstly, the interdiffusion kinetics as well as the interphase development have been investigated using SAOS measurements with results analyzed under Doi-Edwards theory. The PMMA/PVDF mixture, has been examined to own close component monomeric friction coefficients. Based on this physics, a new rheological model was developed to quantify the interdiffusion coefficients. Thereby, rheological and geometrical properties of the interphase have been quantified, as validated by SEM-EDX. Secondly, step strain, shear and uniaxial extension startup were carried out to investigate their sensitivity to the diffuse interphase. An original model was proposed for the stress relaxation of multilayer and that of the interphase. Entanglement lack and weak entanglement intensity at the interface/diffuse interphase make them to be subsequently readily to suffer from interfacial yielding under large deformations. Finally, the interphase development coupled to flow in coextrusion has been considered. Net result between negative effect of chain orientation and favorable effect of flow has been shown to broaden the interphase. Its presence during coextrusion process was demonstrated to significantly weaken the interfacial instabilities.

  6. Inverse Oxide/Metal Catalysts in Fundamental Studies and Practical Applications: A Perspective of Recent Developments.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, José A; Liu, Ping; Graciani, Jesús; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Grinter, David C; Stacchiola, Dario; Hrbek, Jan; Fernández-Sanz, Javier

    2016-07-01

    Inverse oxide/metal catalysts have shown to be excellent systems for studying the role of the oxide and oxide-metal interface in catalytic reactions. These systems can have special structural and catalytic properties due to strong oxide-metal interactions difficult to attain when depositing a metal on a regular oxide support. Oxide phases that are not seen or are metastable in a bulk oxide can become stable in an oxide/metal system opening the possibility for new chemical properties. Using these systems, it has been possible to explore fundamental properties of the metal-oxide interface (composition, structure, electronic state), which determine catalytic performance in the oxidation of CO, the water-gas shift and the hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol. Recently, there has been a significant advance in the preparation of oxide/metal catalysts for technical or industrial applications. One goal is to identify methods able to control in a precise way the size of the deposited oxide particles and their structure on the metal substrate. PMID:27327114

  7. Fundamental Studies For The Triple-Flash X-Ray Generator For Biomedical Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Isobe, Hiroshi; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1989-06-01

    The fundamental studies for the triple-flash x-ray generator having variable spectra for biomedical radiography are described. Two types of triple-flash x-ray generators consisted of the following components: a high-voltage generating unit, a voltage divider unit, three high-voltage pulsers, a triple-parallel impulse switching system utilizing air gap pulsers for the main gas gaps, a high-power gas diode having three terminals, a turbo molecular pump, and three x-ray tubes having cold cathodes. For the single-tube generator, the pulse condensers of the pulsers were charged to the same or different energies by using a voltage divider unit and were connected to the x-ray tube through a high-power gas diode. In contrast, the pulsers were connected directly to three tubes without a diode. The duration of each x-ray pulse was a few ps, and the minimum time interval between two pulses was about 100ps (single-tube type), the x-ray intensity was less than lx10-5C/kg at lm per pulse, and the effective focal spot size was determined by the diameter of the anode rod. The triple exposure of pulsed x-rays having variable spectra and time intervals was obtained.

  8. Fundamental Study of Local Heat Transfer in Forced Convective Boiling of Ammonia on Vertical Flat Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hun; Arima, Hirofumi; Ikegami, Yasuyuki

    In the present study, the fundamental experiments that investigate characteristics of local heat transfer in forced convective boiling on vertical flat plate with 2-mm channel height are taken to realize plate type compact evaporator for OTEC or STEC. The experiments are performed with ammonia as the working fluid. The experiments are also carried out with the following test conditions; saturated pressure = 0.7, 0.8, 0.9 MPa, mass flux = 7.5, 10, 15 kg/(m2•s), heat flux = 15, 20, 25 kW/m2 and inlet quality = 0.1 ~ 0.4 [-]. The result shows that the wall superheated temperature of forced convective boiling is lower than that of pool boiling. And the heat transfer coefficient increases with an increase in quality and the decrease in the local heat flux and saturated pressure for prescribed experimental conditions. However, local heat transfer coefficients are not affected by mass fluxes in the prescribed experimental conditions. An empirical correlation that can predict the local heat transfer coefficient on vertical flat plate within experimental conditions is also proposed.

  9. Spectroscopic studies of magnesium plasma produced by fundamental and second harmonics of Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, S. U.; Ahmat, L.; Mumtaz, M.; Shakeel, Hira; Mahmood, S.; Nadeem, A.

    2015-08-01

    In the present experimental work, laser induced magnesium plasma has been characterized using plasma parameters. The plasma has been generated by the fundamental (1064 nm) and second harmonics (532 nm) of Nd:YAG laser. The plasma parameters such as electron temperature and electron number density have been extracted using Boltzmann plot method and Stark broadened line profile, respectively. The laser irradiance dependence and spatial behavior of electron temperature and number density in laser induced magnesium plasma have been studied. The electron temperature as a function of laser irradiance (0.5 to 6.5 GW/cm2) ranges from (9.16-10.37) × 103 K and (8.5-10.1)× 103 K, and electron number density from (0.99-1.08) × 1016 cm-3 and (1.04-1.22) × 1016cm-3 for 1064 and 532 nm, respectively. These parameters exhibit fast increase at low laser irradiance and slow increase at high irradiance. The spatial distribution of electron temperature and electron number density shows same decreasing trend up to 2.25 mm from the target surface. The electron temperature and number density decrease from (9.5-8.6) × 103 K, (1.27-1.15) × 1016cm-3 and (10.56-8.85)× 103 K, (1.08-0.99) × 1016 cm-3 for 532 nm and 1064 nm laser ablation wavelengths, respectively.

  10. RAMSEYS DRAFT WILDERNESS STUDY AREA AND ADDITION, VIRGINIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lesure, Frank G.; Mory, Peter C.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral-resource surveys of the Ramseys Draft Wilderness Study Area and adjoining roadless area addition in George Washington National Forest in the western valley and ridge province, Augusta and Highland Counties, Virginia, were done. The surveys outlined three small areas containing anomalous amounts of copper, lead, and zinc related to stratabound red-bed copper mineralization, but these occurrences are not large and are not considered as having mineral-resource potential. The area contains abundant sandstone suitable for construction materials and shale suitable for making brick, tile, and other low-grade ceramic products, but these commodities occur in abundance outside the wilderness study area. Structural conditions are probably favorable for the accumulation of natural gas, but exploratory drilling has not been done sufficiently near the area to evaluate the gas potential.

  11. Fundamental Studies of Solidification in Microgravity Using Real-Time X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William; Sen, Subhayu; Bhat, Biliyar N.

    1999-01-01

    This research applies a state of the art X-ray Transmission Microscope, XTM, to image (with resolutions up to 3 micrometers) the solidification of metallic or semiconductor alloys in real-time. We have successfully imaged in real-time: interfacial morphologies, phase growth, coalescence, incorporation of phases into the growing interface, and the solute boundary layer in the liquid at the solid-liquid interface. We have also measured true local growth rates and can evaluate segregation structures in the solid; a form of in-situ metallography. During this study, the growth of secondary phase fibers and lamellae from eutectic and monotectic alloys have been imaged during solidification, in real-time, for the first time in bulk metal alloys. Current high resolution X-ray sources and high contrast X-ray detectors have advanced to allow systematic study of solidification dynamics and the resulting microstructure. We have employed a state-of-the-art sub-micron source with acceleration voltages of 10-100 kV to image solidification of metals. One useful strength of the XTM stems from the manner an image is formed. The radiographic image is a shadow formed by x-ray photons that are not absorbed as they pass through the specimen. Composition gradients within the specimen cause variations in absorption of the flux such that the final image represents a spatial integral of composition (or thickness). The ability to image these features in real-time enables more fundamental and detailed understanding of solidification dynamics than has previously been possible. Hence, application of this technique towards microgravity experiments will allow rigorous testing of critical solidification models.

  12. Fundamental and applied localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy studies from nanoparticle arrays to single nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Julia Marie

    The overarching theme of this work is to understand how the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of metallic nanoparticles can be utilized for sensing applications. The work presented here describes the use of both nanoparticle arrays and single nanoparticles. Specifically, nanoparticle arrays demonstrate sensing capabilities for inhibin A, prostate specific antigen (PSA), gas and vapors, and the dye, Nile Red. A new wide-field imaging apparatus is developed to characterize multiple single nanoparticles simultaneously as well as correlate the nanoparticle structural details using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultimately to develop single nanoparticle sensors. From these studies, LSPR spectroscopy is shown to be a valuable tool for sensor development. In the studies utilizing nanoparticle arrays, LSPR spectroscopy proves to be a feasible technique to detect inhibin A and PSA using a sandwich assay format. However, binding constants are determined to be several orders of magnitude lower than expected for PSA. It is hypothesized that the method to immobilize the capture antibody affected the affinity for PSA. Using a high resolution LSPR spectrometer, gas and vapor sensing on the basis of small refractive index (RI) changes is demonstrated. Nile Red is used to investigate the interaction between the polarity-dependent dye absorbance and the RI dependent LSPR of Ag nanoparticles. A wide-field LSPR imaging method using a liquid crystal tunable filter is used to measure the scattering spectra of multiple Ag nanoparticles in parallel and the RI response of multiple single nanoparticles is determined. This method also provides the ability to characterize moving Ag nanoparticles by measuring the scattering spectra of the particles while simultaneously tracking their motion. Consequently, single particle diffusion coefficients are determined. As an example, several single Ag nanoprisms are tracked, the LSPR scattering spectrum of each moving particle is

  13. Spectroscopic studies of magnesium plasma produced by fundamental and second harmonics of Nd:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Haq, S. U. Ahmat, L.; Mumtaz, M.; Nadeem, A.; Shakeel, Hira; Mahmood, S.

    2015-08-15

    In the present experimental work, laser induced magnesium plasma has been characterized using plasma parameters. The plasma has been generated by the fundamental (1064 nm) and second harmonics (532 nm) of Nd:YAG laser. The plasma parameters such as electron temperature and electron number density have been extracted using Boltzmann plot method and Stark broadened line profile, respectively. The laser irradiance dependence and spatial behavior of electron temperature and number density in laser induced magnesium plasma have been studied. The electron temperature as a function of laser irradiance (0.5 to 6.5 GW/cm{sup 2}) ranges from (9.16–10.37) × 10{sup 3 }K and (8.5–10.1)× 10{sup 3 }K, and electron number density from (0.99–1.08) × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} and (1.04–1.22) × 10{sup 16}cm{sup −3} for 1064 and 532 nm, respectively. These parameters exhibit fast increase at low laser irradiance and slow increase at high irradiance. The spatial distribution of electron temperature and electron number density shows same decreasing trend up to 2.25 mm from the target surface. The electron temperature and number density decrease from (9.5–8.6) × 10{sup 3 }K, (1.27–1.15) × 10{sup 16}cm{sup −3} and (10.56–8.85)× 10{sup 3 }K, (1.08–0.99) × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} for 532 nm and 1064 nm laser ablation wavelengths, respectively.

  14. A numerical study of fundamental shock noise mechanisms. Ph.D. Thesis - Cornell Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Kristine R.

    1995-01-01

    The results of this thesis demonstrate that direct numerical simulation can predict sound generation in unsteady aerodynamic flows containing shock waves. Shock waves can be significant sources of sound in high speed jet flows, on helicopter blades, and in supersonic combustion inlets. Direct computation of sound permits the prediction of noise levels in the preliminary design stage and can be used as a tool to focus experimental studies, thereby reducing cost and increasing the probability of a successfully quiet product in less time. This thesis reveals and investigates two mechanisms fundamental to sound generation by shocked flows: shock motion and shock deformation. Shock motion is modeled by the interaction of a sound wave with a shock. During the interaction, the shock wave begins to move and the sound pressure is amplified as the wave passes through the shock. The numerical approach presented in this thesis is validated by the comparison of results obtained in a quasi-one dimensional simulation with linear theory. Analysis of the perturbation energy demonstrated for the first time that acoustic energy is generated by the interaction. Shock deformation is investigated by the numerical simulation of a ring vortex interacting with a shock. This interaction models the passage of turbulent structures through the shock wave. The simulation demonstrates that both acoustic waves and contact surfaces are generated downstream during the interaction. Analysis demonstrates that the acoustic wave spreads cylindrically, that the sound intensity is highly directional, and that the sound pressure level increases significantly with increasing shock strength. The effect of shock strength on sound pressure level is consistent with experimental observations of shock noise, indicating that the interaction of a ring vortex with a shock wave correctly models a dominant mechanism of shock noise generation.

  15. Bence Jones proteins: Powerful tool for fundamental study of protein chemistry and pathophysiology

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F.J.; Schiffer, M.; Solomon, A.

    1991-12-31

    Bence Jones proteins are typically found in patients with monoclonal plasma cell or related B-cell immunoproliferative disorders. Because of their monoclonal origin and resulting chemical homogeneity much of the fundamental information on immunoglobulin structure came initially from their analysis. Amino acid analyses of these components revealed an N-terminal variable (V) and C-terminal constant (C) domain as well as the existence within the V domain of hypervariable segments that account for the specificity and diversity of antibodies. Over the past three decades, the primary structures of hundreds of light chains (complete and partial), from human and other sources, have been determined, aligned, and archived. Bence Jones proteins and V{sub L} dimers were the crystallizable homogeneous proteins which provided much of the early three-dimensional conformational data that helped explain the structural basis of antibody function. Remarkably, a single Bence Jones protein in two solvent systems (low and high ionic strength) exhibited significant differences in the interactions of the two monomeric subunits comprising the dimer, resulting in substantial variation in the structure of the antigen combining site under the two solution conditions. This observation led to a prediction that heterogeneity of domain interactions may contribute to antibody-antigen interactions. Experimental support for this hypothesis has come from comparisons of the detailed structures of antibody-antigen complexes. The interactions at the interface of the V{sub L} dimer are a function of primary structure and solution conditions. Study of these interactions has led to new information on the relationship between protein structure and function and, as discussed below, can account for specific pathophysiological properties associated with Bence Jones proteins.

  16. [Studies of the fundamental nature of catalytic acidity, sites and intermediates]: Final performance (technical progress) report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This project was concerned with the fundamental nature of catalyst acidity in the H-zeolites and silica/alumina cracking catalysts. This report summarizes the progress on this project over the past five years. The titles of the twelve papers generated by this research are provided in the attached bibliography in chronological order.

  17. A Study of the Relationship between Reading, Computational, and Critical Thinking Skills and Academic Success in Fundamentals of Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurov, Janet Torrisi

    In spring 1987, a study was conducted at St. Louis Community College at Florissant Valley (Missouri) to identify the basic skills necessary for the successful completion of the course, "Fundamentals of Chemistry." The study evaluated the relationship between performance on the Nelson-Denny Reading Test (NDRT), the Numerical Reasoning subtest of…

  18. Experimental Study of Additives on Viscosity biodiesel at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajar, Berkah; Sukarno

    2015-09-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to find out the viscosity of additive and biodiesel fuel mixture in the temperature range from 283 K to 318 K. Solutions to reduce the viscosity of biodiesel is to add the biodiesel with some additive. The viscosity was measured using a Brookfield Rheometer DV-II. The additives were the generic additive (Diethyl Ether/DDE) and the commercial additive Viscoplex 10-330 CFI. Each biodiesel blends had a concentration of the mixture: 0.0; 0.25; 0.5; 0.75; 1.0; and 1.25% vol. Temperature of biodiesel was controlled from 40°C to 0°C. The viscosity of biodiesel and additive mixture at a constant temperature can be approximated by a polynomial equation and at a constant concentration by exponential equation. The optimum mixture is at 0.75% for diethyl ether and 0.5% for viscoplex.

  19. Fundamental studies of energy-and hole/electron- transfer in hydroporphyrin architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Bocian, David F.

    2014-08-20

    of spectra for naturally occurring and synthetic hydroporphyrins. The availability of such data should augment efforts in the design of light-harvesting systems where spectral coverage in the red and near-infrared regions is desired. Collectively, the proposed studies will provide fundamental insights into molecular properties, interactions, and processes relevant to the design of molecular architectures for solar-energy conversion. The accomplishment of these goals is only possible through a highly synergistic program that encompasses molecular design, synthesis, and characterization.

  20. Theoretical studies of fundamental pathways for alkaline hydrolysis of carboxylic acid esters in gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, C.G.; Landry, D.W.; Ornstein, R.L.

    2000-02-23

    Fundamental reaction pathways for the alkaline hydrolysis of carboxylic acid esters, RCOOR{prime}, were examined through a series of first-principle calculations. The reactions of six representative esters with hydroxide ion were studied in the gas phase. A total of three competing reaction pathways were found and theoretically confirmed for each of the esters examined: bimolecular base-catalyzed acyl-oxygen cleavage (B{sub AC}2), bimolecular base-catalyzed alkyl-oxygen cleavage (B{sub AL}2), and carbonyl oxygen exchange with hydroxide. For the two-step B{sub AC}2 process, this is the first theoretical study to consider the individual sub-steps of the reaction process and to consider substituent effects. For the carbonyl oxygen exchange with hydroxide and for the one-step B{sub AL}2 process, the authors report here the first quantitative theoretical results for the reaction pathways and for the energy barriers. The energy barrier calculated for the second step of the B{sub AC}2 process, that is, the decomposition of the tetrahedral intermediate, is larger in the gas phase than that of the first step, that is, the formation of the tetrahedral intermediate, for all but one of the esters examined. The exception, CH{sub 3}COOC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}, does not have an {alpha} hydrogen in the leaving group. The highest energy barrier calculated for the B{sub AC}2 process is always lower than the barriers for the oxygen exchange and for the B{sub AL}2 process. The difference between the barrier for the B{sub AL}2 process and the highest barrier for the B{sub AC}2 process is only {approximately}1--3 kcal/mol for the methyl esters, but becomes much larger for the others. Substitution of an {alpha} hydrogen in R{prime} with a methyl group considerably increases the energy barrier for the B{sub AL}2 process, and significantly decreases the energy barrier for the second step of the B{sub AC}2 process. The calculated substituent shifts of the energy barrier for the first step of the

  1. School-Based Fundamental-Motor-Skill Intervention for Children With Autism-Like Characteristics: An Exploratory Study.

    PubMed

    Bremer, Emily; Lloyd, Meghann

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to demonstrate the impact of a fundamental-motor-skill (FMS) intervention on the motor skills of 3- to 7-year-old children with autism-like characteristics in an early intervention classroom. A secondary purpose was to qualitatively assess the impact of the program as described by the classroom's special education teacher. All children in the classroom (N = 5) took part in an FMS intervention for two 6-wk blocks (fall 2013 and winter 2014). Motor-skill proficiency and social skills were assessed at 3 times: baseline, after Block 1 of the intervention, and after Block 2 of the intervention. In addition, an interview was conducted with the classroom teacher after Assessment 3 to draw further insights into the relative success and impact of the program. Results were analyzed through a visual analysis and presented individually. They indicated improvements in the participants' individual FMS and social-skill scores, possible improvements in declarative knowledge, and an increase in the special education teacher's readiness to teach FMS; further research with larger, controlled samples is warranted. PMID:26785501

  2. Additive Manufacturing in Production: A Study Case Applying Technical Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ituarte, Iñigo Flores; Coatanea, Eric; Salmi, Mika; Tuomi, Jukka; Partanen, Jouni

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is expanding the manufacturing capabilities. However, quality of AM produced parts is dependent on a number of machine, geometry and process parameters. The variability of these parameters affects the manufacturing drastically and therefore standardized processes and harmonized methodologies need to be developed to characterize the technology for end use applications and enable the technology for manufacturing. This research proposes a composite methodology integrating Taguchi Design of Experiments, multi-objective optimization and statistical process control, to optimize the manufacturing process and fulfil multiple requirements imposed to an arbitrary geometry. The proposed methodology aims to characterize AM technology depending upon manufacturing process variables as well as to perform a comparative assessment of three AM technologies (Selective Laser Sintering, Laser Stereolithography and Polyjet). Results indicate that only one machine, laser-based Stereolithography, was feasible to fulfil simultaneously macro and micro level geometrical requirements but mechanical properties were not at required level. Future research will study a single AM system at the time to characterize AM machine technical capabilities and stimulate pre-normative initiatives of the technology for end use applications.

  3. [Fundamental and clinical studies on cefuzonam in the field of pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Kuno, K; Hakamada, S; Miyachi, Y; Nakashima, T; Hayakawa, F; Miura, K; Miyajima, Y

    1987-02-01

    Fundamental and clinical studies on cefuzonam (L-105, CZON), a newly semisynthesized cephem antibiotic, were carried out in the field of pediatrics and the following results were obtained. Antibacterial activities of CZON against clinically isolated strains of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae and H. influenzae were compared with those of cefmenoxime (CMX), latamoxef (LMOX), cefoperazone (CPZ), cefmetazole (CMZ), cefotiam (CTM) and cefazolin (CEZ). CZON was nearly as active as CEZ against S. aureus and S. epidermidis and superior to other antibiotics against other Gram-positive cocci. Against Gram-negative rods, CZON was as active as CMX and superior to other 5 antibiotics compared. Serum concentrations and urinary excretion rates after intravenous bolus injection of CZON at doses of 10 mg/kg, 20 mg/kg and 40 mg/kg for 5 minutes in 1, 5 and 4 cases, respectively, were determined. Mean serum concentrations of CZON at these dose levels were 11.0, 43.8 and 111.5 micrograms/ml at 15 minutes, 2.4, 10.3 and 30.3 micrograms/ml at 1 hour and 0.17, 0.72 and 1.28 micrograms/ml at 4 hours, with serum half-lives of 1.79, 0.88 and 1.19 hours, respectively. Mean cumulative urinary excretion rates within 6 hours after administration were 47.9, 56.3 and 40.3%, respectively. Thirty-four pediatric patients with various bacterial infections (tonsillitis 2, acute bronchitis 1, pneumonia 14, pyothorax 1, sepsis 1, suppurative lymphadenitis 1, UTI 13 and enteritis 1) were treated with CZON at a daily dose of 40-94 mg/kg t.i.d. or q.i.d.. The overall clinical efficacy rate was 94.1%. No adverse reactions were observed except 2 cases with mild diarrhea. Abnormal laboratory findings were also mild; slight elevation of GOT and GPT in 2, eosinophilia in 1 and thrombocytosis in 1. These results clearly indicate the usefulness of CZON in the treatment of bacterial infections in

  4. Fundamental and applied studies in nanoparticle biomedical imaging, stabilization, and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pansare, Vikram J.

    Nanoparticle carrier systems are gaining importance in the rapidly expanding field of biomedical whole animal imaging where they provide long circulating, real time imaging capability. This thesis presents a new paradigm in imaging whereby long wavelength fluorescent or photoacoustically active contrast agents are embedded in the hydrophobic core of nanocarriers formed by Flash NanoPrecipitation. The long wavelength allows for improved optical penetration depth. Compared to traditional contrast agents where fluorophores are placed on the surface, this allows for improved signal, increased stability, and molecular targeting capabilities. Several types of long wavelength hydrophobic dyes based on acene, cyanine, and bacteriochlorin scaffolds are utilized and animal results obtained for nanocarrier systems used in both fluorescent and photoacoustic imaging modes. Photoacoustic imaging is particularly promising due to its high resolution, excellent penetration depth, and ability to provide real-time functional information. Fundamental studies in nanoparticle stabilization are also presented for two systems: model alumina nanoparticles and charge stabilized polystyrene nanoparticles. Motivated by the need for stable suspensions of alumina-based nanocrystals for security printing applications, results are presented for the adsorption of various small molecule charged hydrophobes onto the surface of alumina nanoparticles. Results are also presented for the production of charge stabilized polystyrene nanoparticles via Flash NanoPrecipitation, allowing for the independent control of polymer molecular weight and nanoparticle size, which is not possible by traditional emulsion polymerization routes. Lastly, methods for processing nanoparticle systems are explored. The increasing use of nanoparticle therapeutics in the pharmaceutical industry has necessitated the development of scalable, industrially relevant processing methods. Ultrafiltration is particularly well suited for

  5. A Study of Thermal Analyses and Fundamental Combustion Characteristics for Animal’s Waste⁄Pig Dung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, Tamio; Morita, Akihiro; Namba, Kunihiko; Fujimoto, Hideto; Sano, Hiroshi

    Biomass utilities for high water content have very important signifi cance close future in Japan. Especially, London treaty for ocean disposal of wastes in 2007-6 has big problems to keep of sustainability provisions supply for our lives. We could calculate to exist total caloric thermal energy 124TJ⁄y (340GJ⁄dZ) in Pig wastes as domestic biomass energy. This study is doing fundamental experimental by thermal decomposition and combustion for Pig wastes. Thermal decomposition analysis investigates for gasifi cation and fi xed carbon combustion characteristics. Fundamental combustion experiment shows time dependent combustion process, ignition process, fl ame process and char combustion process.

  6. Developmental Changes in the Fundamental Frequency (f0) of Infants' Cries: A Study of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposito, Gianluca; Venuti, Paola

    2010-01-01

    Episodes of crying with higher fundamental frequency (f0) are perceived as more aversive and distressful than lower frequency cries. Besides, previous studies have speculated that in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) higher f0 may account for evoking mental states of uneasiness in the caregiver. Moreover no evidence on developmental…

  7. The Fundamental Lifestyle of a University Community: A Case Study of Higher Education in a Malaysian Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdullah, Melissa Ng Lee Yen; Mey, See Ching

    2012-01-01

    This study identified the fundamental lifestyles adopted by a university community in Malaysia. Rapid growth and expansion of higher education in Malaysia is inevitable as the country moves from a production-based economy to one that is innovative and knowledge-based, requiring the development of a highly skilled and knowledgeable workforce.…

  8. Fundamental studies on electrochemical production of dendrite-free aluminum and titanium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Debabrata

    -Al alloys were determined. The Ti-Al alloys containing about 13-27 atom % Ti were produced using both electrolytes. The current efficiency of AlCl3-BMIC was varies between 79-87%. But lower current efficiency (25-38%) was obtained for AlCl3-BMIC-TiCl4 electrolytes due to the formation of TiCl3 passive layer on the electrodes. To increase the productivity, constant current method (160-210 A/m2) was implemented. This fundamental study on low temperature production of dendrite-free aluminum and Al-Ti alloys is not only efficient but also opens a novel route in aluminum and titanium process metallurgy.

  9. Health studies indicate MTBE is safe gasoline additive

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E.V.

    1993-09-01

    Implementation of the oxygenated fuels program by EPA in 39 metropolitan areas, including Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska, in the winter of 1992, encountered some unexpected difficulties. Complaints of headaches, dizziness, nausea, and irritated eyes started in Fairbanks, jumped to Anchorage, and popped up in various locations in the lower 48 states. The suspected culprit behind these complaints was the main additive for oxygenation of gasoline is methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). A test program, hastily organized in response to these complaints, has indicated that MTBE is a safe gasoline additive. However, official certification of the safety of MTBE is still awaited.

  10. ULTRASONIC STUDIES OF THE FUNDAMENTAL MECHANISMS OF RECRYSTALLIZATION AND SINTERING OF METALS

    SciTech Connect

    TURNER, JOSEPH A.

    2005-11-30

    The purpose of this project was to develop a fundamental understanding of the interaction of an ultrasonic wave with complex media, with specific emphases on recrystallization and sintering of metals. A combined analytical, numerical, and experimental research program was implemented. Theoretical models of elastic wave propagation through these complex materials were developed using stochastic wave field techniques. The numerical simulations focused on finite element wave propagation solutions through complex media. The experimental efforts were focused on corroboration of the models developed and on the development of new experimental techniques. The analytical and numerical research allows the experimental results to be interpreted quantitatively.

  11. Fundamental study of ash formation and deposition: Effect of reducing stoichiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Helble, J.J.; Bool, L.E.; Kang, S.G.

    1995-11-01

    This project is designed to examine the effects of combustion stoichiometry on the fundamental aspects of ash formation and ash deposit initiation. Emphasis is being placed on reducing stoichiometries associated with low-NOx combustion, although a range of oxidant/fuel ratios are being considered. Previous work has demonstrated that ash formation depends strongly upon coal mineralogy, including mineral type, size, amount, and the presence of organically associated inorganic species. Combustion temperature and the oxidation state of iron also play a significant role. As these latter items will vary with changes in stoichiometry, research to determine the net effect on deposition is required.

  12. Nanosecond Pulsed Discharge in Water without Bubbles: A Fundamental Study of Initiation, Propagation and Plasma Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seepersad, Yohan

    The state of plasma is widely known as a gas-phase phenomenon, but plasma in liquids have also received significant attention over the last century. Generating plasma in liquids however is theoretically challenging, and this problem is often overcome via liquid-gas phase transition preceding the actual plasma formation. In this sense, plasma forms in gas bubbles in the liquid. Recent work at the Drexel Plasma Institute has shown that nanosecond pulsed electric fields can initiate plasma in liquids without any initial cavitation phase, at voltages below theoretical direct-ionization thresholds. This unique regime is poorly understood and does not fit into any current descriptive mechanisms. As with all new phenomena, a complete fundamental description is paramount to understanding its usefulness to practical applications. The primary goals of this research were to qualitatively and quantitatively understand the phenomenon of nanosecond pulsed discharge in liquids as a means to characterizing properties that may open up niche application possibilities. Analysis of the plasma was based on experimental results from non-invasive, sub-nanosecond time-resolved optical diagnostics, including direct imaging, transmission imaging (Schlieren and shadow), and optical emission spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of the plasma were studied as a function of variations in the electric field amplitude and polarity, liquid permittivity, and pulse duration. It was found that the plasma size and emission intensity was dependent on the permittivity of the liquid, as well as the voltage polarity, and the structure and dynamics were explained by a 'cold-lightning' mechanism. The under-breakdown dynamics at the liquid-electrode interface were investigated by transmission imaging to provide evidence for a novel mechanism for initiation based on the electrostriction. This mechanism was proposed by collaborators on the project and developed alongside the experimental work in this

  13. Marketing fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Redmond, W H

    2001-01-01

    This chapter outlines current marketing practice from a managerial perspective. The role of marketing within an organization is discussed in relation to efficiency and adaptation to changing environments. Fundamental terms and concepts are presented in an applied context. The implementation of marketing plans is organized around the four P's of marketing: product (or service), promotion (including advertising), place of delivery, and pricing. These are the tools with which marketers seek to better serve their clients and form the basis for competing with other organizations. Basic concepts of strategic relationship management are outlined. Lastly, alternate viewpoints on the role of advertising in healthcare markets are examined. PMID:11401791

  14. Experimental studies of an X-Band fundamental frequency coaxial gyroklystron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jack Chih-Kang

    Gyroklystron amplifiers have long been viewed as a strong candidate for the RF source in next generation linear colliders. A fundamental frequency X-Band gyroklystron has been designed, built and tested on the new 100 MW test bed at the University of Maryland. The design frequency is 8.568 GHz. This thesis details the design, construction, and performance of these first harmonic microwave circuits. Investigation was done on two circuits, a two-cavity and a three-cavity circuit. The achieved power levels for the final three-cavity tube was 70 MW at 30% efficiency according to calorimetric measurements. The original design calls for a peak power of 96 MW at an efficiency near 40%; however, the highest velocity ratio achieved was near 1.0 as opposed to the design number of 1.5. This device operated at electron beam voltages and currents of 469 kV and 506 A respectively. The final operating frequency was 8.601 GHz because of beam cavity detuning effects. The amplifier successfully operated in the linear regime with the output frequency closely following the input source frequency. A successful implementation of a high power coaxial microwave circuit was one of the main results from these fundamental frequency experiments because it paved the way for investigating high power coaxial circuits at the second harmonic.

  15. Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler Fouling in Diesel Applications: Fundamental Studies Deposit Properties and Microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Storey, John Morse; Sluder, Scott; Lance, Michael J; Styles, Dan; Simko, Steve

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of experimental efforts aimed at improving the understanding of the mechanisms and conditions at play in the fouling of EGR coolers. An experimental apparatus was constructed to utilize simplified surrogate heat exchanger tubes in lieu of full-size heat exchangers. The use of these surrogate tubes allowed removal of the tubes after exposure to engine exhaust for study of the deposit layer and its properties. The exhaust used for fouling the surrogate tubes was produced using a modern medium-duty diesel engine fueled with both ultra-low sulfur diesel and biodiesel blends. At long exposure times, no significant difference in the fouling rate was observed between fuel types and HC levels. Surface coatings for the tubes were also evaluated to determine their impact on deposit growth. No surface treatment or coating produced a reduction in the fouling rate or any evidence of deposit removal. In addition, microstructural analysis of the fouling layers was performed using optical and electron microscopy in order to better understand the deposition mechanism. The experimental results are consistent with thermophoretic deposition for deposit formation, and van der Waals attraction between the deposit surface and exhaust-borne particulate.

  16. Separation of neutral compounds by microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography: fundamental studies on selectivity.

    PubMed

    Gabel-Jensen, C; Honoré Hansen, S; Pedersen-Bjergaard, S

    2001-04-01

    The selectivity of microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) was studied utilizing some uncharged model compounds like aromatic amides, steroids, and esters of nicotinic acid. The cosurfactant of the microemulsion was found to be the most important factor affecting the selectivity, and alteration between 6.6% of 1-propanol, 1-butanol, tetrahydrofuran, and 2-ethoxyethanol caused several substantial changes in the migration order. In addition, the nature of the surfactant was found to significantly affect the selectivity. In this case, changes in order of migration was observed by replacement of half the content of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) with either sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (SDOSS), 3-(N,N-dimethylmyristylammonio) propanesulfonate (MAPS), polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 21), and polyoxyethylene 23 lauryl ether (Brij 35). MEEKC was also accomplished with 3.3% of the anionic surfactant sodium cholate and with the cationic surfactant N-cetyl-N,N,N-trimethylammonium bromide (CTMA). Both provided substantial differences in selectivity as compared to the SDS-based systems. With SDS as surfacant, the concentration was varied within 1.0-4.5%. Minor selectivity changes were observed as the concentration of the surfacant was reduced, but the major effect was a reduction in the total migration time. The organic solvent of the microemulsion droplets was found only to have minor impact on the selectivity. PMID:11379955

  17. Fundamental and applied studies of helium ingrowth and aging in plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, M.F.; Zocco, T.; Albers, R.; Becker, J.D.; Walter, K.; Cort, B.; Paisley, D.; Nastasi, M.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this project was to develop new capabilities to assess the nucleation and growth of helium-associated defects in aged plutonium metal. This effort involved both fundamental and applied models to assist in predicting the transport and kinetics of helium in the metal lattice as well as ab initio calculations of the disposition of gallium in the fcc plutonium lattice and its resulting effects on phase stability. Experimentally this project aimed to establish experimental capabilities crucial to the prediction of helium effects in metals, such as transmission electron microscopy, thermal helium effusion, and the development of a laser-driven mini-flyer for understanding the role of helium and associated defects on shock response of plutonium surrogates.

  18. Studies of collision-induced emission in the fundamental vibration-rotation band of H2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caledonia, G. E.; Krech, R. H.; Wilkerson, T.; Taylor, R. L.; Birnbaum, G.

    Measurements are presented of the collision induced emission (CIE) from the fundamental vibration-rotation band of H2 taken over the temperature range of 900-3000 K. The spectral shape and strength of this IR band centered about 2.4 microns has been measured behind reflected shocks in mixtures of H2/Ar. The observed radiation at elevated temperatures is found to be dominantly in the Q branch. The results, compared with theory, show that radiation at elevated temperatures is primarily the result of an induced dipole moment in H2 induced by the overlap between the H2 and Ar electron clouds during collision. The strength of this interaction has been evaluated by an analysis of the measured temperature dependence of the absolute bandstrengths.

  19. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Arikawa, Hiroshi Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawamura, H.; Kato, K.; Kato, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakemi, Y.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Yoshida, H. P.; Imai, K.; and others

    2014-02-15

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a {sup 18}O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line.

  20. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ando, S; Aoki, T; Ezure, S; Harada, K; Hayamizu, T; Inoue, T; Ishikawa, T; Itoh, M; Kawamura, H; Kato, K; Kato, T; Uchiyama, A; Aoki, T; Furukawa, T; Hatakeyama, A; Hatanaka, K; Imai, K; Murakami, T; Nataraj, H S; Sato, T; Shimizu, Y; Wakasa, T; Yoshida, H P; Sakemi, Y

    2014-02-01

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a (18)O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line. PMID:24593466

  1. Radioactive ion beam transportation for the fundamental symmetry study with laser-trapped atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawamura, H.; Kato, K.; Kato, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2014-02-01

    The search for the violation of the fundamental symmetry in a radioactive atom is the promising candidate for precision tests of the standard model and its possible extensions. The subtle signal arising from the symmetry violation is enhanced in heavy atoms, such as a francium (Fr). To realize high precision measurements, a large amount of radioactive isotopes is required. The Fr is produced via a nuclear fusion reaction using a melted gold target with a 18O primary beam at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The maximum extraction efficiency of the Fr ion was achieved at approximately 35%. The beam line consists of an electrostatic deflector, three electrostatic quadrupole triplets to the measurement area at 10 m away from the reaction point, and several beam diagnosis systems. We optimized parameters of the beam line.

  2. Fundamental Study on Temperature Dependence of Deposition Rate of Silicic Acid - 13270

    SciTech Connect

    Shinmura, Hayata; Niibori, Yuichi; Mimura, Hitoshi

    2013-07-01

    The dynamic behavior of the silicic acid is one of the key factors to estimate the condition of the repository system after the backfill. This study experimentally examined the temperature dependence of dynamic behavior of supersaturated silicic acid in the co-presence of solid phase, considering Na ions around the repository, and evaluated the deposition rate constant, k, of silicic acid by using the first-order reaction equation considering the specific surface area. The values of k were in the range of 1.0x10{sup -11} to 1.0x10{sup -9} m/s in the temperature range of 288 K to 323 K. The deposition rate became larger with increments of temperature under the Na ion free condition. Besides, in the case of Na ions 0.6 M, colloidal silicic acid decreased dramatically at a certain time. This means that the diameter of the colloidal silicic acid became larger than the pore size of filter (0.45 μm) due to bridging of colloidal silicic acid. Furthermore, this study estimated the range of altering area and the aperture of flow-path in various value of k corresponding to temperature by using advection-dispersion model. The concentration in the flow-path became lower with increments of temperature, and when the value of k is larger than 1.0x10{sup -11} m/s, the deposition range of supersaturated silicic acid was estimated to be less than 20 m around the repository. In addition, the deposition of supersaturated silicic acid led the decrement of flow-path aperture, which was remarkable under the condition of relatively high temperature. Such a clogging in flow paths is expected as a retardation effect of radionuclides. (authors)

  3. Fundamental studies of the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Final technical report, April 1, 1988--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, W.D.

    1995-05-01

    We submit here a final technical report for the research program entitled: Fundamental Studies of the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond, DOE Grant No. DE-FG05-88ER45345-M006. This research program was initiated in 1988 under the direction of the late Professor David A. Stevenson and was renewed in 1992. Unfortunately, at the end of 1992, just as the last phase of this work was getting underway, Professor Stevenson learned that he had developed mesothelioma, a form of cancer based on asbestos. Professor Stevenson died from that disease in February of 1994. Professor William D. Nix, the Chairman of the Materials Science department at Stanford was named the Principal Investigator. Professor Nix has assembled this final technical report. Much of the work of this grant was conducted by Mr. Paul Dennig, a graduate student who will receive his Ph.D. degree from Stanford in a few months. His research findings are described in the chapters of this report and in the papers published over the past few years. The main discovery of this work was that surface topology plays a crucial role in the nucleation of diamond on silicon. Dennig and his collaborators demonstrated this by showing that diamond nucleates preferentially at the tips of asperities on a silicon surface rather than in the re-entrant comers at the base of such asperities. Some of the possible reasons for this effect are described in this report. The published papers listed on the next page of this report also describe this research. Interested persons can obtain copies of these papers from Professor Nix at Stanford. A full account of all of the research results obtained in this work is given in the regular chapters that follow this brief introduction. In addition, interested readers will want to consult Mr. Dennig`s Ph.D. dissertation when it is made available later this year.

  4. Exploiting the Temperature Dependence of Magnetic Susceptibility to Control Convection in Fundamental Studies of Solidification Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, C. D.; Evans, J. W.; Leslie, Fred; Jones, W. K., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that convection is a dominant mass transport mechanism when materials are solidified on Earth's surface. This convection is caused by gradients in density (and therefore gravitational force) that are brought about by gradients in temperature, composition or both. Diffusion of solute is therefore dwarfed by convection and the study of fundamental parameters, such as dendrite tip shape and growth velocity in the absence of convection is nearly impossible. Significant experimental work has therefore been carried out in orbiting laboratories with the intent of minimizing convection by minimizing gravity. One of the best known experiments of this kind is the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), supported by NASA. Naturally such experiments are costly and one objective of the present investigation is to develop an experimental method whereby convection can be- halted, in solidification and other experiments, on the surface. A second objective is to use the method to minimize convection resulting from the residual accelerations suffered by experiments in microgravity. The method to be used to minimize convection relies on the dependence of the magnetic susceptibility of a fluid on temperature or composition (whichever is driving convection). All materials experience a force when placed in a magnetic field gradient. The direction and magnitude of that force depend on the magnetic susceptibility of the material. Consequently the force will vary if the susceptibility varies with temperature or composition. With a magnetic field gradient in the right direction (typically upward) and of the right magnitude, this variation in the magnetic force can be made to exactly cancel the variation in the gravitational force. Expressed another way, normal buoyancy is exactly countered by a "magnetic buoyancy". To demonstrate the principle, a solution of MnC12 in water has been used. First the variation of the susceptibility of this paramagnetic solution with

  5. How fundamental are fundamental constants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    I argue that the laws of physics should be independent of one's choice of units or measuring apparatus. This is the case if they are framed in terms of dimensionless numbers such as the fine structure constant, ?. For example, the standard model of particle physics has 19 such dimensionless parameters whose values all observers can agree on, irrespective of what clock, rulers or scales? they use to measure them. Dimensional constants, on the other hand, such as ?, c, G, e and k ?, are merely human constructs whose number and values differ from one choice of units to the next. In this sense, only dimensionless constants are 'fundamental'. Similarly, the possible time variation of dimensionless fundamental 'constants' of nature is operationally well defined and a legitimate subject of physical enquiry. By contrast, the time variation of dimensional constants such as ? or ? on which a good many (in my opinion, confusing) papers have been written, is a unit-dependent phenomenon on which different observers might disagree depending on their apparatus. All these confusions disappear if one asks only unit-independent questions. We provide a selection of opposing opinions in the literature and respond accordingly.

  6. Fundamental studies on ultrasonic cavitation-assisted molten metal processing of A356-nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoda

    The usage of lightweight high-performance components is expected to increase significantly as automotive, military and aerospace industries are required to improve the energy efficiency and the performance of their products. A356, which is much lighter than steel, is an attractive replacement material. Therefore, it is of great interest to enhance its properties. There is strong evidence that the microstructure and mechanical properties can be considerably improved if nanoparticles are used as reinforcement to form metal-matrix-nano-composite (MMNC). Several recent studies revealed that ultrasonic vibration is highly efficient in dispersing nanoparticles into the melt and producing MMNC. In this thesis, a detailed analysis of the microstructure and mechanical properties is provided for an A356 alloy enhanced with Al2O 3 and SiC nanoparticles via ultrasonic processing. Each type of the nanoparticles was inserted into the A356 molten metal and dispersed by ultrasonic cavitation and acoustic streaming technology (UST) to avoid agglomeration or coalescence. The results showed that microstructures were greatly refined and with the addition of nanoparticles, tensile strength, yield strength and elongation increased significantly. SEM and EDS analyses were also performed to analyze the dispersion of nanoparticles in the A356 matrix. Since the ultrasonic energy is concentrated in a small region under the ultrasonic probe, it is difficult to ensure proper cavitation and acoustic streaming for efficient dispersion of the nanoparticles (especially in larger UST systems) without to determine the suitable ultrasonic parameters via modeling and simulation. Accordingly, another goal of this thesis was to develop well-controlled UST experiments that can be used in the development and validation of a recently developed UST modeling and simulation tool.

  7. Impact of Four Nonclinical Speaking Environments on a Child's Fundamental Frequency and Voice Level: A Preliminary Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Eric J.; Halpern, Angela E.; Spielman, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate how a child's fundamental frequency (F0) and estimated voice level (dB SPL) change in distinct speaking environments. Method: A child age 5;7 (years;months) wore a National Center for Voice and Speech voice dosimeter for 4 days. The 2 parameters measured were F0 and dB SPL. During analysis, the F0…

  8. Studies of fundamental properties of rutherfordium (element 104) using organic complexing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Czerwinski, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Chemical properties of rutherfordium (Rf) have been investigated with the organic ligands triisooctylamine (TIOA), tributylphosphate (TBP), and thenoyltrigluoroacetone (TTA). The TIOA studies showed that Rf behaves differently from Th and Eu and most similarly to Zr; only Zr and Rf extract from 12 M HCl. This result is further evidence that Rf is a Group 4 element. Studies with TBP showed that Rf chemical behavior differed from the other Group 4 elements. The extraction by TBP at different chloride concentrations showed that Rf at times behaves more like Pu[sup 4+] than Zr or Hf. At high chloride concentrations, Rf and Pu extraction decreased. Under the same conditions, Zr, Hf and Th extraction increased. In addition, Rf extraction by TBP was affected by hydrogen ion concentration, while Zr and Hf extraction was not. TTA extractions were used to determine the K[sub eq], K[sub hyd], and the ionic radius of Rf. The log K[sub eq] for Rf with TTA was calculated to be 3.18 [plus minus] 0.90. The first four log K[sub hyd]'s for Rf are calculated to be -2.6 [plus minus] 0.7, -5.9 [plus minus] 1.7, -10.2 [plus minus] 2.9, and -14.5 [plus minus] 4.1. These hydrolysis constants indicate that Rf will not hydrolyze at conditions under which Zr, Hf, and Pu will. Calculations of the ionic radius were made with the log K[sub eq] for Rf derived with TTA. The ionic radius of Rf was calculated to be 9.1 [plus minus] 0.4 nm for the 6-coordinate species and 10.2 [plus minus] 0.4 nm for the 8-coordinate species. A search for the isotope [sup 263]Rf was conducted using TTA chemistry. In 300 experiments, seven SF events and no alpha events were observed in the Rf chemical fraction. The observed SF events were attributed to [sup 263]Rf and had a half-life of 500 [plus minus][sup 300[sub 200

  9. Studies of fundamental properties of rutherfordium (Element 104) using organic complexing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Czerwinski, K.R.

    1992-04-01

    Chemical properties of rutherfordium (Rf) have been investigated with the organic ligands triisooctylamine (TIOA), tributylphosphate (TBP), and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA). The TIOA studies showed that Rf behaves differently than Th and Eu and most similarly to Zr, only Zr and Rf extract from 12 M HCI. This result is further evidence that Rf is a Group 4 element. Studies with TBP showed that Rf chemical behavior differed from the other Group 4 elements. The extraction by TBP at different chloride concentrations showed that Rf at times behaves more like Pu{sup 4+} than Zr or Hf. At high chloride concentrations, Rf and Pu extraction decreased. Under the same conditions, Zr, Hf and Th extraction increased. In addition, Rf extraction by TBP was affected by hydrogen ion concentration, while Zr and Hf extraction was not. TTA extractions were used to determine the K{sub eq}, K{sub hyd}, and the ionic radius of Rf. The of K{sub eq} for Rf with TTA was calculated to be 3.18 {plus_minus} 0.90. The first four log K{sub hyd`s} for Rf are calculated to be {minus}2.6 {plus_minus} 0.7, {minus}5.9 {plus_minus} 1.7, {minus}10.2 {plus_minus} 2.9, and {minus}14.5 {plus_minus} 4.1. These hydrolysis constants indicate that Rf will not hydrolyze at conditions under which Zr, Hf, and Pu will. Calculations of the ionic radius were made with the log K{sub eq} for Rf derived with TTA. The ionic radius of Rf was calculated to be 91 {plus_minus} 4 pm for the 6-coordinate species and 102 {plus_minus} 4 pm for the 8-coordinate species. A search for the isotope {sup 263}Rf was conducted using TTA chemistry. In 300 experiments, seven SF events and no alpha events were observed in the Rf chemical fraction. The observed SF events attributed to {sup 263}Rf and had a half-life of 500 {plus_minus}{sub 200}{sup 300} seconds and a production cross section of 140 {plus_minus} 50 pb.

  10. Studies of fundamental properties of rutherfordium (Element 104) using organic complexing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Czerwinski, K.R.

    1992-04-01

    Chemical properties of rutherfordium (Rf) have been investigated with the organic ligands triisooctylamine (TIOA), tributylphosphate (TBP), and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA). The TIOA studies showed that Rf behaves differently than Th and Eu and most similarly to Zr, only Zr and Rf extract from 12 M HCI. This result is further evidence that Rf is a Group 4 element. Studies with TBP showed that Rf chemical behavior differed from the other Group 4 elements. The extraction by TBP at different chloride concentrations showed that Rf at times behaves more like Pu{sup 4+} than Zr or Hf. At high chloride concentrations, Rf and Pu extraction decreased. Under the same conditions, Zr, Hf and Th extraction increased. In addition, Rf extraction by TBP was affected by hydrogen ion concentration, while Zr and Hf extraction was not. TTA extractions were used to determine the K{sub eq}, K{sub hyd}, and the ionic radius of Rf. The of K{sub eq} for Rf with TTA was calculated to be 3.18 {plus minus} 0.90. The first four log K{sub hyd's} for Rf are calculated to be {minus}2.6 {plus minus} 0.7, {minus}5.9 {plus minus} 1.7, {minus}10.2 {plus minus} 2.9, and {minus}14.5 {plus minus} 4.1. These hydrolysis constants indicate that Rf will not hydrolyze at conditions under which Zr, Hf, and Pu will. Calculations of the ionic radius were made with the log K{sub eq} for Rf derived with TTA. The ionic radius of Rf was calculated to be 91 {plus minus} 4 pm for the 6-coordinate species and 102 {plus minus} 4 pm for the 8-coordinate species. A search for the isotope {sup 263}Rf was conducted using TTA chemistry. In 300 experiments, seven SF events and no alpha events were observed in the Rf chemical fraction. The observed SF events attributed to {sup 263}Rf and had a half-life of 500 {plus minus}{sub 200}{sup 300} seconds and a production cross section of 140 {plus minus} 50 pb.

  11. Real-time X-ray transmission microscopy for fundamental studies solidification: Al-Al2Au eutectic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William F.; Sen, Subhayu

    1998-01-01

    High resolution real-time X-ray Transmission Microscopy, XTM, has been applied to obtain information fundamental to solidification of optically opaque metallic systems. We have previously reported the measurement of the solute profile in the liquid, phase growth, and detailed solid-liquid interfacial morphology of aluminum based alloys with exposure times less than 2 seconds. Recent advances in XTM furnace design have provided an increase in real-time magnification (during solidification) for the XTM from 40X to 160X. The increased magnification has enabled for the first time the XTM imaging of real-time growth of fibers and particles with diameters of 5 μm. We have previously applied this system to study the kinetics of formation and morphological evolution of secondary fibers and particles in Al-Bi monotectic alloys. In this paper we present the preliminary results of the first real-time observations of fiber morphology evolution in optically opaque bulk metal sample of Aluminum-Gold eutectic alloy. These studies show that the XTM can be applied to study the fundamentals of eutectic and monotectic solidification. We are currently attempting to apply this technology in the fundamentals of solidification in microgravity.

  12. Real-time X-ray transmission microscopy for fundamental studies solidification: Al-Al{sub 2}Au eutectic

    SciTech Connect

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William F.; Sen, Subhayu

    1998-01-15

    High resolution real-time X-ray Transmission Microscopy, XTM, has been applied to obtain information fundamental to solidification of optically opaque metallic systems. We have previously reported the measurement of the solute profile in the liquid, phase growth, and detailed solid-liquid interfacial morphology of aluminum based alloys with exposure times less than 2 seconds. Recent advances in XTM furnace design have provided an increase in real-time magnification (during solidification) for the XTM from 40X to 160X. The increased magnification has enabled for the first time the XTM imaging of real-time growth of fibers and particles with diameters of 5 {mu}m. We have previously applied this system to study the kinetics of formation and morphological evolution of secondary fibers and particles in Al-Bi monotectic alloys. In this paper we present the preliminary results of the first real-time observations of fiber morphology evolution in optically opaque bulk metal sample of Aluminum-Gold eutectic alloy. These studies show that the XTM can be applied to study the fundamentals of eutectic and monotectic solidification. We are currently attempting to apply this technology in the fundamentals of solidification in microgravity.

  13. Additional Treatments Offer Little Benefit for Pancreatic Cancer: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... of gastroenterology-pancreatology at Beaujon Hospital, in Clichy, France. The study was funded by the pharmaceutical company ... D., department of gastroenterology-pancreatology, Beaujon Hospital, Clichy, France; Deborah Schrag, M.D., M.P.H., chief ...

  14. NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives

    SciTech Connect

    Jumate, E.; Manea, D.; Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R.

    2013-11-13

    The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T{sub 2} relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T{sub 2} distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T{sub 2} relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T{sub 2} relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water.

  15. An SEU tolerant memory cell derived from fundamental studies of SEU mechanisms in SRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, H.T.; Axness, C.L.; McBrayer, J.D.; Browning, J.S.; Fu, J.S.; Ochoa, A. Jr.; Koga, R.

    1987-12-01

    A new single event upset (SEU) hardening concept, an LRAM cell, is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. Decoupling resistors in the LRAM are used only to protect against the short n-channel transient; longer persisting pulses are reduced in magnitude by a voltage divider, a basically new concept for SEU protection. In such a design, smaller resistors provide SEU tolerance, allowing higher performance, hardened memories. As basis for the LRAM idea, techniques were developed to measure time constants for ion induced voltage transients in conventional static random access memories, SRAM. Time constants of 0.8 and 6.3 nsec were measured for transients following strikes at the n- and p-channel drains, respectively - primary areas of SEU sensitivity. These data are the first transient time measurements on full memory chips and the large difference is fundamental to the LRAM concept. Test structures of the new design exhibit equivalent SEU tolerance with resistors 5-to-10 times smaller than currently used in SRAM. Our advanced transport-plus-circuit numerical simulations of the SEU process predicted this result and account for the LRAM experiments, as well as a variety of experiments on conventional SRAM.

  16. Additional EIPC Study Analysis: Interim Report on High Priority Topics

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Stanton W

    2013-11-01

    Between 2010 and 2012 the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) conducted a major long-term resource and transmission study of the Eastern Interconnection (EI). With guidance from a Stakeholder Steering Committee (SSC) that included representatives from the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) among others, the project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 involved a long-term capacity expansion analysis that involved creation of eight major futures plus 72 sensitivities. Three scenarios were selected for more extensive transmission- focused evaluation in Phase 2. Five power flow analyses, nine production cost model runs (including six sensitivities), and three capital cost estimations were developed during this second phase. The results from Phase 1 and 2 provided a wealth of data that could be examined further to address energy-related questions. A list of 13 topics was developed for further analysis; this paper discusses the first five.

  17. Testing Our Fundamental Assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    fundamental assumptions.A recent focus set in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, titled Focus on Exploring Fundamental Physics with Extragalactic Transients, consists of multiple published studies doing just that.Testing General RelativitySeveral of the articles focus on the 4th point above. By assuming that the delay in photon arrival times is only due to the gravitational potential of the Milky Way, these studies set constraints on the deviation of our galaxys gravitational potential from what GR would predict. The study by He Gao et al. uses the different photon arrival times from gamma-ray bursts to set constraints at eVGeV energies, and the study by Jun-Jie Wei et al. complements this by setting constraints at keV-TeV energies using photons from high-energy blazar emission.Photons or neutrinos from different extragalactic transients each set different upper limits on delta gamma, the post-Newtonian parameter, vs. particle energy or frequency. This is a test of Einsteins equivalence principle: if the principle is correct, delta gamma would be exactly zero, meaning that photons of different energies move at the same velocity through a vacuum. [Tingay Kaplan 2016]S.J. Tingay D.L. Kaplan make the case that measuring the time delay of photons from fast radio bursts (FRBs; transient radio pulses that last only a few milliseconds) will provide even tighter constraints if we are able to accurately determine distances to these FRBs.And Adi Musser argues that the large-scale structure of the universe plays an even greater role than the Milky Way gravitational potential, allowing for even stricter testing of Einsteins equivalence principle.The ever-narrower constraints from these studies all support GR as a correct set of rules through which to interpret our universe.Other Tests of Fundamental PhysicsIn addition to the above tests, Xue-Feng Wu et al. show that FRBs can be used to provide severe constraints on the rest mass of the photon, and S. Croft et al. even touches on what we

  18. Fundamental studies of high-temperature corrosion reactions. Fifth annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, R.A.

    1980-02-01

    The in-situ study of metal oxidation reactions and the mechanism of the sulfidation of molybdenum by sulfur gases were studied. Equipment including a SEM microscope, heater and power supply which were used is described. (FS)

  19. Fundamental studies of fluid mechanics and stability in porous media. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Homsy, G.M.

    1992-07-01

    We have been active in four areas: Numerical and analytical studies of viscous fingering in miscible displacements, including non- monotonic mobility profiles; numerical and analytical studies of the effect of non-Newtonian fluid characteristics on instabilities; experimental studies of instabilities of moving contact lines for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids; and studies of natural convective energy transport due to time-dependent body forces.

  20. Study Guide for Fundamentals of Solar Heating: A Correspondence Course for the Airconditioning Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association, Vienna, VA.

    This study guide groups eleven lessons into four study units. The first unit discusses the development and basic concepts of solar heating. The second unit deals with the nomenclature of the solar heating system. The third study unit covers sizing of the solar heating system to meet demand and discusses the operation of the total system. The…

  1. The Testing Effect: Illustrating a Fundamental Concept and Changing Study Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einstein, Gilles O.; Mullet, Hillary G.; Harrison, Tyler L.

    2012-01-01

    An important recent finding is that testing improves learning and memory. In this article, the authors describe a demonstration that illustrates this principle and helps students incorporate more testing into their learning. The authors asked students to read one text using a Study-Study strategy and one text using a Study-Test strategy. One week…

  2. Fundamental studies of water pretreatment of coal. Seventh quarterly report, April 1, 1991--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Kroo, E.; Charpenay, S.; Bassilakis, R.

    1991-10-25

    During the seventh quarter, water pretreatment experiments were done at lower pressures (1000 psig), with early H{sub 2}O injection or continuous H{sub 2}O injection, and with demineralized coals. In addition, a set of blank experiments was done with all four coals in helium at the following conditions: 350{degrees}C; 4000 psig; 20 minutes. An additional experiment was done with the Zap lignite at atmospheric pressure. Helium was used instead of nitrogen since it can be obtained in highly pure grades. The purpose of the blank experiments is to determine how much of the water pretreatment process is a thermal and/or pressure effort. The residues from the standard water pretreatment experiments with Illinois and Pittsburgh coals were subjected to analysis by TG-FTIR, solvent extraction, solvent swelling, oxygen reactivity index and donor solvent liquefaction. The pyridine extractables were analyzed. With regard to liquefaction behavior, improvements in the yields of oils and toluene solubles are observed for selected Illinois and Pittsburgh coals at longer pretreatment times ({ge} 60 minutes).

  3. Variability in Fundamental Frequency during Speech in Prodromal and Incipient Parkinson's Disease: A Longitudinal Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harel, Brian; Cannizzaro, Michael; Snyder, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Nearly two centuries ago, Parkinson (1817) first observed that a particular pattern of speech changes occur in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Numerous studies have documented these changes using a wide variety of acoustic measures, and yet few studies have attempted to quantify any such changes longitudinally, through the early…

  4. A Fundamental Study for Efficient Implementaion of Online Collaborative Activities in Large-Scale Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsuba, Ryuichi; Suzuki, Yusei; Kubota, Shin-Ichiro; Miyazaki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    We study tactics for writing skills development through cross-disciplinary learning in online large-scale classes, and particularly are interested in implementation of online collaborative activities such as peer reviewing of writing. The goal of our study is to carry out collaborative works efficiently via online effectively in large-scale…

  5. Secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS)-recent methodical progress and applications to fundamental studies in particle/surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oechsner, Hans

    1995-05-01

    Recent instrumental developments of the conventional secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) technique based on electron gas post-ionization are described with regard to its application to non-conducting samples and its implementation in a novel secondary neutral microprobe. The use of molecular SNMS signals for quantitative surface analysis, and a standard free technique for absolute depth calibration from the mass spectrometric signals are discussed and elucidated by appropriate examples. Finally, some applications of electron gas SNMS to fundamental studies on low energy particle/surface interaction are presented.

  6. Fundamental studies of coal liquefaction. Quarterly report No. 6, January 1--April 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.S.

    1993-05-04

    Figures 3, 4, and 5 display images of two adjacent particles chosen for analysis with characteristic dimensions of 50--100 {mu}m Figure 3 shows that there is essentially no change up to 395{degrees}C over an 18 min period, but at that point the particle labeled a begins to shrink. The action continues in Figure 4 where the particle contracts to about half its initial size over a 45 sec period as the temperature, increases from 424{degrees}C to 430{degrees}C, at which point the contraction stops. The size profile for a is presented in Figure 6 and compares very well with the profile generated in an earlier experiment from our last report. As just noted, this agreement suggests that this behavior is representative of at least one class of particle in the sample. Figure 5 shows that there is a second, higher temperature range of activity, represented by the changes in particle b. This particle contracts to about half its size from 450{degrees} to 460{degrees}C over 1 min. The temperature was held at 460{degrees} and there appears to be an additional 7--10% contraction over 10 min at that temperature, although the scatter seen in Figure 6 shows that change is not outside our error limits. We conclude that the process takes place rapidly and concludes within initial 1 min period.

  7. Fundamental study of flow field generated by rotorcraft blades using wide-field shadowgraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.; Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    The vortex trajectory and vortex wake generated by helicopter rotors are visualized using a wide-field shadowgraph technique. Use of a retro-reflective Scotchlite screen makes it possible to investigate the flow field generated by full-scale rotors. Tip vortex trajectories are visible in shadowgraphs for a range of tip Mach number of 0.38 to 0.60. The effect of the angle of attack is substantial. At an angle of attack greater than 8 degrees, the visibility of the vortex core is significant even at relatively low tip Mach numbers. The theoretical analysis of the sensitivity is carried out for a rotating blade. This analysis demonstrates that the sensitivity decreases with increasing dimensionless core radius and increases with increasing tip Mach number. The threshold value of the sensitivity is found to be 0.0015, below which the vortex core is not visible and above which it is visible. The effect of the optical path length is also discussed. Based on this investigation, it is concluded that the application of this wide-field shadowgraph technique to a large wind tunnel test should be feasible. In addition, two simultaneous shadowgraph views would allow three-dimensional reconstruction of vortex trajectories.

  8. Fundamental studies of gas phase ionic reactions by ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, K.; Knighton, W. B.; Sahlstrom, K. E.; Grimsrud, E. P.

    1995-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) provides a promising approach to the study of gas phase ionic reactions in buffer gases at unusually high pressures. This point is illustrated here by studies of the Sn2 nucleophilic displacement reaction, Cl(-) + CH3Br yields Br + CH3Br, using IMS at atmospheric pressure. The equilibrium clustering reaction, Cl(-)(CHCI3)(n - 1) + CHCI3 yields Cl(-)(CHCI3)(n), where n = 1 and 2, and the effect of clustering on the Sn2 reaction with CH3Br have also been characterized by this IMS-based kinetic method. Present problems and anticipated improvements in the application of ion mobility spectrometry to studies of other gas phase ionic processes are discussed.

  9. Fundamental studies of the properties of photoresists based on resins containing polymer-bound photoacid generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheng-Tsung; Jarnagin, Nathan D.; Wang, Mingxing; Gonsalves, Kenneth E.; Robert, Jeanette M.; Yueh, Wang; Henderson, Clifford L.

    2006-03-01

    Conventional chemically amplified photoresist formulations are complex mixtures that include a protected polymer resin and a small molecule photoacid generator (PAG). The limited compatibility of the PAG with resist resin and the mobility of the small molecule additive can lead to problems including PAG phase separation, non-uniform initial PAG and photoacid distribution, and acid migration during the post-exposure baking (PEB) processes. The incorporation of PAG units into the main chain of the polymer resin is one possible method to alleviate these problems. Recently, we have investigated methacrylate based resists which incorporate novel PAG functional groups into the polymer main chain. These materials have demonstrated good resolution performance for both 193 nm and EUV exposure for sub-100 nm patterning. However, limited information is available on the effect of binding the PAG to the polymer on PAG photoreactivity and photoacid diffusivity. In this work, the photoacid generation rate constant (commonly referred to as the Dill C parameter for the PAG) of both triflate polymer-bound PAG and blended PAG photoresists based on poly(γ-butyrolactone methacrylate -co-2-ethyl-2-adamantyl methacrylate ) resists were determined by a new technique utilizing both quantitative FTIR spectroscopy and kinetic model fitting. The results indicate that the polymer-bound PAG resist has a lower photoacid generation rate constant (C=0.0122) than the blend PAG one (C=0.2647). This large difference in Dill C parameters would indicate that the sensitivity of the polymer-bound PAG resist is substantially lower than that of the analogous blended sample which is consistent with contrast curve data for these two samples.

  10. Using Baseball in Social Studies Instruction: Addressing the Five Fundamental Themes of Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgington, William D.; Hyman, William

    2005-01-01

    Many children do not enjoy social studies because they see it as having little, if any, relevance to their lives. That response is attributable primarily to two factors: Dry content and even drier instructional strategies. Teachers know that if material presented to children is not meaningful and relevant to their lives, real learning does not…

  11. Exploratory cell research and fundamental processes study in solid state electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smyrl, W.H.; Owens, B.B.; White, H.S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science)

    1990-06-01

    Last year this program demonstrated that alternative to lithium had some merit on which to base new polymer electrolyte batteries and other electrochemical devices. We reported that Na, Zn, and Cu electrolytes have modest conductivities at 100{degree}C. Some preliminary cell cycling data were reported with V{sub 6}O{sub 13} insertion cathodes, and the successful cell cycling suggested that N{sup +}, Zn{sup +2} could be inserted and removed reversibly in the cathode material. Also, thin-film polymer cathodes were shown by impedance measurements to have three characteristic regions of behavior. Each region had different controlling processes with relaxation time constants that could be separated with careful manipulation of film thickness, morphology, and charging level. The present report gives results of the continuation of these studies. In particular, the sodium system was studied more intensively with conductivity measurements on sodium triflate in poly(ethyleneoxide)(PEO), and cell studies with V{sub 6}O{sub 13} and poly(pyrrole)(PPY) cathodes. The impedance work was concluded and several directions of new work in that area were identified. The insertion studies with single crystal V{sub 6}O{sub 13} were concluded on this program and transferred to NSF funding. 29 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Fundamental and Magnetic-Hardening Studies of Rare-Earth and Nanocomposite Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Sellmyer, David J.

    2003-12-22

    In this project we study new nanocrystalline and nanocomposite structures that have high potential for permanent-magnet development. These materials, which can be synthesized to have either very high or intermediate coercivities, have many applications in electric power, transportation, and information-storage industries. There is great interest in further development of understanding and application of these materials.

  13. Swimming Upstream against the Fundamental Attribution Error: Subjects' Weak Generalizations from the Darley and Batson Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietromonaco, Paula R.; Nisbett, Richard E.

    1982-01-01

    Examined whether reading the Darley and Batson study served to change subjects' understanding of the determinants of helping, and if subjects would come to regard degree of hurry as an important predictor in similar helping situations. Found subjects predicting helping behavior in similar situations were influenced moderately by hurry. (RC)

  14. Fundamental Studies on Two-Phase Gas-Liquid Flows Through Packed Beds in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakotaiah, Vemuri; McCready, Mark J.; Motil, Brian J.

    2002-01-01

    evaluated along with a companion set of tests in normal gravity. The flow rates, fluid properties and packing properties were selected to provide a range of several orders-of-magnitude for the important dimensionless parameters. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  15. A fundamental study of the sticking of insect residues to aircraft wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiss, N. S., Jr.; Wightman, J. P.; Gilliam, D. R.; Siochi, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    The aircraft industry has long been concerned with the increase of drag on airplanes due to fouling of the wings by insects. The present research studied the effects of surface energy and surface roughness on the phenomenon of insect sticking. Aluminum plates of different roughnesses were coated with thin films of polymers with varying surface energies. The coated plates were attached to a custom jig and mounted on top of an automobile for insect collection. Contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and specular reflectance infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the surface before and after the insect impact experiments. Scanning electron microscopy showed the topography of insect residues on the exposed plates. Moments were calculated in order to find a correlation between the parameters studied and the amount of bugs collected on the plates. An effect of surface energy on the sticking of insect residues was demonstrated.

  16. Fundamental studies of the mechanisms of slag deposit formation: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, L.G.; Benson, S.; Rabinovich, A.; Tangsathitkulchai, M.; Schobert H.H.

    1987-07-01

    The kinetics of ash deposition on utility boilers have been studied. A heated tube furnace system was used in the study. Areas of consideration in the deposition mechanics were: close space knowledge of chemical composition and distribution of inorganic constituents in coal, transformations and reactions of the inorganic constituents in the flame, ash transport mechanisms, initial adhesion of ash particles to heat transfer surfaces and subsequently to each other to form a deposit, and further interactions of the deposited ash to grow a strong deposit. Interactions of deposited ash that cause changes in physical and chemical properties in an aged deposit are due to processes such as sintering, chemical reactions, and melting. The degree of these changes increases as the deposit grows from the heat transfer surfaces where it forms. All of these changes during the deposit formation process are coal-specific and are strongly dependent on the boiler configuration and operating conditions. 18 refs., 55 figs., 42 tabs.

  17. Neutron Scattering Studies of Fundamental Processes in Earth Materials, Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, K. R.

    2007-06-11

    The aim of this work was to use neutron scattering techniques to explore the dynamics and structure of water in rock samples. The dynamics of water in rock at low (residual) saturation are directly related to the transport properties of fluids within the host rock. The structure of water in rock may be related to the elastic behavior of the rock, which in many cases is nonlinear and hysteretic. Neutron scattering techniques allow us to study water in intact rock samples at both the molecular and microstructural scales. Our samples were Berea sandstone, Calico Hills and Prow Pass tuffs from Yucca Mountain, NV, and pure samples of the tuff constituents, specifically mordenite and clinoptilolite. We chose Berea sandstone because its macroscopic elastic behavior is known to be highly unusual, and the microscopic mechanisms producing this behavior are not understood. We chose Yucca Mountain tuff, because the fluid transport properties of the geologic structure at Yucca Mountain, Nevada could be relevant to the performance of a high level nuclear waste repository at that site. Neutron scattering methods have a number of properties that are extremely useful for the study of earth materials. In contrast to X-rays, neutrons have very low absorption cross-sections for most elements so that entire bulk samples of considerable size can be 'illuminated' by the neutron beam. Similarly, samples that are optically opaque can be readily investigated by inelastic neutron scattering techniques. Neutrons are equally sensitive to light atoms as to heavy atoms, and can, for example, readily distinguish between Al and Si, neighboring atoms in the periodic table that are difficult to tell apart by X-ray diffraction. Finally, neutrons are particularly sensitive to hydrogen and thus can be used to study the motions, both vibrational and diffusive, of H-containing molecules in rocks, most notably of course, water. Our studies were primarily studies of guest molecules (in our case, water) in

  18. Fundamental Studies on Donor-acceptor Conjugated Polymers Containing 'Heavy' Group 14 and Group 16 Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Gregory Laird

    One advantage of conjugated polymers as organic materials is that their properties may be readily tuned through covalent modifications. This thesis presents studies on the structure-property relationships resulting from single- and double-atom substitutions on an alternating donor-acceptor conjugated polymer. Specifically, single selenium and tellurium atoms have been incorporated into the acceptor monomer in place of sulfur; silicon and germanium atoms have been substituted in place of carbon at the donor monomer bridge position. The carbon-donor/ tellurium-acceptor polymer was synthesized by a post-polymerization reaction sequence and demonstrated the utility of heavy group 16 atoms to red shift a polymer absorption spectrum. Density functional theory calculations point to a new explanation for this result invoking the lower heavy atom ionization energy and reduced aromaticity of acceptor monomers containing selenium and tellurium compared to sulfur. Absorption and emission experiments demonstrate that both silicon and germanium substitutions in the donor slightly blue shift the polymer absorption spectrum. Polymers containing sulfur in the acceptor are the strongest light absorbers of all polymers studied here. Molecular weight and phenyl end capping studies show that molecular weight appears to affect polymer absorption to the greatest degree in a medium molecular weight regime and that these effects have a significant aggregation component. Solar cell devices containing either the silicon- or germanium-donor/selenium-acceptor polymer display improved red light harvesting or hole mobility relative to their structural analogues. Overall, these results clarify the effects of single atom substitution on donor-acceptor polymers and aid in the future design of polymers containing heavy atoms.

  19. The use of analytical surface tools in the fundamental study of wear. [atomic nature of wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Various techniques and surface tools available for the study of the atomic nature of the wear of materials are reviewed These include chemical etching, x-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, Auger emission spectroscopy analysis, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, field ion microscopy, and the atom probe. Properties of the surface and wear surface regions which affect wear, such as surface energy, crystal structure, crystallographic orientation, mode of dislocation behavior, and cohesive binding, are discussed. A number of mechanisms involved in the generation of wear particles are identified with the aid of the aforementioned tools.

  20. Fundamental studies of passivity and passivity breakdown. Final report, [September 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, D.D.; Urquidi-Macdonald, M.

    1994-02-21

    Purpose is to understand the mechanisms for growth and breakdown of passive films on metal and alloy surfaces in aqueous medium; a secondary goal is to devise methods for predicting localized corrosion damage in industrial systems. Tasks currently being studied are: formation of bilayer structures in passive films on metals and alloys; passivity breakdown on solid vs. liquid gallium; roles of alloying elements in passivity breakdown; electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of passive films; electronic structure of passive oxide films; photoelectrochemical impedance spectroscopy of passive films; and kinetics of localized attack.

  1. The use of analytical surface tools in the fundamental study of wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews the various techniques and surface tools available for the study of the atomic nature of the wear of materials. These include chemical etching, X-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, Auger emission spectroscopy analysis, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, field ion microscopy, and the atom probe. Properties of the surface and wear surface regions which effect wear such as surface energy, crystal structure, crystallographic orientation, mode of dislocation behavior, and cohesive binding are discussed. A number of mechanisms involved in the generation of wear particles are identified with the aid of the aforementioned tools.

  2. Atomic physics techniques for studying nuclear ground state properties, fundamental interactions and symmetries: status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, H.-Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    The international workshop on “Application of Lasers and Storage Devices in Atomic Nuclei Research” held during 2009 in Poznan gave an excellent overview on the latest experimental and theoretical results regarding the investigation of radionuclides by atomic physics techniques and the extraction of ground state properties of exotic nuclei. This publication intends to summarize the progress recently achieved by laser spectroscopy and mass spectrometry as well as by weak interaction studies using atomic physics techniques. Furthermore, it tries to point to some areas requiring urgent improvements and to indicate some routes of future research and challenging opportunities.

  3. Fundamental studies in production of C[sub 2]-C[sub 4] hydrocarbons from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, W.H.; Oblad, A.G.

    1993-03-01

    The following conclusions can be drawn from the result obtained in this kinetic study of single stage coal gasification to hydrocarbon (HC) gases high in C[sub 2]-C[sub 4] hydrocarbons. It was observed that the direct conversion of coal to HC gases involves two steps. The first step is thermal cleavage of the coal structure to produce liquids with small amounts of gases and coke. The second step is conversion of liquids to gases. Coal to liquids occurs very rapidly and was completed within 10 minutes. Liquids to gases is the rate-determining step of the overall process. The conversion of liquids to gases was observed to follow first order kinetics. The first order kinetics treatment of the data by isothermal approximation gave an apparent activation energy of approximately 23 kcal/mol. The first order kinetics treatment of the data by a more rigorous non-isothermal method gave an activation energy of 26 kcal/mol. The quantity of HC gases produced directly from coal reached a constant value of about l0% of the dmmf coal at a reaction time of 10 miutes. Most of the HC gases were produced from the liquids. The study of model compounds shows that conversion of liquids to HC gases.proceeds through a carbonium ion mechanism, and this accounts for the production of C[sub 2]-C[sub 4] gases. Liquid to gases occurs by a catalytic hydrocracking reaction.

  4. Development of critical attitude in fundamentals of professional care discipline: a case study.

    PubMed

    Waterkemper, Roberta; do Prado, Marta Lenise; Medina, Jose Luis Moya; Reibnitz, Kenya Schmidt

    2014-04-01

    This is a qualitative case study to identify the contributions of a critical pedagogical technique in developing critical attitudes of graduating nursing students in Brazil. Fourteen students participated in this study. Data were collected from March to August 2010 using triangulation of non-participant observation, interview and document analysis. The collected data were transcribed to Word documents, which were subsequently imported into ATLAS.ti, version 6.2, for organisation and qualitative data analysis. The analysis was based on the work of Minayo (2010). The following three thematic analysis units were constructed: feeling free - seeking the liberty to learn to admire, admiring by curiosity and reflecting about the admired object. The results of the thematic categories reveal that the students understand that they are free to have an active role in their education, and the teacher facilitates this process; thus, the students have a raison d'ètre, or reason for being, free. Feeling free, the student can exercise their curiosity when facing the given situations and topics, which challenges them to make decisions based on their awareness of the world. PMID:23968668

  5. [A fundamental study of the fabrication of a medical prosthesis by slip casting (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, S

    1982-01-01

    Sintered 316 L stainless steel, made by slip casting, was studied in the present work for its potential use as a medical prosthesis. The physical and mechanical properties were scrutinized to determine characteristics of the specimens. Corrosion tests were conducted in boiling 5% H2SO4. Microstructures of the specimens were examined. The samples were implanted for 31 days in the dorsolateral subcutaneous site of living rats. The results were as follows. The shrinkage during heating varied from 10.3 to 33.0%, the relative density from 0.41 to 0.78, and porosity from 20.4 to 58.2%. Tensile strength varied from 2.3 to 24.6 kg/mm2, yield strength from 2.8 to 11.6 kg/mm2, elastic modulus from 1 075 to 7 400 kg/mm2, elongation from 9.1 to 19%, hardness of Brinell scale from 7.5 to 53.1. Mechanical properties as mentioned above decreased with increasing porosity. Pore size distribution varied 4.4 to 44 mu. Both Si and ferrite, or either of the two were observed in the matrix of austenite. Corrosion resistance were effected greatly by the porosity. Blood vessels, fibroblasts, fibrous tissues were found surrounding the sintered specimens and in the interior pores. No degeneration or necrosis were noted. Based on the tentative findings of the present studies, I can say that sintered stainless steel have a potential for medical application. PMID:6951897

  6. Fundamental Studies of Assembly and Mechanical Properties of Lipid Bilayer Membranes and Unilamellar Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi

    This dissertation work focuses on: (i) obtaining a phospholipid bilayer membrane (LBM)/conducting electrode system with low defect density and optimized rigidity; (ii) investigating vesicle stability and mechanical properties. LBM is a simplified yet representative cell membrane model. LBMs assembled on conductive surfaces can probe protein-LBM interactions activities electrochemically. Sterically stabilized vesicles could be used as cell models or for drug delivery. The main challenges for LBM assembly on gold are vesicles do not spontaneously rupture to form LBMs on gold and the roughness of the gold substrate has considerable influence on molecular film defect density. In this study, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) vesicles were functionalized with 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine- N-poly(ethylene glycol)-2000-N-[3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate] (DSPE-PEG-PDP) to yield stable LBMs on gold without surface modification. A template-stripping method was used to obtain atomically flat and pristine gold surfaces. The critical force to initiate vesicle rupture decreases with increasing DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration, indicating that gold-thiolate bonding between DSPE-PEG-PDP and gold substrates promotes LBM formation. Mechanical properties of LBMs and vesicles were investigated as a function of DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration via Atomic Force Microscopy. The elastic moduli of LBMs were determined with DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration ranging from 0mol% to 24mol% and were found to depend on PEG chain conformation. Incorporating DSPE-PEG-PDP molecules with PEG in mushroom conformation results in a decrease of LBM rigidity, while incorporating PEG in brush conformation leads to LBM stiffening. Contrarily, mechanical properties of functionalized vesicles did not vary significantly by varying DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration. LBM with tunable rigidity by adjusting DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration provides a versatile cell membrane model for studying protein or

  7. Fundamental studies of ceramic/metal interfacial reactions at elevated temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, S. M.; Billings, G. W.; Indacochea, J. E.

    2000-12-14

    This work characterizes the interfaces resulting from exposing oxide and non-oxide ceramic substrates to zirconium metal and stainless steel-zirconium containing alloys. The ceramic/metal systems together were preheated at about 600 C and then the temperatures were increased to the test maximum temperature, which exceeded 1800 C, in an atmosphere of high purity argon. Metal samples were placed onto ceramic substrates, and the system was heated to elevated temperatures past the melting point of the metallic specimen. After a short stay at the peak temperature, the system was cooled to room temperature and examined. The chemical changes across the interface and other microstructural developments were analyzed with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). This paper reports on the condition of the interfaces in the different systems studied and describes possible mechanisms influencing the microstructure.

  8. A fundamental study of chromium deposition on solid oxide fuel cell cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Michael C.; Kurokawa, Hideto; Jacobson, Craig P.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Visco, Steven J.

    Chromium contamination of metal oxides and SOFC cathode catalysts is studied in the range 700-1000 °C. Samples are exposed to a moist air atmosphere saturated with volatile Cr species in the presence and absence of direct contact between the sample and ferritic stainless steel powder. Chromium contamination of the samples is observed to occur via two separate pathways: surface diffusion from the stainless steel surface and vapor deposition from the atmosphere. Surface diffusion dominates in all cases. Surface diffusion is found to be a significant source of Cr contamination for LSM and LSCF at 700, 800, and 1000 °C. Vapor deposition of Cr onto LSCF was observed at each of these temperatures, but was not observed for LSM at 700 or 800 °C. Comparison of the behavior for LSM, LSCF, and single metal oxides suggests that Mn and Co, respectively, are responsible for the Cr contamination of these catalysts.

  9. Fundamental studies of radar scattering from water surfaces: The Lake Washington experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salam, A.; Bush, D.; Gogineni, S.; Zaide, A.

    1991-01-01

    The University of Kansas and the University of Washington conducted a series of experiments during July and August of 1989, and July and August of 1990, to study the effects of various geophysical parameters on radar backscatter. The experiments were conducted from a platform in Lake Washington. Measurements of backscattered power and radar range were made by the University of Kansas, and environmental data such as wind speed, wind direction, and air and water temperature were measured by the University of Washington. Results of preliminary data processing are described. Radar data were acquired using two radars, one that operated at C and X bands and another at Ka band. Measurements were made at W and HH antenna polarizations, at different angles of incidence and under various wind conditions. Plots of backscattered power, normalized radar cross section, and wave height, and the Modulation Transfer Functions of selected data are presented.

  10. Fundamental studies of retrograde reactions in direct liquefaction. Topical report, September 30, 1988--September 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Solomon, P.R.; Bassilakis, R.; Kroo, E.

    1989-12-31

    Most of the proposed processing schemes for improving liquefaction yields involve favoring bond-breaking and radical stabilization reactions over the retrograde reactions. The retrograde reactions are often encountered before liquefaction temperatures are reached. The objective of this program is to elucidate and model the retrograde reaction chemistry in direct coal liquefaction through the application of experimental techniques and theoretical models which have been successfully employed at Advanced Fuel Research (AFR) and SRI International (a subcontractor) to understand and predict coal reaction behavior. The study of retrograde reactions is being done using an integrated approach using extensive characterization of the liquefaction chemistry of three kinds of systems: (1) model polymers; (2) coal; and (3) modified coals.

  11. The Anisakis Transcriptome Provides a Resource for Fundamental and Applied Studies on Allergy-Causing Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Fiona J.; Su, Xiaopei; Aibinu, Ibukun; Nolan, Matthew J.; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Otranto, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Background Food-borne nematodes of the genus Anisakis are responsible for a wide range of illnesses (= anisakiasis), from self-limiting gastrointestinal forms to severe systemic allergic reactions, which are often misdiagnosed and under-reported. In order to enhance and refine current diagnostic tools for anisakiasis, knowledge of the whole spectrum of parasite molecules transcribed and expressed by this parasite, including those acting as potential allergens, is necessary. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we employ high-throughput (Illumina) sequencing and bioinformatics to characterise the transcriptomes of two Anisakis species, A. simplex and A. pegreffii, and utilize this resource to compile lists of potential allergens from these parasites. A total of ~65,000,000 reads were generated from cDNA libraries for each species, and assembled into ~34,000 transcripts (= Unigenes); ~18,000 peptides were predicted from each cDNA library and classified based on homology searches, protein motifs and gene ontology and biological pathway mapping. Using comparative analyses with sequence data available in public databases, 36 (A. simplex) and 29 (A. pegreffii) putative allergens were identified, including sequences encoding ‘novel’ Anisakis allergenic proteins (i.e. cyclophilins and ABA-1 domain containing proteins). Conclusions/Significance This study represents a first step towards providing the research community with a curated dataset to use as a molecular resource for future investigations of the biology of Anisakis, including molecules putatively acting as allergens, using functional genomics, proteomics and immunological tools. Ultimately, an improved knowledge of the biological functions of these molecules in the parasite, as well as of their immunogenic properties, will assist the development of comprehensive, reliable and robust diagnostic tools. PMID:27472517

  12. Formation of imploding plasma liners for fundamental HEDP studies and MIF Standoff Driver Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Cassibry, Jason; Hatcher, Richard; Stanic, Milos

    2013-08-17

    The disciplines of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) are characterized by hypervelocity implosions and strong shocks. The Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) is focused on reaching HEDP and/or ICF relevant regimes in excess of 1 Mbar peak pressure by the merging and implosion of discrete plasma jets, as a potentially efficient path towards these extreme conditions in a laboratory. In this work we have presented the first 3D simulations of plasma liner, formation, and implosion by the merging of discrete plasma jets in which ionization, thermal conduction, and radiation are all included in the physics model. The study was conducted by utilizing a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (SPHC) and was a part of the plasma liner experiment (PLX). The salient physics processes of liner formation and implosion are studied, namely vacuum propagation of plasma jets, merging of the jets (liner forming), implosion (liner collapsing), stagnation (peak pressure), and expansion (rarefaction wave disassembling the target). Radiative transport was found to significantly reduce the temperature of the liner during implosion, thus reducing the thermal leaving more pronounced gradients in the plasma liner during the implosion compared with ideal hydrodynamic simulations. These pronounced gradients lead to a greater sensitivity of initial jet geometry and symmetry on peak pressures obtained. Accounting for ionization and transport, many cases gave higher peak pressures than the ideal hydrodynamic simulations. Scaling laws were developed accordingly, creating a non-dimensional parameter space in which performance of an imploding plasma jet liner can be estimated. It is shown that HEDP regimes could be reached with ~ 5 MJ of liner energy, which would translate to roughly 10 to 20 MJ of stored (capacitor) energy. This is a potentially significant improvement over the currently available means via ICF of achieving HEDP and nuclear fusion relevant parameters.

  13. Fundamental studies of water pretreatment of coal. Second annual report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Serio, M.A.; Kroo, E.; Solomon, P.R.; Charpenay, S.; Bassilakis, R.

    1991-12-31

    The goals of this project are to gain an understanding of the chemistry of water or steam coal pretreatments and to assess the importance of such pretreatments on subsequent coal liquefaction. For the achievement of these goals, coals, modified coals and model-polymers will be treated with water or steam. This study will include three coals, five modifications (dried, demineralized, ion-exchanged, Ca-loaded, Ba-loaded), three polymers and two polymer modifications (e.g., acid chlorides, amides). Experiments will be performed to investigate both conventional steam pretreatment and the possibility of using the CO/H{sub 2}O system of Ross and coworkers as a pretreatment method. The main experimental variables will be sample type and temperature. Detailed characterization of the gas, liquid and solid products from the pretreatment stage will be done. This will include analysis of gases by GC or FT-IR, liquids by capillary GC, FT-IR and FIMS, and residues by solvent swelling, solvent extraction, and elemental analysis. Selected residues will also be evaluated by a standard liquefaction test. Analysis of the raw coals and pretreatment samples will be performed using the above techniques to study changes in the crosslinking, donatable hydrogen, heteroatom composition, evolved gases, functional group composition, extraction yields, molecular weight distributions, etc. Standard tubing bomb liquefaction tests will be used to determine the effect of pretreatment on coal reactivity toward coal liquefaction. A previously developed model for coal liquefaction, the FG-DVC liquefaction model, will be used (after appropriate modifications) to model the physics and chemistry of water pretreatment.

  14. Fundamental studies of catalytic gasification: Quarterly report, October 1, 1986-December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Heinemann, H.

    1986-12-01

    This program studies the basic chemistry of the reaction of carbonaceous materials with water in the presence of catalysts to produce hydrogen and/or synthesis gas. Relatively low temperatures are being used. The catalysts under investigation are compounds of potassium and a transition metal oxide. Major objectives are the extension of the work from chars to coke; the effect of H/sub 2/, CO and CO/sub 2/ partial pressure on the gaseous product distribution; and the inhibition of catalyst poisoning by ash components. Some of the highlights are: (1) Activation energies for K/Ni catalyzed steam gasification of graphite and of chars are identical, indicating the same mechanism prevails though rates are much higher for chars. This permits extrapolation of findings in high vacuum equipment from graphite to chars. (2) The CO/CO/sub 2/ ratio of gases produced along with hydrogen varies with different chars. The ratio is 0.8 for Illinois No. 6 char and 0.08 for North Dakota char. Methane production is several orders of magnitude smaller and ceases after about 2 hours. (3) Comparison of K/Ni catalyst for steam gasification of Illinois No. 6 char with K or Ni alone indicates: (a) K alone produces much higher CO/CO/sub 2/ ratios than K/Ni. (b) Ni alone is almost inactive for the steam gasification of Illinois No. 6 except for the short first period of operation. (4) Montana char treated with aqua regia to remove ash components prior to impregnation with K/Ni has 75% of the activity of untreated char but exhibits little deactivation with time so that it gasifies better than untreated char after a few hours. (5) Controlled atmosphere electron microscopy studies have been extended to wet hydrogen and wet oxygen treatments of K/Ni impregnated graphite 3 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Fundamental basis and implementation of shell and tube heat exchanger project design: condenser and evaporator study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalkilic, A. S.; Acikgoz, O.; Tapan, S.; Wongwises, S.

    2016-03-01

    A shell and tube heat exchanger is used as a condenser and an evaporator in this theoretical study. Parametric performance analyses for various actual refrigerants were performed using well-known correlations in open sources. Condensation and evaporation were occurred in the shell side while the water was flowing in the tube side of heat exchanger. Heat transfer rate from tube side was kept constant for condenser and evaporator design. Condensing temperatures were varied from 35 to 60 °C whereas evaporating temperatures were ranging from -15 to 10 °C for the refrigerants of R12, R22, R134a, R32, R507A, R404A, R502, R407C, R152A, R410A and R1234ZE. Variation of convective heat transfer coefficients of refrigerants, total heat transfer coefficients with Reynolds numbers and saturation temperatures were given as validation process considering not only fouling resistance and omission of it but also staggered (triangular) and line (square) arrangements. The minimum tube lengths and necessary pumping powers were calculated and given as case studies for the investigated refrigerants considering validation criteria. It was understood that refrigerant type, fouling resistance and arrangement type are one of the crucial issues regarding the determination of heat exchanger's size and energy consumption. Consequently, R32 and R152a were found to require the shortest tube length and lowest pumping power in the condenser, whereas R507 and R407C have the same advantages in the evaporator. Their heat transfer coefficients were also determined larger than others as expectedly.

  16. Fundamental Studies of the Removal of Contaminants from Ground and Waste Waters via Reduction by Zero-Valent Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Yarmoff, Jory A.; Amrhein, Christopher

    1999-06-01

    Contaminated groundwater and surface waters are a problem throughout the United States and the world. In many instances, the types of contamination can be directly attributed to man's actions. For instance, the burial of chemical wastes, casual disposal of solvents in unlined pits, and the development of irrigated agriculture have all contributed to groundwater and surface water contamination. The kinds of contaminants include chlorinated solvents and toxic trace elements (including radioisotopes) that are soluble and mobile in soils and aquifers. Oxyanions of uranium, selenium, chromium, arsenic, technetium, and chlorine (as perchlorate) are frequently found as contaminants on many DOE sites. Uranium is a particularly widespread contaminant at most DOE sites including Oak Ridge, Rocky Flats, Hanford, Idaho (INEEL), and Fernald. The uranium contamination is associated with mining and milling of uranium ore (UMTRA sites), isotope separation and enrichment, and mixed waste and TRU waste burial. In addition, the careless disposal of halogenated solvents, such as carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene, has further contaminated many groundwaters at these sites. A potential remediation method for many of these oxyanions and chlorinated-solvents is to react the contaminated water with zero-valent iron. In this reaction, the iron serves as both an electron source and as a catalyst. Elemental iron is already being used on an experimental basis at many DOE sites. Both in situ reactive barriers and above-ground reactors are being developed for this purpose. However, the design and operation of these treatment systems requires a detailed process-level understanding of the interactions between the contaminants and the iron surfaces. We are performing fundamental investigations of the interactions of the relevant chlorinated solvents and trace element-containing compounds with single- and poly-crystalline Fe surfaces. The aim of this work is to develop th e fundamental

  17. A fundamental study on the structural integrity of magnesium alloys joined by friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Harish Mangebettu

    The goal of this research is to study the factors that influence the physical and mechanical properties of lap-shear joints produced using friction stir welding. This study focuses on understanding the effect of tool geometry and weld process parameters including the tool rotation rate, tool plunge depth and dwell time on the mechanical performance of similar magnesium alloy and dissimilar magnesium to aluminum alloy weld joints. A variety of experimental activities were conducted including tensile and fatigue testing, fracture surface and failure analysis, microstructure characterization, hardness measurements and chemical composition analysis. An investigation on the effect of weld process conditions in friction stir spot welding of magnesium to magnesium produced in a manner that had a large effective sheet thickness and smaller interfacial hook height exhibited superior weld strength. Furthermore, in fatigue testing of friction stir spot welded of magnesium to magnesium alloy, lap-shear welds produced using a triangular tool pin profile exhibited better fatigue life properties compared to lap-shear welds produced using a cylindrical tool pin profile. In friction stir spot welding of dissimilar magnesium to aluminum, formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone of the weld had a dominant effect on the weld strength. Lap-shear dissimilar welds with good material mixture and discontinues intermetallic compounds in the stir zone exhibited superior weld strength compared to lap-shear dissimilar welds with continuous formation of intermetallic compounds in the stir zone. The weld structural geometry like the interfacial hook, hook orientation and bond width also played a major role in influencing the weld strength of the dissimilar lap-shear friction stir spot welds. A wide scatter in fatigue test results was observed in friction stir linear welds of aluminum to magnesium alloys. Different modes of failure were observed under fatigue loading including crack

  18. Experimental studies of fundamental issues in electron transfer through nanometer scale devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Hiromichi

    Electron transfer reactions constitute many of the primary events in materials science, chemistry, physics, and biochemistry, e.g. the electron transport properties and photoexcited processes in solids and molecules, chemical reactions, corrosion, photosynthesis, respiration, and so forth. A self-assembled monolayer (SAM) film provides us with a unique environment not only to understand and manipulate the surface electronic properties of a solid, but also to control electron transfer processes at the interface. The first topic in this thesis describes the structure and electron tunneling characterization of alkanethiol SAMs on InP(100). Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the bonding of alkanethiols to n-InP surfaces and to measure the monolayer thickness. The results showed that the sulfur binds to In atoms on the surface, and provided film thicknesses of 6.4 A for C8H17SH, 11.1 A for C12H25SH, and 14.9 A for C16H 33SH, resulting in an average tilt angle of 55°. The analysis indicated that super-exchange coupling between the alkane chains plays an important role in defining electron tunneling barriers, especially for highly tilted chains. The second topic describes studies of cytochrome c bound to pure and mixed SAMs of o-terminated alkanethiol (terminated with pyridine, imidazole or nitrile groups) and alkanethiol on gold. Electrochemical methods are used to determine electron transfer rate constants of cytochrome c, and scanning tunneling microscopy to observe the cytochrome c on the SAM. Detailed analysis revealed direct association of the heme of cytochrome c with the terminal groups of the SAMs and a 'turning-over' of the electron transfer of cytochrome c from adiabatic to non-adiabatic regime. The third topic describes studies of oxidation and reduction of cytochrome c in solution through eleven different self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold electrodes by cyclic voltammetry. Electron transfer rate constants of

  19. Fundamental study of lower limb muscle activity using an angled whole body vibration exercise instrument.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang Ho; Kang, Seung Rok; Kwon, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    This research was performed to assess the effects of angled whole body vibration on muscle activity of the lower limbs, by examining adults in their twenties during squat exercises, taking into account two variables of exercise intensity (vibration frequency and gradient). Twenty healthy males in their twenties with previous experience of more than 6 month's weight training and no past medical history were included in this study. The experiment was performed by participating in squat exercises which consisted of 3 sets (1 set = 5 seconds x 3 repetitions of exercise), and the muscle activities of the Rectus Femoris, Vastus Lateralis, Vastus Medialis were measured with variation in the gradients of 0°, 10°, and 20°, and vibration frequencies of 20, 30, and 40 Hz. At 30 and 40 Hz, the vastus lateralis showed the highest change in muscle activity, while activity of the vastus medialis also increased significantly. Analysis of muscle activity according to the gradient showed a significant increase of the vastus lateralis at 20°, while the highest muscle activity at 20° was observed for the vastus medialis. In comparison of the change in lower limb muscle activity according to simultaneous stimulation, at a gradient of 10°, high activity was shown in muscle, while at 20°, high muscle activities were produced at 40 Hz in the vastus lateralis, 40 Hz in the rectus femoris, and both 30 and 40 Hz in the vastus medialis. PMID:25226944

  20. Nucifer: A small electron-antineutrino detector for fundamental and safeguard studies

    SciTech Connect

    Letourneau, A.; Bui, V. M.; Fallot, M.; Giot, L.; Martino, J.; Porta, A.; Varignon, C.; Yermia, F.

    2011-07-01

    The Nucifer detector will be deployed in the next few months at the Osiris research reactor in France. Nucifer is a 1-ton Gd-doped liquid scintillator detector devoted to reactor antineutrino studies. It will be installed 7 m away from the compact core of the Osiris reactor. The design of such small volume detector has been focused on high detection efficiency and good background rejection. Over the last decades, our understanding of the neutrino properties has been improved and allows today the possibility to apply the detection of antineutrinos to automatic and to non intrusively survey nuclear power plant. This has triggered the interest of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which is interested by developing new safeguard techniques for next generation reactors. The sensitivity of such technique has to be proved and demonstrated. On the other hand there is still some issues in our understanding of the neutrino properties as the observed deficit in the antineutrino rate at short distances (< 100 m) that can not be explained by oscillations in the 3-flavors neutrino model. If a global systematic error is rejected, such anomaly opens the door to new physic that can be assessed with small detectors placed close to the core. Here we review the Nucifer detector in this context and the tests we are performing. (authors)

  1. Does planetary temperature fundamentally affect water availability on land? An idealized modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheff, J.; Frierson, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    The geologic and paleobotanical record is usually said to show that during warm greenhouse climates of Earth's past, moisture for plant growth was at least as plentiful as it is today in most land areas. Similarly, very cold glacial stages are usually interpreted as times of water scarcity, outside of a few small regions. Yet, for the warm greenhouse climates of Earth's near future, comprehensive models largely project declines in time-mean soil moisture, and increases in physical drought and aridity measures. This study attempts to understand these projections by using a simple, general, idealized land model coupled to a global atmosphere model (GFDL AM2.1) and a slab ocean. The model is run to equilibrium over a wide range of planetary temperatures, and the responses of land hydroclimates are examined. In particular, several different dimensionless water-scarcity metrics are tracked, including near-surface relative humidity, ratios between precipitation, actual and potential evapotranspiration, and the percent of maximum soil moisture. These experiments are performed for a very wide range of land model parameters, atmospheric parameterizations, idealized continent geometries, prescribed ocean heat transport fields, astronomical boundary conditions, and temperature change mechanisms. If dimensionless water availability systematically declines with increasing planetary temperature regardless of these choices, then the model result might be viewed as robust. However, if certain modeling choices, metrics, and/or regions indicate the opposite behavior, in line with the geologic record, then the results could greatly aid in the interpretation of that record.

  2. Fundamental Study on Sulfur Attack and Coking of LNG Rocket Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashino, Kazuyuki; Sugioka, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Takao; Sakai, Masahiro; Minato, Ryojiro; Sasayama, Yousuke; Otsuka, Masaya; Okita, Koichi; Aoki, Kenji; Kawashima, Hideto; Azuma, Nobuyuki

    Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) is one of the most promising propellant for near future space transportation rocket engine because of its low cost and fewer handling concerns. However, for LNG propellant, erosion of engine material by sulfur (sulfur attack) and coking by LNG pyrolysis are significant problems in a regenerative cooling passage. In this study, the effects of sulfur attack and coking are experimentally evaluated for material candidates such as Inconel600, SUS316, Hastelloy-X, and some copper alloys. In the sulfur attack tests, EPMA and Raman analysis indicate that metallic sulfide can be observed only on the surface and XRD analysis indicates that sulfur attack are hardly recognized for all of material in the test conditions. In coking tests, it is clear that coking of methane with 5% propane can proceed more than those of pure methane. The thermal decomposition temperature is significantly decreased by catalytic effects of Ni in engine material. The results of coking tests will be included in the design criteria of combustion chamber, nozzle of the LNG rocket engines.

  3. FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES OF THE DURABILITY OF MATERIALS FOR INTERCONNECTS IN SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick S. Pettit; Gerald H. Meier

    2003-06-30

    This report describes the result of the first eight months of effort on a project directed at improving metallic interconnect materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The results include cyclic oxidation studies of a group of ferritic alloys, which are candidate interconnect materials. The exposures have been carried out in simulated fuel cell atmospheres. The oxidation morphologies have been characterized and the ASR has been measured for the oxide scales. The effect of fuel cell electric current density on chromia growth rates has been considered The thermomechanical behavior of the scales has been investigated by stress measurements using x-ray diffraction and interfacial fracture toughness measurements using indentation. The ultimate goal of this thrust is to use knowledge of changes in oxide thickness, stress and adhesion to develop accelerated testing methods for evaluating SOFC interconnect alloys. Finally a theoretical assessment of the potential for use of ''new'' metallic materials as interconnect materials has been conducted and is presented in this report. Alloys being considered include materials based on pure nickel, materials based on the ''Invar'' concept, and coated materials to optimize properties in both the anode and cathode gases.

  4. Fundamental study on dissolution behavior of poly(methyl methacrylate) by quartz crystal microbalance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konda, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Yoshitake, Shusuke; Kozawa, Takahiro

    2016-03-01

    Ionizing radiations such as extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and electron beam (EB) are the most promising exposure source for next-generation lithographic technology. In the realization of high resolution lithography, it is necessary for resist materials to improve the trade-off relationship among sensitivity, resolution, and line width roughness (LWR). In order to overcome them, it is essential to understand basic chemistry of resist matrices in resist processes. In particular, the dissolution process of resist materials is a key process. Therefore, it is essential for next-generation resist design for ionizing radiation to clarify the dissolution behavior of the resist film into developer. However, the details in dissolution process of EUV and EB resist films have not been investigated thus far. In this study, main chain scission and dissolution behavior of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as main chain scission type resist was investigated using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) in order to understand the relationship between the degree of PMMA degradation and dissolution behavior. The relationship between the molecular weight after irradiation and the swelling behavior was clarified.

  5. Fundamental study of spin-coating using in-situ analysis and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harumoto, Masahiko; Yoshida, Jun-ichi; Stokes, Harold; Tanaka, Yuji; Miyagi, Tadashi; Kaneyama, Koji; Pieczulewski, Charles; Asai, Masaya

    2015-03-01

    Spin coating has been used as a photoresist application method for many years, and consequently certain defects have been recognized through each resist generation; i-line, KrF, ArF, ArF immersion and, most recently, EUV. Last year we reported an in-situ analysis via high-speed video camera that proved to be useful for understanding defect formation such as non-uniformity spots within organic film coatings and post-develop water-mark defects. In this study, fingerprints known as `tiger stripes' around the wafer's edge were analyzed. This phenomenon, for example, is directly related to the wafer spin-speed and air-flow during the coat-processing. Utilizing a high-speed camera and 3D simulation, we reveal the mechanism of fingerprint generation for tiger stripe phenomena, confirm the mechanism with several different spin-speeds, and correlate these to defect inspection results. Furthermore, we will discuss the expansion to 450mmm wafers.

  6. Radiolytic Modification of Sulfur Containing Acidic Amino Residues in Model Peptides: Fundamental Studies for Protein Footprinting

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,G.; Chance, M.

    2005-01-01

    Protein footprinting based on hydroxyl radical-mediated modification and quantitative mass spectroscopic analysis is a proven technique for examining protein structure, protein-ligand interactions, and structural allostery upon protein complex formation. The reactive and solvent-accessible amino acid side chains function as structural probes; however, correct structural analysis depends on the identification and quantification of all the relevant oxidative modifications within the protein sequence. Sulfur-containing amino acids are oxidized readily and the mechanisms of oxidation are particularly complex, although they have been extensively investigated by EPR and other spectroscopic methods. Here we have undertaken a detailed mass spectrometry study (using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry) of model peptides containing cysteine (Cys-SH), cystine (disulfide bonded Cys), and methionine after oxidation using {gamma}-rays or synchrotron X-rays and have compared these results to those expected from oxidation mechanisms proposed in the literature. Radiolysis of cysteine leads to cysteine sulfonic acid (+48 Da mass shift) and cystine as the major products; other minor products including cysteine sulfinic acid (+32 Da mass shift) and serine (-16 Da mass shift) are observed. Radiolysis of cystine results in the oxidative opening of the disulfide bond and generation of cysteine sulfonic acid and sulfinic acid; however, the rate of oxidation is significantly less than that for cysteine. Radiolysis of methionine gives rise primarily to methionine sulfoxide (+16 Da mass shift); this can be further oxidized to methionine sulfone (+32 Da mass shift) or another product with a -32 Da mass shift likely due to aldehyde formation at the {gamma}-carbon. Due to the high reactivity of sulfur-containing amino acids, the extent of oxidation is easily influenced by secondary oxidation events or the presence of redox reagents used in standard proteolytic

  7. A Fundamental Study of Nucleate Pool Boiling Under Microgravity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ervin, J.S.; Merte, H. Jr.

    1996-03-01

    An experimental study of incipient boiling in short-term microgravity and with a/g = {+-} 1 for pool boiling was performed. Calibrated thin gold films sputtered on a smoothly polished quartz surface were used simultaneously for thermal-resistance measurements and heating of the boiling surface. The gold films were used for both transient and quasi-steady heating surface temperature measurements. Two test vessels were constructed for precise measurement and control of fluid temperature and pressure: a laboratory pool boiling vessel for the a/g = {+-} 1 experiments and a pool boiling vessel designed for the 131 m free-fall in the NASA Lewis Research Center Microgravity Research Facility for the microgravity tests. Measurements included the heater surface temperature, the pressure near the heating surface, the bulk liquid temperatures. High speed photography (up to 1,000 frames per second) was used in the experiments. With high quality microgravity and the measured initial temperature of the quiescent test fluid, R113, the temperature distribution in the liquid at the moment of boiling inception resulting from an imposed step in heat flux is known with a certainty not possible previously. The types of boiling propagation across the large flat heating surface, some observed here for the first time, are categorized; the conditions necessary for their occurrence are described. Explosive boiling propagation with a striking pattern of small scale protuberances over the entire vapor mass periphery not observed previously at low heat flux levels (on the order of 5 W/cm(exp 2)) is described. For the heater surface with a/g = {minus}1, a step in the heater surface temperature of short duration was imposed. The resulting liquid temperature distribution at the moment of boiling inception was different from that obtained with a step in heat flux.

  8. Fundamental studies of coal liquefaction. Quarterly report No. 7, April 1--July 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.S.

    1993-07-14

    In our last report we discussed observations in our cell concerning the behavior or Illinois No. 6 coal in tetralin to 460{degrees}C. We noted that there were possibly two distinct types of particles comprising the organic phase, reacting respectively at 420{degrees}--430{degrees}C, and at 450{degrees}--460{degrees}C. Alternatively we could interpret the data as describing a range of reactivity bounded by those temperatures. As evidenced by the contraction of the particles, the reactions were rapid. The particles lost half of their substance within 1 min, and we suggested that the rates were too fast to be accommodated by the commonly held scheme for coal liquefaction involving thermolytic scission of weak, bibenzyl-like bonds. Our analyses were aided by our use of Adobe Photoshop, which allows us to store, digitized versions of our recorded images. The images can then be manipulated at will to provide quantitative data on morphological changes. We noted in our last report that printer limitations prevented us from presenting images with the desirable quality, and we are at present attempting to find access to equipment which will provide satisfactory figures. Accordingly our progress will be described here without any photographs, and we expect to present a more complete account of our work in our next report. The work reported here includes studies of Illinois No. 6 coal with water as the medium, and a control run with argon as medium. Our temperature ramping was like that used last time, 25{degrees}C/min to 250{degrees}C, and then 10{degrees}C/min to 450{degrees}C. The results from the earlier work and the data presented here can therefore be directly compared.

  9. A fundamental study on biological removal of N2O in the presence of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Figueroa-González, Ivonne; Quijano, Guillermo; Laguna, Inés; Muñoz, Raúl; García-Encina, Pedro A

    2016-09-01

    The biodegradation of N2O by a non-acclimated secondary activated sludge in the presence of O2 was studied. Batch tests with a headspace containing an initial N2O concentration of ∼400 mg m(-3) (∼200 ppmv) and initial O2 gas concentrations of 0%, 1%, 2%, 5% and 21% were investigated. The effect of O2 on the biokinetic parameters qmax (maximum specific N2O uptake rate) and KS (half-saturation constant), as well as on the bacterial population structure, was evaluated. A complete N2O removal was recorded in the presence of up to 2% O2, while O2 at 5% and 21% mediated inhibitions of 37% and 95% in the removal of N2O compared with the control without O2. The elemental analysis of the biomass obtained at the end of the batch tests strongly suggested that NN2O was not used as a nitrogen source. The presence of O2 mediated decreases of up to 12.6- and 4.8-fold in qmax and KS, respectively, compared to the control without O2. Likewise, the presence of O2 induced changes in the structure of the bacterial population. The predominant microorganisms in the presence of O2 belonged to the phyla Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Chlamydiae. Bacteria belonging to the Proteobacteria phylum, particularly the Dokdonella genus, were predominant at 2% O2, which was the highest O2 concentration without inhibitory effects on N2O biodegradation. PMID:27236493

  10. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yunyan; Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Dai, Jinxing; Katz, Barry; Zhang, Shuichang; Tang, Yongchun

    2011-05-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2 cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using δD values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the δ 13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that δD values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that δD values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane.

  11. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Ethics fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2011-01-01

    Ethics is about studying the right and the good; morality is about acting as one should. Although there are differences among what is legal, charitable, professional, ethical, and moral, these desirable characteristics tend to cluster and are treasured in dentistry. The traditional approach to professionalism in dentistry is based on a theory of biomedical ethics advanced 30 years ago. Known as the principles approach, general ideals such as respect for autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, justice, and veracity, are offered as guides. Growth in professionalism consists in learning to interpret the application of these principles as one's peers do. Moral behavior is conceived as a continuous cycle of sensitivity to situations requiring moral response, moral reasoning, the moral courage to take action when necessary, and integration of habits of moral behavior into one's character. This essay is the first of two papers that provide the backbone for the IDEA Project of the College--an online, multiformat, interactive "textbook" of ethics for the profession. PMID:22263371

  13. Fundamentals of soil science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study guide provides comments and references for professional soil scientists who are studying for the soil science fundamentals exam needed as the first step for certification. The performance objectives were determined by the Soil Science Society of America's Council of Soil Science Examiners...

  14. Testing Our Fundamental Assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    fundamental assumptions.A recent focus set in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, titled Focus on Exploring Fundamental Physics with Extragalactic Transients, consists of multiple published studies doing just that.Testing General RelativitySeveral of the articles focus on the 4th point above. By assuming that the delay in photon arrival times is only due to the gravitational potential of the Milky Way, these studies set constraints on the deviation of our galaxys gravitational potential from what GR would predict. The study by He Gao et al. uses the different photon arrival times from gamma-ray bursts to set constraints at eVGeV energies, and the study by Jun-Jie Wei et al. complements this by setting constraints at keV-TeV energies using photons from high-energy blazar emission.Photons or neutrinos from different extragalactic transients each set different upper limits on delta gamma, the post-Newtonian parameter, vs. particle energy or frequency. This is a test of Einsteins equivalence principle: if the principle is correct, delta gamma would be exactly zero, meaning that photons of different energies move at the same velocity through a vacuum. [Tingay Kaplan 2016]S.J. Tingay D.L. Kaplan make the case that measuring the time delay of photons from fast radio bursts (FRBs; transient radio pulses that last only a few milliseconds) will provide even tighter constraints if we are able to accurately determine distances to these FRBs.And Adi Musser argues that the large-scale structure of the universe plays an even greater role than the Milky Way gravitational potential, allowing for even stricter testing of Einsteins equivalence principle.The ever-narrower constraints from these studies all support GR as a correct set of rules through which to interpret our universe.Other Tests of Fundamental PhysicsIn addition to the above tests, Xue-Feng Wu et al. show that FRBs can be used to provide severe constraints on the rest mass of the photon, and S. Croft et al. even touches on what we

  15. Fundamentals studies in geodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Research in geodynamics, seismology, and planetary quakes is presented. Terradynamics and plate tectonics are described using dynamic models. The early evolution of the Earth's mantle is also discussed.

  16. Fundamental studies in the molecular basis of laser-induced retinal damage. Annual report, February-September 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis

    1981-09-01

    Laser-spectroscopy experiments have focused on cones in the red-eared swamp turtle, Pseudemys scripta elegans. Choice of this system was based on the desire to correlate molecular data with the extensive data being collected on this system by Dr. Zwick in his studies on laser hazards at LAIR. Thus, a detailed collaborative effort was initiated on this system during the past year. The experiments resulted in important information that opens new avenues to explore fundamental molecular mechanisms of retinal damage with laser irradiation. Results of these experiments are summarized in the following sections: I. Elucidation of the role of oil droplets in the absorption of light by the turtle retina; II. A Selective Probe of Membrane Potentials in Turtle Cone Cells; III. Angstrom Resolution Light Microscopy of Photoreceptor Cells; IV. Identification and Selective Staining of Other Important Molecular Components of Photoreceptor Cells.

  17. Fundamental Study on the Segmented Flow Injection - Multiphase Flow Formation Towards Microchip-Based Multi-Ion Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hisamoto, Hideaki; Horiuchi, Takayuki; Hibara, Akihide; Tokeshi, Manabu; Kitamori, Takehiko

    A new fluid flow inside the microchannel was successfully developed. The flow created here involves segmented flow injection of plural organic phases into a microchannel followed by contact with a single aqueous phase to form stable organic-aqueous two-layer flow inside the microchannel. Fundamental study on the developed flow inside the microchannel was performed by monitoring the dye-doped segmented organic phases by thermal lens microscopy (TLM). Excellent repeatability and very small injection volume in developing segmented flow were realized. The new fluid flow created here is expected to allow us multi-ion sensing, which is not easily demonstrated by conventional ion sensor technology using a solvent polymeric membrane, by combining with neutral ionophore-based ion pair extraction using plural numbers of organic phases containing different ionophore molecules.

  18. Fundamental Study on a Long-Duration Flash X-Ray Generator with a Surface-Discharge Triode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kei; Sato, Eiichi; Sagae, Michiaki; Oizumi, Teiji; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1994-07-01

    Fundamental studies on a long-duration flash X-ray generator are described. This generator consisted of the following components: a high-voltage power supply with a maximum voltage of 100 kV, an energy-storage condenser of 500 nF, a main discharge condenser of 10 nF, a turbo molecular pump, a thyratron pulser as a trigger device, and a surface-discharge triode. The effective pulse width was less than 30 µs, and the X-ray intensity approximately had a value of 0.6 µC/kg at 1.0 m per pulse with a charged voltage of 60 kV. The maximum tube voltage was equivalent to the initial charged voltage of the condenser, and the peak tube current was less than 40 A. With this generator, we could obtain stable X-ray intensity maximized by preventing damped oscillations of the tube voltage and current.

  19. An ab initio study of the harmonic and anharmonic force field and fundamental vibrational frequencies of performic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Charles W.; Trachtman, Mendel; George, Philip

    1980-11-01

    The harmonic and anharmonic force fields and fundamental vibrational frequencies of cis-cis and cis-trans performic acid are studied ab initio in the 4-31G basis set using geometries fully optimized at this level. The frequencies predicted for the cis-cis conformer are compared with those derived from spectroscopic observations on the most stable form. An extensive comparison is made between the changes in diagonal and off-diagonal quadratic and cubic force constants, and diagonal stretching quartic constants, in going from the chain to the ring structure in performic and formic acid, and features which these changes have in common are seen to support the view that there is a hydrogen bonding type of interaction in trans-formic acid despite its unfavorable geometry.

  20. A fundamental cause approach to the study of disparities in lung cancer and pancreatic cancer mortality in the United States.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Marcie S; Clouston, Sean; Link, Bruce G

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how associations between socioeconomic status (SES) and lung and pancreatic cancer mortality have changed over time in the U.S. The fundamental cause hypothesis predicts as diseases become more preventable due to innovation in medical knowledge or technology, individuals with greater access to resources will disproportionately benefit, triggering the formation or worsening of health disparities along social cleavages. We examine socioeconomic disparities in mortality due to lung cancer, a disease that became increasingly preventable with the development and dissemination of knowledge of the causal link between smoking cigarettes and lung cancer, and compare it to that of pancreatic cancer, a disease for which there have been no major prevention or treatment innovations. County-level disease-specific mortality rates for those ≥45 years, adjusted for sex, race, and age during 1968-2009 are derived from death certificate and population data from the National Center for Health Statistics. SES is measured using five county-level variables from four decennial censuses, interpolating values for intercensal years. Negative binomial regression was used to model mortality. Results suggest the impact of SES on lung cancer mortality increases 0.5% per year during this period. Although lung cancer mortality rates are initially higher in higher SES counties, by 1980 persons in lower SES counties are at greater risk and by 2009 the difference in mortality between counties with SES one SD above compared to one SD below average was 33 people per 100,000. In contrast, we find a small but significant reverse SES gradient in pancreatic cancer mortality that does not change over time. These data support the fundamental cause hypothesis: social conditions influencing access to resources more greatly impact mortality when preventative knowledge exists. Public health interventions and policies should facilitate more equitable distribution of new health

  1. A laboratory study of the 8.65 micron fundamental of (C-12)H3D at temperatures relevant to Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, P.; Giver, L. P.; Valero, F. P. J.

    1983-01-01

    Spectral transmittance measurements have been performed in the nu6-fundamental of (C-12)H3D at 153 K. Relevant to the studies of the emission spectra of Titan recorded by the IRIS instruments on board Voyagers 1 and 2, N2 has been used as the broadening gas. Excellent agreement between experimental and theoretical spectral transmittance has been the result of using N2-broadened line widths and their dependence upon temperature measured in the nu2-fundamental and S = 63.6 per(sq cm atm) for the absolute intensity of the nu6-fundamental.

  2. SISGR-Fundamental Experimental and Theoretical Studies on a Novel Family of Oxide Catalyst Supports for Water Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kumta, Prashant

    2014-10-03

    Identification and development of non-noble metal based electro-catalysts or electro-catalysts with significant reduction of expensive noble metal contents (E.g. IrO2, Pt) with comparable electrochemical performance as the standard noble metal/metal oxide for proton exchange membrane (PEM) based water electrolysis would constitute a major breakthrough in the generation of hydrogen by water electrolysis. Accomplishing such a system would not only result reduction of the overall capital costs of PEM based water electrolyzers, but also help attain the targeted hydrogen production cost [< $ 3.0 / gallon gasoline equivalent (gge)] comparable to conventional liquid fuels. In line with these goals, it was demonstrated that fluorine doped IrO2 thin films and nanostructured high surface area powders display remarkably higher electrochemical activity, and comparable durability as pure IrO2 electro-catalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis. Furthermore, corrosion resistant SnO2 and NbO2 support has been doped with F and coupled with IrO2 or RuO2 for use as an OER electro-catalyst. A solid solution of SnO2:F or NbO2:F with only 20 - 30 mol.% IrO2 or RuO2 yielding a rutile structure in the form of thin films and bulk nanoparticles displays similar electrochemical activity and stability as pure IrO2/RuO2. This would lead to more than 70 mol.% reduction in the noble metal oxide content. Novel nanostructured ternary (Ir,Sn,Nb)O2 thin films of different compositions FUNDAMENTAL STUDY OF NANOSTRUCTURED ELECTRO-CATALYSTS WITH REDUCED NOBLE METAL CONTENT FOR PEM BASED WATER ELECTROLYSIS 4 have also been studied. It has been shown that (Ir0.40Sn0.30Nb0.30)O2 shows similar electrochemical activity and enhanced chemical robustness as compared to pure IrO2. F doping of the ternary (Ir,Sn,Nb)O2 catalyst helps in further decreasing the noble metal oxide content of the catalyst. As a result, these reduced noble metal oxide catalyst systems would

  3. Fundamental studies on initiation and evolution of multi-channel discharges and their application to next generation pulsed power machines.

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Jens; Savage, Mark E.; Lucero, Diego Jose; Jaramillo, Deanna M.; Seals, Kelly Gene; Pitts, Todd Alan; Hautzenroeder, Brenna M.; Laine, Mark Richard; Karelitz, David B.; Porter, John L.

    2014-09-01

    Future pulsed power systems may rely on linear transformer driver (LTD) technology. The LTD's will be the building blocks for a driver that can deliver higher current than the Z-Machine. The LTD's would require tens of thousands of low inductance ( %3C 85nH), high voltage (200 kV DC) switches with high reliability and long lifetime ( 10 4 shots). Sandia's Z-Machine employs 36 megavolt class switches that are laser triggered by a single channel discharge. This is feasible for tens of switches but the high inductance and short switch life- time associated with the single channel discharge are undesirable for future machines. Thus the fundamental problem is how to lower inductance and losses while increasing switch life- time and reliability. These goals can be achieved by increasing the number of current-carrying channels. The rail gap switch is ideal for this purpose. Although those switches have been extensively studied during the past decades, each effort has only characterized a particular switch. There is no comprehensive understanding of the underlying physics that would allow predictive capability for arbitrary switch geometry. We have studied rail gap switches via an extensive suite of advanced diagnostics in synergy with theoretical physics and advanced modeling capability. Design and topology of multichannel switches as they relate to discharge dynamics are investigated. This involves electrically and optically triggered rail gaps, as well as discrete multi-site switch concepts.

  4. Fundamental studies of the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Progress report, April 1, 1990--July 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    The plasma or thermally enhanced low pressure chemical vapor deposition of diamond films is an exciting development with many challenging fundamental problems. The early stages of nucleation is relevant to the initial growth rate and the perfection and morphology of the deposit. To isolate one of the factors that influence nucleation, we have studied the effect of surface topography on the nucleation process. Our earlier work has shown preferential nucleation on sharp convex features and we have proposed several possible reasons for this behavior, including dangling bonds at the convex features. In our recent work, we have extended our investigation to include a novel patterning of silicon substrates used to pattern silicon solar cells. The results are consistent with our earlier observations that the majority of nucleation events occur on protruding surface features. In an effort to establish whether dangling bonds at the protruding surfaces may be responsible for the selective nucleation, we have evaluated the dangling bond concentration using electron spin resonance. We have carried out deposition under nominally identical surface topography, but with different concentrations of dangling bonds at or near the surface. The results of this study indicate that dangling bonds play a minor role in enhancing nucleation, in contrast to a substantial role played by special surface topographical features. In the course of the past year, we have submitted four manuscripts for publication and have made six presentations.

  5. Fundamental Study on Saving Energy for Electrified Railway System Applying High Temperature Superconductor Motor and Energy Storage System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Taketsune; Amemiya, Naoyuki

    Induction motor instead of dc one has been applied widely for dc electric rolling stock because of the advantage of its utility and efficiency. However, further improvement of motor characteristics will be required to realize environment-friendly dc railway system in the future. It is important to study more efficient machine applying dc electric rolling stock for next generation high performance system. On the other hand, the methods to reuse regenerative energy produced by motors effectively are also important. Therefore, we carried out fundamental study on saving energy for electrified railway system. For the first step, we introduced the energy storage system applying electric double-layer capacitors (EDLC), and its control system. And then, we tried to obtain the specification of high temperature superconductor induction/synchronous motor (HTS-ISM), which performance is similar with that of the conventional induction motors. Furthermore, we tried to evaluate an electrified railway system applying energy storage system and HTS-ISM based on simulation. We succeeded in showing the effectiveness of the introductions of energy storage system and HTS-ISM in DC electrified railway system.

  6. Exploiting the Temperature/Concentration Dependence of Magnetic Susceptibility to Control Convection in Fundamental Studies of Solidification Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. W.; Xu, Dong; Jones, W. Kinzy, Jr.; Szofran, Frank R.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this new research project is to demonstrate by experiment, supplemented by mathematical modeling and physical property measurement, that the effects of buoyancy driven convection can be largely eliminated in ground-based experiments, and further reduced in flight, by applying a new technique. That technique exploits the dependence of magnetic susceptibility on composition or temperature. It is emphasized at the outset that the phenomenon to be exploited is fundamentally and practically different from the magnetic damping of convection in conducting liquids that has been the subject of much prior research. The concept suggesting this research is that all materials, even non-conductors, when placed in a magnetic field gradient, experience a force. Of particular interest here are paramagnetic and diamagnetic materials, classes which embrace the "model alloys", such as succinonitrile-acetone, that have been used by others investigating the fundamentals of solidification. Such alloys will exhibit a dependence of susceptibility on composition. The consequence is that, with a properly oriented field (gradient) a force will arise that can be made to be equal to, but opposite, the buoyancy force arising from concentration (or temperature) gradients. In this way convection can be stilled. The role of convection in determining the microstructure, and thereby properties, of materials is well known. Elimination of that convection has both scientific and technological consequences. Our knowledge of diffusive phenomena in solidification, phenomena normally hidden by the dominance of convection, is enhanced if we can study solidification of quiescent liquids. Furthermore, the microstructure, microchemistry and properties of materials (thereby practical value) are affected by the convection occurring during their solidification. Hitherto the method of choice for elimination of convection has been experimentation in microgravity. However, even in low Earth orbit

  7. MICELLE FORMATION AND SURFACE INTERACTIONS IN SUPERCRITICAL CO2: FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES FOR THE EXTRACTION OF ACTINIDES FROM CONTAMINATED SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research seeks to build the fundamental understanding of micelle formation and mobility in supercritical CO2, necessary to develop an innovative phase-transfer extraction system for selectively removing metals (actinides) from contaminated surfaces. We will extract metal ion...

  8. MICELLE FORMATION AND SURFACE INTERACTIONS IN SUPERCRITICAL CO2: FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES FOR THE EXTRACTION OF ACTINIDES FROM CONTAMINATED SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this research was to build a fundamental understanding of microemulsion formation and mobility in supercritical CO2 necessary to develop an innovative extraction system for selectively removing metals (actinides) from contaminated surfaces. The goals included (1) stud...

  9. Fundamentals of Structural Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, David D.; Fletcher, Raymond C.

    2005-09-01

    Fundamentals of Structural Geology provides a new framework for the investigation of geological structures by integrating field mapping and mechanical analysis. Assuming a basic knowledge of physical geology, introductory calculus and physics, it emphasizes the observational data, modern mapping technology, principles of continuum mechanics, and the mathematical and computational skills, necessary to quantitatively map, describe, model, and explain deformation in Earth's lithosphere. By starting from the fundamental conservation laws of mass and momentum, the constitutive laws of material behavior, and the kinematic relationships for strain and rate of deformation, the authors demonstrate the relevance of solid and fluid mechanics to structural geology. This book offers a modern quantitative approach to structural geology for advanced students and researchers in structural geology and tectonics. It is supported by a website hosting images from the book, additional colour images, student exercises and MATLAB scripts. Solutions to the exercises are available to instructors. The book integrates field mapping using modern technology with the analysis of structures based on a complete mechanics MATLAB is used to visualize physical fields and analytical results and MATLAB scripts can be downloaded from the website to recreate textbook graphics and enable students to explore their choice of parameters and boundary conditions The supplementary website hosts color images of outcrop photographs used in the text, supplementary color images, and images of textbook figures for classroom presentations The textbook website also includes student exercises designed to instill the fundamental relationships, and to encourage the visualization of the evolution of geological structures; solutions are available to instructors

  10. Study of wood plastic composite in the presence of nitrogen containing additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, K. M. Idriss; Khan, Mubarak A.; Husain, M. M.

    1994-10-01

    Effect of nitrogen-containing additives in the study of wood plastic composites of MMA with simul and mango wood of Bangladesh has been investigated. Nine different additives were used and the additives containing carboamide group induce the highest tensile strength to the composite.

  11. VLTI/AMBER Studies of the Atmospheric Structure and Fundamental Parameters of Red Giant and Supergiant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo-Torres, B.; Wittkowski, M.; Marcaide, J. M.; Abellan, F. J.; Chiavassa, A.; Fabregat, J.; Freytag, B.; Guirado, J. C.; Hauschildt, P. H.; Marti-Vidal, I.; Quirrenbach, A.; Scholz, M.; Wood, P. R.

    2015-08-01

    We present recent near-IR interferometric studies of red giant and supergiant stars, which are aimed at obtaining information on the structure of the atmospheric layers and constraining the fundamental parameters of these objects. The observed visibilities of six red supergiants (RSGs), and also of one of the five red giants observed, indicate large extensions of the molecular layers, as previously observed for Mira stars. These extensions are not predicted by hydrostatic PHOENIX model atmospheres, hydrodynamical (RHD) simulations of stellar convection, or self-excited pulsation models. All these models based on parameters of RSGs lead to atmospheric structures that are too compact compared to our observations. We discuss how alternative processes might explain the atmospheric extensions for these objects. As the continuum appears to be largely free of contamination by molecular layers, we can estimate reliable Rosseland angular radii for our stars. Together with distances and bolometric fluxes, we estimate the effective temperatures and luminosities of our targets, locate them in the HR diagram, and compare their positions to recent evolutionary tracks.

  12. A STUDY OF FUNDAMENTAL LIMITATIONS TO STATISTICAL DETECTION OF REDSHIFTED H I FROM THE EPOCH OF REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Udaya Shankar, N.; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Arcus, Wayne; Emrich, David; Herne, David; Bernardi, Gianni; Greenhill, Lincoln J.; Bowman, Judd D.; Briggs, Frank; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Bunton, John D.; DeSouza, Ludi; Cappallo, Roger J.; Corey, Brian E.; Goeke, Robert F.; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Hazelton, Bryna J.; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Kaplan, David L.; and others

    2013-10-10

    In this paper, we explore for the first time the relative magnitudes of three fundamental sources of uncertainty, namely, foreground contamination, thermal noise, and sample variance, in detecting the H I power spectrum from the epoch of reionization (EoR). We derive limits on the sensitivity of a Fourier synthesis telescope to detect EoR based on its array configuration and a statistical representation of images made by the instrument. We use the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) configuration for our studies. Using a unified framework for estimating signal and noise components in the H I power spectrum, we derive an expression for and estimate the contamination from extragalactic point-like sources in three-dimensional k-space. Sensitivity for EoR H I power spectrum detection is estimated for different observing modes with MWA. With 1000 hr of observing on a single field using the 128 tile MWA, EoR detection is feasible (S/N >1 for k ∼< 0.8 Mpc{sup –1}). Bandpass shaping and refinements to the EoR window are found to be effective in containing foreground contamination, which makes the instrument tolerant to imaging errors. We find that for a given observing time, observing many independent fields of view does not offer an advantage over a single field observation when thermal noise dominates over other uncertainties in the derived power spectrum.

  13. Fundamental solution of Laplace's equation in oblate spheroidal coordinates and Galerkin's matrix for Neumann's problem in Earth's gravity field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holota, Petr; Nesvadba, Otakar

    2015-04-01

    In this paper the reciprocal distance is used for generating Galerkin's approximations in the weak solution of Neumann's problem that has an important role in Earth's gravity field studies. The reciprocal distance has a natural tie to the fundamental solution of Laplace's partial differential equation and in the paper it is represented by means of an expansion into a series of oblate spheroidal harmonics. Subsequently, the gradient vector of the reciprocal distance is constructed. In the computation of its components the expansion mentioned above is employed. The paper then focuses on the scalar product of reciprocal distance gradients in two different points and in particular on a series representation of a volume integral of the scalar product spread over an unbounded domain given by the exterior of an oblate spheroid (oblate ellipsoid of revolution). The integral yields the entries of Galerkin's matrix. The numerical interpretation of all the expansions used as well as the respective software implementation within the OpenCL framework is treated, which concerns also a numerical evaluation of Legendre functions of a real and an imaginary argument. In parallel an approximate closed formula expressing the entries of Galerkin's matrix (with an accuracy up to terms multiplied by the square of numerical eccentricity) is derived for convenience and comparison. The paper is added extensive numerical examples that illustrate the approach applied and demonstrate the accuracy of the derived formulas. Aspects related to practical applications are discussed.

  14. Fundamental studies in the molecular basis of laser-induced retinal damage. Annual report, September 1983-September 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, A.

    1984-09-01

    Advances made in the work for the Ocular Hazards Program at the Letterman Army Institute of Research (LAIR) are described. The research has seen the first application of femtosecond lasers to the visual system; it is giving new insights into how these ultimate laser sources interact with biological tissue in general and with the visual system in particular. The authors have discovered that simple anions can activate visual photoreceptors in the dark; among these anionic activators is the dental agent fluoride. Research has continued into identifying selectively and spatially the image of various elements in photoreceptors and adjacent tissue. The authors were able to extend our preparation procedures to view the elemental composition of such components as melanin granules. The sensitive and selective spatial images should play important roles in extending understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of laser damage. The staining procedures developed can be applied to study laser-damaged retina. Data were obtained demonstrating rapid mechanical motions in vertebrate photoreceptors. Such rapid mechanical motions which parallel electrophysiological responses in the cell may lie at the very basis of photoreceptor function. Laser-damage mechanisms should now be reevaluated in terms of this new data. The effect of laser light on these newly discovered mechanical motions will surely lead to new and improved understanding of low-level laser ocular hazards.

  15. A fundamental study on the [(μ-Cl)3 Mg2 (THF)6 ]+ dimer electrolytes for rechargeable Mg batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Tianbiao; Cox, Jonathan T.; Hu, Dehong; Deng, Xuchu; Hu, Jianzhi; Hu, Mary Y.; Xiao, Jie; Shao, Yuyan; Tang, Keqi; Liu, Jun

    2015-01-05

    We present a fundamental study on [(μ-Cl)3 Mg2 (THF)6 ]+ dimer electrolytes using various physical methods including Subambient Pressure Ionization with Nanoelectrospray Mass spectrometry (SPIN-MS), Raman spectroscopy, 25Mg{1H} NMR, 27Al{1H} NMR and electrochemical analysis. For the first time, long time sought THF solvated [MgCl]+ species was experimentally characterized by SPIN mass spectrometry in the solution of the Mgdimer containing electrolyte, confirming the mono-Cl- abstraction reaction between MgCl2 and an Al Lewis acid. Solvated MgCl2 in the electrolyte was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results establish the previously proposed dimerization equilibrium of solvated [MgCl]+ and MgCl2 with [(μ-Cl)3Mg2(THF)6]+.more » 25Mg{1H} NMR, 27Al{1H} NMR and electrochemical analysis on chloration reaction of [(μ-Cl)3Mg2(THF)6]AlPh3Cl with external Cl- led to further insights on the coordination chemistry of the dimer electrolyte. Finally, a comprehensive mechanism is proposed for the reversible electrochemical Mg deposition and stripping and Mg2+ and Cl- ion transports of the Mg dimer electrolytes in rechargeable Mg batteries.« less

  16. Fundamental studies for the high-intensity long-duration flash x-ray generator for biomedical radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Isobe, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kei; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1991-04-01

    The fundamental studies for the repetitive high-intensity microsecond x-ray generator utilizing a cold cathode tetrode are described. This generator consisted of the following essential components: a constant high-voltage power supply, an energy storage condenser of 500nF, an main discharge condenser of lOnF, a turbo molecular pump, a repetitive trigger device, and an x-ray tube. The condenser was charged from 40 to 80kV, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged repetitively to an x-ray tube by a trigger device. The x-ray tube was of the tetrode type which was connected to a turbo molecular pump and consisted of the following major parts: a rod-shaped long anode tip made of tungsten, a cathode rod made of graphite, a ring-shaped grid electrode, and a trigger electrode. The trigger electrode was mounted at the center of the cathode electrode and was insulated by a ceramic tube. The tube current was about 0. 4kA with a charged voltage of 60kV. The x-ray pulse height and the time-integrated intensity increased when the condenser charged voltage was increased, and the intensity was less than 2. OpC/kg at lm per pulse. The exposure times were about 2Ops, and the repetition frequency was less than 50Hz.

  17. Fundamental Studies and Development of III-N Visible LEDs for High-Power Solid-State Lighting Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, Russell

    2012-02-29

    The goal of this program is to understand in a fundamental way the impact of strain, defects, polarization, and Stokes loss in relation to unique device structures upon the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and efficiency droop (ED) of III-nitride (III-N) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and to employ this understanding in the design and growth of high-efficiency LEDs capable of highly-reliable, high-current, high-power operation. This knowledge will be the basis for our advanced device epitaxial designs that lead to improved device performance. The primary approach we will employ is to exploit new scientific and engineering knowledge generated through the application of a set of unique advanced growth and characterization tools to develop new concepts in strain-, polarization-, and carrier dynamics-engineered and low-defect materials and device designs having reduced dislocations and improved carrier collection followed by efficient photon generation. We studied the effects of crystalline defect, polarizations, hole transport, electron-spillover, electron blocking layer, underlying layer below the multiplequantum- well active region, and developed high-efficiency and efficiency-droop-mitigated blue LEDs with a new LED epitaxial structures. We believe new LEDs developed in this program will make a breakthrough in the development of high-efficiency high-power visible III-N LEDs from violet to green spectral region.

  18. A Fundamental Study on the [(μ-Cl)3Mg2(THF)6]+ Dimer Electrolytes for Rechargeable Mg Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tianbiao L.; Cox, Jonathan T.; Hu, Dehong; Deng, Xuchu; Hu, Jian Z.; Hu, Mary Y.; Xiao, Jie; Shao, Yuyan; Tang, Keqi; Liu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We present a fundamental study on [(μ-Cl)3Mg2(THF)6]+dimer electrolytes using various physical methods including Subambient Pressure Ionization with Nanoelectrospray Mass spectrometry (SPIN-MS), Raman spectroscopy, 25Mg{1H} NMR, 27Al{1H} NMR and electrochemical analysis. For the first time, long time sought THF solvated [MgCl]+ species was experimentally characterized by SPIN mass spectrometry in the solution of the Mgdimer containing electrolyte, confirming the mono-Cl- abstraction reaction between MgCl2 and an Al Lewis acid. Solvated MgCl2 in the electrolyte was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results establish the previously proposed dimerization equilibrium of solvated [MgCl]+ and MgCl2 with [(μ-Cl)3Mg2(THF)6]+. 25Mg{1H} NMR, 27Al{1H} NMR and electrochemical analysis on chloration reaction of [(μ-Cl)3Mg2(THF)6]AlPh3Cl with external Cl- led to further insights on the coordination chemistry of the dimer electrolyte. Finally, a comprehensive mechanism is proposed for the reversible electrochemical Mg deposition and stripping and Mg2+ and Cl- ion transports of the Mg dimer electrolytes in rechargeable Mg batteries.

  19. Fundamental studies of hydrogen attack in carbon-0.5molybdenum steel and weldments applied in petroelum and petrochemical industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng

    High temperature hydrogen attack (HTHA) is a form of surface decarburization, internal decarburization, and/or intergranular cracking in steels exposed to high temperature (>400°F) and high hydrogen pressure. Hydrogen attack is an irreversible process which can cause permanent damage resulting in degradation of mechanical properties and failures such as leakage, bursting, fire, and/or explosion. The continuous progression of hydrogen attack in C-0.5Mo steel and weldments below the C-0.5Mo Nelson Curve has caused a significant concern for the integrity and serviceability of C-0.5Mo steel utilized for pressure vessels and piping in the petroleum refinery and petrochemical industries. A state-of-the-art literature review was implemented to provide a comprehensive overview of the published research efforts on hydrogen attack studies. The evolution of "Nelson Curves" for carbon steel, C-0.5Mo, and Cr-Mo steels was historically reviewed in regard to design applications and limitations. Testing techniques for hydrogen attack assessment were summarized under the categories of hydrogen exposure testing, mechanical evaluation, and dilatometric swelling testing. In accord with the demands of these industries, fundamental studies of hydrogen attack in C-0.5Mo steel and weldments were accomplished in terms of quantitative methodologies for hydrogen damage evaluation; hydrogen damage assessment of service exposed weldments and autoclave exposed materials; effects of carbon and alloying elements, heat treatments, hot and cold working, welding processes and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) on hydrogen attack susceptibility; development of continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams for C-0.5Mo base metals and the coarse grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ); carbide evaluation for the C-0.5Mo steel after service exposure and heat treatment; methane evolution by the reaction of hydrogen and carbides; hydrogen diffusion and methane pressure through the wall thickness of one

  20. Fundamentals of ionic conductivity relaxation gained from study of procaine hydrochloride and procainamide hydrochloride at ambient and elevated pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnarowska, Z.; Swiety-Pospiech, A.; Grzybowska, K.; Hawelek, L.; Paluch, M.; Ngai, K. L.

    2012-04-01

    The pharmaceuticals, procaine hydrochloride and procainamide hydrochloride, are glass-forming as well as ionically conducting materials. We have made dielectric measurements at ambient and elevated pressures to characterize the dynamics of the ion conductivity relaxation in these pharmaceuticals, and calorimetric measurements for the structural relaxation. Perhaps due to their special chemical and physical structures, novel features are found in the ionic conductivity relaxation of these pharmaceuticals. Data of conductivity relaxation in most ionic conductors when represented by the electric loss modulus usually show a single resolved peak in the electric modulus loss M″(f ) spectra. However, in procaine hydrochloride and procainamide hydrochloride we find in addition another resolved loss peak at higher frequencies over a temperature range spanning across Tg. The situation is analogous to many non-ionic glass-formers showing the presence of the structural α-relaxation together with the Johari-Goldstein (JG) β-relaxation. Naturally the analogy leads us to name the slower and faster processes resolved in procaine hydrochloride and procainamide hydrochloride as the primary α-conductivity relaxation and the secondary β-conductivity relaxation, respectively. The analogy of the β-conductivity relaxation in procaine HCl and procainamide HCl with JG β-relaxation in non-ionic glass-formers goes further by the finding that the β-conductivity is strongly related to the α-conductivity relaxation at temperatures above and below Tg. At elevated pressure but compensated by raising temperature to maintain α-conductivity relaxation time constant, the data show invariance of the ratio between the β- and the α-conductivity relaxation times to changes of thermodynamic condition. This property indicates that the β-conductivity relaxation has fundamental importance and is indispensable as the precursor of the α-conductivity relaxation, analogous to the relation found

  1. Sources of Image Degradation in Fundamental and Harmonic Ultrasound Imaging: A Nonlinear, Full-Wave, Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Dahl, Jeremy J.

    2011-01-01

    A full-wave equation that describes nonlinear propagation in a heterogeneous attenuating medium is solved numerically with finite differences in the time domain (FDTD). This numerical method is used to simulate propagation of a diagnostic ultrasound pulse through a measured representation of the human abdomen with heterogeneities in speed of sound, attenuation, density, and nonlinearity. Conventional delay-and-sum beamforming is used to generate point spread functions (PSF) that display the effects of these heterogeneities. For the particular imaging configuration that is modeled, these PSFs reveal that the primary source of degradation in fundamental imaging is due to reverberation from near-field structures. Compared to fundamental imaging, reverberation clutter in harmonic imaging is 27.1 dB lower. Simulated tissue with uniform velocity but unchanged impedance characteristics indicates that for fundamental imaging, the primary source of degradation is phase aberration. PMID:21507753

  2. Load bearing and stiffness tailored NiTi implants produced by additive manufacturing: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmanian, Rasool; Shayesteh Moghaddam, Narges; Haberland, Christoph; Dean, David; Miller, Michael; Elahinia, Mohammad

    2014-03-01

    Common metals for stable long-term implants (e.g. stainless steel, Titanium and Titanium alloys) are much stiffer than spongy cancellous and even stiffer than cortical bone. When bone and implant are loaded this stiffness mismatch results in stress shielding and as a consequence, degradation of surrounding bony structure can lead to disassociation of the implant. Due to its lower stiffness and high reversible deformability, which is associated with the superelastic behavior, NiTi is an attractive biomaterial for load bearing implants. However, the stiffness of austenitic Nitinol is closer to that of bone but still too high. Additive manufacturing provides, in addition to the fabrication of patient specific implants, the ability to solve the stiffness mismatch by adding engineered porosity to the implant. This in turn allows for the design of different stiffness profiles in one implant tailored to the physiological load conditions. This work covers a fundamental approach to bring this vision to reality. At first modeling of the mechanical behavior of different scaffold designs are presented as a proof of concept of stiffness tailoring. Based on these results different Nitinol scaffolds can be produced by additive manufacturing.

  3. Final Report: DE- FC36-05GO15063, Fundamental Studies of Advanced High-Capacity, Reversible Metal Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Craig; McGrady, Sean; Severa, Godwin; Eliseo, Jennifer; Chong, Marina

    2015-02-08

    The project was component of the US DOE, Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE). The Sandia National Laboratory led center was established to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE/FreedomCAR 2010 and 2015 system targets for hydrogen storage materials. Our approach entailed a wide variety of activities ranging from synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of new candidate hydrogen storage materials; screening of catalysts for high capacity materials requiring kinetics enhancement; development of low temperature methods for nano-confinement of hydrides and determining its effects on the kinetics and thermodynamics of hydrides; and development of novel processes for the direct re-hydrogenation of materials. These efforts have resulted in several advancements the development of hydrogen storage materials. We have greatly extended the fundamental knowledge about the highly promising hydrogen storage carrier, alane (AlH₃), by carrying out the first crystal structure determinations and the first determination of the heats of dehydrogenation of β–AlH₃ and γ-AlD₃. A low-temperature homogenous organometallic approach to incorporation of Al and Mg based hydrides into carbon aerogels has been developed that that allows high loadings without degradation of the nano-porous scaffold. Nano-confinement was found to significantly improve the dehydrogenation kinetics but not effect the enthalpy of dehydrogenation. We conceived, characterized, and synthesized a novel class of potential hydrogen storage materials, bimetallic borohydrides. These novel compounds were found to have many favorable properties including release of significant amounts of hydrogen at moderate temperatures (75-190ºC). However, in situ IR studies in tandem with thermal gravimetric analysis have shown that about 0.5 equivalents of diborane are released during the dehydrogenation making re

  4. Fundamental study of microelectronic chip response under laser ultrasonic-interferometric inspection using C-scan method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Gong, Jie; Ume, I. Charles

    2014-02-01

    In modern surface mount packaging technologies, such as flip chips, chip scale packages, and ball grid arrays(BGA), chips are attached to the substrates/printed wiring board (PWB) using solder bump interconnections. The quality of solder bumps between the chips and the substrate/board is difficult to inspect. Laser ultrasonic-interferometric technique was proved to be a promising approach for solder bump inspection because of its noncontact and nondestructive characteristics. Different indicators extracted from received signals have been used to predict the potential defects, such as correlation coefficient, error ratio, frequency shifting, etc. However, the fundamental understanding of the chip behavior under laser ultrasonic inspection is still missing. Specifically, it is not sure whether the laser interferometer detected out-of-plane displacements were due to wave propagation or structural vibration when the chip was excited by pulsed laser. Plus, it is found that the received signals are chip dependent. Both challenges impede the interpretation of acquired signals. In this paper, a C-scan method was proposed to study the underlying phenomenon during laser ultrasonic inspection. The full chip was inspected. The response of the chip under laser excitation was visualized in a movie resulted from acquired signals. Specifically, a BGA chip was investigated to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method. By characterizing signals using discrete wavelet transform(DWT), both ultrasonic wave propagation and vibration were observed. Separation of them was successfully achieved using ideal band-pass filter and visualized in resultant movies, too. The observed ultrasonic waves were characterized and their respective speeds were measured by applying 2-D FFT. The C-scan method, combined with different digital signal processing techniques, was proved to be an very effective methodology to learn the behavior of chips under laser excitation. This general procedure can be

  5. Gas-Grain Simulation Facility: Fundamental studies of particle formation and interactions. Volume 2: Abstracts, candidate experiments and feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogleman, Guy (Editor); Huntington, Judith L. (Editor); Schwartz, Deborah E. (Editor); Fonda, Mark L. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    An overview of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility (GGSF) project and its current status is provided. The proceedings of the Gas-Grain Simulation Facility Experiments Workshop are recorded. The goal of the workshop was to define experiments for the GGSF--a small particle microgravity research facility. The workshop addressed the opportunity for performing, in Earth orbit, a wide variety of experiments that involve single small particles (grains) or clouds of particles. Twenty experiments from the fields of exobiology, planetary science, astrophysics, atmospheric science, biology, physics, and chemistry were described at the workshop and are outlined in Volume 2. Each experiment description included specific scientific objectives, an outline of the experimental procedure, and the anticipated GGSF performance requirements. Since these experiments represent the types of studies that will ultimately be proposed for the facility, they will be used to define the general science requirements of the GGSF. Also included in the second volume is a physics feasibility study and abstracts of example Gas-Grain Simulation Facility experiments and related experiments in progress.

  6. Fundamental studies in the molecular basis of laser-induced retinal damage. Annual report, September 1981-August 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis

    1982-09-01

    This research led to new insights in the fundamental mechanisms involved in laser induced retinal damage and some of the fundamental work on these mechanisms lead to new and exciting avenues in the development of rapidly adjustable molecular light filters with important new possibilities for pulsed-laser eye protection. This report summarizes the significant progress of the past year: (1) Development and Fundamental Mechanism of a Rapidly Adjustable Molecular Filter for Pulsed Laser Eye Protection - this research direction resulted from our investigations on cones of the red-eared swamp turtle, Pseudemys scripta elegans. (2) The Optical Density of Turtle Oil Droplet Solutions - it is important both from a practical and fundamental point of view to determine the optical density of turtle oil-droplet suspensions. In view of the high optical densities in this system, tunable-laser resonance Raman spectroscopy, which is the only technique that has been able to provide high-resolution data, is the only technique that is potentially able to obtain the information. (3) Laser-Induced Molecular Alterations in Turtle Retina. (4) Light Driven Enzymatic Reactions in Photoreceptors. (5) Molecular Cytology of Rod Outer Segments.

  7. Effectiveness of a Fundamental Motor Skill Intervention for 4-Year-Old Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bremer, Emily; Balogh, Robert; Lloyd, Meghann

    2015-01-01

    A wait-list control experimental design was employed to investigate the effectiveness of a fundamental motor skill intervention at improving the motor skills, adaptive behavior, and social skills of 4-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder (experimental n?=?5, control n?=?4); the impact of intervention intensity was also explored. The…

  8. Fundamental Fraction Knowledge of Preservice Elementary Teachers: A Cross-National Study in the United States and Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Fenqjen; Lo, Jane-Jane; Leu, Yuh-Chyn

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show the similarities as well as the differences of fundamental fraction knowledge owned by preservice elementary teachers from the United States (N = 89) and Taiwan (N = 85). To this end, we examined and compared their performance on an instrument including 15 multiple-choice test items. The items were categorized…

  9. Fundamental study of nanostructured electro-catalysts with reduced noble metal content for PEM based water electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadakia, Sandeep Karan

    with its robustness would make them great candidates for contributing to significant reduction in the overall capital costs of PEM based water electrolyzers. This thesis provides a detailed fundamental study of the synthesis, materials, characterization, theoretical studies and detailed electrochemical response and potential mechanisms of these novel electrocatalysts for OER processes.

  10. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation... TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND GUARANTEES Construction Work Plans and Related Studies § 1710.253 Engineering... engineering and cost studies as specified by RUS. The studies shall cover a period from the beginning of...

  11. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation... TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND GUARANTEES Construction Work Plans and Related Studies § 1710.253 Engineering... engineering and cost studies as specified by RUS. The studies shall cover a period from the beginning of...

  12. Fundamental Atomtronic Circuit Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeffrey; McIlvain, Brian; Lobb, Christopher; Hill, Wendell T., III

    2012-06-01

    Recent experiments with neutral superfluid gases have shown that it is possible to create atomtronic circuits analogous to existing superconducting circuits. The goals of these experiments are to create complex systems such as Josephson junctions. In addition, there are theoretical models for active atomtronic components analogous to diodes, transistors and oscillators. In order for any of these devices to function, an understanding of the more fundamental atomtronic elements is needed. Here we describe the first experimental realization of these more fundamental elements. We have created an atomtronic capacitor that is discharged through a resistance and inductance. We will discuss a theoretical description of the system that allows us to determine values for the capacitance, resistance and inductance. The resistance is shown to be analogous to the Sharvin resistance, and the inductance analogous to kinetic inductance in electronics. This atomtronic circuit is implemented with a thermal sample of laser cooled rubidium atoms. The atoms are confined using what we call free-space atom chips, a novel optical dipole trap produced using a generalized phase-contrast imaging technique. We will also discuss progress toward implementing this atomtronic system in a degenerate Bose gas.

  13. Lateralization of the frontal lobe functions elicited by a cognitive bias task is a fundamental process. Lesion study.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Kakurou; Aihara, Masao; Goldberg, Elkhonon; Nakazawa, Shinpei

    2005-09-01

    Cognitive neuroscience researchers have hypothesized that context-dependent and context-independent response selection is associated with the left and right frontal lobe, respectively, in right-handed adult males. Patients with left frontal lobe lesions show context-independent reasoning in a cognitive bias task (CBT), while those with right frontal lesions show context-dependent reasoning. Young children show more context-independent responses in a modified CBT (mCBT), while adolescents and adults show more context-dependent responses. We investigated the cognitive bias of right-handed children with unilateral frontal lobe lesions/epileptic foci to explore the plasticity of lateralization in the frontal lobes. The study included eight children with left frontal lobe lesions/epileptic foci (LLF) and four children with right frontal lobe lesions/epileptic foci (RLF). Twenty-three right-handed age-matched males served as controls. A computer presented version of the original card-choice task that was simplified and modified for children was used (mCBT). Simple visual stimuli differed dichotomously in shape, color, number, and shading. A target object presented alone was followed by two choices from which subjects made selection based on preference. Considering all four characteristics, the degree of similarity between the target and the subjects' choice was scored for 30 trials. A high score indicated a context-dependent response selection bias and a low score indicated a context-independent bias. The RLF subjects had a higher converted score (mean: 26.8+/-2.2), while LLF subjects showed a lower converted score (mean: 7.75+/-6.3). There were highly significant differences between LLF subjects and the other groups (P<0.001 vs. controls or RLF subjects). No significant correlations were observed between the converted scores and the age at onset, time since insult, or IQ in either LLF or RLF subjects. These findings suggest that the lateralization of frontal lobe

  14. FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES OF THE REMOVAL OF CONTAMINANTS FROM GROUND AND WASTE WATERS VIA REDUCTION BY ZERO-VALENT METALS

    SciTech Connect

    Yarmoff, Jory A.; Amrhein, Christopher

    2000-06-01

    Oxyanions of uranium, selenium, chromium, arsenic, technetium, and chlorine (as perchlorate) are frequently found as contaminants on many DOE sites. A potential remediation method is to react the contaminated water with zero-valent iron (ZVI). In this reaction, the iron serves as both an electron source and as a catalyst. Elemental iron is already being used on an experimental basis at many sites. Both in situ reactive barriers and above-ground reactors are being developed and field tested at this time. However, the design and operation of these treatment systems requires a detailed process-level understanding of the interactions between the contaminants and the iron surfaces. We are performing fundamental investigations of the interactions of the relevant compounds with Fe filings and single- and poly-crystalline surfaces. The aim of this work is to develop the fundamental physical and chemical understanding that is necessary for the development of cleanup techniques and procedures.

  15. Erratum: Sources of Image Degradation in Fundamental and Harmonic Ultrasound Imaging: A Nonlinear, Full-Wave, Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Trahey, Gregg E.; Dahl, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    A full-wave equation that describes nonlinear propagation in a heterogeneous attenuating medium is solved numerically with finite differences in the time domain. This numerical method is used to simulate propagation of a diagnostic ultrasound pulse through a measured representation of the human abdomen with heterogeneities in speed of sound, attenuation, density, and nonlinearity. Conventional delay-and-sum beamforming is used to generate point spread functions (PSFs) that display the effects of these heterogeneities. For the particular imaging configuration that is modeled, these PSFs reveal that the primary source of degradation in fundamental imaging is due to reverberation from near-field structures. Compared with fundamental imaging, reverberation clutter in harmonic imaging is 27.1 dB lower. Simulated tissue with uniform velocity but unchanged impedance characteristics indicates that for harmonic imaging, the primary source of degradation is phase aberration. PMID:21693410

  16. Fundamental studies of catalytic processing of synthetic liquids. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.R.

    1992-01-22

    This project revolves around understanding the fundamental processes involved in the catalytic removal of harmful oxygenated organics present in coal liquids. We are modelling the complex type of sulfided Mo catalyst proposed for these reactions with simple single crystal surfaces. These display a controlled range and number of reaction sites and can be extensively characterized by surface science techniques. We then investigate the reaction pathways for representative simple oxygenates upon these surfaces.

  17. An ab initio study of the geometries, anharmonic force fields and fundamental vibration frequencies of cis- and trans-formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Charles W.; Trachtman, Mendel; George, Philip

    1980-03-01

    The geometry, harmonic and anharmonic force fields, and fundamental vibration frequencies of cis- and trans-formic acid are studied ab initio in the 4-31G and (9,5) basis sets. For the more stable trans-conformer (i.e., trans with respect to CH and OH) comparisons are made between the predicted and observed anharmonic frequencies, and between the calculated harmonic force constants and those Redington derived from an analysis of experimental data. In the case of the less stable cis-conformer, for which there is as yet little experimental data, the calculations serve to predict values for the fundamental vibrational frequencies.

  18. Unification of Fundamental Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus

    1990-05-01

    This is an expanded version of the third Dirac Memorial Lecture, given in 1988 by the Nobel Laureate Abdus Salam. Salam's lecture presents an overview of the developments in modern particle physics from its inception at the turn of the century to the present theories seeking to unify all the fundamental forces. In addition, two previously unpublished lectures by Paul Dirac, and Werner Heisenberg are included. These lectures provide a fascinating insight into their approach to research and the developments in particle physics at that time. Nonspecialists, undergraduates and researchers will find this a fascinating book. It contains a clear introduction to the major themes of particle physics and cosmology by one of the most distinguished contemporary physicists.

  19. Fundamentals of battery dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jossen, Andreas

    Modern applications, such as wireless communication systems or hybrid electric vehicles operate at high power fluctuations. For some applications, where the power frequencies are high (above some 10 or 100 Hz) it is possible to filter the high frequencies using passive components; yet this results in additional costs. In other applications, where the dynamic time constants are in the range up to some seconds, filtering cannot be done. Batteries are hence operated with the dynamic loads. But what happens under these dynamic operation conditions? This paper describes the fundamentals of the dynamic characteristics of batteries in a frequency range from some MHz down to the mHz range. As the dynamic behaviour depends on the actual state of charge (SOC) and the state of health (SOH), it is possible to gain information on the battery state by analysing the dynamic behaviour. High dynamic loads can influence the battery temperature, the battery performance and the battery lifetime.

  20. A direct anatomical study of additional renal arteries in a Colombian mestizo population.

    PubMed

    Saldarriaga, B; Pérez, A F; Ballesteros, L E

    2008-05-01

    Traditional anatomy describes each kidney as receiving irrigation from a single renal artery. However, current literature reports great variability in renal blood supply, the number of renal arteries mentioned being the most frequently found variation. Such variation has great implications when surgery is indicated, such as in renal transplants, uroradiological procedures, renovascular hypertension, renal trauma and hydronephrosis. This article pretends to determine the frequency of additional renal arteries and their morphological expression in Colombian population in a cross-sectional study. A total of 196 of renal blocks were analysed from autopsies carried out in the Bucaramanga Institute of Forensic Medicine, Colombia; these renal blocks were processed by the injection- corrosion technique. The average age of the people being studied was 33.8 +/- 15.6 years; 85.4% of them were male and the rest female. An additional renal artery was found in 22.3% of the whole population and two additional ones were found in 2.6% of the same sample. The additional renal artery was most frequently found on the left side. The additional artery arose from the aorta's lateral aspect (52.4%); these additional arteries usually entered the renal parenchyma through the hilum. No difference was established according to gender. Nearly a third of the Colombian population presents one additional renal artery and about 3% of the same population presents two additional renal arteries. Most of them reached the kidney through its hilar region. PMID:18521812

  1. Fundamentals of electrokinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, M. W.

    The study of electrokinetics is a very mature field. Experimental studies date from the early 1800s, and acceptable theoretical analyses have existed since the early 1900s. The use of electrokinetics in practical field problems is more recent, but it is still quite mature. Most developments in the fundamental understanding of electrokinetics are in the colloid science literature. A significant and increasing divergence between the theoretical understanding of electrokinetics found in the colloid science literature and the theoretical analyses used in interpreting applied experimental studies in soil science and waste remediation has developed. The soil science literature has to date restricted itself to the use of very early theories, with their associated limitations. The purpose of this contribution is to review fundamental aspects of electrokinetic phenomena from a colloid science viewpoint. It is hoped that a bridge can be built between the two branches of the literature, from which both will benefit. Attention is paid to special topics such as the effects of overlapping double layers, applications in unsaturated soils, the influence of dispersivity, and the differences between electrokinetic theory and conductivity theory.

  2. Exchange Rates and Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, Charles; West, Kenneth D.

    2005-01-01

    We show analytically that in a rational expectations present-value model, an asset price manifests near-random walk behavior if fundamentals are I (1) and the factor for discounting future fundamentals is near one. We argue that this result helps explain the well-known puzzle that fundamental variables such as relative money supplies, outputs,…

  3. Fundamental study of a refractory-based carbon fiber reinforced composite made by reactive melt infiltration for hypersonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wali, Natalie Alice

    Ceramic matrix composites are excellent candidates for ultrahigh temperature applications due their good physical properties, which are a combination of a chemically stable matrix and tough fiber reinforcement. This work is a fundamental study of a carbon fiber reinforced zirconium carbide composite (Cf/ZrC). The background chapter reviews reactive melt infiltration, which is the processing method used to make the Cf/ZrC composite. The first chapter discusses the microstructural characterization and development of Cf/ZrC. A formation mechanism of the unique matrix microstructure is proposed based on the characterization results. In the second chapter the mechanical properties of Cf/ZrC were determined. The fracture toughness at room temperature is obtained with a standard four point bend test, while flexural strength of Cf/ZrC is obtained to the ultra high temperature regime. For high temperatures a testing rig was modified to operate in inert atmosphere and tests were conducted at 1100 °C, 1350 °C and 1650 °C. Correlation is made between the flexural strength and fiber coatings of two different composite types. In situ compression tests were performed a modified SEM. Digital image correlation was used to monitor strains during compression. The stress-strain information is correlated to surface deformation. The environmental durability and oxidation behavior of Cf/ZrC and ZrC is detailed in the third and fourth chapters. The oxidation and shock behavior of Cf/ZrC were observed under both slow and rapid heating rates to ultra high temperatures. For rapid heating rates a panel was subjected to heating at steady-state and non-steady state heat flux. For slow heating rates specimen coupons were heated at 2000 °C in a bottom-loading furnace. Specimens were characterized post-test by x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and optical microscopy. The oxidation kinetics of Cf/ZrC composites and ZrC powders (45 micron and 60 nanometer

  4. Fundamental studies of the removal of contaminants from ground and waste waters via reduction by zero-valent metals. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Yarmoff, J.A.; Amrhein, C.

    1998-06-01

    'Contaminated groundwater and surface waters are a problem throughout the US and the world. In many instances, the types of contamination can be directly attributed to man''s actions. For instance, the burial of wastes, casual disposal of solvents in unlined pits, and the development of irrigated agriculture have all contributed to groundwater and surface water contamination. The kinds of contaminants include chlorinated solvents and toxic trace elements that are soluble and mobile in soils and aquifers. Oxyanions of selenium, chromium, uranium, arsenic, and chlorine (as perchlorate) are frequently found as contaminants on many DOE sites. In addition, the careless disposal of cleaning solvents, such as carbon tetrachloride and trichloroethylene, has further contaminated many groundwaters at these sites. Oxyanions of selenium, nitrogen, arsenic, vanadium, uranium, chromium, and molybdenum are contaminants in agricultural areas of the Western US. The management of these waters requires treatment to remove the contaminants before reuse or surface water disposal. In one instance in the Central Valley of California, the discharge of selenate-contaminated shallow groundwater to a wildlife refuge caused catastrophic bird deaths and deformities of embryos. A potential remediation method for many of these oxyanions and chlorinated-solvents is to react the contaminated water with zero-valent iron. In this reaction, the iron serves as both an electron source and as a catalyst. Elemental iron is already being used on an experimental basis. Both in-situ reactive barriers and above-ground reactors are being developed for this purpose. However, the design and operation of these treatment systems requires a detailed process-level understanding of the interactions between the contaminants and the iron surfaces. Only limited success has been achieved in the field, partly because the basic surface chemical reactions are not well understood. The authors are performing fundamental

  5. Fundamental Study on Applicability of Powder-Based 3D Printer for Physical Modeling in Rock Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereshtenejad, Sayedalireza; Song, Jae-Joon

    2016-06-01

    Applications of 3D printing technology become more widespread in many research fields because of its rapid development and valuable capabilities. In rock mechanics and mining engineering, this technology has the potential to become a useful tool that might help implement a number of research studies previously considered impractical. Most commercial 3D printers cannot print prototypes with mechanical properties that match precisely those of natural rock samples. Therefore, some additional enhancements are required for 3D printers to be effectively utilized for rock mechanics applications. In this study, we printed and studied specimens using a powder-based commercial ZPrinter® 450 with ZP® 150 powder and Zb® 63 binder used as raw materials. The specimens printed by this 3D printer exhibited relatively low strength and ductile behavior, implying that it needs further improvements. Hence, we focused on several ways to determine the best combination of printing options and post-processing including the effects of the printing direction, printing layer thickness, binder saturation level, and heating process on the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) and stress-strain behavior of the printed samples. The suggested procedures have demonstrated their effectiveness by obtaining the printed samples that behave similarly to the natural rocks with low UCS. Although our optimization methods were particularly successful, further improvements are required to expand 3D printer application in the area of rock mechanics.

  6. Fundamental Studies of The Removal of Contaminants from Ground and Waste Waters Via Reduction By Zero-Valent metals

    SciTech Connect

    Jory A. Yarmoff; Christopher Amrhein

    2002-04-23

    Oxyanions of uranium, selenium, chromium, arsenic, technetium, and chlorine (as perchlorate) are frequently found as contaminants on many DOE sites, and in other areas of the U.S.. A potential remediation method is to react the contaminated water with zero-valent iron (ZVI). We are performing fundamental investigations of the interactions of the relevant compounds with Fe filings and single- and poly-crystalline surfaces. The aim of this work is to develop the physical and chemical understanding that is necessary for the development of cleanup techniques and procedures.

  7. Analysis, scientific computing and fundamental studies in fluid mechanics. Final report Number 21, May 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This report is a summary of work in progress and completed. Subject areas covered are: effective numerical methods for interfacial flows; multiscale finite element methods: analysis and applications; an efficient boundary integral method for the Mullins-Sekera problem; numerical simulation of three-dimensional water waves using a fast summation method; numerical solutions of steady-state rising bubbles; solidification coupled to fluid convection; turbulence models; exact solution of very viscous and Hele-Shaw flow; fundamental vortex dynamics; functional methods for turbulence; structure functions for isotropic turbulence; and water waves.

  8. Fundamental study of ash formation and deposition: Effect of reducing stoichiometry. Final report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Bool, L.E. III; Helble, J.J.; Shah, N.

    1995-09-01

    The technical objectives of this project are: (1) To identify the partitioning of inorganic coal constituents among vapor, submicron fume, and fly ash products generated during the combustion of pulverized coal under a variety of combustion conditions. Fuel lean and fuel rich combustion conditions are considered. (2) To identify and quantify the fundamental processes by which the transformations of minerals and organically-associated inorganic species occur. Emphasis is placed on identifying any changes that occur as a result of combustion under sub-stoichiometric combustion conditions. (3) To incorporate the effects of combustion stoichiometry into an Engineering Model for Ash Formation.

  9. Additional short-term plutonium urinary excretion data from the 1945-1947 plutonium injection studies

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, W.D.; Gautier, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    The amount of plutonium excreted per day following intravenous injection was shown to be significantly higher than predicted by the Langham power function model. Each of the Los Alamos National Laboratory notebooks used to record the original analytical data was studied for details that could influence the findings. It was discovered there were additional urine excretion data for case HP-3. This report presents the additional data, as well as data on case HP-6. (ACR)

  10. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity. 1710.253 Section 1710.253 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND GUARANTEES Construction Work Plans and Related Studies § 1710.253...

  11. Evaluating Drugs and Food Additives for Public Use: A Case Studies Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritt, Sheridan V.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a case study used in an introductory college biology course that provides a basis for generating debate on an issue concerning the regulation of controversial food additives and prescription drugs. The case study contained within this article deals with drug screening, specifically with information related to thalidomide. (CS)

  12. Fundamental Studies on the Enzymatic Liquefaction and Rheology of Cellulosic Biomass viaMagnetic Resonance Imaging Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardona, Maria Jose

    Worldwide need for alternatives to fossil fuels has driven significant research effort toward the development and scale-up of sustainable forms of energy. Second-generation biofuels, obtained from the breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., agricultural residues), present a promising alternative. In biofuel production, the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose is currently one of the most expensive steps in the biochemical breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass. Economic considerations for large-scale implementation of this process demand operation at high solids loadings of biomass (>15% (w/w)) due to potential for higher product concentrations and reduction of water usage throughout the biorefining process. In the high-solids regime, however, biomass slurries form a high viscosity, non-Newtonian slurry that introduces processing challenges, especially during the initial stages of hydrolysis (liquefaction), due to the low availability of water in the bulk phase. Furthermore, a concomitant reduction in glucose yields with increase in solids loadings has been observed, a phenomenon that is not well understood, but if overcome could hold the key to achieving desirable yields during hydrolysis. In order to better understand liquefaction, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) rheometer was used to perform in-line, in situ, real-time, and noninvasive studies on biomass slurries undergoing enzymatic hydrolysis. Batch and fed-batch experiments were done on lignocellulosic and cellulosic substrates with both purified and mixtures of enzymes, under various reaction conditions. The mechanism of liquefaction was found to be decoupled from the mechanism of saccharification. In addition, end product inhibition was found to have an impact on both saccharification and liquefaction during the initial stage of hydrolysis, which has an impact on scale-up of hydrolysis processes. Lastly, to address and overcome high-solids limitations, a fed-batch liquefaction process based on

  13. Fitting additive hazards models for case-cohort studies: a multiple imputation approach.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jinhyouk; Harel, Ofer; Kang, Sangwook

    2016-07-30

    In this paper, we consider fitting semiparametric additive hazards models for case-cohort studies using a multiple imputation approach. In a case-cohort study, main exposure variables are measured only on some selected subjects, but other covariates are often available for the whole cohort. We consider this as a special case of a missing covariate by design. We propose to employ a popular incomplete data method, multiple imputation, for estimation of the regression parameters in additive hazards models. For imputation models, an imputation modeling procedure based on a rejection sampling is developed. A simple imputation modeling that can naturally be applied to a general missing-at-random situation is also considered and compared with the rejection sampling method via extensive simulation studies. In addition, a misspecification aspect in imputation modeling is investigated. The proposed procedures are illustrated using a cancer data example. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26194861

  14. SHEEP MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS STUDY AREA AND CUCAMONGA WILDERNESS AND ADDITIONS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, James G.; Ridenour, James

    1984-01-01

    The Sheep Mountain Wilderness Study Area and Cucamonga Wilderness and additions encompass approximately 104 sq mi of the eastern San Gabriel Mountains, Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties, California. A mineral survey indicates areas of probable and substantiated tungsten and gold resource potential for parts of the Sheep Mountain Wilderness Study Area and an area of probable tungsten and gold resource potential in the Cucamonga Wilderness and additions. The rugged topography, withdrawal of lands from mineral entry to protect watershed, and restricted entry of lands during periods of high fire danger have contributed to the continuing decline in mineral exploration. The geologic setting precludes the presence of energy resources.

  15. Influence of Polarization on Carbohydrate Hydration: A Comparative Study Using Additive and Polarizable Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Poonam; Mallajosyula, Sairam S

    2016-07-14

    Carbohydrates are known to closely modulate their surrounding solvent structures and influence solvation dynamics. Spectroscopic investigations studying far-IR regions (below 1000 cm(-1)) have observed spectral shifts in the libration band (around 600 cm(-1)) of water in the presence of monosaccharides and polysaccharides. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics simulations to gain atomistic insight into carbohydrate-water interactions and to specifically highlight the differences between additive (nonpolarizable) and polarizable simulations. A total of six monosaccharide systems, α and β anomers of glucose, galactose, and mannose, were studied using additive and polarizable Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics (CHARMM) carbohydrate force fields. Solvents were modeled using three additive water models TIP3P, TIP4P, and TIP5P in additive simulations and polarizable water model SWM4 in polarizable simulations. The presence of carbohydrate has a significant effect on the microscopic water structure, with the effects being pronounced for proximal water molecules. Notably, disruption of the tetrahedral arrangement of proximal water molecules was observed due to the formation of strong carbohydrate-water hydrogen bonds in both additive and polarizable simulations. However, the inclusion of polarization resulted in significant water-bridge occupancies, improved ordered water structures (tetrahedral order parameter), and longer carbohydrate-water H-bond correlations as compared to those for additive simulations. Additionally, polarizable simulations also allowed the calculation of power spectra from the dipole-dipole autocorrelation function, which corresponds to the IR spectra. From the power spectra, we could identify spectral signatures differentiating the proximal and bulk water structures, which could not be captured from additive simulations. PMID:27266974

  16. Fundamental study of ash formation and deposition: Effect of reducing stoichiometry. Quarterly report No. 4, 1 January--31 March 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Helble, J.J.; Bool, L.E.; Senior, C.L.; Sarofim, A.F.; Zeng, Taofang; Huffman, G.P.; Huggins, F.E.; Shah, N.

    1994-05-01

    The technical objectives of this project are: (a) To identify the partitioning of inorganic coal constituents among vapor, submicron fume, and fly ash products generated during the combustion of pulverized coal under a variety of combustion conditions. Fuel lean and fuel rich combustion conditions will be considered. (b) To identify and quantify the fundamental processes by which the transformations of minerals and organically associated inorganic species occurs. Emphasis will be placed on identifying any changes that occur as a result of combustion under sub-stoichiometric combustion conditions. (c) To incorporate the effects of combustion stoichiometry into an engineering model for ash formation based upon the understanding developed in (a) and (b). When completed, this model will predict the particle size and chemical composition distributions of ash formed during the combustion of pulverized coal under a broad range of conditions.

  17. Final Technical Report, Grant DE-FG02-87ER13714, "Fundamental Studies of Metastable Liquids"

    SciTech Connect

    Pablo G. Debenedetti

    2009-03-09

    Grant DE-FG02-87ER13714 supported fundamental work on the physical properties of metastable liquids from 6/1/87 to 4/30/08. Renewal proposals were submitted every three years (1990, 1993, 1996, 1999, 2002, 2005), and included, in every case, a detailed Final Technical Report on the previous three years. Accordingly, the bulk of this report covers the final 2-year period 5/1/06 to 4/30/08 of this grant, which is not covered in any of the previous Final Technical Reports. This is preceded by a brief overview of the main research objectives and principal accomplishments during these very fruitful and productive 21 years of DOE-funded research.

  18. Analytical study of seismic effects of a solar receiver mounted on concrete towers with different fundamental periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Lin

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines the seismic effects experienced by a solar receiver mounted on concrete towers with different fundamental periods. Ten concrete towers are modeled with the empty solar receiver structure and loaded solar receiver structure to examine the tower seismic effects on the solar receiver. The fundamental periods of the towers range from 0.22 seconds to 4.58 seconds, with heights ranging from 40.5 meters to 200 meters. Thirty earthquake ground motion records are used to investigate the responses of each of the combined receiver-on-tower models as well as the receiver-on-ground models by the STAAD Pro software using time history analyses. The earthquake ground motion records are chosen based on the ratio of the peak ground acceleration to the peak ground velocity, ranging from 0.29 g/m/s to 4.88 g/m/s. For each of the combined models, the base shear at the interface between the receiver and the concrete tower is compared with the base shear of the receiver-on-ground model, and the ratio of the two base shears represents the structure amplification factor. It is found that the peak mean plus one standard deviation value of the structure amplification factor matches well with equation 13.3-1 in ASCE 7-10 for the empty solar receiver structure. However, when the solar receiver structure is loaded with dead loads, the peak value is greatly suppressed, and using equation 13.3-1 in ASCE 7-10 will be overly conservative.

  19. Coprocessing through fundamental and mechanistic studies in hydrogen transfer and catalysis. Quarterly report, September 26, 1991--December 26, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1991-12-31

    The research conducted during this quarter evaluated hydrogen transfer from hydroaromatics and cyclic olefins to aromatics under thermal and catalytic conditions. The reactions under study involved thermal reactions of a cyclic olefin, isotetralin (ISO), with aromatics, anthracene (ANT) and pyrene (PYR). These reactions completed a set of experiments with hydrogen-rich species and aromatics previously reported that included cycloalkanes of perhydropyrene (PHP) and perhydroanthracene (PHA), hydroaromatic donors, tetralin (TET) and dihydroanthracene (DHA), cyclic olefins, hexahydroanthracene (HHA) and ISO, and aromatics, PYR and ANT. Catalytic reactions performed this quarter used a sulfur catalyst that had been shown by Rudnick to affect the hydrogen transfer from cycloalkanes to aromatics and/or coal. Rudnick investigated the dehydrogenation of alicyclic compounds converting them to the corresponding aromatic compounds in a process in which the alicyclic compounds served as hydrogen donors. Thiophenol and thiol were effective catalysts and helped promote the conversion of alicyclic compounds to aromatic compounds. The research performed in our laboratory focused on evaluating the effect of a sulfur catalyst on the transfer of hydrogen from cycloalkanes like perhydropyrene (PHP) to aromatics like anthracene under catalytic conditions. The catalyst used in this study was sulfur generated from thiophenol present at a concentration level of 2000 ppm of sulfur. The reactions were performed under two temperature conditions, 380 and 440{degrees}C; both thermal and catalytic reactions were performed for comparison. In addition, the individual cycloalkane and aromatic compounds were reacted under these conditions so that a direct comparison of the effect of temperature and of catalyst on the reaction products formed could be made.

  20. Molecular modeling of directed self-assembly of block copolymers: Fundamental studies of processing conditions and evolutionary pattern design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaira, Gurdaman Singh

    Rapid progress in the semi-conductor industry has pushed for smaller feature sizes on integrated electronic circuits. Current photo-lithographic techniques for nanofabrication have reached their technical limit and are problematic when printing features small enough to meet future industrial requirements. "Bottom-up'' techniques, such as the directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers (BCP), are the primary contenders to compliment current "top-down'' photo-lithography ones. For industrial requirements, the defect density from DSA needs to be less than 1 defect per 10 cm by 10 cm. Knowledge of both material synthesis and the thermodynamics of the self-assembly process are required before optimal operating conditions can be found to produce results adequate for industry. The work present in this thesis is divided into three chapters, each discussing various aspects of DSA as studied via a molecular model that contains the essential physics of BCP self-assembly. Though there are various types of guiding fields that can be used to direct BCPs over large wafer areas with minimum defects, this study focuses only on chemically patterned substrates. The first chapter addresses optimal pattern design by describing a framework where molecular simulations of various complexities are coupled with an advanced optimization technique to find a pattern that directs a target morphology. It demonstrates the first ever study where BCP self-assembly on a patterned substrate is optimized using a three-dimensional description of the block-copolymers. For problems pertaining to DSA, the methodology is shown to converge much faster than the traditional random search approach. The second chapter discusses the metrology of BCP thin films using TEM tomography and X-ray scattering techniques, such as CDSAXS and GISAXS. X-ray scattering has the advantage of being able to quickly probe the average structure of BCP morphologies over large wafer areas; however, deducing the BCP morphology

  1. Generating Scenarios of Addition and Subtraction: A Study of Japanese University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinda, Shigehiro

    2013-01-01

    Students are presented with problems involving three scenario types of addition and subtraction in elementary mathematics: one dynamic ("Change") and two static ("Combine, Compare"). Previous studies have indicated that the dynamic type is easier for school children, whereas the static types are more difficult and comprehended only gradually…

  2. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity. 1710.253 Section 1710.253 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL AND PRE-LOAN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES COMMON TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND...

  3. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity. 1710.253 Section 1710.253 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL AND PRE-LOAN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES COMMON TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND...

  4. Experimental study of combustion of decane, dodecane and hexadecane with polymeric and nano-particle additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamari, Mohsen; Ratner, Albert

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that adding combustible nano-particles could have promising effects on increasing burning rate of liquid fuels. Combustible nano-particles could enhance the heat conduction and mixing within the droplet. Polymers have also higher burning rate than regular hydrocarbon fuels because of having the flame closer to the droplet surface. Therefore adding polymeric additive could have the potential to increase the burning rate. In this study, combustion of stationary fuel droplets of n-Decane, n-Dodecane and n-Hexadecane doped with different percentages of a long chain polymer and also a very fine nano carbon was examined and compared with the pure hydrocarbon behavior. In contrast with hydrocarbon droplets with no polymer addition, several zones of combustion including a slow and steady burning zone, a strong swelling zone and a final fast and fairly steady combustion zone were also detected. In addition, increasing polymer percentage resulted in a more extended swelling zone and shorter slow burning zone in addition to a shorter total burning time. Addition of nano-particles also resulted in an overall increased burning rate and shortened burning time which is due to enhanced heat conduction within the droplet.

  5. Anatomically ordered tapping interferes more with one-digit addition than two-digit addition: a dual-task fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Soylu, Firat; Newman, Sharlene D

    2016-02-01

    Fingers are used as canonical representations for numbers across cultures. In previous imaging studies, it was shown that arithmetic processing activates neural resources that are known to participate in finger movements. Additionally, in one dual-task study, it was shown that anatomically ordered finger tapping disrupts addition and subtraction more than multiplication, possibly due to a long-lasting effect of early finger counting experiences on the neural correlates and organization of addition and subtraction processes. How arithmetic task difficulty and tapping complexity affect the concurrent performance is still unclear. If early finger counting experiences have bearing on the neural correlates of arithmetic in adults, then one would expect anatomically and non-anatomically ordered tapping to have different interference effects, given that finger counting is usually anatomically ordered. To unravel these issues, we studied how (1) arithmetic task difficulty and (2) the complexity of the finger tapping sequence (anatomical vs. non-anatomical ordering) affect concurrent performance and use of key neural circuits using a mixed block/event-related dual-task fMRI design with adult participants. The results suggest that complexity of the tapping sequence modulates interference on addition, and that one-digit addition (fact retrieval), compared to two-digit addition (calculation), is more affected from anatomically ordered tapping. The region-of-interest analysis showed higher left angular gyrus BOLD response for one-digit compared to two-digit addition, and in no-tapping conditions than dual tapping conditions. The results support a specific association between addition fact retrieval and anatomically ordered finger movements in adults, possibly due to finger counting strategies that deploy anatomically ordered finger movements early in the development. PMID:26410214

  6. A synchrotron study of microstructure gradient in laser additively formed epitaxial Ni-based superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jiawei; Zhang, Anfeng; Li, Yao; Qian, Dan; Wan, Jingchun; Qi, Baolu; Tamura, Nobumichi; Song, Zhongxiao; Chen, Kai

    2015-10-01

    Laser additive forming is considered to be one of the promising techniques to repair single crystal Ni-based superalloy parts to extend their life and reduce the cost. Preservation of the single crystalline nature and prevention of thermal mechanical failure are two of the most essential issues for the application of this technique. Here we employ synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction to evaluate the quality in terms of crystal orientation and defect distribution of a Ni-based superalloy DZ125L directly formed by a laser additive process rooted from a single crystalline substrate of the same material. We show that a disorientation gradient caused by a high density of geometrically necessary dislocations and resultant subgrains exists in the interfacial region between the epitaxial and stray grains. This creates a potential relationship of stray grain formation and defect accumulation. The observation offers new directions on the study of performance control and reliability of the laser additive manufactured superalloys.

  7. Microstructural Study Of Zinc Hot Dip Galvanized Coatings with Titanium Additions In The Zinc Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konidaris, S.; Pistofidis, N.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergiou, A.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E. K.

    2007-04-01

    Zinc hot-dip galvanizing is a method for protecting iron and steel against corrosion. Galvanizing with pure Zn or Zn with additions like Ni, Al, Pb and Bi has been extensively studied, but there is a lack of scientific information about other additions. The present work examines the effect of a 0.5 wt% Ti addition in the Zn melt. The samples were exposed to accelerated corrosion in a salt spray chamber (SSC). The microstructure and chemical composition of the coatings were determined by Optical Microscopy, XRD and SEM associated with an EDS Analyzer. The results indicate that the coatings have a typical morphology, while Zn-Ti phases were also detected.

  8. A synchrotron study of microstructure gradient in laser additively formed epitaxial Ni-based superalloy

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jiawei; Zhang, Anfeng; Li, Yao; Qian, Dan; Wan, Jingchun; Qi, Baolu; Tamura, Nobumichi; Song, Zhongxiao; Chen, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Laser additive forming is considered to be one of the promising techniques to repair single crystal Ni-based superalloy parts to extend their life and reduce the cost. Preservation of the single crystalline nature and prevention of thermal mechanical failure are two of the most essential issues for the application of this technique. Here we employ synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction to evaluate the quality in terms of crystal orientation and defect distribution of a Ni-based superalloy DZ125L directly formed by a laser additive process rooted from a single crystalline substrate of the same material. We show that a disorientation gradient caused by a high density of geometrically necessary dislocations and resultant subgrains exists in the interfacial region between the epitaxial and stray grains. This creates a potential relationship of stray grain formation and defect accumulation. The observation offers new directions on the study of performance control and reliability of the laser additive manufactured superalloys. PMID:26446425

  9. A synchrotron study of microstructure gradient in laser additively formed epitaxial Ni-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Jiawei; Zhang, Anfeng; Li, Yao; Qian, Dan; Wan, Jingchun; Qi, Baolu; Tamura, Nobumichi; Song, Zhongxiao; Chen, Kai

    2015-10-08

    Laser additive forming is considered to be one of the promising techniques to repair single crystal Ni-based superalloy parts to extend their life and reduce the cost. Preservation of the single crystalline nature and prevention of thermal mechanical failure are two of the most essential issues for the application of this technique. Here we employ synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction to evaluate the quality in terms of crystal orientation and defect distribution of a Ni-based superalloy DZ125L directly formed by a laser additive process rooted from a single crystalline substrate of the same material. We show that a disorientation gradient caused by a high density of geometrically necessary dislocations and resultant subgrains exists in the interfacial region between the epitaxial and stray grains. This creates a potential relationship of stray grain formation and defect accumulation. In conclusion, the observation offers new directions on the study of performance control and reliability of the laser additive manufactured superalloys.

  10. Experimental study of impact-cratering damage on brittle cylindrical column model as a fundamental component of space architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Akira; Onose, Naomi; Setoh, Masato; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Hiraoka, Kensuke; Hasegawa, Sunao; Okudaira, Kyoko

    2014-10-01

    The cylindrical column of brittle material processed from soil and rock is a fundamental component of architectures on the surface of solid bodies in the solar system. One of the most hazardous events for the structure is damaging by hypervelocity impacts by meteoroids and debris. In such a background, cylindrical columns made of plaster of Paris and glass-bead-sintered ceramic were impacted by spherical projectiles of nylon, glass, and steel at velocity of about 1-4.5 km/s. Measured crater radii, depth, and excavated mass expressed by a function of the cylinder radius are similar irrespective of the target material, if those parameters are normalized by appropriate parameters of the crater produced on the flat-surface target. The empirical scaling relations of the normalized crater radii and depth are provided. Using them, crater dimensions and excavated mass of crater on cylindrical surface of any radius can be predicted from the existing knowledge of those for flat surface. Recommendation for the minimum diameter of a cylinder so as to resist against a given impact is provided.

  11. Fundamental studies of catalytic processing of synthetic liquids. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, P.R.

    1992-04-23

    This project revolves around understanding the fundamental processes involved in the catalytic removal of harmful oxygenated organics present in coal liquids. We are modelling the complex type of sulfided Mo catalyst proposed for these reactions with simple single crystal surfaces. These display a controlled range and number of reaction sites and can be extensively characterized by surface science techniques. We then investigate the reaction pathways for representative simple oxygenates upon these surfaces. We have made considerable progress in characterizing the adsorption site of sulfur on the Mo(110) surface. The sulfur is probably located in the quasi-fourfold center hollow site on the surface at a vertical distance of about 1.5{Angstrom} above the topmost metal layer. At present the calculations assume no reconstruction of the metal layer and this tentative finding may change when we allow the metal to reconstruct. We have also progressed in our understanding of the reactions of furan on these surfaces. The data is therefore consistent with propane adsorption being hindered relative to either ethylene or furan, but the release of hydrogen from adsorbed furan is a higher energy process than the equivalent process for a simple hydrocarbon. The effect of preadsorbed S on furan and hydrocarbon adsorption is consistent with an adsorption site blocking role.

  12. Summary of Previous Chamber or Controlled Anthrax Studies and Recommendations for Possible Additional Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2010-12-29

    This report and an associated Excel file(a) summarizes the investigations and results of previous chamber and controlled studies(b) to characterize the performance of methods for collecting, storing and/or transporting, extracting, and analyzing samples from surfaces contaminated by Bacillus anthracis (BA) or related simulants. This report and the Excel are the joint work of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for the Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate. The report was originally released as PNNL-SA-69338, Rev. 0 in November 2009 with limited distribution, but was subsequently cleared for release with unlimited distribution in this Rev. 1. Only minor changes were made to Rev. 0 to yield Rev. 1. A more substantial update (including summarizing data from other studies and more condensed summary tables of data) is underway

  13. Studies of levels of biogenic amines in meat samples in relation to the content of additives.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębska, Aneta; Kowalska, Sylwia; Szłyk, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The impact of meat additives on the concentration of biogenic amines and the quality of meat was studied. Fresh white and red meat samples were fortified with the following food additives: citric and lactic acids, disodium diphosphate, sodium nitrite, sodium metabisulphite, potassium sorbate, sodium chloride, ascorbic acid, α-tocopherol, propyl 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoate (propyl gallate) and butylated hydroxyanisole. The content of spermine, spermidine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, tryptamine and 2-phenylethylamine was determined by capillary isotachophoretic methods in meat samples (fresh and fortified) during four days of storage at 4°C. The results were applied to estimate the impact of the tested additives on the formation of biogenic amines in white and red meat. For all tested meats, sodium nitrite, sodium chloride and disodium diphosphate showed the best inhibition. However, cadaverine and putrescine were characterised by the biggest changes in concentration during the storage time of all the additives. Based on the presented data for the content of biogenic amines in meat samples analysed as a function of storage time and additives, we suggest that cadaverine and putrescine have a significant impact on meat quality. PMID:26515667

  14. In-situ study of the influence of additives on the growth behavior of copper electrodeposits on copper single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Aiwen

    Trace organic additives are known to be essential in obtaining desired metal electrodeposits in the microelectronic industry, however, fundamental design principles for their use and a scientific understanding of their interaction during electrodeposition is lacking. In the present study we investigated electrodeposition of copper on the Cu(100) surface in air-saturated or dearated acid-sulfate plating solutions containing several combinations of chloride and additives benzotriazole (BTA) and 3-mercapto propane sulfonic acid (MPSA) under galvanostatic pulse-current conditions. The electrodeposition process was followed using in-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM images were quantitatively analyzed by pattern-recognition and scaling procedures. In the absence of additives, copper deposits grew in a layer-by-layer mode from the earliest stage of deposition. The surface consisted of smooth terraces separated by steps. The scaling analysis result was consistent with a process dominated by surface diffusion and step growth. In chloride containing solutions, square-pyramidal mounds were initiated and grew to cover the surface. Mound slope increased with deposition time with no indication of reaching a steady-state value. This growth mode was consistent with a surface diffusion mechanism. The scaling result was similar to the additive-free system, but indicated that surface diffusion was more dominant in the presence of chloride. BTA inhibited the surface and produced nucleation-limited growth at hemispheroidal centers whose height to base radius aspect ratio increased linearly with deposition time. Nucleation and growth of three-dimensional nodules started randomly across the entire surface. The nodules were smaller in size than the mounds observed without BTA. The number and density of nodules were much higher than the mounds density. The deposit growth was dominated by a roughening mechanism that can be described by the random roughening term of a stochastic model

  15. Fundamental Physical Constants

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 121 CODATA Fundamental Physical Constants (Web, free access)   This site, developed in the Physics Laboratory at NIST, addresses three topics: fundamental physical constants, the International System of Units (SI), which is the modern metric system, and expressing the uncertainty of measurement results.

  16. a Study on the Role of Sintering Additives for Fabrication of sic Ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Han Ki; Lee, Young Ju; Cho, Ho Jun; Kim, Tae Gyu

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials have been extensively studied for high temperature components in advanced energy system and advanced gas turbine. The SiC ceramics have been fabricated by a NITE (Nano Infiltration Transient Eutectic Phase) Process, using Nano-SiC powder. The sintering additives used for forming liquid phase under sintering process, used the sintering additives ratios were an Al2O3-Y2O3 system or add SiO2 contents. A major R&D focus for the SiC ceramics is the production to obtain high purity SiC ceramics. In this study, we investigated roles of the sintering additives(Al2O3:Y2O3) to fabrication of the SiC ceramics. The effects of SiO2 contents and density properties of the SiC ceramics were also investigated. To investigate the effects of SiO2, Al2O3/Y2O3 composition were fixed and then SiO2 ratios were changed as several kinds, and to confirm the effects of sintering additives ratios (Al2O3:Y2O3) they were changed between 4:6 and 6:4 in x wt.%.

  17. Using epidemiology to regulate food additives: saccharin case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Cordle, F; Miller, S A

    1984-01-01

    The increasing use of nonnutritive sweeteners and the widely publicized 1969 ban on cyclamate led to additional investigations in rodents of the carcinogenic potential of saccharin. Preliminary results of a long-term feeding study indicated formation of bladder tumors in rodents, and collective experimental evidence has demonstrated that high doses of the synthetic sweetener saccharin can cause bladder cancer in rodents. Based on the results of that and other rodent studies indicating an increased risk of bladder cancer associated with saccharin, the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration announced the agency's intention to propose a ban on saccharin. This intention was made known in April 1977 under the Delaney Clause of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The clause essentially states that no additive shall be deemed safe if it is found to induce cancer in man or animals, or if it is found, after tests appropriate for the evaluation of the safety of food additives, to induce cancer in man or animals. Also in 1977, a group of epidemiologists began to assess the available epidemiologic information to determine the potential human risk. This report describes the assessment of several human epidemiologic studies available then and the results of more recent epidemiologic studies. PMID:6431484

  18. A fundamental study of the impact of pressure on the adsorption mechanism in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Åsberg, Dennis; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Fornstedt, Torgny

    2016-07-29

    A fundamental investigation of the pressure effect on individual adsorption sites was undertaken based on adsorption energy distribution and adsorption isotherm measurements. For this purpose, we measured adsorption equilibrium data at pressures ranging from 100 to 1000bar at constant flow and over a wide concentration range for three low-molecular-weight solutes, antipyrine, sodium 2-naphthalenesulfonate, and benzyltriethylammonium chloride, on an Eternity C18 stationary phase. The adsorption energy distribution was bimodal for all solutes, remaining clearly so at all pressures. The bi-Langmuir model best described the adsorption in these systems and two types of adsorption sites were identified, one with a low and another with a high energy of interaction. Evidence exists that the low-energy interactions occur at the interface between the mobile and stationary phases and that the high-energy interactions occur nearer the silica surface, deeper in the C18 layer. The contribution of each type of adsorption site to the retention factor was calculated and the change in solute molar volume from the mobile to stationary phase during the adsorption process was estimated for each type of site. The change in solute molar volume was 2-4 times larger at the high-energy site, likely because of the greater loss of solute solvation layer when penetrating deeper into the C18 layer. The association equilibrium constant increased with increasing pressure while the saturation capacity of the low-energy site remained almost unchanged. The observed increase in saturation capacity for the high-energy site did not affect the column loading capacity, which was almost identical at 50- and 950-bar pressure drops over the column. PMID:27357740

  19. Comparative study of fundamental and second-harmonic ICRF wave propagation and damping at high density in the Alcator tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudreau, M.P.J.

    1981-09-01

    Due to the versatility of the high power apparatus, the fast magnetosonic branch is used with ..omega../sub 0/ = 1,2,3,4 ..omega../sub ci/, unlike most other ICRF experiments. Unusually high magnetic field (B/sub 0/ = 40 to 80 kG), plasma density (n/sub e/ = 10/sup 13/ - 5 x 10/sup 14//cm/sup 3/), generator frequency (f/sub 0/ = 90 to 200 MHz) and transmitter power, with shielded and unshielded antennas, are the key parameters of the experiment. This wide parameter range allows a direct comparison between fundamental and second harmonic regimes, and shielded and unshielded antennas, our prime goals. The real and imaginary parts of the parallel and perpendicular wave numbers are measured with extensive magnetic probe diagnostics for a spectrum of plasma parameters and compared with theory. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the wave structure and scaling laws are derived analytically in simple geometries and computed numerically for realistic plasma parameters and profiles. General figures of merit, such as radiation resistance and quality factor, are also derived and compared with the experiment. Secondary effects of the high power wave launching, such as changes in plasma current, density, Z/sub eff/, energetic neutral flux, soft x-rays, neutron flux, and impurities are also discussed. Most important, a general synthesis of the many engineering, physics, and experimental problems and conclusions of the Alcator A ICRF program are inspected in detail. Finally, the derived and experimentally determined scaling laws and engineering constraints are used to estimate the ICRF requrements, advantages, and potential pitfalls of the next generations of experiments on the Alcator tokamaks.

  20. Study of asphalt/asphaltene precipitation during addition of solvents to West Sak crude

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.C.; Patil, S.L.; Kamath, V.A. )

    1990-07-01

    In this study, experimental data on the amount of asphalt and asphaltene precipitation due to addition of solvents to West Sak crude were gathered. The first set of tests were conducted for two types of West Sak stock tank oils. Solvents used include: ethane, carbon dioxide, propane, n-butane, n-pentane, n-heptane, Prudhoe Bay natural gas (PBG) and natural gas liquids (NGL). Effect of solvent to oil dilution ratio on the amount of precipitation was studied. Alteration of crude oil composition due to asphalt precipitation was measured using gas-liquid chromatography. A second set of experiments were conducted to measure asphaltene precipitation due to addition of CO{sub 2} to live (recombined) West Sak crude.

  1. A Study of Aluminum Combustion in Solids, Powders, Foams, Additively-Manufactured Lattices, and Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, James; Trammell, Norman; Batteh, Jad; Curran, Nicholas; Rogers, John; Littrell, Donald

    2015-06-01

    This study examines the fireball characteristics, blast parameters, and combustion efficiency of explosively-shocked aluminum-based materials. The materials included structural and non-structural aluminum forms - such as solid cylinders, foams, additively-manufactured lattices, and powders - and some polytetrafluoroethylene-aluminum (PTFE-Al) composites. The materials were explosively dispersed in a small blast chamber, and the blast properties and products were measured with pressure transducers, thermocouples, slow and fast ultraviolet/visible spectrometers, and high-speed video.

  2. Spectra-temporal patterns underlying mental addition: an ERP and ERD/ERS study.

    PubMed

    Ku, Yixuan; Hong, Bo; Gao, Xiaorong; Gao, Shangkai

    2010-03-12

    Functional neuroimaging data have shown that mental calculation involves fronto-parietal areas that are composed of different subsystems shared with other cognitive functions such as working memory and language. Event-related potential (ERP) analysis has also indicated sequential information changes during the calculation process. However, little is known about the dynamic properties of oscillatory networks in this process. In the present study, we applied both ERP and event-related (de-)synchronization (ERS/ERD) analyses to EEG data recorded from normal human subjects performing tasks for sequential visual/auditory mental addition. Results in the study indicate that the late positive components (LPCs) can be decomposed into two separate parts. The earlier element LPC1 (around 360ms) reflects the computing attribute and is more prominent in calculation tasks. The later element LPC2 (around 590ms) indicates an effect of number size and appears larger only in a more complex 2-digit addition task. The theta ERS and alpha ERD show modality-independent frontal and parietal differential patterns between the mental addition and control groups, and discrepancies are noted in the beta ERD between the 2-digit and 1-digit mental addition groups. The 2-digit addition (both visual and auditory) results in similar beta ERD patterns to the auditory control, which may indicate a reliance on auditory-related resources in mental arithmetic, especially with increasing task difficulty. These results coincide with the theory of simple calculation relying on the visuospatial process and complex calculation depending on the phonological process. PMID:20105450

  3. Fundamental studies of the removal of contaminants from ground and waste waters via reduction by zero-valent metals. Annual progress report, September 1, 1996--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Yarmoff, J.A.; Amrhein, C.

    1997-01-01

    contaminants and the iron surfaces. Only limited success has been achieved in the field, partly because the basic surface chemical reactions are not well understood. The authors are performing fundamental investigations of the interactions of the relevant chlorinated solvents, trace elements, and trace element-containing compounds with single- and poly-crystalline Fe surfaces. The aim of this work is to develop the fundamental physical and chemical understanding that is necessary for the development of cleanup techniques and procedures. The authors are perforrming both bulk chemical measurements of the reduction reactions and surface science studies of model chemical systems. During this first year of funding, the authors have already made significant progress in both areas. Initially, they have focused primarily on the reduction of selenate by elemental iron. They have also performed some work with chromate, perchlorate, uranyl, and carbon tetrachloride, as well. In the following sections, some of the progress is described.'

  4. Fundamental studies of the plasma extraction and ion beam formation processes in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Hongsen

    1995-02-10

    The fundamental and practical aspects are described for extracting ions from atmospheric pressure plasma sources into an analytical mass spectrometer. Methodologies and basic concepts of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are emphasized in the discussion, including ion source, sampling interface, supersonic expansion, slumming process, ion optics and beam focusing, and vacuum considerations. Some new developments and innovative designs are introduced. The plasma extraction process in ICP-MS was investigated by Langmuir measurements in the region between the skimmer and first ion lens. Electron temperature (T{sub e}) is in the range 2000--11000 K and changes with probe position inside an aerosol gas flow. Electron density (n{sub e}) is in the range 10{sup 8}--10{sup 10} {sup {minus}cm }at the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3} near the skimmer tip and drops abruptly to 10{sup 6}--10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}3} downstream further behind the skimmer. Electron density in the beam leaving the skimmer also depends on water loading and on the presence and mass of matrix elements. Axially resolved distributions of electron number-density and electron temperature were obtained to characterize the ion beam at a variety of plasma operating conditions. The electron density dropped by a factor of 101 along the centerline between the sampler and skimmer cones in the first stage and continued to drop by factors of 10{sup 4}--10{sup 5} downstream of skimmer to the entrance of ion lens. The electron density in the beam expansion behind sampler cone exhibited a 1/z{sup 2} intensity fall-off (z is the axial position). An second beam expansion originated from the skimmer entrance, and the beam flow underwent with another 1/z{sup 2} fall-off behind the skimmer. Skimmer interactions play an important role in plasma extraction in the ICP-MS instrument.

  5. Mineral resources of the Buffalo Hump and Sand Dunes Addition Wilderness Study Areas, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, A.B.; Barbon, H.N.; Kulik, D.M. ); McDonnell, J.R. Jr. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a study to assess the potential for undiscovered mineral resources and appraise the identified resources of the Buffalo Hump and Sand Dunes Addition Wilderness Study Areas, southwestern Wyoming, There are no mines, prospects, or mineralized areas nor any producing oil or gas wells; however, there are occurrences of coal, claystone and shale, and sand. There is a moderate resource potential for oil shale and natural gas and a low resource potential for oil, for metals, including uranium, and for geothermal sources.

  6. Additional Treatment Services in a Cocaine Treatment Study: Level of Services Obtained and Impact on Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Worley, Matthew; Gallop, Robert; Gibbons, Mary Beth Connolly; Ring-Kurtz, Sarah; Present, Julie; Weiss, Roger D.; Crits-Christoph, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the level of additional treatment services obtained by patients enrolled in the NIDA Cocaine Collaborative Study, a multi-center efficacy trial of four treatments for cocaine dependence, and to determine whether these services impact treatment outcome. Cocaine-dependent patients (N = 487) were recruited at five sites and randomly assigned to six months of one of four psychosocial treatments. Assessments were made at baseline, monthly during treatment, and at follow-ups at 9, 12, 15, and 18 months post-randomization. On average, patients received little or no additional treatment services during active treatment (first 6 months), but the rate of obtaining most services increased during the follow-up phase (month 7 to 18). In general, the treatment groups did not differ in the rates of obtaining non-protocol services. For all treatment groups, patients with greater psychiatric severity received more medical and psychiatric services during active treatment and follow-up. Use of treatment services was unrelated to drug use outcomes during active treatment. However, during the follow-up period, increased use of psychiatric medication, 12-step attendance, and 12-step participation was related to less drug use. The results suggest that during uncontrolled follow-up phases, additional non-protocol services may potentially confound the interpretation of treatment group comparisons in drug use outcomes. PMID:18463998

  7. Characterization of fundamental catalytic properties of MoS2/WS2 nanotubes and nanoclusters for desulfurization catalysis - a surface temperature study

    SciTech Connect

    U. Burghaus

    2012-07-05

    The prior project consisted of two main project lines. First, characterization of novel nanomaterials for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) applications. Second, studying more traditional model systems for HDS such as vapor-deposited silica-supported Mo and MoSx clusters. In the first subproject, we studied WS2 and MoS2 fullerene-like nanoparticles as well as WS2 nanotubes. Thiophene (C4H4S) was used as the probe molecule. Interestingly, metallic and sulfur-like adsorption sites could be identified on the silica-supported fullerene-particles system. Similar structures are seen for the traditional system (vapor-deposited clusters). Thus, this may be a kinetics fingerprint feature of modern HDS model systems. In addition, kinetics data allowed characterization of the different adsorption sites for thiophene on and inside WS2 nanotube bundles. The latter is a unique feature of nanotubes that has not been reported before for any inorganic nanotube system; however, examples are known for carbon nanotubes, including prior work of the PI. Although HDS has been studied for decades, utilizing nanotubes as nanosized HDS reactors has never been tried before, as far as we know. This is of interest from a fundamental perspective. Unfortunately, the HDS activity of the nanocatalysts at ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions was close to the detection limit of our techniques. Therefore, we propose to run experiments at ambient pressure on related nanopowder samples as part of the renewal application utilizing a now-available GC (gas chromatograph) setup. In addition, Ni and Co doped nanocatalyts are proposed for study. These dopants will boost the catalytic activity. In the second subproject of the prior grant, we studied HDS-related chemistry on more traditional supported cluster catalysts. Mo clusters supported by physical vapor deposition (PVD) on silica have been characterized. Two reaction pathways are evident when adsorbing thiophene on Mo and MoSx clusters: molecular adsorption and

  8. A fundamental study of the modification of elastomeric poly(dimethylsiloxane) and silicon surfaces using polymers and their applications in patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ell, John Randall

    A fundamental study of the polymer functionalization of flat elastomeric poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and Silcon wafers is described. Using polymer grafting methodologies such as "grafting onto" and "grafting from" a functional substrate, the development of a novel pattern miniaturization protocol and method for nanoparticle patterning was achieved. Currently, a general strategy for the poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) functionalization of Silastic RTV elastomeric substrates does not exist in the literature. Our preliminary attempts with the functionalization of elastomeric PDMS suffered from a lack of effective surface functionalization control, primarily as a result of literature inconsistencies and inadequate surface characterization. Therefore, we performed in-depth and quantitative surface analysis of the surface functionality of the elastic PDMS substrates that were used to adopt a modified functionalization strategy. The end result was the development of a dynamic material where the surface energy could be manipulated through simple mechanical stretching. A new miniaturization protocol, referred to as high-efficiency stepwise contraction and adsorption nanolithography (hSCAN), was demonstrated. A thin film of elastomeric precursor was first cast on a stretched substrate. A designed microstructure was then imprinted and the precursor layer was subsequently cured. The microstructure was miniaturized after the substrate relaxed to its original length. The miniaturized structures can be used as stamps to transfer materials onto a designated support or as molds to produce the structure on another stretched substrate for further miniaturization. The patterning of materials by microcontact printing has been improved with the development of hSCAN. Optical disc media polycarbonate discs were used as master molds in the hSCAN miniaturization protocol with promising results. CD's, DVD's and even Blue-ray polycarbonate discs were miniaturized, and < 100 nm features were

  9. Fundamental studies of the mechanisms of slag deposit formation: Studies on initiation, growth and sintering in the formation of utility boiler deposits: Topical technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Tangsathitkulchai, M.; Austin, L.G.

    1986-03-01

    Three laboratory-scale devices were utilized to investigate the mechanisms of the initiation, growth and sintering process involved in the formation of boiler deposits. Sticking apparatus investigations were conducted to study deposit initiation by comparing the adhesion behavior of the ash drops on four types of steel-based heat exchanger materials under the conditions found in a utility boiler and an entrained slagging gasifier. In addition, the adhesion behavior of the ash drops on a reduced steel surface were investigated. All the ash drops studied in this investigation were produced from bituminous coals.

  10. A synchrotron study of microstructure gradient in laser additively formed epitaxial Ni-based superalloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xue, Jiawei; Zhang, Anfeng; Li, Yao; Qian, Dan; Wan, Jingchun; Qi, Baolu; Tamura, Nobumichi; Song, Zhongxiao; Chen, Kai

    2015-10-08

    Laser additive forming is considered to be one of the promising techniques to repair single crystal Ni-based superalloy parts to extend their life and reduce the cost. Preservation of the single crystalline nature and prevention of thermal mechanical failure are two of the most essential issues for the application of this technique. Here we employ synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction to evaluate the quality in terms of crystal orientation and defect distribution of a Ni-based superalloy DZ125L directly formed by a laser additive process rooted from a single crystalline substrate of the same material. We show that a disorientation gradient caused bymore » a high density of geometrically necessary dislocations and resultant subgrains exists in the interfacial region between the epitaxial and stray grains. This creates a potential relationship of stray grain formation and defect accumulation. In conclusion, the observation offers new directions on the study of performance control and reliability of the laser additive manufactured superalloys.« less

  11. Isomeric Selective Studies of the Dominant Addition Channel in OH Initiated Oxidation of Isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, B.; Bugarin, A.; Connell, B.; North, S. W.

    2009-12-01

    We report the first isomeric selective study of the dominant isomeric pathway in the OH initiated oxidation of isoprene in the presence of O2 and NO using the Laser Photolysis-Laser Induced Fluorescence (LP-LIF) technique. The photolysis of monodeuterated/non deuterated 2-iodo-2-methyl-but-3-en-1-ol results exclusively in the dominant OH-isoprene addition product, providing important insight into the oxidation mechanism. Based on kinetic analysis of OH cycling experiments we have determined the rate constant for O2 addition to the hydroxy alkyl radical to be (1.0±0.5) × 10^(-12) cm^(3) s^(-1) and we find a value of (8.05±2.3) × 10^(-12) cm^(3) s^(-1) for the overall reaction rate constant of the hydroxy peroxy radical with NO. We also report the first clear experimental evidence of the (E-) form of the δ-hydroxyalkoxy channel through isotopic labeling experiments and quantify its branching ratio to be 0.1±0.025. Since it corresponds to missing carbon balance in isoprene oxidation, we have been able to identify some of the missing carbon balance. Since our measured isomeric selective rate constants for the dominant outer channel in OH initiated isoprene chemistry are similar to the overall rate constants derived from non isomeric kinetics, we predict that the remaining outer addition channel will have similar reactivity. We have extended this study to the OH initiated oxidation of 1,3-butadiene. We have obtained isomeric selective rate constants on the dominant channel of the butadiene oxidation chemistry and measured the branching ratio for the δ-hydroxyalkoxy channel. These results on butadiene studies will be discussed.

  12. STUDY OF THE FUNDAMENTALS OF MERCURY SPECIATION IN COAL-FIRED BOILERS UNDER SIMULATED POST-COMBUSTION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses a continuation of the study on mercury speciation initiated in the fiscal year 1997 (FY97). The previous study found that cupric oxide (CuO) and ferric oxide (Fe2O3) in the presence of hydrogen chloride (HCl) promote elemental mercury oxidation in simulated f...

  13. Immunotoxic effects of the color additive caramel color III: immune function studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Houben, G F; Penninks, A H; Seinen, W; Vos, J G; Van Loveren, H

    1993-01-01

    Administration of the color additive caramel color III (AC) may cause a reduction in total white blood cell counts in rats due to reduced lymphocyte counts. Beside lymphopenia, several other effects in rat have been described. The effects are caused by the imidazole derivative 2-acetyl-4(5)-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxybutyl)imidazole (THI) and occur in rats fed a diet low in vitamin B6. In the present paper, immune function studies on AC and THI with rats fed a diet low, but not deficient in vitamin B6 are presented and discussed. Rats were exposed to 0.4 or 4% AC or to 5.72 ppm THI in drinking water during and for 28 days prior to the start of immune function assays. Resistance to Trichinella spiralis was examined in an oral infection model and clearance of Listeria monocytogenes upon an intravenous infection was studied. In addition, natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity of splenic and nonadherent peritoneal cells and the antibody response to sheep red blood cells were studied. From the results it is concluded that exposure of rats to AC or THI influenced various immune function parameters. Thymus-dependent immunity was suppressed, while parameters of the nonspecific resistance were also affected, as shown by a decreased natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity in the spleen and an enhanced clearance of L. monocytogenes. PMID:8432426

  14. Improving wound care simulation with the addition of odor: a descriptive, quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Roberson, Donna W; Neil, Janice A; Bryant, Elizabeth T

    2008-08-01

    Improving problem-solving skills and expertise in complex clinical care provision requires engaging students in the learning process--a challenging goal when clinical practicums and supervisors are limited. High-fidelity simulation has created many new opportunities for educating healthcare professionals. Because addressing malodorous wounds is a common problem that may be difficult to "teach," a descriptive, quasi-experimental simulation study was conducted. Following completion of a wound care simulation and Laerdal's Simulation Experience Evaluation Tool by 137 undergraduate nursing students, 50 control subjects were randomly selected and 49 volunteer students (experimental group) participated in a wound care simulation after one of three cheeses with a strong odor was added to simulate a malodorous wound. Compared to the control group, study group responses were significantly better (P <0.001) for eight of the 12 survey variables tested and indicated the addition of odor was beneficial in enhancing the perceived realism and value of the simulation. Students responded that the addition of odor in the simulation laboratory improved realism and they felt better prepared to handle malodorous wounds in a clinical setting. An unanticipated outcome was the enhanced feeling of involvement associated with paired care teams as opposed to working in larger groups. The results of this study indicate that wound care education outcomes improve when nursing students are able to practice using a multi-sensorial wound care simulation model. PMID:18716340

  15. Fundamentals of Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C. L.

    2005-06-01

    Quantum mechanics has evolved from a subject of study in pure physics to one with a wide range of applications in many diverse fields. The basic concepts of quantum mechanics are explained in this book in a concise and easy-to-read manner emphasising applications in solid state electronics and modern optics. Following a logical sequence, the book is focused on the key ideas and is conceptually and mathematically self-contained. The fundamental principles of quantum mechanics are illustrated by showing their application to systems such as the hydrogen atom, multi-electron ions and atoms, the formation of simple organic molecules and crystalline solids of practical importance. It leads on from these basic concepts to discuss some of the most important applications in modern semiconductor electronics and optics. Containing many homework problems and worked examples, the book is suitable for senior-level undergraduate and graduate level students in electrical engineering, materials science and applied physics. Clear exposition of quantum mechanics written in a concise and accessible style Precise physical interpretation of the mathematical foundations of quantum mechanics Illustrates the important concepts and results by reference to real-world examples in electronics and optoelectronics Contains homeworks and worked examples, with solutions available for instructors

  16. A fundamental study on the [(μ-Cl)3Mg2(THF)6]+ dimer electrolytes for rechargeable Mg batteries†

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jonathan T.; Hu, Dehong; Deng, Xuchu; Hu, Jianzhi; Hu, Mary Y.; Xiao, Jie; Shao, Yuyan; Tang, Keqi; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The long sought solvated [MgCl]+ species in the Mg-dimer electrolytes was characterized by soft mass spectrometry. The presented study provides an insightful understanding on the electrolyte chemistry of rechargeable Mg batteries. PMID:25562393

  17. Numerical analysis, scientific computing and fundamental studies of fluid mechanics: Final report, April 1, 1986--March 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses the following topics: vortex dynamics, vortical flow and separated flow; free surface flows at low Reynolds number; concurrent linear algebra routines; concurrent continuation and invariant manifolds; concurrent multigrid continuation methods; AUTO-software; Taylor-vortex flows; boundary conditions for infinite domains; numerical and analytical studies of evolutionary systems; numerical methods for stiff differential equations; vortex reconnection; and a study of finite amplitude bifurcations in plane Poiseuille flow. (LSP)

  18. A fundamental study of drag and an assessment of conventional drag-due-to-lift reduction devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, J. E.; Donald, C. D.

    1986-01-01

    The integral conservation laws of fluid mechanics are used to assess the drag efficiency of lifting wings, both CTOL and various out-of-plane configurations. The drag-due-to-lift is separated into two major components: (1) the induced drag-due-to-lift that depends on aspect ratio but is relatively independent of Reynolds number; (2) the form drag-due-to-lift that is independent of aspect ratio but dependent on the details of the wing section design, planform and Reynolds number. For each lifting configuration there is an optimal load distribution that yields the minimum value of drag-due-to-lift. For well designed high aspect ratio CTOL wings the two drag components are independent. With modern design technology CTOL wings can be (and usually are) designed with a drag-due-to-lift efficiency close to unity. Wing tip-devices (winglets, feathers, sails, etc.) can improve drag-due-to-lift efficiency by 10 to 15% if they are designed as an integral part of the wing. As add-on devices they can be detrimental. It is estimated that 25% improvements of wing drag-due-to-lift efficiency can be obtained with joined tip configurations and vertically separated lifting elements without considering additional benefits that might be realized by improved structural efficiency. It is strongly recommended that an integrated aerodynamic/structural approach be taken in the design of (or research on) future out-of-plane configurations.

  19. Fundamental study of low-NOx combustion fly ash utilization. Semiannual report, May 1, 1998--October 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, R.H.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1999-10-20

    The objective of the current work was to investigate the oxidation reactivity of fly ash carbons, using thermogravimetric analysis techniques. Good measures of the oxidation reactivity of fly ash carbon were the critical temperature (T{sub cr}) and the late burnout temperature (T{sub late}). The lower the critical temperature of the fly ash carbon, the more reactive the sample. By contrast, the higher T{sub late}, the less reactive the fly ash carbon. The difference between T{sub cr} and T{sub late} provided information about the reactivity distribution and was mainly dependent on fly ash carbon content (Loss-On-Ignition (LOI)). Fly ash carbons having different origins, some from lower rank coals and some from higher rank coals had slightly different reactivities. Class C fly ash carbons from low rank coals were more reactive than the typical class F fly ash carbons from higher rank coals. The reactivity parameters did not, however, provide any additional ability to predict the suitability of a given ash for use in concrete.

  20. Fundamental studies in the molecular basis of laser-induced retinal damage. Annual report, September 1982-August 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis

    1983-09-01

    This research led to major discoveries in two general areas. First, it was shown that there are a series of anionic activators of visual cells. These anionic activators turn on, in the dark, the enzymatic processes usually stimulated by light. Among these anionic activators is fluoride, the important additive in dental care. It is possible that the discovery of anionic activators will allow modulation of visual sensitivity and excitation. A second major advance was the development of a staining method that allows the direct observation with light microscopy of actin filaments in rod outer segments. This discovery will now allow viewing these important actin filaments in live cells under physiologically relevant experimental conditions. It will also allow for the development of new methods to probe pathological and damaged conditions in visual photoreceptor cells. The above discoveries are described in two separate sections, the first entitled Anionic Activators of Photoreceptor Cells in the Dark, and the second entitled Visualization of Actin in Photoreceptor Cells by Light Microscopy.

  1. A water soluble additive to suppress respirable dust from concrete-cutting chainsaws: a case study.

    PubMed

    Summers, Michael P; Parmigiani, John P

    2015-01-01

    Respirable dust is of particular concern in the construction industry because it contains crystalline silica. Respirable forms of silica are a severe health threat because they heighten the risk of numerous respirable diseases. Concrete cutting, a common work practice in the construction industry, is a major contributor to dust generation. No studies have been found that focus on the dust suppression of concrete-cutting chainsaws, presumably because, during normal operation water is supplied continuously and copiously to the dust generation points. However, there is a desire to better understand dust creation at low water flow rates. In this case study, a water-soluble surfactant additive was used in the chainsaw's water supply. Cutting was performed on a free-standing concrete wall in a covered outdoor lab with a hand-held, gas-powered, concrete-cutting chainsaw. Air was sampled at the operator's lapel, and around the concrete wall to simulate nearby personnel. Two additive concentrations were tested (2.0% and 0.2%), across a range of fluid flow rates (0.38-3.8 Lpm [0.1-1.0 gpm] at 0.38 Lpm [0.1 gpm] increments). Results indicate that when a lower concentration of additive is used exposure levels increase. However, all exposure levels, once adjusted for 3 hours of continuous cutting in an 8-hour work shift, are below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 5 mg/m(3). Estimates were made using trend lines to predict the fluid flow rates that would cause respirable dust exposure to exceed both the OSHA PEL and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH®) threshold limit value (TLV). PMID:25714034

  2. Augmenting a Waste Glass Mixture Experiment Study with Additional Glass Components and Experimental Runs

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F. ); Cooley, Scott K. ); Peeler, David K.; Vienna, John D. ); Edwards, Tommy B.

    2002-01-01

    A glass composition variation study (CVS) for high-level waste (HLW) stored in Idaho is being statistically designed and performed in phases over several years. The purpose of the CVS is to investigate and model how HLW-glass properties depend on glass composition. The resulting glass property-composition models will be used to develop desirable glass formulations and for other purposes. Phases 1 and 2 of the CVS have been completed and are briefly described. This paper focuses on the CVS Phase 3 experimental design, which was chosen to augment the Phase 1 and 2 data with additional data points, as well as to account for additional glass components not studied in Phases 1 and/or 2. In total, 16 glass components were varied in the Phase 3 experimental design. The paper describes how these Phase 3 experimental design augmentation challenges were addressed using the previous data, preliminary property-composition models, and statistical mixture experiment and optimal experimental design methods and software.

  3. Role of sulfite additives in wine induced asthma: single dose and cumulative dose studies

    PubMed Central

    Vally, H; Thompson, P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Wine appears to be a significant trigger for asthma. Although sulfite additives have been implicated as a major cause of wine induced asthma, direct evidence is limited. Two studies were undertaken to assess sulfite reactivity in wine sensitive asthmatics. The first study assessed sensitivity to sulfites in wine using a single dose sulfited wine challenge protocol followed by a double blind, placebo controlled challenge. In the second study a cumulative dose sulfited wine challenge protocol was employed to establish if wine sensitive asthmatics as a group have an increased sensitivity to sulfites.
METHODS—In study 1, 24 asthmatic patients with a strong history of wine induced asthma were screened. Subjects showing positive responses to single blind high sulfite (300 ppm) wine challenge were rechallenged on separate days in a double blind, placebo controlled fashion with wines of varying sulfite levels to characterise their responses to these drinks. In study 2, wine sensitive asthmatic patients (n=12) and control asthmatics (n=6) were challenged cumulatively with wine containing increasing concentrations of sulfite in order to characterise further their sensitivity to sulfites in wine.
RESULTS—Four of the 24 self-reporting wine sensitive asthmatic patients were found to respond to sulfite additives in wine when challenged in a single dose fashion (study 1). In the double blind dose-response study all four had a significant fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (>15% from baseline) following exposure to wine containing 300 ppm sulfite, but did not respond to wines containing 20, 75 or 150 ppm sulfite. Responses were maximal at 5 minutes (mean (SD) maximal decline in FEV1 28.7 (13)%) and took 15-60 minutes to return to baseline levels. In the cumulative dose-response study (study 2) no significant difference was observed in any of the lung function parameters measured (FEV1, peak expiratory flow (PEF), mid phase forced expiratory

  4. Characterization studies on the additives mixed L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haja Hameed, A. S.; Karthikeyan, C.; Ravi, G.; Rohani, S.

    2011-04-01

    L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP), potassium thiocyanate (KSCN) mixed LAP (LAP:KSCN) and sodium sulfite (Na 2SO 3) mixed LAP (LAP:Na 2SO 3) single crystals were grown by slow cooling technique. The effect of microbial contamination and coloration on the growth solutions was studied. The crystalline powders of the grown crystals were examined by X-ray diffraction and the lattice parameters of the crystals were estimated. From the FTIR spectroscopic analysis, various functional group frequencies associated with the crystals were assigned. Vickers microhardness studies were done on {1 0 0} faces for pure and additives mixed LAP crystals. From the preliminary surface second harmonic generation (SHG) results, it was found that the SHG intensity at (1 0 0) face of LAP:KSCN crystal was much stronger than that of pure LAP.

  5. The guanidine and maleic acid (1:1) complex. The additional theoretical and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, Marek; Dudzic, Damian

    2012-04-01

    On the basis of experimental literature data the theoretical studies for guanidinium and maleic acid complex with using DFT method are performed. In these studies the experimental X-ray data for two different forms of investigated crystal were used. During the geometry optimization process one equilibrium structure was found, only. According to this result the infrared spectrum for one theoretical molecule was calculated. On the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) analysis the clear-cut assignments of observed bands were performed. For the calculated molecule with energy minimum the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) were obtained and graphically illustrated. The energy difference (GAP) between HOMO and LUMO was analyzed. Additionally, the nonlinear properties of this molecule were calculated. The α and β (first and second order) hyperpolarizability values are obtained. On the basis of these results the title crystal was classified as new second order NLO generator.

  6. Competency to Study and Learn in Stressful Contests: Fundamentals of the "e-Coping with Academic Stress"™ Utility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Fuente, Jesús; López, Mireia; Zapata, Lucía; Martínez-Vicente, Jose Manuel; Vera, Manuel Mariano; Solinas, Giulliana; Fadda, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    There has been growing research interest in achievement emotions in university teaching-learning processes in recent years. While their importance has been firmly established, there continues to be a need for assessment and intervention models. The objective of this report is to present the "Competency Model for Studying, Learning and…

  7. Prazosin addition to fluvoxamine: A preclinical study and open clinical trial in OCD.

    PubMed

    Feenstra, Matthijs G P; Klompmakers, André; Figee, Martijn; Fluitman, Sjoerd; Vulink, Nienke; Westenberg, Herman G M; Denys, Damiaan

    2016-02-01

    The efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) in psychiatric disorders may be "augmented" through the addition of atypical antipsychotic drugs. A synergistic increase in dopamine (DA) release in the prefrontal cortex has been suggested to underlie this augmentation effect, though the mechanism of action is not clear yet. We used in vivo microdialysis in rats to study DA release following the administration of combinations of fluvoxamine (10 mg/kg) and quetiapine (10 mg/kg) with various monoamine-related drugs. The results confirmed that the selective 5-HT1A antagonist WAY-100635 (0.05 mg/kg) partially blocked the fluvoxamine-quetiapine synergistic effect (maximum DA increase dropped from 325% to 214%). A novel finding is that the α1-adrenergic blocker prazosin (1 mg/kg), combined with fluvoxamine, partially mimicked the effect of augmentation (maximum DA increase 205%; area-under-the-curve 163%). As this suggested that prazosin augmentation might be tested in a clinical study, we performed an open clinical trial of prazosin 20 mg addition to SRI in therapy-resistant patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder applying for neurosurgery. A small, non-significant reduction in Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) scores was observed in 10 patients and one patient was classified as a responder with a reduction in Y-BOCS scores of more than 25%. We suggest that future clinical studies augmenting SRIs with an α1-adrenergic blocker in less treatment resistant cases should be considered. The clinical trial "Prazosin in combination with a serotonin reuptake inhibitor for patients with Obsessive Compulsive disorder: an open label study" was registered at 24/05/2011 under trial number ISRCTN61562706: http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN61562706. PMID:26712326

  8. Fundamental Study of a Jet-in-Cross-Flow Interacting with a Vortex Generator for Film Cooling Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaman, Khairul; Rigby, David; Heidmann, James

    2009-01-01

    Results of an experimental study are presented on the effectiveness of a vortex generator (VG) in preventing lift-off of a jet-in-cross-flow (JICF). The study is pertinent to film-cooling applications and its relevance to NASA programs is first briefly discussed. In the experiment, the jet issues into the boundary layer at an angle of 20deg to the free-stream. The effect of a triangular, ramp-shaped VG is studied while varying its geometry and location. Detailed flow-field properties are obtained for a case in which the height of the VG and the diameter of the orifice are comparable to the approach boundary layer thickness. The VG produces a streamwise vortex pair with vorticity magnitude three times larger (and of opposite sense) than that found in the JICF alone. Such a VG appears to be most effective in keeping the jet attached to the wall. The effect of parametric variation is studied mostly from surveys ten diameters downstream from the orifice. Results over a range of jet-to-freestream momentum flux ratio (1

  9. Fundamental studies of the chemisorption of organosulfur compounds on Au(111). Implications for molecular self-assembly on gold surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Nuzzo, R.G.; Zegarski, B.R.; Dubois, L.H.

    1987-02-04

    Studies of the adsorption of methanethiol and dimethyl disulfide on an Au(111) surface under UHV conditions are described. Both adsorbates bind strongly, with the bonding of the disulfide being greatly favored. It is found that, under these conditions, the disulfide bond is dissociated to give a stable surface thiolate. Adsorption of methanethiol does not involve cleavage of the S-H bond. The implications of these results for solution adsorption experiments and the thermodynamics characterizing monolayer formation are discussed.

  10. Analysis, scientific computing and fundamental studies in fluid mechanics. Summary report number 19, May 1, 1995--April 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Summaries are given of the progress on each of the following research projects: (1) a multi-resolution finite element method for computing multiscale solutions; (2) numerical study of free interface problems; (3) numerical simulation of two-dimensional particle coarsening; (4) numerical simulation of three-dimensional water waves; (5) vortex dynamics; (6) vortex models and turbulence; (7) flow in a non-uniform Hele-Shaw cell; (8) numerical analysis/scientific computing.

  11. Fundamental studies of fuel chemistry as related to internal combustion engine phenomena. Final technical report, October 1987--December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Dryer, F.L.; Brezinsky, K.

    1990-09-01

    Intent of this research effort was to provide insight (through homogeneous gas phase kinetic studies at different constant pressures) to the fuel chemistry issues important to autoignition in engines. Conditions of the proposed experiments were chosen to be similar to engine parameters under knocking conditions: 700--1100 K temperatures, 1--20 atm pressures, and stoichiometries around 1. A variable pressure flow reactor was designed in which a range of reaction pressures and lower reaction temperatures could be accessed. Crossed beam optical access, continuous on-line gas sampling (nondispersive infrared, oxygen paramagnetic, H thermo-conductive, Fourier transform infrared, off-line GC, GC/mass spectrometric, wet chemical), and temperature measurements at the sampling location are available; reacting systems with reaction times ranging from 50--100 ms to 15--20 s can be studied. Testing has begun. Experiments on isobutene/oxygen mixtures have been conducted in the old atmospheric pressure flow reactor at 1150 K and in an equivalence ratio range of pyrolysis with 100 ppM oxygen background to 0.42. The kinetic model indicates that the inhibitory effect of isobutene at high temps is due to depletion of the active radical pool and formation of unreactive stable species and methyl radicals; isobutene oxidation/pyrolysis is heavily influenced by the chemistry of methyl radicals. The reaction of hydroperoxy radical (HO{sub 2}) with methyl radical and its effect on isobutene oxidation will be studied in the new reactor.

  12. Impact of contacting study authors to obtain additional data for systematic reviews: diagnostic accuracy studies for hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Seventeen of 172 included studies in a recent systematic review of blood tests for hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis reported diagnostic accuracy results discordant from 2 × 2 tables, and 60 studies reported inadequate data to construct 2 × 2 tables. This study explores the yield of contacting authors of diagnostic accuracy studies and impact on the systematic review findings. Methods Sixty-six corresponding authors were sent letters requesting additional information or clarification of data from 77 studies. Data received from the authors were synthesized with data included in the previous review, and diagnostic accuracy sensitivities, specificities, and positive and likelihood ratios were recalculated. Results Of the 66 authors, 68% were successfully contacted and 42% provided additional data for 29 out of 77 studies (38%). All authors who provided data at all did so by the third emailed request (ten authors provided data after one request). Authors of more recent studies were more likely to be located and provide data compared to authors of older studies. The effects of requests for additional data on the conclusions regarding the utility of blood tests to identify patients with clinically significant fibrosis or cirrhosis were generally small for ten out of 12 tests. Additional data resulted in reclassification (using median likelihood ratio estimates) from less useful to moderately useful or vice versa for the remaining two blood tests and enabled the calculation of an estimate for a third blood test for which previously the data had been insufficient to do so. We did not identify a clear pattern for the directional impact of additional data on estimates of diagnostic accuracy. Conclusions We successfully contacted and received results from 42% of authors who provided data for 38% of included studies. Contacting authors of studies evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of serum biomarkers for hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis in hepatitis C patients

  13. A combined toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles and vitamin C in food additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Yuan, Lulu; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Li, Chenchen; Fang, Jie; Sui, Keke; Liu, Yuanfang; Wu, Minghong

    2014-11-01

    At present, safety evaluation standards for nanofood additives are made based on the toxic effects of a single additive. Since the size, surface properties and chemical nature influence the toxicity of nanomaterials, the toxicity may have dramatically changed when nanomaterials are used as food additives in a complex system. Herein, we investigated the combined toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and vitamin C (Vc, ascorbic acid). The results showed that Vc increased the cytotoxicity significantly compared with that of the ZnO only NPs. When the cells were exposed to ZnO NPs at a concentration less than 15 mg L-1, or to Vc at a concentration less than 300 mg L-1, there was no significant cytotoxicity, both in the case of gastric epithelial cell line (GES-1) and neural stem cells (NSCs). However, when 15 mg L-1 of ZnO NPs and 300 mg L-1 of Vc were introduced to cells together, the cell viability decreased sharply indicating significant cytotoxicity. Moreover, the significant increase in toxicity was also shown in the in vivo experiments. The dose of the ZnO NPs and Vc used in the in vivo study was calculated according to the state of food and nutrition enhancer standard. After repeated oral exposure to ZnO NPs plus Vc, the injury of the liver and kidneys in mice has been indicated by the change of these indices. These findings demonstrate that the synergistic toxicity presented in a complex system is essential for the toxicological evaluation and safety assessment of nanofood.At present, safety evaluation standards for nanofood additives are made based on the toxic effects of a single additive. Since the size, surface properties and chemical nature influence the toxicity of nanomaterials, the toxicity may have dramatically changed when nanomaterials are used as food additives in a complex system. Herein, we investigated the combined toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and vitamin C (Vc, ascorbic acid). The results showed that Vc increased the

  14. Fundamental studies with a monodisperse aerosol-based liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry interface (MAGIC-LC/MS). Final progress report, December 1, 1989--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Browner, R.F.

    1992-12-01

    One of the most dramatic developments in mass spectrometry in the last fifteen years has been the evolution of versatile and powerful interfacing approaches that allow direct chromatographic coupling of separations techniques to mass spectrometers. The most successful of these approaches have been aerosol-based. This report describes the research carried out under DOE support directed toward fundamental studies with the Particle Beam LC/MS interface (also known as the MAGIC LC/MS interface). The primary goal has been to gain a better understanding of aerosol generation, transport, vaporization, and ionization processes which forms the basis of the technique. Gaining a deeper understanding of the basic physical processes on which particle Beam LC/MS is based provides the most direct way to improve performance benchmarks, such as (1) detection limits (2) quality of mass spectra (3) range of compound types possible, and (4) the ability to interface with all types of separation techniques. This research effort has been devoted to developing a fundamental understanding of the basic physical process which underlie aerosol mass spectrometry interfacing approaches. The paper describes chromatographic peak broadening studies and carrier effects with the particle beam interface.

  15. A study of pyrazines in cigarettes and how additives might be used to enhance tobacco addiction

    PubMed Central

    Alpert, Hillel R; Agaku, Israel T; Connolly, Gregory N

    2016-01-01

    Background Nicotine is known as the drug that is responsible for the addicted behaviour of tobacco users, but it has poor reinforcing effects when administered alone. Tobacco product design features enhance abuse liability by (A) optimising the dynamic delivery of nicotine to central nervous system receptors, and affecting smokers’ withdrawal symptoms, mood and behaviour; and (B) effecting conditioned learning, through sensory cues, including aroma, touch and visual stimulation, to create perceptions of pending nicotine reward. This study examines the use of additives called ‘pyrazines’, which may enhance abuse potential, their introduction in ‘lights’ and subsequently in the highly market successful Marlboro Lights (Gold) cigarettes and eventually many major brands. Methods We conducted internal tobacco industry research using online databases in conjunction with published scientific literature research, based on an iterative feedback process. Results Tobacco manufacturers developed the use of a range of compounds, including pyrazines, in order to enhance ‘light’ cigarette products’ acceptance and sales. Pyrazines with chemosensory and pharmacological effects were incorporated in the first ‘full-flavour, low-tar’ product achieving high market success. Such additives may enhance dependence by helping to optimise nicotine delivery and dosing and through cueing and learned behaviour. Conclusions Cigarette additives and ingredients with chemosensory effects that promote addiction by acting synergistically with nicotine, increasing product appeal, easing smoking initiation, discouraging cessation or promoting relapse should be regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration. Current models of tobacco abuse liability could be revised to include more explicit roles with regard to non-nicotine constituents that enhance abuse potential. PMID:26063608

  16. Monte Carlo fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, F.B.; Sutton, T.M.

    1996-02-01

    This report is composed of the lecture notes from the first half of a 32-hour graduate-level course on Monte Carlo methods offered at KAPL. These notes, prepared by two of the principle developers of KAPL`s RACER Monte Carlo code, cover the fundamental theory, concepts, and practices for Monte Carlo analysis. In particular, a thorough grounding in the basic fundamentals of Monte Carlo methods is presented, including random number generation, random sampling, the Monte Carlo approach to solving transport problems, computational geometry, collision physics, tallies, and eigenvalue calculations. Furthermore, modern computational algorithms for vector and parallel approaches to Monte Carlo calculations are covered in detail, including fundamental parallel and vector concepts, the event-based algorithm, master/slave schemes, parallel scaling laws, and portability issues.

  17. Does carrier size matter? A fundamental study of drug aerosolisation from carrier based dry powder inhalation systems.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Jesslynn; Traini, Daniela; Hoe, Susan; Wong, William; Young, Paul M

    2011-07-15

    There is plenty of evidence supporting the notion that the size of the carrier influences the aerosolisation performance of drug from a drug-carrier blend. Interestingly, that evidence is contradictory in places and the study of such mechanisms is fraught by the compounding variables associated with comparing crystalline powders (e.g. as size is varied so may the shape, surface chemistry, roughness and the amount of fine excipients). To overcome these limitations, a series of model polystyrene spheres were used to study the influence of size on aerosol performance. Three polystyrene sphere carriers (TS-80, TS-250 and TS-500, describing their approximate diameters) were characterised using laser diffraction, atomic force microscopy, colloid probe microscopy, electron microscopy, true density and dynamic vapour sorption. The model carriers were blended with micronized salbutamol sulphate (67.5:1 ratios) and the aerosolisation performance was tested using a multistage liquid impinger at a range of flow rates (40-100 lmin(-1)). Physico-chemical analysis of the carriers indicated that all carriers were spherical with similar roughness and densities. Furthermore, the adhesion force of drug to the carrier surfaces was independent of carrier size. Significant differences in drug aerosolisation were observed with both flow rate and carrier size. In general, as carrier size was increased, aerosol performance decreased. Furthermore, as flow rate was increased so did performance. Such observations suggest that higher energy processes drive aerosolisation, however this is likely to be due to the number of impaction events (and associated frictional and rotational forces) rather than the actual collision velocity (since the larger carriers had increased momentum and drag forces). This study shows that, in isolation of other variables, as carrier size increases, a concurrent decrease in drug aerosolisation performance is observed. PMID:21501674

  18. Fundamental studies of stress distributions and stress relaxation in oxide scales on high temperature alloys. [Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Shores, D.A.; Stout, J.H.; Gerberich, W.W.

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes a three-year study of stresses arising in the oxide scale and underlying metal during high temperature oxidation and of scale cracking. In-situ XRD was developed to measure strains during oxidation over 1000{degrees}C on pure metals. Acoustic emission was used to observe scale fracture during isothermal oxidation and cooling, and statistical analysis was used to infer mechanical aspects of cracking. A microscratch technique was used to measure the fracture toughness of scale/metal interface. A theoretical model was evaluated for the development and relaxation of stresses in scale and metal substrate during oxidation.

  19. [Fundamental studies in oxidation-reduction in relation to water photolysis]. Final report, February 15, 1990--July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, J.K.

    1994-07-01

    Broad objectives are to improve the conceptual view of ways in which membranes and interfaces can be used to control chemical reactivity. Focus was on three elementary processes central to developing membrane-based integrated chemical systems for water photolysis or related photoconversion/photostorage processes. It was sought to identify the influence of interfaces on charge separation/recombination reactions, pathways for transmembrane charge separation across hydrocarbon bilayer membranes, and mechanisms of water oxidation catalyzed by transition metal coordination complexes. The supramolecular assemblies studied comprise primarily small unilamellar vesicles doped with amphiphilic viologens (N,N`dialkyl-4,4`-bipyridinium ions) which can function as transmembrane charge relays.

  20. Additional follow-up telephone counselling and initial smoking relapse: a longitudinal, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lei; He, Yao; Jiang, Bin; Zuo, Fang; Liu, Qinghui; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Changxi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Smoking cessation services can help smokers to quit; however, many smoking relapse cases occur over time. Initial relapse prevention should play an important role in achieving the goal of long-term smoking cessation. Several studies have focused on the effect of extended telephone support in relapse prevention, but the conclusions remain conflicting. Design and setting From October 2008 to August 2013, a longitudinal, controlled study was performed in a large general hospital of Beijing. Participants The smokers who sought treatment at our smoking cessation clinic were non-randomised and divided into 2 groups: face-to-face individual counselling group (FC group), and face-to-face individual counselling plus telephone follow-up counselling group (FCF group). No pharmacotherapy was offered. Outcomes The timing of initial smoking relapse was compared between FC and FCF groups. Predictors of initial relapse were investigated during the first 180 days, using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results Of 547 eligible male smokers who volunteered to participate, 457 participants (117 in FC group and 340 in FCF group) achieved at least 24 h abstinence. The majority of the lapse episodes occurred during the first 2 weeks after the quit date. Smokers who did not receive the follow-up telephone counselling (FC group) tended to relapse to smoking earlier than those smokers who received the additional follow-up telephone counselling (FCF group), and the log-rank test was statistically significant (p=0.003). A Cox regression model showed that, in the FCF group, being married, and having a lower Fagerström test score, normal body mass index and doctor-diagnosed tobacco-related chronic diseases, were significantly independent protective predictors of smoking relapse. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that additional follow-up telephone counselling might be an effective strategy in preventing relapse. Further research is still

  1. A Mechanistic Study of Halogen Addition and Photoelimination from π-Conjugated Tellurophenes.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Elisa I; Lanterna, Anabel E; Lough, Alan J; Scaiano, Juan C; Seferos, Dwight S

    2016-03-01

    The ability to drive reactivity using visible light is of importance for many disciplines of chemistry and has significant implications for sustainable chemistry. Identifying photochemically active compounds and understanding photochemical mechanisms is important for the development of useful materials for synthesis and catalysis. Here we report a series of photoactive diphenyltellurophene compounds bearing electron-withdrawing and electron-donating substituents synthesized by alkyne coupling/ring closing or palladium-catalyzed ipso-arylation chemistry. The redox chemistry of these compounds was studied with respect to oxidative addition and photoelimination of bromine, which is of importance for energy storage reactions involving X2. The oxidative addition reaction mechanism was studied using density functional theory, the results of which support a three-step mechanism involving the formation of an initial η(1) association complex, a monobrominated intermediate, and finally the dibrominated product. All of the tellurophene derivatives undergo photoreduction using 430, 447, or 617 nm light depending on the absorption properties of the compound. Compounds bearing electron-withdrawing substituents have the highest photochemical quantum efficiencies in the presence of an alkene trap, with efficiencies of up to 42.4% for a pentafluorophenyl-functionalized tellurophene. The photoelimination reaction was studied in detail through bromine trapping experiments and laser flash photolysis, and a mechanism is proposed. The photoreaction, which occurs by release of bromine radicals, is competitive with intersystem crossing to the triplet state of the brominated species, as evidenced by the formation of singlet oxygen. These findings should be useful for the design of new photochemically active compounds supported by main-group elements. PMID:26853739

  2. Fundamental Studies of Low Velocity Impact Resistance of Graphite Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to relate the impact resistance of graphite fiber reinforced composites with matrix properties through gaining an understanding of the basic mechanics involved in the deformation and fracture process, and the effect of the polymer matrix structure on these mechanisms. It was found that the resin matrix structure influences the composite impact resistance in at least two ways. The integration of flexibilizers into the polymer chain structure tends to reduce the T sub g and the mechanical properties of the polymer. The reduction in the mechanical properties of the matrix does not enhance the composite impact resistance because it allows matrix controlled failure to initiate impact damage. It was found that when the instrumented dropweight impact tester is used as a means for assessing resin toughness, the resin toughness is enhanced by the ability of the clamped specimen to deflect enough to produce sufficient membrane action to support a significant amount of the load. The results of this study indicate that crossplied composite impact resistance is very much dependent on the matrix mechanical properties.

  3. Fundamental studies of desulfurization processes: reaction of methanethiol on ZnO and Cs/ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorak, Joseph; Jirsak, Tomas; Rodriguez, José A.

    2001-05-01

    The reaction of methanethiol on ZnO and Cs promoted ZnO surfaces has been studied with synchrotron based photoemission and thermal desorption spectroscopy. On ZnO, methanethiol undergoes selective reaction to produce carbon monoxide (37-58%), methane (23-38%), formaldehyde (12-15%), ethane (1-11%), and a mixture of ethylene and acetylene (3-13%). At low temperatures (<100 K), methanethiol reacts to yield thiolate intermediate bound to Zn 2+ cations. The thiolate is stable to 500 K. Above this temperature, C-S bond cleavage occurs to yield methyl intermediate and atomic S. Carbon is removed from the surface as gaseous products above 500 K, and atomic sulfur remains bound to the zinc sites of the surface. Submonolayer amounts of cesium do not have a significant promotional effect on C-S bond cleavage, whereas Cs multilayers are found to significantly lower the activation barrier for C-S bond cleavage. This study illustrates the chemistry associated with the desulfurization of thiols on a catalytically relevant oxide surface.

  4. Study of mandible reconstruction using a fibula flap with application of additive manufacturing technology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to establish surgical guiding techniques for completing mandible lesion resection and reconstruction of the mandible defect area with fibula sections in one surgery by applying additive manufacturing technology, which can reduce the surgical duration and enhance the surgical accuracy and success rate. Methods A computer assisted mandible reconstruction planning (CAMRP) program was used to calculate the optimal cutting length and number of fibula pieces and design the fixtures for mandible cutting, registration, and arrangement of the fibula segments. The mandible cutting and registering fixtures were then generated using an additive manufacturing system. The CAMRP calculated the optimal fibula cutting length and number of segments based on the location and length of the defective portion of the mandible. The mandible cutting jig was generated according to the boundary surface of the lesion resection on the mandible STL model. The fibular cutting fixture was based on the length of each segment, and the registered fixture was used to quickly arrange the fibula pieces into the shape of the defect area. In this study, the mandibular lesion was reconstructed using registered fibular sections in one step, and the method is very easy to perform. Results and conclusion The application of additive manufacturing technology provided customized models and the cutting fixtures and registered fixtures, which can improve the efficiency of clinical application. This study showed that the cutting fixture helped to rapidly complete lesion resection and fibula cutting, and the registered fixture enabled arrangement of the fibula pieces and allowed completion of the mandible reconstruction in a timely manner. Our method can overcome the disadvantages of traditional surgery, which requires a long and different course of treatment and is liable to cause error. With the help of optimal cutting planning by the CAMRP and the 3D printed mandible resection jig and

  5. Fundamental neutron physics at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.

    1995-10-01

    Modern neutron sources and science share a common origin in mid-20th-century scientific investigations concerned with the study of the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. Since the time of that common origin, neutron science and the study of elementary particles have evolved into quite disparate disciplines. The neutron became recognized as a powerful tool for studying condensed matter with modern neutron sources being primarily used (and justified) as tools for neutron scattering and materials science research. The study of elementary particles has, of course, led to the development of rather different tools and is now dominated by activities performed at extremely high energies. Notwithstanding this trend, the study of fundamental interactions using neutrons has continued and remains a vigorous activity at many contemporary neutron sources. This research, like neutron scattering research, has benefited enormously by the development of modern high-flux neutron facilities. Future sources, particularly high-power spallation sources, offer exciting possibilities for continuing this research.

  6. Resources allocation in healthcare for cancer: a case study using generalised additive mixed models.

    PubMed

    Musio, Monica; Sauleau, Erik A; Augustin, Nicole H

    2012-11-01

    Our aim is to develop a method for helping resources re-allocation in healthcare linked to cancer, in order to replan the allocation of providers. Ageing of the population has a considerable impact on the use of health resources because aged people require more specialised medical care due notably to cancer. We propose a method useful to monitor changes of cancer incidence in space and time taking into account two age categories, according to healthcar general organisation. We use generalised additive mixed models with a Poisson response, according to the methodology presented in Wood, Generalised additive models: an introduction with R. Chapman and Hall/CRC, 2006. Besides one-dimensional smooth functions accounting for non-linear effects of covariates, the space-time interaction can be modelled using scale invariant smoothers. Incidence data collected by a general cancer registry between 1992 and 2007 in a specific area of France is studied. Our best model exhibits a strong increase of the incidence of cancer along time and an obvious spatial pattern for people more than 70 years with a higher incidence in the central band of the region. This is a strong argument for re-allocating resources for old people cancer care in this sub-region. PMID:23242683

  7. Covalent binding of aniline to humic substances. 2. 15N NMR studies of nucleophilic addition reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pettigrew, P.J.; Goldenberg, W.S.; Weber, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Aromatic amines are known to undergo covalent binding with humic substances in the environment. Although previous studies have examined reaction conditions and proposed mechanisms, there has been no direct spectroscopic evidence for the covalent binding of the amines to the functional groups in humic substances. In order to further elucidate the reaction mechanisms, the Suwannee River and IHSS soil fulvic and humic acids were reacted with 15N-labeled aniline at pH 6 and analyzed using 15N NMR spectrometry. Aniline underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with the quinone and other carbonyl groups in the samples and became incorporated in the form of anilinohydroquinone, anilinoquinone, anilide, imine, and heterocyclic nitrogen, the latter comprising 50% or more of the bound amine. The anilide and anilinohydroquinone nitrogens were determined to be susceptible to chemical exchange by ammonia. In the case of Suwannee River fulvic acid, reaction under anoxic conditions and pretreatment with sodium borohydride or hydroxylamine prior to reaction under oxic conditions resulted in a decrease in the proportion of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen incorporated. The relative decrease in the incorporation of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen with respect to anilinoquinone nitrogen under anoxic conditions suggested that inter- or intramolecular redox reactions accompanied the nucleophilic addition reactions.

  8. Toxicogenomics concepts and applications to study hepatic effects of food additives and chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Stierum, Rob . E-mail: stierum@voeding.tno.nl; Heijne, Wilbert; Kienhuis, Anne; Ommen, Ben van; Groten, John

    2005-09-01

    Transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics are genomics technologies with great potential in toxicological sciences. Toxicogenomics involves the integration of conventional toxicological examinations with gene, protein or metabolite expression profiles. An overview together with selected examples of the possibilities of genomics in toxicology is given. The expectations raised by toxicogenomics are earlier and more sensitive detection of toxicity. Furthermore, toxicogenomics will provide a better understanding of the mechanism of toxicity and may facilitate the prediction of toxicity of unknown compounds. Mechanism-based markers of toxicity can be discovered and improved interspecies and in vitro-in vivo extrapolations will drive model developments in toxicology. Toxicological assessment of chemical mixtures will benefit from the new molecular biological tools. In our laboratory, toxicogenomics is predominantly applied for elucidation of mechanisms of action and discovery of novel pathway-supported mechanism-based markers of liver toxicity. In addition, we aim to integrate transcriptome, proteome and metabolome data, supported by bioinformatics to develop a systems biology approach for toxicology. Transcriptomics and proteomics studies on bromobenzene-mediated hepatotoxicity in the rat are discussed. Finally, an example is shown in which gene expression profiling together with conventional biochemistry led to the discovery of novel markers for the hepatic effects of the food additives butylated hydroxytoluene, curcumin, propyl gallate and thiabendazole.

  9. Assessment of Nano Cellulose from Peach Palm Residue as Potential Food Additive: Part II: Preliminary Studies.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Dayanne Regina Mendes; Mendonça, Márcia Helena; Helm, Cristiane Vieira; Magalhães, Washington L E; de Muniz, Graciela Ines Bonzon; Kestur, Satyanarayana G

    2015-09-01

    High consumption of dietary fibers in the diet is related to the reduction of the risk of non-transmitting of chronic diseases, prevention of the constipation etc. Rich diets in dietary fibers promote beneficial effects for the metabolism. Considering the above and recognizing the multifaceted advantages of nano materials, there have been many attempts in recent times to use the nano materials in the food sector including as food additive. However, whenever new product for human and animal consumption is developed, it has to be tested for their effectiveness regarding improvement in the health of consumers, safety aspects and side effects. However, before it is tried with human beings, normally such materials would be assessed through biological tests on a living organism to understand its effect on health condition of the consumer. Accordingly, based on the authors' finding reported in a previous paper, this paper presents body weight, biochemical (glucose, cholesterol and lipid profile in blood, analysis of feces) and histological tests carried out with biomass based cellulose nano fibrils prepared by the authors for its possible use as food additive. Preliminary results of the study with mice have clearly brought out potential of these fibers for the said purpose. PMID:26344977

  10. Fundamentals of fluid lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, Bernard J.

    1991-01-01

    The aim is to coordinate the topics of design, engineering dynamics, and fluid dynamics in order to aid researchers in the area of fluid film lubrication. The lubrication principles that are covered can serve as a basis for the engineering design of machine elements. The fundamentals of fluid film lubrication are presented clearly so that students that use the book will have confidence in their ability to apply these principles to a wide range of lubrication situations. Some guidance on applying these fundamentals to the solution of engineering problems is also provided.

  11. Fundamentals of fluid sealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1976-01-01

    The fundamentals of fluid sealing, including seal operating regimes, are discussed and the general fluid-flow equations for fluid sealing are developed. Seal performance parameters such as leakage and power loss are presented. Included in the discussion are the effects of geometry, surface deformations, rotation, and both laminar and turbulent flows. The concept of pressure balancing is presented, as are differences between liquid and gas sealing. Mechanisms of seal surface separation, fundamental friction and wear concepts applicable to seals, seal materials, and pressure-velocity (PV) criteria are discussed.

  12. FTICR/MS studies of gas-phase actinide ion reactions: fundamental chemical and physical properties of atomic and molecular actinide ions and neutrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. K.; Haire, R. G.; Marçalo, J.; Santos, M.; Leal, J. P.; Pires de Matos, A.; Tyagi, R.; Mrozik, M. K.; Pitzer, R. M.; Bursten, B. E.

    2007-10-01

    Fundamental aspects of the chemical and physical properties of atomic and molecular actinide ions and neutrals are being examined by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR/MS). To date, gas-phase reactivity studies of bare and ligated An+ and An2+ ions, where An = Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm, with oxidants and with hydrocarbons have been performed. Among the information that has been deduced from these studies are thermodynamic properties of neutral and ionic actinide oxide molecules and the role of the 5f electrons in actinide chemistry. Parallel theoretical studies of selected actinide molecular ions have also been carried out to substantiate the interpretation of the experimental observations.

  13. Fundamental study on transient bubble (slug) behavior by characterizing transient forces of solid particles in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, H.O.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to recognize and interpret the signals of transient motion of bubbles (slugs) in fluidized beds by measuring and utilizing the signals of transient motion of solid particles. The two signals were measured simultaneously and also synchronized by using the TTL signal technique in the same fluidized beds. Also, a simultaneous study of video bubble image, transient force and pressure signals was initiated in a two dimensional fluidized bed. we successfully synchronized three signals so that the relationship of bubble behavior and force pressure signals can be identified and characterized. It has been found that bubble image can well be correlated to the transient force signal of solid particles under certain conditions in three dimensional fluidized beds. Accordingly, it seems that the transient force signals can significantly help understanding the transient motion of bubbles (slugs), which is important to design the fluidized beds.

  14. Fundamental study on transient bubble (slug) behavior by characterizing transient forces of solid particles in fluidized beds. 1990 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, H.O.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to recognize and interpret the signals of transient motion of bubbles (slugs) in fluidized beds by measuring and utilizing the signals of transient motion of solid particles. The two signals were measured simultaneously and also synchronized by using the TTL signal technique in the same fluidized beds. Also, a simultaneous study of video bubble image, transient force and pressure signals was initiated in a two dimensional fluidized bed. we successfully synchronized three signals so that the relationship of bubble behavior and force pressure signals can be identified and characterized. It has been found that bubble image can well be correlated to the transient force signal of solid particles under certain conditions in three dimensional fluidized beds. Accordingly, it seems that the transient force signals can significantly help understanding the transient motion of bubbles (slugs), which is important to design the fluidized beds.

  15. FUNDAMENTAL STUDY ON REAL-TIME FLOOD FORECASTING METHOD FOR LOCALLY HEAVY RAINFALL IN URBAN DRAINAGE AREAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Makoto; Kido, Yoshinobu; Nakakita, Eiichi

    Recently, locally heavy rainfall occurs frequently at highly urbanized area, and causes serious personal accidents, so importance of flood forecasting system is growing in order to reduce damage of inundation. However, flood forecasting that secured lead-time for evacuation is extremely difficult, because the rainfall flows out rapidly. In this study, the numerical simulation model that can finely express inundation mechanism of urban drainage areas was applied with the most recent available data and analysis tool. The influence of the factor (i.e. sewer system, overland and rainfall information) which affected inundation mechanism was evaluated through the sensibility analysis with this model, and evaluation results show some requirements of model condition and information on time and space resolution of real-time flood forecasting.

  16. Substrate Selection for Fundamental Studies of Electrocatalysts and Photoelectrodes: Inert Potential Windows in Acidic, Neutral, and Basic Electrolyte

    PubMed Central

    Gorlin, Yelena; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    The selection of an appropriate substrate is an important initial step for many studies of electrochemically active materials. In order to help researchers with the substrate selection process, we employ a consistent experimental methodology to evaluate the electrochemical reactivity and stability of seven potential substrate materials for electrocatalyst and photoelectrode evaluation. Using cyclic voltammetry with a progressively increased scan range, we characterize three transparent conducting oxides (indium tin oxide, fluorine-doped tin oxide, and aluminum-doped zinc oxide) and four opaque conductors (gold, stainless steel 304, glassy carbon, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite) in three different electrolytes (sulfuric acid, sodium acetate, and sodium hydroxide). We determine the inert potential window for each substrate/electrolyte combination and make recommendations about which materials may be most suitable for application under different experimental conditions. Furthermore, the testing methodology provides a framework for other researchers to evaluate and report the baseline activity of other substrates of interest to the broader community. PMID:25357131

  17. Coprocessing through fundamental and mechanistic studies in hydrogen transfer and catalysis. Quarterly report, December 27, 1991--March 27, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, C.W.

    1992-12-31

    The research conducted this quarter evaluated hydrogen transfer from resids reduced using the Birch reduction method and their corresponding parent resid to an aromatic acceptor, anthracene (ANT). The reactions involved thermal and catalytic reactions using sulfur introduced as thiophenol. This catalyst has been shown by Rudnick to affect the hydrogen transfer from cycloalkane to aromatics/or coal. The purpose of this current study was to evaluate the efficacy of hydrogen transfer from the hydrogen-enriched reduced resid to an aromatic species and to compare that to the hydrogen transfer from the original resid. The analyses performed to evaluate hydrogen transfer were the determination of product slates from the hydrogenation of ANT and the fractionation of the resid into solubility fractions after reaction with ANT. The amount of coal conversion to THF solubles was higher in the coprocessing reactions with the reduced resids compared to the reactions with the corresponding untreated resid. The reduction of the resids by the Birch method increased the hydrogen donating ability of the resid to the same level as that obtained with the introduction of isotetralin (ISO) to the original resid. The ISO was introduced at a level of 0.5 wt % donable hydrogen. Both the original resids and the resids reduced by the Birch method were reacted in the presence of an aromatic species, anthracene (ANT). These reactions were performed under both nitrogen and hydrogen atmospheres at a pressure of 1250 psig introduced at ambient temperature. The reactions were performed both thermally and catalytically at 380{degree}C for 30 minutes. The catalyst used was thiophenol which is the same catalyst as has been used in the previously reported model compound studies involving hydrogen transfer from cycloalkanes to aromatics.

  18. Fundamental studies of materials, designs, and models development for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell flow field distributors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikam, Vaibhav Vilas

    Fuel cells are becoming a popular source of energy due to their promising performance and availability. However, the high cost of fuel cell stack forbids its deployment to end user. Moreover, bipolar plate is one of the critical components in current polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system, causing severe increase in manufacturing cost. The objective of this research work is to develop new materials, design and manufacturing process for bipolar plates. The materials proposed for use were tested for corrosion resistance in simulated fuel cell conditions. After corrosion studies copper alloy (C17200) and Low Temperature Carburized (LTC) SS 316 were selected as an alternative material for bipolar plate. It was observed that though the copper alloy offered good resistance in corrosive atmosphere, the major advantage of using the alloys was good conductivity even after formation of corrosion layer compared to SS 316. However, LTC SS 316 achieved the best corrosion resistance (ever reported in current open literature at relatively low cost) with decreased contact resistance, as compared to SS 316. Due to the expensive and tedious machining for bipolar plate manufacturing, the conventional machining process was not used. Bipolar plates were manufactured from thin corrugated sheets formed of the alloy. This research also proposed a novel single channel convoluted flow field design which was developed by increasing the tortuosity of conventional serpentine design. The CFD model for novel single channel convoluted design showed uniform distribution of velocity over the entire three dimensional domain. The novel design was further studied using pressure drop and permeability models. These modeling calculations showed substantial benefit in using corrugated sheet design and novel single channel convoluted flow field design. All the concepts of materials (except for LTC SS 316), manufacturing and design are validated using various tests like long term stability

  19. Fundamental studies of ion injection and trapping of electrosprayed ions on a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarmby, Scott Thomas

    The quadrupole ion trap is a highly versatile and sensitive analytical mass spectrometer. Because of the advantages offered by the ion trap, there has been intense interest in coupling it to ionization techniques such as electrospray which form ions externally to the ion trap. In this work, experiments and computer simulations were employed to study the injection of electrosprayed ions into the ion trap of a Finnigan MAT LCQ LC/MS n mass spectrometer. The kinetic energy distribution of the ion beam was characterized and found to be relatively wide, a result of the high pressures from the atmospheric pressure source. One of the most important experimental parameters which affects ion injection efficiency is the RF voltage applied to the ring electrode. A theoretical model was fit to experimental data allowing the optimum RF voltage for trapping a given m/z ion to be predicted. Computer simulations of ion motion were performed to study the effect of various instrumental parameters on trapping efficiency. A commercially available ion optics program, SIMION v6.0, was chosen because it allowed the actual ion trap electrode geometry including endcap holes to be simulated. In contrast to previous computer simulations, SIMION provided the ability to start ions outside the ion trap and to simulate more accurately the injection of externally formed ions. The endcap holes were found to allow the RF field to penetrate out of the ion trap and affect ions as they approached the ion trap. From these simulations, a model for the process by which injected ions are trapped was developed. Using these computer simulations, techniques of improving trapping efficiency were investigated. Most previous techniques perturb ions which are already in the ion trap and therefore cannot be used to accumulate ions; the ability to accumulate ions is a necessity with ionization sources such as electrospray which form ions continuously. One such novel technique for improving trapping efficiency

  20. Comparative study of dimensional accuracy of different impression techniques using addition silicone impression material.

    PubMed

    Penaflor, C F; Semacio, R C; De Las Alas, L T; Uy, H G

    1998-01-01

    This study compared dimensional accuracy of the single, double with spacer, double with cut-out and double mix impression technique using addition silicone impression material. A typhodont containing Ivorine teeth model with six (6) full-crown tooth preparations were used as the positive control. Two stone replication models for each impression technique were made as test materials. Accuracy of the techniques were assessed by measuring four dimensions on the stone dies poured from the impression of the Ivorine teeth model. Results indicated that most of the measurements for the height, width and diameter slightly decreased and a few increased compared with the Ivorine teeth model. The double with cut-out and double mix technique presents the least difference from the master model as compared to the two latter impression techniques. PMID:10202524

  1. Spectroscopic studies of nucleic acid additions during seed-mediated growth of gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tapp, Maeling; Sullivan, Rick; Dennis, Patrick; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of adding nucleic acids to gold seeds during the growth stage of either nanospheres or nanorods was investigated using UV-Vis spectroscopy to reveal any oligonucleotide base or structure-specific effects on nanoparticle growth kinetics or plasmonic signatures. Spectral data indicate that the presence of DNA duplexes during seed ageing drastically accelerated nanosphere growth while the addition of single-stranded polyadenine at any point during seed ageing induces nanosphere aggregation. For seeds added to a gold nanorod growth solution, single-stranded polythymine induces a modest blue-shift in the longitudinal peak wavelength. Moreover, a particular sequence comprised of 50% thymine bases was found to induce a faster, more dramatic blue-shift in the longitudinal peak wavelength compared to any of the homopolymer incubation cases. Monomeric forms of the nucleic acids, however, do not yield discernable spectral differences in any of the gold suspensions studied. PMID:25960601

  2. Study on Friction and Wear Properties of Silver Matrix Brush Material with Different Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoli; Wang, Wenfang; Hong, Yu; Wu, Yucheng

    2013-07-01

    Friction and wear processes of AgCuX (G, CF and AlN) composites-CuAgV alloy friction pair and effects of different additive content in silver based composite on friction and wear behavior are studied in this paper. The microstructure of the brush wear surface is observed by SEM. The results show that when graphite content is up to 9 wt.%, Ag-Cu-CF-G composite exhibits the best wear properties; when the content of aluminum nitride is up to 0.5 wt.%, Ag-Cu-AlN-G composites has the most comprehensive performance. The wear loss of both composites arises with the increase of both pressure and speed, but when speed reaches a critical value, the increased amplitude of wear loss tends to be steady.

  3. Fundamental optical studies of competitive adsorption and thin film phenomena: Progress report for period July 1, 1986-June 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Furtak, T.E.

    1987-04-01

    The program has provided insight into the mechanisms of surface-enhanced Raman scattering and optical second harmonic generation. New information was also obtained on the electrolyte-metal interface, particularly with regard to the role of chloride ions. The active site was identified in surface enhanced Raman scattering from silver substrates. It was shown that Ag/sub 4//sup +/, stabilized by low temperature or by coadsorption provide specific enhancement, caused by resonance within the silver cluster. Other experiments showed that local field effects dominate the shift of vibrational energy with applied potential in the Ag-Cl system. Several forms of adsorbed chloride were identified. Some are associated with the surface Raman active site stabilization and others represent ''ordinary'' adsorbed chloride. Optical second harmonic generation studies on underpotential deposited metal films on single crystal samples have shown that some overlayers (Cu, Zn, Cd) demonstrate intrinsic resonance related to the electronic structure of the layer. Other overlayers (Tl, Bi) modify the electron dynamics or density within the substrate. Information has been obtained about the growth sequence for Cu on Ag.

  4. Fundamental ultrasonic wave propagation studies in a model thermal protection system (porous tiles bonded to aluminum bulkhead)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Tribikram; Reibel, Richard; Jata, Kumar V.

    2006-03-01

    A model thermal protection system (TPS) was designed by bonding ceramic porous tiles to 2.2 and 3.5 mm thick 2124-T351 aluminum alloy plates. One of the goals of the present work was to investigate the potential of detecting simulated defects using guided waves. Simulated defects consisted of cracks, voids and delaminations at the tile-substrate interface. Cracks and voids were introduced into the porous tiles during the fabrication of the TPS. Delamination was created by cutting the gluing tape between the tile and the aluminum substrate. Guided wave propagation studies were conducted using the pitch-catch approach, while changing the angle of strike and the frequency of the transducer excitation to generate the appropriate guided wave mode. The receiver was placed at a distance so that only the guided waves were received during the immersion experiment. The delamination defect could be conclusively detected, however the presence of the imperfect bond between the tiles and the substrate interfered with the detection of the simulated cracks and voids in the porous tiles.

  5. Fundamental study for improvement of dewatering of fine coal/refuse. Annual report, June 1979-June 1980. Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, S.H.; Fulton, P.F.; Klinzing, G.E.; Tierney, J.W.; Chao, J.; Gala, H.; Kakwani, R.; Riquelme, G.; Roy, R.

    1980-07-01

    The particle size distribution of constituent coal samples was determined by the microscopic technique using the Omnicon Alpha Image Analyzer. Shape factors of non-spherical and irregular shaped particles were determined by stereology. Consolidated filter cake samples were prepared using vacuum impregnation techniques. After polishing these samples, the pore size analysis was carried out using the Omnicon Alpha Image Analyzer. These processes of preparing a consolidated cake and analyzing it with the image analyzer are standardized. The basic structure of a computer oriented network model for studying dewatering of fine coal has been specified. The model uses an idealized three dimensional representation of the pore space which consists of a set of nodes with interconnecting bonds. The model consist of four separate modules at present: (i) the network module determines the state of the network at a given fraction of bonds which can be opened; (ii) the breakthrough condition module determines the minimum fraction of open bonds which gives a continuous path across the network; (iii) the equilibrium desaturation module determines the equilibrium moisture content as a function of increasing pressure; and (iv) the dewatering rate module determines the rate of dewatering as a function of filtration parameters. 20 refs.

  6. Understanding the fundamentals of redox mediators in Li-O2 batteries: a case study on nitroxides.

    PubMed

    Bergner, Benjamin J; Hofmann, Christine; Schürmann, Adrian; Schröder, Daniel; Peppler, Klaus; Schreiner, Peter R; Janek, Jürgen

    2015-12-21

    The development of aprotic lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries suffers from high charging overvoltages. Dissolved redox mediators, like nitroxides, providing increased energy efficiency and longer lifetime are promising tools to overcome this challenge. Since this auspicious concept is still in its infancy, the underlying chemical reactions as well as the impact of the different (electro)chemical parameters are poorly understood. Herein, we derive an electrochemical model for the charging reactions, which is validated by potentiostatic measurements. The model elucidates the impact of the major factors including basic cell parameters and the chemical properties of the redox mediator. The model is applied to the promising class of nitroxides, which is systematically investigated by using derivatives of TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy), AZADO (2-azaadamantane-N-oxyl), and an azaphenalene based nitroxide. The nitroxides are electrochemically characterized by cyclic voltammetry and their performance as redox mediators is studied in Li-O2 batteries with an ether-based electrolyte. Based on the presented model, the charging profiles of the different nitroxide redox mediators are correlated with their molecular structures. PMID:26563563

  7. Genetic assessment of additional endophenotypes from the Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia Family Study.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Tiffany A; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Calkins, Monica E; Freedman, Robert; Green, Michael F; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Light, Gregory A; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Olincy, Ann; Radant, Allen D; Seidman, Larry J; Siever, Larry J; Silverman, Jeremy M; Stone, William S; Sugar, Catherine A; Swerdlow, Neal R; Tsuang, Debby W; Tsuang, Ming T; Turetsky, Bruce I; Braff, David L

    2016-01-01

    The Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia Family Study (COGS-1) has previously reported our efforts to characterize the genetic architecture of 12 primary endophenotypes for schizophrenia. We now report the characterization of 13 additional measures derived from the same endophenotype test paradigms in the COGS-1 families. Nine of the measures were found to discriminate between schizophrenia patients and controls, were significantly heritable (31 to 62%), and were sufficiently independent of previously assessed endophenotypes, demonstrating utility as additional endophenotypes. Genotyping via a custom array of 1536 SNPs from 94 candidate genes identified associations for CTNNA2, ERBB4, GRID1, GRID2, GRIK3, GRIK4, GRIN2B, NOS1AP, NRG1, and RELN across multiple endophenotypes. An experiment-wide p value of 0.003 suggested that the associations across all SNPs and endophenotypes collectively exceeded chance. Linkage analyses performed using a genome-wide SNP array further identified significant or suggestive linkage for six of the candidate endophenotypes, with several genes of interest located beneath the linkage peaks (e.g., CSMD1, DISC1, DLGAP2, GRIK2, GRIN3A, and SLC6A3). While the partial convergence of the association and linkage likely reflects differences in density of gene coverage provided by the distinct genotyping platforms, it is also likely an indication of the differential contribution of rare and common variants for some genes and methodological differences in detection ability. Still, many of the genes implicated by COGS through endophenotypes have been identified by independent studies of common, rare, and de novo variation in schizophrenia, all converging on a functional genetic network related to glutamatergic neurotransmission that warrants further investigation. PMID:26597662

  8. Fundamental studies of methanol synthesis from CO(2) hydrogenation on Cu(111), Cu clusters, and Cu/ZnO(0001).

    PubMed

    Yang, Yixiong; Evans, Jaime; Rodriguez, Jose A; White, Michael G; Liu, Ping

    2010-09-01

    A combination of experimental and theoretical methods were employed to investigate the synthesis of methanol via CO(2) hydrogenation (CO(2) + 3H(2)--> CH(3)OH + H(2)O) on Cu(111) and Cu nanoparticle surfaces. High pressure reactivity studies show that Cu nanoparticles supported on a ZnO(0001[combining macron]) single crystal exhibit a higher catalytic activity than the Cu(111) planar surface. Complementary density functional theory (DFT) calculations of methanol synthesis were also performed for a Cu(111) surface and unsupported Cu(29) nanoparticles, and the results support a higher activity for Cu nanoparticles. The DFT calculations show that methanol synthesis on Cu surfaces proceeds through a formate intermediate and the overall reaction rate is limited by both formate and dioxomethylene hydrogenation. Moreover, the superior activity of the nanoparticle is associated with its fluxionality and the presence of low-coordinated Cu sites, which stabilize the key intermediates, e.g. formate and dioxomethylene, and lower the barrier for the rate-limiting hydrogenation process. The reverse water-gas-shift (RWGS) reaction (CO(2) + H(2)--> CO + H(2)O) was experimentally observed to compete with methanol synthesis and was also considered in our DFT calculations. In agreement with experiment, the rate of the RWGS reaction on Cu nanoparticles is estimated to be approximately 2 orders of magnitude faster than methanol synthesis at T = 573 K. The experiments and calculations also indicate that CO produced by the fast RWGS reaction does not undergo subsequent hydrogenation to methanol, but instead simply accumulates as a product. Methanol production from CO hydrogenation via the RWGS pathway is hindered by the first hydrogenation of CO to formyl, which is not stable and prefers to dissociate into CO and H atoms on Cu. Our calculated results suggest that the methanol yield over Cu-based catalysts could be improved by adding dopants or promoters which are able to stabilize formyl

  9. Fundamental and practical studies on high-performance liquid affinity chromatography of biopolymers with novel stationary phases

    SciTech Connect

    Bacolod, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    Rigid microparticulate stationary phases having surface-bound metal chelating functions were developed and evaluated in high performance metal chelate affinity chromatography of proteins. Silica- and polystyrene-divinylbenzene-based metal chelate sorbents were produced in wide pore and in non-porous type of column packings. A major effort has been placed on development of non-porous highly crosslinked polystyrene-divinylbenzene (PSDVB). These PSDVB microparticles were produced by a two-step swelling polymerization, and exhibited excellent mechanical strength over a wide range of flow-rates and composition used in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Simple and reproducible hydrophilic coatings were developed for the surface modification of hydrophobic PSDVB supports. A tetradentate metal chelating ligand, ethylenediamine-N, N[prime]-diacetic acid (EDDA), was covalently bound to the surface of the various supports. Sorbents having iminodiacetic acid (IDA) metal chelating functions were also evaluated. The hydrophilic character and surface coverage of various stationary phases were assessed chromatographically. Studies concerning the effects of eluent pH as well as the nature and concentration of salts on retention and selectivity with different metal chelate stationary phases having various immobilized metal ions were carried out. Elution schemes were developed for rapid separation of proteins in metal chelate affinity chromatography. EDDA stationary phases in metal forms can be viewed as complementary to IDA stationary phases since they afforded different selectivity and retentivity toward proteins. Hydrophilic PSDVB could be functionalized with IDA or EDDA metal chelating ligands or lectins. The non-porous metal chelate stationary phases afforded rapid separation of proteins by the development of multiple gradient systems, which permitted higher column peak capacity, enabling the separation of a greater number of proteins in a single chromatographic run.

  10. Fundamental study on photodynamic therapy for atrial fibrillation: effect of photosensitization reaction parameters on myocardial necrosis in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Emiyu; Ito, Arisa; Arai, Tsunenori

    2012-03-01

    We studied necrotic cell death effect on myocardial cells with photosensitizer existed outside the cells varying photosensitization reaction parameters widely in vitro. We have developed non-thermal ablator with the application of photosensitization reaction for atrial fibrillation. Since laser irradiation is applied shortly after photosensitizer injection, the photosensitization reaction is induced outside the cells. The interaction for the myocardial cells by the photosensitization reaction is not well understood yet on various photosensitization reaction parameters. Rat myocardial cells were cultured in 96 well plates for 7 days. The photosensitization reaction was applied with talaporfin sodium (NPe6) and the semiconductor laser of 663nm wavelength. The average drug light interval was set 8 mins. The photosensitizer concentration and radiant exposure were varied from 5 to 40 μg/ml and 1.2 to 60 J/cm2, respectively. The well bottom was irradiated by the red laser with irradiance of 293 mW/cm2. The photosensitizer fluorescence was monitored during the photosensitization reaction. Alive cell rate was measured by WST assay after 2 hours from the irradiation. In the case of the photosensitizer concentration of 10 μg/ml, the myocardial cells were almost alive even thought 60 J/cm2 in the radiant exposure was applied. In the 15 μg/ml case, the alive cell rate was almost linear relation to the photosensitizer concentration and radiant exposure. We obtained that the threshold for myocardial cell necrosis on the photosensitizer concentration was around 15 μg/ml with 20 J/cm2 in the radiant exposure. This threshold on the photosensitizer concentration was similar to the reported threshold for cancer therapy.

  11. Serum Potassium and Glucose Regulation in the ADDITION-Leicester Screening Study

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Patrice; Bodicoat, Danielle H.; Quinn, Lauren M.; Zaccardi, Francesco; Webb, David R.; Khunti, Kamlesh; Davies, Melanie J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Previous observational studies have shown conflicting results between plasma K+ concentrations and risk of type 2 diabetes. To help clarify the evidence we aimed to determine whether an association existed between serum K+ and glucose regulation within a UK multiethnic population. Methods. Participants were recruited as part of the ADDITION Leicester study, a population based screening study. Individuals from primary care between the age of 40 and 75 years if White European or 25 and 75 years if South Asian or Afro Caribbean were recruited. Tests for associations between baseline characteristics and K+ quartiles were conducted using linear regression models. Results. Data showed individuals in the lowest K+ quartile had significantly greater 2-hour glucose levels (0.53 mmol/L, 95% CI: 0.36 to 0.70, P ≤ 0.001) than those in the highest K+ quartile. This estimation did not change with adjustment for potential confounders. Conversely, participants in the lowest K+ quartile had a 0.14% lower HbA1c (95% CI −0.19 to −0.10: P ≤ 0.001) compared to those in the highest K+ quartile. Conclusion. This cross-sectional analysis demonstrated that lower K+ was associated with greater 2 hr glucose. The data supports the possibility that K+ may influence glucose regulation and further research is warranted. PMID:25883988

  12. Study of triallyl phosphate as an electrolyte additive for high voltage lithium-ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, J.; Madec, L.; Ma, L.; Ellis, L. D.; Qiu, W.; Nelson, K. J.; Lu, Z.; Dahn, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The role of triallyl phosphate as an electrolyte additive in Li(Ni0.42Mn0.42Co0.16)O2/graphite pouch cells was studied using ex-situ gas measurements, ultra high precision coulometry, automated storage experiments, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, long-term cycling and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cells containing triallyl phosphate produced less gas during formation, cycling and storage than control cells. The use of triallyl phosphate led to higher coulombic efficiency and smaller charge endpoint capacity slippage during ultra high precision charger testing. Cells containing triallyl phosphate showed smaller potential drop during 500 h storage at 40 °C and 60 °C and the voltage drop decreased as the triallyl phosphate content in the electrolyte increased. However, large amounts of triallyl phosphate (>3% by weight in the electrolyte) led to large impedance after cycling and storage. Symmetric cell studies showed large amounts of triallyl phosphate (5% or more) led to significant impedance increase at both negative and positive electrodes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies suggested that the high impedance came from the polymerization of triallyl phosphate molecules which formed thick solid electrolyte interphase films at the surfaces of both negative and positive electrodes. An optimal amount of 2%-3% triallyl phosphate led to better capacity retention during long term cycling.

  13. Food Service Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    Developed as part of the Marine Corps Institute (MCI) correspondence training program, this course on food service fundamentals is designed to provide a general background in the basic aspects of the food service program in the Marine Corps; it is adaptable for nonmilitary instruction. Introductory materials include specific information for MCI…

  14. Unification of Fundamental Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Abdus; Taylor, Foreword by John C.

    2005-10-01

    Foreword John C. Taylor; 1. Unification of fundamental forces Abdus Salam; 2. History unfolding: an introduction to the two 1968 lectures by W. Heisenberg and P. A. M. Dirac Abdus Salam; 3. Theory, criticism, and a philosophy Werner Heisenberg; 4. Methods in theoretical physics Paul Adrian Maurice Dirac.

  15. Fundamentals of Diesel Engines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This student guide, one of a series of correspondence training courses designed to improve the job performance of members of the Marine Corps, deals with the fundamentals of diesel engine mechanics. Addressed in the three individual units of the course are the following topics: basic principles of diesel mechanics; principles, mechanics, and…

  16. Reading Is Fundamental, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. National Reading is Fun-damental Program.

    Reading Is Fundamental (RIF) is a national, nonprofit organization designed to motivate children to read by making a wide variety of inexpensive books available to them and allowing the children to choose and keep books that interest them. This annual report for 1977 contains the following information on the RIF project: an account of the…

  17. Homeschooling and Religious Fundamentalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunzman, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the relationship between homeschooling and religious fundamentalism by focusing on their intersection in the philosophies and practices of conservative Christian homeschoolers in the United States. Homeschooling provides an ideal educational setting to support several core fundamentalist principles: resistance to…

  18. Fundamentals of tribology

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, N.P.; Saka, N.

    1980-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the June 1978 International Conference on the Fundamentals of Tribology. The papers discuss the effects of surface topography and of the properties of materials on wear; friction, wear, and thermomechanical effects; wear mechanisms in metal processing; polymer wear; wear monitoring and prevention; and lubrication. (LCL)

  19. Fundamental research data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A fundamental research data base containing ground truth, image, and Badhwar profile feature data for 17 North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota agricultural sites is described. Image data was provided for a minimum of four acquisition dates for each site and all four images were registered to one another.

  20. Laser Fundamentals and Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Pelt, W. F.; And Others

    As a result of work performed at the Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory with respect to lasers, this manual was prepared in response to the increasing use of lasers in high schools and colleges. It is directed primarily toward the high school instructor who may use the text for a short course in laser fundamentals. The definition of the…

  1. The Fundamental Property Relation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Joseph J.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a basic equation in thermodynamics (the fundamental property relation), focusing on a logical approach to the development of the relation where effects other than thermal, compression, and exchange of matter with the surroundings are considered. Also demonstrates erroneous treatments of the relation in three well-known textbooks. (JN)

  2. Fundamentals of Library Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdoo, Monty L.

    2012-01-01

    Being a great teacher is part and parcel of being a great librarian. In this book, veteran instruction services librarian McAdoo lays out the fundamentals of the discipline in easily accessible language. Succinctly covering the topic from top to bottom, he: (1) Offers an overview of the historical context of library instruction, drawing on recent…

  3. Fundamental electrode kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elder, J. P.

    1968-01-01

    Report presents the fundamentals of electrode kinetics and the methods used in evaluating the characteristic parameters of rapid-charge transfer processes at electrode-electrolyte interfaces. The concept of electrode kinetics is outlined, followed by the principles underlying the experimental techniques for the investigation of electrode kinetics.

  4. Basic Publication Fundamentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savedge, Charles E., Ed.

    Designed for students who produce newspapers and newsmagazines in junior high, middle, and elementary schools, this booklet is both a scorebook and a fundamentals text. The scorebook provides realistic criteria for judging publication excellence at these educational levels. All the basics for good publications are included in the text of the…

  5. Theoretical study of the molecular force field and vibration analysis of the hydrogen cyanide addition compound with boron tribromide.

    PubMed

    Hase, Y

    2010-01-01

    An extensive HF, MP2, B3LYP and CCSD study of the molecular structure, force field and normal vibrations has been carried out for the hydrogen cyanide compound with boron tribromide. Most of the calculations agree that the HCN-BBr(3) molecule belongs to C(3v) point group and has a N-B length of 1.55-1.70 A and a N-B-Br angle of 103-105 degrees. These calculations also have estimated the missing low-wavenumber fundamentals in the 190 (nu(5)), 150 (nu(9)) and 105 cm(-1) (nu(10)) regions, instead of the supposed fundamentals at 207, 188 and 150 cm(-1), respectively, based on the combination bands. The quantum chemical force constants, by the B3LYP/6-31G and CCSD/3-21G calculations, have been adjusted by the scaling factors to reproduce the fundamentals in the literature [3] to include the bands below 200 cm(-1) proposed in this study. Normal coordinate analysis using the scaled force constants has been performed to interpret the molecular vibrations of four isotopic molecules, HCN-(10)BBr(3), HCN-(11)BBr(3), DCN-(10)BBr(3) and DCN-(11)BBr(3). PMID:19955013

  6. Theoretical study of the molecular force field and vibration analysis of the hydrogen cyanide addition compound with boron tribromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Y.

    2010-01-01

    An extensive HF, MP2, B3LYP and CCSD study of the molecular structure, force field and normal vibrations has been carried out for the hydrogen cyanide compound with boron tribromide. Most of the calculations agree that the HCN-BBr 3 molecule belongs to C3v point group and has a N-B length of 1.55-1.70 Å and a N-B-Br angle of 103-105°. These calculations also have estimated the missing low-wavenumber fundamentals in the 190 ( ν5), 150 ( ν9) and 105 cm -1 ( ν10) regions, instead of the supposed fundamentals at 207, 188 and 150 cm -1, respectively, based on the combination bands. The quantum chemical force constants, by the B3LYP/6-31G and CCSD/3-21G calculations, have been adjusted by the scaling factors to reproduce the fundamentals in the literature [3] to include the bands below 200 cm -1 proposed in this study. Normal coordinate analysis using the scaled force constants has been performed to interpret the molecular vibrations of four isotopic molecules, HCN- 10BBr 3, HCN- 11BBr 3, DCN- 10BBr 3 and DCN- 11BBr 3.

  7. Experimental Study of Disruption of Columnar Grains During Rapid Solidification in Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manogharan, Guha; Yelamanchi, Bharat; Aman, Ronald; Mahbooba, Zaynab

    2016-03-01

    Over the years, many studies have been conducted to study and analyze the grain structures of metal alloys during additive manufacturing to improve mechanical properties. In particular, columnar grains are observed predominantly during rapid solidification of molten metal. This leads to lower mechanical properties and requires expensive secondary heat-treatment processes. This study is aimed at disrupting the formation of columnar grain growth during rapid solidification using ultrasonic vibration and analyzes the effects on grain structure and mechanical properties. A gas-metal arc welder mounted on a Rep-Rap-based low-cost metal 3 Dimension printer was used to deposit ER70S-6 mild steel layers on a plate. A contact-type ultrasonic transducer with a control system to vary the frequency and power of the vibration was used. The effects of ultrasonic vibration were determined from the statistical analysis of microstructure and micro-indentation techniques on the deposited layer and heat-affected zone. It was found that both frequency and interaction between frequency and power had significant impact on the refinement of average grain size up to 10.64% and increased the number of grains by approximately 41.78%. Analysis of micro-indentation tests showed that there was an increase of approximately 14.30% in micro-hardness due to the applied frequency during rapid solidification. A pole diagram shows that application of vibration causes randomization of grain orientation. Along with the results from this study, further efforts in modeling and experimentation of multi-directional vibrations would lead to a better understanding of disrupting columnar grains in applications that use mechanical vibrations, such as welding, directed energy deposition, brazing, etc.

  8. Synthesis, Characterization, Molecular Modeling, and DNA Interaction Studies of Copper Complex Containing Food Additive Carmoisine Dye.

    PubMed

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Akbari, Alireza; Jamshidbeigi, Mina; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2016-06-01

    A copper complex of carmoisine dye; [Cu(carmoisine)2(H2O)2]; was synthesized and characterized by using physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The binding of this complex with calf thymus (ct) DNA was investigated by circular dichroism, absorption studies, emission spectroscopy, and viscosity measurements. UV-vis results confirmed that the Cu complex interacted with DNA to form a ground-state complex and the observed binding constant (2× 10(4) M(-1)) is more in keeping with the groove bindings with DNA. Furthermore, the viscosity measurement result showed that the addition of complex causes no significant change on DNA viscosity and it indicated that the intercalation mode is ruled out. The thermodynamic parameters are calculated by van't Hoff equation, which demonstrated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions played major roles in the reaction. The results of circular dichroism (CD) suggested that the complex can change the conformation of DNA from B-like form toward A-like conformation. The cytotoxicity studies of the carmoisine dye and its copper complex indicated that both of them had anticancer effects on HT-29 (colon cancer) cell line and they may be new candidates for treatment of the colon cancer. PMID:27152751

  9. Percutaneous Dorsal Instrumentation of Vertebral Burst Fractures: Value of Additional Percutaneous Intravertebral Reposition—Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Antonio; Schmuck, Maya; Noriega, David C.; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Baroud, Gamal; Oberkircher, Ludwig

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The treatment of vertebral burst fractures is still controversial. The aim of the study is to evaluate the purpose of additional percutaneous intravertebral reduction when combined with dorsal instrumentation. Methods. In this biomechanical cadaver study twenty-eight spine segments (T11-L3) were used (male donors, mean age 64.9 ± 6.5 years). Burst fractures of L1 were generated using a standardised protocol. After fracture all spines were allocated to four similar groups and randomised according to surgical techniques (posterior instrumentation; posterior instrumentation + intravertebral reduction device + cement augmentation; posterior instrumentation + intravertebral reduction device without cement; and intravertebral reduction device + cement augmentation). After treatment, 100000 cycles (100–600 N, 3 Hz) were applied using a servohydraulic loading frame. Results. Overall anatomical restoration was better in all groups where the intravertebral reduction device was used (p < 0.05). In particular, it was possible to restore central endplates (p > 0.05). All techniques decreased narrowing of the spinal canal. After loading, clearance could be maintained in all groups fitted with the intravertebral reduction device. Narrowing increased in the group treated with dorsal instrumentation. Conclusions. For height and anatomical restoration, the combination of an intravertebral reduction device with dorsal instrumentation showed significantly better results than sole dorsal instrumentation. PMID:26137481

  10. Density functional theory study of the effects of alloying additions on sulfur adsorption on nickel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyi, Oleksandr I.; Chen, Zhong; Kulish, Vadym V.; Bai, Kewu; Wu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Reactions of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) with Nickel/Ytrria-doped zirconia (Ni/YDZ) anode materials might cause degradation of the performance of solid oxide fuel cells when S containing fuels are used. In this paper, we employ density functional theory to investigate S adsorption on metal (M)-doped and undoped Ni(0 0 1) and Ni(1 1 1) surfaces. Based on the performed calculations, we analyze the effects of 12 alloying additions (Ag, Au, Al, Bi, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Sn, Sb, V, and Zn) on the temperature of transition between clean (S atoms do not adsorb on the surfaces) and contaminated (S atoms can adsorb on the surfaces spontaneously) M-doped Ni surfaces for different concentrations of H2S in the fuel. Predicted results are consistent with many experimental studies relevant to S poisoning of both Ni/YDZ and M-doped Ni/YDZ anode materials. This study is important to understand S poisoning phenomena and to develop new S tolerant anode materials.

  11. Using laser diagnostics for studying the injection of a dry additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunov, Iu. M.; Zhilin, V. G.; Liuliukin, V. I.; Mostinskii, I. L.; Putin, Iu. A.

    1987-02-01

    In MHD generators using an ionizing additive, the uniform injection of the additive into the combustion chamber and the dispersity of the injected particles are important. Some of the problems associated with the injection of an ionizing additive can be alleviated by using dry additives. In the experiment reported here, an He-Ne laser was used to monitor the injection of potash powder with an average size of 40 microns. It is shown that laser diagnostics can be successfully used to determine the mean particle diameter and variation of the powder flow rate with time.

  12. Evaluation of additional head of biceps brachii: a study with autopsy material.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, L E; Forero, P L; Buitrago, E R

    2014-05-01

    Additional head of the biceps brachii (AHBB) has been reported in different population groups with a frequency of 1-25%. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and morphologic expression of the AHBB as determined in a sample of the Colombian population. An exploration was conducted with 106 arms corresponding to unclaimed corpses autopsied at Institute of Legal and Forensic Medicine of Bucaramanga, Colombia. Using medial incision involvingskin, subcutaneous tissue, and brachial fascia, the heads of the biceps and their innervating branches were visualised. One AHBB was observed in 21 (19.8%) of the arms evaluated, with non-significant difference (p = 0.568) per side of presentation: 11 (52.4%) cases on the right side and 10 (47.6%) on the left side. All AHBBs were originated in the infero-medial segment of the humerus, with a mean thickness of 17.8 ± 6.8 mm. In 4 (19%) cases the fascicle was thin, less than 10 mm; in 7 (33.3%) cases it was of medium thickness, between 11 and 20 mm, whereas in 47.6% it was longer than 20 mm. The length of the AHBB was 118.3 ± 26.8 mm; its motor point supplied by the musculocutaneous nerve was located at 101.3 ± 20.9 mm of the bi-epicondylar line. The incidence of AHBB in this study is located at the upper segment of what has been reportedin the literature and could be a morphologic trait of the Colombian population; in agreement with prior studies, the origin was the infero-medial surface of the humerus. PMID:24902098

  13. Increased Risk of Additional Cancers Among Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, James D.; Ma, Grace L.; Baumgartner, Joel M.; Madlensky, Lisa; Burgoyne, Adam M.; Tang, Chih-Min; Martinez, Maria Elena; Sicklick, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are considered non-hereditary or sporadic. However, single-institution studies suggest that GIST patients develop additional malignancies with increased frequencies. We hypothesized that we could gain greater insight into possible associations between GIST and other malignancies using a national cancer database inquiry. Methods Patients diagnosed with GIST (2001–2011) in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database were included. Standardized prevalence ratios (SPRs) and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were used to quantify cancer risks incurred by GIST patients before and after GIST diagnoses, respectively, when compared with the general U.S. population. Results Of 6,112 GIST patients, 1,047 (17.1%) had additional cancers. There were significant increases in overall cancer rates: 44% (SPR=1.44) before diagnosis and 66% (SIR=1.66) after GIST diagnoses. Malignancies with significantly increased occurrence both before/after diagnoses included other sarcomas (SPR=5.24/SIR=4.02), neuroendocrine-carcinoid tumors (SPR=3.56/SIR=4.79), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (SPR=1.69/SIR=1.76), and colorectal adenocarcinoma (SPR=1.51/SIR=2.16). Esophageal adenocarcinoma (SPR=12.0), bladder adenocarcinoma (SPR=7.51), melanoma (SPR=1.46), and prostate adenocarcinoma (SPR=1.20) were significantly more common only before GIST. Ovarian carcinoma (SIR=8.72), small intestine adenocarcinoma (SIR=5.89), papillary thyroid cancer (SIR=5.16), renal cell carcinoma (SIR=4.46), hepatobiliary adenocarcinomas (SIR=3.10), gastric adenocarcinoma (SIR=2.70), pancreatic adenocarcinoma (SIR=2.03), uterine adenocarcinoma (SIR=1.96), non-small cell lung cancer (SIR=1.74), and transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (SIR=1.65) were significantly more common only after GIST. Conclusion This is the first population-based study to characterize the associations and temporal relationships between GIST and other cancers, both by site and

  14. Fundamental study on the characteristics of a radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeter with no energy compensation filter for measuring patient entrance doses in cardiac interventional procedures.

    PubMed

    Kato, Mamoru; Chida, Koichi; Moritake, Takashi; Koguchi, Yasuhiro; Sato, Tadaya; Oosaka, Hajime; Tosa, Tetsuo; Kadowaki, Ken

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac interventional procedures have been increasing year by year. However, radiation skin injuries have been still reported. There is a necessity to measure the patient entrance skin dose (ESD), but an accurate dose measurement method has not been established. To measure the ESD, a lot of radiophotoluminescence dosemeters (RPLDs) provide an accurate measurement of the direct actual ESD at the points they are arrayed. The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of RPLD to measure the ESD. As a result, X-ray permeable RPLD (with no tin filter) did not interfere with the percutaneous coronary intervention procedure. The RPLD also had good fundamental performance characteristics. Although the RPLD had a little energy dependence, it showed excellent dose and dose-rate linearity, and good angular dependence. In conclusion, by calibrating the energy dependence, RPLDs are useful dosemeter to measure the ESD in cardiac intervention. PMID:24277872

  15. Speech tempo and fundamental frequency patterns: a case study of male monozygotic twins and an age- and sex-matched sibling.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Sandra P; Rixon, Emma

    2013-12-01

    This case study describes an investigation into the speaking characteristics of a set of male monozygotic (MZ) twins (T1 and T2) and an age- and sex-matched sibling (S). Measures of speech tempo and fundamental frequency (F0) were analysed in the speech samples of a reading passage. Results showed significant between-sibling differences for sentence durations and F0 parameters; however, Euclidean distance (ED) measures revealed the smallest distances between the F0 parameters of the MZ twins. The smallest ED values were also observed between T1 and T2 for word durations, pause durations, all-voiced sample durations, and all the all-voiced sample F0 parameters. Greater similarities were observed across all three siblings for the speech tempo and dynamic F0 parameters. PMID:23194081

  16. Fundamental studies and development of technologies for CuInSe[sub 2] based thin film solar cells in the EUROCIS program

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, T.; Schock, H.W. )

    1994-06-30

    The main objectives of the European program on thin film solar cells based on chalcopyrite semiconductors are presented in this contribution. Emphasis is put on fundamental studies aiming at a better understanding of film growth, heterointerface properties, and device performance. Alloying of CuInSe[sub 2] with CuGaSe[sub 2] and CuInS[sub 2] is considered to be of major importance in increasing the conversion efficiency. Active area efficiencies of nearly 17% have been achieved using advanced deposition techniques for the absorber and an optimized window. Having developed processes that yield highly efficient devices on a laboratory scale, the main task is presently considered to be upscaling and the fabrication of submodules.

  17. Gas cell based on optical contacting for fundamental spectroscopy studies with initial reference absorption spectrum of H2O vapor at 1723 K and 0.0235 bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melin, Scott T.; Sanders, Scott T.

    2016-09-01

    A gas cell, using optically contacted sapphire windows to form a hot vapor seal, has been created for high temperature fundamental spectroscopy studies. It is designed to operate at temperatures from 280-2273 K and pressures from vacuum to 1.3 bar. Using the cell in conjunction with an external cavity diode laser spectrometer, a reference H2O vapor absorption spectrum at P=0.0235±0.0036 bar and T=1723±6 K was measured with 0.0001 cm-1 resolution over the 7326-7598 cm-1 range. Comparison of the measured spectrum to simulations reveals errors in both the HITEMP and BT2 databases. This work establishes heated static cell capabilities at temperatures well above the typical limit of approximately 1300 K set by quartz material properties. This paper addresses the design of the cell as well as the cell's limitations.

  18. Fundamentals of Space Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, Gilles

    2005-03-01

    A total of more than 240 human space flights have been completed to date, involving about 450 astronauts from various countries, for a combined total presence in space of more than 70 years. The seventh long-duration expedition crew is currently in residence aboard the International Space Station, continuing a permanent presence in space that began in October 2000. During that time, investigations have been conducted on both humans and animal models to study the bone demineralization and muscle deconditioning, space motion sickness, the causes and possible treatment of postflight orthostatic intolerance, the changes in immune function, crew and crew-ground interactions, and the medical issues of living in a space environment, such as the effects of radiation or the risk of developing kidney stones. Some results of these investigations have led to fundamental discoveries about the adaptation of the human body to the space environment. Gilles Clément has been active in this research. This readable text presents the findings from the life science experiments conducted during and after space missions. Topics discussed in this book include: adaptation of sensory-motor, cardio-vascular, bone, and muscle systems to the microgravity of spaceflight; psychological and sociological issues of living in a confined, isolated, and stressful environment; operational space medicine, such as crew selection, training and in-flight health monitoring, countermeasures and support; results of space biology experiments on individual cells, plants, and animal models; and the impact of long-duration missions such as the human mission to Mars. The author also provides a detailed description of how to fly a space experiment, based on his own experience with research projects conducted onboard Salyut-7, Mir, Spacelab, and the Space Shuttle. Now is the time to look at the future of human spaceflight and what comes next. The future human exploration of Mars captures the imagination of both the

  19. Fundamentals of Space Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clément, G.

    2003-10-01

    As of today, a total of more than 240 human space flights have been completed, involving about 450 astronauts from various countries, for a combined total presence in space of more than 70 years. The seventh long-duration expedition crew is currently in residence aboard the International Space Station, continuing a permanent presence in space that began in October 2000. During that time, investigations have been conducted on both humans and animal models to study the bone demineralization and muscle deconditioning, space motion sickness, the causes and possible treatment of postflight orthostatic intolerance, the changes in immune function, crew and crew-ground interactions, and the medical issues of living in a space environment, such as the effects of radiation or the risk of developing kidney stones. Some results of these investigations have led to fundamental discoveries about the adaptation of the human body to the space environment. Gilles Clément has been active in this research. This book presents in a readable text the findings from the life science experiments conducted during and after space missions. Topics discussed in this book include: adaptation of sensory-motor, cardiovascular, bone and muscle systems to the microgravity of spaceflight; psychological and sociological issues of living in a confined, isolated and stressful environment; operational space medicine, such as crew selection, training and in-flight health monitoring, countermeasures and support; results of space biology experiments on individual cells, plants, and animal models; and the impact of long-duration missions such as the human mission to Mars. The author also provides a detailed description of how to fly a space experiment, based on his own experience with research projects conducted onboard Salyut-7, Mir, Spacelab, and the Space Shuttle. Now is the time to look at the future of human spaceflight and what comes next. The future human exploration of Mars captures the imagination

  20. Fundamentals of Polarized Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The analytical and numerical basis for describing scattering properties of media composed of small discrete particles is formed by the classical electromagnetic theory. Although there are several excellent textbooks outlining the fundamentals of this theory, it is convenient for our purposes to begin with a summary of those concepts and equations that are central to the subject of this book and will be used extensively in the following chapters. We start by formulating Maxwell's equations and constitutive relations for time- harmonic macroscopic electromagnetic fields and derive the simplest plane-wave solution that underlies the basic optical idea of a monochromatic parallel beam of light. This solution naturally leads to the introduction of such fundamental quantities as the refractive index and the Stokes parameters. Finally, we define the concept of a quasi-monochromatic beam of light and discuss its implications.

  1. Fundamentals of Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohlich, Cliff

    Choosing an intermediate-level geophysics text is always problematic: What should we teach students after they have had introductory courses in geology, math, and physics, but little else? Fundamentals of Geophysics is aimed specifically at these intermediate-level students, and the author's stated approach is to construct a text “using abundant diagrams, a simplified mathematical treatment, and equations in which the student can follow each derivation step-by-step.” Moreover, for Lowrie, the Earth is round, not flat—the “fundamentals of geophysics” here are the essential properties of our Earth the planet, rather than useful techniques for finding oil and minerals. Thus this book is comparable in both level and approach to C. M. R. Fowler's The Solid Earth (Cambridge University Press, 1990).

  2. Fundamental limits on EMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showers, R. M.; Lin, S.-Y.; Schulz, R. B.

    1981-02-01

    Both fundamental and state-of-the-art limits are treated with emphasis on the former. Fundamental limits result from both natural and man-made electromagnetic noise which then affect two basic ratios, signal-to-noise (S/N) and extraneous-input-to-noise (I/N). Tolerable S/N values are discussed for both digital and analog communications systems. These lead to tolerable signal-to-extraneous-input (S/I) ratios, again for digital and analog communications systems, as well as radar and sonar. State-of-the-art limits for transmitters include RF noise emission, spurious emissions, and intermodulation. Receiver limits include adjacent-channel interactions, image, IF, and other spurious responses, including cross modulation, intermodulation, and desensitization. Unintentional emitters and receivers are also discussed. Coupling limitations between undesired sources and receptors are considered from mechanisms including radiation, induction, and conduction.

  3. Additional Language Teaching within the International Baccalaureate Primary Years Programme: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lebreton, Marlène

    2014-01-01

    The International Baccalaureate Primary Years Programme supports the learning of languages and cultures, but the role of the additional language within this programme is often unclear. There remains a great variability in schools regarding the frequency of lessons and the way that the additional language is taught within the Primary Years…

  4. Beyond the Call of Duty: A Qualitative Study of Teachers' Additional Responsibilities Related to Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Marla E.; Madsen, Nikki; Oliphant, Jennifer A.; Resnick, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Seven focus groups were conducted with sexuality educators in Minnesota to explore ways that teaching sexuality education differs from teaching other health education content and to determine if additional supports or resources are needed for sexuality educators. Teachers described many specific additional responsibilities or concerns related to…

  5. Experimental study of combustion characteristics of nanoscale metal and metal oxide additives in biofuel (ethanol)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the combustion behavior of nano-aluminum (n-Al) and nano-aluminum oxide (n-Al2O3) particles stably suspended in biofuel (ethanol) as a secondary energy carrier was conducted. The heat of combustion (HoC) was studied using a modified static bomb calorimeter system. Combustion element composition and surface morphology were evaluated using a SEM/EDS system. N-Al and n-Al2O3 particles of 50- and 36-nm diameters, respectively, were utilized in this investigation. Combustion experiments were performed with volume fractions of 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10% for n-Al, and 0.5, 1, 3, and 5% for n-Al2O3. The results indicate that the amount of heat released from ethanol combustion increases almost linearly with n-Al concentration. N-Al volume fractions of 1 and 3% did not show enhancement in the average volumetric HoC, but higher volume fractions of 5, 7, and 10% increased the volumetric HoC by 5.82, 8.65, and 15.31%, respectively. N-Al2O3 and heavily passivated n-Al additives did not participate in combustion reactively, and there was no contribution from Al2O3 to the HoC in the tests. A combustion model that utilized Chemical Equilibrium with Applications was conducted as well and was shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:21711760

  6. A theoretical study of wave dispersion and thermal conduction for HMX/additive interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yao; Chen, Jun

    2014-04-01

    The wave dispersion rule for non-uniform material is useful for ultrasonic inspection and engine life prediction, and also is key in achieving an understanding of the energy dissipation and thermal conduction properties of solid material. On the basis of linear response theory and molecular dynamics, we derive a set of formulas for calculating the wave dispersion rate of interface systems, and study four kinds of interfaces inside plastic bonded explosives: HMX/{HMX, TATB, F2312, F2313}. (HMX: octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine; TATB: 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene; F2312, F2313: fluoropolymers). The wave dispersion rate is obtained over a wide frequency range from kHz to PHz. We find that at low frequency, the rate is proportional to the square of the frequency, and at high frequency, the rate couples with the molecular vibration modes at the interface. By using the results, the thermal conductivities of HMX/additive interfaces are derived, and a physical model is built for describing the total thermal conductivity of mixture explosives, including HMX multi-particle systems and {TATB, F2312, F2313}-coated HMX.

  7. Addition reaction of alkyl radical to C60 fullerene: Density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Functionalized fullerenes are known as a high-performance molecules. In this study, the alkyl-functionalized fullerenes (denoted by R-C60) have been investigated by means of the density functional theory (DFT) method to elucidate the effects of functionalization on the electronic states of fullerene. Also, the reaction mechanism of alkyl radicals with C60 was investigated. The methyl, ethyl, propyl, and butyl radicals (denoted by n = 1-4, where n means the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl radical) were examined as alkyl radicals. The DFT calculation showed that the alkyl radical binds to the carbon atom of C60 at the on-top site, and a strong C-C single bond is formed. The binding energies of alkyl radicals to C60 were distributed in the range of 31.8-35.1 kcal mol-1 at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. It was found that the activation barrier exists before alkyl addition, the barrier heights were calculated to be 2.1-2.8 kcal mol-1. The electronic states of R-C60 complexes were discussed on the basis of the theoretical results.

  8. Ecological Optimization and Parametric Study of an Irreversible Regenerative Modified Brayton Cycle with Isothermal Heat Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Sudhir K.; Kaushik, Subhash C.; Tiwari, Vivek

    2003-12-01

    An ecological optimization along with a detailed parametric study of an irreversible regenerative Brayton heat engine with isothermal heat addition have been carried out with external as well as internal irreversibilities. The ecological function is defined as the power output minus the power loss (irreversibility) which is ambient temperature times the entropy generation rate. The external irreversibility is due to finite temperature difference between the heat engine and the external reservoirs while the internal irreversibilities are due to nonisentropic compression and expansion processes in the compressor and the turbine respectively and the regenerative heat loss. The ecological function is found to be an increasing function of the isothermal-, sink- and regenerative-side effectiveness, isothermal-side inlet temperature, component efficiencies and sink-side temperature while it is found to be a decreasing function of the isobaric-side temperature and effectiveness and the working fluid heat capacitance rate. The effects of the isobaric-side effectiveness are found to be more than those of the other parameters and the effects of turbine efficiency are found to be more than those of the compressor efficiency on all the performance parameters of the cycle.

  9. Theoretical study of addition reactions of carbene, silylene, and germylene to carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Ying-Ying; Su, Ming-Der

    2004-08-01

    A theoretical study of the mechanism of the reaction of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with carbene (H 2C), silylene (H 2Si), and germylene (H 2Ge) has been carried out using a two-layered ONIOM(B3LYP/6-311G ∗:PM3) approach. The main findings are as follows: (1) The computational results based on the method used in this work are in good agreement with recent theoretical findings [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 41 (2002) 1853]. That is, SWCNTs with H 2C, H 2Si, and H 2Ge addends favor opened structures rather than three-membered rings. (2) The greater the atomic number of the carbene center, the larger the activation energy and the less exothermic (or the more endothermic) the cycloaddition reaction becomes. Therefore, addition to the C dbnd C bond of a SWCNT is more difficult the heavier the carbene center. (3) The theoretical observations suggest that the singlet-triplet splitting of a carbene can be used as a guide to its reactivity during the SWCNT cycloaddition process.

  10. Value of Fundamental Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, Alexey

    Fundamental science is a hard, long-term human adventure that has required high devotion and social support, especially significant in our epoch of Mega-science. The measure of this devotion and this support expresses the real value of the fundamental science in public opinion. Why does fundamental science have value? What determines its strength and what endangers it? The dominant answer is that the value of science arises out of curiosity and is supported by the technological progress. Is this really a good, astute answer? When trying to attract public support, we talk about the ``mystery of the universe''. Why do these words sound so attractive? What is implied by and what is incompatible with them? More than two centuries ago, Immanuel Kant asserted an inseparable entanglement between ethics and metaphysics. Thus, we may ask: which metaphysics supports the value of scientific cognition, and which does not? Should we continue to neglect the dependence of value of pure science on metaphysics? If not, how can this issue be addressed in the public outreach? Is the public alienated by one or another message coming from the face of science? What does it mean to be politically correct in this sort of discussion?

  11. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  12. DEEP ABSORPTION LINE STUDIES OF QUIESCENT GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2: THE DYNAMICAL-MASS-SIZE RELATION AND FIRST CONSTRAINTS ON THE FUNDAMENTAL PLANE

    SciTech Connect

    Toft, S.; Gallazzi, A.; Zirm, A.; Wold, M.; Zibetti, S.; Grillo, C.; Man, A.

    2012-07-20

    We present dynamical and structural scaling relations of quiescent galaxies at z = 2, including the dynamical-mass-size relation and the first constraints on the fundamental plane (FP). The backbone of the analysis is a new, very deep Very Large Telescope/X-shooter spectrum of a massive, compact, quiescent galaxy at z = 2.0389. We detect the continuum between 3700 and 22,000 A and several strong absorption features (Balmer series, Ca H+K, G band) from which we derive a stellar velocity dispersion of 318 {+-} 53 km s{sup -1}. We perform detailed modeling of the continuum emission and line indices and derive strong simultaneous constraints on the age, metallicity, and stellar mass. The galaxy is a dusty (A{sub V} = 0.77{sup +0.36}{sub -0.32}) solar metallicity (log(Z/Z{sub Sun }) = 0.02{sup +0.20}{sub -0.41}) post-starburst galaxy, with a mean-luminosity-weighted log(age/yr) of 8.9 {+-} 0.1. The galaxy formed the majority of its stars at z > 3 and currently has little or no ongoing star formation. We compile a sample of three other z {approx} 2 quiescent galaxies with measured velocity dispersions, two of which are also post-starburst like. Their dynamical-mass-size relation is offset significantly less than the stellar-mass-size relation from the local early-type relations, which we attribute to a lower central dark matter fraction. Recent cosmological merger simulations agree qualitatively with the data, but cannot fully account for the evolution in the dark matter fraction. The z {approx} 2 FP requires additional evolution beyond passive stellar aging to be in agreement with the local FP. The structural evolution predicted by the cosmological simulations is insufficient, suggesting that additional, possibly non-homologous, structural evolution is needed.

  13. Fortification of yogurts with different antioxidant preservatives: A comparative study between natural and synthetic additives.

    PubMed

    Caleja, Cristina; Barros, Lillian; Antonio, Amilcar L; Carocho, Márcio; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2016-11-01

    Consumers demand more and more so-called "natural" products and, therefore, the aim of this work was to compare the effects of natural versus synthetic antioxidant preservatives in yogurts. Matricaria recutita L. (chamomile) and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (fennel) decoctions were tested as natural additives, while potassium sorbate (E202) was used as a synthetic additive. The fortification of yogurts with natural and synthetic antioxidants did not cause significant changes in the yoghurt pH and nutritional value, in comparison with control samples (yogurt without any additive). However, the fortified yogurts showed higher antioxidant activity, mainly the yogurts with natural additives (and among these, the ones with chamomile decoction). Overall, it can be concluded that plant decoctions can be used to develop novel yogurts, by replacing synthetic preservatives and improving the antioxidant properties of the final product, without changing the nutritional profile. PMID:27211646

  14. ALUM ADDITION AND STEP-FEED STUDIES IN OXYGEN-ACTIVATED SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A plug flow, O2-activated sludge process was operated with alum addition to remove phosphorus and with lime addition to prevent the process pH from decreasing below 6.4. The O2 reactor was operated at F/M ratios between 0.18 to 0.24 gm of BOD5/gm of MLVSS/day in a typical co-curr...

  15. Chemostat Studies of TCE-Dehalogenating Anaerobic Consortia under Excess and Limited Electron Donor Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semprini, L.; Azizian, M.; Green, J.; Mayer-Blackwell, K.; Spormann, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Two cultures - the Victoria Strain (VS) and the Evanite Strain (EV), enriched with the organohalide respiring bacteria Dehalococcoides mccartyi - were grown in chemostats for more than 4 years at a mean cell residence time of 50 days. The slow doubling rate represents growth likely experienced in the subsurface. The chemostats were fed formate as an electron donor and trichloroethene (TCE) as the terminal electron acceptor. Under excess formate conditions, stable operation was observed with respect to TCE transformation, steady-state hydrogen (H2) concentrations (40 nM), and the structure of the dehalogenating community. Both cultures completely transformed TCE to ethene, with minor amounts of vinyl chloride (VC) observed, along with acetate formation. When formate was limited, TCE was transformed incompletely to ethene (40-60%) and VC (60- 40%), and H2 concentrations ranged from 1 to 3 nM. The acetate concentration dropped below detection. Batch kinetic studies of TCE transformation with chemostat harvested cells found transformation rates of c-DCE and VC were greatly reduced when the cells were grown with limited formate. Upon increasing formate addition to the chemostats, from limited to excess, essentially complete transformation of TCE to ethene was achieved. The increase in formate was associated with an increase in H2 concentration and the production of acetate. Results of batch kinetic tests showed increases in transformation rates for TCE and c-DCE by factors of 3.5 and 2.5, respectively, while VC rates increased by factors of 33 to 500, over a six month period. Molecular analysis of chemostat samples is being performed to quantify the changes in copy numbers of reductase genes and to determine whether shifts in the strains of Dehalococcoides mccartyi where responsible for the observed rate increases. The results demonstrate the importance of electron donor supply for successful in-situ remediation.

  16. A study of the electrochemistry of nickel hydroxide electrodes with various additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wen-Hua; Ke, Jia-Jun; Yu, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Deng-Jun

    Nickel composite electrodes (NCE) with various additives are prepared by a chemical impregnation method from nitrate solutions on sintered porous plaques. The electrochemical properties, such as utilization of active material, swelling and the discharge potential of the nickel oxide electrode (NOE) are determined mainly through the composition of the active material and the characteristics of nickel plaques. Most additives (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Zn, Cd, Co, Li and Al hydroxide) exert effects on the discharge potential and swelling of the NOE. Chemical co-precipitation with the addition of calcium, zinc, magnesium and barium hydroxide increases the discharge potential by more than 20 mV, but that with zinc hydroxide results in an obvious decrease of active-material utilization and that with calcium and magnesium hydroxide produces a larger increase of electrode thickness. The effects of anion additives are also examined. Less than 1% mol of NiS in the active material increases the discharge potential. Cadmium, cobalt and zinc hydroxide are excellent additives for preventing swelling of the NCE. Slow voltammetry (0.2 mV s -1) in 6 M KOH is applied to characterize the oxygen-evolving potential of the NCE. The difference between the oxygen-evolution potential and the potential of the oxidation peak for the NCE with additives of calcium, lithium, barium and aluminium hydroxide is at least + 60 mV.

  17. 78 FR 68461 - Guidance for Industry: Studies To Evaluate the Utility of Anti-Salmonella Chemical Food Additives...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... Guidance for Industry: Studies to Evaluate the Utility of Anti-Salmonella Chemical Food Additives in Feeds... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry: Studies To Evaluate the Utility of Anti- Salmonella Chemical Food Additives in Feeds; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and...

  18. Fundamental experiments in velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Matthew Ellsworth; Hull, Larry; Shinas, Michael

    2009-01-01

    One can understand what velocimetry does and does not measure by understanding a few fundamental experiments. Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) is an interferometer that will produce fringe shifts when the length of one of the legs changes, so we might expect the fringes to change whenever the distance from the probe to the target changes. However, by making PDV measurements of tilted moving surfaces, we have shown that fringe shifts from diffuse surfaces are actually measured only from the changes caused by the component of velocity along the beam. This is an important simplification in the interpretation of PDV results, arising because surface roughness randomizes the scattered phases.

  19. Fundamental research data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A fundamental research data base was created on a single 9-track 1600 BPI tape containing ground truth, image, and Badhwar profile feature data for 17 North Dakota, South Dakota, and Minnesota agricultural sites. Each site is 5x6 nm in area. Image data has been provided for a minimum of four acquisition dates for each site. All four images have been registered to one another. A list of the order of the files on tape and the dates of acquisition is provided.

  20. Maltreated children's representations of mother and an additional caregiver: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Manashko, Shany; Besser, Avi; Priel, Beatriz

    2009-04-01

    In the current longitudinal investigation, we explored the continuity of and changes in the mental representations of the mother and an additional caregiver among forty-five 9- to 11-year-old children who had been severely maltreated and subsequently placed in long-term residential care as well as the relationships between the content and structure of these representations and teacher's assessments of the child's externalizing and internalizing symptoms. At Time 1, a nonmaltreated comparison group was assessed concomitantly. Compared to nonmaltreated children, maltreated children scored higher for externalizing and internalizing symptoms, and their maternal representations were found to be significantly less benevolent and integrated and more punitive. In addition, among the maltreated children, the additional caregiver representations were found to be more benevolent and integrated, and less punitive, than the maternal representations. After 30 months, the maltreated children's levels of externalizing and internalizing symptoms diminished, their maternal representations become more benevolent and less punitive, and the additional caregiver representations became less benevolent. Moreover, the Benevolence of the additional caregiver representation was found to predict these children's changes in externalizing symptoms beyond the effects of their symptomatology and its associations with the Benevolence of these representations at Time 1. PMID:19220720

  1. Mechanical characterization of filler sandcretes with rice husk ash additions. Study applied to Senegal

    SciTech Connect

    Cisse, I.K.; Laquerbe, M.

    2000-01-01

    To capitalize on the local materials of Senegal (agricultural and industrial wastes, residual fines from crushing process, sands from dunes, etc.), rise husk ash and residues of industrial and agricultural wastes have been used as additions in sandcretes. The mechanical resistance of sandcrete blocks obtained when unground ash (and notably the ground ash) is added reveals that there is an increase in performance over the classic mortar blocks. In addition, the use of unground rice husk ash enables production of a lightweight sandcrete with insulating properties, at a reduced cost. The ash pozzolanic reactivity explains the high strengths obtained.

  2. Computational study of the rate constants and free energies of intramolecular radical addition to substituted anilines

    PubMed Central

    Seddiqzai, Meriam; Dahmen, Tobias; Sure, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Summary The intramolecular radical addition to aniline derivatives was investigated by DFT calculations. The computational methods were benchmarked by comparing the calculated values of the rate constant for the 5-exo cyclization of the hexenyl radical with the experimental values. The dispersion-corrected PW6B95-D3 functional provided very good results with deviations for the free activation barrier compared to the experimental values of only about 0.5 kcal mol−1 and was therefore employed in further calculations. Corrections for intramolecular London dispersion and solvation effects in the quantum chemical treatment are essential to obtain consistent and accurate theoretical data. For the investigated radical addition reaction it turned out that the polarity of the molecules is important and that a combination of electrophilic radicals with preferably nucleophilic arenes results in the highest rate constants. This is opposite to the Minisci reaction where the radical acts as nucleophile and the arene as electrophile. The substitution at the N-atom of the aniline is crucial. Methyl substitution leads to slower addition than phenyl substitution. Carbamates as substituents are suitable only when the radical center is not too electrophilic. No correlations between free reaction barriers and energies (ΔG ‡ and ΔG R) are found. Addition reactions leading to indanes or dihydrobenzofurans are too slow to be useful synthetically. PMID:24062821

  3. Study on automatic optical element addition or deletion in lens optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xuemin; Wang, Yongtian; Hao, Qun

    2002-09-01

    Two lens form parameters, quantifying the symmetry of the optical system and the optical power distribution among the individual lens elements, are used as the criteria for automatic element addition or deletion in lens optimization. The scheme based on the criteria is described in this paper. Design examples are provided, which demonstrate that the scheme is practicable.

  4. Teaching Young Children Decomposition Strategies to Solve Addition Problems: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Zi-Juan

    2012-01-01

    The ability to count has traditionally been considered an important milestone in children's development of number sense. However, using counting (e.g., counting on, counting all) strategies to solve addition problems is not the best way for children to achieve their full mathematical potential and to prepare them to develop more complex and…

  5. Computational study of the rate constants and free energies of intramolecular radical addition to substituted anilines.

    PubMed

    Gansäuer, Andreas; Seddiqzai, Meriam; Dahmen, Tobias; Sure, Rebecca; Grimme, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The intramolecular radical addition to aniline derivatives was investigated by DFT calculations. The computational methods were benchmarked by comparing the calculated values of the rate constant for the 5-exo cyclization of the hexenyl radical with the experimental values. The dispersion-corrected PW6B95-D3 functional provided very good results with deviations for the free activation barrier compared to the experimental values of only about 0.5 kcal mol(-1) and was therefore employed in further calculations. Corrections for intramolecular London dispersion and solvation effects in the quantum chemical treatment are essential to obtain consistent and accurate theoretical data. For the investigated radical addition reaction it turned out that the polarity of the molecules is important and that a combination of electrophilic radicals with preferably nucleophilic arenes results in the highest rate constants. This is opposite to the Minisci reaction where the radical acts as nucleophile and the arene as electrophile. The substitution at the N-atom of the aniline is crucial. Methyl substitution leads to slower addition than phenyl substitution. Carbamates as substituents are suitable only when the radical center is not too electrophilic. No correlations between free reaction barriers and energies (ΔG (‡) and ΔG R) are found. Addition reactions leading to indanes or dihydrobenzofurans are too slow to be useful synthetically. PMID:24062821

  6. Vector generalized additive models for extreme rainfall data analysis (study case rainfall data in Indramayu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utami, Eka Putri Nur; Wigena, Aji Hamim; Djuraidah, Anik

    2016-02-01

    Rainfall pattern are good indicators for potential disasters. Global Circulation Model (GCM) contains global scale information that can be used to predict the rainfall data. Statistical downscaling (SD) utilizes the global scale information to make inferences in the local scale. Essentially, SD can be used to predict local scale variables based on global scale variables. SD requires a method to accommodate non linear effects and extreme values. Extreme value Theory (EVT) can be used to analyze the extreme value. One of methods to identify the extreme events is peak over threshold that follows Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD). The vector generalized additive model (VGAM) is an extension of the generalized additive model. It is able to accommodate linear or nonlinear effects by involving more than one additive predictors. The advantage of VGAM is to handle multi response models. The key idea of VGAM are iteratively reweighted least square for maximum likelihood estimation, penalized smoothing, fisher scoring and additive models. This works aims to analyze extreme rainfall data in Indramayu using VGAM. The results show that the VGAM with GPD is able to predict extreme rainfall data accurately. The prediction in February is very close to the actual value at quantile 75.

  7. Studies on the Food Additive Propyl Gallate: Synthesis, Structural Characterization, and Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrido, Jorge; Garrido, E. Manuela; Borges, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidants are additives largely used in industry for delaying, retarding, or preventing the development of oxidative deterioration. Propyl gallate (E310) is a phenolic antioxidant extensively used in the food, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. A series of lab experiments have been developed to teach students about the importance and…

  8. Fundamental studies of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, using time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Eades, D.; Wruck, D.; Gregg, H.

    1996-11-11

    MALDI MS was developed as a way of getting molecular weight information on small quantities (picomole to femtomole levels) of high-mass, thermally labile macromolecules. While most other analytical MS ionization techniques cause fragmentation, decomposition, or multiple charging, MALDI efficiently places intact macromolecules into the gas phase with little fragmentation or rearrangement. This project had 3 objectives: establish the MALDI capability at LLNL, perform fundamental studies of analyte-matrix interactions, and apply the technique for biochemical research. A retired time-of-flight instrument was adapted for MALDI analyses, relevant parameters influencing the MALDI process were identified for further study (matrix molar absorptivity, sample crystal preparation), and collaborations were established with research groups in the Biology and Biotechnology Research Program at LLNL. In MALDI, the macromolecule of interest is mixed with a high-molar excess (1:100 to 1:10,000) of an organic matrix which readily absorbs energy at the wavelength corresponding to a UV laser. Upon laser irradiation, the matrix absorbs the majority of the energy, causing it to desorb from the surface and gently release the macromolecule into the gas phase with little or no fragmentation. Once in the gas phase, ion-molecule reactions between excited matrix and neutral macromolecules generated ionized analyte species which then can be focused into a MS for detection.

  9. Fundamental interactions involving neutrons and neutrinos: reactor-based studies led by Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute') [PNPI (NRC KI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A. P.

    2015-11-01

    Neutrons of very low energy ( ˜ 10-7 eV), commonly known as ultracold, are unique in that they can be stored in material and magnetic traps, thus enhancing methodical opportunities to conduct precision experiments and to probe the fundamentals of physics. One of the central problems of physics, of direct relevance to the formation of the Universe, is the violation of time invariance. Experiments searching for the nonzero neutron electric dipole moment serve as a time invariance test, and the use of ultracold neutrons provides very high measurement precision. Precision neutron lifetime measurements using ultracold neutrons are extremely important for checking ideas on the early formation of the Universe. This paper discusses problems that arise in studies using ultracold neutrons. Also discussed are the currently highly topical problem of sterile neutrinos and the search for reactor antineutrino oscillations at distances of 6-12 meters from the reactor core. The field reviewed is being investigated at multiple facilities globally. The present paper mainly concentrates on the results of PNPI-led studies at WWR-M PNPI (Gatchina), ILL (Grenoble), and SM-3 (Dimitrovgrad) reactors, and also covers the results obtained during preparation for research at the PIK reactor which is under construction.

  10. FINAL REPORT. MICELLE FORMATION AND SURFACE INTERACTIONS IN SUPERCRITICAL CO2: FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES FOR THE EXTRACTION OF ACTINIDES FROM CONTAMINATED SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this research was to build the fundamental understanding of microemulsion formation and mobility in supercritical CO2 necessary to develop an innovative extraction system for selectively removing metals (actinides) from contaminated surfaces. Supercritical CO2 has man...

  11. A laboratory study of the perceived benefit of additional noise attenuation by houses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flindell, I. H.

    1983-01-01

    Two Experiments were conducted to investigate the perceived benefit of additional house attenuation against aircraft flyover noise. First, subjects made annoyance judgments in a simulated living room while an operative window with real and dummy storm windows was manipulated in full view of those subjects. Second, subjects made annoyance judgments in an anechoic audiometric test chamber of frequency shaped noise signals having spectra closely matched to those of the aircraft flyover noises reproduced in the first experiment. These stimuli represented the aircraft flyover noises in levels and spectra but without the situational and visual cues present in the simulated living room. Perceptual constancy theory implies that annoyance tends to remain constant despite reductions in noise level caused by additional attenuation of which the subjects are fully aware. This theory was supported when account was taken for a reported annoyance overestimation for certain spectra and for a simulated condition cue overreaction.

  12. Enhanced flux pinning in MOCVD-YBCO films through Zr-additions:Systematic feasibility studies

    SciTech Connect

    Aytug, Tolga; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Specht, Eliot D; Kim, Kyunghoon; Zhang, Yifei; Cantoni, Claudia; Zuev, Yuri L; Goyal, Amit; Christen, David K; Maroni, Victor A.

    2009-01-01

    Systematic effects of Zr additions on the structural and flux pinning properties of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) films deposited by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) have been investigated. Detailed characterization, conducted by coordinated transport, x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy analyses, and imaging Raman microscopy have revealed trends in the resulting property/performance correlations of these films with respect to varying mole percentages (mol%) of added Zr. For compositions {le} 7.5 mol%, Zr additions lead to improved in-field critical current density, as well as extra correlated pinning along the c-axis direction of the YBCO films via the formation of columnar, self-assembled stacks of BaZrO{sub 3} nanodots.

  13. Enhanced flux pinning in MOCVD-YBCO films through Zr additions : systematic feasibility studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Aytug, T.; Paranthaman, M.; Specht, E. D.; Zhang, Y.; Kim, K.; Zuev, Y. L.; Cantoni, C.; Goyal, A.; Christen, D. K.; Maroni, V. A.; Chen, Y.; Selvamanickam, V.; ORNL; SuperPower, Inc.

    2010-01-01

    Systematic effects of Zr additions on the structural and flux pinning properties of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) films deposited by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) have been investigated. Detailed characterization, conducted by coordinated transport, x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy analyses, and imaging Raman microscopy have revealed trends in the resulting property/performance correlations of these films with respect to varying mole percentages (mol%) of added Zr. For compositions {le} 7.5 mol%, Zr additions lead to improved in-field critical current density, as well as extra correlated pinning along the c-axis direction of the YBCO films via the formation of columnar, self-assembled stacks of BaZrO{sub 3} nanodots.

  14. Indolyne Experimental and Computational Studies: Synthetic Applications and Origins of Selectivities of Nucleophilic Additions

    PubMed Central

    Im, G-Yoon J.; Bronner, Sarah M.; Goetz, Adam E.; Paton, Robert S.; Cheong, Paul H.-Y.; Houk, K. N.; Garg, Neil K.

    2010-01-01

    Efficient syntheses of 4,5-, 5,6-, and 6,7-indolyne precursors beginning from commercially available hydroxyindole derivatives are reported. The synthetic routes are versatile and allow access to indolyne precursors that remain unsubstituted on the pyrrole ring. Indolynes can be generated under mild fluoride-mediated conditions, trapped by a variety of nucleophilic reagents, and used to access a number of novel substituted indoles. Nucleophilic addition reactions to indolynes proceed with varying degrees of regioselectivity; distortion energies control regioselectivity and provide a simple model to predict the regioselectivity in the nucleophilic additions to indolynes and other unsymmetrical arynes. This model has led to the design of a substituted 4,5-indolyne that exhibits enhanced nucleophilic regioselectivity. PMID:21114321

  15. Structural changes in gluten protein structure after addition of emulsifier. A Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Evelina G.; Gómez, Analía V.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2011-06-01

    Food protein product, gluten protein, was chemically modified by varying levels of sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL); and the extent of modifications (secondary and tertiary structures) of this protein was analyzed by using Raman spectroscopy. Analysis of the Amide I band showed an increase in its intensity mainly after the addition of the 0.25% of SSL to wheat flour to produced modified gluten protein, pointing the formation of a more ordered structure. Side chain vibrations also confirmed the observed changes.

  16. A design study for the addition of higher order parametric discrete elements to NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, E. L.

    1972-01-01

    The addition of discrete elements to NASTRAN poses significant interface problems with the level 15.1 assembly modules and geometry modules. Potential problems in designing new modules for higher-order parametric discrete elements are reviewed in both areas. An assembly procedure is suggested that separates grid point degrees of freedom on the basis of admissibility. New geometric input data are described that facilitate the definition of surfaces in parametric space.

  17. Magnetic Force Microscopy Study of Zr2Co11 -Based Nanocrystalline Materials: Effect of Mo Addition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Lanping; Jin, Yunlong; Zhang, Wenyong; Sellmyer, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Tmore » he addition of Molybdenum was used to modify the nanostructure and enhance coercivity of rare-earth-free Zr2Co11-based nanocrystalline permanent magnets. he effect of Mo addition on magnetic domain structures of melt spun nanocrystalline Zr16Co84-xMox(x=0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2.0) ribbons has been investigated. It was found that magnetic properties and local domain structures are strongly influenced by Mo doping. he coercivity of the samples increases with the increase in Mo content (x≤1.5). he maximum energy product(BH)maxincreases with increasingxfrom 0.5 MGOe forx=0to a maximum value of 4.2 MGOe forx=1.5. he smallest domain size with a relatively short magnetic correlation length of 128 nm and largest root-mean-square phase shiftΦrmsvalue of 0.66° are observed for thex=1.5. he optimal Mo addition promotes magnetic domain structure refinement and thus leads to a significant increase in coercivity and energy product in this sample.« less

  18. Parameters and pitfalls to consider in the conduct of food additive research, Carrageenan as a case study.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Myra L

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides guidance on the conduct of new in vivo and in vitro studies on high molecular weight food additives, with carrageenan, the widely used food additive, as a case study. It is important to understand the physical/chemical properties and to verify the identity/purity, molecular weight and homogeneity/stability of the additive in the vehicle for oral delivery. The strong binding of CGN to protein in rodent chow or infant formula results in no gastrointestinal tract exposure to free CGN. It is recommended that doses of high Mw non-caloric, non-nutritive additives not exceed 5% by weight of total solid diet to avoid potential nutritional effects. Addition of some high Mw additives at high concentrations to liquid nutritional supplements increases viscosity and may affect palatability, caloric intake and body weight gain. In in vitro studies, the use of well-characterized, relevant cell types and the appropriate composition of the culture media are necessary for proper conduct and interpretation. CGN is bound to media protein and not freely accessible to cells in vitro. Interpretation of new studies on food additives should consider the interaction of food additives with the vehicle components and the appropriateness of the animal or cell model and dose-response. PMID:26615870

  19. Wall of fundamental constants

    SciTech Connect

    Olive, Keith A.; Peloso, Marco; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2011-02-15

    We consider the signatures of a domain wall produced in the spontaneous symmetry breaking involving a dilatonlike scalar field coupled to electromagnetism. Domains on either side of the wall exhibit slight differences in their respective values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}. If such a wall is present within our Hubble volume, absorption spectra at large redshifts may or may not provide a variation in {alpha} relative to the terrestrial value, depending on our relative position with respect to the wall. This wall could resolve the contradiction between claims of a variation of {alpha} based on Keck/Hires data and of the constancy of {alpha} based on Very Large Telescope data. We derive the properties of the wall and the parameters of the underlying microscopic model required to reproduce the possible spatial variation of {alpha}. We discuss the constraints on the existence of the low-energy domain wall and describe its observational implications concerning the variation of the fundamental constants.

  20. Fundamentals in Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basdevant, Jean-Louis, Rich, James, Spiro, Michael

    This course on nuclear physics leads the reader to the exploration of the field from nuclei to astrophysical issues. Much nuclear phenomenology can be understood from simple arguments such as those based on the Pauli principle and the Coulomb barrier. This book is concerned with extrapolating from such arguments and illustrating nuclear systematics with experimental data. Starting with the basic concepts in nuclear physics, nuclear models, and reactions, the book covers nuclear decays and the fundamental electro-weak interactions, radioactivity, and nuclear energy. After the discussions of fission and fusion leading into nuclear astrophysics, there is a presentation of the latest ideas about cosmology. As a primer this course will lay the foundations for more specialized subjects. This book emerged from a series of topical courses the authors delivered at the Ecole Polytechnique and will be useful for graduate students and for scientists in a variety of fields.