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Sample records for addition haplotype analysis

  1. General Framework for Meta-Analysis of Haplotype Association Tests.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Jing Hua; An, Ping; Guo, Xiuqing; Jensen, Richard A; Marten, Jonathan; Huffman, Jennifer E; Meidtner, Karina; Boeing, Heiner; Campbell, Archie; Rice, Kenneth M; Scott, Robert A; Yao, Jie; Schulze, Matthias B; Wareham, Nicholas J; Borecki, Ingrid B; Province, Michael A; Rotter, Jerome I; Hayward, Caroline; Goodarzi, Mark O; Meigs, James B; Dupuis, Josée

    2016-04-01

    For complex traits, most associated single nucleotide variants (SNV) discovered to date have a small effect, and detection of association is only possible with large sample sizes. Because of patient confidentiality concerns, it is often not possible to pool genetic data from multiple cohorts, and meta-analysis has emerged as the method of choice to combine results from multiple studies. Many meta-analysis methods are available for single SNV analyses. As new approaches allow the capture of low frequency and rare genetic variation, it is of interest to jointly consider multiple variants to improve power. However, for the analysis of haplotypes formed by multiple SNVs, meta-analysis remains a challenge, because different haplotypes may be observed across studies. We propose a two-stage meta-analysis approach to combine haplotype analysis results. In the first stage, each cohort estimate haplotype effect sizes in a regression framework, accounting for relatedness among observations if appropriate. For the second stage, we use a multivariate generalized least square meta-analysis approach to combine haplotype effect estimates from multiple cohorts. Haplotype-specific association tests and a global test of independence between haplotypes and traits are obtained within our framework. We demonstrate through simulation studies that we control the type-I error rate, and our approach is more powerful than inverse variance weighted meta-analysis of single SNV analysis when haplotype effects are present. We replicate a published haplotype association between fasting glucose-associated locus (G6PC2) and fasting glucose in seven studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium and we provide more precise haplotype effect estimates. PMID:27027517

  2. A haplotypic approach to founder-origin probabilities and outbred QTL analysis.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Valdès, M Humberto; Williams, Claire G

    2002-12-01

    Founder-origin probability methods are used to trace specific chromosomal segments in individual offspring. A haplotypic method was developed for calculating founder-origin probabilities in three-generation outbred pedigrees suited to quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. Estimators for expected founder-origin proportions were derived for a linkage group segment, an entire linkage group and a complete haplotype. If the founders are truly outbred, the haplotypic method gives a close approximation when compared with the Haley et al. (1994) method that simultaneously uses all marker information for QTL analysis, and it is less computationally demanding. The chief limitation of the haplotypic method is that some information in two-allele intercross marker-type configurations is ignored. Informativeness of marker arrays is discussed in the framework of founder-origin probabilities and proportions. The haplotypic method can be extended to more complex pedigrees with additional generations. PMID:12688662

  3. General Framework for Meta‐Analysis of Haplotype Association Tests

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Jing Hua; An, Ping; Guo, Xiuqing; Jensen, Richard A.; Marten, Jonathan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Meidtner, Karina; Boeing, Heiner; Campbell, Archie; Rice, Kenneth M.; Scott, Robert A.; Yao, Jie; Schulze, Matthias B.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Province, Michael A.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Hayward, Caroline; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Meigs, James B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT For complex traits, most associated single nucleotide variants (SNV) discovered to date have a small effect, and detection of association is only possible with large sample sizes. Because of patient confidentiality concerns, it is often not possible to pool genetic data from multiple cohorts, and meta‐analysis has emerged as the method of choice to combine results from multiple studies. Many meta‐analysis methods are available for single SNV analyses. As new approaches allow the capture of low frequency and rare genetic variation, it is of interest to jointly consider multiple variants to improve power. However, for the analysis of haplotypes formed by multiple SNVs, meta‐analysis remains a challenge, because different haplotypes may be observed across studies. We propose a two‐stage meta‐analysis approach to combine haplotype analysis results. In the first stage, each cohort estimate haplotype effect sizes in a regression framework, accounting for relatedness among observations if appropriate. For the second stage, we use a multivariate generalized least square meta‐analysis approach to combine haplotype effect estimates from multiple cohorts. Haplotype‐specific association tests and a global test of independence between haplotypes and traits are obtained within our framework. We demonstrate through simulation studies that we control the type‐I error rate, and our approach is more powerful than inverse variance weighted meta‐analysis of single SNV analysis when haplotype effects are present. We replicate a published haplotype association between fasting glucose‐associated locus (G6PC2) and fasting glucose in seven studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium and we provide more precise haplotype effect estimates. PMID:27027517

  4. Mitochondrial haplotype analysis for differentiation of isolates of Phytophthora cinnamomi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While Phytophthora cinnamomi is heterothallic, there are few instances of successful crossing in laboratory experiments and analysis of field populations indicates a clonally reproducing population. In the absence of sexual recombination the ability to monitor mitochondrial haplotypes may provide a...

  5. [Analysis of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in yakut population].

    PubMed

    Fedorova, S A; Bermisheva, M A; Villems, R; Maksimova, N R; Khusnutdinova, E K

    2003-01-01

    To study the mitochondrial gene pool structure in Yakuts, polymorphism of mtDNA hypervariable segment I (16,024-16,390) was analyzed in 191 people sampled from the indigenous population of the Sakha Republic. In total, 67 haplotypes of 14 haplogroups were detected. Most (91.6%) haplotypes belonged to haplogroups A, B, C, D, F, G, M*, and Y, which are specific for East Eurasian ethnic groups; 8.4% haplotypes represented Caucasian haplogroups H, HV1, J, T, U, and W. A high frequency of mtDNA types belonging to Asian supercluster M was peculiar for Yakuts: mtDNA types belonging to haplogroup C, D, or G and undifferentiated mtDNA types of haplogroup M (M*) accounted for 81% of all haplotypes. The highest diversity was observed for haplogroups C and D, which comprised respectively 22 (44%) and 18 (30%) haplotypes. Yakuts showed the lowest genetic diversity (H = 0.964) among all Turkic ethnic groups. Phylogenetic analysis testified to a common genetic substrate of Yakuts, Mongols, and Central Asian (Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Uigur) populations. Yakuts proved to share 21 (55.5%) mtDNA haplogroups with the Central Asian ethnic groups and Mongols. Comparisons with modern paleo-Asian populations (Chukcha, Itelmen, Koryaks) revealed three (8.9%) haplotypes common for Yakuts and Koryaks. The results of mtDNA analysis disagree with the hypothesis of an appreciable paleo-Asian contribution to the modern Yakut gene pool. PMID:12942638

  6. Sequence-Level Analysis of the Major European Huntington Disease Haplotype

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Shin, Aram; Chao, Michael J.; Abu Elneel, Kawther; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi Srinidhi; Kaye, Julia A.; Zahed, Hengameh; Kratter, Ian H.; Daub, Aaron C.; Finkbeiner, Steven; Li, Hong; Roach, Jared C.; Goodman, Nathan; Hood, Leroy; Myers, Richard H.; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Gusella, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) reflects the dominant consequences of a CAG-repeat expansion in HTT. Analysis of common SNP-based haplotypes has revealed that most European HD subjects have distinguishable HTT haplotypes on their normal and disease chromosomes and that ∼50% of the latter share the same major HD haplotype. We reasoned that sequence-level investigation of this founder haplotype could provide significant insights into the history of HD and valuable information for gene-targeting approaches. Consequently, we performed whole-genome sequencing of HD and control subjects from four independent families in whom the major European HD haplotype segregates with the disease. Analysis of the full-sequence-based HTT haplotype indicated that these four families share a common ancestor sufficiently distant to have permitted the accumulation of family-specific variants. Confirmation of new CAG-expansion mutations on this haplotype suggests that unlike most founders of human disease, the common ancestor of HD-affected families with the major haplotype most likely did not have HD. Further, availability of the full sequence data validated the use of SNP imputation to predict the optimal variants for capturing heterozygosity in personalized allele-specific gene-silencing approaches. As few as ten SNPs are capable of revealing heterozygosity in more than 97% of European HD subjects. Extension of allele-specific silencing strategies to the few remaining homozygous individuals is likely to be achievable through additional known SNPs and discovery of private variants by complete sequencing of HTT. These data suggest that the current development of gene-based targeting for HD could be extended to personalized allele-specific approaches in essentially all HD individuals of European ancestry. PMID:26320893

  7. Sequence-Level Analysis of the Major European Huntington Disease Haplotype.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Shin, Aram; Chao, Michael J; Abu Elneel, Kawther; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi Srinidhi; Kaye, Julia A; Zahed, Hengameh; Kratter, Ian H; Daub, Aaron C; Finkbeiner, Steven; Li, Hong; Roach, Jared C; Goodman, Nathan; Hood, Leroy; Myers, Richard H; MacDonald, Marcy E; Gusella, James F

    2015-09-01

    Huntington disease (HD) reflects the dominant consequences of a CAG-repeat expansion in HTT. Analysis of common SNP-based haplotypes has revealed that most European HD subjects have distinguishable HTT haplotypes on their normal and disease chromosomes and that ∼50% of the latter share the same major HD haplotype. We reasoned that sequence-level investigation of this founder haplotype could provide significant insights into the history of HD and valuable information for gene-targeting approaches. Consequently, we performed whole-genome sequencing of HD and control subjects from four independent families in whom the major European HD haplotype segregates with the disease. Analysis of the full-sequence-based HTT haplotype indicated that these four families share a common ancestor sufficiently distant to have permitted the accumulation of family-specific variants. Confirmation of new CAG-expansion mutations on this haplotype suggests that unlike most founders of human disease, the common ancestor of HD-affected families with the major haplotype most likely did not have HD. Further, availability of the full sequence data validated the use of SNP imputation to predict the optimal variants for capturing heterozygosity in personalized allele-specific gene-silencing approaches. As few as ten SNPs are capable of revealing heterozygosity in more than 97% of European HD subjects. Extension of allele-specific silencing strategies to the few remaining homozygous individuals is likely to be achievable through additional known SNPs and discovery of private variants by complete sequencing of HTT. These data suggest that the current development of gene-based targeting for HD could be extended to personalized allele-specific approaches in essentially all HD individuals of European ancestry. PMID:26320893

  8. Sibship analysis of associations between SNP haplotypes and a continuous trait with application to mammographic density.

    PubMed

    Stone, J; Gurrin, L C; Hayes, V M; Southey, M C; Hopper, J L; Byrnes, G B

    2010-05-01

    Haplotype-based association studies have been proposed as a powerful comprehensive approach to identify causal genetic variation underlying complex diseases. Data comparisons within families offer the additional advantage of dealing naturally with complex sources of noise, confounding and population stratification. Two problems encountered when investigating associations between haplotypes and a continuous trait using data from sibships are (i) the need to define within-sibship comparisons for sibships of size greater than two and (ii) the difficulty of resolving the joint distribution of haplotype pairs within sibships in the absence of parental genotypes. We therefore propose first a method of orthogonal transformation of both outcomes and exposures that allow the decomposition of between- and within-sibship regression effects when sibship size is greater than two. We conducted a simulation study, which confirmed analysis using all members of a sibship is statistically more powerful than methods based on cross-sectional analysis or using subsets of sib-pairs. Second, we propose a simple permutation approach to avoid errors of inference due to the within-sibship correlation of any errors in haplotype assignment. These methods were applied to investigate the association between mammographic density (MD), a continuously distributed and heritable risk factor for breast cancer, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes from the VDR gene using data from a study of 430 twins and sisters. We found evidence of association between MD and a 4-SNP VDR haplotype. In conclusion, our proposed method retains the benefits of the between- and within-pair analysis for pairs of siblings and can be implemented in standard software. PMID:19918759

  9. Genetic analysis of Iranian autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: new insight to haplotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Entezam, M; Khatami, M R; Saddadi, F; Ayati, M; Roozbeh, J; Saghafi, H; Keramatipour, M

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) caused by mutations in two PKD1 and PKD2 genes. Due to the complexity of the PKD1 gene, its direct mutation screening is an expensive and time-consuming procedure. Pedigree-based haplotype analysis is a useful indirect approach to identify the responsible gene in families with multiple affected individuals, before direct mutation analysis. Here, we applied this approach to investigate 15 appropriate unrelated ADPKD families, selected from 25 families, who referred for genetic counseling. Four polymorphic microsatellite markers were selected around each PKD1 and PKD2 loci. In addition, by investigating the genomic regions, two novel flanking tetranucleotide STR markers were identified. Haplotype analysis and calculating Lod score confirmed linkage to PKD1 in 9 families (60%) and to PKD2 in 2 families (13%). Linkage to both loci was excluded in one family (6.6%). In 2 families (13%) the Lod scores were inconclusive. Causative mutation was identified successfully by direct analysis in two families with confirmed linkage, one to PKD1 and another to PKD2 locus. The study showed that determining the causative locus prior to direct mutation analysis is an efficient strategy to reduce the resources required for genetic analysis of ADPKD families. This is more prominent in PKD2-linked families. Selection of suitable markers, and appropriate PCR multiplexing strategy, using fluorescent labeled primers and 3 primer system, will also add value to this approach. PMID:26950445

  10. Analysis of 22 Y chromosomal STR haplotypes and Y haplogroup distribution in Pathans of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Young; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Rakha, Allah; Sim, Jeong Eun; Park, Myung Jin; Kim, Na Young; Yang, Woo Ick; Lee, Hwan Young

    2014-07-01

    We analyzed haplotypes for 22 Y chromosomal STRs (Y-STRs), including 17 Yfiler loci (DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DY438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and Y-GATA-H4) and five additional STRs (DYS388, DYS446, DYS447, DYS449 and DYS464), and Y chromosomal haplogroup distribution in 270 unrelated individuals from the Pathans residing in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas and the North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan using in-house multiplex PCR systems. Each Y-STR showed diversities ranging from 0.2506 to 0.8538, and the discriminatory capacity (DC) was 73.7% with 199 observed haplotypes using 17 Yfiler loci. By the addition of 5 Y-STRs to the Yfiler system, the DC was increased to 85.2% while showing 230 observed haplotypes. Among the additional 5 Y-STRs, DYS446, DYS447 and DYS449 were major contributors to enhancing discrimination. In the analysis of molecular variance, the Pathans of this study showed significant differences from other Pathan populations as well as neighboring population sets. In Y-SNP analysis, a total of 12 Y chromosomal haplogroups were observed and the most frequent haplogroup was R1a1a with 49.3% frequency. To obtain insights on the origin of Pathans, the network analysis was performed for the haplogroups G and Q observed from the Pathans and the Jewish population groups including Ashkenazim and Sephardim, but little support for a Jewish origin could be found. In the present study, we report Y-STR population data in Pathans of Pakistan, and we emphasize the need for adding additional markers to the commonly used 17 Yfiler loci to achieve more improved discriminatory capacity in a population with low genetic diversity. PMID:24709582

  11. An Extensive Analysis of Y-Chromosomal Microsatellite Haplotypes in Globally Dispersed Human Populations

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Manfred; Krawczak, Michael; Excoffier, Laurent; Dieltjes, Patrick; Corach, Daniel; Pascali, Vincente; Gehrig, Christian; Bernini, Luigi F.; Jespersen, Jørgen; Bakker, Egbert; Roewer, Lutz; de Knijff, Peter

    2001-01-01

    The genetic variance at seven Y-chromosomal microsatellite loci (or short tandem repeats [STRs]) was studied among 986 male individuals from 20 globally dispersed human populations. A total of 598 different haplotypes were observed, of which 437 (73.1%) were each found in a single male only. Population-specific haplotype-diversity values were .86–.99. Analyses of haplotype diversity and population-specific haplotypes revealed marked population-structure differences between more-isolated indigenous populations (e.g., Central African Pygmies or Greenland Inuit) and more-admixed populations (e.g., Europeans or Surinamese). Furthermore, male individuals from isolated indigenous populations shared haplotypes mainly with male individuals from their own population. By analysis of molecular variance, we found that 76.8% of the total genetic variance present among these male individuals could be attributed to genetic differences between male individuals who were members of the same population. Haplotype sharing between populations, ΦST statistics, and phylogenetic analysis identified close genetic affinities among European populations and among New Guinean populations. Our data illustrate that Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes are an ideal tool for the study of the genetic affinities between groups of male subjects and for detection of population structure. PMID:11254455

  12. Analysis of Swine Leukocyte Antigen Haplotypes in Yucatan Miniature Pigs Used as Biomedical Model Animal.

    PubMed

    Choi, Nu-Ri; Seo, Dong-Won; Choi, Ki-Myung; Ko, Na-Young; Kim, Ji-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Il; Jung, Woo-Young; Lee, Jun-Heon

    2016-03-01

    The porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is called swine leukocyte antigen (SLA), which controls immune responses and transplantation reactions. The SLA is mapped on pig chromosome 7 (SSC7) near the centromere. In this study, 3 class I (SLA-1, SLA-3, and SLA-2) and 3 class II (DRB1, DQB1, and DQA) genes were used for investigation of SLA haplotypes in Yucatan miniature pigs in Korea. This pig breed is a well-known model organism for biomedical research worldwide. The current study indicated that Korean Yucatan pig population had 3 Class I haplotypes (Lr-4.0, Lr-6.0, and Lr-25.0) and 3 class II haplotypes (Lr-0.5, Lr-0.7, and Lr-0.25). The combinations of SLA class I and II haplotype together, 2 homozygous (Lr-4.5/4.5 and Lr-6.7/6.7) and 3 heterozygous (Lr-4.5/6.7, Lr-4.5/25.25, and Lr-6.7/25.25) haplotypes were identified, including previously unidentified new heterozygous haplotypes (Lr-4.5/4.7). In addition, a new SLA allele typing method using Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer was developed that permitted more rapid identification of SLA haplotypes. These results will facilitate the breeding of SLA homozygous Yucatan pigs and will expedite the possible use of these pigs for the biomedical research, especially xenotransplantation research. PMID:26950861

  13. Analysis of Swine Leukocyte Antigen Haplotypes in Yucatan Miniature Pigs Used as Biomedical Model Animal

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Nu-Ri; Seo, Dong-Won; Choi, Ki-Myung; Ko, Na-Young; Kim, Ji-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Il; Jung, Woo-Young; Lee, Jun-Heon

    2016-01-01

    The porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is called swine leukocyte antigen (SLA), which controls immune responses and transplantation reactions. The SLA is mapped on pig chromosome 7 (SSC7) near the centromere. In this study, 3 class I (SLA-1, SLA-3, and SLA-2) and 3 class II (DRB1, DQB1, and DQA) genes were used for investigation of SLA haplotypes in Yucatan miniature pigs in Korea. This pig breed is a well-known model organism for biomedical research worldwide. The current study indicated that Korean Yucatan pig population had 3 Class I haplotypes (Lr-4.0, Lr-6.0, and Lr-25.0) and 3 class II haplotypes (Lr-0.5, Lr-0.7, and Lr-0.25). The combinations of SLA class I and II haplotype together, 2 homozygous (Lr-4.5/4.5 and Lr-6.7/6.7) and 3 heterozygous (Lr-4.5/6.7, Lr-4.5/25.25, and Lr-6.7/25.25) haplotypes were identified, including previously unidentified new heterozygous haplotypes (Lr-4.5/4.7). In addition, a new SLA allele typing method using Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer was developed that permitted more rapid identification of SLA haplotypes. These results will facilitate the breeding of SLA homozygous Yucatan pigs and will expedite the possible use of these pigs for the biomedical research, especially xenotransplantation research. PMID:26950861

  14. Highly informative Y-chromosomal haplotypes by the addition of three new STRs DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439.

    PubMed

    Grignani, P; Peloso, G; Fattorini, P; Previderè, C

    2000-01-01

    The Y chromosome STRs DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439 were selected from publicly available genome databases and used to analyse an Italian population sample. A tetraplex PCR reaction including the highly informative DYS385 locus, was set up and used for the analysis of 131 male samples to determine allele frequencies and STR diversity values. The number of different haplotypes and the haplotype diversity value found from the analysis of the STRs included in the tetraplex reaction were very similar to those found from the analysis of the basic set of 7 Y-STRs (DYS19, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392 and DYS393) previously carried out on the same population sample. By combining the allelic states of the 11 Y-chromosomal STRs we could construct highly informative haplotypes that allowed the discrimination of 93.8% (120 out of 128) of the samples tested. This approach represents a very powerful tool for individual identification and paternity testing in forensic medicine. PMID:11197619

  15. Integrative analysis of haplotype-resolved epigenomes across human tissues.

    PubMed

    Leung, Danny; Jung, Inkyung; Rajagopal, Nisha; Schmitt, Anthony; Selvaraj, Siddarth; Lee, Ah Young; Yen, Chia-An; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Qiu, Yunjiang; Xie, Wei; Yue, Feng; Hariharan, Manoj; Ray, Pradipta; Kuan, Samantha; Edsall, Lee; Yang, Hongbo; Chi, Neil C; Zhang, Michael Q; Ecker, Joseph R; Ren, Bing

    2015-02-19

    Allelic differences between the two homologous chromosomes can affect the propensity of inheritance in humans; however, the extent of such differences in the human genome has yet to be fully explored. Here we delineate allelic chromatin modifications and transcriptomes among a broad set of human tissues, enabled by a chromosome-spanning haplotype reconstruction strategy. The resulting large collection of haplotype-resolved epigenomic maps reveals extensive allelic biases in both chromatin state and transcription, which show considerable variation across tissues and between individuals, and allow us to investigate cis-regulatory relationships between genes and their control sequences. Analyses of histone modification maps also uncover intriguing characteristics of cis-regulatory elements and tissue-restricted activities of repetitive elements. The rich data sets described here will enhance our understanding of the mechanisms by which cis-regulatory elements control gene expression programs. PMID:25693566

  16. Integrative analysis of haplotype-resolved epigenomes across human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Anthony; Selvaraj, Siddarth; Lee, Ah Young; Yen, Chia-An; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Qiu, Yunjiang; Xie, Wei; Yue, Feng; Hariharan, Manoj; Ray, Pradipta; Kuan, Samantha; Edsall, Lee; Yang, Hongbo; Chi, Neil C.; Zhang, Michael Q.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Ren, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Allelic differences between the two homologous chromosomes can affect the propensity of inheritance in humans; however, the extent of such differences in the human genome has yet to be fully explored. Here, for the first time, we delineate allelic chromatin modifications and transcriptomes amongst a broad set of human tissues, enabled by a chromosome-spanning haplotype reconstruction strategy1. The resulting masses of haplotype-resolved epigenomic maps reveal extensive allelic biases in both chromatin state and transcription, which show considerable variation across tissues and between individuals, and allow us to investigate cis-regulatory relationships between genes and their control sequences. Analyses of histone modification maps also uncover intriguing characteristics of cis-regulatory elements and tissue-restricted activities of repetitive elements. The rich datasets described here will enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of how cis-regulatory elements control gene expression programs. PMID:25693566

  17. Haplotype analysis of the COMT-ARVCF gene region in Israeli anorexia nervosa family trios.

    PubMed

    Michaelovsky, Elena; Frisch, Amos; Leor, Shani; Stein, Daniel; Danziger, Yardena; Carel, Cynthia; Fennig, Silvana; Mimouni, Marc; Klauck, Sabine M; Benner, Axel; Poustka, Annemarie; Apter, Alan; Weizman, Abraham

    2005-11-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe and complex psychiatric disorder with a significant genetic contribution. Previously, we found an association between AN and the 158Val/Met polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene in a family-based study of 51 Israeli AN trios. In the present study, we extended the original sample to include 85 family trios [66 AN restricting (AN-R) and 19 bingeing/purging (AN-BP) subtype] and performed a family-based transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) analysis for five SNPs in the COMT and two in the adjacent ARVCF gene. Association was found between AN-R and several SNPs in the COMT-ARVCF region including the 158Val/Met polymorphism. TDT analysis of 5-SNP haplotypes in AN-R trios revealed an overall statistically significant transmission disequilibrium (P < 0.001). Specifically, haplotype B [COMT-186C-408G-472G(158Val)-ARVCF-659C(220Pro)-524T(175Val)] was preferentially transmitted (P < 0.001) from parents of AN-R patients to their affected daughters, while haplotype A [COMT-186T-408C-472A(158Met)-ARVCF-659T(220Leu)-524C(175Ala)] was preferentially (P = 0.01) not transmitted. Haplotype B was associated with increased risk (RR 3.38; 0.95CI 1.98-6.43) while haplotype A exhibited a protective effect (RR 0.40; 0.95CI 0.21-0.70) for AN-R. Preferential transmission of the risk alleles and haplotypes from the parents was mostly contributed by the fathers. No significant transmission disequilibrium of alleles or haplotypes was found for AN-BP trios. The risk and protective haplotypes may carry molecular variations in the COMT gene or its vicinity that are relevant to the pathophysiology of restrictive anorexia nervosa in the Israeli-Jewish population. PMID:16118784

  18. Linkage disequilibrium and haplotype analysis among Polish families with spinal muscular atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Brzustowicz, L.M.; Wang, C.H.; Matseoane, D.; Kleyn, P.W.; Vitale, E.; Das, K.; Penchaszadeh, G.K.; Gilliam, T.C.; Munsat, T.L.; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, I.

    1995-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited degenerative disorder of anterior horn cells that results in progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. The autosomal recessive forms of childhood-onset SMA have been mapped to chromosome 5q11.2-13.3, in a number of studies examining different populations. A total of 9 simple sequence repeat markers were genotyped against 32 Polish families with SMA. The markers span an {approximately}0.7 cM region defined by the SMA flanking markers D5S435 and MAP1B. Significant linkage disequilibrium (corrected P<0.5) was detected at four of these markers, with D/D{sub max} values of {le}.89. Extended haplotype analysis revealed a predominant haplotype associated with SMA. The apparently high mutation rate of some of the markers has resulted in a number of haplotypes that vary slightly from this predominant haplotype. The predominant haplotype and these closely related patterns represent 25% of the disease chromosomes and none of the nontransmitted parental chromosomes. This predominant haplotype is present both in patients with acute (type I) and in chronic (types II and III) forms of SMA and occurs twice in a homozygous state, both times in children with chronic SMA. 34 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Fetal male lineage determination by analysis of Y-chromosome STR haplotype in maternal plasma.

    PubMed

    Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; Santa Rita, Ticiane Henriques; Chianca, Camilla Figueiredo; Velasco, Lara Francielle Ribeiro; de Sousa, Claudia Ferreira; Nery, Lídia Freire Abdalla; Costa, Sandra Santana Soares

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the fetus Y-STR haplotype in maternal plasma during pregnancy and estimate, non-invasively, if the alleged father and fetus belong to the same male lineage. The study enrolled couples with singleton pregnancies and known paternity. All participants signed informed consent and the local ethics committee approved the study. Peripheral blood was collected in EDTA tubes (mother) and in FTA paper (father). Maternal plasma DNA was extracted by using NucliSens EasyMAG. Fetal gender was determined by qPCR targeting DYS-14 in maternal plasma and it was also confirmed after the delivery. From all included volunteers, the first consecutive 20 mothers bearing male fetuses and 10 mothers bearing female fetuses were selected for the Y-STR analysis. The median gestational age was 12 weeks (range 12-36). All DNA samples were subjected to PCR amplification by PowerPlex Y23, ampFLSTR Yfiler, and two in-house multiplexes, which together accounts for 27 different Y-STR. The PCR products were detected with 3500 Genetic Analyzer and they were analyzed using GeneMapper-IDX. Fetuses' haplotypes (Yfiler format) were compared to other 5328 Brazilian haplotypes available on Y-chromosome haplotypes reference database (YHRD). As a result, between 22 and 27 loci were successfully amplified from maternal plasma in all 20 cases of male fetuses. None of the women bearing female fetuses had a falsely amplified Y-STR haplotype. The haplotype detected in maternal plasma completely matched the alleged father haplotype in 16 out of the 20 cases. Four cases showed single mismatches and they did not configure exclusions; 1 case showed a mutation in the DYS 458 locus due to the loss of one repeat unit and 3 cases showed one DYS 385I/II locus dropout. All mismatches were confirmed after the delivery. Seventeen fetuses' haplotypes were not found in YHRD and one of them had a mutation, which corresponded to the paternity probability of 99.9812% and 95.7028%, respectively

  20. Haplotype Analysis of Hemochromatosis Gene Polymorphisms in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gerayli, Sina; Pasdar, Alireza; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi; Sepahi, Samaneh; Hoseini, Seyed Mousalreza; Ahadi, Mitra; Rostami, Sina; Meshkat, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequently associated with elevated serum iron markers. Polymorphisms in the hemochromatosis (HFE) genes are responsible for iron accumulation in most cases of hemochromatosis, and may play a role in HCV infection. Objectives We aimed to assess the prevalence of HFE gene polymorphisms in a group of Iranian HCV-infected patients, and to explore the association of these polymorphisms with HCV infection. Patients and Methods HFE gene polymorphisms were examined in a total of 69 HCV patients and 69 healthy controls using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques. Haplotype and diplotype analyses were performed using PHASE software. Results In a recessive analysis model of the His63Asp (H63D) locus (HH vs. HD + DD), the HH genotype was more common in patients compared to controls (adjusted P = 0.012; OR = 6.42 [95% CI: 1.51 - 27.33]). Also, in a recessive analysis model of the Cys282Tyr (C282Y) locus (CC vs. CY + YY), the CC genotype was more frequent in patients compared to controls (adjusted P = 0.03; OR = 5.06 [95% CI: 1.13 - 22.06]). In addition, there was a significant association between the HC haplotype and the HCDC diplotype and HCV infection. Conclusions Polymorphism in the hemochromatosis gene may confer some degree of risk for HCV infection, and individuals carrying the H and C alleles may be susceptible to this disease; however, a larger sample of HCV patients and healthy individuals may be necessary to further illustrate the role of these polymorphisms in HCV. PMID:27621921

  1. Genetic evidence for heterogeneity in the etiology of CBAVD: Haplotype analysis in families

    SciTech Connect

    Kerem, B.; Rave-Harel, N.; Goshen, R.

    1994-09-01

    Male infertility due to congenital aplasia of the vas deference (CBAVD) is present in almost all CF male patients. It is also found in 1-2% of infertile otherwise healthy males. Several studies have found that about 10% of males with CBAVD carry 2 CF mutations, 40% carry one mutation and 50% have no mutations. These results indicate that in some males CBAVD is caused by two mutated CF alleles. However, in cases of males with one or no identified CF mutations, the association between CBAVD and CF is unclear. We therefore performed, in addition to CF mutation analysis, an extended haplotype analysis in 7 families of CBAVD males (2 had 2 brothers with CBAVD). Our results show that in 6 of the families, the infertile males inherited different CF alleles than their fertile brothers. However, in 2 families, in which no CF mutations were as of yet identified, different results were found. In one family, 2 infertile brothers differed in their haplotypes: both inherited from their mother the same CF allele, while from their father they inherited different alleles. Furthermore, their fertile brother inherited the same CF alleles as one of his fertile brothers. In another family, 2 brothers, one with CBAVD and the other fertile, inherited the same 2 CFTR alleles. These results provide genetic evidence for heterogeneity in the etiology of CBAVD. In some families the CBAVD is caused by 2 CF mutations, in others it is caused by other mechanism(s): heterozygosity for a CF mutation influenced by different threshold levels, mutations in other gene(s), or interaction between the two.

  2. Haplotype analysis of genes for Fusarium head blight resistance in tetraploid wheat germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haplotype analysis at the molecular marker loci associated with the known Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistance QTL in wheat can be used to identify resistance genes in the resistant germplasm, and thus provides practical information of pyramiding different sources of resistance for the development ...

  3. Hypercontrols in Genotype-Phenotype Analysis Reveal Ancestral Haplotypes Associated With Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Balam-Ortiz, Eros; Esquivel-Villarreal, Adolfo; Huerta-Hernandez, David; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Alfaro-Ruiz, Luis; Muñoz-Monroy, Omar; Gutierrez, Ruth; Figueroa-Genis, Enrique; Carrillo, Karol; Elizalde, Adela; Hidalgo, Alfredo; Rodriguez, Mauricio; Urushihara, Maki; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo

    2012-01-01

    The angiotensinogen gene locus has been associated with essential hypertension in most populations analyzed to date. Increased plasma angiotensinogen levels have been proposed as an underlying cause of essential hypertension in whites; however, differences in the genetic regulation of plasma angiotensinogen levels have also been reported for other populations. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms and haplotypes with plasma angiotensinogen levels and the risk of essential hypertension in the Mexican population. We genotyped 9 angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms in 706 individuals. Four polymorphisms, A-6, C4072, C6309, and G12775, were associated with increased risk, and the strongest association was found for the C6309 allele (χ2 = 23.9; P = 0.0000009), which resulted in an odds ratio of 3.0 (95% CI: 1.8–4.9; P = 0.000006) in the recessive model. Two polymorphisms, A-20C (P = 0.003) and C3389T (P = 0.0001), were associated with increased plasma angiotensinogen levels but did not show association with essential hypertension. The haplotypes H1 (χ2 = 8.1; P = 0.004) and H5 (χ2 = 5.1; P = 0.02) were associated with essential hypertension. Using phylogenetic analysis, we found that haplotypes 1 and 5 are the human ancestral haplotypes. Our results suggest that the positive association between angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms and haplotypes with essential hypertension is not simply explained by an increase in plasma angiotensinogen concentration. Complex interactions between risk alleles suggest that these haplotypes act as “superalleles.” PMID:22371359

  4. Hypercontrols in genotype-phenotype analysis reveal ancestral haplotypes associated with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Balam-Ortiz, Eros; Esquivel-Villarreal, Adolfo; Huerta-Hernandez, David; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Alfaro-Ruiz, Luis; Muñoz-Monroy, Omar; Gutierrez, Ruth; Figueroa-Genis, Enrique; Carrillo, Karol; Elizalde, Adela; Hidalgo, Alfredo; Rodriguez, Mauricio; Urushihara, Maki; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo

    2012-04-01

    The angiotensinogen gene locus has been associated with essential hypertension in most populations analyzed to date. Increased plasma angiotensinogen levels have been proposed as an underlying cause of essential hypertension in whites; however, differences in the genetic regulation of plasma angiotensinogen levels have also been reported for other populations. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms and haplotypes with plasma angiotensinogen levels and the risk of essential hypertension in the Mexican population. We genotyped 9 angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms in 706 individuals. Four polymorphisms, A-6, C4072, C6309, and G12775, were associated with increased risk, and the strongest association was found for the C6309 allele (χ(2)=23.9; P=0.0000009), which resulted in an odds ratio of 3.0 (95% CI: 1.8-4.9; P=0.000006) in the recessive model. Two polymorphisms, A-20C (P=0.003) and C3389T (P=0.0001), were associated with increased plasma angiotensinogen levels but did not show association with essential hypertension. The haplotypes H1 (χ(2)=8.1; P=0.004) and H5 (χ(2)=5.1; P=0.02) were associated with essential hypertension. Using phylogenetic analysis, we found that haplotypes 1 and 5 are the human ancestral haplotypes. Our results suggest that the positive association between angiotensinogen gene polymorphisms and haplotypes with essential hypertension is not simply explained by an increase in plasma angiotensinogen concentration. Complex interactions between risk alleles suggest that these haplotypes act as "superalleles." PMID:22371359

  5. Haplotyping algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Sobel, E.; Lange, K.; O`Connell, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    Haplotyping is the logical process of inferring gene flow in a pedigree based on phenotyping results at a small number of genetic loci. This paper formalizes the haplotyping problem and suggests four algorithms for haplotype reconstruction. These algorithms range from exhaustive enumeration of all haplotype vectors to combinatorial optimization by simulated annealing. Application of the algorithms to published genetic analyses shows that manual haplotyping is often erroneous. Haplotyping is employed in screening pedigrees for phenotyping errors and in positional cloning of disease genes from conserved haplotypes in population isolates. 26 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Genetic structure of Mediterranean populations of the sandfly Phlebotomus papatasi by mitochondrial cytochrome b haplotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Hamarsheh, O; Presber, W; Abdeen, Z; Sawalha, S; Al-Lahem, A; Schönian, G

    2007-09-01

    Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) (Diptera: Psychodidae) is the main vector of Leishmania major Yakimoff & Schokhor; which is the cause of self-limiting cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Old World. This sandfly is found in houses, animal shelters, caves and rodent burrows. It has a large geographical range, which includes the Middle East and the Mediterranean regions. A population analysis of colony and field specimens of P. papatasi was conducted on 25 populations originating from 10 countries. The distribution of haplotypes of the maternally inherited mitochondrial cytochrome b gene were analysed to assess the population differentiation of P. papatasi. Alignment of a 442-basepair region at the 3' end of the gene identified 21 haplotypes and 33 segregating sites from 131 sandflies. The pattern of sequence variations did not support the existence of a species complex. The median-joining network method was used to describe both the origin of the haplotypes and the population structure; haplotypes tended to cluster by geographical location, suggesting some level of genetic differentiation between populations. Our findings indicate the presence of significant population differentiation for populations derived from Syria, Turkey, Palestine, Israel, Jordan and Egypt. Knowledge of population differentiation among P. papatasi populations is important for understanding patterns of dispersal in this species and for planning appropriate control measures. PMID:17897368

  7. Analysis of recombinational hot spots associated with the p haplotype fo the mouse MHC

    SciTech Connect

    Heine, D.; Khambata, S.; Wydner, K.S.; Passmore, H.C.

    1994-09-01

    Most of the recombination events detected within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of the mouse fall into areas of limited physical size that have been designated recombinational hot spots. One of these hot spots, associated with the Ea gene, appears to be active only in the presence of the p haplotype of the MHC. To study the regulation of the Ea recombinational hot spot and its haplotype specificity, a high-resolution comparative map fo the MHC and adjacent regions was completed in four different backcrosses carrying the p haplotype. This mapping study utilized a total of 29 PCR-based molecular markers, including 7 newly developed markers spanning the region between Pim1 and D17Mit11 on Chromosome 17. The analysis of a total of 1093 backcross animals: (1) revealed that the presence of the p haplotype of the MHC is not sufficient to induce recombination at the Ea hot spot in a dominant manner, and (2) resulted in the definition of a new intra-MHC recombinational hot spot between the Tnfb and the H2-D genes.

  8. Refined localization of the branchiootorenal syndrome gene by linkage and haplotype analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, L.; Johnson, K.; Smith, R.J.H.; Wagner, M.J.; Wells, D.E.; Kimberling, W.J.; Kumar, S.; Pembrey, M.E.; Grundfast, K.M.; Daiger, S.P.

    1994-06-01

    Branchiootorenal (BOR) syndrome is a common autosomal dominant form of hearing impairment previously mapped to 8q. This report refines the localization of the BOR syndrome gene by haplotype analysis to the interval flanked by markers D8S553 and D8S286. By multipoint linkage analysis, the disease locus most likely is flanked by markers D8S530 and D8S279. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Detecting local haplotype sharing and haplotype association.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hanli; Guan, Yongtao

    2014-07-01

    A novel haplotype association method is presented, and its power is demonstrated. Relying on a statistical model for linkage disequilibrium (LD), the method first infers ancestral haplotypes and their loadings at each marker for each individual. The loadings are then used to quantify local haplotype sharing between individuals at each marker. A statistical model was developed to link the local haplotype sharing and phenotypes to test for association. We devised a novel method to fit the LD model, reducing the complexity from putatively quadratic to linear (in the number of ancestral haplotypes). Therefore, the LD model can be fitted to all study samples simultaneously, and, consequently, our method is applicable to big data sets. Compared to existing haplotype association methods, our method integrated out phase uncertainty, avoided arbitrariness in specifying haplotypes, and had the same number of tests as the single-SNP analysis. We applied our method to data from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium and discovered eight novel associations between seven gene regions and five disease phenotypes. Among these, GRIK4, which encodes a protein that belongs to the glutamate-gated ionic channel family, is strongly associated with both coronary artery disease and rheumatoid arthritis. A software package implementing methods described in this article is freely available at http://www.haplotype.org. PMID:24812308

  10. Genetic diversity and geographical structure of the pitcher plant Nepenthes vieillardii in New Caledonia: A chloroplast DNA haplotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Kaoruko; Jaffré, Tanguy; Setoguchi, Hiroaki

    2008-12-01

    Among the many species that grow in New Caledonia, the pitcher plant Nepenthes vieillardii (Nepenthaceae) has a high degree of morphological variation. In this study, we present the patterns of genetic differentiation of pitcher plant populations based on chloroplast DNA haplotype analysis using the sequences of five spacers. We analyzed 294 samples from 16 populations covering the entire range of the species, using 4660 bp of sequence. Our analysis identified 17 haplotypes, including one that is widely distributed across the islands, as well as regional and private haplotypes. The greatest haplotype diversity was detected on the eastern coast of the largest island and included several private haplotypes, while haplotype diversity was low in the southern plains region. The parsimony network analysis of the 17 haplotypes suggested that the genetic divergence is the result of long-term isolation of individual populations. Results from a spatial analysis of molecular variance and a cluster analysis suggest that the plants once covered the entire serpentine area of New Caledonia and that subsequent regional fragmentation resulted in the isolation of each population and significantly restricted seed flow. This isolation may have been an important factor in the development of the morphological and genetic variation among pitcher plants in New Caledonia. PMID:21628169

  11. Analysis of 24 Y chromosomal STR haplotypes in a Chinese Han population sample from Henan Province, Central China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Meisen; Liu, Yaju; Zhang, Juntao; Bai, Rufeng; Lv, Xiaojiao; Ma, Shuhua

    2015-07-01

    We analyzed haplotypes for 24 Y chromosomal STRs (Y-STRs), including 17 Yfiler loci (DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DY438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635 and Y-GATA-H4) and 7 additional STRs (DYS388, DYS444, DYS447, DYS449, DYS522 and DYS527a/b) in 1100 unrelated Chinese Han individuals from Henan Province using AGCU Y24 STR kit systems. The calculated average gene diversity (GD) values ranged from 0.4105 to 0.9647 for the DYS388 and DYS385a/b loci, respectively. The discriminatory capacity (DC) was 72.91% with 802 observed haplotypes using 17 Yfiler loci, by the addition of 7 Y-STRs to the Yfiler system, the DC was increased to 79.09% while showing 870 observed haplotypes. Among the additional 7 Y-STRs, DYS449, DYS527a/b, DYS444 and DYS522 were major contributors to enhancing discrimination. In the analysis of molecular variance, the Henan Han population clustered with Han origin populations and showed significant differences from other Non-Han populations. In the present study, we report 24 Y-STR population data in Henan Han population, and we emphasize the need for adding additional markers to the commonly used 17 Yfiler loci to achieve more improved discriminatory capacity in a population with low genetic diversity. PMID:25864156

  12. Major Soybean Maturity Gene Haplotypes Revealed by SNPViz Analysis of 72 Sequenced Soybean Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Langewisch, Tiffany; Zhang, Hongxin; Vincent, Ryan; Joshi, Trupti; Xu, Dong; Bilyeu, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    In this Genomics Era, vast amounts of next-generation sequencing data have become publicly available for multiple genomes across hundreds of species. Analyses of these large-scale datasets can become cumbersome, especially when comparing nucleotide polymorphisms across many samples within a dataset and among different datasets or organisms. To facilitate the exploration of allelic variation and diversity, we have developed and deployed an in-house computer software to categorize and visualize these haplotypes. The SNPViz software enables users to analyze region-specific haplotypes from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) datasets for different sequenced genomes. The examination of allelic variation and diversity of important soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] flowering time and maturity genes may provide additional insight into flowering time regulation and enhance researchers' ability to target soybean breeding for particular environments. For this study, we utilized two available soybean genomic datasets for a total of 72 soybean genotypes encompassing cultivars, landraces, and the wild species Glycine soja. The major soybean maturity genes E1, E2, E3, and E4 along with the Dt1 gene for plant growth architecture were analyzed in an effort to determine the number of major haplotypes for each gene, to evaluate the consistency of the haplotypes with characterized variant alleles, and to identify evidence of artificial selection. The results indicated classification of a small number of predominant haplogroups for each gene and important insights into possible allelic diversity for each gene within the context of known causative mutations. The software has both a stand-alone and web-based version and can be used to analyze other genes, examine additional soybean datasets, and view similar genome sequence and SNP datasets from other species. PMID:24727730

  13. Haplotype-Based Analysis of Genes Associated With Risk of Adverse Skin Reactions After Radiotherapy in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Suga, Tomo; Ishikawa, Atsuko; Kohda, Masakazu; Otsuka, Yoshimi; Yamada, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Naohito; Shibamoto, Yuta; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Nomura, Kuninori; Sho, Keizen; Omura, Motoko; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Kikuchi, Yuzo; Michikawa, Yuichi; Noda, Shuhei; Sagara, Masashi; Ohashi, Jun; Yoshinaga, Shinji; Mizoe, Junetsu; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To identify haplotypes of single nucleotide polymorphism markers associated with the risk of early adverse skin reactions (EASRs) after radiotherapy in breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: DNA was sampled from 399 Japanese breast cancer patients who qualified for breast-conserving radiotherapy. Using the National Cancer Institute-Common Toxicity Criteria scoring system, version 2, the patients were grouped according to EASRs, defined as those occurring within 3 months of starting radiotherapy (Grade 1 or less, n = 290; Grade 2 or greater, n = 109). A total of 999 single nucleotide polymorphisms from 137 candidate genes for radiation susceptibility were genotyped, and the haplotype associations between groups were assessed. Results: The global haplotype association analysis (p < 0.05 and false discovery rate < 0.05) indicated that estimated haplotypes in six loci were associated with EASR risk. A comparison of the risk haplotype with the most frequent haplotype in each locus showed haplotype GGTT in CD44 (odds ratio [OR] = 2.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-4.43) resulted in a significantly greater EASR risk. Five haplotypes, CG in MAD2L2 (OR = 0.55; 95% CI, 0.35-0.87), GTTG in PTTG1 (OR = 0.48; 95% CI, 0.24-0.96), TCC (OR = 0.48; 95% CI, 0.26-0.89) and CCG (OR = 0.50; 95% CI, 0.27-0.92) in RAD9A, and GCT in LIG3 (OR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.22-0.93) were associated with a reduced EASR risk. No significant risk haplotype was observed in REV3L. Conclusion: Individual radiosensitivity can be partly determined by these haplotypes in multiple loci. Our findings may lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the genetic variation in radiation sensitivity and resistance among breast cancer patients.

  14. Haplotype analysis of beta-actin gene for its association with sperm quality and boar fertility.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-L; Jennen, D G J; Ponsuksili, S; Tholen, E; Tesfaye, D; Schellander, K; Wimmers, K

    2006-12-01

    beta-actin (ACTB) was examined as a direct functional candidate gene for the possible association with sperm concentration, motility (MOT), semen volume per ejaculate, plasma droplet rate, abnormal sperm rate (ASR) and the fertility traits, non-return rate and number of piglets born alive (NBA). Three polymorphisms in intron 3 (T>C) and one polymorphism in exon 4 (T>C) of porcine ACTB gene were identified by comparative sequencing of animals of the breeds Pietrain and Hampshire. Association analysis revealed that haplotypes affected the variation of the traits MOT, ASR and NBA. The beneficial haplotypes may provide considerable improvement of sperm quality and fertility in the tested commercial boar population. PMID:17177693

  15. DNA analysis of ancient dogs of the Americas: identifying possible founding haplotypes and reconstructing population histories.

    PubMed

    Witt, Kelsey E; Judd, Kathleen; Kitchen, Andrew; Grier, Colin; Kohler, Timothy A; Ortman, Scott G; Kemp, Brian M; Malhi, Ripan S

    2015-02-01

    As dogs have traveled with humans to every continent, they can potentially serve as an excellent proxy when studying human migration history. Past genetic studies into the origins of Native American dogs have used portions of the hypervariable region (HVR) of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) to indicate that prior to European contact the dogs of Native Americans originated in Eurasia. In this study, we summarize past DNA studies of both humans and dogs to discuss their population histories in the Americas. We then sequenced a portion of the mtDNA HVR of 42 pre-Columbian dogs from three sites located in Illinois, coastal British Columbia, and Colorado, and identify four novel dog mtDNA haplotypes. Next, we analyzed a dataset comprised of all available ancient dog sequences from the Americas to infer the pre-Columbian population history of dogs in the Americas. Interestingly, we found low levels of genetic diversity for some populations consistent with the possibility of deliberate breeding practices. Furthermore, we identified multiple putative founding haplotypes in addition to dog haplotypes that closely resemble those of wolves, suggesting admixture with North American wolves or perhaps a second domestication of canids in the Americas. Notably, initial effective population size estimates suggest at least 1000 female dogs likely existed in the Americas at the time of the first known canid burial, and that population size increased gradually over time before stabilizing roughly 1200 years before present. PMID:25532803

  16. Haplotype Analysis and Linkage Disequilibrium at Five Loci in Eragrostis tef.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shavannor M; Yuan, Yinan; Doust, Andrew N; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L

    2012-03-01

    Eragrostis tef (Zucc.), a member of the Chloridoideae subfamily of grasses, is one of the most important food crops in Ethiopia. Lodging is the most important production problem in tef. The rht1 and sd1 dwarfing genes have been useful for improving lodging resistance in wheat and rice, respectively, in what has been known as the "Green Revolution." All homologs of rht1 and sd1 were cloned and sequenced from 31 tef accessions collected from across Ethiopia. The allotetraploid tef genome was found to carry two rht1 homologs. From sequence variation between these two putative homologs, an approximate ancestral divergence date of 6.4 million years ago was calculated for the two genomes within tef. Three sd1 homologs were identified in tef, with unknown orthologous/paralogous relationships. The genetic diversity in the 31 studied accessions was organized into a relatively small number of haplotypes (2-4) for four of these genes, whereas one rht1 homeologue exhibited 10 haplotypes. A low level of nucleotide diversity was observed at all loci. Linkage disequilibrium analysis demonstrated strong linkage disequilibrium, extending the length of the five genes investigated (2-4 kb), with no significant decline. There was no significant correlation between haplotypes of any of these genes and their recorded site of origin. PMID:22413094

  17. Spatial and temporal distribution of the neutral polymorphisms in the last ZFX intron: analysis of the haplotype structure and genealogy.

    PubMed Central

    Jaruzelska, J; Zietkiewicz, E; Batzer, M; Cole, D E; Moisan, J P; Scozzari, R; Tavaré, S; Labuda, D

    1999-01-01

    With 10 segregating sites (simple nucleotide polymorphisms) in the last intron (1089 bp) of the ZFX gene we have observed 11 haplotypes in 336 chromosomes representing a worldwide array of 15 human populations. Two haplotypes representing 77% of all chromosomes were distributed almost evenly among four continents. Five of the remaining haplotypes were detected in Africa and 4 others were restricted to Eurasia and the Americas. Using the information about the ancestral state of the segregating positions (inferred from human-great ape comparisons), we applied coalescent analysis to estimate the age of the polymorphisms and the resulting haplotypes. The oldest haplotype, with the ancestral alleles at all the sites, was observed at low frequency only in two groups of African origin. Its estimated age of 740 to 1100 kyr corresponded to the time to the most recent common ancestor. The two most frequent worldwide distributed haplotypes were estimated at 550 to 840 and 260 to 400 kyr, respectively, while the age of the continentally restricted polymorphisms was 120 to 180 kyr and smaller. Comparison of spatial and temporal distribution of the ZFX haplotypes suggests that modern humans diverged from the common ancestral stock in the Middle Paleolithic era. Subsequent range expansion prevented substantial gene flow among continents, separating African groups from populations that colonized Eurasia and the New World. PMID:10388827

  18. Spatial and temporal distribution of the neutral polymorphisms in the last ZFX intron: analysis of the haplotype structure and genealogy.

    PubMed

    Jaruzelska, J; Zietkiewicz, E; Batzer, M; Cole, D E; Moisan, J P; Scozzari, R; Tavaré, S; Labuda, D

    1999-07-01

    With 10 segregating sites (simple nucleotide polymorphisms) in the last intron (1089 bp) of the ZFX gene we have observed 11 haplotypes in 336 chromosomes representing a worldwide array of 15 human populations. Two haplotypes representing 77% of all chromosomes were distributed almost evenly among four continents. Five of the remaining haplotypes were detected in Africa and 4 others were restricted to Eurasia and the Americas. Using the information about the ancestral state of the segregating positions (inferred from human-great ape comparisons), we applied coalescent analysis to estimate the age of the polymorphisms and the resulting haplotypes. The oldest haplotype, with the ancestral alleles at all the sites, was observed at low frequency only in two groups of African origin. Its estimated age of 740 to 1100 kyr corresponded to the time to the most recent common ancestor. The two most frequent worldwide distributed haplotypes were estimated at 550 to 840 and 260 to 400 kyr, respectively, while the age of the continentally restricted polymorphisms was 120 to 180 kyr and smaller. Comparison of spatial and temporal distribution of the ZFX haplotypes suggests that modern humans diverged from the common ancestral stock in the Middle Paleolithic era. Subsequent range expansion prevented substantial gene flow among continents, separating African groups from populations that colonized Eurasia and the New World. PMID:10388827

  19. Haplotype association analysis of genes within the WNT signalling pathways in diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Renal interstitial fibrosis and glomerular sclerosis are hallmarks of diabetic nephropathy (DN) and several studies have implicated members of the WNT pathways in these pathological processes. This study comprehensively examined common genetic variation within the WNT pathway for association with DN. Methods Genes within the WNT pathways were selected on the basis of nominal significance and consistent direction of effect in the GENIE meta-analysis dataset. Common SNPs and common haplotypes were examined within the selected WNT pathway genes in a white population with type 1 diabetes, discordant for DN (cases: n = 718; controls: n = 749). SNPs were genotyped using Sequenom or Taqman assays. Association analyses were performed using PLINK, to compare allele and haplotype frequencies in cases and controls. Correction for multiple testing was performed by either permutation testing or using false discovery rate. Results A logistic regression model including collection centre, duration of diabetes, and average HbA1c as covariates highlighted three SNPs in GSK3B (rs17810235, rs17471, rs334543), two in DAAM1 (rs1253192, rs1252906) and one in NFAT5 (rs17297207) as being significantly (P < 0.05) associated with DN, however these SNPs did not remain significant after correction for multiple testing. Logistic regression of haplotypes, with ESRD as the outcome, and pairwise interaction analyses did not yield any significant results after correction for multiple testing. Conclusions These results indicate that both common SNPs and common haplotypes of WNT pathway genes are not strongly associated with DN. However, this does not completely exclude these or the WNT pathways from association with DN, as unidentified rare genetic or copy number variants could still contribute towards the genetic architecture of DN. PMID:23777469

  20. Molecular analysis of human leukocyte antigen class I and class II allele frequencies and haplotype distribution in Pakistani population

    PubMed Central

    Moatter, T.; Aban, M.; Tabassum, S.; Shaikh, U.; Pervez, S.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: Distribution of HLA class I and II alleles and haplotype was studied in Pakistani population and compared with the data reported for Caucasoid, Africans, Orientals and Arab populations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: HLA class I and II polymorphisms in 1000 unrelated Pakistani individuals was studied using sequence-specific primers and polymerase chain reaction and assay. RESULTS: The most frequent class I alleles observed were A*02, B*35 and CW*07, with frequencies of 19.2, 13.7 and 20%, respectively. Fifteen distinct HLA-DRB1 alleles and eight HLA-DQB1 alleles were recognized. The most frequently observed DRB1 alleles which represented more than 60% of the subjects were DRB1 *03, *07, *11 and *15. The rare DRB1 alleles detected in this study were HLADRB1 *08 and *09, having frequencies of 0.9 and 1.7%, respectively. In addition, at DRB1-DQB1 loci there were 179 different haplotypes and 285 unique genotypes and the most common haplotype was DRB1*15-DQB1*06 which represented 17% of the total DRB1-DQB1 haplotypes. In our population, haplotype A*33-B*58-Cw*03 comprised 2.8% of the total class I haplotypes observed. This haplotype was seen only in the oriental populations and has not been reported in the African or European Caucasoid. CONCLUSION: Our study showed a close similarity of HLA class I and II alleles with that of European Caucasoid and Orientals. In Pakistani population, two rare loci and three haplotypes were identified, whereas haplotypes characteristic of Caucasians, Africans and Orientals were also found, suggesting an admixture of different races due to migration to and from this region. PMID:21206703

  1. Genetic analysis of completely sequenced disease-associated MHC haplotypes identifies shuffling of segments in recent human history.

    PubMed

    Traherne, James A; Horton, Roger; Roberts, Anne N; Miretti, Marcos M; Hurles, Matthew E; Stewart, C Andrew; Ashurst, Jennifer L; Atrazhev, Alexey M; Coggill, Penny; Palmer, Sophie; Almeida, Jeff; Sims, Sarah; Wilming, Laurens G; Rogers, Jane; de Jong, Pieter J; Carrington, Mary; Elliott, John F; Sawcer, Stephen; Todd, John A; Trowsdale, John; Beck, Stephan

    2006-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is recognised as one of the most important genetic regions in relation to common human disease. Advancement in identification of MHC genes that confer susceptibility to disease requires greater knowledge of sequence variation across the complex. Highly duplicated and polymorphic regions of the human genome such as the MHC are, however, somewhat refractory to some whole-genome analysis methods. To address this issue, we are employing a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) cloning strategy to sequence entire MHC haplotypes from consanguineous cell lines as part of the MHC Haplotype Project. Here we present 4.25 Mb of the human haplotype QBL (HLA-A26-B18-Cw5-DR3-DQ2) and compare it with the MHC reference haplotype and with a second haplotype, COX (HLA-A1-B8-Cw7-DR3-DQ2), that shares the same HLA-DRB1, -DQA1, and -DQB1 alleles. We have defined the complete gene, splice variant, and sequence variation contents of all three haplotypes, comprising over 259 annotated loci and over 20,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Certain coding sequences vary significantly between different haplotypes, making them candidates for functional and disease-association studies. Analysis of the two DR3 haplotypes allowed delineation of the shared sequence between two HLA class II-related haplotypes differing in disease associations and the identification of at least one of the sites that mediated the original recombination event. The levels of variation across the MHC were similar to those seen for other HLA-disparate haplotypes, except for a 158-kb segment that contained the HLA-DRB1, -DQA1, and -DQB1 genes and showed very limited polymorphism compatible with identity-by-descent and relatively recent common ancestry (<3,400 generations). These results indicate that the differential disease associations of these two DR3 haplotypes are due to sequence variation outside this central 158-kb segment, and that shuffling of ancestral blocks via

  2. Analysis of 27 Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes in a Han population of Henan province, Central China.

    PubMed

    Bai, Rufeng; Liu, Yaju; Zhang, Juntao; Shi, Meisen; Dong, Hongmei; Ma, Shuhua; Bai, R F; Shi, Ms

    2016-09-01

    A total of 1225 unrelated Han males from Henan province were analyzed with the prototype Yfiler® Plus kit (Life Technologies, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA, USA). The calculated gene diversity (GD) values ranged from 0.3855 to 0.9673 for the DYS391 and DYS385a/b loci, respectively. The discriminatory capacity (DC) was 86.94 % with 1065 observed haplotypes using 17 Yfiler loci, by the addition of 10 Y-STRs to the Yfiler® Plus system, the DC was increased to 98.94 % while showing 1212 observed haplotypes. Among the new incorporated Y-STRs, DYS576, DYF387S1, DYS518, DYS627, and DYS449 were major contributors to enhancing discrimination. In the analysis of molecular variance, the Henan Han population clustered with Asian origin populations and showed significant differences from other reference populations. In this study, the improvement of adding additional Y-STR markers with the Yfiler® Plus kit provided substantially stronger discriminatory power in the Henan Han population. PMID:26932866

  3. Dissection of the genetics of Parkinson's disease identifies an additional association 5′ of SNCA and multiple associated haplotypes at 17q21

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Chris C.A.; Plagnol, Vincent; Strange, Amy; Gardner, Michelle; Paisan-Ruiz, Coro; Band, Gavin; Barker, Roger A.; Bellenguez, Celine; Bhatia, Kailash; Blackburn, Hannah; Blackwell, Jennie M.; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Martin A.; Brown, Matthew A.; Burn, David; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Clarke, Carl E.; Corvin, Aiden; Craddock, Nicholas; Deloukas, Panos; Edkins, Sarah; Evans, Jonathan; Freeman, Colin; Gray, Emma; Hardy, John; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah; Jankowski, Janusz; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew J.; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Morrison, Karen E.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Pearson, Justin P.; Peltonen, Leena; Pirinen, Matti; Plomin, Robert; Potter, Simon; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Su, Zhan; Trembath, Richard C.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Williams, Nigel W.; Morris, Huw R.; Donnelly, Peter; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2011-01-01

    We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 1705 Parkinson's disease (PD) UK patients and 5175 UK controls, the largest sample size so far for a PD GWAS. Replication was attempted in an additional cohort of 1039 French PD cases and 1984 controls for the 27 regions showing the strongest evidence of association (P< 10−4). We replicated published associations in the 4q22/SNCA and 17q21/MAPT chromosome regions (P< 10−10) and found evidence for an additional independent association in 4q22/SNCA. A detailed analysis of the haplotype structure at 17q21 showed that there are three separate risk groups within this region. We found weak but consistent evidence of association for common variants located in three previously published associated regions (4p15/BST1, 4p16/GAK and 1q32/PARK16). We found no support for the previously reported SNP association in 12q12/LRRK2. We also found an association of the two SNPs in 4q22/SNCA with the age of onset of the disease. PMID:21044948

  4. Association between ABCB1 polymorphisms and haplotypes and Alzheimer's disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Liu, Ming-Yan; Sun, Xiao-Hong; Wei, Min-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Although several epidemiological studies have investigated the association between ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1) gene polymorphisms and Alzheimer's disease (AD) susceptibility, controversial results exist. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to assess whether ABCB1 polymorphisms 3435C > T (rs1045642), 2677G > T/A (rs2032582), 1236C > T (rs1128503) and haplotypes were associated with AD risk. Nine independent publications were included and analyzed. Crude odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were applied to investigate the strength of the association. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to measure the robustness of our analysis. A funnel plot and trim and fill method were used to test and adjust for publication bias. The results showed a significant association between the 3435C > T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and AD susceptibility (CT vs. CC: OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.06-1.45, P = 0.01; CT + TT vs. CC: OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.04-1.41, P = 0.01) in the total population, as well as in Caucasian subgroup. The 2677G > T/A SNP was related to a decreased AD risk in Caucasian subgroup (TT + TA + AA vs. GT + GA + GG: OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.47-0.98, P = 0.04). Moreover, the ABCB1 haplotype analysis showed that the 1236T/2677T/3435C haplotype was associated with a higher risk of AD (OR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.24-3.18, P = 0.00). Our results suggest that the ABCB1 3435C > T SNP, the 2677G > T/A SNP and 1236T/2677T/3435C haplotype are significantly associated with AD susceptibility. PMID:27600024

  5. Association between ABCB1 polymorphisms and haplotypes and Alzheimer’s disease: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Xin; Liu, Ming-Yan; Sun, Xiao-Hong; Wei, Min-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Although several epidemiological studies have investigated the association between ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1) gene polymorphisms and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) susceptibility, controversial results exist. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to assess whether ABCB1 polymorphisms 3435C > T (rs1045642), 2677G > T/A (rs2032582), 1236C > T (rs1128503) and haplotypes were associated with AD risk. Nine independent publications were included and analyzed. Crude odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were applied to investigate the strength of the association. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to measure the robustness of our analysis. A funnel plot and trim and fill method were used to test and adjust for publication bias. The results showed a significant association between the 3435C > T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and AD susceptibility (CT vs. CC: OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.06–1.45, P = 0.01; CT + TT vs. CC: OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.04–1.41, P = 0.01) in the total population, as well as in Caucasian subgroup. The 2677G > T/A SNP was related to a decreased AD risk in Caucasian subgroup (TT + TA + AA vs. GT + GA + GG: OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.47–0.98, P = 0.04). Moreover, the ABCB1 haplotype analysis showed that the 1236T/2677T/3435C haplotype was associated with a higher risk of AD (OR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.24–3.18, P = 0.00). Our results suggest that the ABCB1 3435C > T SNP, the 2677G > T/A SNP and 1236T/2677T/3435C haplotype are significantly associated with AD susceptibility. PMID:27600024

  6. Genomic-assisted haplotype analysis and the development of high-throughput SNP markers for salinity tolerance in soybean

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Gunvant; Do, Tuyen; Vuong, Tri D.; Valliyodan, Babu; Lee, Jeong-Dong; Chaudhary, Juhi; Shannon, J. Grover; Nguyen, Henry T.

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinity is a limiting factor of crop yield. The soybean is sensitive to soil salinity, and a dominant gene, Glyma03g32900 is primarily responsible for salt-tolerance. The identification of high throughput and robust markers as well as the deployment of salt-tolerant cultivars are effective approaches to minimize yield loss under saline conditions. We utilized high quality (15x) whole-genome resequencing (WGRS) on 106 diverse soybean lines and identified three major structural variants and allelic variation in the promoter and genic regions of the GmCHX1 gene. The discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with structural variants facilitated the design of six KASPar assays. Additionally, haplotype analysis and pedigree tracking of 93 U.S. ancestral lines were performed using publically available WGRS datasets. Identified SNP markers were validated, and a strong correlation was observed between the genotype and salt treatment phenotype (leaf scorch, chlorophyll content and Na+ accumulation) using a panel of 104 soybean lines and, an interspecific bi-parental population (F8) from PI483463 x Hutcheson. These markers precisely identified salt-tolerant/sensitive genotypes (>91%), and different structural-variants (>98%). These SNP assays, supported by accurate phenotyping, haplotype analyses and pedigree tracking information, will accelerate marker-assisted selection programs to enhance the development of salt-tolerant soybean cultivars. PMID:26781337

  7. Haplotype analysis of BRCA1 intragenic markers in Iranian patients with familial breast and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miresmaeili, Seyed Mohsen; Kordi Tamandani, Dor Mohammad; Kalantar, Seyed Mehdi; Moshtaghioun, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Breast Cancer Type 1 Susceptibility gene (BRCA1) is a tumor suppressor gene, involved in DNA damage repair and in 81% of the breast-ovarian cancer families were due to BRCA1. In some clinically investigated genes, the intragenic marker polymorphism is important and the screening of such mutations is faster by using short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphism. Individual polymorphism of STR is a good evidence for following inheritance of repeat polymorphism. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate three intragenic BRCA1 marker polymorphisms in families, which have two or more patients with breast/ovarian cancer in comparison to healthy women. Materials and Methods: A total of 107 breast and/or ovarian cancer patients and 93 unrelated healthy women with no clinical phenotype of any malignancy or familial cancer history constitute the study groups. Haplotyping analysis, at 3 intragenic BRCA1 microsatellite markers (D17S855, D17S1322 and D17S1323), were performed for all subject and control groups using labeled primers. Results: After fragment analysis, significance differences were observed as follows: two alleles of D17S855; allele 146 (p=0.02) and 150 (p=0.006), and two alleles of D17S1322, allele 121 (p=0.015) and 142 (p=0.043). These differences were compared with control group. There was significance difference in 8 di/tri allelic haplotypes in present experimental subjects. Some haplotypes were observed to have approximately twice the relation risk for breast cancer. Conclusion: According to recent results, assessment of presence or absence of mentioned alleles in BRCA1 microsatellite can be used for prognosis in individuals, suspected of having or not having the breast cancer. PMID:27351029

  8. The identification of additional zebrafish DICP genes reveals haplotype variation and linkage to MHC class I genes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Nunez, Ivan; Wcisel, Dustin J; Litman, Ronda T; Litman, Gary W; Yoder, Jeffrey A

    2016-04-01

    Bony fish encode multiple multi-gene families of membrane receptors that are comprised of immunoglobulin (Ig) domains and are predicted to function in innate immunity. One of these families, the diverse immunoglobulin (Ig) domain-containing protein (DICP) genes, maps to three chromosomal loci in zebrafish. Most DICPs possess one or two Ig ectodomains and include membrane-bound and secreted forms. Membrane-bound DICPs include putative inhibitory and activating receptors. Recombinant DICP Ig domains bind lipids with varying specificity, a characteristic shared with mammalian CD300 and TREM family members. Numerous DICP transcripts amplified from different lines of zebrafish did not match the zebrafish reference genome sequence suggesting polymorphic and haplotypic variation. The expression of DICPs in three different lines of zebrafish has been characterized employing PCR-based strategies. Certain DICPs exhibit restricted expression in adult tissues whereas others are expressed ubiquitously. Transcripts of a subset of DICPs can be detected during embryonic development suggesting roles in embryonic immunity or other developmental processes. Transcripts representing 11 previously uncharacterized DICP sequences were identified. The assignment of two of these sequences to an unplaced genomic scaffold resulted in the identification of an alternative DICP haplotype that is linked to a MHC class I Z lineage haplotype on zebrafish chromosome 3. The linkage of DICP and MHC class I genes also is observable in the genomes of the related grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio) suggesting that this is a shared character with the last common Cyprinidae ancestor. PMID:26801775

  9. Analysis and exploration of the use of rule-based algorithms and consensus methods for the inferral of haplotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Orzack, Steven Hecht; Gusfield, Daniel; Olson, Jeffrey; Nesbitt, Steven; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Stanton, Vincent P

    2003-01-01

    The difficulty of experimental determination of haplotypes from phase-unknown genotypes has stimulated the development of nonexperimental inferral methods. One well-known approach for a group of unrelated individuals involves using the trivially deducible haplotypes (those found in individuals with zero or one heterozygous sites) and a set of rules to infer the haplotypes underlying ambiguous genotypes (those with two or more heterozygous sites). Neither the manner in which this "rule-based" approach should be implemented nor the accuracy of this approach has been adequately assessed. We implemented eight variations of this approach that differed in how a reference list of haplotypes was derived and in the rules for the analysis of ambiguous genotypes. We assessed the accuracy of these variations by comparing predicted and experimentally determined haplotypes involving nine polymorphic sites in the human apolipoprotein E (APOE) locus. The eight variations resulted in substantial differences in the average number of correctly inferred haplotype pairs. More than one set of inferred haplotype pairs was found for each of the variations we analyzed, implying that the rule-based approach is not sufficient by itself for haplotype inferral, despite its appealing simplicity. Accordingly, we explored consensus methods in which multiple inferrals for a given ambiguous genotype are combined to generate a single inferral; we show that the set of these "consensus" inferrals for all ambiguous genotypes is more accurate than the typical single set of inferrals chosen at random. We also use a consensus prediction to divide ambiguous genotypes into those whose algorithmic inferral is certain or almost certain and those whose less certain inferral makes molecular inferral preferable. PMID:14573498

  10. Analysis and exploration of the use of rule-based algorithms and consensus methods for the inferral of haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Orzack, Steven Hecht; Gusfield, Daniel; Olson, Jeffrey; Nesbitt, Steven; Subrahmanyan, Lakshman; Stanton, Vincent P

    2003-10-01

    The difficulty of experimental determination of haplotypes from phase-unknown genotypes has stimulated the development of nonexperimental inferral methods. One well-known approach for a group of unrelated individuals involves using the trivially deducible haplotypes (those found in individuals with zero or one heterozygous sites) and a set of rules to infer the haplotypes underlying ambiguous genotypes (those with two or more heterozygous sites). Neither the manner in which this "rule-based" approach should be implemented nor the accuracy of this approach has been adequately assessed. We implemented eight variations of this approach that differed in how a reference list of haplotypes was derived and in the rules for the analysis of ambiguous genotypes. We assessed the accuracy of these variations by comparing predicted and experimentally determined haplotypes involving nine polymorphic sites in the human apolipoprotein E (APOE) locus. The eight variations resulted in substantial differences in the average number of correctly inferred haplotype pairs. More than one set of inferred haplotype pairs was found for each of the variations we analyzed, implying that the rule-based approach is not sufficient by itself for haplotype inferral, despite its appealing simplicity. Accordingly, we explored consensus methods in which multiple inferrals for a given ambiguous genotype are combined to generate a single inferral; we show that the set of these "consensus" inferrals for all ambiguous genotypes is more accurate than the typical single set of inferrals chosen at random. We also use a consensus prediction to divide ambiguous genotypes into those whose algorithmic inferral is certain or almost certain and those whose less certain inferral makes molecular inferral preferable. PMID:14573498

  11. KIR and HLA haplotype analysis in a family lacking the KIR 2DL1-2DP1 genes

    PubMed Central

    Vojvodić, S; Ademović-Sazdanić, D

    2015-01-01

    The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene cluster exhibits extensive allelic and haplotypic diversity that is observed as presence/absence of genes, resulting in expansion and contraction of KIR haplotypes and by allelic variation of individual KIR genes. We report a case of KIR pseudogene 2DP1 and 2DL1 gene absence in members of one family with the children suffering from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor low resolution genotyping was performed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequence-specific primers (SSP)/sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) method and haplotype assignment was done by gene content analysis. Both parents and the maternal grandfather, shared the same Cen-B2 KIR haplotype, containing KIR 3DL3, -2DS2, -2DL2 and -3DP1 genes. The second haplotype in the KIR genotype of the mother and grandfather was Tel-A1 with KIR 2DL4 (normal and deleted variant), -3DL1, -22 bp deletion variant of the 2DS4 gene and -3DL2, while the second haplotype in the KIR genotype of the father was Tel-B1 with 2DL4 (normal variant), -3DS1, -2DL5, -2DS5, -2DS1 and 3DL2 genes. Haplotype analysis in all three offsprings revealed that the children inherited the Cen-B2 haplotype with the same gene content but two of the children inherited a deleted variant of the 2DL4 gene, while the third child inherited a normal one. The second haplotype of all three offspring contained KIR 2DL4, -2DL5, -2DS1, -2DS4 (del 22bp variant), -2DS5, -3DL1 and -3DL2 genes, which was the basis of the assumption that there is a hybrid haplotype and that the present 3DL1 gene is a variant of the 3DS1 gene. Due to consanguinity among the ancestors, the results of KIR segregation analysis showed the existence of a very rare KIR genotype in the offspring. The family who is the subject of this case is even more interesting because the father was 10/10 human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched to his daughter, all members of the family have the

  12. Haplotype analysis of the 185delAG BRCA1 mutation in ethnically diverse populations

    PubMed Central

    Laitman, Yael; Feng, Bing-Jian; Zamir, Itay M; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Duncan, Paul; Port, Danielle; Thirthagiri, Eswary; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Evans, Gareth; Latif, Ayse; Newman, William G; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Zidan, Jamal; Shimon-Paluch, Shani; Goldgar, David; Friedman, Eitan

    2013-01-01

    The 185delAG* BRCA1 mutation is encountered primarily in Jewish Ashkenazi and Iraqi individuals, and sporadically in non-Jews. Previous studies estimated that this is a founder mutation in Jewish mutation carriers that arose before the dispersion of Jews in the Diaspora ∼2500 years ago. The aim of this study was to assess the haplotype in ethnically diverse 185delAG* BRCA1 mutation carriers, and to estimate the age at which the mutation arose. Ethnically diverse Jewish and non-Jewish 185delAG*BRCA1 mutation carriers and their relatives were genotyped using 15 microsatellite markers and three SNPs spanning 12.5 MB, encompassing the BRCA1 gene locus. Estimation of mutation age was based on a subset of 11 markers spanning a region of ∼5 MB, using a previously developed algorithm applying the maximum likelihood method. Overall, 188 participants (154 carriers and 34 noncarriers) from 115 families were included: Ashkenazi, Iraq, Kuchin-Indians, Syria, Turkey, Iran, Tunisia, Bulgaria, non-Jewish English, non-Jewish Malaysian, and Hispanics. Haplotype analysis indicated that the 185delAG mutation arose 750–1500 years ago. In Ashkenazim, it is a founder mutation that arose 61 generations ago, and with a small group of founder mutations was introduced into the Hispanic population (conversos) ∼650 years ago, and into the Iraqi–Jewish community ∼450 years ago. The 185delAG mutation in the non-Jewish populations in Malaysia and the UK arose at least twice independently. We conclude that the 185delAG* BRCA1 mutation resides on a common haplotype among Ashkenazi Jews, and arose about 61 generations ago and arose independently at least twice in non-Jews. PMID:22763381

  13. Haplotype analysis of the 185delAG BRCA1 mutation in ethnically diverse populations.

    PubMed

    Laitman, Yael; Feng, Bing-Jian; Zamir, Itay M; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Duncan, Paul; Port, Danielle; Thirthagiri, Eswary; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Evans, Gareth; Latif, Ayse; Newman, William G; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Zidan, Jamal; Shimon-Paluch, Shani; Goldgar, David; Friedman, Eitan

    2013-02-01

    The 185delAG* BRCA1 mutation is encountered primarily in Jewish Ashkenazi and Iraqi individuals, and sporadically in non-Jews. Previous studies estimated that this is a founder mutation in Jewish mutation carriers that arose before the dispersion of Jews in the Diaspora ~2500 years ago. The aim of this study was to assess the haplotype in ethnically diverse 185delAG* BRCA1 mutation carriers, and to estimate the age at which the mutation arose. Ethnically diverse Jewish and non-Jewish 185delAG*BRCA1 mutation carriers and their relatives were genotyped using 15 microsatellite markers and three SNPs spanning 12.5 MB, encompassing the BRCA1 gene locus. Estimation of mutation age was based on a subset of 11 markers spanning a region of ~5 MB, using a previously developed algorithm applying the maximum likelihood method. Overall, 188 participants (154 carriers and 34 noncarriers) from 115 families were included: Ashkenazi, Iraq, Kuchin-Indians, Syria, Turkey, Iran, Tunisia, Bulgaria, non-Jewish English, non-Jewish Malaysian, and Hispanics. Haplotype analysis indicated that the 185delAG mutation arose 750-1500 years ago. In Ashkenazim, it is a founder mutation that arose 61 generations ago, and with a small group of founder mutations was introduced into the Hispanic population (conversos) ~650 years ago, and into the Iraqi-Jewish community ~450 years ago. The 185delAG mutation in the non-Jewish populations in Malaysia and the UK arose at least twice independently. We conclude that the 185delAG* BRCA1 mutation resides on a common haplotype among Ashkenazi Jews, and arose about 61 generations ago and arose independently at least twice in non-Jews. PMID:22763381

  14. Genealogical analysis of cystic fibrosis families and chromosome 7q RFLP haplotypes in the Hutterite Brethren.

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, T M; Morgan, K; Schwartz, R H; Doherty, R A; Miller, S R; Klinger, K; Stanislovitis, P; Stuart, N; Watkins, P C

    1989-01-01

    In the 100-year period 1880-1980 the Hutterite population increased from about 442 to 23,000 individuals in North America. There are three endogamous subdivisions in this Caucasian genetic isolate. A total of 11 cystic fibrosis (CF) families from Canada and the United States were investigated, including at least two families from each of the three subdivisions, the Dariusleut, Lehrerleut, and Schmiedeleut. A study of RFLPs for the loci D7S8, D7S23, MET, and D7S18 (also called D7S16) in the region of the CF gene in 10 families shows considerable genetic variability. There were three different extended CF gene-region haplotypes on CF chromosomes (CF haplotypes), and there were 13 different extended CF gene-region haplotypes on normal chromosomes (normal haplotypes). The three CF haplotypes have different D7S23 and MET haplotypes. Parents who have the same CF haplotype are, on the average, more closely related than parents who have different haplotypes, but only within the same subdivision. A marriage node graph of 11 families illustrates the complexity of Hutterite genealogies. The frequency distribution of CF haplotypes in the Hutterite sample differs notably from those of larger agglomerates of family data from collaborative studies, with respect to D7S8, MET haplotypes, and D7S23 haplotypes. We propose that there were at least three CF carriers among the founders of the Hutterite population and that copies of a particular CF haplotype in current individuals are identical by descent. The alternative that one or more genetically distinguishable CF haplotypes resulted from recombination since the founding of the population is considered to be less likely. PMID:2563632

  15. Haplotag: Software for Haplotype-Based Genotyping-by-Sequencing Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tinker, Nicholas A.; Bekele, Wubishet A.; Hattori, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), and related methods, are based on high-throughput short-read sequencing of genomic complexity reductions followed by discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within sequence tags. This provides a powerful and economical approach to whole-genome genotyping, facilitating applications in genomics, diversity analysis, and molecular breeding. However, due to the complexity of analyzing large data sets, applications of GBS may require substantial time, expertise, and computational resources. Haplotag, the novel GBS software described here, is freely available, and operates with minimal user-investment on widely available computer platforms. Haplotag is unique in fulfilling the following set of criteria: (1) operates without a reference genome; (2) can be used in a polyploid species; (3) provides a discovery mode, and a production mode; (4) discovers polymorphisms based on a model of tag-level haplotypes within sequenced tags; (5) reports SNPs as well as haplotype-based genotypes; and (6) provides an intuitive visual “passport” for each inferred locus. Haplotag is optimized for use in a self-pollinating plant species. PMID:26818073

  16. Analysis of the 8.1 ancestral MHC haplotype in severe, pneumonia-related sepsis.

    PubMed

    Aladzsity, István; Madách, Krisztina; Szilágyi, Agnes; Gál, János; Pénzes, István; Prohászka, Zoltán; Fust, George

    2011-06-01

    The most frequent Caucasian MHC haplotype, AH8.1 - associated with numerous immunopathological differences and certain autoimmune diseases - was recently linked to the delayed onset of bacterial colonization in cystic fibrosis. Based on this observation, we hypothesized that the carriers of AH8.1 have lower risk for a worse outcome in sepsis. AH8.1 carrier state was determined in 207 Caucasian patients with severe, pneumonia-related sepsis. Our data showed that in patients without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), septic shock - a serious consequence of the bacterial infection - occurred significantly less frequently (OR=0.3383; 95% CI=0.1141-0.995; p=0.043) in carriers of AH8.1, than in non-carriers. According to the multivariate logistic regression analysis, this haplotype had an independent protective role against septic shock in all patients (OR=0.315; 95% CI=0.100-0.992; p=0.048), particularly in COPD-free patients (OR=0.117; 95% CI=0.025-0.554; p=0.007). These results indicate that AH8.1 may confer protection against the progression of bacterial infection, and this could explain, at least partially, its high frequency in the Caucasian population. PMID:21414845

  17. Genome sequence, comparative analysis and haplotype structure of the domestic dog.

    PubMed

    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Wade, Claire M; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Karlsson, Elinor K; Jaffe, David B; Kamal, Michael; Clamp, Michele; Chang, Jean L; Kulbokas, Edward J; Zody, Michael C; Mauceli, Evan; Xie, Xiaohui; Breen, Matthew; Wayne, Robert K; Ostrander, Elaine A; Ponting, Chris P; Galibert, Francis; Smith, Douglas R; DeJong, Pieter J; Kirkness, Ewen; Alvarez, Pablo; Biagi, Tara; Brockman, William; Butler, Jonathan; Chin, Chee-Wye; Cook, April; Cuff, James; Daly, Mark J; DeCaprio, David; Gnerre, Sante; Grabherr, Manfred; Kellis, Manolis; Kleber, Michael; Bardeleben, Carolyne; Goodstadt, Leo; Heger, Andreas; Hitte, Christophe; Kim, Lisa; Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Parker, Heidi G; Pollinger, John P; Searle, Stephen M J; Sutter, Nathan B; Thomas, Rachael; Webber, Caleb; Baldwin, Jennifer; Abebe, Adal; Abouelleil, Amr; Aftuck, Lynne; Ait-Zahra, Mostafa; Aldredge, Tyler; Allen, Nicole; An, Peter; Anderson, Scott; Antoine, Claudel; Arachchi, Harindra; Aslam, Ali; Ayotte, Laura; Bachantsang, Pasang; Barry, Andrew; Bayul, Tashi; Benamara, Mostafa; Berlin, Aaron; Bessette, Daniel; Blitshteyn, Berta; Bloom, Toby; Blye, Jason; Boguslavskiy, Leonid; Bonnet, Claude; Boukhgalter, Boris; Brown, Adam; Cahill, Patrick; Calixte, Nadia; Camarata, Jody; Cheshatsang, Yama; Chu, Jeffrey; Citroen, Mieke; Collymore, Alville; Cooke, Patrick; Dawoe, Tenzin; Daza, Riza; Decktor, Karin; DeGray, Stuart; Dhargay, Norbu; Dooley, Kimberly; Dooley, Kathleen; Dorje, Passang; Dorjee, Kunsang; Dorris, Lester; Duffey, Noah; Dupes, Alan; Egbiremolen, Osebhajajeme; Elong, Richard; Falk, Jill; Farina, Abderrahim; Faro, Susan; Ferguson, Diallo; Ferreira, Patricia; Fisher, Sheila; FitzGerald, Mike; Foley, Karen; Foley, Chelsea; Franke, Alicia; Friedrich, Dennis; Gage, Diane; Garber, Manuel; Gearin, Gary; Giannoukos, Georgia; Goode, Tina; Goyette, Audra; Graham, Joseph; Grandbois, Edward; Gyaltsen, Kunsang; Hafez, Nabil; Hagopian, Daniel; Hagos, Birhane; Hall, Jennifer; Healy, Claire; Hegarty, Ryan; Honan, Tracey; Horn, Andrea; Houde, Nathan; Hughes, Leanne; Hunnicutt, Leigh; Husby, M; Jester, Benjamin; Jones, Charlien; Kamat, Asha; Kanga, Ben; Kells, Cristyn; Khazanovich, Dmitry; Kieu, Alix Chinh; Kisner, Peter; Kumar, Mayank; Lance, Krista; Landers, Thomas; Lara, Marcia; Lee, William; Leger, Jean-Pierre; Lennon, Niall; Leuper, Lisa; LeVine, Sarah; Liu, Jinlei; Liu, Xiaohong; Lokyitsang, Yeshi; Lokyitsang, Tashi; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, Jan; Major, John; Marabella, Richard; Maru, Kebede; Matthews, Charles; McDonough, Susan; Mehta, Teena; Meldrim, James; Melnikov, Alexandre; Meneus, Louis; Mihalev, Atanas; Mihova, Tanya; Miller, Karen; Mittelman, Rachel; Mlenga, Valentine; Mulrain, Leonidas; Munson, Glen; Navidi, Adam; Naylor, Jerome; Nguyen, Tuyen; Nguyen, Nga; Nguyen, Cindy; Nguyen, Thu; Nicol, Robert; Norbu, Nyima; Norbu, Choe; Novod, Nathaniel; Nyima, Tenchoe; Olandt, Peter; O'Neill, Barry; O'Neill, Keith; Osman, Sahal; Oyono, Lucien; Patti, Christopher; Perrin, Danielle; Phunkhang, Pema; Pierre, Fritz; Priest, Margaret; Rachupka, Anthony; Raghuraman, Sujaa; Rameau, Rayale; Ray, Verneda; Raymond, Christina; Rege, Filip; Rise, Cecil; Rogers, Julie; Rogov, Peter; Sahalie, Julie; Settipalli, Sampath; Sharpe, Theodore; Shea, Terrance; Sheehan, Mechele; Sherpa, Ngawang; Shi, Jianying; Shih, Diana; Sloan, Jessie; Smith, Cherylyn; Sparrow, Todd; Stalker, John; Stange-Thomann, Nicole; Stavropoulos, Sharon; Stone, Catherine; Stone, Sabrina; Sykes, Sean; Tchuinga, Pierre; Tenzing, Pema; Tesfaye, Senait; Thoulutsang, Dawa; Thoulutsang, Yama; Topham, Kerri; Topping, Ira; Tsamla, Tsamla; Vassiliev, Helen; Venkataraman, Vijay; Vo, Andy; Wangchuk, Tsering; Wangdi, Tsering; Weiand, Michael; Wilkinson, Jane; Wilson, Adam; Yadav, Shailendra; Yang, Shuli; Yang, Xiaoping; Young, Geneva; Yu, Qing; Zainoun, Joanne; Zembek, Lisa; Zimmer, Andrew; Lander, Eric S

    2005-12-01

    Here we report a high-quality draft genome sequence of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris), together with a dense map of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across breeds. The dog is of particular interest because it provides important evolutionary information and because existing breeds show great phenotypic diversity for morphological, physiological and behavioural traits. We use sequence comparison with the primate and rodent lineages to shed light on the structure and evolution of genomes and genes. Notably, the majority of the most highly conserved non-coding sequences in mammalian genomes are clustered near a small subset of genes with important roles in development. Analysis of SNPs reveals long-range haplotypes across the entire dog genome, and defines the nature of genetic diversity within and across breeds. The current SNP map now makes it possible for genome-wide association studies to identify genes responsible for diseases and traits, with important consequences for human and companion animal health. PMID:16341006

  18. Performance of single nucleotide polymorphisms versus haplotypes for genome-wide association analysis in barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) may benefit from using haplotype information for making marker-phenotype associations. Several rationales for grouping single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) into haplotype blocks exist, but any advantage may depend on the genetic architecture of traits, patter...

  19. Massively parallel haplotyping on microscopic beads for the high-throughput phase analysis of single molecules.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Jérôme; Muresan, Leila; Tiemann-Boege, Irene

    2012-01-01

    In spite of the many advances in haplotyping methods, it is still very difficult to characterize rare haplotypes in tissues and different environmental samples or to accurately assess the haplotype diversity in large mixtures. This would require a haplotyping method capable of analyzing the phase of single molecules with an unprecedented throughput. Here we describe such a haplotyping method capable of analyzing in parallel hundreds of thousands single molecules in one experiment. In this method, multiple PCR reactions amplify different polymorphic regions of a single DNA molecule on a magnetic bead compartmentalized in an emulsion drop. The allelic states of the amplified polymorphisms are identified with fluorescently labeled probes that are then decoded from images taken of the arrayed beads by a microscope. This method can evaluate the phase of up to 3 polymorphisms separated by up to 5 kilobases in hundreds of thousands single molecules. We tested the sensitivity of the method by measuring the number of mutant haplotypes synthesized by four different commercially available enzymes: Phusion, Platinum Taq, Titanium Taq, and Phire. The digital nature of the method makes it highly sensitive to detecting haplotype ratios of less than 1:10,000. We also accurately quantified chimera formation during the exponential phase of PCR by different DNA polymerases. PMID:22558329

  20. Using Haplotype Analysis to Elucidate Significant Associations between Genes and Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    D’Amelio, Anthony M.; Monroy, Claudia; El-Zein, Randa; Etzel, Carol J.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we estimated the association between the inferred haplotypes in the inflammation, DNA repair, and folate pathways, and developed risk models for Hodgkin Lymphoma. The study population consisted of 200 Hodgkin Lymphoma cases and 220 controls. A susceptible association was observed on the XPC gene with Haplotype CT (rs2228001 and rs2228000), and a protective association was observed on the IL4R gene with Haplotype TCA (rs1805012, rs1805015, and rs1801275). These results can provide the necessary tools to identify high-risk individuals after validation in large data sets. PMID:22902050

  1. Y chromosome haplotype analysis in Portuguese cattle breeds using SNPs and STRs.

    PubMed

    Ginja, Catarina; Telo da Gama, Luís; Penedo, Maria Cecilia T

    2009-01-01

    DNA samples from 307 males of 13 Portuguese native cattle breeds, 57 males of the 3 major exotic breeds in Portugal (Charolais, Friesian, and Limousin), and 5 Brahman (Bos indicus) were tested for 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms, 1 "indel," and 7 microsatellites specific to the Y chromosome. The 13 Y-haplotypes defined included 3 previously described patrilines (Y1, Y2, and Y3) and 10 new haplotypes within Bos taurus. Native cattle contained most of the diversity with 7 haplotypes (H2Y1, H3Y1, H5Y1, H7Y2, H8Y2, H10Y2, and H12Y2) found only in these breeds. H6Y2 and H11Y2 occurred in high frequency across breeds including the exotics. Introgression of Friesian cattle into Ramo Grande was inferred through their sharing of haplotype H4Y1. Among the native breeds, Mertolenga had the highest haplotype diversity (0.68 +/- 0.07), Brava de Lide was the least differentiated. The analyses of molecular variance showed significant (P < 0.0001) differences between breeds with more than 64% of the total genetic variation found among breeds within groups and 33-35% within breeds. The detection of INRA189-104 allele in 8 native breeds suggested influence of African cattle in breeds of the Iberian Peninsula. The presence in Portuguese breeds of Y1 patrilines, also found in aurochs, could represent more ancient local haplotypes. PMID:18832111

  2. The Roles of Variants in Human Multidrug Resistance (MDR1) Gene and Their Haplotypes on Antiepileptic Drugs Response: A Meta-Analysis of 57 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng; Wu, Minghua; Xu, Yun; Jiang, Yajun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous studies reported the associations between the ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 1 (ABCB1, also known as MDR1) polymorphisms and their haplotypes with risk of response to antiepileptic drugs in epilepsy, however, the results were inconclusive. Methods The Pubmed, Embase, Web of Science, CNKI and Chinese Biomedicine databases were searched up to July 15, 2014. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a fixed-effects or random-effects model based on heterogeneity tests. Meta-regression and Galbraith plot analysis were carried out to explore the possible heterogeneity. Results A total of 57 studies involving 12407 patients (6083 drug-resistant and 6324 drug-responsive patients with epilepsy) were included in the pooled-analysis. For all three polymorphisms (C3435T, G2677T/A, and C1236T), we observed a wide spectrum of minor allele frequencies across different ethnicities. A significantly decreased risk of AEDs resistance was observed in Caucasian patients with T allele of C3435T variant, which was still significant after adjusted by multiple testing corrections (T vs C: OR=0.83, 95%CI=0.71-0.96, p=0.01). However, no significant association was observed between the other two variants and AEDs resistance. Of their haplotypes in ABCB1 gene (all studies were in Indians and Asians), no significant association was observed with AEDs resistance. Moreover, sensitivity and Cumulative analysis showed that the results of this meta-analysis were stable. Conclusion In summary, this meta-analysis demonstrated that effect of C3435T variant on risk of AEDs resistance was ethnicity-dependent, which was significant in Caucasians. Additionally, further studies in different ethnic groups are warranted to clarify possible roles of haplotypes in ABCB1 gene in AEDs resistance, especially in Caucasians. PMID:25816099

  3. Haplotype analysis of non-HLA immunogenetic loci in Turkish and worldwide populations.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Sefayet; Karaca, Mehmet; Civelek, Ersoy; Ozgul, Riza K; Sekerel, Bulent E; Polimanti, Renato

    2016-08-10

    Immunogenes (i.e., genes related to the immune system and its functions) are involved in the predisposition to numerous traits and their variation contributes to the phenotypic variability observed among human groups. Turkish population presents particular genetic features since its genetic pool is an admixture of European, Middle-Eastern, and Central Asian ancestries. Here, we analyzed the haplotype structure of four immunogenetic loci (i.e., ADAM33; IL13-IL4; IL4R; MS4A2) in 482 subjects from five different regions of Turkey. Genotyping was performed using KASP technology. Turkish data were compared with the haplotype information available from the 1000 Genomes Project Phase 3 (26 human populations from 5 ancestry groups). We did not observe significant differences among Turkish groups. Comparing other ancestries, we identified haplotype similarity of Turkish subjects with European populations in IL13-IL4, IL4R, and ADAM33 loci; and with central Asians in MS4A2 region. Considering loci displaying Turkish-European haplotype similarity (i.e., IL13-IL4, IL4R, and ADAM33), we observed differences between Turkish subjects and northern/western Europeans. Conversely, no significant difference was determined in MS4A2 between Turkish and central Asian populations. Finally, we assessed the haplotypes responsible for the differences between Turkish and European samples and the potential functional effects on the immunogenetic loci investigated. PMID:27129937

  4. Minigene analysis of intronic variants in common SPINK1 haplotypes associated with chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kereszturi, Éva; Király, Orsolya; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS Two common haplotypes of the serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) gene have been shown to increase the risk for chronic pancreatitis. A haplotype comprising the c.101A>G (p.N34S) missense variant and four intronic alterations has been found worldwide, whereas a second haplotype consisting of the c. −215G>A promoter variant and the c.194+2T>C intronic alteration has been observed frequently in Japan. METHODS In the present study we examined the functional significance of the intronic variants in the pathogenic SPINK1 haplotypes by utilizing minigenes, which harbor individual introns placed in the appropriate context of the full-length SPINK1 cDNA. Cells transfected with the SPINK1 minigenes secrete active trypsin inhibitor, thereby allowing evaluation of mutational effects simultaneously on transcription, splicing, translation and secretion. RESULTS We found that the c.194+2T>C intronic alteration abolished SPINK1 expression at the mRNA level, with consequent loss of inhibitor secretion, whereas the p.N34S associated intronic variants had no detectable functional effect. CONCLUSIONS Taken together with previous studies, the results indicate that all known variants within the p.N34S associated haplotype are functionally innocuous, suggesting that a yet unidentified variant within this haplotype is responsible for the pathogenic effect. The marked negative impact of the c.194+2T>C variant on SPINK1 expression supports the notion that SPINK1 variants increase the risk of chronic pancreatitis by diminishing protective trypsin inhibitor levels. PMID:18978175

  5. The Inference of Phased Haplotypes for the Immunoglobulin H Chain V Region Gene Loci by Analysis of VDJ Gene Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Marie J.; Chen, Zhiliang; Wang, Yan; Jackson, Katherine J.; Zhang, Lyndon; Boyd, Scott D.; Fire, Andrew Z.; Tanaka, Mark M.; Gaëta, Bruno A.; Collins, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    The existence of many highly similar genes in the lymphocyte receptor gene loci makes them difficult to investigate, and the determination of phased “haplotypes” has been particularly problematic. However, V(D)J gene rearrangements provide an opportunity to infer the association of Ig genes along the chromosomes. The chromosomal distribution of H chain genes in an Ig genotype can be inferred through analysis of VDJ rearrangements in individuals who are heterozygous at points within the IGH locus. We analyzed VDJ rearrangements from 44 individuals for whom sufficient unique rearrangements were available to allow comprehensive genotyping. Nine individuals were identified who were heterozygous at the IGHJ6 locus and for whom sufficient suitable VDJ rearrangements were available to allow comprehensive haplotyping. Each of the 18 resulting IGHV|IGHD|IGHJ haplotypes was unique. Apparent deletion polymorphisms were seen that involved as many as four contiguous, functional IGHV genes. Two deletion polymorphisms involving multiple contiguous IGHD genes were also inferred. Three previously unidentified gene duplications were detected, where two sequences recognized as allelic variants of a single gene were both inferred to be on a single chromosome. Phased genomic data brings clarity to the study of the contribution of each gene to the available repertoire of rearranged VDJ genes. Analysis of rearrangement frequencies suggests that particular genes may have substantially different yet predictable propensities for rearrangement within different haplotypes. Together with data highlighting the extent of haplotypic variation within the population, this suggests that there may be substantial variability in the available Ab repertoires of different individuals. PMID:22205028

  6. Integrated Genetic and Epigenetic Analysis Identifies Haplotype-Specific Methylation in the FTO Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Gareth A.; Rakyan, Vardhman K.; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Akan, Pelin; Stupka, Elia; Down, Thomas A.; Prokopenko, Inga; Morison, Ian M.; Mill, Jonathan; Pidsley, Ruth; Deloukas, Panos; Frayling, Timothy M.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Beck, Stephan; Hitman, Graham A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent multi-dimensional approaches to the study of complex disease have revealed powerful insights into how genetic and epigenetic factors may underlie their aetiopathogenesis. We examined genotype-epigenotype interactions in the context of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), focussing on known regions of genomic susceptibility. We assayed DNA methylation in 60 females, stratified according to disease susceptibility haplotype using previously identified association loci. CpG methylation was assessed using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation on a targeted array (MeDIP-chip) and absolute methylation values were estimated using a Bayesian algorithm (BATMAN). Absolute methylation levels were quantified across LD blocks, and we identified increased DNA methylation on the FTO obesity susceptibility haplotype, tagged by the rs8050136 risk allele A (p = 9.40×10−4, permutation p = 1.0×10−3). Further analysis across the 46 kb LD block using sliding windows localised the most significant difference to be within a 7.7 kb region (p = 1.13×10−7). Sequence level analysis, followed by pyrosequencing validation, revealed that the methylation difference was driven by the co-ordinated phase of CpG-creating SNPs across the risk haplotype. This 7.7 kb region of haplotype-specific methylation (HSM), encapsulates a Highly Conserved Non-Coding Element (HCNE) that has previously been validated as a long-range enhancer, supported by the histone H3K4me1 enhancer signature. This study demonstrates that integration of Genome-Wide Association (GWA) SNP and epigenomic DNA methylation data can identify potential novel genotype-epigenotype interactions within disease-associated loci, thus providing a novel route to aid unravelling common complex diseases. PMID:21124985

  7. Functional and genetic analysis of haplotypic sequence variation at the nicastrin genomic locus

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Gillian; Killick, Richard; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Amouyel, Philippe; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Younkin, Steven G.; Powell, John F.; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Nicastrin (NCSTN) is a component of the γ-secretase complex and therefore potentially a candidate risk gene for Alzheimer's disease. Here, we have developed a novel functional genomics methodology to express common locus haplotypes to assess functional differences. DNA recombination was used to engineer 5 bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) to each express a different haplotype of the NCSTN locus. Each NCSTN-BAC was delivered to knockout nicastrin (Ncstn−/−) cells and clonal NCSTN-BAC+/Ncstn−/− cell lines were created for functional analyses. We showed that all NCSTN-BAC haplotypes expressed nicastrin protein and rescued γ-secretase activity and amyloid beta (Aβ) production in NCSTN-BAC+/Ncstn−/− lines. We then showed that genetic variation at the NCSTN locus affected alternative splicing in human postmortem brain tissue. However, there was no robust functional difference between clonal cell lines rescued by each of the 5 different haplotypes. Finally, there was no statistically significant association of NCSTN with disease risk in the 4 cohorts. We therefore conclude that it is unlikely that common variation at the NCSTN locus is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22405046

  8. Disclosing the Genetic Structure of Brazil through Analysis of Male Lineages with Highly Discriminating Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Palha, Teresinha; Gusmão, Leonor; Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Elzemar; Guerreiro, João Farias; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea; Santos, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    In a large variety of genetic studies, probabilistic inferences are made based on information available in population databases. The accuracy of the estimates based on population samples are highly dependent on the number of chromosomes being analyzed as well as the correct representation of the reference population. For frequency calculations the size of a database is especially critical for haploid markers, and for countries with complex admixture histories it is important to assess possible substructure effects that can influence the coverage of the database. Aiming to establish a representative Brazilian population database for haplotypes based on 23 Y chromosome STRs, more than 2,500 Y chromosomes belonging to Brazilian, European and African populations were analyzed. No matter the differences in the colonization history of the five geopolitical regions that currently exist in Brazil, for the Y chromosome haplotypes of the 23 studied Y-STRs, a lack of genetic heterogeneity was found, together with a predominance of European male lineages in all regions of the country. Therefore, if we do not consider the diverse Native American or Afro-descendent isolates, which are spread through the country, a single Y chromosome haplotype frequency database will adequately represent the urban populations in Brazil. In comparison to the most commonly studied group of 17 Y-STRs, the 23 markers included in this work allowed a high discrimination capacity between haplotypes from non-related individuals within a population and also increased the capacity to discriminate between paternal relatives. Nevertheless, the expected haplotype mutation rate is still not enough to distinguish the Y chromosome profiles of paternally related individuals. Indeed, even for rapidly mutating Y-STRs, a very large number of markers will be necessary to differentiate male lineages from paternal relatives. PMID:22808085

  9. Molecular and immunogenetic analysis of major histocompatibility haplotypes in Northern Bobwhite enable direct identification of corresponding haplotypes in an endangered subspecies, the Masked Bobwhite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drake, B.M.; Goto, R.M.; Miller, M.M.; Gee, G.F.; Briles, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a group of genetic loci coding for haplotypes that have been associated with fitness traits in mammals and birds. Such associations suggest that MHC diversity may be an indicator of overall genetic fitness of endangered or threatened species. The MHC haplotypes of a captive population of 12 families of northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus) were identified using a combination of immunogenetic and molecular techniques. Alloantisera were produced within families of northern bobwhites and were then tested for differential agglutination of erythrocytes of all members of each family. The pattern of reactions determined from testing these alloantisera identified a single genetic system of alloantigens in the northern bobwhites, resulting in the assignment of a tentative genotype to each individual within the quail families. Restriction fragment patterns of the DNA of each bird were determined using the chicken MHC B-G cDNA probe bg11. The concordance between the restriction fragment patterns and the alloantisera reactions showed that the alloantisera had identified the MHC of the northern bobwhite and supported the tentative genotype assignments, identifying at least 12 northern bobwhite MHC haplotypes.

  10. Global haplotype analysis of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci cryptic species Asia I in Asia.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Chen, Yong-Dui; Jiang, Zhi-Lin; Nardi, Francesco; Yang, Tai-Yuan; Jin, Jie; Zhang, Zhong-Kai

    2015-04-01

    The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidiae), is a cryptic species complex comprising a minimum of 24 cryptic species. Some members of this complex are important agricultural pests, causing considerable damage to vegetable as well as ornamental and horticultural crops. Asia I, one of the cryptic species of B. tabaci, is widely distributed in Asia. One hundred and sixty mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) sequences from eight countries have been analyzed to investigate the geographic origin and current genetic structure of this cryptic species. Sixty different haplotypes were identified, with levels of genetic distances ranging from 0.001 to 0.021. A sign of possible genetic differentiation emerges from the differential distribution of dominant haplotypes in Indonesia and India compared to China. A possible ancient separation between Asia I in India and Indonesia and secondary contact in China has been hypothesized. PMID:24460161

  11. Genetic analysis of 17 Y-chromosomal STRs haplotypes of Chinese Tibetan ethnic minority group.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhou; Jun, Wang; XingBo, Song; XiaoJun, Lu; Liu, Ding; BinWu, Ying

    2010-03-01

    We have co-amplified and analyzed 17 Y-chromosomal STRs loci (DYS19, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS438, DYS439, DYS437, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, YGATA-H4 and DYS385a/b) in 132 healthy unrelated autochthonous male individuals of Chinese Tibetan ethnic group residing in Lassa area of China. The gene diversity values for the Y-STRs loci ranged from a minimum 0.206 for DYS391 locus to a maximum of 0.912 for DYS385a/b locus in the populations. A total of 123 haplotypes were identified, among which 115 were unique and 8 occurred more than once. The overall haplotype diversity for 17 Y-STRs loci was 0.998. Research results will be valuable for forensic use in the regions and for Chinese population genetic study. PMID:20116321

  12. Analysis of Amblyomma sculptum haplotypes in an area endemic for Brazilian spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Bitencourth, K; Voloch, C M; Serra-Freire, N M; Machado-Ferreira, E; Amorim, M; Gazêta, G S

    2016-09-01

    Amblyomma sculptum (Ixodida: Ixodidae) Berlese, 1888, a member of the Amblyomma cajennense complex, is the major vector of Brazilian spotted fever (BSF) in southeastern Brazil. In this study, the genetic diversity of A. sculptum populations in the state of Rio de Janeiro (RJ), Brazil, was investigated because genetic variability in tick populations may be related to vector competence. Samples of A. sculptum from 19 municipalities in 7 regions of RJ were subjected to DNA extraction, amplification and sequencing of D-loop, cytochrome oxidase II and 12S rDNA mitochondrial genes. These sequences were used to map the genetic diversity of this tick. Amblyomma sculptum populations are genetically diverse in RJ, especially in the South Centre and Highland regions. Few unique haplotypes were observed in all populations, and the majority of genetic variation found was among ticks within each population. Phylogenetic reconstruction reinforced the assumption that all the haplotypes identified in RJ belong to A. sculptum. However, some RJ haplotypes are closer to A. sculptum from Argentina than to A. sculptum from elsewhere in Brazil. In RJ, A. sculptum has high genetic diversity, although little genetic differentiation. Observations also indicated a high level of gene flow among the studied populations and no evidence of population structure according to region in RJ. PMID:27120044

  13. Detecting local haplotype sharing and haplotype association

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel haplotype association method is presented, and its power is demonstrated. Relying on a statistical model for linkage disequilibrium (LD), the method first infers ancestral haplotypes and their loadings at each marker for each individual. The loadings are then used to quantify local haplotype...

  14. Native and European haplotypes of Phragmites Australis (common reed) in the central Platte River, Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, D.L.; Galatowitsch, S.M.; Larson, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Phragmites australis (common reed) is known to have occurred along the Platte River historically, but recent rapid increases in both distribution and density have begun to impact habitat for migrating sandhill cranes and nesting piping plovers and least terns. Invasiveness in Phragmites has been associated with the incursion of a European genotype (haplotype M) in other areas; determining the genotype of Phragmites along the central Platte River has implications for proper management of the river system. In 2008 we sampled Phragmites patches along the central Platte River from Lexington to Chapman, NE, stratified by bridge segments, to determine the current distribution of haplotype E (native) and haplotype M genotypes. In addition, we did a retrospective analysis of historical Phragmites collections from the central Platte watershed (1902-2006) at the Bessey Herbarium. Fresh tissue from the 2008 survey and dried tissue from the herbarium specimens were classified as haplotype M or E using the restriction fragment length polymorphism procedure. The European haplotype was predominant in the 2008 samples: only 14 Phragmites shoots were identified as native haplotype E; 224 were non-native haplotype M. The retrospective analysis revealed primarily native haplotype individuals. Only collections made in Lancaster County, near Lincoln, NE, were haplotype M, and the earliest of these was collected in 1973. ?? 2011 Copyright by the Center for Great Plains Studies, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

  15. Haplotyping Problem, A Clustering Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Eslahchi, Changiz; Sadeghi, Mehdi; Pezeshk, Hamid; Kargar, Mehdi; Poormohammadi, Hadi

    2007-09-06

    Construction of two haplotypes from a set of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) fragments is called haplotype reconstruction problem. One of the most popular computational model for this problem is Minimum Error Correction (MEC). Since MEC is an NP-hard problem, here we propose a novel heuristic algorithm based on clustering analysis in data mining for haplotype reconstruction problem. Based on hamming distance and similarity between two fragments, our iterative algorithm produces two clusters of fragments; then, in each iteration, the algorithm assigns a fragment to one of the clusters. Our results suggest that the algorithm has less reconstruction error rate in comparison with other algorithms.

  16. Twelve short tandem repeat loci Y chromosome haplotypes: genetic analysis on populations residing in North America.

    PubMed

    Budowle, Bruce; Adamowicz, Mike; Aranda, Xavier G; Barna, Charles; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Cheswick, Dan; Dafoe, Bradley; Eisenberg, Arthur; Frappier, Roger; Gross, Ann Marie; Ladd, Carll; Lee, Hee-Suk; Milne, Scott C; Meyers, Carole; Prinz, Mechthild; Richard, Melanie L; Saldanha, Gabriela; Tierney, Amy A; Viculis, Lori; Krenke, Benjamin E

    2005-05-28

    A total of 2443 male individuals, previously typed for the 13 CODIS STR loci, distributed across the five North American population groups African American, Asian, Caucasian, Hispanic, and Native American were typed for the Y-STR loci DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389I/II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439 using the PowerPlex Y System. All population samples were highly polymorphic for the 12 Y-STR loci with the marker DYS385a/b being the most polymorphic across all sample populations. The Native American population groups demonstrated the lowest genetic diversity, most notably at the DYS393 and DYS437 loci. Almost all of the 12-locus haplotypes observed in the sample populations were represented only once in the database. Haplotype diversities were greater than 99.6% for the African Americans, Caucasians, Hispanics, and Asians. The Native Americans had the lowest haplotype diversities (Apaches, 97.0%; Navajo, 98.1%). Population substructure effects were greater for Y-haplotypes, compared with that for the autosomal loci. For the apportionment of variance for the 12 Y-STRs, the within sample population variation was the largest component (>98% for each major population group and approximately 97% in Native Americans), and the variance component contributed by the major population groups was less than the individual component, but much greater than among sample populations within a major group (11.79% versus 1.02% for African Americans/Caucasians/Hispanics and 15.35% versus 1.25% for all five major populations). When each major population is analyzed individually, the R(ST) values were low but showed significant among group heterogeneity. In 692 confirmed father-son pairs, 14 mutation events were observed with the average rate of 1.57x10(-3)/locus/generation (a 95% confidence bound of 0.83x10(-3) to 2.69x10(-3)). Since the Y-STR loci reside on the non-recombining region of the Y chromosome, the counting method is one approach suggested for conveying

  17. Haplotype hitchhiking promotes trait coselection in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lunwen; Qian, Wei; Snowdon, Rod J

    2016-07-01

    Local haplotype patterns surrounding densely spaced DNA markers with significant trait associations can reveal information on selective sweeps and genome diversity associated with important crop traits. Relationships between haplotype and phenotype diversity, coupled with analysis of gene content in conserved haplotype blocks, can provide insight into coselection for nonrelated traits. We performed genome-wide analysis of haplotypes associated with the important physiological and agronomic traits leaf chlorophyll and seed glucosinolate content, respectively, in the major oilseed crop species Brassica napus. A locus on chromosome A01 showed opposite effects on leaf chlorophyll content and seed glucosinolate content, attributed to strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) between orthologues of the chlorophyll biosynthesis genes EARLY LIGHT-INDUCED PROTEIN and CHLOROPHYLL SYNTHASE, and the glucosinolate synthesis gene ATP SULFURYLASE 1. Another conserved haplotype block, on chromosome A02, contained a number of chlorophyll-related genes in LD with orthologues of the key glucosinolate biosynthesis genes METHYLTHIOALKYMALATE SYNTHASE-LIKE 1 and 3. Multigene haplogroups were found to have a significantly greater contribution to variation for chlorophyll content than haplotypes for any single gene, suggesting positive effects of additive locus accumulation. Detailed reanalysis of population substructure revealed a clade of ten related accessions exhibiting high leaf chlorophyll and low seed glucosinolate content. These accessions each carried one of the above-mentioned haplotypes from A01 or A02, generally in combination with further chlorophyll-associated haplotypes from chromosomes A05 and/or C05. The phenotypic rather than pleiotropic correlations between leaf chlorophyll content index and seed GSL suggest that LD may have led to inadvertent coselection for these two traits. PMID:26800855

  18. An evolutionary analysis of RAC2 identifies haplotypes associated with human autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Sironi, Manuela; Guerini, Franca Rosa; Agliardi, Cristina; Biasin, Mara; Cagliani, Rachele; Fumagalli, Matteo; Caputo, Domenico; Cassinotti, Andrea; Ardizzone, Sandro; Zanzottera, Milena; Bolognesi, Elisabetta; Riva, Stefania; Kanari, Yasuyoshi; Miyazawa, Masaaki; Clerici, Mario

    2011-12-01

    The human RAC2 gene encodes a small GTP-binding protein with a pivotal role in immune activation and in the induction of peripheral immune tolerance through restimulation-induced cell death (RICD). Different human pathogens target the protein product of RAC2, suggesting that the gene may be subject to natural selection, and that variants in RAC2 may affect immunological phenotypes in humans. We scanned the genomic region encompassing the entire transcription unit for the presence of putative noncoding regulatory elements conserved across mammals. This information was used to select two RAC2 gene regions and analyze their intraspecific genetic diversity. Results suggest that a region covering the 3' untranslated region has been a target of multiallelic balancing selection (or diversifying selection), and three major RAC2 haplogroups occur in human populations. Haplotypes belonging to one of these clades are associated with increased susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (P = 0.022) and earlier onset of disease symptoms (P = 0.025). This same haplogroup is significantly more common in patients with Crohn's disease compared with healthy controls (P = 0.048). These data reinforce recent evidences that susceptibility alleles/haplotypes are shared among multiple autoimmune disorders and support a causal "role for RAC2" variants in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Other genes with a role in RICD have previously been associated with autoimmunity in humans, suggesting that this pathway and RAC2 may represent novel therapeutic targets in autoimmune disorders. PMID:21680873

  19. An integrative variant analysis pipeline for accurate genotype/haplotype inference in population NGS data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Lu, James; Yu, Jin; Gibbs, Richard A; Yu, Fuli

    2013-05-01

    Next-generation sequencing is a powerful approach for discovering genetic variation. Sensitive variant calling and haplotype inference from population sequencing data remain challenging. We describe methods for high-quality discovery, genotyping, and phasing of SNPs for low-coverage (approximately 5×) sequencing of populations, implemented in a pipeline called SNPTools. Our pipeline contains several innovations that specifically address challenges caused by low-coverage population sequencing: (1) effective base depth (EBD), a nonparametric statistic that enables more accurate statistical modeling of sequencing data; (2) variance ratio scoring, a variance-based statistic that discovers polymorphic loci with high sensitivity and specificity; and (3) BAM-specific binomial mixture modeling (BBMM), a clustering algorithm that generates robust genotype likelihoods from heterogeneous sequencing data. Last, we develop an imputation engine that refines raw genotype likelihoods to produce high-quality phased genotypes/haplotypes. Designed for large population studies, SNPTools' input/output (I/O) and storage aware design leads to improved computing performance on large sequencing data sets. We apply SNPTools to the International 1000 Genomes Project (1000G) Phase 1 low-coverage data set and obtain genotyping accuracy comparable to that of SNP microarray. PMID:23296920

  20. Haplotype analysis of HLA-A, -B antigens and -DRB1 alleles in south Indian HIV-1-infected patients with and without pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, S; Selvaraj, P; Swaminathan, S; Alagarasu, K; Narendran, G; Narayanan, P R

    2009-06-01

    We have shown earlier the association of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-A11 with resistance and HLA-B40 and -DR2 with susceptibility to HIV and HIV-TB. In the present study, we have attempted to find out the HLA-DR2 subtypes and the possible HLA-A/-B/-DRB1 haplotype combinations that are associated with susceptibility or resistance to HIV and HIV with pulmonary tuberculosis (HIV+PTB+). HLA-DR2 subtyping was carried out by polymerase chain reaction-based sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe method. Overrepresentation of HLA-DRB1*1501 in HIV-positive PTB-negative (HIV+PTB-) patients (P = 0.004, P(c) = 0.06) and -DRB1*1502 in HIV-positive PTB-positive (HIV+PTB+) patients (P = 0.019) was observed as compared to healthy controls. Haplotype analysis revealed an increased frequency of HLA-A2-DRB1*1501 haplotype in HIV+PTB- patients (P = 0.008) and HLA-A2-DRB1*1502 among HIV+PTB+ patients (P = 0.01) compared to healthy controls. The haplotypes B40-DRB1*1501 and B40-DRB1*04 were found to be moderately increased in HIV+PTB(-) and HIV+PTB+ patients (P < 0.05). The study suggests that HLA-A2-DRB1*1501 haplotype may be associated with HIV infection while HLA-A2-DRB1*1502 haplotype might be associated with susceptibility to PTB in HIV patients. Moreover, HLA-B40-DRB1*1501 and HLA-B40-DRB1*04 haplotypes may be associated with susceptibility to HIV infection and to PTB in HIV patients. PMID:19392836

  1. Identification of rheumatoid arthritis biomarkers based on single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotype blocks: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Mohamed N.; Mabrouk, Mai S.; Eldeib, Ayman M.; Shaker, Olfat G.

    2015-01-01

    Genetics of autoimmune diseases represent a growing domain with surpassing biomarker results with rapid progress. The exact cause of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is unknown, but it is thought to have both a genetic and an environmental bases. Genetic biomarkers are capable of changing the supervision of RA by allowing not only the detection of susceptible individuals, but also early diagnosis, evaluation of disease severity, selection of therapy, and monitoring of response to therapy. This review is concerned with not only the genetic biomarkers of RA but also the methods of identifying them. Many of the identified genetic biomarkers of RA were identified in populations of European and Asian ancestries. The study of additional human populations may yield novel results. Most of the researchers in the field of identifying RA biomarkers use single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) approaches to express the significance of their results. Although, haplotype block methods are expected to play a complementary role in the future of that field. PMID:26843965

  2. Functional variation in promoter region of monoamine oxidase A and subtypes of alcoholism: haplotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Parsian, Abbas; Cloninger, C Robert; Sinha, Rashmi; Zhang, Zhen Hua

    2003-02-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is a mitochondrial enzyme involved in the degradation of certain neurotransmitter amines. MAO-A, due to its function in central nervous system, has been one of the important candidate genes involved in the development of neuropsychiatric disorders. A functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the MAO-A gene has been identified. This variation affects the transcriptional efficiency of the gene. To determine the role of this MAO-A functional polymorphism in the development of subtypes of alcoholism, a sample of alcoholics and normal controls were screened with this marker. The allele frequency differences between total alcoholics, Types I and II alcoholics, and normal controls was not significant. Comparison of male alcoholics to male normal controls for the frequencies of two-loci and three-loci haplotypes was statistically significant. After Bonferroni's correction for multiple tests none of the results remained significant at P < 0.05. Our results indicate that MAO-A may play a role in the development of alcoholism but the gene effect is very small. PMID:12555234

  3. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci.

    PubMed

    Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha; Nagy, Marion; Alves, Cíntia; Salazar, Renato; Angustia, Sheila M T; Santos, Lorna H; Anslinger, Katja; Bayer, Birgit; Ayub, Qasim; Wei, Wei; Xue, Yali; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Bafalluy, Miriam Baeta; Martínez-Jarreta, Begoña; Egyed, Balazs; Balitzki, Beate; Tschumi, Sibylle; Ballard, David; Court, Denise Syndercombe; Barrantes, Xinia; Bäßler, Gerhard; Wiest, Tina; Berger, Burkhard; Niederstätter, Harald; Parson, Walther; Davis, Carey; Budowle, Bruce; Burri, Helen; Borer, Urs; Koller, Christoph; Carvalho, Elizeu F; Domingues, Patricia M; Chamoun, Wafaa Takash; Coble, Michael D; Hill, Carolyn R; Corach, Daniel; Caputo, Mariela; D'Amato, Maria E; Davison, Sean; Decorte, Ronny; Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Ottoni, Claudio; Rickards, Olga; Lu, Di; Jiang, Chengtao; Dobosz, Tadeusz; Jonkisz, Anna; Frank, William E; Furac, Ivana; Gehrig, Christian; Castella, Vincent; Grskovic, Branka; Haas, Cordula; Wobst, Jana; Hadzic, Gavrilo; Drobnic, Katja; Honda, Katsuya; Hou, Yiping; Zhou, Di; Li, Yan; Hu, Shengping; Chen, Shenglan; Immel, Uta-Dorothee; Lessig, Rüdiger; Jakovski, Zlatko; Ilievska, Tanja; Klann, Anja E; García, Cristina Cano; de Knijff, Peter; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; Kondili, Aikaterini; Miniati, Penelope; Vouropoulou, Maria; Kovacevic, Lejla; Marjanovic, Damir; Lindner, Iris; Mansour, Issam; Al-Azem, Mouayyad; Andari, Ansar El; Marino, Miguel; Furfuro, Sandra; Locarno, Laura; Martín, Pablo; Luque, Gracia M; Alonso, Antonio; Miranda, Luís Souto; Moreira, Helena; Mizuno, Natsuko; Iwashima, Yasuki; Neto, Rodrigo S Moura; Nogueira, Tatiana L S; Silva, Rosane; Nastainczyk-Wulf, Marina; Edelmann, Jeanett; Kohl, Michael; Nie, Shengjie; Wang, Xianping; Cheng, Baowen; Núñez, Carolina; Pancorbo, Marian Martínez de; Olofsson, Jill K; Morling, Niels; Onofri, Valerio; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Pamjav, Horolma; Volgyi, Antonia; Barany, Gusztav; Pawlowski, Ryszard; Maciejewska, Agnieszka; Pelotti, Susi; Pepinski, Witold; Abreu-Glowacka, Monica; Phillips, Christopher; Cárdenas, Jorge; Rey-Gonzalez, Danel; Salas, Antonio; Brisighelli, Francesca; Capelli, Cristian; Toscanini, Ulises; Piccinini, Andrea; Piglionica, Marilidia; Baldassarra, Stefania L; Ploski, Rafal; Konarzewska, Magdalena; Jastrzebska, Emila; Robino, Carlo; Sajantila, Antti; Palo, Jukka U; Guevara, Evelyn; Salvador, Jazelyn; Ungria, Maria Corazon De; Rodriguez, Jae Joseph Russell; Schmidt, Ulrike; Schlauderer, Nicola; Saukko, Pekka; Schneider, Peter M; Sirker, Miriam; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Oh, Yu Na; Skitsa, Iulia; Ampati, Alexandra; Smith, Tobi-Gail; Calvit, Lina Solis de; Stenzl, Vlastimil; Capal, Thomas; Tillmar, Andreas; Nilsson, Helena; Turrina, Stefania; De Leo, Domenico; Verzeletti, Andrea; Cortellini, Venusia; Wetton, Jon H; Gwynne, Gareth M; Jobling, Mark A; Whittle, Martin R; Sumita, Denilce R; Wolańska-Nowak, Paulina; Yong, Rita Y Y; Krawczak, Michael; Nothnagel, Michael; Roewer, Lutz

    2014-09-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, GATAH4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS643) and using the PowerPlex Y23 System (PPY23, Promega Corporation, Madison, WI). Locus-specific allelic spectra of these markers were determined and a consistently high level of allelic diversity was observed. A considerable number of null, duplicate and off-ladder alleles were revealed. Standard single-locus and haplotype-based parameters were calculated and compared between subsets of Y-STR markers established for forensic casework. The PPY23 marker set provides substantially stronger discriminatory power than other available kits but at the same time reveals the same general patterns of population structure as other marker sets. A strong correlation was observed between the number of Y-STRs included in a marker set and some of the forensic parameters under study. Interestingly a weak but consistent trend toward smaller genetic distances resulting from larger numbers of markers became apparent. PMID:24854874

  4. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci

    PubMed Central

    Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha; Nagy, Marion; Alves, Cíntia; Salazar, Renato; Angustia, Sheila M.T.; Santos, Lorna H.; Anslinger, Katja; Bayer, Birgit; Ayub, Qasim; Wei, Wei; Xue, Yali; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Bafalluy, Miriam Baeta; Martínez-Jarreta, Begoña; Egyed, Balazs; Balitzki, Beate; Tschumi, Sibylle; Ballard, David; Court, Denise Syndercombe; Barrantes, Xinia; Bäßler, Gerhard; Wiest, Tina; Berger, Burkhard; Niederstätter, Harald; Parson, Walther; Davis, Carey; Budowle, Bruce; Burri, Helen; Borer, Urs; Koller, Christoph; Carvalho, Elizeu F.; Domingues, Patricia M.; Chamoun, Wafaa Takash; Coble, Michael D.; Hill, Carolyn R.; Corach, Daniel; Caputo, Mariela; D’Amato, Maria E.; Davison, Sean; Decorte, Ronny; Larmuseau, Maarten H.D.; Ottoni, Claudio; Rickards, Olga; Lu, Di; Jiang, Chengtao; Dobosz, Tadeusz; Jonkisz, Anna; Frank, William E.; Furac, Ivana; Gehrig, Christian; Castella, Vincent; Grskovic, Branka; Haas, Cordula; Wobst, Jana; Hadzic, Gavrilo; Drobnic, Katja; Honda, Katsuya; Hou, Yiping; Zhou, Di; Li, Yan; Hu, Shengping; Chen, Shenglan; Immel, Uta-Dorothee; Lessig, Rüdiger; Jakovski, Zlatko; Ilievska, Tanja; Klann, Anja E.; García, Cristina Cano; de Knijff, Peter; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; Kondili, Aikaterini; Miniati, Penelope; Vouropoulou, Maria; Kovacevic, Lejla; Marjanovic, Damir; Lindner, Iris; Mansour, Issam; Al-Azem, Mouayyad; Andari, Ansar El; Marino, Miguel; Furfuro, Sandra; Locarno, Laura; Martín, Pablo; Luque, Gracia M.; Alonso, Antonio; Miranda, Luís Souto; Moreira, Helena; Mizuno, Natsuko; Iwashima, Yasuki; Neto, Rodrigo S. Moura; Nogueira, Tatiana L.S.; Silva, Rosane; Nastainczyk-Wulf, Marina; Edelmann, Jeanett; Kohl, Michael; Nie, Shengjie; Wang, Xianping; Cheng, Baowen; Núñez, Carolina; Pancorbo, Marian Martínez de; Olofsson, Jill K.; Morling, Niels; Onofri, Valerio; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Pamjav, Horolma; Volgyi, Antonia; Barany, Gusztav; Pawlowski, Ryszard; Maciejewska, Agnieszka; Pelotti, Susi; Pepinski, Witold; Abreu-Glowacka, Monica; Phillips, Christopher; Cárdenas, Jorge; Rey-Gonzalez, Danel; Salas, Antonio; Brisighelli, Francesca; Capelli, Cristian; Toscanini, Ulises; Piccinini, Andrea; Piglionica, Marilidia; Baldassarra, Stefania L.; Ploski, Rafal; Konarzewska, Magdalena; Jastrzebska, Emila; Robino, Carlo; Sajantila, Antti; Palo, Jukka U.; Guevara, Evelyn; Salvador, Jazelyn; Ungria, Maria Corazon De; Rodriguez, Jae Joseph Russell; Schmidt, Ulrike; Schlauderer, Nicola; Saukko, Pekka; Schneider, Peter M.; Sirker, Miriam; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Oh, Yu Na; Skitsa, Iulia; Ampati, Alexandra; Smith, Tobi-Gail; Calvit, Lina Solis de; Stenzl, Vlastimil; Capal, Thomas; Tillmar, Andreas; Nilsson, Helena; Turrina, Stefania; De Leo, Domenico; Verzeletti, Andrea; Cortellini, Venusia; Wetton, Jon H.; Gwynne, Gareth M.; Jobling, Mark A.; Whittle, Martin R.; Sumita, Denilce R.; Wolańska-Nowak, Paulina; Yong, Rita Y.Y.; Krawczak, Michael; Nothnagel, Michael; Roewer, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, GATAH4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS643) and using the PowerPlex Y23 System (PPY23, Promega Corporation, Madison, WI). Locus-specific allelic spectra of these markers were determined and a consistently high level of allelic diversity was observed. A considerable number of null, duplicate and off-ladder alleles were revealed. Standard single-locus and haplotype-based parameters were calculated and compared between subsets of Y-STR markers established for forensic casework. The PPY23 marker set provides substantially stronger discriminatory power than other available kits but at the same time reveals the same general patterns of population structure as other marker sets. A strong correlation was observed between the number of Y-STRs included in a marker set and some of the forensic parameters under study. Interestingly a weak but consistent trend toward smaller genetic distances resulting from larger numbers of markers became apparent. PMID:24854874

  5. Toward localization of the Werner syndrome gene by linkage disequilibrium and ancestral haplotyping: Lessons learned from analysis of 35 chromosome 8p11.1-21.1 markers

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, K.A.B.; Wijsman, E.M.; Martin, G.M.

    1996-06-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by premature onset of a number of age-related diseases. The gene for WS, WRN, has been mapped to the 8p11.1-21.1 region with further localization through linkage disequilibrium mapping. Here we present the results of linkage disequilibrium and ancestral haplotype analyses of 35 markers to further refine the location of WRN. We identified an interval in this region in which 14 of 18 markers tested show significant evidence of linkage disequilibrium in at least one of the two populations tested. Analysis of extended and partial haplotypes covering 21 of the markers studied supports the existence of both obligate and probable ancestral recombinant events which localize WRN almost certainly to the interval between DSS2196 and D8S2186, and most likely to the narrower interval between D8S2168 and D8S2186. These haplotype analyses also suggest that there are multiple WRN mutations in each of the two populations under study. We also present a comparison of approaches to performing disequilibrium tests with multiallelic markers, and show that some commonly used approximations for such tests perform poorly in comparison to exact probability tests. Finally, we discuss some of the difficulties introduced by the high mutation rate at microsatellite markers which influence our ability to use ancestral haplotype analysis to localize disease genes. 51 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Genetic Analysis of Mouse T Haplotypes Using Mutations Induced by Ethylnitrosourea Mutagenesis: The Order of T and Qk Is Inverted in T Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Justice, M. J.; Bode, V. C.

    1988-01-01

    The t region of mouse chromosome 17 exhibits recombination suppression with wild-type chromatin. However, the region has resisted classical genetic dissection because of a lack of defined variants. Mutations induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) at the Brachyury (T), quaking (qk), and tufted (tf) loci of the mouse t(w5) haplotype have now allowed the analysis of crossovers between two complete t haplotypes. A classical breeding analysis of the complete t haplotypes, t(w5) and t(12), utilizing the newly induced markers, reveals two inversions in t chromatin: one involving T and qk, and one involving tf and the H-2 complex. Moreover, the recombination frequency between the loci of T and qk is reduced compared to the frequency reported in normal chromatin. These two inversions are a sufficient explanation for the recombination inhibition with normal chromatin exhibited by t haplotypes isolated from the wild. Furthermore, the reduced recombination frequency between T and qk may indicate that the proximal gene rearrangement is not a simple inversion. PMID:3197958

  7. Comparative sequence analysis of the potato cyst nematode resistance locus H1 reveals a major lack of co-linearity between three haplotypes in potato (Solanum tuberosum ssp.).

    PubMed

    Finkers-Tomczak, Anna; Bakker, Erin; de Boer, Jan; van der Vossen, Edwin; Achenbach, Ute; Golas, Tomasz; Suryaningrat, Suwardi; Smant, Geert; Bakker, Jaap; Goverse, Aska

    2011-02-01

    The H1 locus confers resistance to the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis pathotypes 1 and 4. It is positioned at the distal end of chromosome V of the diploid Solanum tuberosum genotype SH83-92-488 (SH) on an introgression segment derived from S. tuberosum ssp. andigena. Markers from a high-resolution genetic map of the H1 locus (Bakker et al. in Theor Appl Genet 109:146-152, 2004) were used to screen a BAC library to construct a physical map covering a 341-kb region of the resistant haplotype coming from SH. For comparison, physical maps were also generated of the two haplotypes from the diploid susceptible genotype RH89-039-16 (S. tuberosum ssp. tuberosum/S. phureja), spanning syntenic regions of 700 and 319 kb. Gene predictions on the genomic segments resulted in the identification of a large cluster consisting of variable numbers of the CC-NB-LRR type of R genes for each haplotype. Furthermore, the regions were interspersed with numerous transposable elements and genes coding for an extensin-like protein and an amino acid transporter. Comparative analysis revealed a major lack of gene order conservation in the sequences of the three closely related haplotypes. Our data provide insight in the evolutionary mechanisms shaping the H1 locus and will facilitate the map-based cloning of the H1 resistance gene. PMID:21049265

  8. Extended haplotype analysis of ovine ADRB3 using polymerase chain reaction single strand conformational polymorphism on two regions of the gene.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guo; Hickford, Jon G H; Zhou, Huitong; Fang, Qian; Forrest, Rachel H

    2011-07-01

    The β3 adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) plays a critical role in the regulation of energy metabolism in mammals. In sheep, intronic polymorphism of the ADRB3 gene has been associated with lamb survival and various production traits. This study investigates variation in the ovine ADRB3 3' untranslated region (3'UTR), a region that may impact expression of the gene. Using PCR- single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP), six unique patterns (named a-f) were observed in an approximately 304-bp amplicon. Sequencing revealed three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (c.*233A>C, c.*271G>C, c.*357A>T) and a single-nucleotide deletion (c.*257delG). Haplotype analyses showed that the previously described allele A defined by variation in the ovine ADRB3 intron can be divided into three haplotypes (Aa, Ab, and Ac). In total, 16 haplotypes through ovine ADRB3 were detected. This study suggests that ovine ADRB3 is highly polymorphic and that the extended haplotype analysis through the promoter, 5'UTR, coding sequence, intron, and 3'UTR needs to be performed to define the full extent of variation in this gene. PMID:21348572

  9. Multi-SNP analysis of MHC region: remarkable conservation of HLA-A1-B8-DR3 haplotype.

    PubMed

    Aly, Theresa A; Eller, Elise; Ide, Akane; Gowan, Katherine; Babu, Sunanda R; Erlich, Henry A; Rewers, Marian J; Eisenbarth, George S; Fain, Pamela R

    2006-05-01

    Technology has become available to cost-effectively analyze thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We recently confirmed by genotyping a small series of class I alleles and microsatellite markers that the extended haplotype HLA-A1-B8-DR3 (8.1 AH) at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a common and conserved haplotype. To further evaluate the region of conservation of the DR3 haplotypes, we genotyped 31 8.1 AHs and 29 other DR3 haplotypes with a panel of 656 SNPs spanning 4.8 Mb in the MHC region. This multi-SNP evaluation revealed a 2.9-Mb region that was essentially invariable for all 31 8.1 AHs. The 31 8.1 AHs were >99.9% identical for 384 consecutive SNPs of the 656 SNPs analyzed. Future association studies of MHC-linked susceptibility to type 1 diabetes will need to account for the extensive conservation of the 8.1 AH, since individuals who carry this haplotype provide no information about the differential effects of the alleles that are present on this haplotype. PMID:16644681

  10. Haplotype analysis and age estimation of the 113insR CDKN2A founder mutation in Swedish melanoma families.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, J; Bendahl, P O; Sandberg, T; Platz, A; Linder, S; Stierner, U; Olsson, H; Ingvar, C; Hansson, J; Borg, A

    2001-06-01

    Germline mutations in the CDKN2A tumor suppressor gene located on 9p21 have been linked to development of melanomas in some families. A germline 3-bp insertion in exon 2 of CDKN2A, leading to an extra arginine at codon 113 (113insR), has been identified in 17 Swedish melanoma families. Analysis of 10 microsatellite markers, spanning approximately 1 Mbp in the 9p21 region, showed that all families share a common allele for at least one of the markers closest to the CDKN2A gene, suggesting that the 113insR mutation is an ancestral founder mutation. Differences in the segregating haplotypes, due to meiotic recombinations and/or mutations in the short-tandem-repeat markers, were analyzed further to estimate the age of the mutation. Statistical analysis using a maximum likelihood approach indicated that the mutation arose 98 generations (90% confidence interval: 52-167 generations), or approximately 2,000 years, ago. Thus, 113insR would be expected to have a more widespread geographic distribution in European and North American regions with ancestral connections to Sweden. Alternatively, CDKN2A may lie in a recombination hot spot region, as suggested by the many meiotic recombinations in this narrow approximately 1-cM region on 9p21. PMID:11319798

  11. Analysis of DNA haplotypes suggests a genetic predisposition to trisomy 21 associated with DNA sequences on chromosome 21.

    PubMed Central

    Antonarakis, S E; Kittur, S D; Metaxotou, C; Watkins, P C; Patel, A S

    1985-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that there is a genetic predisposition to nondisjunction and trisomy 21 associated with DNA sequences on chromosome 21, we used DNA polymorphism haplotypes for chromosomes 21 to examine the distribution of different chromosomes 21 in Down syndrome and control families from the same ethnic group. The chromosomes 21 from 20 Greek families with a Down syndrome child and 27 control Greek families have been examined for DNA polymorphism haplotypes by using four common polymorphic sites adjacent to two closely linked single-copy DNA sequences (namely pW228C and pW236B), which map somewhere near the proximal long arm of chromosome 21. Three haplotypes, +, +---, and - with respective frequencies of 43/108, 24/108, and 23/108, account for the majority of chromosomes 21 in the control families. However, haplotype - was found to be much more commonly associated with chromosomes 21 that underwent nondisjunction in the Down syndrome families (frequency of 21/50; X2 for the two distributions is 9.550; P = 0.023; degrees of freedom, 3). The two populations (control and trisomic families) did not differ in the distribution of haplotypes for two DNA polymorphisms on chromosome 17. The data from this initial study suggest that the chromosome 21, which is marked in Greeks with haplotype - for the four above described polymorphic sites, is found more commonly in chromosomes that participate in nondisjunction than in controls. We propose an increased tendency for nondisjunction due to DNA sequences associated with a subset of chromosomes 21 bearing this haplotype. Images PMID:2987923

  12. Association analysis of bovine Foxa2 gene single sequence variant and haplotype combinations with growth traits in Chinese cattle.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Li, Mijie; Wang, Shaoqiang; Xu, Yao; Lan, Xianyong; Li, Zhuanjian; Lei, Chuzhao; Yang, Dongying; Jia, Yutang; Chen, Hong

    2014-02-25

    Forkhead box A2 (Foxa2) has been recognized as one of the most potent transcriptional activators that is implicated in the control of feeding behavior and energy homeostasis. However, similar researches about the effects of genetic variations of Foxa2 gene on growth traits are lacking. Therefore, this study detected Foxa2 gene polymorphisms by DNA pool sequencing, PCR-RFLP and PCR-ACRS methods in 822 individuals from three Chinese cattle breeds. The results showed that four sequence variants (SVs) were screened, including two mutations (SV1, g. 7005 C>T and SV2, g. 7044 C>G) in intron 4, one mutation (SV3, g. 8449 A>G) in exon 5 and one mutation (SV4, g. 8537 T>C) in the 3'UTR. Notably, association analysis of the single mutations with growth traits in total individuals (at 24months) revealed that significant statistical difference was found in four SVs, and SV4 locus was highly significantly associated with growth traits throughout all three breeds (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Meanwhile, haplotype combination CCCCAGTC also indicated remarkably associated to better chest girth and body weight in Jiaxian Red cattle (P<0.05). We herein described a comprehensive study on the variability of bovine Foxa2 gene that was predictive of molecular markers in cattle breeding for the first time. PMID:24333857

  13. A risk haplotype of STAT4 for systemic lupus erythematosus is over-expressed, correlates with anti-dsDNA and shows additive effects with two risk alleles of IRF5

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Nordmark, Gunnel; Garnier, Sophie; Grundberg, Elin; Kwan, Tony; Nilsson, Olof; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Gunnarsson, Iva; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Sturfelt, Gunnar; Bengtsson, Anders A.; Jönsen, Andreas; Truedsson, Lennart; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Eriksson, Catharina; Alm, Gunnar; Göring, Harald H.H.; Pastinen, Tomi; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Rönnblom, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is the prototype autoimmune disease where genes regulated by type I interferon (IFN) are over-expressed and contribute to the disease pathogenesis. Because signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) plays a key role in the type I IFN receptor signaling, we performed a candidate gene study of a comprehensive set of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in STAT4 in Swedish patients with SLE. We found that 10 out of 53 analyzed SNPs in STAT4 were associated with SLE, with the strongest signal of association (P = 7.1 × 10−8) for two perfectly linked SNPs rs10181656 and rs7582694. The risk alleles of these 10 SNPs form a common risk haplotype for SLE (P = 1.7 × 10−5). According to conditional logistic regression analysis the SNP rs10181656 or rs7582694 accounts for all of the observed association signal. By quantitative analysis of the allelic expression of STAT4 we found that the risk allele of STAT4 was over-expressed in primary human cells of mesenchymal origin, but not in B-cells, and that the risk allele of STAT4 was over-expressed (P = 8.4 × 10−5) in cells carrying the risk haplotype for SLE compared with cells with a non-risk haplotype. The risk allele of the SNP rs7582694 in STAT4 correlated to production of anti-dsDNA (double-stranded DNA) antibodies and displayed a multiplicatively increased, 1.82-fold risk of SLE with two independent risk alleles of the IRF5 (interferon regulatory factor 5) gene. PMID:18579578

  14. Polymorphism of the HLA-D region in American blacks. A DR3 haplotype generated by recombination.

    PubMed

    Hurley, C K; Gregersen, P; Steiner, N; Bell, J; Hartzman, R; Nepom, G; Silver, J; Johnson, A H

    1988-02-01

    The polymorphism of HLA class II molecules in man is particularly evident when comparisons between population groups are made. This study describes a DR3 haplotype commonly present in the American black population. Unlike the Northern European population in which almost all DR3 individuals are DQw2, approximately 50% of DR3-positive American blacks express a serologically undefined DQ allelic product. DNA restriction fragment analysis with the use of several unrelated individuals and an informative family has allowed us to identify unique DQ alpha- and beta-fragments associated with the DR3, DQw- haplotype. Based on fragment size, the DQ alpha genes of the DR3, DQw- and DRw8, DQw- haplotypes are similar as are the DQ beta genes of DR3, DQw-; DRw8, DQw-; and DR4, DQw- haplotypes. In addition, a DX beta gene polymorphism has been identified which is associated with some DR3 haplotypes including the American black DR3, DQw- haplotype. cDNA sequence analysis has revealed a DQw2-like alpha gene and a DQ beta gene which is similar to that previously described for a DR4, DQw- haplotype. It is postulated that recombination between DQ alpha and DQ beta genes and between the DQ and DX subregions has generated the various DR3 haplotypes and has played an important role in creating diversity in the HLA-D region. PMID:2892884

  15. Y chromosome probe p49a detects complex PvuII haplotypes and many new TaqI haplotypes in southern African populations.

    PubMed Central

    Spurdle, A; Jenkins, T

    1992-01-01

    Y-specific 49a/TaqI haplotypes were determined for 831 individuals drawn from 21 different southern African populations. A total of 31 new haplotypes were observed, some of which contained new alleles or allelic variants. Duplication, in addition to CpG mutation, is implicated in the generation of certain allelic variants. Cluster analysis of genetic distances between the populations, calculated using the 49a/TaqI haplotype frequencies, revealed a basic split between African and non-African populations. Hybrid groups cluster with the caucasoid groups, indicating that male gene flow has occurred from the latter into the former. Clustering of the negroid and Khoisan groups is not what might have been expected from the known linguistic affinities. It is suggested that the 49a/TaqI haplotype analysis of these populations is not sufficiently sensitive to distinguish between many of the populations. The Y-specific 49a/PvuII polymorphism was studied in 127 individuals from southern African populations, and 17 polymorphic fragments ranging in size from 3.6 kb to greater than 48 kb were identified. A total of 53 PvuII haplotypes were observed, corresponding to only 30 TaqI haplotypes. There appears to be poor correlation between the two polymorphisms. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:1729883

  16. Major soybean maturity gene haplotypes revealed by SNPViz analysis of 72 sequenced soybean genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this Genomics Era, vast amounts of next generation sequencing data have become publicly-available for multiple genomes across hundreds of species. Analysis of these large-scale datasets can become cumbersome, especially when comparing nucleotide polymorphisms across many samples within a dataset...

  17. Haplotype analysis in prenatal diagnosis and carrier identification of Salla disease.

    PubMed Central

    Schleutker, J; Sistonen, P; Aula, P

    1996-01-01

    Salla disease (SD) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which free sialic acid (N-acetyl neuraminic acid) accumulates in lysosomes. A specific transport mechanism for acidic monosaccharides on the lysosomal membrane has recently been described, but the molecular deficiency causing SD is still unknown. We have previously mapped the SD gene to 6q14-q15 by means of genetic linkage analysis and restricted the positive chromosomal area to less than 100 kb with linkage disequilibrium mapping. The two best allelic association markers have now retrospectively been used in five prenatal analyses originally studied with sialic acid assays in chorionic villus specimens. In four cases an unaffected fetus was predicted with a probability level of more than 94%, which was in concordance with the biochemical data. One fetus was predicted to be affected with over 96% probability, as was shown by free sialic acid assays in a CVS sample and in fetal tissues after termination of the pregnancy. Risk calculations incorporating disequilibrium were also used to predict the carrier status in members of six families with previous SD cases, and also in a few cases with no known family history of SD. DNA marker based analysis thus provides a reliable method for risk estimations in prenatal cases and for carrier identification of SD. PMID:8825046

  18. Mutational and haplotype analysis of the {alpha}{sub 1} subunit of the glycine receptor in hyperekplexia patients

    SciTech Connect

    Shiang, R.; Zhu, Y.Z.; Wasmuth, J.J.

    1994-09-01

    Familial hyperekplexia or Startle disease (STHE) is a rare autosomal dominant neurologic disorder manifested by marked muscular hypertonia in infants and exaggerated startle response that persists throughout the lifetime of the patient. This disorder is caused by mutations in the {alpha}{sub 1} subunit of the receptor for the inhibitory neurotransmitter glycine (GLRA1). Previously, we have reported three mutations, two of which change arginine 271 (Arg 271) to uncharged amino acids and a third which changes a tyrosine at amino acid 279 to a cysteine. The most common mutation, detected in three of six original families, is a G to A transition mutation at Arg 271. Four new STHE patients have been screened and were found to have the most common Arg 271 mutation. Three of the new patients have a clear family history while family information on the fourth patient was unavailable. Four possible sporadic cases of STHE have been screened by DGGE in all exons of the GLRA1 gene and no mutations have been detected. These sporadic cases may represent defects from other causes. A new three-allele dinucleotide repeat polymorphism at the GLRA1 locus has been detected. Haplotype analysis of two polymorphisms at the GLRA1 locus and CA-repeat polymorphism, D5S119, suggests that the most common mutation arose at least two and most likely three independent times. Thus, it appears that at least five independent GLRA1 mutation events (two of which are identical) have occurred in ten STHE families. The fact that these mutations affect only two amino acids suggests that the dominant STHE phenotype can only be caused by abnormalities in a highly restricted region of GLRA1.

  19. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Haplotypes Are Associated with Preeclampsia in Maya Mestizo Women

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Olguín, Lizbeth; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón Mauricio; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Ramírez Regalado, Belem; Fernández, Genny; Canto, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a specific disease of pregnancy and believed to have a genetic component. The aim of this study was to investigate if three polymorphisms in eNOS or their haplotypes are associated with preeclampsia in Maya mestizo women. A case-control study was performed where 127 preeclamptic patients and 263 controls were included. Genotyped and haplotypes for the -768T→C, intron 4 variants, Glu298Asp of eNOS were determined by PCR and real-time PCR allelic discrimination. Logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age and body mass index (BMI) was used to test for associations between genotype and preeclampsia under recessive, codominant and dominant models. Pairwise linkage disequilibrium between single nucleotide polymorphisms was calculated by direct correlation r2, and haplotype analysis was conducted. Women homozygous for the Asp298 allele showed an association of preeclampsia. In addition, analysis of the haplotype frequencies revealed that the -786C-4b-Asp298 haplotype was significantly more frequent in preeclamptic patients than in controls (0.143 vs. 0.041, respectively; OR = 3.01; 95% CI = 1.74–5.23; P = 2.9 × 10−4). Despite the Asp298 genotype in a recessive model associated with the presence of preeclampsia in Maya mestizo women, we believe that in this population the -786C-4b-Asp298 haplotype is a better genetic marker. PMID:21897002

  20. Haplotypes and mutations in Wilson disease

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.R.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W.

    1995-06-01

    Wilson disease is a disorder of copper transport, resulting in neurological and hepatic damage due to copper toxicity. We have recently identified >20 mutations in the copper-transporting ATPase defective in this disease. Given the difficulties of searching for mutations in a gene spanning >80 kb of genomic DNA, haplotype data are important as a guide to mutation detection. Here we examine the haplotypes associated with specific mutations. We have extended previous studies of DNA haplotypes of dinucleotide-repeat polymorphisms (CA repeats) in the Wilson disease region to include an additional marker, in 58 families. These haplotypes, combining three markers (D13S314, D12S316, and D13S301), are usually specific for each different mutation, even though highly polymorphic CA repeat markers have been used. Haplotypes, as well as their accompanying mutations, differ between populations. In the patients whom we have studied, the haplotype data indicate that as many as 20 mutations may still be unidentified. The use of the haplotypes that we have identified provides an important guide for the identification of known mutations and can facilitate future mutation searches. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. HaplotypeCN: copy number haplotype inference with Hidden Markov Model and localized haplotype clustering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Jen; Chen, Yu-Tin; Hsu, Shu-Ni; Peng, Chien-Hua; Tang, Chuan-Yi; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Hsieh, Wen-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) has been reported to be associated with disease and various cancers. Hence, identifying the accurate position and the type of CNV is currently a critical issue. There are many tools targeting on detecting CNV regions, constructing haplotype phases on CNV regions, or estimating the numerical copy numbers. However, none of them can do all of the three tasks at the same time. This paper presents a method based on Hidden Markov Model to detect parent specific copy number change on both chromosomes with signals from SNP arrays. A haplotype tree is constructed with dynamic branch merging to model the transition of the copy number status of the two alleles assessed at each SNP locus. The emission models are constructed for the genotypes formed with the two haplotypes. The proposed method can provide the segmentation points of the CNV regions as well as the haplotype phasing for the allelic status on each chromosome. The estimated copy numbers are provided as fractional numbers, which can accommodate the somatic mutation in cancer specimens that usually consist of heterogeneous cell populations. The algorithm is evaluated on simulated data and the previously published regions of CNV of the 270 HapMap individuals. The results were compared with five popular methods: PennCNV, genoCN, COKGEN, QuantiSNP and cnvHap. The application on oral cancer samples demonstrates how the proposed method can facilitate clinical association studies. The proposed algorithm exhibits comparable sensitivity of the CNV regions to the best algorithm in our genome-wide study and demonstrates the highest detection rate in SNP dense regions. In addition, we provide better haplotype phasing accuracy than similar approaches. The clinical association carried out with our fractional estimate of copy numbers in the cancer samples provides better detection power than that with integer copy number states. PMID:24849202

  2. Separating Population Structure from Population History: A Cladistic Analysis of the Geographical Distribution of Mitochondrial DNA Haplotypes in the Tiger Salamander, Ambystoma Tigrinum

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, A. R.; Routman, E.; Phillips, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    Nonrandom associations of alleles or haplotypes with geographical location can arise from restricted gene flow, historical events (fragmentation, range expansion, colonization), or any mixture of these factors. In this paper, we show how a nested cladistic analysis of geographical distances can be used to test the null hypothesis of no geographical association of haplotypes, test the hypothesis that significant associations are due to restricted gene flow, and identify patterns of significant association that are due to historical events. In this last case, criteria are given to discriminate among contiguous range expansion, long-distance colonization, and population fragmentation. The ability to make these discriminations depends critically upon an adequate geographical sampling design. These points are illustrated with a worked example: mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in the salamander Ambystoma tigrinum. For this example, prior information exists about restricted gene flow and likely historical events, and the nested cladistic analyses were completely concordant with this prior information. This concordance establishes the plausibility of this nested cladistic approach, but much future work will be necessary to demonstrate robustness and to explore the power and accuracy of this procedure. PMID:7498753

  3. Mitochondrial Haplotype Diversity in Zambian Lions: Bridging a Gap in the Biogeography of an Iconic Species

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Caitlin J.; White, Paula A.; Derr, James N.

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of DNA sequence diversity at the 12S to 16S mitochondrial genes of 165 African lions (Panthera leo) from five main areas in Zambia has uncovered haplotypes which link Southern Africa with East Africa. Phylogenetic analysis suggests Zambia may serve as a bridge connecting the lion populations in southern Africa to eastern Africa, supporting earlier hypotheses that eastern-southern Africa may represent the evolutionary cradle for the species. Overall gene diversity throughout the Zambian lion population was 0.7319 +/- 0.0174 with eight haplotypes found; three haplotypes previously described and the remaining five novel. The addition of these five novel haplotypes, so far only found within Zambia, nearly doubles the number of haplotypes previously reported for any given geographic location of wild lions. However, based on an AMOVA analysis of these haplotypes, there is little to no matrilineal gene flow (Fst = 0.47) when the eastern and western regions of Zambia are considered as two regional sub-populations. Crossover haplotypes (H9, H11, and Z1) appear in both populations as rare in one but common in the other. This pattern is a possible result of the lion mating system in which predominately males disperse, as all individuals with crossover haplotypes were male. The determination and characterization of lion sub-populations, such as done in this study for Zambia, represent a higher-resolution of knowledge regarding both the genetic health and connectivity of lion populations, which can serve to inform conservation and management of this iconic species. PMID:26674533

  4. Alternative haplotype construction methods for genomic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jónás, Dávid; Ducrocq, Vincent; Fouilloux, Marie-Noëlle; Croiseau, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    Genomic evaluation methods today use single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) as genomic markers to trace quantitative trait loci (QTL). Today most genomic prediction procedures use biallelic SNP markers. However, SNP can be combined into short, multiallelic haplotypes that can improve genomic prediction due to higher linkage disequilibrium between the haplotypes and the linked QTL. The aim of this study was to develop a method to identify the haplotypes, which can be expected to be superior in genomic evaluation, as compared with either SNP or other haplotypes of the same size. We first identified the SNP (termed as QTL-SNP) from the bovine 50K SNP chip that had the largest effect on the analyzed trait. It was assumed that these SNP were not the causative mutations and they merely indicated the approximate location of the QTL. Haplotypes of 3, 4, or 5 SNP were selected from short genomic windows surrounding these markers to capture the effect of the QTL. Two methods described in this paper aim at selecting the most optimal haplotype for genomic evaluation. They assumed that if an allele has a high frequency, its allele effect can be accurately predicted. These methods were tested in a classical validation study using a dairy cattle population of 2,235 bulls with genotypes from the bovine 50K SNP chip and daughter yield deviations (DYD) on 5 dairy cattle production traits. Combining the SNP into haplotypes was beneficial with all tested haplotypes, leading to an average increase of 2% in terms of correlations between DYD and genomic breeding value estimates compared with the analysis when the same SNP were used individually. Compared with haplotypes built by merging the QTL-SNP with its flanking SNP, the haplotypes selected with the proposed criteria carried less under- and over-represented alleles: the proportion of alleles with frequencies <1 or >40% decreased, on average, by 17.4 and 43.4%, respectively. The correlations between DYD and genomic breeding value

  5. Association of MAPT haplotypes with Alzheimer’s disease risk and MAPT brain gene expression levels

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction MAPT encodes for tau, the predominant component of neurofibrillary tangles that are neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Genetic association of MAPT variants with late-onset AD (LOAD) risk has been inconsistent, although insufficient power and incomplete assessment of MAPT haplotypes may account for this. Methods We examined the association of MAPT haplotypes with LOAD risk in more than 20,000 subjects (n-cases = 9,814, n-controls = 11,550) from Mayo Clinic (n-cases = 2,052, n-controls = 3,406) and the Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC, n-cases = 7,762, n-controls = 8,144). We also assessed associations with brain MAPT gene expression levels measured in the cerebellum (n = 197) and temporal cortex (n = 202) of LOAD subjects. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) which tag MAPT haplotypes with frequencies greater than 1% were evaluated. Results H2-haplotype tagging rs8070723-G allele associated with reduced risk of LOAD (odds ratio, OR = 0.90, 95% confidence interval, CI = 0.85-0.95, p = 5.2E-05) with consistent results in the Mayo (OR = 0.81, p = 7.0E-04) and ADGC (OR = 0.89, p = 1.26E-04) cohorts. rs3785883-A allele was also nominally significantly associated with LOAD risk (OR = 1.06, 95% CI = 1.01-1.13, p = 0.034). Haplotype analysis revealed significant global association with LOAD risk in the combined cohort (p = 0.033), with significant association of the H2 haplotype with reduced risk of LOAD as expected (p = 1.53E-04) and suggestive association with additional haplotypes. MAPT SNPs and haplotypes also associated with brain MAPT levels in the cerebellum and temporal cortex of AD subjects with the strongest associations observed for the H2 haplotype and reduced brain MAPT levels (β = -0.16 to -0.20, p = 1.0E-03 to 3.0E-03). Conclusions These results confirm the previously reported MAPT H2 associations with LOAD risk in two large series, that this haplotype has the strongest

  6. Haplotype studies in Wilson disease

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.R.; Bull, P.C.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W.; Walshe, J.M. )

    1994-01-01

    In 51 families with Wilson disease, the authors have studied DNA haplotypes of dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms (CA repeats) in the 13q14.3 region, to examine these markers for association with the Wilson disease gene (WND). In addition to a marker (D13S133) described elsewhere, the authors have developed three new highly polymorphic markers (D13S314, D13S315, and D13S316) close to the WND locus. The authors have examined the distribution of marker alleles at the loci studied and have found that D13S314, D13S133, and D13S316 each show nonrandom distribution on chromosomes carrying the WND mutation. The authors have studied haplotypes of these three markers and have found that there are highly significant differences between WND and normal haplotypes in northern European families. These findings have important implications for mutation detection and molecular diagnosis in families with Wilson disease. 25 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Probabilistic Multilocus Haplotype Reconstruction in Outcrossing Tetraploids.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chaozhi; Voorrips, Roeland E; Jansen, Johannes; Hackett, Christine A; Ho, Julie; Bink, Marco C A M

    2016-05-01

    For both plant (e.g., potato) and animal (e.g., salmon) species, unveiling the genetic architecture of complex traits is key to the genetic improvement of polyploids in agriculture. F1 progenies of a biparental cross are often used for quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping in outcrossing polyploids, where haplotype reconstruction by identifying the parental origins of marker alleles is necessary. In this paper, we build a novel and integrated statistical framework for multilocus haplotype reconstruction in a full-sib tetraploid family from biallelic marker dosage data collected from single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays or next-generation sequencing technology given a genetic linkage map. Compared to diploids, in tetraploids, additional complexity needs to be addressed, including double reduction and possible preferential pairing of chromosomes. We divide haplotype reconstruction into two stages: parental linkage phasing for reconstructing the most probable parental haplotypes and ancestral inference for probabilistically reconstructing the offspring haplotypes conditional on the reconstructed parental haplotypes. The simulation studies and the application to real data from potato show that the parental linkage phasing is robust to, and that the subsequent ancestral inference is accurate for, complex chromosome pairing behaviors during meiosis, various marker segregation types, erroneous genetic maps except for long-range disturbances of marker ordering, various amounts of offspring dosage errors (up to ∼20%), and various fractions of missing data in parents and offspring dosages. PMID:26920758

  8. Meta-analysis of the TNFAIP3 region in psoriasis reveals a risk haplotype that is distinct from other autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Nititham, J; Taylor, K E; Gupta, R; Chen, H; Ahn, R; Liu, J; Seielstad, M; Ma, A; Bowcock, A M; Criswell, L A; Stahle, M; Liao, W

    2015-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha-inducible protein 3 (TNFAIP3) encodes a ubiquitin-modifying protein, A20, that is a critical regulator of inflammatory responses. TNFAIP3 polymorphisms are associated with the susceptibility to multiple autoimmune diseases (AIDs) including psoriasis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis and celiac disease. In order to refine the TNFAIP3 association signal in psoriasis and identify candidate causal variants, we performed imputation and meta-analysis of the TNFAIP3 region in five European ancestry cohorts totaling 4704 psoriasis cases and 7805 controls. We identified 49 variants whose significance exceeded a corrected Bonferroni threshold, with the top variant being rs582757 (P = 6.07 × 10(-12), odds ratio (OR) = 1.23). Conditional analysis revealed a suggestive independent association at rs6918329 (P(cond) = 7.22 × 10(-5), OR = 1.15). Functional annotation of the top variants identified several with a strong evidence of regulatory potential and several within long noncoding RNAs. Analysis of TNFAIP3 haplotypes revealed that the psoriasis risk haplotype is distinct from other AIDs. Overall, our findings identify novel candidate causal variants of TNFAIP3 in psoriasis and highlight the complex genetic architecture of this locus in autoimmune susceptibility. PMID:25521225

  9. Meta-Analysis of the TNFAIP3 Region in Psoriasis Reveals a Risk Haplotype that is Distinct from Other Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nititham, Joanne; Taylor, Kimberly E.; Gupta, Rashmi; Chen, Haoyan; Ahn, Richard; Liu, Jianjun; Seielstad, Mark; Ma, Averil; Bowcock, Anne M.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Stahle, Mona; Liao, Wilson

    2014-01-01

    TNFAIP3 encodes aubiquitin-modifying protein, A20, that is a critical regulator of inflammatory responses. TNFAIP3 polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to multiple autoimmune diseases including psoriasis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, and celiac disease. In order to refine the TNFAIP3 association signal in psoriasis and identify candidate causal variants, we performed imputation and meta-analysis of the TNFAIP3 region in five European ancestry cohorts totaling 4,704 psoriasis cases and 7,805 controls. We identified 49 variants whose significance exceeded a corrected Bonferroni threshold, with the top variant being rs582757 (P = 6.07 × 10−12, OR = 1.23). Conditional analysis revealed a suggestive independent association at rs6918329 (Pcond = 7.22 × 10−5, OR=1.15). Functional annotation of the top variants identified several with strong evidence of regulatory potential and several within long non-coding RNAs. Analysis of TNFAIP3 haplotypes revealed that the psoriasis risk haplotype is distinct from other autoimmune diseases. Overall, our findings identify novel candidate causal variants of TNFAIP3 in psoriasis and highlight the complex genetic architecture of this locus in autoimmune susceptibility. PMID:25521225

  10. Genetic mapping of the Batten disease locus (CLN3) to the interval D16S288-D16S383 by analysis of haplotypes and allelic association

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchison, H.M.; O`Rawe, A.M.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1994-07-15

    CLN3, the gene for juvenile-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL) or Batten disease, has been localized by genetic linkage analysis to chromosome 16p between loci D16S297 and D16S57. The authors have now further refined the localization of CLN3 by haplotype analysis using two new microsatellite markers from loci D16S383 and SPN in the D16S297-D16S57 interval on a larger collaborative family resource consisting of 142 JNCL pedigrees. Crossover events in 3 maternal meioses define new flanking markers for CLN3 and localize the gene to the interval at 16p12.1-11.2 between D16S288 and D16S383, which corresponds to a genetic distance of 2.1 cM. Within this interval 4 microsatellite loci are in strong linkage disequilibrium with CLN3, and extended haplotype analysis of the associated alleles indicates that CLN3 is in closest proximity to loci D16S299 and D16S298. 6 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Analysis of HLA class I-II haplotype frequency and segregation in a cohort of patients with advanced stage ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gamzatova, Z; Villabona, L; van der Zanden, H; Haasnoot, G W; Andersson, E; Kiessling, R; Seliger, B; Kanter, L; Dalianis, T; Bergfeldt, K; Masucci, G V

    2007-09-01

    In solid tumors, human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 has been suggested to be a risk factor and a negative prognostic factor. The HLA-A2 allele in Scandinavia has a high prevalence; it decreases with latitude and also with ovarian cancer mortality in Europe. Furthermore, an association of the HLA-A2 allele with severe prognosis in serous adenocarcinoma of the ovary in stages III-IV was found. Thirty-two unrelated Swedish women with relapsing or progressive ovarian cancer were analysed for the genotypes at the HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-Cw, and HLA-DRB1 loci by the polymerase chain reaction/sequence-specific primer method. The frequencies of HLA alleles of healthy Swedish bone marrow donors provided by the coordinating centre of the Bone Marrow Donors Worldwide Registries, Leiden, the Netherlands were used as controls. When this cohort of epithelial ovarian cancer patients was compared with healthy Swedish donors, the frequency of HLA-A1 and HLA-A2 gene/phenotype appears, although not statistically significant, to be increased in patients with ovarian carcinoma, while HLA-A3 was decreased. HLA-A2 homozygotes were twofold higher in patients. The A2-B8 haplotype was significantly increased (corrected P value). A2-B5, A2-B15, A2-DRB1*03, A2-DRB1*04, A2-B15-Cw3, and A2-B8-DRB1*03 had odds ratio as well as the level of the lower confidence interval above 1 and significant P value only when considered as single, non-corrected analysis. HLA-B15 and HLA-Cw3 were only present in HLA-A2-positive patients showing that the HLA-A2-HLA-Cw3 and HLA-B15 haplotypes were segregated. In this selected cohort with advanced disease, there are indications of an unusual overrepresentation of HLA class I and II genes/haplotypes as well as segregation for the HLA-A2-HLA-Cw3 and HLA-B15 haplotypes. These findings are presented as a descriptive analysis and need further investigations on a larger series of ovarian cancer patients to establish prognostic associations. PMID:17661908

  12. Genetic association analysis of 300 genes identifies a risk haplotype in SLC18A2 for post-traumatic stress disorder in two independent samples.

    PubMed

    Solovieff, Nadia; Roberts, Andrea L; Ratanatharathorn, Andrew; Haloosim, Michelle; De Vivo, Immaculata; King, Anthony P; Liberzon, Israel; Aiello, Allison; Uddin, Monica; Wildman, Derek E; Galea, Sandro; Smoller, Jordan W; Purcell, Shaun M; Koenen, Karestan C

    2014-07-01

    The genetic architecture of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remains poorly understood with the vast majority of genetic association studies reporting on single candidate genes. We conducted a large genetic study in trauma-exposed European-American women (N=2538; 845 PTSD cases, 1693 controls) by testing 3742 SNPs across more than 300 genes and conducting polygenic analyses using results from the Psychiatric Genome-Wide Association Studies Consortium (PGC). We tested the association between each SNP and two measures of PTSD, a severity score and diagnosis. We found a significant association between PTSD (diagnosis) and SNPs (top SNP: rs363276, odds ratio (OR)=1.4, p=2.1E-05) in SLC18A2 (vesicular monoamine transporter 2). A haplotype analysis of 9 SNPs in SLC18A2, including rs363276, identified a risk haplotype (CGGCGGAAG, p=0.0046), and the same risk haplotype was associated with PTSD in an independent cohort of trauma-exposed African-Americans (p=0.049; N=748, men and women). SLC18A2 is involved in transporting monoamines to synaptic vesicles and has been implicated in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders including major depression. Eight genes previously associated with PTSD had SNPs with nominally significant associations (p<0.05). The polygenic analyses suggested that there are SNPs in common between PTSD severity and bipolar disorder. Our data are consistent with a genetic architecture for PTSD that is highly polygenic, influenced by numerous SNPs with weak effects, and may overlap with mood disorders. Genome-wide studies with very large samples sizes are needed to detect these types of effects. PMID:24525708

  13. Genetic Association Analysis of 300 Genes Identifies a Risk Haplotype in SLC18A2 for Post-traumatic Stress Disorder in Two Independent Samples

    PubMed Central

    Solovieff, Nadia; Roberts, Andrea L; Ratanatharathorn, Andrew; Haloosim, Michelle; De Vivo, Immaculata; King, Anthony P; Liberzon, Israel; Aiello, Allison; Uddin, Monica; Wildman, Derek E; Galea, Sandro; Smoller, Jordan W; Purcell, Shaun M; Koenen, Karestan C

    2014-01-01

    The genetic architecture of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) remains poorly understood with the vast majority of genetic association studies reporting on single candidate genes. We conducted a large genetic study in trauma-exposed European-American women (N=2538; 845 PTSD cases, 1693 controls) by testing 3742 SNPs across more than 300 genes and conducting polygenic analyses using results from the Psychiatric Genome-Wide Association Studies Consortium (PGC). We tested the association between each SNP and two measures of PTSD, a severity score and diagnosis. We found a significant association between PTSD (diagnosis) and SNPs (top SNP: rs363276, odds ratio (OR)=1.4, p=2.1E-05) in SLC18A2 (vesicular monoamine transporter 2). A haplotype analysis of 9 SNPs in SLC18A2, including rs363276, identified a risk haplotype (CGGCGGAAG, p=0.0046), and the same risk haplotype was associated with PTSD in an independent cohort of trauma-exposed African-Americans (p=0.049; N=748, men and women). SLC18A2 is involved in transporting monoamines to synaptic vesicles and has been implicated in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders including major depression. Eight genes previously associated with PTSD had SNPs with nominally significant associations (p<0.05). The polygenic analyses suggested that there are SNPs in common between PTSD severity and bipolar disorder. Our data are consistent with a genetic architecture for PTSD that is highly polygenic, influenced by numerous SNPs with weak effects, and may overlap with mood disorders. Genome-wide studies with very large samples sizes are needed to detect these types of effects. PMID:24525708

  14. Additional EIPC Study Analysis. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Stanton W; Gotham, Douglas J.; Luciani, Ralph L.

    2014-12-01

    Between 2010 and 2012 the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) conducted a major long-term resource and transmission study of the Eastern Interconnection (EI). With guidance from a Stakeholder Steering Committee (SSC) that included representatives from the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) among others, the project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 involved a long-term capacity expansion analysis that involved creation of eight major futures plus 72 sensitivities. Three scenarios were selected for more extensive transmission- focused evaluation in Phase 2. Five power flow analyses, nine production cost model runs (including six sensitivities), and three capital cost estimations were developed during this second phase. The results from Phase 1 and 2 provided a wealth of data that could be examined further to address energy-related questions. A list of 14 topics was developed for further analysis. This paper brings together the earlier interim reports of the first 13 topics plus one additional topic into a single final report.

  15. Assigning linkage haplotypes from parent and progeny genotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Nejati-Javaremi, A.; Smith, C.

    1996-04-01

    Given the genotypes of parents and progeny, their haplotypes over several or many linked loci can be easily assigned by listing the allele type at each locus along the haplotype known to be from each parent. Only a small number (5-10) of progeny per family is usually needed to assign the parental and progeny haplotypes. Any gaps left in the haplotypes may be filled in from the assigned haplotypes of relatives. The process is facilitated by having multiple alleles at the loci and by using more linked loci in the haplotype and with more progeny from the mating. Crossover haplotypes in the progeny can be identified by their being unique or uncommon, and the crossover point can often be detected if the locus linkage map order is known. The haplotyping method applies to outbreeding populations in plants, animals, and man, as well as to traditional experimental crosses of inbred lines. The method also applies to half-sib families, whether the genotype of the mates are known or unknown. The haplotyping procedure is already used in linkage analysis but does not seem to have been published. It should be useful in teaching and in genetic applications of haplotypes. 15 refs., 5 tabs.

  16. Homologous haplotypes, expression, genetic effects and geographic distribution of the wheat yield gene TaGW2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background TaGW2-6A, cloned in earlier research, strongly influences wheat grain width and TKW. Here, we mainly analyzed haplotypes of TaGW2-6B and their effects on TKW and interaction with haplotypes at TaGW2-6A. Results About 2.9 kb of the promoter sequences of TaGW2-6B and TaGW2-6D were cloned in 34 bread wheat cultivars. Eleven SNPs were detected in the promoter region of TaGW2-6B, forming 4 haplotypes, but no divergence was detected in the TaGW2-6D promoter or coding region. Three molecular markers including CAPS, dCAPS and ACAS, were developed to distinguish the TaGW2-6B haplotypes. Haplotype association analysis indicated that TaGW2-6B has a stronger influence than TaGW2-6A on TKW, and Hap-6B-1 was a favored haplotype increasing grain width and weight that had undergone strong positive selection in global wheat breeding. However, clear geographic distribution differences for TaGW2-6A haplotypes were found; Hap-6A-A was favored in Chinese, Australian and Russian cultivars, whereas Hap-6A-G was preferred in European, American and CIMMYT cultivars. This difference might be caused by a flowering and maturity time difference between the two haplotypes. Hap-6A-A is the earlier type. Haplotype interaction analysis between TaGW2-6A and TaGW2-6B showed additive effects between the favored haplotypes. Hap-6A-A/Hap-6B-1 was the best combination to increase TKW. Relative expression analysis of the three TaGW2 homoeologous genes in 22 cultivars revealed that TaGW2-6A underwent the highest expression. TaGW2-6D was the least expressed during grain development and TaGW2-6B was intermediate. Diversity of the three genes was negatively correlated with their effect on TKW. Conclusions Genetic effects, expression patterns and historic changes of haplotypes at three homoeologous genes of TaGW2 influencing yield were dissected in wheat cultivars. Strong and constant selection to favored haplotypes has been found in global wheat breeding during the past century. This research

  17. Green turtles (Chelonia mydas) foraging at Arvoredo Island in Southern Brazil: Genetic characterization and mixed stock analysis through mtDNA control region haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Maíra Carneiro; Lara-Ruiz, Paula; Reisser, Júlia Wiener; da Silva Pinto, Luciano; Dellagostin, Odir Antonio; Marins, Luis Fernando

    2009-07-01

    We analyzed mtDNA control region sequences of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) from Arvoredo Island, a foraging ground in southern Brazil, and identified eight haplotypes. Of these, CM-A8 (64%) and CM-A5 (22%) were dominant, the remainder presenting low frequencies (< 5%). Haplotype (h) and nucleotide (π) diversities were 0.5570 ± 0.0697 and 0.0021 ± 0.0016, respectively. Exact tests of differentiation and AMOVA Φ(ST) pairwise values between the study area and eight other Atlantic foraging grounds revealed significant differences in most areas, except Ubatuba and Rocas/Noronha, in Brazil (p > 0.05). Mixed Stock Analysis, incorporating eleven Atlantic and one Mediterranean rookery as possible sources of individuals, indicated Ascension and Aves islands as the main contributing stocks to the Arvoredo aggregation (68.01% and 22.96%, respectively). These results demonstrate the extensive relationships between Arvoredo Island and other Atlantic foraging and breeding areas. Such an understanding provides a framework for establishing adequate management and conservation strategies for this endangered species. PMID:21637527

  18. Green turtles (Chelonia mydas) foraging at Arvoredo Island in Southern Brazil: Genetic characterization and mixed stock analysis through mtDNA control region haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed mtDNA control region sequences of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) from Arvoredo Island, a foraging ground in southern Brazil, and identified eight haplotypes. Of these, CM-A8 (64%) and CM-A5 (22%) were dominant, the remainder presenting low frequencies (< 5%). Haplotype (h) and nucleotide (π) diversities were 0.5570 ± 0.0697 and 0.0021 ± 0.0016, respectively. Exact tests of differentiation and AMOVA ΦST pairwise values between the study area and eight other Atlantic foraging grounds revealed significant differences in most areas, except Ubatuba and Rocas/Noronha, in Brazil (p > 0.05). Mixed Stock Analysis, incorporating eleven Atlantic and one Mediterranean rookery as possible sources of individuals, indicated Ascension and Aves islands as the main contributing stocks to the Arvoredo aggregation (68.01% and 22.96%, respectively). These results demonstrate the extensive relationships between Arvoredo Island and other Atlantic foraging and breeding areas. Such an understanding provides a framework for establishing adequate management and conservation strategies for this endangered species. PMID:21637527

  19. Haplotype analysis of the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) c.1298A>C (E429A) polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The polymorphism 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) c.1298A>C is associated with various diseases. 45 DNA samples homozygous for the A allele and 40 DNA probes homozygous for the C allele were taken from healthy German subjects of white Caucasian origin to analyze the haplotype of the two MTHFR c.1298A>C alleles. Samples were genotyped for the polymorphism MTHFR c.677C>T and for the silent polymorphisms MTHFR c.129C>T, IVS2 533 G>A, c.1068C>T and IVS10 262C>G. Findings Haplotype construction revealed that the C-allele of MTHFR c.1298A>C was more frequently observed in cis with c.129T, IVS2 533A, c.677C, c.1068T, and IVS10 262 G than expected from normal distribution. Estimation of the most recent common ancestor with the DMLE + 2.3 program resulted in an estimated age of approximately 36,660 years of the MTHFR c.1298C allele. Conclusion Given that the era from 30,000 to 40,000 years ago is characterised by the spread of modern humans in Europe and that the prevalence of the MTHFR c.1298C allele is significantly higher in Central Europe in comparison to African populations, a selective advantage of MTHFR c.1298C could be assumed, e. g. by adaption to changes in the nutritional environment. The known founder ancestry of the T allele of MTHFR c.677C>T allele, together with the present data suggests that the MTHFR mutant alleles c.677T and 1298C arose from two independent ancestral alleles, that both confer a selective advantage. PMID:22023786

  20. Hybrid origin of European commercial pigs examined by an in-depth haplotype analysis on chromosome 1.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Mirte; Madsen, Ole; Megens, Hendrik-Jan; Frantz, Laurent A F; Paudel, Yogesh; Crooijmans, Richard P M A; Groenen, Martien A M

    2014-01-01

    Although all farm animals have an original source of domestication, a large variety of modern breeds exist that are phenotypically highly distinct from the ancestral wild population. This phenomenon can be the result of artificial selection or gene flow from other sources into the domesticated population. The Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) has been domesticated at least twice in two geographically distinct regions during the Neolithic revolution when hunting shifted to farming. Prior to the establishment of the commercial European pig breeds we know today, some 200 years ago Chinese pigs were imported into Europe to improve local European pigs. Commercial European domesticated pigs are genetically more diverse than European wild boars, although historically the latter represents the source population for domestication. In this study we examine the cause of the higher diversity within the genomes of European commercial pigs compared to their wild ancestors by testing two different hypotheses. In the first hypothesis we consider that European commercial pigs are a mix of different European wild populations as a result of movement throughout Europe, hereby acquiring haplotypes from all over the European continent. As an alternative hypothesis, we examine whether the introgression of Asian haplotypes into European breeds during the Industrial Revolution caused the observed increase in diversity. By using re-sequence data for chromosome 1 of 136 pigs and wild boars, we show that an Asian introgression of about 20% into the genome of European commercial pigs explains the majority of the increase in genetic diversity. These findings confirm that the Asian hybridization, that was used to improve production traits of local breeds, left its signature in the genome of the commercial pigs we know today. PMID:25601878

  1. Hybrid origin of European commercial pigs examined by an in-depth haplotype analysis on chromosome 1

    PubMed Central

    Bosse, Mirte; Madsen, Ole; Megens, Hendrik-Jan; Frantz, Laurent A. F.; Paudel, Yogesh; Crooijmans, Richard P. M. A.; Groenen, Martien A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Although all farm animals have an original source of domestication, a large variety of modern breeds exist that are phenotypically highly distinct from the ancestral wild population. This phenomenon can be the result of artificial selection or gene flow from other sources into the domesticated population. The Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) has been domesticated at least twice in two geographically distinct regions during the Neolithic revolution when hunting shifted to farming. Prior to the establishment of the commercial European pig breeds we know today, some 200 years ago Chinese pigs were imported into Europe to improve local European pigs. Commercial European domesticated pigs are genetically more diverse than European wild boars, although historically the latter represents the source population for domestication. In this study we examine the cause of the higher diversity within the genomes of European commercial pigs compared to their wild ancestors by testing two different hypotheses. In the first hypothesis we consider that European commercial pigs are a mix of different European wild populations as a result of movement throughout Europe, hereby acquiring haplotypes from all over the European continent. As an alternative hypothesis, we examine whether the introgression of Asian haplotypes into European breeds during the Industrial Revolution caused the observed increase in diversity. By using re-sequence data for chromosome 1 of 136 pigs and wild boars, we show that an Asian introgression of about 20% into the genome of European commercial pigs explains the majority of the increase in genetic diversity. These findings confirm that the Asian hybridization, that was used to improve production traits of local breeds, left its signature in the genome of the commercial pigs we know today. PMID:25601878

  2. Allelic association and extended haplotype analysis of the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) candidate region in the French Candadian population

    SciTech Connect

    Simard, L.R.; Prescott, G.; Rochette, C. |

    1994-09-01

    SMA is a common lower motor neuron disease characterized by progressive proximal limb and trunk muscle weakness. Despite the wide range in phenotypic severity, all three clinical types of childhood SMAs map to chromosome 5q11.2-5q13.3. The proximal (D5S557) flanking markers span about 1 Mb. We have previously demonstrated significant linkage disequilibrium between D5S125, D5S435, D5S351, JK53CA1/2 and SMA in the French Canadian population. We now present data for three new DNA markers mapping between D5S435 and D5S557 kindly provided to us by Drs. B. Wirth (A31), A. Burghes (Ag1) and A. MacKenzie (CATT-40G1). We identified 10 different A31 Alleles whose frequencies were similar for both normal and SMA chromosomes. Ag1 is a complex multi-allelic marker and specific primers amplified 1 (Class I), 2 or rarely 3 (Class II) alleles per chromosome. We observed significant association between Ag1 and SMA. For example, the 100 bp Ag1 fragment was typed on 20 of 73 SMA chromosomes and 0 of 74 normal chromosomes (p=<10{sup -4}). We also observed significant association between Ag1 Class genotypes and phenotypic severity. Class I chromosomes predominated in Type I SMA (p=.001) while Type II SMA individuals were generally heterozygous Class I/Class II (p=.001). Finally, we provide evidence for allelic association between Type I SMA and CATT-40G1, a tri-allelic sublocus of CATT-1. All of our Type I SMA chromosomes (n=20) carried a null allele compared to 40% of normal chromosomes (p=<10{sup -4}). Extended haplotype analyses indicated that > 19% of French Canadian SMA chromosomes appear to be ancestrally related to two unique haplotypes indicating their utility for linkage disequilibrium mapping.

  3. Use of haplotypes to predict selection limits and Mendelian sampling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limits to selection and Mendelian sampling terms can be calculated using haplotypes, which are sums of individual additive effects on a chromosome. Haplotypes were imputed for 43,385 actual markers of 3,765 Jerseys using the Fortran program findhap.f90, which combines population and pedigree haploty...

  4. Rule-based induction method for haplotype comparison and identification of candidate disease loci

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for methods that are able to identify rare variants that cause low or moderate penetrance disease susceptibility. To answer this need, we introduce a rule-based haplotype comparison method, Haplous, which identifies haplotypes within multiple samples from phased genotype data and compares them within and between sample groups. We demonstrate that Haplous is able to accurately identify haplotypes that are identical by descent, exclude common haplotypes in the studied population and select rare haplotypes from the data. Our analysis of three families with multiple individuals affected by lymphoma identified several interesting haplotypes shared by distantly related patients. PMID:22429919

  5. Haplotype and functional analysis of four flavin-containing monooxygenase isoform 2 (FMO2) polymorphisms in Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Sharon K.; Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Henderson, Marilyn C.; Andreasen, Eric A.; Tanguay, Robert L.; Pereira, Clifford B.; Cabacungan, Erwin T.; Hines, Ronald N.; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Williams, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives Previous work defined two flavin-containing monooxygenase 2 (FMO2) alleles. The major allele, FMO2*2 (g.23,238C> T), encodes truncated inactive protein (p.X472) whereas the minor allele, FMO2*1, present in African- and Hispanic-American populations, encodes active protein (p.Q472). Recently, four common (27 to 51% incidence) FMO2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected in African-Americans (N= 50); they encode the following protein variants: p.71Ddup, p.V113fs, p.S195L and p.N413 K. Our objectives were to: (1) determine the incidence of these SNPs in 29 Hispanic individuals previously genotyped as g.23,238C (p.Q472) and 124 previously genotyped as homozygous g.23,238 T (p.X472); (2) determine FMO2 haplotypes in this population; and (3) assess the functional impact of SNPs in expressed proteins. Methods SNPs were detected via allele-specific oligonucleotide amplification coupled with real-time or electrophoretic product detection, or single strand conformation polymorphism. Results The g.7,700_7,702dupGAC SNP (p.71Ddup) was absent. The remaining SNPs were present but, except for g.13,732C > T (p.S195L), were less common in the current Hispanic study population versus the previously described African-Americans. Only expressed p.N413K was as active as p.Q472, as determined by methimazole- and ethylenethiourea-dependent oxidation. Haplotype determination demonstrated that the g.10,951delG (p.V113fs), g.13,732C > T (p.S195L) and g.22,060T >G (p.N413 K) variants segregated with g.23,238C> T (p.X472). Conclusions SNPs would not alter FMO2 activity in individuals possessing at least one FMO2*1 allele. It is likely that these SNPs will segregate similarly in African-American populations. Therefore, estimates that 26% of African-Americans and 2–7% of Hispanic- Americans have at least one FMO2*1 allele should closely reflect the percentages producing active FMO2 protein. PMID:15864117

  6. Fine genetic mapping of the Batten disease locus (CLN3) by haplotype analysis and demonstration of allelic association with chromosome 16p microsatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchison, H.M.; McKay, T.R.; Thompson, A.D.; Mulley, J.C.; Kozman, H.M.; Richards, R.I.; Callen, D.F.; Stallings, R.L.; Doggett, N.A.; Attwood, J.

    1993-05-01

    Batten disease, juvenile onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by accumulation of autofluorescent lipopigment in neurons and other cell types. The disease locus (CLN3) has previously been assigned to chromosome 16p. The genetic localization of CLN3 has been refined by analyzing 70 families using a high-resolution map of 15 marker loci encompassing the CLN3 region on 16p. Crossovers in three maternal meioses allowed localization of CLN3 to the interval between D16S297 and D16S57. Within that interval alleles at three highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat loci (D16S288, D16S298, D16S299) were found to be in strong linkage disequilibrium with CLN3. Analysis of haplotypes suggests that a majority of CLN3 chromosomes have arisen from a single founder mutation. 15 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Linkage and haplotype analysis for chemokine receptors clustered on chromosome 3p21.3 and transmitted in family pedigrees with asthma and atopy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abdulhadi, Saleh A.; Al-Rabia, Mohammed W. O.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Genomic scan analyses have suggested that the chemokine receptor cluster (CCR2, CCR3, CCR5 <300 kb span) on the short arm of chromosome 3 may contribute to susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and to the expression of a number of inflammatory diseases. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and a deletion in these chemokine receptors have also been found in case-control studies to be associated with susceptibility for asthma and related phenotypes. We extended these case-control studies by establishing whether these polymorphisms were in linkage and linkage disequilibrium with asthma and related phenotypes using linkage and haplotype analyses. METHODS: We genotyped 154 nuclear families identified through two child probands with physician-diagnosed asthma (453 unrelated individuals) including 303 unrelated parents and 150 unrelated children. Atopy was defined as a positive skin prick test (SPT 3 mm) to a panel of common inhaled allergens. RESULTS: From a panel of ten known SNPs, only three polymorphisms: –G190A in CCR2, –T51C in CCR3, and a 32 bp deletion in CCR5 were found to occur at clinically relevant frequencies. All 154 families were used for haplotype analysis but only 12 nuclear families were eligible for linkage analysis. Both analyses confirmed that the mutations were in linkage with asthma, but not with atopy. CONCLUSION: The chemokine receptor genes on 3p21.3 are significantly plausible candidate genes that can influence the expression of asthma. The previous association of the CCR5Δ32 deletion with protection from childhood asthma appears to be explained by linkage disequilibrium with the –G190A mutation in the CCR2 receptor gene. PMID:20220260

  8. Acid Rain Analysis by Standard Addition Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.

    1985-01-01

    The standard addition titration is a precise and rapid method for the determination of the acidity in rain or snow samples. The method requires use of a standard buret, a pH meter, and Gran's plot to determine the equivalence point. Experimental procedures used and typical results obtained are presented. (JN)

  9. Genome-wide association studies using haplotypes and individual SNPs in Simmental cattle.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Fan, Huizhong; Wang, Yanhui; Zhang, Lupei; Gao, Xue; Chen, Yan; Li, Junya; Ren, HongYan; Gao, Huijiang

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput genotyping technologies have provided the opportunity to map genes using associations between complex traits and markers. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) based on either a single marker or haplotype have identified genetic variants and underlying genetic mechanisms of quantitative traits. Prompted by the achievements of studies examining economic traits in cattle and to verify the consistency of these two methods using real data, the current study was conducted to construct the haplotype structure in the bovine genome and to detect relevant genes genuinely affecting a carcass trait and a meat quality trait. Using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip, 942 young bulls with genotyping data were introduced as a reference population to identify the genes in the beef cattle genome significantly associated with foreshank weight and triglyceride levels. In total, 92,553 haplotype blocks were detected in the genome. The regions of high linkage disequilibrium extended up to approximately 200 kb, and the size of haplotype blocks ranged from 22 bp to 199,266 bp. Additionally, the individual SNP analysis and the haplotype-based analysis detected similar regions and common SNPs for these two representative traits. A total of 12 and 7 SNPs in the bovine genome were significantly associated with foreshank weight and triglyceride levels, respectively. By comparison, 4 and 5 haplotype blocks containing the majority of significant SNPs were strongly associated with foreshank weight and triglyceride levels, respectively. In addition, 36 SNPs with high linkage disequilibrium were detected in the GNAQ gene, a potential hotspot that may play a crucial role for regulating carcass trait components. PMID:25330174

  10. Genome-Wide Association Studies Using Haplotypes and Individual SNPs in Simmental Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yang; Fan, Huizhong; Wang, Yanhui; Zhang, Lupei; Gao, Xue; Chen, Yan; Li, Junya; Ren, HongYan; Gao, Huijiang

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput genotyping technologies have provided the opportunity to map genes using associations between complex traits and markers. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) based on either a single marker or haplotype have identified genetic variants and underlying genetic mechanisms of quantitative traits. Prompted by the achievements of studies examining economic traits in cattle and to verify the consistency of these two methods using real data, the current study was conducted to construct the haplotype structure in the bovine genome and to detect relevant genes genuinely affecting a carcass trait and a meat quality trait. Using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip, 942 young bulls with genotyping data were introduced as a reference population to identify the genes in the beef cattle genome significantly associated with foreshank weight and triglyceride levels. In total, 92,553 haplotype blocks were detected in the genome. The regions of high linkage disequilibrium extended up to approximately 200 kb, and the size of haplotype blocks ranged from 22 bp to 199,266 bp. Additionally, the individual SNP analysis and the haplotype-based analysis detected similar regions and common SNPs for these two representative traits. A total of 12 and 7 SNPs in the bovine genome were significantly associated with foreshank weight and triglyceride levels, respectively. By comparison, 4 and 5 haplotype blocks containing the majority of significant SNPs were strongly associated with foreshank weight and triglyceride levels, respectively. In addition, 36 SNPs with high linkage disequilibrium were detected in the GNAQ gene, a potential hotspot that may play a crucial role for regulating carcass trait components. PMID:25330174

  11. Recent emergence of the wheat Lr34 multi-pathogen resistance: insights from haplotype analysis in wheat, rice, sorghum and Aegilops tauschii.

    PubMed

    Krattinger, Simon G; Jordan, David R; Mace, Emma S; Raghavan, Chitra; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Keller, Beat; Lagudah, Evans S

    2013-03-01

    Spontaneous sequence changes and the selection of beneficial mutations are driving forces of gene diversification and key factors of evolution. In highly dynamic co-evolutionary processes such as plant-pathogen interactions, the plant's ability to rapidly adapt to newly emerging pathogens is paramount. The hexaploid wheat gene Lr34, which encodes an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, confers durable field resistance against four fungal diseases. Despite its extensive use in breeding and agriculture, no increase in virulence towards Lr34 has been described over the last century. The wheat genepool contains two predominant Lr34 alleles of which only one confers disease resistance. The two alleles, located on chromosome 7DS, differ by only two exon-polymorphisms. Putatively functional homoeologs and orthologs of Lr34 are found on the B-genome of wheat and in rice and sorghum, but not in maize, barley and Brachypodium. In this study we present a detailed haplotype analysis of homoeologous and orthologous Lr34 genes in genetically and geographically diverse selections of wheat, rice and sorghum accessions. We found that the resistant Lr34 haplotype is unique to the wheat D-genome and is not found in the B-genome of wheat or in rice and sorghum. Furthermore, we only found the susceptible Lr34 allele in a set of 252 Ae. tauschii genotypes, the progenitor of the wheat D-genome. These data provide compelling evidence that the Lr34 multi-pathogen resistance is the result of recent gene diversification occurring after the formation of hexaploid wheat about 8,000 years ago. PMID:23117720

  12. Tracking human migrations by the analysis of the distribution of HLA alleles, lineages and haplotypes in closed and open populations

    PubMed Central

    Vina, Marcelo A. Fernandez; Hollenbach, Jill A.; Lyke, Kirsten E.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Maiers, Martin; Klitz, William; Cano, Pedro; Mack, Steven; Single, Richard; Brautbar, Chaim; Israel, Shosahna; Raimondi, Eduardo; Khoriaty, Evelyne; Inati, Adlette; Andreani, Marco; Testi, Manuela; Moraes, Maria Elisa; Thomson, Glenys; Stastny, Peter; Cao, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) system shows extensive variation in the number and function of loci and the number of alleles present at any one locus. Allele distribution has been analysed in many populations through the course of several decades, and the implementation of molecular typing has significantly increased the level of diversity revealing that many serotypes have multiple functional variants. While the degree of diversity in many populations is equivalent and may result from functional polymorphism(s) in peptide presentation, homogeneous and heterogeneous populations present contrasting numbers of alleles and lineages at the loci with high-density expression products. In spite of these differences, the homozygosity levels are comparable in almost all of them. The balanced distribution of HLA alleles is consistent with overdominant selection. The genetic distances between outbred populations correlate with their geographical locations; the formal genetic distance measurements are larger than expected between inbred populations in the same region. The latter present many unique alleles grouped in a few lineages consistent with limited founder polymorphism in which any novel allele may have been positively selected to enlarge the communal peptide-binding repertoire of a given population. On the other hand, it has been observed that some alleles are found in multiple populations with distinctive haplotypic associations suggesting that convergent evolution events may have taken place as well. It appears that the HLA system has been under strong selection, probably owing to its fundamental role in varying immune responses. Therefore, allelic diversity in HLA should be analysed in conjunction with other genetic markers to accurately track the migrations of modern humans. PMID:22312049

  13. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  14. Haplotype map of sickle cell anemia in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Moumni, Imen; Ben Mustapha, Maha; Sassi, Sarra; Zorai, Amine; Ben Mansour, Ikbel; Douzi, Kais; Chouachi, Dorra; Mellouli, Fethi; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Abbes, Salem

    2014-01-01

    β-Globin haplotypes are important to establish the ethnic origin and predict the clinical development of sickle cell disease patients (SCD). To determine the chromosomal background of β (S) Tunisian sickle cell patients, in this first study in Tunisia, we have explored four polymorphic regions of β-globin cluster on chromosome 11. It is the 5' region of β-LCR-HS2 site, the intervening sequence II (IVSII) region of two fetal ((G)γ and (A)γ) genes and the 5' region of β-globin gene. The results reveal a high molecular diversity of a microsatellite configuration describing the sequences haplotypes. The linkage disequilibrium analysis showed various haplotype combinations giving 22 "extended haplotypes". These results confirm the utility of the β-globin haplotypes for population studies and contribute to knowledge of the Tunisian gene pool, as well as establishing the role of genetic markers in physiopathology of SCD. PMID:25197158

  15. Chromosomal Haplotypes by Genetic Phasing of Human Families

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Jared C.; Glusman, Gustavo; Hubley, Robert; Montsaroff, Stephen Z.; Holloway, Alisha K.; Mauldin, Denise E.; Srivastava, Deepak; Garg, Vidu; Pollard, Katherine S.; Galas, David J.; Hood, Leroy; Smit, Arian F.A.

    2011-01-01

    Assignment of alleles to haplotypes for nearly all the variants on all chromosomes can be performed by genetic analysis of a nuclear family with three or more children. Whole-genome sequence data enable deterministic phasing of nearly all sequenced alleles by permitting assignment of recombinations to precise chromosomal positions and specific meioses. We demonstrate this process of genetic phasing on two families each with four children. We generate haplotypes for all of the children and their parents; these haplotypes span all genotyped positions, including rare variants. Misassignments of phase between variants (switch errors) are nearly absent. Our algorithm can also produce multimegabase haplotypes for nuclear families with just two children and can handle families with missing individuals. We implement our algorithm in a suite of software scripts (Haploscribe). Haplotypes and family genome sequences will become increasingly important for personalized medicine and for fundamental biology. PMID:21855840

  16. Reconstruction of N-acetyltransferase 2 haplotypes using PHASE.

    PubMed

    Golka, Klaus; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Samimi, Mirabutaleb; Bolt, Hermann M; Selinski, Silvia

    2008-04-01

    The genotyping of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) by PCR/RFLP methods yields in a considerable percentage ambiguous results. To resolve this methodical problem a statistical approach was applied. PHASE v2.1.1, a statistical program for haplotype reconstruction was used to estimate haplotype pairs from NAT2 genotyping data, obtained by the analysis of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms relevant for Caucasians. In 1,011 out of 2,921 (35%) subjects the haplotype pairs were clearcut by the PCR/RFLP data only. For the majority of the data the applied method resulted in a multiplicity (2-4) of possible haplotype pairs. Haplotype reconstruction using PHASE v2.1.1 cleared this ambiguity in all cases but one, where an alternative haplotype pair was considered with a probability of 0.029. The estimation of the NAT2 haplotype is important because the assignment of the NAT2 alleles *12A, *12B, *12C or *13 to the rapid or slow NAT2 genotype has been discussed controversially. A clear assignment is indispensable in surveys of human bladder cancer caused by aromatic amine exposures. In conclusion, PHASE v2.1.1 software allowed an unambiguous haplotype reconstruction in 2,920 of 2,921 cases (>99.9%). PMID:17879084

  17. Association between vitamin D receptor polymorphisms and haplotypes with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    SALIMI, SAEEDEH; FARAJIAN-MASHHADI, FARZANEH; ALAVI-NAINI, ROYA; TALEBIAN, GOLBARG; NAROOIE-NEJAD, MEHRNAZ

    2015-01-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is an important factor in activating immune response in different infectious diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between the VDR gene polymorphisms and pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). The case control study was performed on 120 PTB patients and 131 healthy controls. Genetic analysis was performed by polymerase chain reaction and the restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The VDR Fok1 Ff genotype was associated with TB and the risk of PTB was two times higher in individuals with the Ff genotype. A higher frequency of f allele was observed in PTB patients and therefore, the f allele may be a risk factor for PTB susceptibility. There were no associations between the Taq1 and Bsm1 polymorphisms and PTB. In addition, haplotype analysis showed that the f-T-B and f-t-b haplotypes (Fok1, Taq1 and Bsm1) may have the potential to increase PTB susceptibility. In conclusion, the Ff genotype and f allele of the VDR Fok1 polymorphism were associated with PTB susceptibility. In addition, the f-T-B and f-t-b haplotypes may be the susceptible haplotypes for PTB. PMID:26075071

  18. Glucocorticoid receptor gene haplotype structure and steroid therapy outcome in IBD patients

    PubMed Central

    Mwinyi, Jessica; Wenger, Christa; Eloranta, Jyrki J; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study whether the glucocorticoid receptor (GR/NR3C1) gene haplotypes influence the steroid therapy outcome in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS: We sequenced all coding exons and flanking intronic sequences of the NR3C1 gene in 181 IBD patients, determined the single nucleotide polymorphisms, and predicted the NR3C1 haplotypes. Furthermore, we investigated whether certain NR3C1 haplotypes are significantly associated with steroid therapy outcomes. RESULTS: We detected 13 NR3C1 variants, which led to the formation of 17 different haplotypes with a certainty of > 95% in 173 individuals. The three most commonly occurring haplotypes were included in the association analysis of the influence of haplotype on steroid therapy outcome or IBD activity. None of the NR3C1 haplotypes showed statistically significant association with glucocorticoid therapy success. CONCLUSION: NR3C1 haplotypes are not related to steroid therapy outcome. PMID:20712049

  19. Analysis of FMR1 (CGG)n alleles and FRAXA microsatellite haplotypes in the population of Greenland: implications for the population of the New World from Asia.

    PubMed

    Larsen, L A; Armstrong, J S; Grønskov, K; Hjalgrim, H; Brøndum-Nielsen, K; Hasholt, L; Nørgaard-Pedersen, B; Vuust, J

    1999-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome is caused by the expansion of a polymorphic (CGG)n tract in the promoter region of the FMR1 gene. Apparently the incidence of fragile X syndrome is rare in the population of Greenland. In order to examine population-related factors involved in stability of the (CGG)n sequence, DNA samples obtained randomly from the Greenlandic population were analysed for size and AGG interspersion pattern of the FMR1 (CGG)n region and associated DXS548-FRAXAC1 haplotypes. In addition a large Greenland family with unstable transmission in the premutation range was analysed. The (CGG)n allele sizes in the Greenland population showed a narrow distribution similar to that reported for Asian populations. DNA sequencing of alleles with 36 CGG repeats revealed an AGG(CGG)6 insertion previously reported exclusively in Asian populations and a high frequency of alleles with a (CGG)10AGG(CGG)9AGG(CGG)9 or (CGG)9AGG(CGG)9AGG(CGG)6AGG(CGG)9 sequence pattern was found. Thus the data confirm the Asian origin of the Greenlandic (Eskimo) population and indicates that some (CGG)n alleles have remained stable for 15-30,000 years, since the population of the New World arrived from Asia via the Bering Strait. PMID:10573009

  20. An approach to mapping haplotype-specific recombination sites in human MHC class III

    SciTech Connect

    Levo, A.; Westman, P.; Partanen, J.

    1996-12-31

    Studies of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in mouse indicate that the recombination sites are not randomly distributed and their occurrence is haplotype-dependent. No data concerning haplotype-specific recombination sites in human are available due to the low number of informative families. To investigate haplotype-specific recombination sites in human MHC, we describe an approach based on identification of recombinant haplotypes derived from one conserved haplotype at the population level. The recombination sites were mapped by comparing polymorphic markers between the recombinant and assumed original haplotypes. We tested this approach on the extended haplotype HLA A3; B47; Bf{sup *}F; C4A{sup *}1; C4B{sup *}Q0; DR7, which is most suitable for this analysis. First, it carries a number of rare markers, and second, the haplotype, albeit rare in the general population, is frequent in patients with 21-hydroxylase (21OH) defect. We observed recombinants derived from this haplotype in patients with 21OH defect. All these haplotypes had the centromeric part (from Bf to DR) identical to the original haplotype, but they differed in HLA A and B. We therefore assumed that they underwent recombinations in the segment that separates the Bf and HLA B genes. Polymorphic markers indicated that all break points mapped to two segments near the TNF locus. This approach makes possible the mapping of preferential recombination sites in different haplotypes. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. Genome-wide analysis identifies 16q deletion associated with survival, molecular subtypes, mRNA expression, and germline haplotypes in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Nordgard, Silje H; Johansen, Fredrik E; Alnaes, Grethe I G; Bucher, Elmar; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Naume, Bjørn; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela N

    2008-08-01

    Breast carcinomas are characterized by DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) with biological and clinical significance. This explorative study integrated CNA, expression, and germline genotype data of 112 early-stage breast cancer patients. Recurrent CNAs differed substantially between tumor subtypes classified according to expression pattern. Deletion of 16q was overrepresented in Luminal A, and a predictor of good prognosis, both overall and for the nonluminal A subgroups. The deleted region most significantly associated with survival mapped to 16q22.2, harboring the genes TXNL4B and DXH38, whose expression was strongly correlated with the deletion. The area most frequently deleted resided on 16q23.1, 3.5 MB downstream of the area most significantly associated with survival, and included the tumor suppressor gene ADAMTS18 and the cell recognition gene CNTNAP4. Whole-genome association analysis identified germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and their corresponding haplotypes, residing on several different chromosomes, to be associated with deletion of 16q. The genes where these SNPs reside encode proteins involved in the extracellular matrix (CHST3 and SPOCK2), in regulation of the cell cycle (JMY, PTPRN2, and Cwf19L2) and chromosome stability (KPNB1). PMID:18398821

  2. Association analysis of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene in Tourette`s syndrome using the haplotype relative risk method

    SciTech Connect

    Noethen, M.M.; Cichon, S.; Propping, P.

    1994-09-15

    Comings et al. have recently reported a highly significant association between Tourette`s syndrome (TS) and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene (DRD2) locus. The A1 allele of the DRD2 Taq I RFLP was present in 45% of the Tourette patients compared with 25% of controls. We tried to replicate this finding by using the haplotype relative risk (HRR) method for association analysis. This method overcomes a major problem of conventional case-control studies, where undetected ethnic differences between patients and controls may result in a false-positive finding, by using parental alleles not inherited by the proband as control alleles. Sixty-one nuclear families encompassing an affected child and parents were typed for the DRD2 Taq I polymorphism. No significant differences in DRD2 A1 allele frequency were observed between TS probands, sub-populations of probands classified according to tic severity, or parental control alleles. Our data do not support the hypothesis that the DRD2 locus may act as a modifying gene in the expression of the disorder in TS probands. 40 refs., 1 tab.

  3. A spatial haplotype copying model with applications to genotype imputation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Yun; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Eskin, Eleazar; Pasaniuc, Bogdan

    2015-05-01

    Ever since its introduction, the haplotype copy model has proven to be one of the most successful approaches for modeling genetic variation in human populations, with applications ranging from ancestry inference to genotype phasing and imputation. Motivated by coalescent theory, this approach assumes that any chromosome (haplotype) can be modeled as a mosaic of segments copied from a set of chromosomes sampled from the same population. At the core of the model is the assumption that any chromosome from the sample is equally likely to contribute a priori to the copying process. Motivated by recent works that model genetic variation in a geographic continuum, we propose a new spatial-aware haplotype copy model that jointly models geography and the haplotype copying process. We extend hidden Markov models of haplotype diversity such that at any given location, haplotypes that are closest in the genetic-geographic continuum map are a priori more likely to contribute to the copying process than distant ones. Through simulations starting from the 1000 Genomes data, we show that our model achieves superior accuracy in genotype imputation over the standard spatial-unaware haplotype copy model. In addition, we show the utility of our model in selecting a small personalized reference panel for imputation that leads to both improved accuracy as well as to a lower computational runtime than the standard approach. Finally, we show our proposed model can be used to localize individuals on the genetic-geographical map on the basis of their genotype data. PMID:25526526

  4. An Analysis of HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1 Allele and Haplotype Frequencies of 21,918 Residents Living in Liaoning, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Yang; Zhang, Kun-Lian; Liu, Xiang-Jun; Li, Jian-Ping

    2014-01-01

    HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 allele frequencies and their haplotype frequencies in 21,918 Chinese residents living in Liaoning Province, who were registered as volunteer donors of China Marrow Donor Registry, were investigated. They are composed of 93.37% Han Chinese, 5.1% Manchus, 0.57% Mongols, 0.46% Hui persons, 0.29% Koreans and 0.14% Xibe ethnic group. In total eighteen different HLA-A alleles, forty-eight different HLA-B alleles and fourteen different HLA-DRB1 alleles have been identified. Their frequencies are in agreement with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. For Han Chinese in Liaoning, 1,534 different HLA-A-B-DRB1 haplotypes were identified, with a frequency of higher than 0.01%. A*30-B*13-DRB1*07, A*02-B*46-DRB1*09 and A*02-B*13-DRB1*12 are the most frequent haplotypes among Liaoning Han. While Liaoning Han, Liaoning Manchu, Liaoning Mongol, Liaoning Hui and Liaoning Korean share the northern Han characteristic haplotypes, all minority ethnic groups with the exception of Liaoning Manchu have developed their own unique HLA profiles. This dataset characterizes the HLA allele and haplotype frequencies in the Liaoning area and suggests that it is different from those in other parts of China and ethnic groups, which implicates transplant donor searching strategies and studies on population genetics. PMID:24691290

  5. Human dopamine transporter gene: differential regulation of 18-kb haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Xiong, Nian; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Yanhong; Li, Nuomin; Qing, Hong; Lin, Zhicheng

    2013-01-01

    Aim Since previous functional studies of short haplotypes and polymorphic sites of SLC6A3 have shown variant-dependent and drug-sensitive promoter activity, this study aimed to understand whether a large SLC6A3 regulatory region, containing these small haplotypes and polymorphic sites, can display haplotype-dependent promoter activity in a drug-sensitive and pathway-related manner. Materials & methods By creating and using a single copy number luciferase-reporter vector, we examined regulation of two different SLC6A3 haplotypes (A and B) of the 5′ 18-kb promoter and two known downstream regulatory variable number tandem repeats by 17 drugs in four different cellular models. Results The two regulatory haplotypes displayed up to 3.2-fold difference in promoter activity. The regulations were drug selective (37.5% of the drugs showed effects), and both haplotype and cell type dependent. Pathway analysis revealed at least 13 main signaling hubs targeting SLC6A3, including histone deacetylation, AKT, PKC and CK2 α-chains. Conclusion SLC6A3 may be regulated via either its promoter or the variable number tandem repeats independently by specific signaling pathways and in a haplotype-dependent manner. Furthermore, we have developed the first pathway map for SLC6A3 regulation. These findings provide a framework for understanding complex and variant-dependent regulations of SLC6A3. PMID:24024899

  6. Mitochondrial haplotype diversity in the tortoise species Testudo graeca from North Africa and the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    van der Kuyl, Antoinette C; Ballasina, Donato LP; Zorgdrager, Fokla

    2005-01-01

    Background To help conservation programs of the endangered spur-thighed tortoise and to gain better insight into its systematics, genetic variation and evolution in the tortoise species Testudo graeca (Testudines: Testudinidae) was investigated by sequence analysis of a 394-nucleotide fragment of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene for 158 tortoise specimens belonging to the subspecies Testudo graeca graeca, Testudo graeca ibera, Testudo graeca terrestris, and a newly recognized subspecies Testudo graeca whitei. A 411-nucleotide fragment of the mitochondrial D-loop was additionally sequenced for a subset of 22 T. graeca, chosen because of their 12S gene haplotype and/or geographical origin. Results Haplotype networks generated by maximum-likelihood and neighbor-joining analyses of both the separate and the combined sequence data sets suggested the existence of two main clades of Testudo graeca, comprising Testudo graeca from northern Africa and Testudo graeca from the Turkey and the Middle East, respectively. Conclusion Mitochondrial DNA haplotyping suggests that the tortoise subspecies of T. g. graeca and T. g. ibera are genetically distinct, with a calculated divergence time in the early or middle Pleistocene. Other proposed subspecies could not clearly be recognized based upon their mt haplotypes and phylogenetic position, and were either part of the T. g. graeca or of the T. g. ibera clade, suggesting that genetic evidence for the existence of most of the 15 proposed subspecies of T. graeca is weak. PMID:15836787

  7. Effects of Introgression and Recombination on Haplotype Structure and Linkage Disequilibrium Surrounding a Locus Encoding Bymovirus Resistance in Barley

    PubMed Central

    Stracke, Silke; Presterl, Thomas; Stein, Nils; Perovic, Dragan; Ordon, Frank; Graner, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the physical and genetic context of the barley gene Hv-eIF4E, which confers resistance to the barley yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) complex. Eighty-three SNPs distributed over 132 kb of Hv-eIF4E and six additional fragments genetically mapped to its flanking region were used to derive haplotypes from 131 accessions. Three haplogroups were recognized, discriminating between the alleles rym4 and rym5, which each encode for a spectrum of resistance to BYMV. With increasing map distance, haplotypes of susceptible genotypes displayed diverse patterns driven mainly by recombination, whereas haplotype diversity within the subgroups of resistant genotypes was limited. We conclude that the breakdown of LD within 1 cM of the resistance gene was generated mainly by susceptible genotypes. Despite the LD decay, a significant association between haplotype and resistance to BYMV was detected up to a distance of 5.5 cM from the resistance gene. The LD pattern and the haplotype structure of the target chromosomal region are the result of interplay between low recombination and recent breeding history. PMID:17151251

  8. Polymorphic DNA haplotypes at the LDL receptor locus.

    PubMed Central

    Leitersdorf, E; Chakravarti, A; Hobbs, H H

    1989-01-01

    Mutations in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene result in the autosomal dominant disorder familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Many different LDL receptor mutations have been identified and characterized, demonstrating a high degree of allelic heterogeneity at this locus. The ability to identify mutant LDL receptor genes for prenatal diagnosis of homozygous FH or to study the role of the LDL receptor gene in polygenic hypercholesterolemia requires the use of closely linked RFLPs. In the present study we used 10 different RFLPs, including three newly described polymorphisms, to construct 123 independent haplotypes from 20 Caucasian American pedigrees. Our sample contained 31 different haplotypes varying in frequency from 0.8% to 29.3%; the five most common haplotypes account for 67.5% of the sample. The heterozygosity and PIC of each site were determined, and these values disclosed that eight of the RFLPs were substantially polymorphic. Linkage-disequilibrium analysis of the haplotype data revealed strong nonrandom associations among all 10 RFLPs, especially among those sites clustered in the 3' region of the gene. Evolutionary analysis suggests the occurrence of both mutational and recombinational events in the generation of the observed haplotypes. A strategy for haplotype analysis of the LDL receptor gene in individuals of Caucasian American descent is presented. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2563635

  9. Transmission of the FRAXA haplotype from three nonpenetrant brothers to their affected grandsons: an update with AGG interspersion analysis.

    PubMed

    Mogk, R L; Carson, N L; Chudley, A E; Dawson, A J

    1998-01-01

    Recently, we reported on a family showing transmission of the FRAXA gene by three nonpenetrant, normally intelligent, full and half brothers to their affected grandsons [Kirkilionis et al., 1992]. We have reanalyzed this family for CGG repeat size by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification/Southern blot and FMR1 methylation status using EcoRI/BssHII double digests with pE5-1 as the hybridization probe. The half brother was found to have a premutation allele size of 59 CGG repeats. MnlI digestion of PCR products showed the absence of intervening AGG sequences. All of his obligate carrier daughters had CGG alleles ranging from 65 to 90 repeats, with a final expansion of more than 200 repeats in his FRAXA-affected grandson and 131 repeats in his carrier granddaughter. Two full brothers were shown to have inherited a 47-CGG repeat premutation allele. Analysis of one brother showed that he stably transmitted the 47-repeat allele to his daughter. Analysis of the second brother, his daughter, and his granddaughter showed that this allele was meiotically unstable, with the allele size increasing from 47, to 48, to 49 from the father, to the daughter to the granddaughter, respectively. MnlI digestion and DNA sequencing of PCR products showed the absence of intervening AGG sequences. This is the first case in which the lack of AGG interspersions has been associated with instability of a gray zone allele resulting in a one-repeat increase in two successive generations. PMID:9450853

  10. De novo assembly of a haplotype-resolved human genome.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hongzhi; Wu, Honglong; Luo, Ruibang; Huang, Shujia; Sun, Yuhui; Tong, Xin; Xie, Yinlong; Liu, Binghang; Yang, Hailong; Zheng, Hancheng; Li, Jian; Li, Bo; Wang, Yu; Yang, Fang; Sun, Peng; Liu, Siyang; Gao, Peng; Huang, Haodong; Sun, Jing; Chen, Dan; He, Guangzhu; Huang, Weihua; Huang, Zheng; Li, Yue; Tellier, Laurent C A M; Liu, Xiao; Feng, Qiang; Xu, Xun; Zhang, Xiuqing; Bolund, Lars; Krogh, Anders; Kristiansen, Karsten; Drmanac, Radoje; Drmanac, Snezana; Nielsen, Rasmus; Li, Songgang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Li, Yingrui; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun

    2015-06-01

    The human genome is diploid, and knowledge of the variants on each chromosome is important for the interpretation of genomic information. Here we report the assembly of a haplotype-resolved diploid genome without using a reference genome. Our pipeline relies on fosmid pooling together with whole-genome shotgun strategies, based solely on next-generation sequencing and hierarchical assembly methods. We applied our sequencing method to the genome of an Asian individual and generated a 5.15-Gb assembled genome with a haplotype N50 of 484 kb. Our analysis identified previously undetected indels and 7.49 Mb of novel coding sequences that could not be aligned to the human reference genome, which include at least six predicted genes. This haplotype-resolved genome represents the most complete de novo human genome assembly to date. Application of our approach to identify individual haplotype differences should aid in translating genotypes to phenotypes for the development of personalized medicine. PMID:26006006

  11. Haplotype inference from unphased SNP data in heterozygous polyploids based on SAT

    PubMed Central

    Neigenfind, Jost; Gyetvai, Gabor; Basekow, Rico; Diehl, Svenja; Achenbach, Ute; Gebhardt, Christiane; Selbig, Joachim; Kersten, Birgit

    2008-01-01

    Background Haplotype inference based on unphased SNP markers is an important task in population genetics. Although there are different approaches to the inference of haplotypes in diploid species, the existing software is not suitable for inferring haplotypes from unphased SNP data in polyploid species, such as the cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum). Potato species are tetraploid and highly heterozygous. Results Here we present the software SATlotyper which is able to handle polyploid and polyallelic data. SATlo-typer uses the Boolean satisfiability problem to formulate Haplotype Inference by Pure Parsimony. The software excludes existing haplotype inferences, thus allowing for calculation of alternative inferences. As it is not known which of the multiple haplotype inferences are best supported by the given unphased data set, we use a bootstrapping procedure that allows for scoring of alternative inferences. Finally, by means of the bootstrapping scores, it is possible to optimise the phased genotypes belonging to a given haplotype inference. The program is evaluated with simulated and experimental SNP data generated for heterozygous tetraploid populations of potato. We show that, instead of taking the first haplotype inference reported by the program, we can significantly improve the quality of the final result by applying additional methods that include scoring of the alternative haplotype inferences and genotype optimisation. For a sub-population of nineteen individuals, the predicted results computed by SATlotyper were directly compared with results obtained by experimental haplotype inference via sequencing of cloned amplicons. Prediction and experiment gave similar results regarding the inferred haplotypes and phased genotypes. Conclusion Our results suggest that Haplotype Inference by Pure Parsimony can be solved efficiently by the SAT approach, even for data sets of unphased SNP from heterozygous polyploids. SATlotyper is freeware and is distributed as

  12. Analysis of HLA class II haplotypes in the Cayapa indians of ecuador: A novel DRBI allele reveals evidence for convergent evolution and balancing selection at position 86

    SciTech Connect

    Titus-Trachtenberg, E.A.; Erlich, H. ); Rickards, O.; De Stefano, G.F. )

    1994-07-01

    PCR amplification, oligonucleotide probe typing, and sequencing were used to analyze the HLA class II loci (DRB1, DQA1, DAB1, and DPB1) of an isolated South Amerindian tribe. Here the authors report HLA class II variation, including the identification of a new DRB1 allele, several novel DR/DQ haplotypes, and an unusual distribution of DPB1 alleles, among the Cayapa Indians (N=100) of Ecuador. A general reduction of HLA class II allelic variation in the Cayapa is consistent with a population bottleneck during the colonization of the Americas. The new Cayapa DRB1 allele, DRB1[sup *]08042, which arose by a G[yields]T point mutation in the parental DRB1[sup *]0802, contains a novel Val codon (GTT) at position 86. The generation of DRB1[sup *]08042 (Val-86) from DRB1[sup *]0802 (Gly-86) in the Cayapa, by a different mechanism than the (GT[yields]TG) change in the creation of DRB1[sub *]08041 (Val-86) from DRB1[sup *]0802 in Africa, implicates selection in the convergent evolution of position 86 DR[beta] variants. The DRB1[sup *]08042 allele has not been found in >1,800 Amerindian haplotypes and thus presumably arose after the Cayapa separated from other South American Amerindians. Selection pressure for increased haplotype diversity can be inferred in the generation and maintenance of three new DRB1[sup *]08042 haplotypes and several novel DR/DQ haplotypes in this population. The DPB1 allelic distribution in the Cayapa is also extraordinary, with two alleles, DPB1[sup *]1401, a very rare allele in North American Amerindian populations, and DPB1[sup *]0402, the most common Amerindian DPB1 allele, constituting 89% of the Cayapa DPB1. These data are consistent with the postulated rapid rate of evolution as noted for the class I HLA-B locus of other South American Indians. 34 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. The Wilson disease gene: Haplotypes and mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.R.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W.; Walshe, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Wilson disease (WND) is an autosomal recessive defect of copper transport. The gene involved in WND, located on chromosome 13, has recently been shown to be a putative copper transporting P-type ATPase, designated ATP7B. The gene is highly similar to ATP7A, located on the X chromosome, which is defective in Menkes disease, another disorder of copper transport. We have available for study WND families from Canada (34 families), the United Kingdom (32 families), Japan (4 families), Iceland (3 families) and Hong Kong (2 families). We have utilized four highly polymorphic CA repeat markers (D13S296, D13S301, D13S314 and D13S316) surrounding the ATP7B locus to construct haplotypes in these families. Analysis indicates that there are many unique WND haplotypes not present on normal chromosomes and that there may be a large number of different WND mutations. We have screened the WND patients for mutations in the ATP7B gene. Fifty six patients, representing all of the identified haplotypes, have been screened using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP), followed by selective sequencing. To date, 19 mutations and 12 polymorphisms have been identified. All of the changes are nucleotide substitutions or small insertions/deletions and there is no evidence for larger deletions as seen in the similar gene on the X chromosome, ATP7A. Haplotypes of close markers and the ability to detect some of the mutations present in the gene allow for more reliable molecular diagnosis of presymptomatic sibs of WND patients. A reassessment of individuals previously diagnosed in the presymptomatic phase is now required, as we have have identified some heterozygotes who are biochemically indistinguishable from affected homozygotes. The identification of specific mutations will soon allow direct diagnosis of WND patients with a high level of certainty.

  14. Haplotypes of angiotensinogen in essential hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Jeunemaitre, X; Inoue, I; Williams, C; Charru, A; Tichet, J; Powers, M; Sharma, A M; Gimenez-Roqueplo, A P; Hata, A; Corvol, P; Lalouel, J M

    1997-01-01

    The M235T polymorphism of the angiotensinogen gene (AGT) has been associated with essential and pregnancy-induced hypertension. Generation of haplotypes can help to resolve whether the T235 allele itself predisposes to the development of hypertension or acts as a marker of an unknown causal molecular variant. We identified 10 diallelic polymorphisms at the AGT locus and genotyped both a series of 477 probands of hypertensive families and 364 controls, all French Caucasians, as well as a series of 92 hypertensives and 122 controls from Japan. Despite a large ethnic difference in gene frequency, a significant association of T235 with hypertension was observed both in Cancasians (.46 vs. .38, P = .004) and in Japanese (.91 vs. .76, P = .002). In both groups, the G-->A substitution located at position -6 upstream of the initial transcription site occurred at the same frequency and in complete linkage disequilibrium with the T235 allele. No other polymorphism was found to be consistently associated with hypertension. Five informative haplotypes subdividing the T235 allele were generated. Whereas two of them were associated with hypertension in Caucasians, none of these two haplotypes (H3 and H4) reached statistical significance in Japanese. The analysis of the AGT-GT repeat revealed marked linkage disequilibriums between each of the diallelic polymorphisms and some (GT)n alleles, with similar patterns in the two populations. The strong disequilibrium between M235 and (GT)16 explained the increased frequency of that particular allele in French controls compared with hypertensives (.42 vs. .36, P < .01). The haplotype combining the M235T and G-6A polymorphisms appears as the ancestral allele of the human AGT gene and as the one associated with hypertension. PMID:9199566

  15. Phenotypic and genetic effects of recessive haplotypes on yield, longevity, and fertility.

    PubMed

    Cole, J B; Null, D J; VanRaden, P M

    2016-09-01

    Phenotypes from the August 2015 US national genetic evaluation were used to compute phenotypic effects of 18 recessive haplotypes in Ayrshire (n=1), Brown Swiss (n=5), Holstein (n=10), and Jersey (n=2) cattle on milk, fat, and protein yields, somatic cell score (SCS), single-trait productive life (PL), daughter pregnancy rate (DPR), heifer conception rate (HCR), and cow conception rate (CCR). The haplotypes evaluated were Ayrshire haplotype 1, Brown Swiss haplotypes 1 and 2, spinal dysmyelination, spinal muscular atrophy, Weaver Syndrome, brachyspina, Holstein cholesterol deficiency, Holstein haplotypes 1 to 5, bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency, complex vertebral malformation, mulefoot (syndactyly), and Jersey haplotypes 1 and 2. When causal variants are unknown and tests are based only on single nucleotide polymorphism haplotypes, it can sometimes be difficult to accurately determine carrier status. For example, 2 Holstein haplotypes for cholesterol deficiency have the same single nucleotide polymorphism genotype, but only one of them carries the causative mutation. Genotyped daughters of carrier bulls included in the analysis ranged from 8 for Weaver Syndrome to 17,869 for Holstein haplotype 3. Lactation records preadjusted for nongenetic factors and direct genomic values (DGV) were used to estimate phenotypic and genetic effects of recessive haplotypes, respectively. We found no phenotypic or genetic differences between carriers and noncarriers of Ayrshire or Brown Swiss defects. Several associations were noted for Holstein haplotypes, including fat and HCR for Holstein haplotype 0 carriers; milk, protein, SCS, PL, and fertility for Holstein haplotype 1; protein, PL, CCR, and HCR for Holstein haplotype 2; milk, protein, and fertility for Holstein haplotype 4; and protein yield and DPR for Holstein haplotype 5. There were no differences among bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency carriers, but complex vertebral malformation affected fat yield and mulefoot

  16. Genomic evaluation of HLA-DR3+ haplotypes associated with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neeraj; Kaur, Gurvinder; Tandon, Nikhil; Kanga, Uma; Mehra, Narinder K

    2013-04-01

    We have defined three sets of HLA-DR3(+) haplotypes that provide maximum risk of type 1 disease development in Indians: (1) a diverse array of B8-DR3 haplotypes, (2) A33-B58-DR3 haplotype, and (3) A2-B50-DR3 occurring most predominantly in this population. Further analysis has revealed extensive diversity in B8-DR3 haplotypes, particularly at the HLA-A locus, in contrast to the single fixed HLA-A1-B8-DR3 haplotype (generally referred to as AH8.1) reported in Caucasians. However, the classical AH8.1 haplotype was rare and differed from the Caucasian counterpart at multiple loci. In our study, HLA-A26-B8-DR3 (AH8.2) was the most common B8-DR3 haplotype constituting >50% of the total B8-DR3 haplotypes. Further, A2-B8-DR3 contributed the maximum risk (RR = 48.7) of type 1 diabetes, followed by A2-B50-DR3 (RR = 9.4), A33-B58-DR3 (RR = 6.6), A24-B8-DR3 (RR = 4.5), and A26-B8-DR3 (RR = 4.2). Despite several differences, the disease-associated haplotypes in Indian and Caucasian populations share a frozen DR3-DQ2 block, suggesting a common ancestor from which multiple haplotypes evolved independently. PMID:23387390

  17. Designing and conducting in silico analysis for identifying of Echinococcus spp. with discrimination of novel haplotypes: an approach to better understanding of parasite taxonomic.

    PubMed

    Spotin, Adel; Gholami, Shirzad; Nasab, Abbas Najafi; Fallah, Esmaeil; Oskouei, Mahmoud Mahami; Semnani, Vahid; Shariatzadeh, Seyyed Ali; Shahbazi, Abbas

    2015-04-01

    The definitive identification of Echinococcus species is currently carried out by sequencing and phylogenetic strategies. However, the application of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) patterns is not broadly used as a result of heterogeneity traits of Echinococcus genome in different regions of the world. Therefore, designing and conducting a standardized pattern should indigenously be considered in under-studied areas. In this investigation, an in silico mapping was designed and developed for eight Echinococcus spp. on the basis of regional sequences in Iran and the world. The numbers of 60 Echinococcus isolates were collected from the liver and lungs of 15 human, 15 sheep, 15 cattle, and 15 camel cases in Semnan province, Central Iran. DNA samples were extracted and examined by polymerase chain reaction of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and PCR-RFLP via Rsa1 endonuclease enzyme. Moreover, 15 amplicons of cytochrome oxidase 1 (Cox1) were directly sequenced in order to identify the strains/haplotypes. PCR-RFLP and phylogenetic analyses revealed firmly the presence of the G1 and G6 genotypes with heterogeneity (three novel haplotypes) of Cox1 gene although no other expected genotypes were found in the region. Finding shows that the identification of novel haplotypes along with discrimination of Echinococcus spp. through regional patterns can unambiguously illustrate the real taxonomic status of parasite in Central Iran. PMID:25645007

  18. Mitochondrial coding genome analysis of tropical root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne) supports haplotype based diagnostics and reveals evidence of recent reticulate evolution

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Toon; Karssen, Gerrit; Verhaeven, Myrtle; Coyne, Danny; Bert, Wim

    2016-01-01

    The polyphagous parthenogenetic root-knot nematodes of the genus Meloidogyne are considered to be the most significant nematode pest in sub-tropical and tropical agriculture. Despite the crucial need for correct diagnosis, identification of these pathogens remains problematic. The traditionally used diagnostic strategies, including morphometrics, host-range tests, biochemical and molecular techniques, now appear to be unreliable due to the recently-suggested hybrid origin of root-knot nematodes. In order to determine a suitable barcode region for these pathogens nine quickly-evolving mitochondrial coding genes were screened. Resulting haplotype networks revealed closely related lineages indicating a recent speciation, an anthropogenic-aided distribution through agricultural practices, and evidence for reticulate evolution within M. arenaria. Nonetheless, nucleotide polymorphisms harbor enough variation to distinguish these closely-related lineages. Furthermore, completeness of lineage sorting was verified by screening 80 populations from widespread geographical origins and variable hosts. Importantly, our results indicate that mitochondrial haplotypes are strongly linked and consistent with traditional esterase isozyme patterns, suggesting that different parthenogenetic lineages can be reliably identified using mitochondrial haplotypes. The study indicates that the barcode region Nad5 can reliably identify the major lineages of tropical root-knot nematodes. PMID:26940543

  19. Genetic analysis of haplotype data for 23 Y-chromosome short tandem repeat loci in the Turkish population recently settled in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Serkan; Primorac, Dragan; Marjanović, Damir

    2014-01-01

    Aim To explore the distribution and polymorphisms of 23 short tandem repeat (STR) loci on the Y chromosome in the Turkish population recently settled in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina and to investigate its genetic relationships with the homeland Turkish population and neighboring populations. Methods This study included 100 healthy unrelated male individuals from the Turkish population living in Sarajevo. Buccal swab samples were collected as a DNA source. Genomic DNA was extracted using the salting out method and amplification was performed using PowerPlex Y 23 amplification kit. The studied population was compared to other populations using pairwise genetic distances, which were represented with a multi-dimensional scaling plot. Results Haplotype and allele frequencies of the sample population were calculated and the results showed that all 100 samples had unique haplotypes. The most polymorphic locus was DYS458, and the least polymorphic DYS391. The observed haplotype diversity was 1.0000 ± 0.0014, with a discrimination capacity of 1.00 and the match probability of 0.01. Rst values showed that our sample population was closely related in both dimensions to the Lebanese and Iraqi populations, while it was more distant from Bosnian, Croatian, and Macedonian populations. Conclusion Turkish population residing in Sarajevo could be observed as a representative Turkish population, since our results were consistent with those previously published for the homeland Turkish population. Also, this study once again proved that geographically close populations were genetically more related to each other. PMID:25358886

  20. Annotated definition of BCL11A and HMIP-2 haplotypes through the analysis of sicilian β-thalassemia patients with high levels of fetal hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Buccheri, Maria A; Spina, Sonia; Ruberto, Concetta; Lombardo, Turi; Labie, Dominique; Ragusa, And Angela

    2013-01-01

    Fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) is the principal ameliorating factor of β-thalassemia (β-thal) and sickle cell disease. Persistent production in adult life is a quantitative trait regulated by loci inside or outside the β-globin gene cluster. From genome-wide association studies, principal quantitative trait loci (QTL) (accounting for 50.0% of Hb F variability in different populations) have been identified in the BCL11A gene, HBS1L-MYB intergenic polymorphism and the β-globin gene cluster itself. In this study, we analyzed quantitative trait haplotypes in two Sicilian families with extremely mild β-thal and unusually high Hb F expression, in order to examine possible genetic background variations in a similar β-thalassemic phenotype. This study redefines the linkage disequilibrium blocks at these loci, but also shows slight differences between probands in haplotype combinations which could reflect different mechanisms of high Hb F production in patients with β-thal. We proposed a haplotype-based approach as a useful tool for the understanding of β-thal phenotype variation in patients with similar β-thalassemic backgrounds in an attempt to answer the recurring question of why patients with the same β-thalassemic genotype show different phenotypes. PMID:23777413

  1. Genotype and haplotype distributions of MTHFR677C>T and 1298A>C single nucleotide polymorphisms: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Shuji; Wilson, Robert B

    2003-01-01

    Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; 677C>T and 1298A>C) in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene ( MTHFR) decrease the activity of the enzyme, leading to hyperhomocysteinemia, particularly in folate-deficient states. We calculate herein the haplotype frequencies of the MTHFR 677 and 1298 polymorphisms in pooled general populations derived from published data. We selected 16 articles that provided reliable data on combined MTHFR genotypes in general populations ( n = 5389). The combined data comprised the following totals for each genotype at nucleotide positions 677 and 1298: 838 CC/AA (i.e., 677CC/1298AA), 1225 CC/AC, 489 CC/CC, 1120 CT/AA, 1093 CT/AC, 8 CT/CC, 606 TT/AA, 10 TT/AC, and 0 TT/CC. The estimated haplotype frequencies, and the fractional contribution of each, were 677C/1298A, 0.37; 677C/1298C, 0.31; 677T/1298A, 0.32; and 677T/1298C, 0.0023 to 0.0034. Thus, a vast majority of 677T alleles and 1298C alleles are associated with 1298A alleles and 677C alleles, respectively. There may be an increased frequency of the very rare cis 677T/1298C haplotype in some parts of the United Kingdom and Canada, possibly due to a founder effect. Further studies on both SNPs are needed to determine their exact role in various clinical settings. PMID:12560871

  2. HLA-B51 and haplotypic diversity of B-Cw associations: implications for matching in unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bettens, F; Nicoloso de Faveri, G; Tiercy, J-M

    2009-04-01

    In unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-C locus incompatibilities occur frequently and are associated with increased risk of posttransplant complications. Because HLA-B51 is associated with a high rate of Cw disparities, we performed a comprehensive four-digit typing analysis of 140 ABCDRB1 B51 genotypes proven by pedigree analysis and 311 unrelated donors selected for 75 B51-positive patients. In addition, 145 A1/Ax-B8/B51-DR3/DRx donors were HLA typed at a high-resolution level and tested for three microsatellite (Msat) polymorphisms located in the HLA class I and III regions. Based on these data sets, 182 different ABCDR haplotypes with 14 different B-Cw associations were detected. Rates of Cw mismatches were shown to be highly correlated with the ABDRB1 haplotypes. We have computed 21 B51 haplotypes that disclose a high probability of HLA-C allele matching and 30 haplotypes with a low (<25%) probability. The HLA-C allele frequency profiles were quite different in these two groups, with a more heterogeneous distribution in the low matching probability group. HLA-Cw*1502 was inversely correlated with the likelihood to identify a Cw-mismatched donor: it was present in 61% of the high vs 18% of the low probability group (P < 0.0001). The analysis of three Msats in the class I and III regions showed a higher allelic diversity in B51-positive haplotypes compared with the conserved A1-B8-DR3 haplotype. HLA-B51 haplotypes therefore exhibit a high diversity at the level of B-Cw associations and of non-HLA polymorphisms in the class I and III regions. Such heterogeneity negatively impacts on overall matching in HSCT. PMID:19317740

  3. Croatian national reference Y-STR haplotype database.

    PubMed

    Mršić, Gordan; Gršković, Branka; Vrdoljak, Andro; Popović, Maja; Valpotić, Ivica; Anđelinović, Šimun; Stenzl, Vlastimil; Ehler, Edvard; Urban, Ludvik; Lacković, Gordana; Underhill, Peter; Primorac, Dragan

    2012-07-01

    A reference Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (STR) haplotype database is needed for Y-STR match interpretation as well as for national and regional characterization of populations. The aim of this study was to create a comprehensive Y-STR haplotype database of the Croatian contemporary population and to analyze substructure between the five Croatian regions. We carried out a statistical analysis of the data from previously performed genetic analyses collected during routine forensic work by the Forensic Science Centre "Ivan Vučetić". A total of 1,100 unrelated men from eastern, western, northern, southern and central Croatia were selected for the purpose of this study. Y-STRs were typed using the AmpFISTR Yfiler PCR amplification kit. Analysis of molecular variance calculated with the Y chromosome haplotype reference database online analysis tool included 16 population samples with 20,247 haplotypes. A total of 947 haplotypes were recorded, 848 of which were unique (89.5%). Haplotype diversity was 0.998, with the most frequent haplotype found in 9 of 1,100 men (0.82%). Locus diversity varied from 0.266 for DYS392 to 0.868 for DYS385. Discrimination capacity was 86.1%. Our results suggested high level of similarity among regional subpopulations within Croatia, except for mildly different southern Croatia. Relative resemblance was found with Bosnia and Herzegovina and Serbia. Whit Atheys' Haplogroup Predictor was used to estimate the frequencies of Y-chromosome haplogroups. I2a, R1a, E1b1b and R1b haplogroups were most frequent in all Croatian regions. These results are important in forensics and contribute to the population genetics and genetic background of the contemporary Croatian population. PMID:22391654

  4. Computed Tomography Inspection and Analysis for Additive Manufacturing Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beshears, Ronald D.

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) inspection was performed on test articles additively manufactured from metallic materials. Metallic AM and machined wrought alloy test articles with programmed flaws were inspected using a 2MeV linear accelerator based CT system. Performance of CT inspection on identically configured wrought and AM components and programmed flaws was assessed using standard image analysis techniques to determine the impact of additive manufacturing on inspectability of objects with complex geometries.

  5. Detecting structure of haplotypes and local ancestry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present a two-layer hidden Markov model to detect the structure of haplotypes for unrelated individuals. This allows us to model two scales of linkage disequilibrium (one within a group of haplotypes and one between groups), thereby taking advantage of rich haplotype information to infer local an...

  6. Optimal Multicomponent Analysis Using the Generalized Standard Addition Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Margaret; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment on the simultaneous determination of chromium and magnesium by spectophotometry modified to include the Generalized Standard Addition Method computer program, a multivariate calibration method that provides optimal multicomponent analysis in the presence of interference and matrix effects. Provides instructions for…

  7. Use of Haplotypes to Estimate Mendelian Sampling Effects and Selection Limits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limits to selection and Mendelian sampling terms can be calculated using haplotypes, by summing the individual additive effects on each chromosome. Haplotypes were imputed for 43,382 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 1,455 Brown Swiss, 40,351 Holstein, and 4,064 Jersey bulls and cows using th...

  8. Rare variant phasing and haplotypic expression from RNA sequencing with phASER.

    PubMed

    Castel, Stephane E; Mohammadi, Pejman; Chung, Wendy K; Shen, Yufeng; Lappalainen, Tuuli

    2016-01-01

    Haplotype phasing of genetic variants is important for clinical interpretation of the genome, population genetic analysis and functional genomic analysis of allelic activity. Here we present phASER, an accurate approach for phasing variants that are overlapped by sequencing reads, including those from RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), which often span multiple exons due to splicing. Using diverse RNA-seq data we demonstrate that this provides more accurate phasing of rare variants compared with population-based phasing and allows phasing of variants in the same gene up to hundreds of kilobases away that cannot be obtained from DNA sequencing (DNA-seq) reads. We show that in the context of medical genetic studies this improves the resolution of compound heterozygotes. Additionally, phASER provides measures of haplotypic expression that increase power and accuracy in studies of allelic expression. In summary, phasing using RNA-seq and phASER is accurate and improves studies where rare variant haplotypes or allelic expression is needed. PMID:27605262

  9. Chromosome loci vary by juvenile myoclonic epilepsy subsyndromes: linkage and haplotype analysis applied to epilepsy and EEG 3.5-6.0 Hz polyspike waves.

    PubMed

    Wight, Jenny E; Nguyen, Viet-Huong; Medina, Marco T; Patterson, Christopher; Durón, Reyna M; Molina, Yolly; Lin, Yu-Chen; Martínez-Juárez, Iris E; Ochoa, Adriana; Jara-Prado, Aurelio; Tanaka, Miyabi; Bai, Dongsheng; Aftab, Sumaya; Bailey, Julia N; Delgado-Escueta, Antonio V

    2016-03-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), the most common genetic epilepsy, remains enigmatic because it is considered one disease instead of several diseases. We ascertained three large multigenerational/multiplex JME pedigrees from Honduras with differing JME subsyndromes, including Childhood Absence Epilepsy evolving to JME (CAE/JME; pedigree 1), JME with adolescent onset pyknoleptic absence (JME/pA; pedigree 2), and classic JME (cJME; pedigree 3). All phenotypes were validated, including symptomatic persons with various epilepsies, asymptomatic persons with EEG 3.5-6.0 Hz polyspike waves, and asymptomatic persons with normal EEGs. Two-point parametric linkage analyses were performed with 5185 single-nucleotide polymorphisms on individual pedigrees and pooled pedigrees using four diagnostic models based on epilepsy/EEG diagnoses. Haplotype analyses of the entire genome were also performed for each individual. In pedigree 1, haplotyping identified a 34 cM region in 2q21.2-q31.1 cosegregating with all affected members, an area close to 2q14.3 identified by linkage (Z max = 1.77; pedigree 1). In pedigree 2, linkage and haplotyping identified a 44 cM cosegregating region in 13q13.3-q31.2 (Z max = 3.50 at 13q31.1; pooled pedigrees). In pedigree 3, haplotyping identified a 6 cM cosegregating region in 17q12. Possible cosegregation was also identified in 13q14.2 and 1q32 in pedigree 3, although this could not be definitively confirmed due to the presence of uninformative markers in key individuals. Differing chromosome regions identified in specific JME subsyndromes may contain separate JME disease-causing genes, favoring the concept of JME as several distinct diseases. Whole-exome sequencing will likely identify a CAE/JME gene in 2q21.2-2q31.1, a JME/pA gene in 13q13.3-q31.2, and a cJME gene in 17q12. PMID:27066514

  10. TUMOR HAPLOTYPE ASSEMBLY ALGORITHMS FOR CANCER GENOMICS

    PubMed Central

    AGUIAR, DEREK; WONG, WENDY S.W.; ISTRAIL, SORIN

    2014-01-01

    The growing availability of inexpensive high-throughput sequence data is enabling researchers to sequence tumor populations within a single individual at high coverage. But, cancer genome sequence evolution and mutational phenomena like driver mutations and gene fusions are difficult to investigate without first reconstructing tumor haplotype sequences. Haplotype assembly of single individual tumor populations is an exceedingly difficult task complicated by tumor haplotype heterogeneity, tumor or normal cell sequence contamination, polyploidy, and complex patterns of variation. While computational and experimental haplotype phasing of diploid genomes has seen much progress in recent years, haplotype assembly in cancer genomes remains uncharted territory. In this work, we describe HapCompass-Tumor a computational modeling and algorithmic framework for haplotype assembly of copy number variable cancer genomes containing haplotypes at different frequencies and complex variation. We extend our polyploid haplotype assembly model and present novel algorithms for (1) complex variations, including copy number changes, as varying numbers of disjoint paths in an associated graph, (2) variable haplotype frequencies and contamination, and (3) computation of tumor haplotypes using simple cycles of the compass graph which constrain the space of haplotype assembly solutions. The model and algorithm are implemented in the software package HapCompass-Tumor which is available for download from http://www.brown.edu/Research/Istrail_Lab/. PMID:24297529

  11. Analysis and Evaluation of Supersonic Underwing Heat Addition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luidens, Roger W.; Flaherty, Richard J.

    1959-01-01

    The linearized theory for heat addition under a wing has been developed to optimize wing geometry, heat addition, and angle of attack. The optimum wing has all of the thickness on the underside of the airfoil, with maximum-thickness point well downstream, has a moderate thickness ratio, and operates at an optimum angle of attack. The heat addition is confined between the fore Mach waves from under the trailing surface of the wing. By linearized theory, a wing at optimum angle of attack may have a range efficiency about twice that of a wing at zero angle of attack. More rigorous calculations using the method of characteristics for particular flow models were made for heating under a flat-plate wing and for several wings with thickness, both with heat additions concentrated near the wing. The more rigorous calculations yield in practical cases efficiencies about half those estimated by linear theory. An analysis indicates that distributing the heat addition between the fore waves from the undertrailing portion of the wing is a way of improving the performance, and further calculations appear desirable. A comparison of the conventional ramjet-plus wing with underwing heat addition when the heat addition is concentrated near the wing shows the ramjet to be superior on a range basis up to Mach number of about B. The heat distribution under the wing and the assumed ramjet and airframe performance may have a marked effect on this conclusion. Underwing heat addition can be useful in providing high-altitude maneuver capability at high flight Mach numbers for an airplane powered by conventional ramjets during cruise.

  12. Analysis of genotype and haplotype effects of ABCB1 (MDR1) polymorphisms in the risk of medically refractory epilepsy in an Indian population.

    PubMed

    Vahab, Saadi Abdul; Sen, Supratim; Ravindran, Nivedita; Mony, Sridevi; Mathew, Anila; Vijayan, Neetha; Nayak, Geetha; Bhaskaranand, Nalini; Banerjee, Moinak; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2009-01-01

    The transmembrane P-glycoprotein that functions as a drug-efflux transporter coded by ATP-binding cassette, subfamily B, member 1/Multidrug Resistance 1 (ABCB1/MDR1) gene is considered relevant to drug absorption and elimination, with access to the central nervous system. Effects of three ABCB1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genotypic and haplotypic combination have been evaluated in a south Indian population for risk of pediatric medically refractory epilepsy. The study included age and sex matched medically refractory (N=113) cases and drug responsive epilepsy patients (N=129) as controls, belonging to the same ethnic population recruited from a tertiary referral centre, of Karnataka, Southern India. The genotype frequencies of SNPs c.1236C>T, c.2677G>T/A, and c.3435C>T were determined from genomic DNA of the cases and controls by PCR- RFLP and confirmatory DNA sequencing. 256 normal population samples of the same ethnicity were genotyped for the three loci to check for population stratification. Results indicate that there was no statistically significant difference between allele and genotype frequencies of refractory and drug responsive epilepsy patients. The predicted haplotype frequencies of the three polymorphisms did not show significant difference between cases and controls. The results confirm earlier observations on absence of association of ABCB1 polymorphisms with medically refractory epilepsy. PMID:19571437

  13. Ehapp2: Estimate haplotype frequencies from pooled sequencing data with prior database information.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chang-Chang; Sun, Xiao

    2016-08-01

    To reduce the cost of large-scale re-sequencing, multiple individuals are pooled together and sequenced called pooled sequencing. Pooled sequencing could provide a cost-effective alternative to sequencing individuals separately. To facilitate the application of pooled sequencing in haplotype-based diseases association analysis, the critical procedure is to accurately estimate haplotype frequencies from pooled samples. Here we present Ehapp2 for estimating haplotype frequencies from pooled sequencing data by utilizing a database which provides prior information of known haplotypes. We first translate the problem of estimating frequency for each haplotype into finding a sparse solution for a system of linear equations, where the NNREG algorithm is employed to achieve the solution. Simulation experiments reveal that Ehapp2 is robust to sequencing errors and able to estimate the frequencies of haplotypes with less than 3% average relative difference for pooled sequencing of mixture of real Drosophila haplotypes with 50× total coverage even when the sequencing error rate is as high as 0.05. Owing to the strategy that proportions for local haplotypes spanning multiple SNPs are accurately calculated first, Ehapp2 retains excellent estimation for recombinant haplotypes resulting from chromosomal crossover. Comparisons with present methods reveal that Ehapp2 is state-of-the-art for many sequencing study designs and more suitable for current massive parallel sequencing. PMID:27216711

  14. ANALYSIS OF MPC ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR ADDITION OF FILLER MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    W. Wallin

    1996-09-03

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) in response to a request received via a QAP-3-12 Design Input Data Request (Ref. 5.1) from WAST Design (formerly MRSMPC Design). The request is to provide: Specific MPC access requirements for the addition of filler materials at the MGDS (i.e., location and size of access required). The objective of this analysis is to provide a response to the foregoing request. The purpose of this analysis is to provide a documented record of the basis for the response. The response is stated in Section 8 herein. The response is based upon requirements from an MGDS perspective.

  15. Distribution of Recombination Crossovers and the Origin of Haplotype Blocks: The Interplay of Population History, Recombination, and Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Akey, Joshua M.; Zhang, Kun; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Jin, Li

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that haplotypes are arranged into discrete blocklike structures throughout the human genome. Here, we present an alternative haplotype block definition that assumes no recombination within each block but allows for recombination between blocks, and we use it to study the combined effects of demographic history and various population genetic parameters on haplotype block characteristics. Through extensive coalescent simulations and analysis of published haplotype data on chromosome 21, we find that (1) the combined effects of population demographic history, recombination, and mutation dictate haplotype block characteristics and (2) haplotype blocks can arise in the absence of recombination hot spots. Finally, we provide practical guidelines for designing and interpreting studies investigating haplotype block structure. PMID:12384857

  16. Genome-wide haplotype association study identifies the FRMD4A gene as a risk locus for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, J-C; Grenier-Boley, B; Harold, D; Zelenika, D; Chouraki, V; Kamatani, Y; Sleegers, K; Ikram, M A; Hiltunen, M; Reitz, C; Mateo, I; Feulner, T; Bullido, M; Galimberti, D; Concari, L; Alvarez, V; Sims, R; Gerrish, A; Chapman, J; Deniz-Naranjo, C; Solfrizzi, V; Sorbi, S; Arosio, B; Spalletta, G; Siciliano, G; Epelbaum, J; Hannequin, D; Dartigues, J-F; Tzourio, C; Berr, C; Schrijvers, E M C; Rogers, R; Tosto, G; Pasquier, F; Bettens, K; Van Cauwenberghe, C; Fratiglioni, L; Graff, C; Delepine, M; Ferri, R; Reynolds, C A; Lannfelt, L; Ingelsson, M; Prince, J A; Chillotti, C; Pilotto, A; Seripa, D; Boland, A; Mancuso, M; Bossù, P; Annoni, G; Nacmias, B; Bosco, P; Panza, F; Sanchez-Garcia, F; Del Zompo, M; Coto, E; Owen, M; O'Donovan, M; Valdivieso, F; Caffara, P; Scarpini, E; Combarros, O; Buée, L; Campion, D; Soininen, H; Breteler, M; Riemenschneider, M; Van Broeckhoven, C; Alpérovitch, A; Lathrop, M; Trégouët, D-A; Williams, J; Amouyel, P

    2013-01-01

    Recently, several genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have led to the discovery of nine new loci of genetic susceptibility in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the landscape of the AD genetic susceptibility is far away to be complete and in addition to single-SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) analyses as performed in conventional GWAS, complementary strategies need to be applied to overcome limitations inherent to this type of approaches. We performed a genome-wide haplotype association (GWHA) study in the EADI1 study (n=2025 AD cases and 5328 controls) by applying a sliding-windows approach. After exclusion of loci already known to be involved in AD (APOE, BIN1 and CR1), 91 regions with suggestive haplotype effects were identified. In a second step, we attempted to replicate the best suggestive haplotype associations in the GERAD1 consortium (2820 AD cases and 6356 controls) and observed that 9 of them showed nominal association. In a third step, we tested relevant haplotype associations in a combined analysis of five additional case–control studies (5093 AD cases and 4061 controls). We consistently replicated the association of a haplotype within FRMD4A on Chr.10p13 in all the data set analyzed (OR: 1.68; 95% CI: (1.43–1.96); P=1.1 × 10−10). We finally searched for association between SNPs within the FRMD4A locus and Aβ plasma concentrations in three independent non-demented populations (n=2579). We reported that polymorphisms were associated with plasma Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio (best signal, P=5.4 × 10−7). In conclusion, combining both GWHA study and a conservative three-stage replication approach, we characterised FRMD4A as a new genetic risk factor of AD. PMID:22430674

  17. Identification of PKD2 mutations in human preimplantation embryos in vitro using a combination of targeted next-generation sequencing and targeted haplotyping.

    PubMed

    Chen, Song-Chang; Xu, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Jun-Yu; Ding, Guo-Lian; Jin, Li; Liu, Bei; Sun, Dong-Mei; Mei, Chang-Lin; Yang, Xiao-Nan; Huang, He-Feng; Xu, Chen-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Here, we evaluate the applicability of a new method that combines targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) with targeted haplotyping in identifying PKD2 gene mutations in human preimplantation embryos in vitro. To achieve this goal, a proband family with a heterozygous deletion of c.595_595 + 14delGGTAAGAGCGCGCGA in exon 1 of the PKD2 gene was studied. A total of 10 samples were analyzed, including 7 embryos. An array-based gene chip was designed to capture all of the exons of 21 disease-related genes, including PKD2. We performed Sanger sequencing combined with targeted haplotyping to evaluate the feasibility of this new method. A total of 7.09 G of data were obtained from 10 samples by NGS. In addition, 24,142 informative single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified. Haplotyping analysis of several informative SNPs of PKD2 that we selected revealed that embryos 3, 5, and 6 did not inherit the mutation haplotypes of the PKD2 gene, a finding that was 100% accurate and was consistent with Sanger sequencing. Our results demonstrate that targeted NGS combined with targeted haplotyping can be used to identify PKD2 gene mutations in human preimplantation embryos in vitro with high sensitivity, fidelity, throughput and speed. PMID:27150309

  18. Identification of PKD2 mutations in human preimplantation embryos in vitro using a combination of targeted next-generation sequencing and targeted haplotyping

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Song-Chang; Xu, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Jun-Yu; Ding, Guo-Lian; Jin, Li; Liu, Bei; Sun, Dong-Mei; Mei, Chang-Lin; Yang, Xiao-Nan; Huang, He-Feng; Xu, Chen-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Here, we evaluate the applicability of a new method that combines targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) with targeted haplotyping in identifying PKD2 gene mutations in human preimplantation embryos in vitro. To achieve this goal, a proband family with a heterozygous deletion of c.595_595 + 14delGGTAAGAGCGCGCGA in exon 1 of the PKD2 gene was studied. A total of 10 samples were analyzed, including 7 embryos. An array-based gene chip was designed to capture all of the exons of 21 disease-related genes, including PKD2. We performed Sanger sequencing combined with targeted haplotyping to evaluate the feasibility of this new method. A total of 7.09 G of data were obtained from 10 samples by NGS. In addition, 24,142 informative single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified. Haplotyping analysis of several informative SNPs of PKD2 that we selected revealed that embryos 3, 5, and 6 did not inherit the mutation haplotypes of the PKD2 gene, a finding that was 100% accurate and was consistent with Sanger sequencing. Our results demonstrate that targeted NGS combined with targeted haplotyping can be used to identify PKD2 gene mutations in human preimplantation embryos in vitro with high sensitivity, fidelity, throughput and speed. PMID:27150309

  19. Evidence for high-risk haplotypes and (CGG)n expansion in fragile X syndrome in the Hellenic population of Greece and Cyprus

    SciTech Connect

    Syrrou, M.; Georgiou, I.; Pagoulatos, G.

    1996-07-12

    The expansion of the trinucleotide repeat (CGG){sub n} in successive generations through maternal meiosis is the cause of fragile X syndrome. Analysis of CA repeat polymorphisms flanking the FMR-1 gene provides evidence of a limited number of {open_quotes}founder{close_quotes} chromosomes and predisposing high-risk haplotypes related to the mutation. To investigate the origin of mutations in the fragile X syndrome in the Hellenic populations of Greece and Cyprus, we studied the alleles and haplotypes at DXS548 and FRAXAC2 loci of 16 independent fragile X and 70 normal control chromosomes. In addition, we studied 191 unrelated normal X chromosomes for the distribution and frequencies of CGG alleles. At DXS548, 6 alleles were found, 2 (194 and 196) of which were represented on fragile X chromosomes. At FRAXAC2, 6 alleles were found, 4 of which were present on fragile X chromosomes. Sixteen haplotypes were identified, but only 5 were present on fragile X chromosomes. The highest number of CGG repeats ({ge} 33) were associated with haplotypes 194-147, 194-151, 194-153, and 204-155. The data provide evidence for founder chromosomes and high-risk haplotypes in the Hellenic population. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Detecting disease-predisposing variants: The haplotype method

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, A.M.; Thomson, G.

    1997-03-01

    For many HLA-associated diseases, multiple alleles - and, in some cases, multiple loci - have been suggested as the causative agents. The haplotype method for identifying disease-predisposing amino acids in a genetic region is a stratification analysis. We show that, for each haplotype combination containing all the amino acid sites involved in the disease process, the relative frequencies of amino acid variants at sites not involved in disease but in linkage disequilibrium with the disease-predisposing sites are expected to be the same in patients and controls. The haplotype method is robust to mode of inheritance and penetrance of the disease and can be used to determine unequivocally whether all amino acid sites involved in the disease have not been identified. Using a resampling technique, we developed a statistical test that takes account of the nonindependence of the sites sampled. Further, when multiple sites in the genetic region are involved in disease, the test statistic gives a closer fit to the null expectation when some - compared with none - of the true predisposing factors are included in the haplotype analysis. Although the haplotype method cannot distinguish between very highly correlated sites in one population, ethnic comparisons may help identify the true predisposing factors. The haplotype method was applied to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) HLA class II DQA1-DQB1 data from Caucasian, African, and Japanese populations. Our results indicate that the combination DQA1 No. 52 (Arg predisposing) DQB1 No. 57 (Asp protective), which has been proposed as an important IDDM agent, does not include all the predisposing elements. With rheumatoid arthritis HLA class H DRB1 data, the results were consistent with the shared-epitope hypothesis. 35 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Spectral Envelopes and Additive + Residual Analysis/Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodet, Xavier; Schwarz, Diemo

    The subject of this chapter is the estimation, representation, modification, and use of spectral envelopes in the context of sinusoidal-additive-plus-residual analysis/synthesis. A spectral envelope is an amplitude-vs-frequency function, which may be obtained from the envelope of a short-time spectrum (Rodet et al., 1987; Schwarz, 1998). [Precise definitions of such an envelope and short-time spectrum (STS) are given in Section 2.] The additive-plus-residual analysis/synthesis method is based on a representation of signals in terms of a sum of time-varying sinusoids and of a non-sinusoidal residual signal [e.g., see Serra (1989), Laroche et al. (1993), McAulay and Quatieri (1995), and Ding and Qian (1997)]. Many musical sound signals may be described as a combination of a nearly periodic waveform and colored noise. The nearly periodic part of the signal can be viewed as a sum of sinusoidal components, called partials, with time-varying frequency and amplitude. Such sinusoidal components are easily observed on a spectral analysis display (Fig. 5.1) as obtained, for instance, from a discrete Fourier transform.

  2. Results of Expedicion Humana. I. Analysis of HLA class II (DRB1-DQA1-DPB1) alleles and DR-DQ haplotypes in nine Amerindian populations from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Trachtenberg, E A; Keyeux, G; Bernal, J E; Rhodas, M C; Erlich, H A

    1996-09-01

    HLA class II variation was analyzed in nine Native American populations of Colombia using PCR/SSOP typing methods. Under the auspices of the Expedition Humana, approximately 30 unrelated native Colombia Indian samples each from the Tule (NW Pacific Coast), Kogui (Sierra Nevada). Ijka (Sierra Nevada), Ingano (Amazonas), Coreguaje (Amazonas), Nukak (Amazonas), Waunana (Pacific), Embera (Pacific) and Sikuani (Northeastern Plains) were collected and analyzed at the DRBI, DQA1, DQB1 and DPB1 loci. The number of different DRB1, DQA1, DQB1 and DPB1 alleles in the Colombian Indians is markedly reduced in comparison with neighboring African Colombian populations, which exhibit a very high degree of class II variability, as discussed in an accompanying paper. In the Colombian Amerindian groups, DR2 (DRB1*1602), DR4 (DRB1*0407, *0404, *0403 AND *0411), DR6 (DRB1*1402) and DR8 (DRB1*0802) comprise > 95% of all DRB1 alleles. We also found an absence of DR3 in all populations, and DR1, DR7 and DR9 allelic groups were either very rare or absent. Each Colombian Amerindian population has a predominant DRB1 allele (f = approximately 0.22-0.65) and DRB1-DQA1-DQB1 haplotype. Several novel DR-DQ haplotypes were also found. At the DPB1 locus, DPB1*0402 (f = 0.28-0.82), *1401 (f = 0.03-0.45), and *3501 (f = 0.03-0.27), were the three most prevalent alleles, each population maintaining one of these three alleles as the predominant (f > 0.26) DPB1 allele. The reduction of diversity for the HLA class II alleles in the Colombian Indians is suggestive of a population bottleneck during the colonization of the Americans, with little to no subsequent admixture with neighboring African Colombian populations in the last approximately 300 years. PMID:8896175

  3. Brazilian Angiostrongylus cantonensis haplotypes, ac8 and ac9, have two different biological and morphological profiles

    PubMed Central

    Monte, Tainá CC; Gentile, Rosana; Garcia, Juberlan; Mota, Ester; Santos, Jeannie N; Maldonado, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the etiologic agent of eosinophilic meningoencephalitis in humans. Cases have been recorded in many parts of the world, including Brazil. The aim of this study was to compare the differences in the biology and morphology of two different Brazilian haplotypes of A. : ac8 and ac9. A significantly larger number of L1 larvae eliminated in the faeces of rodents at the beginning of the patent period was observed for ac9 haplotype and compared to the total of L1 larvae eliminated, there was a significant difference between the two haplotypes. The ac9 haplotype showed a significant difference in the proportion of female and male specimens (0.6:1), but the same was not observed for ac8 (1.2:1). The morphometric analysis showed that male and female specimens isolated from ac8 haplotype were significantly larger with respect to body length, oesophagus length, spicule length (male) and distance from the anus to the rear end (female) compared to specimens from ac9. The morphological analysis by light microscopy showed little variation in the level of bifurcations at the lateral rays in the right lobe of the copulatory bursa between the two haplotypes. The biological, morphological and morphometric variations observed between the two haplotypes agree with the observed variation at the molecular level using the cytochrome oxidase subunit I marker and reinforce the possible influence of geographical isolation on the development of these haplotypes. PMID:25591110

  4. Frequency-based haplotype reconstruction from deep sequencing data of bacterial populations

    PubMed Central

    Pulido-Tamayo, Sergio; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Aminael; Swings, Toon; Van den Bergh, Bram; Dubey, Akanksha; Steenackers, Hans; Michiels, Jan; Fostier, Jan; Marchal, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Clonal populations accumulate mutations over time, resulting in different haplotypes. Deep sequencing of such a population in principle provides information to reconstruct these haplotypes and the frequency at which the haplotypes occur. However, this reconstruction is technically not trivial, especially not in clonal systems with a relatively low mutation frequency. The low number of segregating sites in those systems adds ambiguity to the haplotype phasing and thus obviates the reconstruction of genome-wide haplotypes based on sequence overlap information. Therefore, we present EVORhA, a haplotype reconstruction method that complements phasing information in the non-empty read overlap with the frequency estimations of inferred local haplotypes. As was shown with simulated data, as soon as read lengths and/or mutation rates become restrictive for state-of-the-art methods, the use of this additional frequency information allows EVORhA to still reliably reconstruct genome-wide haplotypes. On real data, we show the applicability of the method in reconstructing the population composition of evolved bacterial populations and in decomposing mixed bacterial infections from clinical samples. PMID:25990729

  5. Chronic inflammatory state in sickle cell anemia patients is associated with HBB(*)S haplotype.

    PubMed

    Bandeira, Izabel C J; Rocha, Lillianne B S; Barbosa, Maritza C; Elias, Darcielle B D; Querioz, José A N; Freitas, Max Vitor Carioca; Gonçalves, Romélia P

    2014-02-01

    The chronic inflammatory state in sickle cell anemia (SCA) is associated with several factors such as the following: endothelial damage; increased production of reactive oxygen species; hemolysis; increased expression of adhesion molecules by leukocytes, erythrocytes, and platelets; and increased production of proinflammatory cytokines. Genetic characteristics affecting the clinical severity of SCA include variations in the hemoglobin F (HbF) level, coexistence of alpha-thalassemia, and the haplotype associated with the HbS gene. The different haplotypes of SCA are Bantu, Benin, Senegal, Cameroon, and Arab-Indian. These haplotypes are associated with ethnic groups and also based on the geographical origin. Studies have shown that the Bantu haplotype is associated with higher incidence of clinical complications than the other haplotypes and is therefore considered to have the worst prognosis. This study aimed to evaluate the profile of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-17 in patients with SCA and also to assess the haplotypes associated with beta globin cluster S (HBB(*)S). We analyzed a total of 62 patients who had SCA and had been treated with hydroxyurea; they had received a dose ranging between 15 and 25 (20.0±0.6)mg/kg/day for 6-60 (18±3.4)months; their data were compared with those for 30 normal individuals. The presence of HbS was detected and the haplotypes of the beta S gene cluster were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Our study demonstrated that SCA patients have increased inflammatory profile when compared to the healthy individuals. Further, analysis of the association between the haplotypes and inflammatory profile showed that the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were greater in subjects with the Bantu/Bantu haplotype than in subjects with the Benin/Benin haplotype. The Bantu/Benin haplotype individuals had lower levels of cytokines than those with

  6. Organelle DNA haplotypes reflect crop-use characteristics and geographic origins of Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Simon; Peakall, Rod; Robertson, James

    2007-10-25

    Comparative sequencing of cannabis individuals across 12 chloroplast and mitochondrial DNA loci revealed 7 polymorphic sites, including 5 length variable regions and 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Simple PCR assays were developed to assay these polymorphisms, and organelle DNA haplotypes were obtained for 188 cannabis individuals from 76 separate populations, including drug-type, fibre-type and wild populations. The haplotype data were analysed using parsimony, UPGMA and neighbour joining methods. Three haplotype groups were recovered by each analysis method, and these groups are suggestive of the crop-use characteristics and geographical origin of the populations, although not strictly diagnostic. We discuss the relationship between our haplotype data and taxonomic opinions of cannabis, and the implications of organelle DNA haplotyping to forensic investigations of cannabis. PMID:17293071

  7. A substantially lower frequency of uninformative matches between 23 versus 17 Y-STR haplotypes in north Western Europe.

    PubMed

    Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Vanderheyden, Nancy; Van Geystelen, Anneleen; Decorte, Ronny

    2014-07-01

    The analysis of human short tandem repeats of the Y-chromosome (Y-STRs) provides a powerful tool in forensic cases for male sex identification, male lineage identification and identification of the geographical origin of male lineages. As the commonly used 12 and 17 Y-STR multiplexes do not discriminate between some unrelated males, additional Y-STRs were implemented in the PowerPlex(®) Y23 System to supplement the existing commercial Y-STR kits. Until today, the forensic value of a (near) 23 versus 17 Y-STR haplotype match between an unknown DNA donor and a certain biological sample in a database is not yet well studied. This will be of huge interest for cases where an autosomal DNA profile yields no match to a DNA database and the database is used for familial searching (male relative(s) of the offender) or for the estimation of the geographical origin of the offender. In order to value (near) 23 Y-STR haplotype matches in a local sample from Western Europe, we selected the region of Flanders (Belgium) due to the already present knowledge on its Y-chromosomal variants. Many Y-chromosomes of this region were previously genotyped with Y-SNPs at a high resolution of the most recently updated Y-chromosomal tree and the deep-rooted genealogy of each DNA donor was already established. By comparing (near) matches of 23 versus 17 Y-STR haplotypes between patrilineal-unrelated males, a substantial lower number of uninformative (near) 23 Y-STR haplotype matches has been observed compared to 17 Y-STR haplotypes. Furthermore, the use of SNP data was informative to discriminate >60% of unrelated males with an (near) identical 17 Y-STR match while SNP data was only necessary to discriminate about 10% of unrelated males with a 23 Y-STR haplotype that differed at only two Y-STRs. This shows the higher value of the Y23 haplotype within familial DNA searching and the estimation of the geographical origin of a DNA donor. Therefore, the use of the PowerPlex(®) Y23 System instead

  8. Distribution of beta-globin haplotypes among the tribes of southern Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Aastha; Khurana, Priyanka; Mitra, Siuli; Raicha, Bhavesh; Saraswathy, K N; Italia, Yazdi M; Kshatriya, Gautam K

    2013-06-01

    The present study was carried out in Indo-European speaking tribal population groups of southern Gujarat (India) to elucidate the allelic and haplotypic content of β-globin system in individuals with HbAA genotypes. 6 neutral restriction sites of the β-globin system were analysed and various statistical parameters were estimated to draw meaningful interpretations. All the 6 sites were found to be polymorphic and most were in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium in the studied group. Haplotypes were constructed using two different combinations of the 6 restriction sites analysed. Analysis of the 5 sites revealed a set of three predominant haplotypes, '+----', '-++-+' and '-+-++'; and haplotypes '+--', '++-' and '+++' were found to be the most frequent when the 3 sites were used to construct the haplotypes. Haplotypic heterozygosity levels (>83%) observed in the present study group were comparable to those observed in African and Afro-American populations and greater than other world populations. All the ancestral haplotypes, +-----, -++-+, -+-++ and ----+ were found in the study group. The distribution pattern of various haplotypes was consistent with the global pattern. The paucity of comparable data from other Indian populations restricted one from making interpretations about the study group's relationships with other Indian populations but the results were indicative of older population histories or experience of gene flow by the study group and their affinities with populations of southern India. PMID:23500448

  9. Analysis of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xiao-Ya; Qin, Chong-Zhen; Bao, Mei-Hua; Hu, Dong-Li; Chen, Feng; Sun, Hong; Chen, Yao; Guo, Dong; Zhang, Wei; Cheng, Yu; Zhou, Hong-Hao

    2015-09-01

    Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1i) protein is the key transporter responsible for dietary cholesterol absorption. Recent studies indicated that several functional polymorphisms of NPC1L1 were associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) and response to ezetimibe therapy. The aim of the present study was to analyze the allele frequency and haplotype distribution of NPC1L1 polymorphisms in Chinese Hans and to compare them with those of other ethnic populations reported before. Blood samples were collected from 424 unrelated Chinese Hans (246 males and 178 females). Ten NPC1L1 polymorphisms (-762T > C, -133A > G, -18C > A, 1721C > T, 1735C > G, 1764T > C, 1767G > A, 27677T > C, 25342A > C and 28650A > G) were genotyped by direct sequencing or polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. Among the variants, the minor allele frequency of -762T > C and 1735C > G were 35.0% and 37.0%, respectively. Furthermore, these two polymorphisms were highly linked with a D' value of 0.80. The observed frequencies of two major haplotypes were 59.1% for T-762/C1735 and 30.1% for C-762/G1735, respectively. The frequencies of the rest variants were extremely low (1.8% for - 133G, 1.5% for -18A, 0.9% for 1721T and only 0.2% for 27677C allele, respectively) or even not detected (1764T > C, 1767G > A, 25342A > C and 28650A > G) in our study population. Comparison with other ethnic populations revealed a remarkable genetic variability in the incidences of NPC1L1 polymorphisms. The frequencies of NPC1L1 polymorphisms in Chinese Hans are comparable to Japanese population but totally different from Caucasians, African-Americans and Hispanic individuals. This is the first study to report the ethnic difference in the frequencies of NPC1L1 functional polymorphisms in detail. -762T > C and 1735C > G are two prevalent NPC1L1 variants which need further studies to explore their clinical impact on CHD prevalence and response to ezetimibe therapy in Chinese Hans

  10. Sensitivity analysis of geometric errors in additive manufacturing medical models.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Jose Miguel; Arrieta, Cristobal; Andia, Marcelo E; Uribe, Sergio; Ramos-Grez, Jorge; Vargas, Alex; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Tejos, Cristian

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) models are used in medical applications for surgical planning, prosthesis design and teaching. For these applications, the accuracy of the AM models is essential. Unfortunately, this accuracy is compromised due to errors introduced by each of the building steps: image acquisition, segmentation, triangulation, printing and infiltration. However, the contribution of each step to the final error remains unclear. We performed a sensitivity analysis comparing errors obtained from a reference with those obtained modifying parameters of each building step. Our analysis considered global indexes to evaluate the overall error, and local indexes to show how this error is distributed along the surface of the AM models. Our results show that the standard building process tends to overestimate the AM models, i.e. models are larger than the original structures. They also show that the triangulation resolution and the segmentation threshold are critical factors, and that the errors are concentrated at regions with high curvatures. Errors could be reduced choosing better triangulation and printing resolutions, but there is an important need for modifying some of the standard building processes, particularly the segmentation algorithms. PMID:25649961

  11. A haplotype map of the human genome

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Inherited genetic variation has a critical but as yet largely uncharacterized role in human disease. Here we report a public database of common variation in the human genome: more than one million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for which accurate and complete genotypes have been obtained in 269 DNA samples from four populations, including ten 500-kilobase regions in which essentially all information about common DNA variation has been extracted. These data document the generality of recombination hotspots, a block-like structure of linkage disequilibrium and low haplotype diversity, leading to substantial correlations of SNPs with many of their neighbours. We show how the HapMap resource can guide the design and analysis of genetic association studies, shed light on structural variation and recombination, and identify loci that may have been subject to natural selection during human evolution. PMID:16255080

  12. GABRB2 Haplotype Association with Heroin Dependence in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yung Su; Yang, Mei; Mat, Wai-Kin; Tsang, Shui-Ying; Su, Zhonghua; Jiang, Xianfei; Ng, Siu-Kin; Liu, Siyu; Hu, Taobo; Pun, Frank; Liao, Yanhui; Tang, Jinsong; Chen, Xiaogang; Hao, Wei; Xue, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Substance dependence is a frequently observed comorbid disorder in schizophrenia, but little is known about genetic factors possibly shared between the two psychotic disorders. GABRB2, a schizophrenia candidate gene coding for GABAA receptor β2 subunit, is examined for possible association with heroin dependence in Han Chinese population. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GABRB2, namely rs6556547 (S1), rs1816071 (S3), rs18016072 (S5), and rs187269 (S29), previously associated with schizophrenia, were examined for their association with heroin dependence. Two additional SNPs, rs10051667 (S31) and rs967771 (S32), previously associated with alcohol dependence and bipolar disorder respectively, were also analyzed. The six SNPs were genotyped by direct sequencing of PCR amplicons of target regions for 564 heroin dependent individuals and 498 controls of Han Chinese origin. Interestingly, it was found that recombination between the haplotypes of all-derived-allele (H1; OR = 1.00) and all-ancestral-allele (H2; OR = 0.74) at S5-S29 junction generated two recombinants H3 (OR = 8.51) and H4 (OR = 5.58), both conferring high susceptibility to heroin dependence. Additional recombination between H2 and H3 haplotypes at S1-S3 junction resulted in a risk-conferring haplotype H5 (OR = 1.94x109). In contrast, recombination between H1 and H2 haplotypes at S3-S5 junction rescued the risk-conferring effect of recombination at S5-S29 junction, giving rise to the protective haplotype H6 (OR = 0.68). Risk-conferring effects of S1-S3 and S5-S29 crossovers and protective effects of S3-S5 crossover were seen in both pure heroin dependent and multiple substance dependence subgroups. In conclusion, significant association was found with haplotypes of the S1-S29 segment in GABRB2 for heroin dependence in Han Chinese population. Local recombination was an important determining factor for switching haplotypes between risk-conferring and protective statuses. The present study

  13. Association of Nrf2 Polymorphism Haplotypes with Acute Lung Injury Phenotypes in Inbred Strains of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jedlicka, Anne E.; Gladwell, Wesley; Marzec, Jacqui; McCaw, Zackary R.; Bienstock, Rachelle J.; Kleeberger, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Nrf2 is a master transcription factor for antioxidant response element (ARE)-mediated cytoprotective gene induction. A protective role for pulmonary Nrf2 was determined in model oxidative disorders, including hyperoxia-induced acute lung injury (ALI). To obtain additional insights into the function and genetic regulation of Nrf2, we assessed functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of Nrf2 in inbred mouse strains and tested whether sequence variation is associated with hyperoxia susceptibility. Results: Nrf2 SNPs were compiled from publicly available databases and by re-sequencing DNA from inbred strains. Hierarchical clustering of Nrf2 SNPs categorized the strains into three major haplotypes. Hyperoxia susceptibility was greater in haplotypes 2 and 3 strains than in haplotype 1 strains. A promoter SNP −103 T/C adding an Sp1 binding site in haplotype 2 diminished promoter activation basally and under hyperoxia. Haplotype 3 mice bearing nonsynonymous coding SNPs located in (1862 A/T, His543Gln) and adjacent to (1417 T/C, Thr395Ile) the Neh1 domain showed suppressed nuclear transactivation of pulmonary Nrf2 relative to other strains, and overexpression of haplotype 3 Nrf2 showed lower ARE responsiveness than overexpression of haplotype 1 Nrf2 in airway cells. Importantly, we found a significant correlation of Nrf2 haplotypes and hyperoxic lung injury phenotypes. Innovation and Conclusion: The results indicate significant influence of Nrf2 polymorphisms and haplotypes on gene function and hyperoxia susceptibility. Our findings further support Nrf2 as a genetic determinant in ALI pathogenesis and provide useful tools for investigators who use mouse strains classified by Nrf2 haplotypes to elucidate the role for Nrf2 in oxidative disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 325–338. PMID:25268541

  14. Filling in missing genotypes using haplotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unknown genotypes can be made known (imputed) from observed genotypes at the same or nearby loci of relatives using pedigree haplotyping, or from matching allele patterns (regardless of pedigree) using population haplotyping. Fortran program findhap.f90 was designed to combine population and pedigre...

  15. Interleukin-10 Haplotype May Predict Survival and Relapse in Resected Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tzu-Chin; Wang, Lee; Chien, Wen-Pin; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Shieh, Shwn-Huey; Lee, Huei

    2012-01-01

    IL-10 is associated with tumor malignancy via immune escape. We hypothesized that IL-10 haplotypes categorized by IL-10 promoter polymorphisms at –1082A>G, –819C>T, and –592C>A might influence IL-10 expression and give rise to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with poor outcomes and relapse. We collected adjacent normal tissues from 385 NSCLC patients to determine IL-10 haplotypes by direct sequencing and polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Of the 385 tumors, 241 were available to evaluate IL-10 mRNA expression levels by real-time RT-PCR. The influence of IL-10 haplotypes on overall survival (OS) and relapse free survival (RFS) were determined by Kaplan-Meier and multivariate Cox regression analysis. The results showed that IL-10 mRNA levels were significantly higher in tumors with the non-ATA haplotype than with the ATA haplotype (P = 0.004). Patients with the non-ATA haplotype had shorter OS and RFS periods than did patients with the ATA haplotype. This may be associated with the observation that the number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes was decreased in the tumors with higher levels of IL-10. Consistently, T cells from the peripheral blood of the patients with non-ATA haplotype were more susceptible to apoptosis and less cytotoxic to tumor cells, compared to those from the patients with ATA haplotype. The results suggest that IL-10 can promote tumor malignancy via promoting T cell apoptosis and tumor cell survival, and IL-10 haplotype evaluated by PCR-RFLP or direct sequencing may be used to predict survival and relapse in resected NSCLC, helping clinicians to make appropriate decisions on treatment of the patients. PMID:22848356

  16. Nonparametric survival analysis using Bayesian Additive Regression Trees (BART).

    PubMed

    Sparapani, Rodney A; Logan, Brent R; McCulloch, Robert E; Laud, Purushottam W

    2016-07-20

    Bayesian additive regression trees (BART) provide a framework for flexible nonparametric modeling of relationships of covariates to outcomes. Recently, BART models have been shown to provide excellent predictive performance, for both continuous and binary outcomes, and exceeding that of its competitors. Software is also readily available for such outcomes. In this article, we introduce modeling that extends the usefulness of BART in medical applications by addressing needs arising in survival analysis. Simulation studies of one-sample and two-sample scenarios, in comparison with long-standing traditional methods, establish face validity of the new approach. We then demonstrate the model's ability to accommodate data from complex regression models with a simulation study of a nonproportional hazards scenario with crossing survival functions and survival function estimation in a scenario where hazards are multiplicatively modified by a highly nonlinear function of the covariates. Using data from a recently published study of patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, we illustrate the use and some advantages of the proposed method in medical investigations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26854022

  17. Sequence analysis of the fragile X trinucleotide repeat: Correlations with stability and haplotype and implications for the origin of fragile X alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, K.; Tester, D.J.; Kruckeberg, K.E.; Thibodeau, S.N.

    1994-09-01

    Fragile X (FX) syndrome is associated with amplification of a CGG trinucleotide repeat in the 5{prime} untranslated region of the gene FMR-1. To address mechanism of instability and concern related to overlap between sizes of normal stable alleles and FX unstable alleles, we have sequenced 165 alleles to analyze patterns of AGG interruptions within the CGG repeat, and have typed the (CA)n at DXS548 for 204 chromosomes. Overall, our data is consistent with the idea that the length of uninterrupted CGG repeats determines instability. For 17 stably transmitted alleles with total repeat lengths between 33 and 51, the longest stretch of uninterrupted CGGs was 41. In contrast, for 13 premutation alleles, the shortest stretch of uninterrupted CGGs was 48, suggesting a threshold for expansion between 41 and 48 pure CGGs. For expansion from a premutation to a full mutation, the threshold appears to be {ge}70 uninterrupted repeats. Interestingly, an AGG was detected in some carriers of a full mutation. Comparison of the number of {open_quote}shadow bands{close_quote} in PCR products from similar size alleles with different AGG interruption patterns supports replication slippage as a potential mechanism, i.e. replication slippage occurs more readily as the length of pure repeat increases. Alleles with high total repeat lengths but up to 3 AGGs may be relatively protected against expansion, whereas smaller alleles with pure CGG sequence could be at higher risk for instability. Comparison of sequence data and DXS548 (CA)n data revealed specific sequence trends for each of the DXS548 alleles, explaining the previously reported haplotype association with FX. Incorporating these observations into models for the origin of FX alleles, we consider replication slippage, unequal crossover within the CGG repeat region, recombination between FMR-1 and DXS548, and loss of AGGs by A to C transversion.

  18. A TNF region haplotype offers protection from typhoid fever in Vietnamese patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The genomic region surrounding the TNF locus on human chromosome 6 has previously been associated with typhoid fever in Vietnam. We used a haplotypic approach to understand this association further. Eighty single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning a 150 kb region were genotyped in 95 Vietnamese individuals (typhoid case/mother/father trios). A subset of data from 33 SNPs with a minor allele frequency of >4.3% was used to construct haplotypes. Fifteen SNPs, which tagged the 42 constructed haplotypes were selected. The haplotype tagging SNPs (T1-T15) were genotyped in 380 confirmed typhoid cases and 380 Vietnamese ethnically matched controls. Allelic frequencies of seven SNPs (T1, T2, T3, T5, T6, T7, T8) were significantly different between typhoid cases and controls. Logistic regression results support the hypothesis that there is just one signal associated with disease at this locus. Haplotype-based analysis of the tag SNPs provided positive evidence of association with typhoid (posterior probability 0.821). The analysis highlighted a low-risk cluster of haplotypes that each carry the minor allele of T1 or T7, but not both, and otherwise carry the combination of alleles *12122*1111 at T1-T11, further supporting the one associated signal hypothesis. Finally, individuals that carry the typhoid fever protective haplotype *12122*1111 also produce a relatively low TNF-α response to LPS. PMID:17503085

  19. Precessing rotating flows with additional shear: Stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, A.; Cambon, C.

    2009-03-01

    We consider unbounded precessing rotating flows in which vertical or horizontal shear is induced by the interaction between the solid-body rotation (with angular velocity Ω0 ) and the additional “precessing” Coriolis force (with angular velocity -ɛΩ0 ), normal to it. A “weak” shear flow, with rate 2ɛ of the same order of the Poincaré “small” ratio ɛ , is needed for balancing the gyroscopic torque, so that the whole flow satisfies Euler’s equations in the precessing frame (the so-called admissibility conditions). The base flow case with vertical shear (its cross-gradient direction is aligned with the main angular velocity) corresponds to Mahalov’s [Phys. Fluids A 5, 891 (1993)] precessing infinite cylinder base flow (ignoring boundary conditions), while the base flow case with horizontal shear (its cross-gradient direction is normal to both main and precessing angular velocities) corresponds to the unbounded precessing rotating shear flow considered by Kerswell [Geophys. Astrophys. Fluid Dyn. 72, 107 (1993)]. We show that both these base flows satisfy the admissibility conditions and can support disturbances in terms of advected Fourier modes. Because the admissibility conditions cannot select one case with respect to the other, a more physical derivation is sought: Both flows are deduced from Poincaré’s [Bull. Astron. 27, 321 (1910)] basic state of a precessing spheroidal container, in the limit of small ɛ . A Rapid distortion theory (RDT) type of stability analysis is then performed for the previously mentioned disturbances, for both base flows. The stability analysis of the Kerswell base flow, using Floquet’s theory, is recovered, and its counterpart for the Mahalov base flow is presented. Typical growth rates are found to be the same for both flows at very small ɛ , but significant differences are obtained regarding growth rates and widths of instability bands, if larger ɛ values, up to 0.2, are considered. Finally, both flow cases

  20. Inferring Selection Intensity and Allele Age from Multilocus Haplotype Structure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    It is a challenging task to infer selection intensity and allele age from population genetic data. Here we present a method that can efficiently estimate selection intensity and allele age from the multilocus haplotype structure in the vicinity of a segregating mutant under positive selection. We use a structured-coalescent approach to model the effect of directional selection on the gene genealogies of neutral markers linked to the selected mutant. The frequency trajectory of the selected allele follows the Wright-Fisher model. Given the position of the selected mutant, we propose a simplified multilocus haplotype model that can efficiently model the dynamics of the ancestral haplotypes under the joint influence of selection and recombination. This model approximates the ancestral genealogies of the sample, which reduces the number of states from an exponential function of the number of single-nucleotide polymorphism loci to a quadratic function. That allows parameter inference from data covering DNA regions as large as several hundred kilo-bases. Importance sampling algorithms are adopted to evaluate the probability of a sample by exploring the space of both allele frequency trajectories of the selected mutation and gene genealogies of the linked sites. We demonstrate by simulation that the method can accurately estimate selection intensity for moderate and strong positive selection. We apply the method to a data set of the G6PD gene in an African population and obtain an estimate of 0.0456 (95% confidence interval 0.0144−0.0769) for the selection intensity. The proposed method is novel in jointly modeling the multilocus haplotype pattern caused by recombination and mutation, allowing the analysis of haplotype data in recombining regions. Moreover, the method is applicable to data from populations under exponential growth and a variety of other demographic histories. PMID:23797107

  1. The Role of MAPT Haplotype H2 and Isoform 1N/4R in Parkinsonism of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira-Filho, Jamary; White, Charles C.; Yu, Lei; Schneider, Julie A.; Buchman, Aron S.; Shulman, Joshua M.; Bennett, David A.; De Jager, Philip L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Recently, we have shown that the Parkinson’s disease (PD) susceptibility locus MAPT (microtubule associated protein tau) is associated with parkinsonism in older adults without a clinical diagnosis of PD. In this study, we investigated the relationship between parkinsonian signs and MAPT transcripts by assessing the effect of MAPT haplotypes on alternative splicing and expression levels of the most common isoforms in two prospective clinicopathologic studies of aging. Materials and Methods using regression analysis, controlling for age, sex, study and neuropathology, we evaluated 976 subjects with clinical, genotyping and brain pathology data for haplotype analysis. For transcript analysis, we obtained MAPT gene and isoform-level expression from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for 505 of these subjects. Results The MAPT H2 haplotype was associated with lower total MAPT expression (p = 1.2x10-14) and global parkinsonism at both study entry (p = 0.001) and proximate to death (p = 0.050). Specifically, haplotype H2 was primarily associated with bradykinesia in both assessments (p<0.001 and p = 0.008). MAPT total expression was associated with age and decreases linearly with advancing age (p<0.001). Analysing MAPT alternative splicing, the expression of 1N/4R isoform was inversely associated with global parkinsonism (p = 0.008) and bradykinesia (p = 0.008). Diminished 1N/4R isoform expression was also associated with H2 (p = 0.001). Conclusions Overall, our results suggest that age and H2 are associated with higher parkinsonism score and decreased total MAPT RNA expression. Additionally, we found that H2 and parkinsonism are associated with altered expression levels of specific isoforms. These findings may contribute to the understanding of the association between MAPT locus and parkinsonism in elderly subjects and in some extent to age-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27458716

  2. Serpin peptidase inhibitor (SERPINB5) haplotypes are associated with susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shun-Fa; Yeh, Chao-Bin; Chou, Ying-Erh; Lee, Hsiang-Lin; Liu, Yu-Fan

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The serpin peptidase inhibitor SERPINB5 is a tumour-suppressor gene that promotes the development of various cancers in humans. However, whether SERPINB5 gene variants play a role in HCC susceptibility remains unknown. In this study, we genotyped 6 SNPs of the SERPINB5 gene in an independent cohort from a replicate population comprising 302 cases and 590 controls. Additionally, patients who had at least one rs2289520 C allele in SERPINB5 tended to exhibit better liver function than patients with genotype GG (Child-Pugh grade A vs. B or C; P = 0.047). Next, haplotype blocks were reconstructed according to the linkage disequilibrium structure of the SERPINB5 gene. A haplotype “C-C-C” (rs17071138 + rs3744941 + rs8089204) in SERPINB5-correlated promoter showed a significant association with an increased HCC risk (AOR = 1.450 P = 0.031). Haplotypes “T-C-A” and “C-C-C” (rs2289519 + rs2289520 + rs1455555) located in the SERPINB5 coding region had a decreased (AOR = 0.744 P = 0.031) and increased (AOR = 1.981 P = 0.001) HCC risk, respectively. Finally, an additional integrated in silico analysis confirmed that these SNPs affected SERPINB5 expression and protein stability, which significantly correlated with tumour expression and subsequently with tumour development and aggressiveness. Taken together, our findings regarding these biomarkers provide a prediction model for risk assessment.

  3. Serpin peptidase inhibitor (SERPINB5) haplotypes are associated with susceptibility to hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shun-Fa; Yeh, Chao-Bin; Chou, Ying-Erh; Lee, Hsiang-Lin; Liu, Yu-Fan

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The serpin peptidase inhibitor SERPINB5 is a tumour-suppressor gene that promotes the development of various cancers in humans. However, whether SERPINB5 gene variants play a role in HCC susceptibility remains unknown. In this study, we genotyped 6 SNPs of the SERPINB5 gene in an independent cohort from a replicate population comprising 302 cases and 590 controls. Additionally, patients who had at least one rs2289520 C allele in SERPINB5 tended to exhibit better liver function than patients with genotype GG (Child-Pugh grade A vs. B or C; P = 0.047). Next, haplotype blocks were reconstructed according to the linkage disequilibrium structure of the SERPINB5 gene. A haplotype “C-C-C” (rs17071138 + rs3744941 + rs8089204) in SERPINB5-correlated promoter showed a significant association with an increased HCC risk (AOR = 1.450; P = 0.031). Haplotypes “T-C-A” and “C-C-C” (rs2289519 + rs2289520 + rs1455555) located in the SERPINB5 coding region had a decreased (AOR = 0.744; P = 0.031) and increased (AOR = 1.981; P = 0.001) HCC risk, respectively. Finally, an additional integrated in silico analysis confirmed that these SNPs affected SERPINB5 expression and protein stability, which significantly correlated with tumour expression and subsequently with tumour development and aggressiveness. Taken together, our findings regarding these biomarkers provide a prediction model for risk assessment. PMID:27221742

  4. ACC interleukin-10 gene promoter haplotype as a breast cancer risk factor predictor among Jordanian females

    PubMed Central

    Atoum, Manar Fayiz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a multifactorial cytokine with a complex biological role in breast cancer. The aims of this study were to investigate any association between IL-10 gene promoter polymorphisms, 1082A>/G, −819T>C, and −592A>C, or haplotypes and breast cancer risk among Jordanian women and to evaluate any association between the most common haplotype with clinicopathological features of breast cancer. Patients and methods A total of 202 breast cancer patients and 210 age-matched healthy control subjects were genotyped for −1082A/G, −819T/C, and −592A/C single nucleotide polymorphisms in the promoter region of the IL-10 gene by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Study patients and control subjects were recruited from Prince Hamzah Hospital, Amman, Jordan (2012–2013). Ethical approval and signed consent forms were signed by all participants. DNA was extracted, and polymerase chain reaction fragments were amplified and restriction digested by MnII, MaeIII, and RsaI. Results This study showed no statistically significant difference between −1082A/G, −819T/C, and −592A/C IL-10 genotypes or alleles among breast cancer patients or controls. Four different haplotypes ATA, ACC, GTA, and ACA within the IL-10 promoter gene were determined among both breast cancer and control groups. The most frequent haplotype was ACC among breast cancer patients and controls (41.6% and 40.7%, respectively). No statistical differences in these haplotypes among breast cancer patients or controls were determined. Analysis of the most common ACC haplotype showed statistical difference in positive estrogen receptor (P=0.022), positive progesterone receptor (P=0.004), cancer grade (P=0.0001), and cancer stage (P=0.009) among the ACC haplotype compared to non-ACC haplotype. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report studying the association of IL-10 haplotype with breast cancer risk events among Jordanian females. The

  5. Practical interpretation of CYP2D6 haplotypes: Comparison and integration of automated and expert calling.

    PubMed

    Ruaño, Gualberto; Kocherla, Mohan; Graydon, James S; Holford, Theodore R; Makowski, Gregory S; Goethe, John W

    2016-05-01

    We describe a population genetic approach to compare samples interpreted with expert calling (EC) versus automated calling (AC) for CYP2D6 haplotyping. The analysis represents 4812 haplotype calls based on signal data generated by the Luminex xMap analyzers from 2406 patients referred to a high-complexity molecular diagnostics laboratory for CYP450 testing. DNA was extracted from buccal swabs. We compared the results of expert calls (EC) and automated calls (AC) with regard to haplotype number and frequency. The ratio of EC to AC was 1:3. Haplotype frequencies from EC and AC samples were convergent across haplotypes, and their distribution was not statistically different between the groups. Most duplications required EC, as only expansions with homozygous or hemizygous haplotypes could be automatedly called. High-complexity laboratories can offer equivalent interpretation to automated calling for non-expanded CYP2D6 loci, and superior interpretation for duplications. We have validated scientific expert calling specified by scoring rules as standard operating procedure integrated with an automated calling algorithm. The integration of EC with AC is a practical strategy for CYP2D6 clinical haplotyping. PMID:26908082

  6. Haplotype and minimum-chimerism consensus determination using short sequence data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Assembling haplotypes given sequence data derived from a single individual is a well studied problem, but only recently has haplotype assembly been considered for population-sampled data. We discuss a software tool called Hapler, which is designed specifically for low-diversity, low-coverage data such as ecological samples derived from natural populations. Because such data may contain error as well as ambiguous haplotype information, we developed methods that increase confidence in these assemblies. Hapler also reconstructs full consensus sequences while minimizing and identifying possible chimeric points. Results Experiments on simulated data indicate that Hapler is effective at assembling haplotypes from gene-sized alignments of short reads. Further, in our tests Hapler-generated consensus sequences are less chimeric than the alternative consensus approaches of majority vote and viral quasispecies estimation regardless of error rate, read length, or population haplotype bias. Conclusions The analysis of genetically diverse sequence data is increasingly common, particularly in the field of ecoinformatics where transcriptome sequencing of natural populations is a cost effective alternative to genome sequencing. For such studies, it is important to consider and identify haplotype diversity. Hapler provides robust haplotype information and identifies possible phasing errors in consensus sequences, providing valuable information for population studies and downstream usage of resulting assemblies. PMID:22537299

  7. Complementarity of Binding Motifs is a General Property of HLA-A and HLA-B Molecules and Does Not Seem to Effect HLA Haplotype Composition.

    PubMed

    Rao, Xiangyu; De Boer, Rob J; van Baarle, Debbie; Maiers, Martin; Kesmir, Can

    2013-01-01

    Different human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes (i.e., the specific combinations of HLA-A, -B, -DR alleles inherited together from one parent) are observed in different frequencies in human populations. Some haplotypes, like HLA-A1-B8, are very frequent, reaching up to 10% in the Caucasian population, while others are very rare. Numerous studies have identified associations between HLA haplotypes and diseases, and differences in haplotype frequencies can in part be explained by these associations: the stronger the association with a severe (autoimmune) disease, the lower the expected HLA haplotype frequency. The peptide repertoires of the HLA molecules composing a haplotype can also influence the frequency of a haplotype. For example, it would seem advantageous to have HLA molecules with non-overlapping binding specificities within a haplotype, as individuals expressing such an haplotype would present a diverse set of peptides from viruses and pathogenic bacteria on the cell surface. To test this hypothesis, we collect the proteome data from a set of common viruses, and estimate the total ligand repertoire of HLA class I haplotypes (HLA-A-B) using in silico predictions. We compare the size of these repertoires to the HLA haplotype frequencies reported in the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP). We find that in most HLA-A and HLA-B pairs have fairly distinct binding motifs, and that the observed haplotypes do not contain HLA-A and -B molecules with more distinct binding motifs than random HLA-A and HLA-B pairs. In addition, the population frequency of a haplotype is not correlated to the distinctness of its HLA-A and HLA-B peptide binding motifs. These results suggest that there is a not a strong selection pressure on the haplotype level favoring haplotypes having HLA molecules with distinct binding motifs, which would result the largest possible presented peptide repertoires in the context of infectious diseases. PMID:24294213

  8. Multiple divergent haplotypes express completely distinct sets of class I MHC genes in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Sean C; Restaino, Anthony C; de Jong, Jill L O

    2014-03-01

    The zebrafish is an important animal model for stem cell biology, cancer, and immunology research. Histocompatibility represents a key intersection of these disciplines; however, histocompatibility in zebrafish remains poorly understood. We examined a set of diverse zebrafish class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes that segregate with specific haplotypes at chromosome 19, and for which donor-recipient matching has been shown to improve engraftment after hematopoietic transplantation. Using flanking gene polymorphisms, we identified six distinct chromosome 19 haplotypes. We describe several novel class I U lineage genes and characterize their sequence properties, expression, and haplotype distribution. Altogether, ten full-length zebrafish class I genes were analyzed, mhc1uba through mhc1uka. Expression data and sequence properties indicate that most are candidate classical genes. Several substitutions in putative peptide anchor residues, often shared with deduced MHC molecules from additional teleost species, suggest flexibility in antigen binding. All ten zebrafish class I genes were uniquely assigned among the six haplotypes, with dominant or codominant expression of one to three genes per haplotype. Interestingly, while the divergent MHC haplotypes display variable gene copy number and content, the different genes appear to have ancient origin, with extremely high levels of sequence diversity. Furthermore, haplotype variability extends beyond the MHC genes to include divergent forms of psmb8. The many disparate haplotypes at this locus therefore represent a remarkable form of genomic region configuration polymorphism. Defining the functional MHC genes within these divergent class I haplotypes in zebrafish will provide an important foundation for future studies in immunology and transplantation. PMID:24291825

  9. Influence of promoter/enhancer region haplotypes on MGMT transcriptional regulation: a potential biomarker for human sensitivity to alkylating agents

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z.

    2014-01-01

    The O 6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase gene (MGMT) encodes the direct reversal DNA repair protein that removes alkyl adducts from the O 6 position of guanine. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) exist in the MGMT promoter/enhancer (P/E) region. However, the haplotype structure encompassing these SNPs and their functional/biological significance are currently unknown. We hypothesized that MGMT P/E haplotypes, rather than individual SNPs, alter MGMT transcription and can thus alter human sensitivity to alkylating agents. To identify the haplotype structure encompassing the MGMT P/E region SNPs, we sequenced 104 DNA samples from healthy individuals and inferred the haplotypes using the data generated. We identified eight SNPs in this region, namely T7C (rs180989103), T135G (rs1711646), G290A (rs61859810), C485A (rs1625649), C575A (rs113813075), G666A (rs34180180), C777A (rs34138162) and C1099T (rs16906252). Phylogenetics and Sequence Evolution analysis predicted 21 potential haplotypes that encompass these SNPs ranging in frequencies from 0.000048 to 0.39. Of these, 10 were identified in our study population as 20 paired haplotype combinations. To determine the functional significance of these haplotypes, luciferase reporter constructs representing these haplotypes were transfected into glioblastoma cells and their effect on MGMT promoter activity was determined. Compared with the most common (reference) haplotype 1, seven haplotypes significantly upregulated MGMT promoter activity (18–119% increase; P < 0.05), six significantly downregulated MGMT promoter activity (29–97% decrease; P < 0.05) and one haplotype had no effect. Mechanistic studies conducted support the conclusion that MGMT P/E haplotypes, rather than individual SNPs, differentially regulate MGMT transcription and could thus play a significant role in human sensitivity to environmental and therapeutic alkylating agents. PMID:24163400

  10. Haplotype Frequency Distribution in Northeastern European Saduria entomon (Crustacea: Isopoda) Populations. A Phylogeographic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Jerzy

    2003-11-01

    The distribution pattern of mtDNA haplotypes in distinct populations of the glacial relict crustacean Saduria entomon was examined to assess phylogeographic relationships among them. Populations from the Baltic, the White Sea and the Barents Sea were screened for mtDNA variation using PCR-based RFLP analysis of a 1150 bp fragment containing part of the CO I and CO II genes. Five mtDNA haplotypes were recorded. An analysis of geographical heterogeneity in haplotype frequency distributions revealed significant differences among populations. The isolated populations of S. entomon have diverged since the retreat of the last glaciation. The geographical pattern of variation is most likely the result of stochastic (founder effect, genetic drift) mechanisms and suggests that the haplotype differentiation observed is probably older than the isolation of the Baltic and Arctic seas.

  11. Haplotype diversity of 17 Y-chromosomal STR loci in the Bangladeshi population.

    PubMed

    Alam, Shafiul; Ali, Md Eunus; Ferdous, Ahmad; Hossain, Tania; Hasan, Md Mahamud; Akhteruzzaman, Sharif

    2010-02-01

    Haplotype and allele frequencies of 17 Y-chromosomal STR loci were determined in 216 unrelated Bangladeshi males. AmpFlSTR Y-filer PCR Amplification kit (Applied Biosystems) was used to type the following Y-STR markers: DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385a/b, DYS438, DYS439, DYS437, DYS448, DYS458, DYS456, DYS635, and Y-GATA-H4. A total of 211 haplotypes for the 17 Y-STR markers were detected and, of these, 206 haplotypes were unique. The haplotype diversity was 0.9998, indicating a high potential for differentiating between male individuals in this population. Comparison analysis via Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) and construction of Neighbor Joining Tree revealed a close association of Bangladeshi population with Indian Gaddi and Southern Indian populations. PMID:20129457

  12. β-globin haplotypes in normal and hemoglobinopathic individuals from Reconcavo Baiano, State of Bahia, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Five restriction site polymorphisms in the β-globin gene cluster (HincII-5‘ ε, HindIII-G γ, HindIII-A γ, HincII- ψβ1 and HincII-3‘ ψβ1) were analyzed in three populations (n = 114) from Reconcavo Baiano, State of Bahia, Brazil. The groups included two urban populations from the towns of Cachoeira and Maragojipe and one rural Afro-descendant population, known as the “quilombo community”, from Cachoeira municipality. The number of haplotypes found in the populations ranged from 10 to 13, which indicated higher diversity than in the parental populations. The haplotypes 2 (+ - - - -), 3 (- - - - +), 4 (- + - - +) and 6 (- + + - +) on the βA chromosomes were the most common, and two haplotypes, 9 (- + + + +) and 14 (+ + - - +), were found exclusively in the Maragojipe population. The other haplotypes (1, 5, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 16) had lower frequencies. Restriction site analysis and the derived haplotypes indicated homogeneity among the populations. Thirty-two individuals with hemoglobinopathies (17 sickle cell disease, 12 HbSC disease and 3 HbCC disease) were also analyzed. The haplotype frequencies of these patients differed significantly from those of the general population. In the sickle cell disease subgroup, the predominant haplotypes were BEN (Benin) and CAR (Central African Republic), with frequencies of 52.9% and 32.4%, respectively. The high frequency of the BEN haplotype agreed with the historical origin of the afro-descendant population in the state of Bahia. However, this frequency differed from that of Salvador, the state capital, where the CAR and BEN haplotypes have similar frequencies, probably as a consequence of domestic slave trade and subsequent internal migrations to other regions of Brazil. PMID:21637405

  13. Toward understanding MHC disease associations: partial resequencing of 46 distinct HLA haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Wade P; Vu, Quyen; Li, Shuying Sue; Hansen, John A; Zhao, Lue Ping; Geraghty, Daniel E

    2006-05-01

    We carried out a resequencing project that examined 552 kb of sequence from each of 46 individual HLA haplotypes representing a diversity of HLA allele types, generating nearly 27 Mb of fully phased genomic sequence. Haplotype blocks were defined extending from telomeric of HLA-F to centromeric of HLA-DP including in total 5186 MHC SNPs. To investigate basic questions about the evolutionary origin of common HLA haplotypes, and to obtain an estimate of rare variation in the MHC, we similarly examined two additional sets of samples. In 19 independent HLA-A1, B8, DR3 chromosomes, the most common HLA haplotype in Northern European Caucasians, variation was found at 11 SNP positions in the 3600-kb region from HLA-A to DR. Partial resequencing of 282 individuals in the gene-dense class III region identified significant variability beyond what could have been detected by linkage to common SNPs. PMID:16434165

  14. Additional analysis of dendrochemical data of Fallon, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Paul R; Helsel, Dennis R; Speakman, Robert J; Ridenour, Gary; Witten, Mark L

    2012-04-01

    Previously reported dendrochemical data showed temporal variability in concentration of tungsten (W) and cobalt (Co) in tree rings of Fallon, Nevada, US. Criticism of this work questioned the use of the Mann-Whitney test for determining change in element concentrations. Here, we demonstrate that Mann-Whitney is appropriate for comparing background element concentrations to possibly elevated concentrations in environmental media. Given that Mann-Whitney tests for differences in shapes of distributions, inter-tree variability (e.g., "coefficient of median variation") was calculated for each measured element across trees within subsites and time periods. For W and Co, the metals of highest interest in Fallon, inter-tree variability was always higher within versus outside of Fallon. For calibration purposes, this entire analysis was repeated at a different town, Sweet Home, Oregon, which has a known tungsten-powder facility, and inter-tree variability of W in tree rings confirmed the establishment date of that facility. Mann-Whitney testing of simulated data also confirmed its appropriateness for analysis of data affected by point-source contamination. This research adds important new dimensions to dendrochemistry of point-source contamination by adding analysis of inter-tree variability to analysis of central tendency. Fallon remains distinctive by a temporal increase in W beginning by the mid 1990s and by elevated Co since at least the early 1990s, as well as by high inter-tree variability for W and Co relative to comparison towns. PMID:22227064

  15. Haplotype diversity of 17 Y-chromosomal STRs in three native Sarawak populations (Iban, Bidayuh and Melanau) in East Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuet Meng; Swaran, Yuvaneswari; Phoon, Yoong Keat; Sothirasan, Kavin; Sim, Hang Thiew; Lim, Kong Boon; Kuehn, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    17 Y-STRs (DYS456, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS389II, DYS458, DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS393, DYS391, DYS439, DYS635 or Y-GATA C4, DYS392, Y-GATA H4, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS448) have been analyzed in 320 male individuals from Sarawak, an eastern state of Malaysia on the Borneo island using the AmpFlSTR Y-filer (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA). These individuals were from three indigenous ethnic groups in Sarawak comprising of 103 Ibans, 113 Bidayuhs and 104 Melanaus. The observed 17-loci haplotypes and the individual allele frequencies for each locus were estimated, whilst the locus diversity, haplotype diversity and discrimination capacity were calculated in the three groups. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) indicated that 87.6% of the haplotypic variation was found within population and 12.4% between populations (fixation index F(ST)=0.124, p=0.000). This study has revealed that the indigenous populations in Sarawak are distinctly different to each other, and to the three major ethnic groups in Malaysia (Malays, Chinese and Indians), with the Melanaus having a strikingly high degree of shared haplotypes within. There are rare unusual variants and microvariants that were not present in Malaysian Malay, Chinese or Indian groups. In addition, occurrences of DYS385 duplications which were only noticeably present in Chinese group previously was also observed in the Iban group whilst null alleles were detected at several Y-loci (namely DYS19, DYS392, DYS389II and DYS448) in the Iban and Melanau groups. PMID:19414156

  16. An Algorithm for Inferring Complex Haplotypes in a Region of Copy-Number Variation

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mamoru; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have extensively examined the large-scale genetic variants in the human genome known as copy-number variations (CNVs), and the universality of CNVs in normal individuals, along with their functional importance, has been increasingly recognized. However, the absence of a method to accurately infer alleles or haplotypes within a CNV region from high-throughput experimental data hampers the finer analyses of CNV properties and applications to disease-association studies. Here we developed an algorithm to infer complex haplotypes within a CNV region by using data obtained from high-throughput experimental platforms. We applied this algorithm to experimental data and estimated the population frequencies of haplotypes that can yield information on both sequences and numbers of DNA copies. These results suggested that the analysis of such complex haplotypes is essential for accurately detecting genetic differences within a CNV region between population groups. PMID:18639202

  17. Analysis of Saccharides by the Addition of Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Abdil; Lin, Jung-Lee; Gillig, Kent J.; Gulfen, Mustafa; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present the detection sensitivity improvement of electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry of neutral saccharides in a positive ion mode by the addition of various amino acids. Saccharides of a broad molecular weight range were chosen as the model compounds in the present study. Saccharides provide strong noncovalent interactions with amino acids, and the complex formation enhances the signal intensity and simplifies the mass spectra of saccharides. Polysaccharides provide a polymer-like ESI spectrum with a basic subunit difference between multiply charged chains. The protonated spectra of saccharides are not well identified because of different charge state distributions produced by the same molecules. Depending on the solvent used and other ions or molecules present in the solution, noncovalent interactions with saccharides may occur. These interactions are affected by the addition of amino acids. Amino acids with polar side groups show a strong tendency to interact with saccharides. In particular, serine shows a high tendency to interact with saccharides and significantly improves the detection sensitivity of saccharide compounds.

  18. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control

    PubMed Central

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part’s porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented. PMID:26601041

  19. Porosity Measurements and Analysis for Metal Additive Manufacturing Process Control.

    PubMed

    Slotwinski, John A; Garboczi, Edward J; Hebenstreit, Keith M

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques can produce complex, high-value metal parts, with potential applications as critical metal components such as those found in aerospace engines and as customized biomedical implants. Material porosity in these parts is undesirable for aerospace parts - since porosity could lead to premature failure - and desirable for some biomedical implants - since surface-breaking pores allows for better integration with biological tissue. Changes in a part's porosity during an additive manufacturing build may also be an indication of an undesired change in the build process. Here, we present efforts to develop an ultrasonic sensor for monitoring changes in the porosity in metal parts during fabrication on a metal powder bed fusion system. The development of well-characterized reference samples, measurements of the porosity of these samples with multiple techniques, and correlation of ultrasonic measurements with the degree of porosity are presented. A proposed sensor design, measurement strategy, and future experimental plans on a metal powder bed fusion system are also presented. PMID:26601041

  20. Additional EIPC Study Analysis: Interim Report on High Priority Topics

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Stanton W

    2013-11-01

    Between 2010 and 2012 the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) conducted a major long-term resource and transmission study of the Eastern Interconnection (EI). With guidance from a Stakeholder Steering Committee (SSC) that included representatives from the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) among others, the project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 involved a long-term capacity expansion analysis that involved creation of eight major futures plus 72 sensitivities. Three scenarios were selected for more extensive transmission- focused evaluation in Phase 2. Five power flow analyses, nine production cost model runs (including six sensitivities), and three capital cost estimations were developed during this second phase. The results from Phase 1 and 2 provided a wealth of data that could be examined further to address energy-related questions. A list of 13 topics was developed for further analysis; this paper discusses the first five.

  1. Disclosure of hydraulic fracturing fluid chemical additives: analysis of regulations.

    PubMed

    Maule, Alexis L; Makey, Colleen M; Benson, Eugene B; Burrows, Isaac J; Scammell, Madeleine K

    2013-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is used to extract natural gas from shale formations. The process involves injecting into the ground fracturing fluids that contain thousands of gallons of chemical additives. Companies are not mandated by federal regulations to disclose the identities or quantities of chemicals used during hydraulic fracturing operations on private or public lands. States have begun to regulate hydraulic fracturing fluids by mandating chemical disclosure. These laws have shortcomings including nondisclosure of proprietary or "trade secret" mixtures, insufficient penalties for reporting inaccurate or incomplete information, and timelines that allow for after-the-fact reporting. These limitations leave lawmakers, regulators, public safety officers, and the public uninformed and ill-prepared to anticipate and respond to possible environmental and human health hazards associated with hydraulic fracturing fluids. We explore hydraulic fracturing exemptions from federal regulations, as well as current and future efforts to mandate chemical disclosure at the federal and state level. PMID:23552653

  2. References for Haplotype Imputation in the Big Data Era

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenzhi; Xu, Wei; Li, Qiling; Ma, Li; Song, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Imputation is a powerful in silico approach to fill in those missing values in the big datasets. This process requires a reference panel, which is a collection of big data from which the missing information can be extracted and imputed. Haplotype imputation requires ethnicity-matched references; a mismatched reference panel will significantly reduce the quality of imputation. However, currently existing big datasets cover only a small number of ethnicities, there is a lack of ethnicity-matched references for many ethnic populations in the world, which has hampered the data imputation of haplotypes and its downstream applications. To solve this issue, several approaches have been proposed and explored, including the mixed reference panel, the internal reference panel and genotype-converted reference panel. This review article provides the information and comparison between these approaches. Increasing evidence showed that not just one or two genetic elements dictate the gene activity and functions; instead, cis-interactions of multiple elements dictate gene activity. Cis-interactions require the interacting elements to be on the same chromosome molecule, therefore, haplotype analysis is essential for the investigation of cis-interactions among multiple genetic variants at different loci, and appears to be especially important for studying the common diseases. It will be valuable in a wide spectrum of applications from academic research, to clinical diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and pharmaceutical industry. PMID:27274952

  3. Reflections on ancestral haplotypes: medical genomics, evolution, and human individuality.

    PubMed

    Steele, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC), once labelled the "sphinx of immunology" by Jan Klein, provides powerful challenges to evolutionary thinking. This essay highlights the main discoveries that established the block ancestral haplotype structure of the MHC and the wider genome, focusing on the work by the Perth (Australia) group, led by Roger Dawkins, and the Boston group, led by Chester Alper and Edmond Yunis. Their achievements have been overlooked in the rush to sequence the first and subsequent drafts of the human genome. In Caucasoids, where most of the detailed work has been done, about 70% of all known allelic MHC diversity can be accounted for by 30 or so ancestral haplotypes (AHs), or conserved sequences of many mega-bases, and their recombinants. The block haplotype structure of the genome, as shown for the MHC (and other genetic regions), is a story that needs to be understood in its own right, particularly given the promotion of the "HapMap" project and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis, which has been wrongly touted as the only way to pinpoint those genes that are important in genetic disorders or other desired (qualitative) characteristics. PMID:25544323

  4. Mitochondrial Haplotypes Influence Metabolic Traits in Porcine Transmitochondrial Cybrids

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guanghui; Xiang, Hai; Tian, Jianhui; Yin, Jingdong; Pinkert, Carl A.; Li, Qiuyan; Zhao, Xingbo

    2015-01-01

    In farm animals, mitochondrial DNA mutations exist widely across breeds and individuals. In order to identify differences among mtDNA haplotypes, two porcine transmitochondrial cybrids were generated by fusion of a Lantang pig cell line devoid of mitochondrial DNA with enucleated cytoplasm from either a Large White pig or a Xiang pig harboring potentially divergent mitochondrial haplotypes. These cybrid cells were subjected to mitochondrial genome sequencing, copy number detecting and analysis of biochemical traits including succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity, ATP content and susceptibility to reactive oxygen species (ROS). The Lantang and Xiang mitochondrial genomes were highly homologous with only 18 polymorphic sites, and differed radically from the Large White with 201 and 198 mutations respectively. The Large White and Xiang cybrids exhibited similar mtDNA copy numbers and different values among biochemical traits, generated greater ROS production (P < 0.05) and less SDH activity (P < 0.05) and a lesser ATP content (P < 0.05). The results show that functional differences exist between cybrid cells which differ in mitochondrial genomic background. In conclusion, transmitochondrial cybrids provide the first direct evidence on pig biochemical traits linking different mitochondrial genome haplotypes. PMID:26285652

  5. Intrahaplotypic Variants Differentiate Complex Linkage Disequilibrium within Human MHC Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tze Hau; Tay, Matthew Zirui; Wang, Bei; Xiao, Ziwei; Ren, Ee Chee

    2015-01-01

    Distinct regions of long-range genetic fixation in the human MHC region, known as conserved extended haplotypes (CEHs), possess unique genomic characteristics and are strongly associated with numerous diseases. While CEHs appear to be homogeneous by SNP analysis, the nature of fine variations within their genomic structure is unknown. Using multiple, MHC-homozygous cell lines, we demonstrate extensive sequence conservation in two common Asian MHC haplotypes: A33-B58-DR3 and A2-B46-DR9. However, characterization of phase-resolved MHC haplotypes revealed unique intra-CEH patterns of variation and uncovered 127 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) which are missing from public databases. We further show that the strong linkage disequilibrium structure within the human MHC that typically confounds precise identification of genetic features can be resolved using intra-CEH variants, as evidenced by rs3129063 and rs448489, which affect expression of ZFP57, a gene important in methylation and epigenetic regulation. This study demonstrates an improved strategy that can be used towards genetic dissection of diseases. PMID:26593880

  6. Mapping MHC haplotype effects in unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Malkki, Mari; Horowitz, Mary M.; Spellman, Stephen R.; Haagenson, Michael D.; Wang, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Life-threatening risks associated with HLA-mismatched unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation limit its general application for the treatment of blood diseases. The increased risks might be explained by undetected genetic variation within the highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. We retrospectively assessed each of 1108 MHC region single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 2628 patients and their HLA-mismatched unrelated donors to determine whether SNPs are associated with the risk of mortality, disease-free survival, transplant-related mortality, relapse, and acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Multivariate analysis adjusted for HLA mismatching and nongenetic variables associated with each clinical end point. Twelve SNPs were identified as transplantation determinants. SNP-associated risks were conferred by either patient or donor SNP genotype or by patient-donor SNP mismatching. Risks after transplantation increased with increasing numbers of unfavorable SNPs. SNPs that influenced acute GVHD were independent of those that affected risk of chronic GVHD and relapse. HLA haplotypes differed with respect to haplotype content of (un)favorable SNPs. Outcome after HLA-mismatched unrelated donor transplantation is influenced by MHC region variation that is undetected with conventional HLA typing. Knowledge of the SNP content of HLA haplotypes provides a means to estimate risks prior to transplantation and to lower complications through judicious selection of donors with favorable MHC genetics. PMID:23305741

  7. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II ..beta..-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this ..beta..-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP ..beta..-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP ..beta..-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP..cap alpha..-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion.

  8. Heterogeneity of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes in Pre-Columbian Natives of the Amazon region.

    PubMed

    Ribetio-dos-Santos, A K; Santos, S E; Machado, A L; Guapindaia, V; Zago, M A

    1996-09-01

    We report the first study of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing from ancestral Amerindian populations of the South American continent. Sequencing of the D-loop region of mtDNA was carried out for bone fragments from 18 skeletons of Pre-Columbian Amerinidians. The skeletons were excavated in different archeological sites of the Brazilian Amazon region, with dating estimated at 500-4,000 years before the present. The sequencing of at least 354 bases permitted the identification of 13 haplotypes defined by variation of 26 nucleotide positions. Two haplotypes were shared by more than one sample, while 11 haplotypes were observed for a single sample. Seven haplotypes observed in 11 individuals (61% of the sample) belong to the four haplogroups described by Horai et al. (1993). Three samples that shared the transition C-->T in positions 16,223 and 16,278 formed a fifth haplogroup, which has been previously described in present-day Indian populations. Finally, four samples formed a heterogeneous group but each haplotype had at least one mutation typically detected in Asian or Mongoloid populations. Thus, although only haplotypes shared by Asian populations were detected, a wide haplotype variability was observed. If our sample is representative of Pre-Columbian South America, the percentage of haplotypes (39%) not belonging to the four haplogroups described by Horai is much greater than in contemporary indigenous populations. This permits us to suggest that, in addition to the postulated bottleneck effect during the migration from Asia to the Americas, the depopulation effect started by European colonization in the 16th century contributed to the reduction in genetic variability of Amerindians. PMID:8876812

  9. Frequency of carriers of 8.1 ancestral haplotype and its fragments in two Caucasian populations.

    PubMed

    Kiszel, Petra; Kovács, Margit; Szalai, Csaba; Yang, Yan; Pozsonyi, Eva; Blaskó, Bernadett; Laki, Judit; Prohászka, Zoltán; Fazakas, Adám; Pánczél, Pál; Hosszúfalusi, Nóra; Rajczy, Katalin; Wu, Yee-Ling; Chung, Erwin K; Zhou, Bi; Blanchong, Carol A; Vatay, Agnes; Yu, C Yung; Füst, G

    2007-01-01

    Within the human MHC region larger stretches of conserved DNA, called conserved ancestral haplotypes exist. However, many MHC haplotypes contain only fragments of an ancestral haplotype. Little is known, however, on relative distribution of the ancestral haplotypes to their fragments. Therefore we determined the frequency of carriers of the whole ancestral haplotype 8.1 (AH8.1) and its fragments in 127 healthy Hungarian people, 101 healthy Ohioian females, and in nine Hungarian families. The HLA-DQ2, HLA-DR3(17), RAGE -429C allele, the mono-S-C4B genotype, the HSP70-2 1267G allele and the TNF -308A (TNF2) allele were used as markers of the AH8.1. Frequency of carriers of the whole AH8.1 and its fragments was similar in the both populations. 18% of the subjects carried the whole AH8.1 in at least one chromosome, while 17-20%, 36-39%, and 24-29%, respectively carried two or three constituents of the haplotype, only one constituent or none of them. Similar results were obtained in the family study. In addition, marked differences were found in the relationship of the constituents' alleles to the whole AH8.1. In both populations, 29%, 50-59%, 52-56% and 76-96%, respectively of the carriers of HSP70-2 1267G, RAGE-429C, TNF2, and mono-S carriers carried the whole 8.1 haplotype. These findings may have important implications for studies of the disease associations with different MHC ancestral haplotypes. PMID:17558713

  10. Genome-wide mapping of IBD segments in an Ashkenazi PD cohort identifies associated haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Vacic, Vladimir; Ozelius, Laurie J; Clark, Lorraine N; Bar-Shira, Anat; Gana-Weisz, Mali; Gurevich, Tanya; Gusev, Alexander; Kedmi, Merav; Kenny, Eimear E; Liu, Xinmin; Mejia-Santana, Helen; Mirelman, Anat; Raymond, Deborah; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Desnick, Robert J; Atzmon, Gil; Burns, Edward R; Ostrer, Harry; Hakonarson, Hakon; Bergman, Aviv; Barzilai, Nir; Darvasi, Ariel; Peter, Inga; Guha, Saurav; Lencz, Todd; Giladi, Nir; Marder, Karen; Pe'er, Itsik; Bressman, Susan B; Orr-Urtreger, Avi

    2014-09-01

    The recent series of large genome-wide association studies in European and Japanese cohorts established that Parkinson disease (PD) has a substantial genetic component. To further investigate the genetic landscape of PD, we performed a genome-wide scan in the largest to date Ashkenazi Jewish cohort of 1130 Parkinson patients and 2611 pooled controls. Motivated by the reduced disease allele heterogeneity and a high degree of identical-by-descent (IBD) haplotype sharing in this founder population, we conducted a haplotype association study based on mapping of shared IBD segments. We observed significant haplotype association signals at three previously implicated Parkinson loci: LRRK2 (OR = 12.05, P = 1.23 × 10(-56)), MAPT (OR = 0.62, P = 1.78 × 10(-11)) and GBA (multiple distinct haplotypes, OR > 8.28, P = 1.13 × 10(-11) and OR = 2.50, P = 1.22 × 10(-9)). In addition, we identified a novel association signal on chr2q14.3 coming from a rare haplotype (OR = 22.58, P = 1.21 × 10(-10)) and replicated it in a secondary cohort of 306 Ashkenazi PD cases and 2583 controls. Our results highlight the power of our haplotype association method, particularly useful in studies of founder populations, and reaffirm the benefits of studying complex diseases in Ashkenazi Jewish cohorts. PMID:24842889

  11. Genome-wide mapping of IBD segments in an Ashkenazi PD cohort identifies associated haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Vacic, Vladimir; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Clark, Lorraine N.; Bar-Shira, Anat; Gana-Weisz, Mali; Gurevich, Tanya; Gusev, Alexander; Kedmi, Merav; Kenny, Eimear E.; Liu, Xinmin; Mejia-Santana, Helen; Mirelman, Anat; Raymond, Deborah; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Desnick, Robert J.; Atzmon, Gil; Burns, Edward R.; Ostrer, Harry; Hakonarson, Hakon; Bergman, Aviv; Barzilai, Nir; Darvasi, Ariel; Peter, Inga; Guha, Saurav; Lencz, Todd; Giladi, Nir; Marder, Karen; Pe'er, Itsik; Bressman, Susan B.; Orr-Urtreger, Avi

    2014-01-01

    The recent series of large genome-wide association studies in European and Japanese cohorts established that Parkinson disease (PD) has a substantial genetic component. To further investigate the genetic landscape of PD, we performed a genome-wide scan in the largest to date Ashkenazi Jewish cohort of 1130 Parkinson patients and 2611 pooled controls. Motivated by the reduced disease allele heterogeneity and a high degree of identical-by-descent (IBD) haplotype sharing in this founder population, we conducted a haplotype association study based on mapping of shared IBD segments. We observed significant haplotype association signals at three previously implicated Parkinson loci: LRRK2 (OR = 12.05, P = 1.23 × 10−56), MAPT (OR = 0.62, P = 1.78 × 10−11) and GBA (multiple distinct haplotypes, OR > 8.28, P = 1.13 × 10−11 and OR = 2.50, P = 1.22 × 10−9). In addition, we identified a novel association signal on chr2q14.3 coming from a rare haplotype (OR = 22.58, P = 1.21 × 10−10) and replicated it in a secondary cohort of 306 Ashkenazi PD cases and 2583 controls. Our results highlight the power of our haplotype association method, particularly useful in studies of founder populations, and reaffirm the benefits of studying complex diseases in Ashkenazi Jewish cohorts. PMID:24842889

  12. HLA haplotypes associated with type 1 diabetes mellitus in North Indian children.

    PubMed

    Kanga, Uma; Vaidyanathan, Balu; Jaini, Ritika; Menon, Puthezath S N; Mehra, Narinder K

    2004-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) encoded susceptibility to develop type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) has been investigated in children from North India. The results revealed significantly increased prevalence of HLA-A26, -B8, and -B50 among patients and strong positive association of the disease with DRB1*0301 (82.1% vs 13.9%, chi2=71.3, odds ratio [OR]=28.3) and a negative association with DRB1*02 (chi2=12.2, PF=38.5). HLA-DQB1*0201 occurred in 96.4% of the patients, whereas the heterodimer DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201 was present in 82.1% of patients (60.7% in single dose and 21.4% in double dose) and revealed significant deviation from the healthy controls (chi2=74.1, pc=6.0E-10). In addition to DRB1*03, positive association was also observed with DRB1*09 (14.3% vs 1.3%, chi2=13.4) and DRB1*04 (39.3% vs 15.6%, chi2=8.39). No HLA association was observed in relation to residual pancreatic beta-cell function or associated thyroid autoimmunity. Family analysis revealed involvement of multiple DR3+ve haplotypes with T1DM in North Indian children with A26-B8-DRB1*03 (25% vs 3.5%, chi2=16.9, p=3.96E-05) and Ax-B50-DRB1*03 (25% vs 0.7%, chi2=44.7, p=9.88E-11) being the most frequent haplotypes encountered among patients. The classical Caucasian haplotype A1-B8-DRB1*03 was infrequent (7.2%) among the diabetic children. The study highlights the race specificity of HLA association and disease associated HLA haplotypes in T1DM among North Indian children. PMID:14700595

  13. Additional challenges for uncertainty analysis in river engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berends, Koen; Warmink, Jord; Hulscher, Suzanne

    2016-04-01

    the proposed intervention. The implicit assumption underlying such analysis is that both models are commensurable. We hypothesize that they are commensurable only to a certain extent. In an idealised study we have demonstrated that prediction performance loss should be expected with increasingly large engineering works. When accounting for parametric uncertainty of floodplain roughness in model identification, we see uncertainty bounds for predicted effects of interventions increase with increasing intervention scale. Calibration of these types of models therefore seems to have a shelf-life, beyond which calibration does not longer improves prediction. Therefore a qualification scheme for model use is required that can be linked to model validity. In this study, we characterize model use along three dimensions: extrapolation (using the model with different external drivers), extension (using the model for different output or indicators) and modification (using modified models). Such use of models is expected to have implications for the applicability of surrogating modelling for efficient uncertainty analysis as well, which is recommended for future research. Warmink, J. J.; Straatsma, M. W.; Huthoff, F.; Booij, M. J. & Hulscher, S. J. M. H. 2013. Uncertainty of design water levels due to combined bed form and vegetation roughness in the Dutch river Waal. Journal of Flood Risk Management 6, 302-318 . DOI: 10.1111/jfr3.12014

  14. Unique haplotypes of cacao trees as revealed by trnH-psbA chloroplast DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-López, Nidia; Ovando-Medina, Isidro; Salvador-Figueroa, Miguel; Molina-Freaner, Francisco; Avendaño-Arrazate, Carlos H.

    2016-01-01

    Cacao trees have been cultivated in Mesoamerica for at least 4,000 years. In this study, we analyzed sequence variation in the chloroplast DNA trnH-psbA intergenic spacer from 28 cacao trees from different farms in the Soconusco region in southern Mexico. Genetic relationships were established by two analysis approaches based on geographic origin (five populations) and genetic origin (based on a previous study). We identified six polymorphic sites, including five insertion/deletion (indels) types and one transversion. The overall nucleotide diversity was low for both approaches (geographic = 0.0032 and genetic = 0.0038). Conversely, we obtained moderate to high haplotype diversity (0.66 and 0.80) with 10 and 12 haplotypes, respectively. The common haplotype (H1) for both networks included cacao trees from all geographic locations (geographic approach) and four genetic groups (genetic approach). This common haplotype (ancient) derived a set of intermediate haplotypes and singletons interconnected by one or two mutational steps, which suggested directional selection and event purification from the expansion of narrow populations. Cacao trees from Soconusco region were grouped into one cluster without any evidence of subclustering based on AMOVA (FST = 0) and SAMOVA (FST = 0.04393) results. One population (Mazatán) showed a high haplotype frequency; thus, this population could be considered an important reservoir of genetic material. The indels located in the trnH-psbA intergenic spacer of cacao trees could be useful as markers for the development of DNA barcoding. PMID:27076998

  15. Whole-genome haplotype reconstruction using proximity-ligation and shotgun sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Siddarth; Dixon, Jesse R; Bansal, Vikas; Ren, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Rapid advances in high-throughput sequencing facilitate variant discovery and genotyping, but linking variants into a single haplotype remains challenging. Here we demonstrate HaploSeq, an approach for assembling chromosome-scale haplotypes by exploiting the existence of ‘chromosome territories’. We use proximity ligation and sequencing to show that alleles on homologous chromosomes occupy distinct territories, and therefore this experimental protocol preferentially recovers physically linked DNA variants on a homolog. Computational analysis of such data sets allows for accurate (~99.5%) reconstruction of chromosome-spanning haplotypes for ~95% of alleles in hybrid mouse cells with 30× sequencing coverage. To resolve haplotypes for a human genome, which has a low density of variants, we coupled HaploSeq with local conditional phasing to obtain haplotypes for ~81% of alleles with ~98% accuracy from just 17× sequencing. Whereas methods based on proximity ligation were originally designed to investigate spatial organization of genomes, our results lend support for their use as a general tool for haplotyping. PMID:24185094

  16. Interactions “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum”—Bactericera cockerelli: Haplotype Effect on Vector Fitness and Gene Expression Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianxiu; Saenkham, Panatda; Levy, Julien; Ibanez, Freddy; Noroy, Christophe; Mendoza, Azucena; Huot, Ordom; Meyer, Damien F.; Tamborindeguy, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” (Lso) has emerged as a serious threat world-wide. Five Lso haplotypes have been identified so far. Haplotypes A and B are present in the Americas and/or New Zealand, where they are vectored to solanaceous plants by the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae). The fastidious nature of these pathogens has hindered the study of the interactions with their eukaryotic hosts (vector and plant). To understand the strategies used by these pathogens to infect their vector, the effects of each Lso haplotype (A or B) on psyllid fitness was investigated, and genome-wide transcriptomic and RT-qPCR analyses were performed to evaluate Lso gene expression in association with its vector. Results showed that psyllids infected with haplotype B had significantly lower percentage of nymphal survival compared to psyllids infected with haplotype A. Although overall gene expression across Lso genome was similar between the two Lso haplotypes, differences in the expression of key candidate genes were found. Among the 16 putative type IV effector genes tested, four of them were differentially expressed between Lso haplotypes, while no differences in gene expression were measured by qPCR or transcriptomic analysis for the rest of the genes. This study provides new information regarding the pathogenesis of Lso haplotypes in their insect vector. PMID:27376032

  17. Inheritance of hetero-diploid pollen S-haplotype in self-compatible tetraploid Chinese cherry (Prunus pseudocerasus Lindl).

    PubMed

    Gu, Chao; Liu, Qing-Zhong; Yang, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Shu-Jun; Khan, Muhammad Awais; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2013-01-01

    The breakdown of self-incompatibility, which could result from the accumulation of non-functional S-haplotypes or competitive interaction between two different functional S-haplotypes, has been studied extensively at the molecular level in tetraploid Rosaceae species. In this study, two tetraploid Chinese cherry (Prunus pseudocerasus) cultivars and one diploid sweet cherry (Prunus avium) cultivar were used to investigate the ploidy of pollen grains and inheritance of pollen-S alleles. Genetic analysis of the S-genotypes of two intercross-pollinated progenies showed that the pollen grains derived from Chinese cherry cultivars were hetero-diploid, and that the two S-haplotypes were made up of every combination of two of the four possible S-haplotypes. Moreover, the distributions of single S-haplotypes expressed in self- and intercross-pollinated progenies were in disequilibrium. The number of individuals of the two different S-haplotypes was unequal in two self-pollinated and two intercross-pollinated progenies. Notably, the number of individuals containing two different S-haplotypes (S1- and S5-, S5- and S8-, S1- and S4-haplotype) was larger than that of other individuals in the two self-pollinated progenies, indicating that some of these hetero-diploid pollen grains may have the capability to inactivate stylar S-RNase inside the pollen tube and grow better into the ovaries. PMID:23596519

  18. Haplotypes of RHO polymorphisms and susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kun; Wang, Wei; Wang, Qun; Wang, Liqiang; Bai, Hua; Jiang, Yanming; Huang, Yifei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether haplotypes of rhodopsin (RHO) polymorphisms including rs7984, rs2855552, rs2855557 and rs2410 were associated with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) risk in Chinese Han population. Methods: Genotypes of rs7984, rs2855552, rs2855557 and rs2410 were detected with polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) in 186 cases and 196 healthy controls. Then, the haplotypes were established with Haploview 4.2 software. And the effects of clinical charactersitics on the frequency of GTTG haplotype were also analyzed. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were utilized to assess the relationship of haplotypes and genotypes of RHO polymorphisms with susceptibility to AMD. Results: Genotype distribution of all polymorphisms in control group were all in agreement with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) (P>0.05). In the analysis, we found that mutant alleles of rs7984 and rs2855557 were both associated with increased risk of AMD. For genotype analysis, rs7984 AA and rs2855557AA, rs2410GG genotypes all could increase the risk for AMD (OR=1.905, 95% CI=1.143-3.174; OR=2.226, 95% CI=1.261-3.932; OR=2.073, 95% CI=1.105-3.888). However, rs2855552 showed no effects on the onset of AMD. Compared with GTTA, the haplotypes of GGTG, ATAA and GTTG were all related with AMD susceptibility. Further analysis suggested that age, hypertension and hyperlipidemia history play important roles in the frequency alteration of GTTG haplotype. Conclusion: RHO polymorphisms (rs7984, rs2855557 and rs2410) and haplotypes may confer remarkable susceptibility to AMD. Further investigation showed that gene and environmental factors may work together in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:26045836

  19. An Arabidopsis haplotype map takes root

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laying the foundation for an A. thaliana haplotype map, Clark et al.1 conducted a thorough array resequencing of 20 diverse A. thaliana genomes at single-base resolution. This provided a powerful catalog of genetic diversity, with more than 1 million SNPs and hypervariable regions (50-bp to >10-kb d...

  20. Applications of haplotypes in dairy farm management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haplotypes from genomic tests are now available for almost 100,000 dairy cows and heifers in the U.S.. Genomic EBV values are accelerating the rate of genetic improvement in dairy cattle, but genomic information also is useful for making improved decisions on the farm. Mate selection strategies have...

  1. Dissecting risk haplotypes in sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Soldner, Frank; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2015-04-01

    Understanding how genetic risk variants contribute to complex diseases is crucial for predicting disease susceptibility and developing patient-tailored therapies. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Young et al. (2015) dissect the function of common non-coding risk haplotypes in the SORL1 locus in the pathogenesis of sporadic Alzheimer's disease using patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25842969

  2. Effects of IL-10 haplotype and atomic bomb radiation exposure on gastric cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomonori; Ito, Reiko; Cologne, John; Maki, Mayumi; Morishita, Yukari; Nagamura, Hiroko; Sasaki, Keiko; Hayashi, Ikue; Imai, Kazue; Yoshida, Kengo; Kajimura, Junko; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Ohishi, Waka; Fujiwara, Saeko; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Nakachi, Kei

    2013-07-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the cancers that reveal increased risk of mortality and incidence in atomic bomb survivors. The incidence of gastric cancer in the Life Span Study cohort of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) increased with radiation dose (gender-averaged excess relative risk per Gy = 0.28) and remains high more than 65 years after exposure. To assess a possible role of gene-environment interaction, we examined the dose response for gastric cancer incidence based on immunosuppression-related IL-10 genotype, in a cohort study with 200 cancer cases (93 intestinal, 96 diffuse and 11 other types) among 4,690 atomic bomb survivors participating in an immunological substudy. Using a single haplotype block composed of four haplotype-tagging SNPs (comprising the major haplotype allele IL-10-ATTA and the minor haplotype allele IL-10-GGCG, which are categorized by IL-10 polymorphisms at -819A>G and -592T>G, +1177T>C and +1589A>G), multiplicative and additive models for joint effects of radiation and this IL-10 haplotyping were examined. The IL-10 minor haplotype allele(s) was a risk factor for intestinal type gastric cancer but not for diffuse type gastric cancer. Radiation was not associated with intestinal type gastric cancer. In diffuse type gastric cancer, the haplotype-specific excess relative risk (ERR) for radiation was statistically significant only in the major homozygote category of IL-10 (ERR = 0.46/Gy, P = 0.037), whereas estimated ERR for radiation with the minor IL-10 homozygotes was close to 0 and nonsignificant. Thus, the minor IL-10 haplotype might act to reduce the radiation related risk of diffuse-type gastric cancer. The results suggest that this IL-10 haplotyping might be involved in development of radiation-associated gastric cancer of the diffuse type, and that IL-10 haplotypes may explain individual differences in the radiation-related risk of gastric cancer. PMID:23772925

  3. Expression levels of JNK associated with polymorphic lactotransferrin haplotypes in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Gengqiu; Zhou, Yanhong; Yi, Wei; Yi, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Lactotransferrin (LTF), a member of the transferrin family, serves a role in the innate immune response and is involved in anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and anti-tumor activity. Alterations in the LTF gene are associated with an increased incidence of cancer. The LTF gene is polymorphic, and several common alleles may be observed in the general population. Our previous study identified a lower rate of occurrence of the ‘A-G-G-T’ haplotype (constructed with rs1126477, rs1126478, rs2073495 and rs9110) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients compared with controls. In the present study, in order to elucidate a possible mechanism of LTF-mediated anti-tumor activity in NPC, the protein profiles of NPC and non-tumorous nasopharyngeal epithelium tissues with/without the ‘A-G-G-T’ haplotype were constructed using LTQ Orbitrap technology. The results revealed that c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 (JNK2) was highly expressed in NPC tissues and non-tumor nasopharyngeal epithelium tissues without the ‘A-G-G-T’ haplotype. These results were confirmed by western blot analysis. Furthermore, microRNA (miRNA) microarray analysis was conducted to investigate the differential miRNA profiles of NPC and non-tumor nasopharyngeal epithelium tissues with/without the ‘A-G-G-T’ haplotype. It was observed that hsa-miR-1256 and hsa-miR-659, which are potentially targeted to the JNK2 gene, were downregulated in NPC tissues without the ‘A-G-G-T’ haplotype. Hsa-miR-298, another miRNA potentially targeted to the JNK2 gene, was downregulated in non-tumor nasopharyngeal epithelium tissues without the ‘A-G-G-T’ haplotype. In summary, these results suggested that the expression levels of JNK2 may be associated with polymorphic LTF haplotypes in human NPC. PMID:27446399

  4. Y chromosome STR allelic and haplotype diversity in a Rwanda population from East Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Balamurugan, Kuppareddi; Duncan, George

    2012-03-01

    We have analyzed 17 Y-chromosomal STR loci in a population sample of 69 unrelated male individuals of the Rwanda-Hutu population from East Central Africa using an AmpFlSTR® Yfiler™ PCR amplification kit. A total of 62 unique haplotypes were identified among the 69 individuals studied. The haplotype diversity was found to be 0.9970 for this population. The gene diversity ranged from 0.1130 (DYS392) to 0.7722 (DYS385). Comparison of populations in this study with twenty-five other national and global populations using Principal Co-ordinate Analysis (PCA) and phylogenetic molecular analysis using a genetic distance matrix indicates a delineation of all the African populations from other unrelated populations. The results of population pair-wise Fst p values indicate statistically significant differentiation of the Rwandan population when compared with 25 other global populations including four African populations (p=0.0000). Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) of the Rwanda population with four other African populations indicated a 93% variance within populations and 7% variance among the five populations. A data base search of the 62 haplotypes yielded only one non-African haplotype match, suggesting these haplotypes are unique to the African continent. PMID:22285642

  5. Evaluating the Feasibility of Fitting Haplotype Effects as Random: Variance Component Estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fitting haplotypes as random effects in association studies may prevent overestimation of haplotypic effects with low frequencies. The objective was to determine whether haplotypic variance could be accurately estimated. Using simulation, haplotypic effects were deterministically assigned to eithe...

  6. Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes in Central Thai population.

    PubMed

    Siriboonpiputtana, T; Jomsawat, U; Rinthachai, T; Thanakitgosate, J; Shotivaranon, J; Limsuwanachot, N; Polyorat, P; Rerkamnuaychoke, B

    2010-04-01

    12 Y-STR loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385a/b, DYS438, DYS439 and DYS437) were typed with PowerPlex Y System (Promega, USA) in a total sample of 501 unrelated males from the central part of Thailand. Allele frequencies and gene diversity for each Y-STR locus were determined. Haplotype diversity from the combined 12 Y-STR loci was 0.9996. The present results can be used as Thai ethnic genetic information resources in routine forensic analysis. PMID:20215020

  7. Haplotype reconstruction and estimation of haplotype frequencies from nuclear families with only one parent available.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiangdong; Zhang, Qin; Flury, Christine; Simianer, Henner

    2006-01-01

    Recent literature has suggested that haplotype inference through close relatives, especially from nuclear families can be an alternative strategy in determining the linkage phase. In this paper, haplotype reconstruction and estimation of haplotype frequencies via expectation maximization (EM) algorithm including nuclear families with only one parent available is proposed. Parent and his (her) child are treated as parent-child pair with one shared haplotype. This reduces the number of potential haplotype pairs for both parent and child separately, resulting in a higher accuracy of the estimation. In a series of simulations, the comparisons of PHASE, GENEHUNTER, EM-based approach for complete nuclear families and our approach are carried out. In all situations, EM-based approach for trio data is comparable but slightly worse error rate than PHASE, our approach is slightly better and much faster than PHASE for incomplete trios, the performance of GENEHUNTER is very bad in simple nuclear family settings and dramatically decreased with the number of markers being increased. On the other hand, the comparison result of different sampling designs demonstrates that sampling trios is the most efficient design to estimate haplotype frequencies in populations under same genotyping cost. PMID:16954697

  8. Haplotype-habitat associations of Coptotermes gestroi (Termitoidae: Rhinotermitidae) from mitochondrial DNA genes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shawn; Thinagaran, Dinaiz; Mohanna, Seyedeh Zeinab Mirjalili; Noh, Nor Anisah Mhd

    2014-08-01

    Coptotermes gestroi (Wasmann) or the Asian subterranean termite is a serious structural pest in urban settlements in Southeast Asia that has been introduced to other parts of the world through human commerce. Although mitochondrial DNA markers were previously used to shed light on the dispersal history of the Asian subterranean termite, there were limited attempts to analyze or include populations of the termite found in the wild in Southeast Asia. In this study, we analyzed the 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) genes of Asian subterranean termite colonies found in mangrove swamps, beach forests, plantations, and buildings in semi-urban and urban areas to determine the relationship between colonies found in the wild and the urban habitat, and to investigate the possibility of different ecotypes of the termite in Peninsular Malaysia. Our findings show that the 16S rRNA haplotypes recovered from this study clustered into eastern, western, and southern populations of the termite, while the cox1 haplotypes were often specific to an area or site. The 16S rRNA and cox1 genes or haplotypes showed that the most abundant haplotype occupied a wide range of environments or habitats. In addition, the cox1 tree showed evidence of historical biogeography where basal haplotypes inhabited a wide range of habitats, while apical haplotypes were restricted to mangrove swamps and beach forests. Information on the haplotype-habitat association of C. gestroi will enable the prediction of habitats that may harbor or be at risk of invasion in areas where they have been introduced. PMID:24915136

  9. Wide distribution and altitude correlation of an archaic high-altitude-adaptive EPAS1 haplotype in the Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Hackinger, Sophie; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; Xue, Yali; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Asan; van Driem, George; Jobling, Mark A; de Knijff, Peter; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Ayub, Qasim

    2016-04-01

    High-altitude adaptation in Tibetans is influenced by introgression of a 32.7-kb haplotype from the Denisovans, an extinct branch of archaic humans, lying within the endothelial PAS domain protein 1 (EPAS1), and has also been reported in Sherpa. We genotyped 19 variants in this genomic region in 1507 Eurasian individuals, including 1188 from Bhutan and Nepal residing at altitudes between 86 and 4550 m above sea level. Derived alleles for five SNPs characterizing the core Denisovan haplotype (AGGAA) were present at high frequency not only in Tibetans and Sherpa, but also among many populations from the Himalayas, showing a significant correlation with altitude (Spearman's correlation coefficient = 0.75, p value 3.9 × 10(-11)). Seven East- and South-Asian 1000 Genomes Project individuals shared the Denisovan haplotype extending beyond the 32-kb region, enabling us to refine the haplotype structure and identify a candidate regulatory variant (rs370299814) that might be interacting in an additive manner with the derived G allele of rs150877473, the variant previously associated with high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans. Denisovan-derived alleles were also observed at frequencies of 3-14% in the 1000 Genomes Project African samples. The closest African haplotype is, however, separated from the Asian high-altitude haplotype by 22 mutations whereas only three mutations, including rs150877473, separate the Asians from the Denisovan, consistent with distant shared ancestry for African and Asian haplotypes and Denisovan adaptive introgression. PMID:26883865

  10. Association of Extrarenal Adverse Effects of Posttransplant Immunosuppression With Sex and ABCB1 Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Venuto, Rocco C.; Meaney, Calvin J.; Chang, Shirley; Leca, Nicolae; Consiglio, Joseph D.; Wilding, Gregory E.; Brazeau, Daniel; Gundroo, Aijaz; Nainani, Neha; Morse, Sarah E.; Cooper, Louise M.; Tornatore, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Extrarenal adverse effects (AEs) associated with calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) and mycophenolic acid (MPA) occur frequently but are unpredictable posttransplant complications. AEs may result from intracellular CNI accumulation and low activity of P-glycoprotein, encoded by the ABCB1 gene. Since ABCB1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and sex influence P-glycoprotein, we investigated haplotypes and extrarenal AEs. A prospective, cross-sectional study evaluated 149 patients receiving tacrolimus and enteric coated mycophenolate sodium or cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. Immunosuppressive AE assessment determined individual and composite gastrointestinal, neurologic, aesthetic, and cumulative AEs. Lipids were quantitated after 12-hour fast. ABCB1 SNPs: c.1236C>T (rs1128503), c.2677G>T/A (rs2032582), and c.3435C>T (rs1045642) were determined with haplotype associations computed using the THESIAS program, and evaluated by immunosuppression, sex and race using multivariate general linear models. Tacrolimus patients exhibited more frequent and higher gastrointestinal AE scores compared with cyclosporine with association to CTT (P = 0.018) and sex (P = 0.01). Aesthetic AE score was 3 times greater for cyclosporine with TTC haplotype (P = 0.005). Females had higher gastrointestinal (P = 0.022), aesthetic (P < 0.001), neurologic (P = 0.022), and cumulative AE ratios (P < 0.001). Total cholesterol (TCHOL), low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and triglycerides were higher with cyclosporine. The TTC haplotype had higher TCHOL (P < 0.001) and LDL (P = 0.005). Higher triglyceride (P = 0.034) and lower high-density lipoproteins (P = 0.057) were associated with TTT with sex-adjusted analysis. ABCB1 haplotypes and sex were associated with extrarenal AEs. Using haplotypes, certain female patients manifested more AEs regardless of CNI. Haplotype testing may identify patients with greater susceptibility to AEs and facilitate CNI

  11. Sickle cell disease in a Brazilian population from Sao Paulo: a study of the beta s haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, M S; Nechtman, J F; Figueiredo, M S; Kerbauy, J; Arruda, V R; Sonati, M F; Saad, S O; Costa, F F; Stoming, T A

    1994-01-01

    In this study we have determined the frequency of beta S haplotypes in a Brazilian sickle cell disease population from Sao Paulo, Brazil, by analyzing sequence variations in the immediate 5' flanking and second intervening sequence (IVSII) regions of the gamma globin genes. This association between sequence differences and beta s haplotype backgrounds was determined by screening genomic DNA samples using dot blot analysis of polymerase chain reaction products. We studied 148 beta s chromosomes, and found that haplotype 20 (CAR or Bantu) significantly predominated in this population. This is in agreement with the findings of the historical Portuguese Atlantic slave trade from Africa to South America. PMID:7860085

  12. Haplotype-based approach for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia by maternal plasma DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dingyuan; Ge, Huijuan; Li, Xuchao; Jiang, Tao; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Yanyan; Hu, Ping; Chen, Shengpei; Zhang, Jingjing; Ji, Xiuqing; Xu, Xun; Jiang, Hui; Chen, Minfeng; Wang, Wei; Xu, Zhengfeng

    2014-07-10

    Prenatal diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is of clinical significance because in utero treatment is available to prevent virilization of an affected female fetus. However, traditional prenatal diagnosis of CAH relies on genetic testing of fetal genomic DNA obtained using amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling, which is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of a new haplotype-based approach for the noninvasive prenatal testing of CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Parental haplotypes were constructed using target-region sequencing data of the parents and the proband. With the assistance of the parental haplotypes, we recovered fetal haplotypes using a hidden Markov model (HMM) through maternal plasma DNA sequencing. In the genomic region around the CYP21A2 gene, the fetus inherited the paternal haplotype '0' alleles linked to the mutant CYP21A2 gene, but the maternal haplotype '1' alleles linked to the wild-type gene. The fetus was predicted to be an unaffected carrier of CAH, which was confirmed by genetic analysis of fetal genomic DNA from amniotic fluid cells. This method was further validated by comparing the inferred SNP genotypes with the direct sequencing data of fetal genomic DNA. The result showed an accuracy of 96.41% for the inferred maternal alleles and an accuracy of 97.81% for the inferred paternal alleles. The haplotype-based approach is feasible for noninvasive prenatal testing of CAH. PMID:24768736

  13. Reliable reconstruction of HIV-1 whole genome haplotypes reveals clonal interference and genetic hitchhiking among immune escape variants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Following transmission, HIV-1 evolves into a diverse population, and next generation sequencing enables us to detect variants occurring at low frequencies. Studying viral evolution at the level of whole genomes was hitherto not possible because next generation sequencing delivers relatively short reads. Results We here provide a proof of principle that whole HIV-1 genomes can be reliably reconstructed from short reads, and use this to study the selection of immune escape mutations at the level of whole genome haplotypes. Using realistically simulated HIV-1 populations, we demonstrate that reconstruction of complete genome haplotypes is feasible with high fidelity. We do not reconstruct all genetically distinct genomes, but each reconstructed haplotype represents one or more of the quasispecies in the HIV-1 population. We then reconstruct 30 whole genome haplotypes from published short sequence reads sampled longitudinally from a single HIV-1 infected patient. We confirm the reliability of the reconstruction by validating our predicted haplotype genes with single genome amplification sequences, and by comparing haplotype frequencies with observed epitope escape frequencies. Conclusions Phylogenetic analysis shows that the HIV-1 population undergoes selection driven evolution, with successive replacement of the viral population by novel dominant strains. We demonstrate that immune escape mutants evolve in a dependent manner with various mutations hitchhiking along with others. As a consequence of this clonal interference, selection coefficients have to be estimated for complete haplotypes and not for individual immune escapes. PMID:24996694

  14. A linear-time algorithm for reconstructing zero-recombinant haplotype configuration on a pedigree

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background When studying genetic diseases in which genetic variations are passed on to offspring, the ability to distinguish between paternal and maternal alleles is essential. Determining haplotypes from genotype data is called haplotype inference. Most existing computational algorithms for haplotype inference have been designed to use genotype data collected from individuals in the form of a pedigree. A haplotype is regarded as a hereditary unit and therefore input pedigrees are preferred that are free of mutational events and have a minimum number of genetic recombinational events. These ideas motivated the zero-recombinant haplotype configuration (ZRHC) problem, which strictly follows the Mendelian law of inheritance, namely that one haplotype of each child is inherited from the father and the other haplotype is inherited from the mother, both without any mutation. So far no linear-time algorithm for ZRHC has been proposed for general pedigrees, even though the number of mating loops in a human pedigree is usually very small and can be regarded as constant. Results Given a pedigree with n individuals, m marker loci, and k mating loops, we proposed an algorithm that can provide a general solution to the zero-recombinant haplotype configuration problem in O(kmn + k2m) time. In addition, this algorithm can be modified to detect inconsistencies within the genotype data without loss of efficiency. The proposed algorithm was subject to 12000 experiments to verify its performance using different (n, m) combinations. The value of k was uniformly distributed between zero and six throughout all experiments. The experimental results show a great linearity in terms of execution time in relation to input size when both n and m are larger than 100. For those experiments where n or m are less than 100, the proposed algorithm runs very fast, in thousandth to hundredth of a second, on a personal desktop computer. Conclusions We have developed the first deterministic linear

  15. A haplotype-based algorithm for multilocus linkage disequilibrium mapping of quantitative trait loci with epistasis.

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Xiang-Yang; Casella, George; Littell, Ramon C; Yang, Mark C K; Johnson, Julie A; Wu, Rongling

    2003-01-01

    For tightly linked loci, cosegregation may lead to nonrandom associations between alleles in a population. Because of its evolutionary relationship with linkage, this phenomenon is called linkage disequilibrium. Today, linkage disequilibrium-based mapping has become a major focus of recent genome research into mapping complex traits. In this article, we present a new statistical method for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) of additive, dominant, and epistatic effects in equilibrium natural populations. Our method is based on haplotype analysis of multilocus linkage disequilibrium and exhibits two significant advantages over current disequilibrium mapping methods. First, we have derived closed-form solutions for estimating the marker-QTL haplotype frequencies within the maximum-likelihood framework implemented by the EM algorithm. The allele frequencies of putative QTL and their linkage disequilibria with the markers are estimated by solving a system of regular equations. This procedure has significantly improved the computational efficiency and the precision of parameter estimation. Second, our method can detect marker-QTL disequilibria of different orders and QTL epistatic interactions of various kinds on the basis of a multilocus analysis. This can not only enhance the precision of parameter estimation, but also make it possible to perform whole-genome association studies. We carried out extensive simulation studies to examine the robustness and statistical performance of our method. The application of the new method was validated using a case study from humans, in which we successfully detected significant QTL affecting human body heights. Finally, we discuss the implications of our method for genome projects and its extension to a broader circumstance. The computer program for the method proposed in this article is available at the webpage http://www.ifasstat.ufl.edu/genome/~LD. PMID:12702696

  16. Assembly of a large Y-STR haplotype database for the Czech population and investigation of its substructure.

    PubMed

    Zastera, Jan; Roewer, Lutz; Willuweit, Sascha; Sekerka, Patrik; Benesova, Lucie; Minarik, Marek

    2010-04-01

    Twelve Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STR) (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385a, DYS385b, DYS437, DYS438, and DYS439) included in the PowerPlex Y Kit (Promega Corporation, Madison, USA) were studied for 1750 unrelated males living in 14 regions of the Czech Republic. A total of 1148 different haplotypes were found. The overall haplotype diversity (HD) was determined as 0.998. Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) reveals non-significant distances between regions concerning their haplotype distribution, thus allowing to use the whole sample as a representative reference database of the Czech Republic. Median network analysis shows a remarkable bipartite composition of the Czech haplotypes, falling in distinct clusters with Eastern and Western European roots. PMID:20215022

  17. Mitochondrial control region haplotypes of the South American sea lion Otaria flavescens (Shaw, 1800).

    PubMed

    Artico, L O; Bianchini, A; Grubel, K S; Monteiro, D S; Estima, S C; Oliveira, L R de; Bonatto, S L; Marins, L F

    2010-09-01

    The South American sea lion, Otaria flavescens, is widely distributed along the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of South America. However, along the Brazilian coast, there are only two nonbreeding sites for the species (Refúgio de Vida Silvestre da Ilha dos Lobos and Refúgio de Vida Silvestre do Molhe Leste da Barra do Rio Grande), both in Southern Brazil. In this region, the species is continuously under the effect of anthropic activities, mainly those related to environmental contamination with organic and inorganic chemicals and fishery interactions. This paper reports, for the first time, the genetic diversity of O. flavescens found along the Southern Brazilian coast. A 287-bp fragment of the mitochondrial DNA control region (D-loop) was analyzed. Seven novel haplotypes were found in 56 individuals (OFA1-OFA7), with OFA1 being the most frequent (47.54%). Nucleotide diversity was moderate (π = 0.62%) and haplotype diversity was relatively low (67%). Furthermore, the median joining network analysis indicated that Brazilian haplotypes formed a reciprocal monophyletic clade when compared to the haplotypes from the Peruvian population on the Pacific coast. These two populations do not share haplotypes and may have become isolated some time back. Further genetic studies covering the entire species distribution are necessary to better understand the biological implications of the results reported here for the management and conservation of South American sea lions. PMID:20838754

  18. A CCL5 Haplotype Is Associated with Low Seropositivity Rate of HCV Infection in People Who Inject Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Huik, Kristi; Avi, Radko; Pauskar, Merit; Kallas, Eveli; Jõgeda, Ene-Ly; Karki, Tõnis; Rüütel, Kristi; Talu, Ave; Abel-Ollo, Katri; Uusküla, Anneli; Carrillo, Andrew; Ahuja, Sunil K.; He, Weijing; Lutsar, Irja

    2016-01-01

    Objective The role of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) and its ligand CCL5 on the pathogenesis of HIV infection has been well studied but not for HCV infection. Here, we investigated whether CCL5 haplotypes influence HIV and HCV seropositivity among 373 Caucasian people who inject drugs (PWID) from Estonia. Methods Study included 373 PWID; 56% were HIV seropositive, 44% HCV seropositive and 47% co-infected. Four CCL5 haplotypes (A-D) were derived from three CCL5 polymorphisms (rs2107538/rs2280788/rs2280789) typed by Taqman allelic discrimination assays. The data of CCR5 haplotypes were used from our previous study. The association between CCL5 haplotypes with HIV and/or HCV seropositivity was determined using logistic regression analysis. Results Possessing CCL5 haplotype D (defined by rs2107538A/rs2280788G/rs2280789C) decreased the odds of HCV seropositivity compared to those not possessing it (OR = 0.19; 95% CI 0.09–0.40), which remained significant after adjustment to co-variates (OR = 0.08; 95% CI 0.02–0.29). An association of this haplotype with HIV seropositivity was not found. In step-wise logistic regression with backward elimination CCL5 haplotype D and CCR5 HHG*1 had reduced odds for HCV seropositivity (OR = 0.28 95% CI 0.09–0.92; OR = 0.23 95% CI 0.08–0.68, respectively) compared to those who did not possess these haplotypes, respectively. Conclusions Our results suggest that among PWID CCL5 haplotype D and CCR5 HHG*1 independently protects against HCV. Our findings highlight the importance of CCL5 genetic variability and CCL5-CCR5 axis on the susceptibility to HCV. PMID:27304910

  19. Mitochondrial haplotypes associated with biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Perry G; Koop, Andre; Maxwell, Taylor J; Bailey, Matthew H; Swerdlow, Russell H; Kauwe, John S K; Honea, Robyn A

    2013-01-01

    Various studies have suggested that the mitochondrial genome plays a role in late-onset Alzheimer's disease, although results are mixed. We used an endophenotype-based approach to further characterize mitochondrial genetic variation and its relationship to risk markers for Alzheimer's disease. We analyzed longitudinal data from non-demented, mild cognitive impairment, and late-onset Alzheimer's disease participants in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative with genetic, brain imaging, and behavioral data. We assessed the relationship of structural MRI and cognitive biomarkers with mitochondrial genome variation using TreeScanning, a haplotype-based approach that concentrates statistical power by analyzing evolutionarily meaningful groups (or clades) of haplotypes together for association with a phenotype. Four clades were associated with three different endophenotypes: whole brain volume, percent change in temporal pole thickness, and left hippocampal atrophy over two years. This is the first study of its kind to identify mitochondrial variation associated with brain imaging endophenotypes of Alzheimer's disease. Our results provide additional evidence that the mitochondrial genome plays a role in risk for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24040196

  20. MAPT H1 Haplotype is Associated with Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Risk in APOEɛ4 Noncarriers: Results from the Dementia Genetics Spanish Consortium.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Pau; Moreno, Fermín; Clarimón, Jordi; Ruiz, Agustín; Combarros, Onofre; Calero, Miguel; López de Munain, Adolfo; Bullido, Maria J; de Pancorbo, Marian M; Carro, Eva; Antonell, Anna; Coto, Eliecer; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Hernandez, Isabel; Tárraga, Lluís; Boada, Mercè; Lleó, Alberto; Dols-Icardo, Oriol; Kulisevsky, Jaime; Vázquez-Higuera, José Luis; Infante, Jon; Rábano, Alberto; Fernández-Blázquez, Miguel Ángel; Valentí, Meritxell; Indakoetxea, Begoña; Barandiarán, Myriam; Gorostidi, Ana; Frank-García, Ana; Sastre, Isabel; Lorenzo, Elena; Pastor, María A; Elcoroaristizabal, Xabier; Lennarz, Martina; Maier, Wolfang; Rámirez, Alfredo; Serrano-Ríos, Manuel; Lee, Suzee E; Sánchez-Juan, Pascual

    2015-01-01

    The MAPT H1 haplotype has been linked to several disorders, but its relationship with Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains controversial. A rare variant in MAPT (p.A152T) has been linked with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and AD. We genotyped H1/H2 and p.A152T MAPT in 11,572 subjects from Spain (4,327 AD, 563 FTD, 648 Parkinson's disease (PD), 84 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and 5,950 healthy controls). Additionally, we included 101 individuals from 21 families with genetic FTD. MAPT p.A152T was borderline significantly associated with FTD [odds ratio (OR) = 2.03; p = 0.063], but not with AD. MAPT H1 haplotype was associated with AD risk (OR = 1.12; p = 0.0005). Stratification analysis showed that this association was mainly driven by APOE ɛ4 noncarriers (OR = 1.14; p = 0.0025). MAPT H1 was also associated with risk for PD (OR = 1.30; p = 0.0003) and PSP (OR = 3.18; p = 8.59 × 10-8) but not FTD. Our results suggest that the MAPT H1 haplotype increases the risk of PD, PSP, and non-APOE ɛ4 AD. PMID:26444794

  1. An improved preprocessing algorithm for haplotype inference by pure parsimony.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mun-Ho; Kang, Seung-Ho; Lim, Hyeong-Seok

    2014-08-01

    The identification of haplotypes, which encode SNPs in a single chromosome, makes it possible to perform a haplotype-based association test with disease. Given a set of genotypes from a population, the process of recovering the haplotypes, which explain the genotypes, is called haplotype inference (HI). We propose an improved preprocessing method for solving the haplotype inference by pure parsimony (HIPP), which excludes a large amount of redundant haplotypes by detecting some groups of haplotypes that are dispensable for optimal solutions. The method uses only inclusion relations between groups of haplotypes but dramatically reduces the number of candidate haplotypes; therefore, it causes the computational time and memory reduction of real HIPP solvers. The proposed method can be easily coupled with a wide range of optimization methods which consider a set of candidate haplotypes explicitly. For the simulated and well-known benchmark datasets, the experimental results show that our method coupled with a classical exact HIPP solver run much faster than the state-of-the-art solver and can solve a large number of instances that were so far unaffordable in a reasonable time. PMID:25152045

  2. Haplotypes and Sequence Variation in the Ovine Adiponectin Gene (ADIPOQ)

    PubMed Central

    An, Qing-Ming; Zhou, Hui-Tong; Hu, Jiang; Luo, Yu-Zhu; Hickford, Jon G. H.

    2015-01-01

    The adiponectin gene (ADIPOQ) plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In this study five separate regions (regions 1 to 5) of ovine ADIPOQ were analysed using PCR-SSCP. Four different PCR-SSCP patterns (A1-D1, A2-D2) were detected in region-1 and region-2, respectively, with seven and six SNPs being revealed. In region-3, three different patterns (A3-C3) and three SNPs were observed. Two patterns (A4-B4, A5-B5) and two and one SNPs were observed in region-4 and region-5, respectively. In total, nineteen SNPs were detected, with five of them in the coding region and two (c.46T/C and c.515G/A) putatively resulting in amino acid changes (p.Tyr16His and p.Lys172Arg). In region-1, -2 and -3 of 316 sheep from eight New Zealand breeds, variants A1, A2 and A3 were the most common, although variant frequencies differed in the eight breeds. Across region-1 and region-3, nine haplotypes were identified and haplotypes A1-A3, A1-C3, B1-A3 and B1-C3 were most common. These results indicate that the ADIPOQ gene is polymorphic and suggest that further analysis is required to see if the variation in the gene is associated with animal production traits. PMID:26610572

  3. FokI Polymorphism, Vitamin D Receptor, and Interleukin-1 Receptor Haplotypes Are Associated with Type 1 Diabetes in the Dalmatian Population

    PubMed Central

    Zemunik, Tatijana; Škrabić, Veselin; Boraska, Vesna; Diklić, Dijaneta; Terzić, Ivana Marinović; Čapkun, Vesna; Peruzović, Marijana; Terzić, Janoš

    2005-01-01

    Vitamin D and interleukin (IL)-1 have been suggested to function in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Therefore, we examined the influence of gene polymorphisms in vitamin D receptor (VDR) and interleukin-1 receptor type I (IL-1-R1) on susceptibility to T1DM in the Dalmatian population of South Croatia. We genotyped 134 children with T1DM and 132 controls; for FokI polymorphism studies, we extended the control group to an additional 102 patients. The VDR gene polymorphism FokI displayed unequal distribution (P = 0.0049) between T1DM and control groups, with the ff genotype occurring more frequently in T1DM individuals whereas the VDR gene polymorphism Tru9I did not differ in frequency between studied groups. All tested polymorphisms of the IL-1-R1 gene [PstI, HinfI, and AluI (promoter region) and PstI-e (exon 1B region)] displayed no differences between cases and controls. Haplotype analysis of the VDR gene (FokI, BsmI, ApaI, TaqI, Tru9I) and of the IL-1-R1 gene (PstI, HinfI, AluI, PstI-e) found haplotypes VDR FbATu (P = 0.0388) and IL-1-R1 phap’ (P = 0.0419) to be more frequent in T1DM patients whereas the BatU haplotype occurred more often in controls (P = 0.0064). Our findings indicate that the VDR FokI polymorphism and several VDR and IL-1-R1 haplotypes are associated with susceptibility to T1DM in the Dalmatian population. PMID:16258158

  4. On the Minimum Error Correction Problem for Haplotype Assembly in Diploid and Polyploid Genomes.

    PubMed

    Bonizzoni, Paola; Dondi, Riccardo; Klau, Gunnar W; Pirola, Yuri; Pisanti, Nadia; Zaccaria, Simone

    2016-09-01

    In diploid genomes, haplotype assembly is the computational problem of reconstructing the two parental copies, called haplotypes, of each chromosome starting from sequencing reads, called fragments, possibly affected by sequencing errors. Minimum error correction (MEC) is a prominent computational problem for haplotype assembly and, given a set of fragments, aims at reconstructing the two haplotypes by applying the minimum number of base corrections. MEC is computationally hard to solve, but some approximation-based or fixed-parameter approaches have been proved capable of obtaining accurate results on real data. In this work, we expand the current characterization of the computational complexity of MEC from the approximation and the fixed-parameter tractability point of view. In particular, we show that MEC is not approximable within a constant factor, whereas it is approximable within a logarithmic factor in the size of the input. Furthermore, we answer open questions on the fixed-parameter tractability for parameters of classical or practical interest: the total number of corrections and the fragment length. In addition, we present a direct 2-approximation algorithm for a variant of the problem that has also been applied in the framework of clustering data. Finally, since polyploid genomes, such as those of plants and fishes, are composed of more than two copies of the chromosomes, we introduce a novel formulation of MEC, namely the k-ploid MEC problem, that extends the traditional problem to deal with polyploid genomes. We show that the novel formulation is still both computationally hard and hard to approximate. Nonetheless, from the parameterized point of view, we prove that the problem is tractable for parameters of practical interest such as the number of haplotypes and the coverage, or the number of haplotypes and the fragment length. PMID:27280382

  5. An Efficient Trio-Based Mini-Haplotyping Method for Genetic Diagnosis of Phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Talebi, Saeed; Entezam, Mona; Mohajer, Neda; Kazemi-sefat, Golnaz-Ensieh; Razipour, Masoumeh; Ahmadloo, Somayeh; Setoodeh, Aria; Keramatipour, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective The phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) locus has high linkage disequilibrium. Haplotypes related to this locus may thus be considered sufficiently informative for genetic diagnosis and carrier screening using multi-allelic markers. In this study, we present an efficient method for haplotype analysis of PAH locus using multiplexing dyes. In addition, we explain how to resolve the dye shift challenge in multiplex short tandem repeat (STR) genotyping. Materials and Methods One hundred family trios were included in this descriptive study. The forward primer of a tetra-nucleotide STR and the reverse primer of a variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) were labeled with three different non-overlapping dyes 5-carboxyfluorescein (FAM), 6-carboxy-N,N,N’,N’-tetramethylrhodamine (HEX) and 6-carboxy-N,N,N’,N’-tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA). The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products from each family trio were multiplexed for capillary electrophoresis and results were analyzed using Peak Scanner software. Results Multiplexing trio products decreased the cost significantly. The TAMRA labeled products had a significant predictable shift (migrated at a slower electrophoretic rate) relative to the HEX and FAM labeled products. Through our methodology we achieve, the less inter-dye shift than intra-dye shift variance. Correcting the dye shift in the labeled products, according to the reference allele size, significantly decreased the inter-dye variability (P<0.001). Conclusion Multiplexing trio products helps to detect and resolve the dye shift accurately in each family, which otherwise would result in diagnostic error. The dye system of FAM, HEX and TAMRA is more feasible and cheaper than other dye systems. PMID:27540528

  6. Analysis methods for the determination of anthropogenic additions of P to agricultural soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus additions and measurement in soil is of concern on lands where biosolids have been applied. Colorimetric analysis for plant-available P may be inadequate for the accurate assessment of soil P. Phosphate additions in a regulatory environment need to be accurately assessed as the reported...

  7. Pediatric celiac disease in India is associated with multiple DR3-DQ2 haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurvinder; Sarkar, N; Bhatnagar, S; Kumar, S; Rapthap, C C; Bhan, M K; Mehra, N K

    2002-08-01

    The role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQ2 heterodimer (DQA1*0501-DQB1*0201) in presenting gluten peptides to effector T cells in celiac disease (CD) has been well documented. Because HLA-DQ2 is carried on DR3 haplotypes due to linkage disequilibrium, such haplotypes are encountered more frequently in patients with autoimmune disease. This study analyzed 35 North Indian children below 15 years of age and diagnosed to have CD as per the ESPGAN criteria, which included histopathologic alterations in duodenal biopsies, clinical response to gluten withdrawal, and presence of antiendomysial antibodies. The HLA class I and class II alleles were determined by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primers, sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe, and reverse line strip molecular techniques. A statistically significant positive association of the disease with HLA-DRB1*03 (94.2% versus 22.1% in controls, chi(2) = 73.4, p = 7.54E-11), and a negative association with DRB1*15 (chi(2) = 7.4, p = 6.5E-03) and DRB1*13 alleles was observed. The HLA-DQB1*0201 was observed in all the 35 patients (100%), whereas the DQ2 heterodimer alpha(0)beta(0) occurred in 97.1% of CD patients (31.4% in double dose, 65.7% in single dose) and revealed significant deviation from healthy controls (chi(2) = 102.08, p = 7.56E-11). Further analysis revealed involvement of multiple DR3+ve haplotypes with CD in Indians, of which A26-B8-DR3 was the most common DR3 haplotype among patients (34.28%, chi(2) = 40.57, p = 2.65E-10) followed by Ax-B21-DR3 (11.4%) (chi(2) = 13.8, p = 2E-04) and the classical Caucasian haplotype A1-B8-DR3 (5.7%). The former two haplotypes are characteristic of Asian Indians and are involved in the development of CD. We conclude that the high risk DR3 haplotypes that play a crucial role in the development of CD are unique in Asian Indians. Detailed analysis of these haplotypes in Indian patients with autoimmune diseases may help understand the influence of other intervening

  8. Unique haplotypes of cacao trees as revealed by trnH-psbA chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-López, Nidia; Ovando-Medina, Isidro; Salvador-Figueroa, Miguel; Molina-Freaner, Francisco; Avendaño-Arrazate, Carlos H; Vázquez-Ovando, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Cacao trees have been cultivated in Mesoamerica for at least 4,000 years. In this study, we analyzed sequence variation in the chloroplast DNA trnH-psbA intergenic spacer from 28 cacao trees from different farms in the Soconusco region in southern Mexico. Genetic relationships were established by two analysis approaches based on geographic origin (five populations) and genetic origin (based on a previous study). We identified six polymorphic sites, including five insertion/deletion (indels) types and one transversion. The overall nucleotide diversity was low for both approaches (geographic = 0.0032 and genetic = 0.0038). Conversely, we obtained moderate to high haplotype diversity (0.66 and 0.80) with 10 and 12 haplotypes, respectively. The common haplotype (H1) for both networks included cacao trees from all geographic locations (geographic approach) and four genetic groups (genetic approach). This common haplotype (ancient) derived a set of intermediate haplotypes and singletons interconnected by one or two mutational steps, which suggested directional selection and event purification from the expansion of narrow populations. Cacao trees from Soconusco region were grouped into one cluster without any evidence of subclustering based on AMOVA (F ST = 0) and SAMOVA (F ST = 0.04393) results. One population (Mazatán) showed a high haplotype frequency; thus, this population could be considered an important reservoir of genetic material. The indels located in the trnH-psbA intergenic spacer of cacao trees could be useful as markers for the development of DNA barcoding. PMID:27076998

  9. Variants and Haplotypes in Angiotensinogen Gene Are Associated With Plasmatic Angiotensinogen Level in Mexican Population

    PubMed Central

    Balam-Ortiz, Eros; Esquivel-Villarreal, Adolfo; Alfaro-Ruiz, Luis; Carrillo, Karol; Elizalde, Adela; Gil, Trinidad; Urushihara, Maki; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The plasmatic angiotensinogen (AGT) level has been associated with essential hypertension. Linkage analysis has found a relationship between the AGT gene locus and hypertension in the Mexican-American population, but studies have failed to identify genetic variants associated with hypertension or plasma AGT levels. This study analyzes the relationship between polymorphisms in the AGT gene and plasmatic AGT levels in Mexican population. Methods Nine polymorphisms in AGT gene were genotyped, and plasma AGT level was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Differences in AGT plasma levels were associated with 2 polymorphisms: T-20G, TT = 25.3 ± 8.3 versus TG + GG = 21.6 ± 8.8 μg/mL; P = 0.008 and C3389T (T174M), CC = 25.8 ± 9.9 versus TC + TT = 20.5 ± 5.4 μg/mL; P = 0.0002. Haplotype 2 was associated with low plasma AGT (−5.1 μg/mL [95% confidence interval: −8.6 to −1.6], P = 0.004) and Haplotype 8 was associated with high plasma AGT (6.5 μg/mL [95% confidence interval: 2.5 to 10.6], P = 0.001). This association remained after adjustment for covariates. A Likelihood Ratio Test for haplotype-phenotype association adjusted for covariates resulted in χ2 = 38.9, P = 0.0005. The total effect of the haplotypes on plasma AGT level variance was 19.5%. No association was identified between haplotypes and quantitative traits of blood pressure. Conclusions Two polymorphisms (T-20G and C3389T) and 2 haplotypes (H2 and H8) showed an association with plasma AGT levels in Mexican population. PMID:21629041

  10. Haplotype diversity of 13 RM Y-STRs in Chinese Han population and an update on the allele designation of DYF403S1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenqiong; Xiao, Chao; Wei, Tian; Pan, Chao; Yi, Shaohua; Huang, Daixin

    2016-07-01

    Rapidly mutating Y-STRs (RM Y-STRs) have been paid much attention in recent years. The 13 RM Y-STRs have been proved to have substantially higher haplotype diversity and discrimination capacity than conventionally used Y-STRs, indicating the considerable power in paternal lineage differentiation. To investigate the haplotype diversity in Chinese Han population, we collected 252 unrelated male samples and tested the genotype of the 13 RM Y-STRs. Among 252 male individuals, a total of 250 haplotypes were observed in which only 2 haplotypes were shared by 2 males respectively. The haplotype diversity reached 0.999937 and the discrimination capacity was 99.21%, showing a great discrimination power in Chinese Han population. In addition, an update on the allele designation of DYF403S1 was proposed. PMID:27217255

  11. Haplotype data for 23 Y-chromosome markers in a reference sample from Bosnia and Herzegovina

    PubMed Central

    Kovačević, Lejla; Fatur-Cerić, Vera; Hadžić, Negra; Čakar, Jasmina; Primorac, Dragan; Marjanović, Damir

    2013-01-01

    Aim To detect polymorphisms of 23 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci, including 6 new loci, in a reference database of male population of Bosnia and Herzegovina, as well as to assess the importance of increasing the number of Y-STR loci utilized in forensic DNA analysis. Methods The reference sample consisted of 100 healthy, unrelated men originating from Bosnia and Herzegovina. Sample collection using buccal swabs was performed in all geographical regions of Bosnia and Herzegovina in the period from 2010 to 2011. DNA samples were typed for 23 Y STR loci, including 6 new loci: DYS576, DYS481, DYS549, DYS533, DYS570, and DYS643, which are included in the new PowerPlex® Y 23 amplification kit. Results The absolute frequency of generated haplotypes was calculated and results showed that 98 samples had unique Y 23 haplotypes, and that only two samples shared the same haplotype. The most polymorphic locus was DYS418, with 14 detected alleles and the least polymorphic loci were DYS389I, DYS391, DYS437, and DYS393. Conclusion This study showed that by increasing the number of highly polymorphic Y STR markers, to include those tested in our analysis, leads to a reduction of repeating haplotypes, which is very important in the application of forensic DNA analysis. PMID:23771760

  12. Haplotype kinship for three populations of the Goettingen minipig

    PubMed Central

    Flury, Christine; Weigend, Steffen; Ding, Xiangdong; Täubert, Helge; Simianer, Henner

    2007-01-01

    To overcome limitations of diversity measures applied to livestock breeds marker based estimations of kinship within and between populations were proposed. This concept was extended from the single locus consideration to chromosomal segments of a given length in Morgan. Algorithms for the derivation of haplotype kinship were suggested and the behaviour of marker based haplotype kinship was investigated theoretically. In the present study the results of the first practical application of this concept are presented. Full sib pairs of three sub-populations of the Goettingen minipig were genotyped for six chromosome segments. After haplotype reconstruction the haplotypes were compared and mean haplotype kinships were estimated within and between populations. Based on haplotype kinships a distance measure is proposed which is approximatively linear with the number of generations since fission. The haplotype kinship distances, the respective standard errors and the pedigree-based expected values are presented and are shown to reflect the true population history better than distances based on single-locus kinships. However the marker estimated haplotype kinship reveals variable among segments. This leads to high standard errors of the respective distances. Possible reasons for this phenomenon are discussed and a pedigree-based approach to correct for identical haplotypes which are not identical by descent is proposed. PMID:17306199

  13. Genomic evolution in domestic cattle: ancestral haplotypes and healthy beef.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Joseph F; Steele, Edward J; Lester, Susan; Kalai, Oscar; Millman, John A; Wolrige, Lindsay; Bayard, Dominic; McLure, Craig; Dawkins, Roger L

    2011-05-01

    We have identified numerous Ancestral Haplotypes encoding a 14-Mb region of Bota C19. Three are frequent in Simmental, Angus and Wagyu and have been conserved since common progenitor populations. Others are more relevant to the differences between these 3 breeds including fat content and distribution in muscle. SREBF1 and Growth Hormone, which have been implicated in the production of healthy beef, are included within these haplotypes. However, we conclude that alleles at these 2 loci are less important than other sequences within the haplotypes. Identification of breeds and hybrids is improved by using haplotypes rather than individual alleles. PMID:21338665

  14. Bayesian Modeling of Haplotype Effects in Multiparent Populations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhaojun; Wang, Wei; Valdar, William

    2014-01-01

    A general Bayesian model, Diploffect, is described for estimating the effects of founder haplotypes at quantitative trait loci (QTL) detected in multiparental genetic populations; such populations include the Collaborative Cross (CC), Heterogeneous Socks (HS), and many others for which local genetic variation is well described by an underlying, usually probabilistically inferred, haplotype mosaic. Our aim is to provide a framework for coherent estimation of haplotype and diplotype (haplotype pair) effects that takes into account the following: uncertainty in haplotype composition for each individual; uncertainty arising from small sample sizes and infrequently observed haplotype combinations; possible effects of dominance (for noninbred subjects); genetic background; and that provides a means to incorporate data that may be incomplete or has a hierarchical structure. Using the results of a probabilistic haplotype reconstruction as prior information, we obtain posterior distributions at the QTL for both haplotype effects and haplotype composition. Two alternative computational approaches are supplied: a Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler and a procedure based on importance sampling of integrated nested Laplace approximations. Using simulations of QTL in the incipient CC (pre-CC) and Northport HS populations, we compare the accuracy of Diploffect, approximations to it, and more commonly used approaches based on Haley–Knott regression, describing trade-offs between these methods. We also estimate effects for three QTL previously identified in those populations, obtaining posterior intervals that describe how the phenotype might be affected by diplotype substitutions at the modeled locus. PMID:25236455

  15. Analysis of CNT additives in porous layered thin film lubrication with electric double layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, T. V. V. L. N.; Rani, A. M. A.; Sufian, S.; Mohamed, N. M.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of thin film lubrication of porous layered carbon nanotubes (CNTs) additive slider bearing with electric double layer. The CNTs additive lubricant flow in the thin fluid film and porous layers are governed by Stokes and Brinkman equations respectively, including electro-kinetic force. The apparent viscosity and nondimensional pressure expression are derived. The nondimensional load capacity increases under the influence of electro-viscosity, CNT additives volume fraction, permeability and thickness of porous layer. A CNTs additive lubricated porous thin film slider bearing with electric double layer provides higher load capacity.

  16. Microsatellites haplotyping of CF chromosomes shows linkage disequilibrium and several founder effects in Brittany (France)

    SciTech Connect

    Raguenes, O.; Ferec, C.; Mercier, B.

    1994-09-01

    A large study on cystic fibrosis (CF) is underway in Brittany (France). It is based on 902 CF patients distributed in 795 families who were or are still followed at the {open_quotes}Centre Helio-Marin{close_quotes} in Roscoff and/or were subjected to a molecular analysis at the {open_quotes}Centre de Biogenetique{close_quotes} in Brest. At present, the CF mutations have been identified in 309 patients born in Brittany, most of them of Celtic origin. A microsatellite (MS) study using IVS 17b TA, IVS 17b CA and IVS 8 CA was also completed in 63 CF patients and their parents (carriers of the {Delta}F508 mutation or the G551D mutation or the 1078delT mutation or the W846X mutation). All the 21 chromosomes carrying the 1078delT mutation had the same MS haplotype (16-21-13), which was also found on 9 of the 83 non-CF chromosomes analyzed. All the 16 chromosomes with the G551D mutation carried another MS haplotype (16-7-17), which was also found on 13.3% of the non-CF chromosomes. All the 6 chromosomes with the W846X mutation carried the 16-32-13 haplotype, also found on 6.0% of the non-CF chromosomes. Sixteen different MS haplotypes were found among the 74 chromosomes carrying the{Delta}F508 mutation, three of them representing 74.3% (55/74) of the chromosomes. These were the 23-31-13 haplotype (31/74 - 41.9%), the 17-31-13 haplotype (11/74 - 14.9%), and the 17-32-13 haplotype (13/74 - 17.6%). These results show that the CF mutations observed in Brittany are in linkage disequilibrium with the MS haplotypes. They also suggest that their presence in Brittany is the consequence of several founder effects.

  17. The association of XRCC1 haplotypes and chromosomal damage levels in peripheral blood lymphocyte among coke-oven workers

    SciTech Connect

    Shuguang Leng; Juan Cheng; Linyuan Zhang; Yong Niu; Yufei Dai; Zufei Pan; Bin Li; Fengsheng He; Yuxin Zheng

    2005-05-15

    Theoretically, a haplotype has a higher level of heterozygosity than individual single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and the association study based on the haplotype may have an increased power for detecting disease associations compared with SNP-based analysis. In this study, we investigated the effects of four haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNP) and the inferred haplotype pairs of the X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) gene on chromosome damage detected by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. The study included 141 coke-oven workers with exposure to a high level of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and 66 nonexposed controls. The frequencies of total MN and MNed cells were borderline associated with the Arg{sup 194}Trp polymorphism (P = 0.053 and P = 0.050, respectively) but not associated with the Arg{sup 280}His, Arg{sup 399}Gln and Gln{sup 632}Gln polymorphisms among coke-oven workers. Five haplotypes, including CGGG, TGGG, CAGG, CGAG, and CGGA, were inferred based on the four htSNPs of XRCC1 gene. The haplotype CGGG was associated with the decreased frequencies of total MN and MNed cells, and the haplotypes TGGG and CGAG were associated with the increased frequencies of total MN and MNed cells with adjustment for covariates among coke-oven workers. This study showed that the haplotypes derived from htSNPs in the XRCC1 gene were more likely than single SNPs to correlate with the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced chromosome damage among coke-oven workers.

  18. Haplotype diversity in mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region in a population of southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fridman, C; Gonzalez, R S; Pereira, A C; Cardena, M M S G

    2014-07-01

    Brazilian population derives from Native Amerindians, Europeans, and Africans. Southeastern Brazil is the most populous region of the country. The present study intended to characterize the maternal genetic ancestry of 290 individuals from southeastern (Brazil) population. Thus, we made the sequencing of the three hypervariable regions (HV1, HV2, and HV3) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The statistical analyses were made using Arlequin software, and the median-joining haplotype networks were generated using Network software. The analysis of three hypervariable regios showed 230 (79.3 %) unique haplotypes and the most common haplotype was "263G" carried by 12 (4.1 %) individuals. The strikingly high variability generated by intense gene flow is mirrored in a high sequence diversity (0.9966 ± 0.0010), and the probability of two random individuals showing identical mtDNA haplotypes were 0.0068. The analysis of haplogroup distribution revealed that 36.9 % (n = 107) presented Amerindian haplogroups, 35.2 % (n = 102) presented African haplogroups, 27.6 % (n = 80) presented European haplogroups, and one (0.3 %) individual presented East Asian haplogroup, evidencing that the southeastern population is extremely heterogeneous and the coexistence of matrilineal lineages with three different phylogeographic origins. The genetic diversity found in the mtDNA control region in the southeastern Brazilian population reinforces the importance of increased national database in order to be important and informative in forensic cases. PMID:24846100

  19. Patterns of haplotypes for 92 cystic fibrosis mutations: Variability, association and recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Morral, N.; Llevadot, R.; Estivill, X.

    1994-09-01

    Most CFTR mutations are very uncommon among the cystic fibrosis population, with frequencies of less than 1%, and many are found only in specific areas. We have analyzed 92 CF mutations for several markers (4 microsatellites and 3 other polymorphisms) scattered in the CFTR gene. Haplotypes associated with these mutations can be used as a framework in the screening of chromosomes carrying unknown mutations. The association between mutation and haplotype reduces the number of mutations it is necessary to search for to a maximum of 16 for the same haplotype. Only mutations {triangle}F508, G542X and N1303K are associated with more than one haplotype as a result of slippage at more than one microsatellite loci, suggesting that these three are the most ancient CF mutations. Recurrence has been found for at least 7 mutations: H199Y, R347P, L558S, R553X, 2184insA, 3272-26A{r_arrow}G, 3849+10kbC{r_arrow}T and R1162X. Also microsatellite analysis of chromosomes of several ethnic origins (Czech, Italian, Russian, Slovac and Spanish) suggested that possibility of three or more independent origins for mutations R334W, R347P, R1162X, and 3849+10kbC{r_arrow}T, which was confirmed by analysis of markers flanking these mutations.

  20. Development of an Italian RM Y-STR haplotype database: Results of the 2013 GEFI collaborative exercise.

    PubMed

    Robino, C; Ralf, A; Pasino, S; De Marchi, M R; Ballantyne, K N; Barbaro, A; Bini, C; Carnevali, E; Casarino, L; Di Gaetano, C; Fabbri, M; Ferri, G; Giardina, E; Gonzalez, A; Matullo, G; Nutini, A L; Onofri, V; Piccinini, A; Piglionica, M; Ponzano, E; Previderè, C; Resta, N; Scarnicci, F; Seidita, G; Sorçaburu-Cigliero, S; Turrina, S; Verzeletti, A; Kayser, M

    2015-03-01

    Recently introduced rapidly mutating Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (RM Y-STR) loci, displaying a multiple-fold higher mutation rate relative to any other Y-STRs, including those conventionally used in forensic casework, have been demonstrated to improve the resolution of male lineage differentiation and to allow male relative separation usually impossible with standard Y-STRs. However, large and geographically-detailed frequency haplotype databases are required to estimate the statistical weight of RM Y-STR haplotype matches if observed in forensic casework. With this in mind, the Italian Working Group (GEFI) of the International Society for Forensic Genetics launched a collaborative exercise aimed at generating an Italian quality controlled forensic RM Y-STR haplotype database. Overall 1509 male individuals from 13 regional populations covering northern, central and southern areas of the Italian peninsula plus Sicily were collected, including both "rural" and "urban" samples classified according to population density in the sampling area. A subset of individuals was additionally genotyped for Y-STR loci included in the Yfiler and PowerPlex Y23 (PPY23) systems (75% and 62%, respectively), allowing the comparison of RM and conventional Y-STRs. Considering the whole set of 13 RM Y-STRs, 1501 unique haplotypes were observed among the 1509 sampled Italian men with a haplotype diversity of 0.999996, largely superior to Yfiler and PPY23 with 0.999914 and 0.999950, respectively. AMOVA indicated that 99.996% of the haplotype variation was within populations, confirming that genetic-geographic structure is almost undetected by RM Y-STRs. Haplotype sharing among regional Italian populations was not observed at all with the complete set of 13 RM Y-STRs. Haplotype sharing within Italian populations was very rare (0.27% non-unique haplotypes), and lower in urban (0.22%) than rural (0.29%) areas. Additionally, 422 father-son pairs were investigated, and 20.1% of them could

  1. Selection of minimum subsets of single nucleotide polymorphisms to capture haplotype block diversity.

    PubMed

    Avi-Itzhak, Hadar I; Su, Xiaoping; De La Vega, Francisco M

    2003-01-01

    We present a simple numerical algorithm to select the minimal subset of SNPs required to capture the diversity of haplotype blocks or other genetic loci. This algorithm can be used to quickly select the minimum SNP subset with no loss of haplotype information. In addition, the method can be used in a more aggressive mode to further reduce the original SNP set, with minimal loss of information. We demonstrate the algorithm performance with data from over 11,000 SNPs with average spacing of 6 to 11 Kb, across all the genes of chromosomes 6, 21, and 22, genotyped on DNA samples of 45 unrelated African-Americans and 45 Caucasians from the Coriell Human Diversity Collection. With no loss of information, we reduced the number of SNPs required to capture the haplotype block diversity by 25% for the African-American and 36% for the Caucasian populations. With a maximum loss of 10% of haplotype distribution information, the SNP reduction was 38% and 49% respectively for the two populations. All computations were performed in less than 1 minute for the entire dataset used. PMID:12603050

  2. Use of haplotypes to estimate Mendelian sampling effects and selection limits.

    PubMed

    Cole, J B; VanRaden, P M

    2011-12-01

    Limits to selection and Mendelian sampling (MS) terms can be calculated using haplotypes by summing the individual additive effects on each chromosome. Haplotypes were imputed for 43 382 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 1455 Brown Swiss, 40 351 Holstein and 4064 Jersey bulls and cows using the Fortran program findhap.f90, which combines population and pedigree haplotyping methods. Lower and upper bounds of MS variance were calculated for daughter pregnancy rate (a measure of fertility), milk yield, lifetime net merit (a measure of profitability) and protein yield assuming either no or complete linkage among SNP on the same chromosome. Calculated selection limits were greater than the largest direct genomic values observed in all breeds studied. The best chromosomal genotypes generally consisted of two copies of the same haplotype even after adjustment for inbreeding. Selection of animals rather than chromosomes may result in slower progress, but limits may be the same because most chromosomes will become homozygous with either strategy. Selection on functions of MS could be used to change variances in later generations. PMID:22059578

  3. Dispersion of human Y chromosome haplotypes based on five microsatellites in global populations.

    PubMed

    Deka, R; Jin, L; Shriver, M D; Yu, L M; Saha, N; Barrantes, R; Chakraborty, R; Ferrell, R E

    1996-12-01

    We have analyzed five microsatellite loci from the nonrecombining portion of the human Y chromosome in 15 diverse human populations to evaluate their usefulness in the reconstruction of human evolution and early male migrations. The results show that, in general, most populations have the same set of the most frequent alleles at these loci. Hypothetical ancestral haplotypes, reconstructed on the basis of these alleles and their close derivatives, are shared by multiple populations across racial and geographical boundaries. A network of the observed haplotypes is characterized by a lack of clustering of geographically proximal populations. In spite of this, few distinct clusters of closely related populations emerged in the network, which are associated with population-specific alleles. A tree based on allele frequencies also shows similar results. Lack of haplotypic structure associated with the presumed ancestral haplotypes consisting of individuals from almost all populations indicate a recent common ancestry and/or extensive male migration during human evolutionary history. The convergent nature of microsatellite mutation confounds population relationships. Optimum resolution of Y chromosome evolution will require the use of additional microsatellite loci and diallelic genetic markers with lower mutation rates. PMID:8973912

  4. A hidden Markov model for investigating recent positive selection through haplotype structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Hey, Jody; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2015-02-01

    Recent positive selection can increase the frequency of an advantageous mutant rapidly enough that a relatively long ancestral haplotype will be remained intact around it. We present a hidden Markov model (HMM) to identify such haplotype structures. With HMM identified haplotype structures, a population genetic model for the extent of ancestral haplotypes is then adopted for parameter inference of the selection intensity and the allele age. Simulations show that this method can detect selection under a wide range of conditions and has higher power than the existing frequency spectrum-based method. In addition, it provides good estimate of the selection coefficients and allele ages for strong selection. The method analyzes large data sets in a reasonable amount of running time. This method is applied to HapMap III data for a genome scan, and identifies a list of candidate regions putatively under recent positive selection. It is also applied to several genes known to be under recent positive selection, including the LCT, KITLG and TYRP1 genes in Northern Europeans, and OCA2 in East Asians, to estimate their allele ages and selection coefficients. PMID:25446961

  5. A Hidden Markov Model for Investigating Recent Positive Selection through Haplotype Structure

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Jody; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2014-01-01

    Recent positive selection can increase the frequency of an advantageous mutant rapidly enough that a relatively long ancestral haplotype will be remained intact around it. We present a hidden Markov model (HMM) to identify such haplotype structures. With HMM identified haplotype structures, a population genetic model for the extent of ancestral haplotypes is then adopted for parameter inference of the selection intensity and the allele age. Simulations show that this method can detect selection under a wide range of conditions and has higher power than the existing frequency spectrum-based method. In addition, it provides good estimate of the selection coefficients and allele ages for strong selection. The method analyzes large data sets in a reasonable amount of running time. This method is applied to HapMap III data for a genome scan, and identifies a list of candidate regions putatively under recent positive selection. It is also applied to several genes known to be under recent positive selection, including the LCT, KITLG and TYRP1 genes in Northern Europeans, and OCA2 in East Asians, to estimate their allele ages and selection coefficients. PMID:25446961

  6. Relationship of serotonin transporter gene polymorphisms and haplotypes to mRNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Sarah L; Dodelzon, Katerina; Sandhu, Harinder K; Philibert, Robert A

    2005-07-01

    The serotonin transporter (5HTT; chromosomal location 17q12) is an important regulator of serotonergic neurotransmission and is the site of action for a number of antidepressant medications. Sequence variation at a VNTR known as the 5HTTLPR, which is 1.4 kb upstream of the translation start of 5HTT, has been associated in some studies with increased vulnerability to depression, neuroticism, and autism. Support for these clinical observations has included laboratory findings that 5HTTLPR variation is associated with changes in 5HTT gene translation. We re-examined these earlier laboratory findings by directly measuring 5HTT mRNA levels and genotyping four loci spanning the 5HTT gene using RNA and DNA prepared from 85 independent lymphoblast cell lines. Using this data, haplotypes were inferred and the resulting single point and haplotypes data analyzed by univariate and regression analyses. Consistent with the original findings, we found a significant effect of the 5HTTLPR on mRNA production. In contrast to previous reports, the effect on 5HTT mRNA production appeared to be mediated through an additive, not dominant, mechanism. Neither genotype nor haplotype at three other 5HTT loci were associated with alterations in mRNA production, although the small number of samples homozygous for the three most common haplotypes limits these findings. We conclude that further examination of the role of 5HTT sequence variation in regulating 5HTT mRNA production is warranted. PMID:15858822

  7. Bayesian quantitative trait locus mapping using inferred haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Durrant, Caroline; Mott, Richard

    2010-03-01

    We describe a fast hierarchical Bayesian method for mapping quantitative trait loci by haplotype-based association, applicable when haplotypes are not observed directly but are inferred from multiple marker genotypes. The method avoids the use of a Monte Carlo Markov chain by employing priors for which the likelihood factorizes completely. It is parameterized by a single hyperparameter, the fraction of variance explained by the quantitative trait locus, compared to the frequentist fixed-effects model, which requires a parameter for the phenotypic effect of each combination of haplotypes; nevertheless it still provides estimates of haplotype effects. We use simulation to show that the method matches the power of the frequentist regression model and, when the haplotypes are inferred, exceeds it for small QTL effect sizes. The Bayesian estimates of the haplotype effects are more accurate than the frequentist estimates, for both known and inferred haplotypes, which indicates that this advantage is independent of the effect of uncertainty in haplotype inference and will hold in comparison with frequentist methods in general. We apply the method to data from a panel of recombinant inbred lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, descended from 19 inbred founders. PMID:20048050

  8. Factors affecting the power of haplotype markers in association studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important, unresolved question in genome-wide association studies is whether there are predictable differences in power between single-SNP and haplotype markers. In this study, we use coalescent simulations to compare power for single-SNP and haplotype markers under a number of different models ...

  9. iXora1: exact haplotype inferencing and trait association

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: We address the task of extracting accurate haplotypes from genotype data of individuals of large F1 populations for mapping studies. While methods for inferring parental haplotype assignments on large F1 populations exist in theory, these approaches do not work in practice at high levels...

  10. Restriction digestion method for haplotyping the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A restriction digestion method has been developed for haplotyping the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli Sulc., an economically important pest of solanaceous crops. This method differentiates the four known potato psyllid haplotypes by utilizing restriction enzyme digestion of a portion of the ...

  11. Identification of the ancestral haplotype for apolipoprotein B suggests an African origin of Homo sapiens sapiens and traces their subsequent migration to Europe and the Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Rapacz, J.; Hasler-Rapacz, J.O. ); Chen, L.; Wu, Mingjiuan; Schumaker, V.N. ); Butler-Brunner, E.; Butler, R. )

    1991-02-15

    The probable ancestral haplotype for human apolipoprotein B (apoB) has been identified through immunological analysis of chimpanzee and gorilla serum and sequence analysis of their DNA. Moreover, the frequency of this ancestral apoB haplotype among different human populations provides strong support for the African origin of Homo sapiens sapiens and their subsequent migration from Africa to Europe and to the Pacific. The approach used here for the identification of the ancestral human apoB haplotype is likely to be applicable to many other genes.

  12. Identification of the ancestral haplotype for apolipoprotein B suggests an African origin of Homo sapiens sapiens and traces their subsequent migration to Europe and the Pacific.

    PubMed Central

    Rapacz, J; Chen, L; Butler-Brunner, E; Wu, M J; Hasler-Rapacz, J O; Butler, R; Schumaker, V N

    1991-01-01

    The probable ancestral haplotype for human apolipoprotein B (apoB) has been identified through immunological analysis of chimpanzee and gorilla serum and sequence analysis of their DNA. Moreover, the frequency of this ancestral apoB haplotype among different human populations provides strong support for the African origin of Homo sapiens sapiens and their subsequent migration from Africa to Europe and to the Pacific. The approach used here for the identification of the ancestral human apoB haplotype is likely to be applicable to many other genes. PMID:1996341

  13. Identification of the ancestral haplotype for apolipoprotein B suggests an African origin of Homo sapiens sapiens and traces their subsequent migration to Europe and the Pacific.

    PubMed

    Rapacz, J; Chen, L; Butler-Brunner, E; Wu, M J; Hasler-Rapacz, J O; Butler, R; Schumaker, V N

    1991-02-15

    The probable ancestral haplotype for human apolipoprotein B (apoB) has been identified through immunological analysis of chimpanzee and gorilla serum and sequence analysis of their DNA. Moreover, the frequency of this ancestral apoB haplotype among different human populations provides strong support for the African origin of Homo sapiens sapiens and their subsequent migration from Africa to Europe and to the Pacific. The approach used here for the identification of the ancestral human apoB haplotype is likely to be applicable to many other genes. PMID:1996341

  14. Mathematical properties and bounds on haplotyping populations by pure parsimony.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-Lin; Chang, Chia-Yuan

    2011-06-01

    Although the haplotype data can be used to analyze the function of DNA, due to the significant efforts required in collecting the haplotype data, usually the genotype data is collected and then the population haplotype inference (PHI) problem is solved to infer haplotype data from genotype data for a population. This paper investigates the PHI problem based on the pure parsimony criterion (HIPP), which seeks the minimum number of distinct haplotypes to infer a given genotype data. We analyze the mathematical structure and properties for the HIPP problem, propose techniques to reduce the given genotype data into an equivalent one of much smaller size, and analyze the relations of genotype data using a compatible graph. Based on the mathematical properties in the compatible graph, we propose a maximal clique heuristic to obtain an upper bound, and a new polynomial-sized integer linear programming formulation to obtain a lower bound for the HIPP problem. PMID:21354185

  15. Validation analysis of probabilistic models of dietary exposure to food additives.

    PubMed

    Gilsenan, M B; Thompson, R L; Lambe, J; Gibney, M J

    2003-10-01

    The validity of a range of simple conceptual models designed specifically for the estimation of food additive intakes using probabilistic analysis was assessed. Modelled intake estimates that fell below traditional conservative point estimates of intake and above 'true' additive intakes (calculated from a reference database at brand level) were considered to be in a valid region. Models were developed for 10 food additives by combining food intake data, the probability of an additive being present in a food group and additive concentration data. Food intake and additive concentration data were entered as raw data or as a lognormal distribution, and the probability of an additive being present was entered based on the per cent brands or the per cent eating occasions within a food group that contained an additive. Since the three model components assumed two possible modes of input, the validity of eight (2(3)) model combinations was assessed. All model inputs were derived from the reference database. An iterative approach was employed in which the validity of individual model components was assessed first, followed by validation of full conceptual models. While the distribution of intake estimates from models fell below conservative intakes, which assume that the additive is present at maximum permitted levels (MPLs) in all foods in which it is permitted, intake estimates were not consistently above 'true' intakes. These analyses indicate the need for more complex models for the estimation of food additive intakes using probabilistic analysis. Such models should incorporate information on market share and/or brand loyalty. PMID:14555358

  16. Modulative effects of COMT haplotype on age-related associations with brain morphology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Annie; Qiu, Anqi

    2016-06-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), located on chromosome 22q11.2, encodes an enzyme critical for dopamine flux in the prefrontal cortex. Genetic variants of COMT have been suggested to functionally manipulate prefrontal morphology and function in healthy adults. This study aims to investigate modulative roles of individuals COMT SNPs (rs737865, val158met, rs165599) and its haplotypes in age-related brain morphology using an Asian sample with 174 adults aged from 21 to 80 years. We showed an age-related decline in cortical thickness of the dorsal visual pathway, including the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, bilateral angular gyrus, right superior frontal cortex, and age-related shape compression in the basal ganglia as a function of the genotypes of the individual COMT SNPs, especially COMT val158met. Using haplotype trend regression analysis, COMT haplotype probabilities were estimated and further revealed an age-related decline in cortical thickness in the default mode network (DMN), including the posterior cingulate, precuneus, supramarginal and paracentral cortex, and the ventral visual system, including the occipital cortex and left inferior temporal cortex, as a function of the COMT haplotype. Our results provided new evidence on an antagonistic pleiotropic effect in COMT, suggesting that genetically programmed neural benefits in early life may have a potential bearing towards neural susceptibility in later life. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2068-2082, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26920810

  17. A class representative model for Pure Parsimony Haplotyping under uncertain data.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Daniele; Labbé, Martine; Porretta, Luciano

    2011-01-01

    The Pure Parsimony Haplotyping (PPH) problem is a NP-hard combinatorial optimization problem that consists of finding the minimum number of haplotypes necessary to explain a given set of genotypes. PPH has attracted more and more attention in recent years due to its importance in analysis of many fine-scale genetic data. Its application fields range from mapping complex disease genes to inferring population histories, passing through designing drugs, functional genomics and pharmacogenetics. In this article we investigate, for the first time, a recent version of PPH called the Pure Parsimony Haplotype problem under Uncertain Data (PPH-UD). This version mainly arises when the input genotypes are not accurate, i.e., when some single nucleotide polymorphisms are missing or affected by errors. We propose an exact approach to solution of PPH-UD based on an extended version of Catanzaro et al.[1] class representative model for PPH, currently the state-of-the-art integer programming model for PPH. The model is efficient, accurate, compact, polynomial-sized, easy to implement, solvable with any solver for mixed integer programming, and usable in all those cases for which the parsimony criterion is well suited for haplotype estimation. PMID:21464966

  18. Origins of Wohlfahrtia magnifica in Italy based on the identification of mitochondrial cytochrome b gene haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Marangi, Marianna; Hall, Martin J R; Aitken, Alex; Ready, Paul D; Giangaspero, Annunziata

    2016-02-01

    To identify the geographical origins of larvae of Wohlfahrtia magnifica (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) causing myiasis of sheep in Italy, comparative DNA sequence analysis of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene was performed, based on gene fragments amplified by PCR from genomic DNA isolated from individual specimens. DNA extractions of 19 larvae from Lazio, Molise, Puglia, and Sicilia generated 17 readable sequences homologous to 2 haplotypes, either CB_magn01 or CB_magn02; DNA extracts from 4 adult flies from Calabria (reared from larvae) produced 4 readable sequences belonging to the haplotype CB_magn01. The two haplotypes found represent both the East and West phylogenetic lineages of W. magnifica, which is consistent with the species' arrival from central/southeast Europe (East lineage) and/or from southwest Europe/northwest Africa (West lineage). This is the first report of the sympatric occurrence of the two lineages, which could have resulted from natural or human-assisted dispersal. Polymorphic nuclear loci will have to be characterized in order to explain the origins and lack of mitochondrial haplotype diversity of this pest in Italy, where it poses increasing veterinary problems. PMID:26453092

  19. Concurrent Whole-Genome Haplotyping and Copy-Number Profiling of Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zamani Esteki, Masoud; Dimitriadou, Eftychia; Mateiu, Ligia; Melotte, Cindy; Van der Aa, Niels; Kumar, Parveen; Das, Rakhi; Theunis, Koen; Cheng, Jiqiu; Legius, Eric; Moreau, Yves; Debrock, Sophie; D’Hooghe, Thomas; Verdyck, Pieter; De Rycke, Martine; Sermon, Karen; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Voet, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Methods for haplotyping and DNA copy-number typing of single cells are paramount for studying genomic heterogeneity and enabling genetic diagnosis. Before analyzing the DNA of a single cell by microarray or next-generation sequencing, a whole-genome amplification (WGA) process is required, but it substantially distorts the frequency and composition of the cell’s alleles. As a consequence, haplotyping methods suffer from error-prone discrete SNP genotypes (AA, AB, BB) and DNA copy-number profiling remains difficult because true DNA copy-number aberrations have to be discriminated from WGA artifacts. Here, we developed a single-cell genome analysis method that reconstructs genome-wide haplotype architectures as well as the copy-number and segregational origin of those haplotypes by employing phased parental genotypes and deciphering WGA-distorted SNP B-allele fractions via a process we coin haplarithmisis. We demonstrate that the method can be applied as a generic method for preimplantation genetic diagnosis on single cells biopsied from human embryos, enabling diagnosis of disease alleles genome wide as well as numerical and structural chromosomal anomalies. Moreover, meiotic segregation errors can be distinguished from mitotic ones. PMID:25983246

  20. A Class Representative Model for Pure Parsimony Haplotyping under Uncertain Data

    PubMed Central

    Catanzaro, Daniele; Labbé, Martine; Porretta, Luciano

    2011-01-01

    The Pure Parsimony Haplotyping (PPH) problem is a NP-hard combinatorial optimization problem that consists of finding the minimum number of haplotypes necessary to explain a given set of genotypes. PPH has attracted more and more attention in recent years due to its importance in analysis of many fine-scale genetic data. Its application fields range from mapping complex disease genes to inferring population histories, passing through designing drugs, functional genomics and pharmacogenetics. In this article we investigate, for the first time, a recent version of PPH called the Pure Parsimony Haplotype problem under Uncertain Data (PPH-UD). This version mainly arises when the input genotypes are not accurate, i.e., when some single nucleotide polymorphisms are missing or affected by errors. We propose an exact approach to solution of PPH-UD based on an extended version of Catanzaro et al. [1] class representative model for PPH, currently the state-of-the-art integer programming model for PPH. The model is efficient, accurate, compact, polynomial-sized, easy to implement, solvable with any solver for mixed integer programming, and usable in all those cases for which the parsimony criterion is well suited for haplotype estimation. PMID:21464966

  1. CD36 haplotypes are associated with lipid profile in normal-weight subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemia is a common metabolic disorder that may result from abnormalities in the synthesis, processing and catabolism of lipoprotein particles. Disorders of lipoprotein concentrations and elevated concentration of oxidized lipoproteins (oxLDL) are risk factors in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). CD36 plays an important role in lipid metabolism and polymorphisms in the CD36 gene are related to cardiovascular risk factors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether there is an association between genotypes and haplotypes of five polymorphisms in the CD36 gene with lipid levels in young normal-weight subjects. Methods A total of 232 unrelated subjects with normal-weight of 18 to 25 years old (157 women and 75 men) were randomly selected. The lipid profile and glucose levels were measured by enzymatic colorimetric assays. Genotyping of the polymorphisms -33137A/G (rs1984112), -31118G/A (rs1761667), -22674 T/C (rs2151916), 27645 Ins/Del (rs3840546) and 30294G/C (rs1049673) in the CD36 receptor gene was performed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism, linkage disequilibrium analysis among the five polymorphisms and an analysis of haplotype were estimated. Results HDL-C levels was lower in men than in women (P = 0.03). However, the median oxLDL levels in men was higher than in women (P = 0.05). There was no significant difference in the levels of TC, TG, LDL-C and glucose (P > 0.05). HDL-C levels were lower in the subjects with TC genotype of polymorphism -22674 T/C (P = 0.04), but the carriers of TT genotype had lower oxLDL levels (P = 0.01). LDL-C levels were higher in young carriers of CC genotype for 30294G/C polymorphism than non-carriers (P = 0.03). The subjects carrying the AATDC haplotype had 3.2 times presumably higher risk of LDL-C > 100 mg/dL than the carrying the AGTIG haplotype (P = 0.02), whereas the subjects carrying the AATIC haplotype had 2.0 times presumably

  2. PAX6 Haplotypes Are Associated with High Myopia in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bo; Yap, Maurice K. H.; Leung, Kim Hung; Ng, Po Wah; Fung, Wai Yan; Lam, Wai Wa; Gu, Yang-shun; Yip, Shea Ping

    2011-01-01

    Background The paired box 6 (PAX6) gene is considered as a master gene for eye development. Linkage of myopia to the PAX6 region on chromosome 11p13 was shown in several studies, but the results for association between myopia and PAX6 were inconsistent so far. Methodology/Principal Findings We genotyped 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PAX6 gene and its regulatory regions in an initial study for 300 high myopia cases and 300 controls (Group 1), and successfully replicated the positive results with another independent group of 299 high myopia cases and 299 controls (Group 2). Five SNPs were genotyped in the replication study. The spherical equivalent of subjects with high myopia was ≤−8.0 dioptres. The PLINK package was used for genetic data analysis. No association was found between each of the SNPs and high myopia. However, exhaustive sliding-window haplotype analysis highlighted an important role for rs12421026 because haplotypes containing this SNP were found to be associated with high myopia. The most significant results were given by the 4-SNP haplotype window consisting of rs2071754, rs3026393, rs1506 and rs12421026 (P = 3.54×10−10, 4.06×10−11 and 1.56×10−18 for Group 1, Group 2 and Combined Group, respectively) and the 3-SNP haplotype window composed of rs3026393, rs1506 and rs12421026 (P = 5.48×10−10, 7.93×10−12 and 6.28×10−23 for the three respective groups). The results remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons by permutations. The associated haplotyes found in a previous study were also successfully replicated in this study. Conclusions/Significance PAX6 haplotypes are associated with susceptibility to the development of high myopia in Chinese. The PAX6 locus plays a role in high myopia. PMID:21589860

  3. Gender-Dimorphic Impact of PXR Genotype and Haplotype on Hepatotoxicity During Antituberculosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jann Yuan; Tsai, Ching Hui; Lee, Yungling Leo; Lee, Li Na; Hsu, Chia Lin; Chang, Hsiu Ching; Chen, Jong Ming; Hsu, Cheng An; Yu, Chong Jen; Yang, Pan Chyr

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Women have a higher risk of drug-induced hepatotoxicity during antituberculosis treatment (HATT) than men. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype and derived haplotype of pregnane X receptor (PXR) gene, which could regulate the expression of phase I enzyme cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, had a sex-specific influence on the risk of HATT. Six SNPs of the PXR gene were sequenced. Genotypes and haplotypes of the PXR SNPs, and other potential risk factors for HATT were compared between pulmonary TB patients with and those without HATT. HATT was defined as an increase in serum transaminase level >3 times the upper limit of normal (ULN) with symptoms, or >5 times ULN without symptoms. We performed the study in a derivation and a validation cohort. Among the 355 patients with pulmonary TB in the derivation cohort, 70 (19.7%) developed HATT. Logistic regression analysis revealed the risk of HATT increased in female genotype AA at rs2461823 (OR: 6.87 [2.55–18.52]) and decreased in female genotype AA at rs7643645 (OR: 0.14 [0.02–1.02]) of PXR gene. Haplotype analysis showed that female h001101 (OR: 2.30 [1.22–4.32]) and female h000110 (OR: 2.25 [1.08–4.69]) haplotype were associated with increased HATT risk. The identified predictors were also significantly associated with female HATT risk among the 182 patients in the validation cohort. Two PXR SNP genotypes and 2 haplotypes influenced the risk of HATT only in females. The PXR SNP showed a sex-specific impact that contributed to an increased HATT risk in females.

  4. Identity of the mtDNA haplotype(s) of Phytophthora infestans in historical specimens from the Irish potato famine.

    PubMed

    May, Kimberley Jane; Ristaino, Jean Beagle

    2004-05-01

    The mtDNA haplotypes of the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans present in dried potato and tomato leaves from herbarium specimens collected during the Irish potato famine and later in the 19th and early 20th century were identified. A 100 bp fragment of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) specific for P. infestans was amplified from 90% of the specimens (n = 186), confirming infection by P. infestans. Primers were designed that distinguish the extant mtDNA haplotypes. 86% percent of the herbarium specimens from historic epidemics were infected with the Ia mtDNA haplotype. Two mid-20th century potato leaves from Ecuador (1967) and Bolivia (1944) were infected with the Ib mtDNA haplotype of the pathogen. Both the Ia and IIb haplotypes were found in specimens collected in Nicaragua in the 1950s. The data suggest that the Ia haplotype of P. infestans was responsible for the historic epidemics during the 19th century in the UK, Europe, and the USA. The Ib mtDNA haplotype of the pathogen was dispersed later in the early 20th century from Bolivia and Ecuador. Multiple haplotypes were present outside Mexico in the 1940s-60s, indicating that pathogen diversity was greater than previously believed. PMID:15229999

  5. Multivariate qualitative analysis of banned additives in food safety using surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shixuan; Xie, Wanyi; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Liqun; Wang, Yunxia; Liu, Xiaoling; Liu, Yulong; Du, Chunlei

    2015-02-01

    A novel strategy which combines iteratively cubic spline fitting baseline correction method with discriminant partial least squares qualitative analysis is employed to analyze the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy of banned food additives, such as Sudan I dye and Rhodamine B in food, Malachite green residues in aquaculture fish. Multivariate qualitative analysis methods, using the combination of spectra preprocessing iteratively cubic spline fitting (ICSF) baseline correction with principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant partial least squares (DPLS) classification respectively, are applied to investigate the effectiveness of SERS spectroscopy for predicting the class assignments of unknown banned food additives. PCA cannot be used to predict the class assignments of unknown samples. However, the DPLS classification can discriminate the class assignment of unknown banned additives using the information of differences in relative intensities. The results demonstrate that SERS spectroscopy combined with ICSF baseline correction method and exploratory analysis methodology DPLS classification can be potentially used for distinguishing the banned food additives in field of food safety.

  6. Multivariate qualitative analysis of banned additives in food safety using surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    He, Shixuan; Xie, Wanyi; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Liqun; Wang, Yunxia; Liu, Xiaoling; Liu, Yulong; Du, Chunlei

    2015-02-25

    A novel strategy which combines iteratively cubic spline fitting baseline correction method with discriminant partial least squares qualitative analysis is employed to analyze the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy of banned food additives, such as Sudan I dye and Rhodamine B in food, Malachite green residues in aquaculture fish. Multivariate qualitative analysis methods, using the combination of spectra preprocessing iteratively cubic spline fitting (ICSF) baseline correction with principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant partial least squares (DPLS) classification respectively, are applied to investigate the effectiveness of SERS spectroscopy for predicting the class assignments of unknown banned food additives. PCA cannot be used to predict the class assignments of unknown samples. However, the DPLS classification can discriminate the class assignment of unknown banned additives using the information of differences in relative intensities. The results demonstrate that SERS spectroscopy combined with ICSF baseline correction method and exploratory analysis methodology DPLS classification can be potentially used for distinguishing the banned food additives in field of food safety. PMID:25300041

  7. 7 CFR 91.38 - Additional fees for appeal of analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional fees for appeal of analysis. 91.38 Section 91.38 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... for laboratory service that appears in this paragraph. The new fiscal year for Science and...

  8. 7 CFR 91.38 - Additional fees for appeal of analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional fees for appeal of analysis. 91.38 Section 91.38 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... for laboratory service that appears in this paragraph. The new fiscal year for Science and...

  9. Rapid growth of a Eurasian haplotype of Phragmites australis in a restored brackish marsh in Louisiana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, R.J.; Travis, S.E.; Sikes, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    While numerous studies have documented patterns of invasion by non-indigenous plant species, few have considered the invasive properties of non-native genotypes of native species. Characteristics associated with specific genotypes, such as tolerance to disturbance, may mistakenly be applied to an entire species in the absence of genetic information, which consequently may affect management decisions. We report here on the incidence and growth of an introduced lineage of Phragmites australis in the Gulf of Mexico coastal zone of Louisiana. P. australis was collected from nine separate locations for inclusion in a series of growth experiments. Chloroplast DNA analysis indicated that specimens collected from four locations in the Mississippi River Delta represented the introduced Eurasian haplotype; the remainder represented the gulf coast haplotype. Three distinct genotypes, or clones, were identified within each haplotype via analysis using amplified fragment length polymorphisms, which also revealed reduced genetic diversity of the gulf coast clones compared to the Eurasian clones. Clones of each haplotype were planted along with three other native macrophytes at similar densities in a restored brackish marsh and monitored for growth. After 14 months, the Eurasian haplotype had spread vegetatively to cover about 82% of the experimental plots, more than four times the coverage (18%) of the gulf coast haplotype. Thus, the use of P. australis plantings for wetland restoration should consider the genetic lineage of plants used since our results indicate the potential of the Eurasian haplotype to grow rapidly at newly restored sites. This rapid growth may limit the establishment of more slowly growing native species. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  10. Apolipoprotein E Variation at the Sequence Haplotype Level: Implications for the Origin and Maintenance of a Major Human Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Fullerton, Stephanie M.; Clark, Andrew G.; Weiss, Kenneth M.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Taylor, Scott L.; Stengård, Jari H.; Salomaa, Veikko; Vartiainen, Erkki; Perola, Markus; Boerwinkle, Eric; Sing, Charles F.

    2000-01-01

    Three common protein isoforms of apolipoprotein E (apoE), encoded by the ε2, ε3, and ε4 alleles of the APOE gene, differ in their association with cardiovascular and Alzheimer's disease risk. To gain a better understanding of the genetic variation underlying this important polymorphism, we identified sequence haplotype variation in 5.5 kb of genomic DNA encompassing the whole of the APOE locus and adjoining flanking regions in 96 individuals from four populations: blacks from Jackson, MS (n=48 chromosomes), Mayans from Campeche, Mexico (n=48), Finns from North Karelia, Finland (n=48), and non-Hispanic whites from Rochester, MN (n=48). In the region sequenced, 23 sites varied (21 single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs, 1 diallelic indel, and 1 multiallelic indel). The 22 diallelic sites defined 31 distinct haplotypes in the sample. The estimate of nucleotide diversity (site-specific heterozygosity) for the locus was 0.0005±0.0003. Sequence analysis of the chimpanzee APOE gene showed that it was most closely related to human ε4-type haplotypes, differing from the human consensus sequence at 67 synonymous (54 substitutions and 13 indels) and 9 nonsynonymous fixed positions. The evolutionary history of allelic divergence within humans was inferred from the pattern of haplotype relationships. This analysis suggests that haplotypes defining the ε3 and ε2 alleles are derived from the ancestral ε4s and that the ε3 group of haplotypes have increased in frequency, relative to ε4s, in the past 200,000 years. Substantial heterogeneity exists within all three classes of sequence haplotypes, and there are important interpopulation differences in the sequence variation underlying the protein isoforms that may be relevant to interpreting conflicting reports of phenotypic associations with variation in the common protein isoforms. PMID:10986041

  11. Functional FEN1 genetic variants and haplotypes are associated with glioma risk.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Dong; Zhang, Xiaojiao; Qiu, Xiao-Guang; Li, Jinpeng; Yuan, Qipeng; Jiang, Tao; Yang, Ming

    2013-01-01

    As a tumor suppressor, FEN1 plays an essential role in keeping genomic instability and preventing tumorigenesis. There are two functional genetic variants (-69G>A and 4150G>T) in the FEN1 gene, which have been associated with DNA damage levels in coke-oven workers as well as risks of lung cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, esophageal cancer, gastric cancer and colorectal cancer in general populations. However, it is still unknown how these polymorphisms and their haplotypes are associated with glioma risk. Therefore, we investigated the role of these polymorphisms in glioma development using a case-control design in a Chinese population. The impact of the haplotypes constructed by these two polymorphisms on glioma risk was also examined. It was observed that the FEN1-69GG or 4150GG genotype were significantly associated to increased glioma risk compared with the -69AA or 4150TT genotype [Odds ratios (OR) = 1.87, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.23-2.85, P = 0.003; or OR = 1.87, 95 % CI = 1.23-2.84, P = 0.003). The associations were more pronounced among female subjects (For -69AG or GG genotype: OR = 2.35, 95 % CI = 1.22-4.52; for 4150TG or GG genotype: OR = 2.33, 95 % CI = 1.21-4.48) and patients with grade 1 or 2 disease (For -69AG or GG genotype: OR = 2.21, 95 % CI = 1.20-4.05; for 4150TG or GG genotype: OR = 2.45, 95 % CI = 1.31-4.58). Additionally, the G(-69)G(4150) haplotype was also significantly associated with increased glioma risk compared with the A(-69)T(4150) haplotype. Our results suggest that FEN1 polymorphisms and haplotypes are associated with glioma risk. PMID:23184144

  12. Stimulation of terrestrial ecosystem carbon storage by nitrogen addition: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yue, Kai; Peng, Yan; Peng, Changhui; Yang, Wanqin; Peng, Xin; Wu, Fuzhong

    2016-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition alters the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle, which is likely to feed back to further climate change. However, how the overall terrestrial ecosystem C pools and fluxes respond to N addition remains unclear. By synthesizing data from multiple terrestrial ecosystems, we quantified the response of C pools and fluxes to experimental N addition using a comprehensive meta-analysis method. Our results showed that N addition significantly stimulated soil total C storage by 5.82% ([2.47%, 9.27%], 95% CI, the same below) and increased the C contents of the above- and below-ground parts of plants by 25.65% [11.07%, 42.12%] and 15.93% [6.80%, 25.85%], respectively. Furthermore, N addition significantly increased aboveground net primary production by 52.38% [40.58%, 65.19%] and litterfall by 14.67% [9.24%, 20.38%] at a global scale. However, the C influx from the plant litter to the soil through litter decomposition and the efflux from the soil due to microbial respiration and soil respiration showed insignificant responses to N addition. Overall, our meta-analysis suggested that N addition will increase soil C storage and plant C in both above- and below-ground parts, indicating that terrestrial ecosystems might act to strengthen as a C sink under increasing N deposition. PMID:26813078

  13. Stimulation of terrestrial ecosystem carbon storage by nitrogen addition: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Kai; Peng, Yan; Peng, Changhui; Yang, Wanqin; Peng, Xin; Wu, Fuzhong

    2016-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition alters the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle, which is likely to feed back to further climate change. However, how the overall terrestrial ecosystem C pools and fluxes respond to N addition remains unclear. By synthesizing data from multiple terrestrial ecosystems, we quantified the response of C pools and fluxes to experimental N addition using a comprehensive meta-analysis method. Our results showed that N addition significantly stimulated soil total C storage by 5.82% ([2.47%, 9.27%], 95% CI, the same below) and increased the C contents of the above- and below-ground parts of plants by 25.65% [11.07%, 42.12%] and 15.93% [6.80%, 25.85%], respectively. Furthermore, N addition significantly increased aboveground net primary production by 52.38% [40.58%, 65.19%] and litterfall by 14.67% [9.24%, 20.38%] at a global scale. However, the C influx from the plant litter to the soil through litter decomposition and the efflux from the soil due to microbial respiration and soil respiration showed insignificant responses to N addition. Overall, our meta-analysis suggested that N addition will increase soil C storage and plant C in both above- and below-ground parts, indicating that terrestrial ecosystems might act to strengthen as a C sink under increasing N deposition. PMID:26813078

  14. Stimulation of terrestrial ecosystem carbon storage by nitrogen addition: a meta-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Kai; Peng, Yan; Peng, Changhui; Yang, Wanqin; Peng, Xin; Wu, Fuzhong

    2016-01-01

    Elevated nitrogen (N) deposition alters the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle, which is likely to feed back to further climate change. However, how the overall terrestrial ecosystem C pools and fluxes respond to N addition remains unclear. By synthesizing data from multiple terrestrial ecosystems, we quantified the response of C pools and fluxes to experimental N addition using a comprehensive meta-analysis method. Our results showed that N addition significantly stimulated soil total C storage by 5.82% ([2.47%, 9.27%], 95% CI, the same below) and increased the C contents of the above- and below-ground parts of plants by 25.65% [11.07%, 42.12%] and 15.93% [6.80%, 25.85%], respectively. Furthermore, N addition significantly increased aboveground net primary production by 52.38% [40.58%, 65.19%] and litterfall by 14.67% [9.24%, 20.38%] at a global scale. However, the C influx from the plant litter to the soil through litter decomposition and the efflux from the soil due to microbial respiration and soil respiration showed insignificant responses to N addition. Overall, our meta-analysis suggested that N addition will increase soil C storage and plant C in both above- and below-ground parts, indicating that terrestrial ecosystems might act to strengthen as a C sink under increasing N deposition.

  15. On an Additive Semigraphoid Model for Statistical Networks With Application to Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Chun, Hyonho; Zhao, Hongyu

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a nonparametric method for estimating non-gaussian graphical models based on a new statistical relation called additive conditional independence, which is a three-way relation among random vectors that resembles the logical structure of conditional independence. Additive conditional independence allows us to use one-dimensional kernel regardless of the dimension of the graph, which not only avoids the curse of dimensionality but also simplifies computation. It also gives rise to a parallel structure to the gaussian graphical model that replaces the precision matrix by an additive precision operator. The estimators derived from additive conditional independence cover the recently introduced nonparanormal graphical model as a special case, but outperform it when the gaussian copula assumption is violated. We compare the new method with existing ones by simulations and in genetic pathway analysis. PMID:26401064

  16. Analysis of occupational accidents: prevention through the use of additional technical safety measures for machinery

    PubMed Central

    Dźwiarek, Marek; Latała, Agata

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of results of 1035 serious and 341 minor accidents recorded by Poland's National Labour Inspectorate (PIP) in 2005–2011, in view of their prevention by means of additional safety measures applied by machinery users. Since the analysis aimed at formulating principles for the application of technical safety measures, the analysed accidents should bear additional attributes: the type of machine operation, technical safety measures and the type of events causing injuries. The analysis proved that the executed tasks and injury-causing events were closely connected and there was a relation between casualty events and technical safety measures. In the case of tasks consisting of manual feeding and collecting materials, the injuries usually occur because of the rotating motion of tools or crushing due to a closing motion. Numerous accidents also happened in the course of supporting actions, like removing pollutants, correcting material position, cleaning, etc. PMID:26652689

  17. Reducing the matrix effects in chemical analysis: fusion of isotope dilution and standard addition methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliano, Enea; Meija, Juris

    2016-04-01

    The combination of isotope dilution and mass spectrometry has become an ubiquitous tool of chemical analysis. Often perceived as one of the most accurate methods of chemical analysis, it is not without shortcomings. Current isotope dilution equations are not capable of fully addressing one of the key problems encountered in chemical analysis: the possible effect of sample matrix on measured isotope ratios. The method of standard addition does compensate for the effect of sample matrix by making sure that all measured solutions have identical composition. While it is impossible to attain such condition in traditional isotope dilution, we present equations which allow for matrix-matching between all measured solutions by fusion of isotope dilution and standard addition methods.

  18. Analysis of occupational accidents: prevention through the use of additional technical safety measures for machinery.

    PubMed

    Dźwiarek, Marek; Latała, Agata

    2016-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of results of 1035 serious and 341 minor accidents recorded by Poland's National Labour Inspectorate (PIP) in 2005-2011, in view of their prevention by means of additional safety measures applied by machinery users. Since the analysis aimed at formulating principles for the application of technical safety measures, the analysed accidents should bear additional attributes: the type of machine operation, technical safety measures and the type of events causing injuries. The analysis proved that the executed tasks and injury-causing events were closely connected and there was a relation between casualty events and technical safety measures. In the case of tasks consisting of manual feeding and collecting materials, the injuries usually occur because of the rotating motion of tools or crushing due to a closing motion. Numerous accidents also happened in the course of supporting actions, like removing pollutants, correcting material position, cleaning, etc. PMID:26652689

  19. Selection of Genetic Markers for Association Analyses, Using Linkage Disequilibrium and Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhaoling; Zaykin, Dmitri V.; Xu, Chun-Fang; Wagner, Michael; Ehm, Margaret G.

    2003-01-01

    The genotyping of closely spaced single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers frequently yields highly correlated data, owing to extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD) between markers. The extent of LD varies widely across the genome and drives the number of frequent haplotypes observed in small regions. Several studies have illustrated the possibility that LD or haplotype data could be used to select a subset of SNPs that optimize the information retained in a genomic region while reducing the genotyping effort and simplifying the analysis. We propose a method based on the spectral decomposition of the matrices of pairwise LD between markers, and we select markers on the basis of their contributions to the total genetic variation. We also modify Clayton’s “haplotype tagging SNP” selection method, which utilizes haplotype information. For both methods, we propose sliding window–based algorithms that allow the methods to be applied to large chromosomal regions. Our procedures require genotype information about a small number of individuals for an initial set of SNPs and selection of an optimum subset of SNPs that could be efficiently genotyped on larger numbers of samples while retaining most of the genetic variation in samples. We identify suitable parameter combinations for the procedures, and we show that a sample size of 50–100 individuals achieves consistent results in studies of simulated data sets in linkage equilibrium and LD. When applied to experimental data sets, both procedures were similarly effective at reducing the genotyping requirement while maintaining the genetic information content throughout the regions. We also show that haplotype-association results that Hosking et al. obtained near CYP2D6 were almost identical before and after marker selection. PMID:12796855

  20. Introgression of a rare haplotype from Southeastern Africa to breed California blackeyes with larger seeds

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Mitchell R.; Huynh, Bao-Lam; Roberts, Philip A.; Close, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Seed size distinguishes most crops from their wild relatives and is an important quality trait for the grain legume cowpea. In order to breed cowpea varieties with larger seeds we introgressed a rare haplotype associated with large seeds at the Css-1 locus from an African buff seed type cultivar, IT82E-18 (18.5 g/100 seeds), into a blackeye seed type cultivar, CB27 (22 g/100 seed). Four recombinant inbred lines derived from these two parents were chosen for marker-assisted breeding based on SNP genotyping with a goal of stacking large seed haplotypes into a CB27 background. Foreground and background selection were performed during two cycles of backcrossing based on genome-wide SNP markers. The average seed size of introgression lines homozygous for haplotypes associated with large seeds was 28.7g/100 seed and 24.8 g/100 seed for cycles 1 and 2, respectively. One cycle 1 introgression line with desirable seed quality was selfed for two generations to make families with very large seeds (28–35 g/100 seeds). Field-based performance trials helped identify breeding lines that not only have large seeds but are also desirable in terms of yield, maturity, and plant architecture when compared to industry standards. A principal component analysis was used to explore the relationships between the parents relative to a core set of landraces and improved varieties based on high-density SNP data. The geographic distribution of haplotypes at the Css-1 locus suggest the haplotype associated with large seeds is unique to accessions collected from Southeastern Africa. Therefore this quantitative trait locus has a strong potential to develop larger seeded varieties for other growing regions which is demonstrated in this work using a California pedigree. PMID:25852699

  1. A specific haplotype at the INS/TH loci confers high susceptibility to IDDM

    SciTech Connect

    Doria, A.; Lee, J.; Warram, J.H.; Krolewski, A.S.

    1994-09-01

    Polymorphism at the insulin locus (INS) have consistently been found to be associated with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). We investigated whether a combined analysis of the INS locus with the 5{prime} flanking tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) locus increases the specificity of this association. A group of 308 Caucasians (201 IDDM CASES and 107 non-diabetic CONTROLS) were genotyped for the two-allele markers, INS/1127PstI and TH/Rsal, by PCR-DGGE. INS/1127PstI allele 2 was more common in CASES than CONTROLS (0.84 vs. 0.68, p<0.0001). The relative risk of IDDM for homozygotes for this allele (2/2) was 3.3 in comparison with the other genotypes (95% CI 2.0-5.3). Similarly, homozygotes for allele 2 of TH/RsaI, which is in moderate linkage disequilibrium with INS/1127PstI ({Delta} = 0.45), had a relative risk of IDDM of 2.5 (1.6-4.2). By haplotyping individuals for the two markers, INS/1127PstI 2/2 genotypes were subdivided on the basis of their INS-TH haplotypes. The excess of INS/1127PstI 2/2 homozygotes in IDDM cases was mainly contributed by homozygotes for the INS-TH haplotype 22. Thus, among hapotypes carrying INS/1127 PstI allele 2, the INS-TH 22 haplotype is a more specific marker of IDDM risk than the INS-TH 21 haplotype. The association of the INS-TH 22/22 genotype with IDDM was independent of HLA, being similar among carriers and non-carriers of IDDM-predisposing DQ{beta} alleles 0302 and 0201-DR3.

  2. Enlarged striatal volume in adults with ADHD carrying the 9-6 haplotype of the dopamine transporter gene DAT1.

    PubMed

    Onnink, A Marten H; Franke, Barbara; van Hulzen, Kimm; Zwiers, Marcel P; Mostert, Jeanette C; Schene, Aart H; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hartman, Catharina A; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Kan, Cornelis C; Buitelaar, Jan; Hoogman, Martine

    2016-08-01

    The dopamine transporter gene, DAT1 (SLC6A3), has been studied extensively as a candidate gene for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Different alleles of variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs) in this gene have been associated with childhood ADHD (10/10 genotype and haplotype 10-6) and adult ADHD (haplotype 9-6). This suggests a differential association depending on age, and a role of DAT1 in modulating the ADHD phenotype over the lifespan. The DAT1 gene may mediate susceptibility to ADHD through effects on striatal volumes, where it is most highly expressed. In an attempt to clarify its mode of action, we examined the effect of three DAT1 alleles (10/10 genotype, and the haplotypes 10-6 and 9-6) on bilateral striatal volumes (nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, and putamen) derived from structural magnetic resonance imaging scans using automated tissue segmentation. Analyses were performed separately in three cohorts with cross-sectional MRI data, a childhood/adolescent sample (NeuroIMAGE, 301 patients with ADHD and 186 healthy participants) and two adult samples (IMpACT, 118 patients with ADHD and 111 healthy participants; BIG, 1718 healthy participants). Regression analyses revealed that in the IMpACT cohort, and not in the other cohorts, carriers of the DAT1 adult ADHD risk haplotype 9-6 had 5.9 % larger striatum volume relative to participants not carrying this haplotype. This effect varied by diagnostic status, with the risk haplotype affecting striatal volumes only in patients with ADHD. An explorative analysis in the cohorts combined (N = 2434) showed a significant gene-by-diagnosis-by-age interaction suggesting that carriership of the 9-6 haplotype predisposes to a slower age-related decay of striatal volume specific to the patient group. This study emphasizes the need of a lifespan approach in genetic studies of ADHD. PMID:26935821

  3. DNA damage in leukocytes of sickle cell anemia patients is associated with hydroxyurea therapy and with HBB*S haplotype.

    PubMed

    da Silva Rocha, Lilianne Brito; Dias Elias, Darcielle Bruna; Barbosa, Maritza Cavalcante; Bandeira, Izabel Cristina Justino; Gonçalves, Romélia Pinheiro

    2012-12-12

    Hydroxyurea (HU) is the primary pharmacologic agent for preventing the complications and improving the quality of life of sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients. Although HU has been associated with an increased risk of leukemia in some patients with myeloproliferative disorders, the mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of HU has not been established. This study used the alkaline comet assay to investigate DNA damage in peripheral blood leukocytes from 41 individuals with SCA treated with HU (SCAHU) and from 26 normal individuals. The presence of HbS and the analysis of the haplotypes of the beta S gene cluster were done by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The damage index (DI) in the SCAHU group was significantly higher than in controls (p<0.001). Neither gender nor age was associated with DNA damage in controls or SCAHU individuals. Among the SCAHU individuals, DI was significantly influenced by length of HU treatment (p=0.0039) and BMI (p=0.001). Individuals with length of HU treatment≥20 months and BMI≤20kg/m(2) had a significantly greater DI than those with length of HU treatment<20 months and BMI>20kg/m(2). No significant influence of mean HU dose was observed on DI (p=0.950). However, individuals who received a mean HU dose≥20mg/kg showed a higher DI than those who received less. Furthermore, an association was observed between DI damage and HBB*S gene haplotypes. DI values for the Bantu/Bantu haplotype was greater when compared to the Benin/Benin haplotype; and the Bantu/Benin haplotype had a DI lower than the Bantu/Bantu haplotype and greater than the Benin/Benin haplotype. Our results show that DNA damage in sickle cell anemia is associated not only with treatment with HU but also with genotype. PMID:22918118

  4. Haplotypes of the D{sub 2} dopamine receptor gene in higher and lower alcohol consuming subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Ritchie, T.; Fitch, R.J.

    1994-09-01

    There is now a substantial body of evidence which indicates that the TaqI A D{sub 2} dopamine receptor (DRD2) minor (Al) allele is associated with alcoholism. In the present study, TaqI A DRD2 alleles and haplotypes of the DRD2 gene were determined in 307 Caucasian (non-Hispanic) subjects. These haplotypes are a combination of closely linked alleles in intron 6 and exon 7 and yield three haplotypes (1, 2, and 4) and six genotypes in Caucasians. The sample under study consisted of 54 individuals who consumed 200 or more alcoholic drinks per month (Group A) and 248 persons who drank less than 200 drinks per month (Group B). The results showed that the DRD2 A1 allele was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in Group A (48.2%) compared to group B (32.7%). Haplotype analysis in the same sample showed Group A having a significantly higher (P < 0.007) prevalence (28.4%) of the 1 haplotype than those in group B (14.0%). The results indicate both these genetic markers in the DRD2 gene are associated with higher alcohol consumption; however, the 1 haplotype appears to be a better marker for this behavior. In conclusion, haplotypes within the DRD2 gene and TaqI A DRD2 alleles (located 20-Kb from the 3{prime} coding region of this gene) are both associated with heavier alcohol consumption. These findings add further evidence to the importance of the gene in alcohol-related behaviors.

  5. Annexin A5 Promoter Haplotype M2 Is Not a Risk Factor for Recurrent Pregnancy Loss in Northern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Rull, Kristiina; Christiansen, Ole B.; Nielsen, Henriette S.; Laan, Maris

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Annexin A5 is an essential component of placental integrity that may potentially mediate susceptibility to phenotypes of compromised pregnancy. A promoter haplotype termed M2 of the coding gene ANXA5 has been implicated in various pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia and recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL), however with inconclusive results. Study subjects and methods A retrospective case-control study combining resequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was undertaken in 313 women with unexplained RPL and 214 fertile women from Estonia and Denmark to estimate the RPL disease risk of the M2 haplotype in Northern Europe. Comparative prevalence of the studied ANXA5 genetic variants in human populations was estimated based on the 1000 Genomes Project (n = 675, whole-genome sequencing data) and the KORA S3 500K dataset of South German samples (n = 1644, genome-wide genotyping data). Results Minor allele frequency of common polymorphisms in ANXA5 promoter was up to two-fold lower among Estonian RPL subjects than fertile controls. The M2 haplotype was not associated with RPL and a trend for decreased prevalence was observed among RPL patients compared to controls both in Estonia (8.1% vs 15.2%, respectively) and Denmark (9.7% vs 12.6%). The high M2 prevalence in fertile controls was consistent with estimations for European and East Asian populations (9.6%-16.0%). Conclusions This study cautions to consider the M2 haplotype as a deterministic factor in early pregnancy success because: i) no RPL disease risk was associated with the haplotype in two clinically well-characterized RPL case-control study samples, ii) high prevalence of the haplotype among fertile controls and world-wide populations is inconsistent with the previously proposed severe impact on early pregnancy success, iii) weak impact of M2 haplotype on the production of ANXA5 protein has been established by others. PMID:26135579

  6. "Extended" A1, B8, DR3 haplotype shows remarkable linkage disequilibrium but is similar to nonextended haplotypes in terms of diabetes risk.

    PubMed

    Ide, Akane; Babu, Sunanda R; Robles, David T; Wang, Tianbao; Erlich, Henry A; Bugawan, Teodorica L; Rewers, Marian; Fain, Pamela R; Eisenbarth, George S

    2005-06-01

    To evaluate potential differential diabetes risk of DR3 haplotypes we have evaluated class I alleles as well as two microsatellites previously associated with differential risk associated with DR3 haplotypes. We found that over one-third of patient DR3 chromosomes consisted of an extended DR3 haplotype, from DQ2 to D6S2223 (DQ2, DR3, D6S273-143, MIC-A5.1, HLA-B8, HLA-Cw7, HLA-A1, and D6S2223-177) with an identical extended haplotype in controls. The extended haplotype was present more frequently (35.1% of autoimmune-associated DR3 haplotypes, 39.4% of control DR3 haplotypes) than other haplotypes (no other haplotype >5% of DR3 haplotypes) and remarkably conserved, but it was not transmitted from parents to affected children more frequently than nonconserved DR3-bearing haplotypes. This suggests that if all alleles are truly identical for the major A1, B8, DR3 haplotype (between A1 and DR3), with different alleles on nonconserved haplotypes without differential diabetes risk, then in this region of the genome DR3-DQ2 may be the primary polymorphisms of common haplotypes contributing to diabetes risk. PMID:15919812

  7. Global patterns of variation in allele and haplotype frequencies and linkage disequilibrium across the CYP2E1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Mukherjee, Namita; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Khaliq, Shagufta; Mohyuddin, Aisha; Mehdi, S. Qasim; Speed, William C.; Kidd, Judith R.; Kidd, Kenneth K.

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2E1, gene symbol CYP2E1, is one of a family of enzymes with a central role in activating and detoxifying xenobiotics and endogenous compounds. Genetic variation at this gene has been reported in different human populations, and some association studies have reported increased risk for cancers and other diseases. To the best of our knowledge, multi-SNP haplotypes and linkage disequilibrium (LD) have not been systematically studied for CYP2E1 in multiple populations. Haplotypes can greatly increase the power both to identify patterns of genetic variation relevant for gene expression as well as to detect disease-related susceptibility mutations. We present frequency and LD data and analyses for 11 polymorphisms and their haplotypes that we have studied on over 2,600 individuals from 50 human population samples representing the major geographical regions of the world. The diverse patterns of haplotype variation found in the different populations we have studied show that ethnicity may be an important variable helping to explain inconsistencies that have been reported by association studies. More studies clearly are needed of the variants we have studied, especially those in the 5′ region, such as the VNTR, as well as studies of additional polymorphisms known for this gene to establish evidence relating any systematic differences in gene expression that exist to the haplotypes at this gene. PMID:18663376

  8. The Effect of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Marker Selection on Patterns of Haplotype Blocks and Haplotype Frequency Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Nothnagel, Michael; Rohde, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    The definition of haplotype blocks of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has been proposed so that the haplotypes can be used as markers in association studies and to efficiently describe human genetic variation. The International Haplotype Map (HapMap) project to construct a comprehensive catalog of haplotypic variation in humans is underway. However, a number of factors have already been shown to influence the definition of blocks, including the population studied and the sample SNP density. Here, we examine the effect that marker selection has on the definition of blocks and the pattern of haplotypes by using comparable but complementary SNP sets and a number of block definition methods in various genomic regions and populations that were provided by the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project. We find that the chosen SNP set has a profound effect on the block-covered sequence and block borders, even at high marker densities. Our results question the very concept of discrete haplotype blocks and the possibility of generalizing block findings from the HapMap project. We comparatively apply the block-free tagging-SNP approach and discuss both the haplotype approach and the tagging-SNP approach as means to efficiently catalog genetic variation. PMID:16380910

  9. Neutron-activation analysis by standard addition and solvent extraction Determination of traces of antimony.

    PubMed

    Alian, A; Shabana, R; Sanad, W; Allam, B; Khalifa, K

    1968-02-01

    The application of neutron activation analysis by standard addition and solvent extraction to the determination of traces of antimony in aluminium and rocks is reported. Three simple extraction procedures, using isopropyl ether, hexone, and tributyl phosphate, are described for the selective separation of radioantimony from interfering radionuclides. Antimony concentration is measured by counting the activities of the (122)Sb and (124)Sb photopeaks at 0.564 and 0.603 MeV. PMID:18960289

  10. Extended haplotype association study in Crohn’s disease identifies a novel, Ashkenazi Jewish-specific missense mutation in the NF-κB pathway gene, HEATR3

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Hui, Ken Y.; Gusev, Alexander; Warner, Neil; Evelyn Ng, Sok Meng; Ferguson, John; Choi, Murim; Burberry, Aaron; Abraham, Clara; Mayer, Lloyd; Desnick, Robert J.; Cardinale, Christopher J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Waterman, Matti; Chowers, Yehuda; Karban, Amir; Brant, Steven R.; Silverberg, Mark S.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Katz, Seymour; Lifton, Richard P.; Zhao, Hongyu; Nuñez, Gabriel; Pe’er, Itsik; Peter, Inga; Cho, Judy H.

    2013-01-01

    The Ashkenazi Jewish population has a several-fold higher prevalence of Crohn’s disease compared to non-Jewish European ancestry populations and has a unique genetic history. Haplotype association is critical to Crohn’s disease etiology in this population, most notably at NOD2, in which three causal, uncommon, and conditionally independent NOD2 variants reside on a shared background haplotype. We present an analysis of extended haplotypes which showed significantly greater association to Crohn’s disease in the Ashkenazi Jewish population compared to a non-Jewish population (145 haplotypes and no haplotypes with P-value < 10−3, respectively). Two haplotype regions, one each on chromosomes 16 and 21, conferred increased disease risk within established Crohn’s disease loci. We performed exome sequencing of 55 Ashkenazi Jewish individuals and follow-up genotyping focused on variants in these two regions. We observed Ashkenazi Jewish-specific nominal association at R755C in TRPM2 on chromosome 21. Within the chromosome 16 region, R642S of HEATR3 and rs9922362 of BRD7 showed genome-wide significance. Expression studies of HEATR3 demonstrated a positive role in NOD2-mediated NF-κB signaling. The BRD7 signal showed conditional dependence with only the downstream rare Crohn’s disease-causal variants in NOD2, but not with the background haplotype; this elaborates NOD2 as a key illustration of synthetic association. PMID:23615072

  11. Extended haplotype association study in Crohn's disease identifies a novel, Ashkenazi Jewish-specific missense mutation in the NF-κB pathway gene, HEATR3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Hui, K Y; Gusev, A; Warner, N; Ng, S M E; Ferguson, J; Choi, M; Burberry, A; Abraham, C; Mayer, L; Desnick, R J; Cardinale, C J; Hakonarson, H; Waterman, M; Chowers, Y; Karban, A; Brant, S R; Silverberg, M S; Gregersen, P K; Katz, S; Lifton, R P; Zhao, H; Nuñez, G; Pe'er, I; Peter, I; Cho, J H

    2013-01-01

    The Ashkenazi Jewish population has a several-fold higher prevalence of Crohn's disease (CD) compared with non-Jewish European ancestry populations and has a unique genetic history. Haplotype association is critical to CD etiology in this population, most notably at NOD2, in which three causal, uncommon and conditionally independent NOD2 variants reside on a shared background haplotype. We present an analysis of extended haplotypes that showed significantly greater association to CD in the Ashkenazi Jewish population compared with a non-Jewish population (145 haplotypes and no haplotypes with P-value <10(-3), respectively). Two haplotype regions, one each on chromosomes 16 and 21, conferred increased disease risk within established CD loci. We performed exome sequencing of 55 Ashkenazi Jewish individuals and follow-up genotyping focused on variants in these two regions. We observed Ashkenazi Jewish-specific nominal association at R755C in TRPM2 on chromosome 21. Within the chromosome 16 region, R642S of HEATR3 and rs9922362 of BRD7 showed genome-wide significance. Expression studies of HEATR3 demonstrated a positive role in NOD2-mediated NF-κB signaling. The BRD7 signal showed conditional dependence with only the downstream rare CD-causal variants in NOD2, but not with the background haplotype; this elaborates NOD2 as a key illustration of synthetic association. PMID:23615072

  12. Haplotype Diversity and Reconstruction of Ancestral Haplotype Associated with the c.35delG Mutation in the GJB2 (Cx26) Gene among the Volgo-Ural Populations of Russia

    PubMed Central

    Dzhemileva, L.U.; Posukh, O.L.; Barashkov, N.A.; Fedorova, S.A.; Teryutin, F.M.; Akhmetova, 
V.L.; Khidiyatova, I.M.; Khusainova, R.I.; Lobov, S.L.; Khusnutdinova, E.K.

    2011-01-01

    The mutations in theGJB2(Сх26) gene make the biggest contribution to hereditary hearing loss. The spectrum and prevalence of theGJB2gene mutations are specific to populations of different ethnic origins. For severalGJB2 mutations, their origin from appropriate ancestral founder chromosome was shown, approximate estimations of “age” obtained, and presumable regions of their origin outlined. This work presents the results of the carrier frequencies’ analysis of the major (for European countries) mutation c.35delG (GJB2gene) among 2,308 healthy individuals from 18 Eurasian populations of different ethnic origins: Bashkirs, Tatars, Chuvashs, Udmurts, Komi-Permyaks, Mordvins, and Russians (the Volga-Ural region of Russia); Byelorussians, Ukrainians (Eastern Europe); Abkhazians, Avars, Cherkessians, and Ingushes (Caucasus); Kazakhs, Uzbeks, Uighurs (Central Asia); and Yakuts, and Altaians (Siberia). The prevalence of the c.35delG mutation in the studied ethnic groups may act as additional evidence for a prospective role of the founder effect in the origin and distribution of this mutation in various populations worldwide. The haplotype analysis of chromosomes with the c.35delG mutation in patients with nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (N=112) and in population samples (N =358) permitted the reconstruction of an ancestral haplotype with this mutation, established the common origin of the majority of the studied mutant chromosomes, and provided the estimated time of the c.35delG mutation carriers expansion (11,800 years) on the territory of the Volga-Ural region. PMID:22649694

  13. Singapore Genome Variation Project: A haplotype map of three Southeast Asian populations

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Yik-Ying; Sim, Xueling; Ong, Rick T.H.; Tan, Adrian K.S.; Chen, Jieming; Tantoso, Erwin; Small, Kerrin S.; Ku, Chee-Seng; Lee, Edmund J.D.; Seielstad, Mark; Chia, Kee-Seng

    2009-01-01

    The Singapore Genome Variation Project (SGVP) provides a publicly available resource of 1.6 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 268 individuals from the Chinese, Malay, and Indian population groups in Southeast Asia. This online database catalogs information and summaries on genotype and phased haplotype data, including allele frequencies, assessment of linkage disequilibrium (LD), and recombination rates in a format similar to the International HapMap Project. Here, we introduce this resource and describe the analysis of human genomic variation upon agglomerating data from the HapMap and the Human Genome Diversity Project, providing useful insights into the population structure of the three major population groups in Asia. In addition, this resource also surveyed across the genome for variation in regional patterns of LD between the HapMap and SGVP populations, and for signatures of positive natural selection using two well-established metrics: iHS and XP-EHH. The raw and processed genetic data, together with all population genetic summaries, are publicly available for download and browsing through a web browser modeled with the Generic Genome Browser. PMID:19700652

  14. Y-chromosome STR haplotypes in males from Greenland.

    PubMed

    Hallenberg, Charlotte; Tomas, Carmen; Simonsen, Bo; Morling, Niels

    2009-09-01

    A total of 272 males from Greenland were typed for 11 Y-chromosome STRs DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389-I, DYS389-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439 with the PowerPlex Y System (Promega). A total of 146 different haplotypes were observed and the haplotype diversity was 0.9887. The number of haplotypes seen once was 108 and the most common haplotype was observed in 12 males. A significant F(ST) value was observed (F(ST)=0.012, P<0.00001) when comparing the population of 15 locations in Greenland assigned to 7 groups. The significance could mainly be attributed to the subpopulation of males from Tasiilaq (East of Greenland). The R(ST) value was not statistically significant (R(ST)=0.016, P=0.15). PMID:19647703

  15. Association of a bovine prion gene haplotype with atypical BSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSEs) are recently recognized prion diseases of cattle. Atypical BSEs are rare; approximately 30 cases have been identified worldwide. We tested prion gene (PRNP) haplotypes for an association with atypical BSE. Methodology/Principal Findin...

  16. Measurement of haplotypic variation in Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae within a single field by rep-PCR and RFLP analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Vera Cruz, C.M.; Leach, J.E.; Ardales, E.Y.; Talag, J.

    1996-12-01

    The haplotypic variation of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae in a farmer;s field that had endemic bacterial blight in the Philippines was evaluated at a single time. The genomic structure of the field population was analyzed by repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction with oligonucleotide primers corresponding to interspersed repeated sequences in prokaryotic genomes and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) with the insertion sequence IS1113. The techniques and specific probes and primers were selected because they grouped consistently into the same lineages a set of 30 selected X. oryzae pv. oryzae strains that represented the four distinct RFLP lineages found in the Philippines did. Strains (155) were systematically collected from a field planted to rice cv. Sinandomeng, which is susceptible to the indigenous pathogen population. Two of the four Philippine lineages, B and C, which included race 2 and races 3 and 9, respectively, were detected in the field. Lineage C was the predominant population (74.8%). The haplotypic diversities of 10 of the 25 blocks were significantly greater than the total haplotypic diversity of the collection in the entire field; however, between individual blocks the haplotypic diversities were not significantly different. Haplo-types from both lineages were distributed randomly across the field. Analysis of genetic diversity at the microgeographic scale provided insights into the finer scale of variation of X. oryzae pv. oryzae, which are useful in designing experiments to study effects of host resistance on the population structure of the bacterial blight pathogen. 46 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. "HOOF-Print" Genotyping and Haplotype Inference Discriminates among Brucella spp Isolates From a Small Spatial Scale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We demonstrate that the “HOOF-Print” assay provides high power to discriminate among Brucella isolates collected on a small spatial scale (within Portugal). Additionally, we illustrate how haplotype identification using non-random association among markers allows resolution of B. melitensis biovars ...

  18. ANALYSIS OF DISTRIBUTION FEEDER LOSSES DUE TO ADDITION OF DISTRIBUTED PHOTOVOLTAIC GENERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Singh, Ruchi

    2011-08-09

    Distributed generators (DG) are small scale power supplying sources owned by customers or utilities and scattered throughout the power system distribution network. Distributed generation can be both renewable and non-renewable. Addition of distributed generation is primarily to increase feeder capacity and to provide peak load reduction. However, this addition comes with several impacts on the distribution feeder. Several studies have shown that addition of DG leads to reduction of feeder loss. However, most of these studies have considered lumped load and distributed load models to analyze the effects on system losses, where the dynamic variation of load due to seasonal changes is ignored. It is very important for utilities to minimize the losses under all scenarios to decrease revenue losses, promote efficient asset utilization, and therefore, increase feeder capacity. This paper will investigate an IEEE 13-node feeder populated with photovoltaic generators on detailed residential houses with water heater, Heating Ventilation and Air conditioning (HVAC) units, lights, and other plug and convenience loads. An analysis of losses for different power system components, such as transformers, underground and overhead lines, and triplex lines, will be performed. The analysis will utilize different seasons and different solar penetration levels (15%, 30%).

  19. Analysis of redox additive-based overcharge protection for rechargeable lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Surampudi, S.; Attia, A. I.; Bankston, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    The overcharge condition in secondary lithium batteries employing redox additives for overcharge protection, has been theoretically analyzed in terms of a finite linear diffusion model. The analysis leads to expressions relating the steady-state overcharge current density and cell voltage to the concentration, diffusion coefficient, standard reduction potential of the redox couple, and interelectrode distance. The model permits the estimation of the maximum permissible overcharge rate for any chosen set of system conditions. Digital simulation of the overcharge experiment leads to numerical representation of the potential transients, and estimate of the influence of diffusion coefficient and interelectrode distance on the transient attainment of the steady state during overcharge. The model has been experimentally verified using 1,1-prime-dimethyl ferrocene as a redox additive. The analysis of the experimental results in terms of the theory allows the calculation of the diffusion coefficient and the formal potential of the redox couple. The model and the theoretical results may be exploited in the design and optimization of overcharge protection by the redox additive approach.

  20. On the relationship between an Asian haplotype on chromosome 6 that reduces androstenone levels in boars and the differential expression of SULT2A1 in the testis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Androstenone is one of the major compounds responsible for boar taint, a pronounced urine-like odor produced when cooking boar meat. Several studies have identified quantitative trait loci (QTL) for androstenone level on Sus scrofa chromosome (SSC) 6. For one of the candidate genes in the region SULT2A1, a difference in expression levels in the testis has been shown at the protein and RNA level. Results Haplotypes were predicted for the QTL region and their effects were estimated showing that haplotype 1 was consistently related with a lower level, and haplotype 2 with a higher level of androstenone. A recombinant haplotype allowed us to narrow down the QTL region from 3.75 Mbp to 1.94 Mbp. An RNA-seq analysis of the liver and testis revealed six genes that were differentially expressed between homozygotes of haplotypes 1 and 2. Genomic sequences of these differentially expressed genes were checked for variations within potential regulatory regions. We identified one variant located within a CpG island that could affect expression of SULT2A1 gene. An allele-specific expression analysis in the testis did not show differential expression between the alleles of SULT2A1 located on the different haplotypes in heterozygous animals. However a synonymous mutation C166T (SSC6: 49,117,861 bp in Sscrofa 10.2; C/T) was identified within the exon 2 of SULT2A1 for which the haplotype 2 only had the C allele which was higher expressed than the T allele, indicating haplotype-independent allelic-imbalanced expression between the two alleles. A phylogenetic analysis for the 1.94 Mbp region revealed that haplotype 1, associated with low androstenone level, originated from Asia. Conclusions Differential expression could be observed for six genes by RNA-seq analysis. No difference in the ratio of C:T expression of SULT2A1 for the haplotypes was found by the allele-specific expression analysis, however, a difference in expression between the C over T allele was found for a

  1. MHC Class II haplotypes of Colombian Amerindian tribes

    PubMed Central

    Yunis, Juan J.; Yunis, Edmond J.; Yunis, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    We analyzed 1041 individuals belonging to 17 Amerindian tribes of Colombia, Chimila, Bari and Tunebo (Chibcha linguistic family), Embera, Waunana (Choco linguistic family), Puinave and Nukak (Maku-Puinave linguistic families), Cubeo, Guanano, Tucano, Desano and Piratapuyo (Tukano linguistic family), Guahibo and Guayabero (Guayabero Linguistic Family), Curripaco and Piapoco (Arawak linguistic family) and Yucpa (Karib linguistic family). for MHC class II haplotypes (HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1). Approximately 90% of the MHC class II haplotypes found among these tribes are haplotypes frequently encountered in other Amerindian tribes. Nonetheless, striking differences were observed among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes. The DRB1*04:04, DRB1*04:11, DRB1*09:01 carrying haplotypes were frequently found among non-Chibcha speaking tribes, while the DRB1*04:07 haplotype showed significant frequencies among Chibcha speaking tribes, and only marginal frequencies among non-Chibcha speaking tribes. Our results suggest that the differences in MHC class II haplotype frequency found among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes could be due to genetic differentiation in Mesoamerica of the ancestral Amerindian population into Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking populations before they entered into South America. PMID:23885196

  2. Haplotype Reconstruction in Large Pedigrees with Many Untyped Individuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Li, Jing

    Haplotypes, as they specify the linkage patterns between dispersed genetic variations, provide important information for understanding the genetics of human traits. However haplotypes are not directly available from current genotyping platforms, and hence there are extensive investigations of computational methods to recover such information. Two major computational challenges arising in current family-based disease studies are large family sizes and many ungenotyped family members. Traditional haplotyping methods can neither handle large families nor families with missing members. In this paper, we propose a method which addresses these issues by integrating multiple novel techniques. The method consists of three major components: pairwise identical-bydescent (IBD) inference, global IBD reconstruction and haplotype restoring. By reconstructing the global IBD of a family from pairwise IBD and then restoring the haplotypes based on the inferred IBD, this method can scale to large pedigrees, and more importantly it can handle families with missing members. Compared with existing methods, this method demonstrates much higher power to recover haplotype information, especially in families with many untyped individuals.

  3. iXora: exact haplotype inferencing and trait association

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We address the task of extracting accurate haplotypes from genotype data of individuals of large F1 populations for mapping studies. While methods for inferring parental haplotype assignments on large F1 populations exist in theory, these approaches do not work in practice at high levels of accuracy. Results We have designed iXora (Identifying crossovers and recombining alleles), a robust method for extracting reliable haplotypes of a mapping population, as well as parental haplotypes, that runs in linear time. Each allele in the progeny is assigned not just to a parent, but more precisely to a haplotype inherited from the parent. iXora shows an improvement of at least 15% in accuracy over similar systems in literature. Furthermore, iXora provides an easy-to-use, comprehensive environment for association studies and hypothesis checking in populations of related individuals. Conclusions iXora provides detailed resolution in parental inheritance, along with the capability of handling very large populations, which allows for accurate haplotype extraction and trait association. iXora is available for non-commercial use from http://researcher.ibm.com/project/3430. PMID:23742238

  4. Association of a Bovine Prion Gene Haplotype with Atypical BSE

    PubMed Central

    Clawson, Michael L.; Richt, Juergen A.; Baron, Thierry; Biacabe, Anne-Gaëlle; Czub, Stefanie; Heaton, Michael P.; Smith, Timothy P. L.; Laegreid, William W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSEs) are recently recognized prion diseases of cattle. Atypical BSEs are rare; approximately 30 cases have been identified worldwide. We tested prion gene (PRNP) haplotypes for an association with atypical BSE. Methodology/Principle Findings Haplotype tagging polymorphisms that characterize PRNP haplotypes from the promoter region through the three prime untranslated region of exon 3 (25.2 kb) were used to determine PRNP haplotypes of six available atypical BSE cases from Canada, France and the United States. One or two copies of a distinct PRNP haplotype were identified in five of the six cases (p = 1.3×10−4, two-tailed Fisher's exact test; CI95% 0.263–0.901, difference between proportions). The haplotype spans a portion of PRNP that includes part of intron 2, the entire coding region of exon 3 and part of the three prime untranslated region of exon 3 (13 kb). Conclusions/Significance This result suggests that a genetic determinant in or near PRNP may influence susceptibility of cattle to atypical BSE. PMID:18350166

  5. Evolution of haplotypes at the DRD2 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Castiglione, C.M.; Deinard, A.S.; Speed, W.C.

    1995-12-01

    We present here the first evolutionary perspective on haplotypes at DRD2, the locus for the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor. The dopamine D{sub 2} receptor plays a critical role in the functioning of many neural circuits in the human brain. If functionally relevant variation at the DRD2 locus exists, understanding the evolution of haplotypes on the basis of polymorphic sites encompassing the gene should provide a powerful framework for identifying that variation. Three DRD2 polymorphisms (TaqI {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} RFLPs and the (CA){sub n} short tandem repeat polymorphism) encompassing the coding sequences have been studied in 15 populations; these markers are polymorphic in all the populations studied, and they display strong and significant linkage disequilibria with each other. The common haplotypes for the two TaqI RFLPs are separately derived from the ancestral haplotype but predate the spread of modern humans around the world. The knowledge of how the various haplotypes have evolved, the allele frequencies of the haplotypes in human populations, and the physical relationships of the polymorphisms to each other and to the functional parts of the gene should now allow proper design and interpretation of association studies. 48 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Molecular evolution and functional characterisation of haplotypes of an important rubber biosynthesis gene in Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Uthup, T K; Rajamani, A; Ravindran, M; Saha, T

    2016-07-01

    Hydroxy-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A synthase (HMGS) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the cytoplasmic isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway leading to natural rubber production in Hevea brasiliensis (rubber). Analysis of the structural variants of this gene is imperative to understand their functional significance in rubber biosynthesis so that they can be properly utilised for ongoing crop improvement programmes in Hevea. We report here allele richness and diversity of the HMGS gene in selected popular rubber clones. Haplotypes consisting of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the coding and non-coding regions with a high degree of heterozygosity were identified. Segregation and linkage disequilibrium analysis confirmed that recombination is the major contributor to the generation of allelic diversity, rather than point mutations. The evolutionarily conserved nature of some SNPs was identified by comparative DNA sequence analysis of HMGS orthologues from diverse taxa, demonstrating the molecular evolution of rubber biosynthesis genes in general. In silico three-dimensional structural studies highlighting the structural positioning of non-synonymous SNPs from different HMGS haplotypes revealed that the ligand-binding site on the enzyme remains impervious to the reported sequence variations. In contrast, gene expression results indicated the possibility of association between specific haplotypes and HMGS expression in Hevea clones, which may have a downstream impact up to the level of rubber production. Moreover, haplotype diversity of the HMGS gene and its putative association with gene expression can be the basis for further genetic association studies in rubber. Furthermore, the data also show the role of SNPs in the evolution of candidate genes coding for functional traits in plants. PMID:26787454

  7. HLA-G UTR haplotype conservation in the Malian population: association with soluble HLA-G.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Federico; Traore, Karim; Cherouat, Nissem; Roubertoux, Pierre; Buhler, Stéphane; Cortey, Martì; Simon, Sophie; Doumbo, Ogobara; Chiaroni, Jacques; Picard, Christophe; Di Cristofaro, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The HLA-G molecule plays an important role in immunomodulation. In a previous study carried out on a southern French population our team showed that HLA-G haplotypes, defined by SNPs in the coding region and specific SNPs located in 5'URR and 3'UTR regulatory regions, are associated with differential soluble HLA-G expression (sHLA-G). Furthermore, the structure of these HLA-G haplotypes appears to be conserved in geographically distant populations. The aim of our study is to confirm these expectations in a sub-Saharan African population and to explore additional factors, such as HLA-A alleles, that might influence sHLA-G expression. DNA and plasma samples were collected from 229 Malians; HLA-G and HLA-A genotyping were respectively performed by the Snap Shot® method and by Luminex™ technology. sHLA-G dosage was performed using an ELISA kit. HLA-G and HLA-A allelic and haplotypic frequencies were estimated using an EM algorithm from the Gene[Rate] program. Associations between genetic and non genetic parameters with sHLA-G were performed using a non-parametric test with GRAPH PAD Prism 5. Our results reveal a good conservation of the HLA-G UTR haplotype structure in populations with different origins and demographic histories. These UTR haplotypes appear to be involved in different sHLA-G expression patterns. Specifically, the UTR-2 haplotype was associated with low sHLA-G levels, displaying a dominant negative effect. Furthermore, an allelic effect of both HLA-G and HLA-A, as well as non genetic parameters, such as age and gender possibly linked to osteogenesis and sexual hormones, also seem to be involved in the modulation of sHLA-G. These data suggest that further investigation in larger cohorts and in populations from various ethnical backgrounds is necessary not only to detect new functional polymorphism in HLA-G regulatory regions, but also to reveal the extent of biological phenomena that influence sHLA-G secretion and this might therefore have an impact

  8. Allelic and haplotype variation of major histocompatibility complex class II DRB1 and DQB loci in the St Lawrence beluga (Delphinapterus leucas).

    PubMed

    1999-07-01

    In order to assess levels of major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) variation within the St Lawrence beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) the variation at the beluga Mhc DRB1 class II locus was assessed by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the peptide-binding region for 313 whales collected from 13 sampling locations across North America. In addition, samples from west Greenland and the St Lawrence were also typed at the DQB locus, allowing comparison to a previous study and assessment of linkage disequilibrium of alleles at the two loci. Comparisons of DRB1 and DQB allele frequencies among all sampling locations indicated genetic structure (alpha < 0.005). Most of this structure resulted from differences between the different wintering groups. Significant genetic structure (alpha = 0.05) exists among each pair of the following groups at both the DRB1 and DQB loci; St Lawrence, Hudson Strait, Bering Sea, Cunningham Inlet, and Davis Strait (minus Cunningham Inlet), except the St Lawrence and Hudson Strait for the DQB locus. In the St Lawrence population, six of the eight DRB1 alleles are present representing all five known allelic lineages. Evidence of linkage disequilibrium between the DRB1 and DQB is present in two sampling locations, the St Lawrence and Nuussuaq (alpha = 0.05). Analysis of probable DRB1-DQB haplotypes among groups of beluga suggests a haplotype reduction in the St Lawrence. PMID:10447854

  9. Analysis of error-prone survival data under additive hazards models: measurement error effects and adjustments.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Yi, Grace Y

    2016-07-01

    Covariate measurement error occurs commonly in survival analysis. Under the proportional hazards model, measurement error effects have been well studied, and various inference methods have been developed to correct for error effects under such a model. In contrast, error-contaminated survival data under the additive hazards model have received relatively less attention. In this paper, we investigate this problem by exploring measurement error effects on parameter estimation and the change of the hazard function. New insights of measurement error effects are revealed, as opposed to well-documented results for the Cox proportional hazards model. We propose a class of bias correction estimators that embraces certain existing estimators as special cases. In addition, we exploit the regression calibration method to reduce measurement error effects. Theoretical results for the developed methods are established, and numerical assessments are conducted to illustrate the finite sample performance of our methods. PMID:26328545

  10. In-line image analysis on the effects of additives in batch cooling crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Haiyan; Louhi-Kultanen, Marjatta; Kallas, Juha

    2006-03-01

    The effects of two potassium salt additives, ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid dipotassium salt (EDTA) and potassium pyrophosphate (KPY), on the batch cooling crystallization of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) were investigated. The crystal growth rates of certain crystal faces were determined from in-line images taken with a MTS particle image analysis (PIA) video microscope. An in-line image processing method was developed to characterize the size and shape of the crystals. The nucleation kinetics was studied by measurement of the metastable zone width and induction time. A significant promotion effect on both nucleation and growth of KDP was observed when EDTA was used as an additive. KPY, however, exhibited strong inhibiting impacts. The mechanism underlying the EDTA promotion effect on crystal growth was further studied with the 2-dimension nucleation model. It is shown that the presence of EDTA increased the density of adsorbed molecules of the crystallizing solute on the surface of the crystal.

  11. Accumulating Mutations in Series of Haplotypes at the KIT and MITF Loci Are Major Determinants of White Markings in Franches-Montagnes Horses

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Bianca; Signer-Hasler, Heidi; Binns, Matthew M.; Obexer-Ruff, Gabriela; Hauswirth, Regula; Bellone, Rebecca R.; Burger, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Coat color and pattern variations in domestic animals are frequently inherited as simple monogenic traits, but a number are known to have a complex genetic basis. While the analysis of complex trait data remains a challenge in all species, we can use the reduced haplotypic diversity in domestic animal populations to gain insight into the genomic interactions underlying complex phenotypes. White face and leg markings are examples of complex traits in horses where little is known of the underlying genetics. In this study, Franches-Montagnes (FM) horses were scored for the occurrence of white facial and leg markings using a standardized scoring system. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed for several white patterning traits in 1,077 FM horses. Seven quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting the white marking score with p-values p≤10−4 were identified. Three loci, MC1R and the known white spotting genes, KIT and MITF, were identified as the major loci underlying the extent of white patterning in this breed. Together, the seven loci explain 54% of the genetic variance in total white marking score, while MITF and KIT alone account for 26%. Although MITF and KIT are the major loci controlling white patterning, their influence varies according to the basic coat color of the horse and the specific body location of the white patterning. Fine mapping across the MITF and KIT loci was used to characterize haplotypes present. Phylogenetic relationships among haplotypes were calculated to assess their selective and evolutionary influences on the extent of white patterning. This novel approach shows that KIT and MITF act in an additive manner and that accumulating mutations at these loci progressively increase the extent of white markings. PMID:24098679

  12. Predominance of B haplotype associated KIR genes in Tamil Speaking Dravidians.

    PubMed

    Maruthamuthu, Stalinraja; Mariakuttikan, Jayalakshmi

    2015-05-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin like receptors (KIRs) are a group of activating (aKIRs) and inhibitory receptors (iKIRs) expressed on subsets of lymphoid cells. Their interaction with HLA class I molecules modulate the innate and adaptive immune response against infections and malignancies. KIR haplotypes varies in gene content and also at allelic level, thereby, distinguishing individuals and populations. Hence, the present study is aimed to determine the KIR gene diversity in Piramalai Kallar (PK) population of South India. The PK population shows diverged KIR gene frequencies and novel haplotypes than other South Indian populations. 52 different KIR gene profiles were identified and 18 of them were new in this population. In phylogenetic analysis the study population is positioned between African and Iranian population in the clade, which supports the South African ancestry of Indian population. PMID:25842054

  13. Neutron activation analysis by standard addition and solvent extraction: Determination of impurities in aluminium.

    PubMed

    Alian, A; Haggag, A

    1967-09-01

    A separation scheme based on selective extraction in conjunction with the standard addition technique has been developed for the determination of impurities in aluminium by neutron activation. Preliminary investigations have been carried out on the extractability of Sc, Co, Hf, Fe, Sn, Cd, Zn, Ag, Cr, Ce, Cs and Rb by TDA and TBP from acidic media. The best conditions are predicted for the separation of these elements into fractions suitable for analysis by gamma-ray spectrometry. Recovery values of approximately 90% were obtained for all the elements. PMID:18960206

  14. A near-infrared spectroscopic study of young field ultracool dwarfs: additional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allers, K. N.; Liu, M. C.

    We present additional analysis of the classification system presented in \\citet{allers13}. We refer the reader to \\citet{allers13} for a detailed discussion of our near-IR spectral type and gravity classification system. Here, we address questions and comments from participants of the Brown Dwarfs Come of Age meeting. In particular, we examine the effects of binarity and metallicity on our classification system. We also present our classification of Pleiades brown dwarfs using published spectra. Lastly, we determine SpTs and calculate gravity-sensitive indices for the BT-Settl atmospheric models and compare them to observations.

  15. Addition of three-dimensional isoparametric elements to NASA structural analysis program (NASTRAN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Field, E. I.; Johnson, S. E.

    1973-01-01

    Implementation is made of the three-dimensional family of linear, quadratic and cubic isoparametric solid elements into the NASA Structural Analysis program, NASTRAN. This work included program development, installation, testing, and documentation. The addition of these elements to NASTRAN provides a significant increase in modeling capability particularly for structures requiring specification of temperatures, material properties, displacements, and stresses which vary throughout each individual element. Complete program documentation is presented in the form of new sections and updates for direct insertion to the three NASTRAN manuals. The results of demonstration test problems are summarized. Excellent results are obtained with the isoparametric elements for static, normal mode, and buckling analyses.

  16. Excap: Maximization of Haplotypic Diversity of Linked Markers

    PubMed Central

    Kahles, André; Sarqume, Fahad; Savolainen, Peter; Arvestad, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Genetic markers, defined as variable regions of DNA, can be utilized for distinguishing individuals or populations. As long as markers are independent, it is easy to combine the information they provide. For nonrecombinant sequences like mtDNA, choosing the right set of markers for forensic applications can be difficult and requires careful consideration. In particular, one wants to maximize the utility of the markers. Until now, this has mainly been done by hand. We propose an algorithm that finds the most informative subset of a set of markers. The algorithm uses a depth first search combined with a branch-and-bound approach. Since the worst case complexity is exponential, we also propose some data-reduction techniques and a heuristic. We implemented the algorithm and applied it to two forensic caseworks using mitochondrial DNA, which resulted in marker sets with significantly improved haplotypic diversity compared to previous suggestions. Additionally, we evaluated the quality of the estimation with an artificial dataset of mtDNA. The heuristic is shown to provide extensive speedup at little cost in accuracy. PMID:24244403

  17. Molecular diversity of HLA-DR4 haplotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, P K; Shen, M; Song, Q L; Merryman, P; Degar, S; Seki, T; Maccari, J; Goldberg, D; Murphy, H; Schwenzer, J

    1986-01-01

    Complementary DNA (cDNA) clones encoding beta chains of the DR and DQ regions and alpha chains of the DQ region were isolated and sequenced from four homozygous DR4 cell lines of different HLA-D types: GM3103(Dw4), FS(Dw10), BIN(Dw14), and KT3(Dw15). When compared with each other and with a previously published sequence from a DR4 (Dw13 cell line), the variability of DR beta 1 gene products is generally restricted to the region around amino acid position 70, with an additional polymorphism at position 86. Many of these differences, including an unusual amino acid substitution at position 57 in the Japanese cell line KT3(Dw15), may be due to gene conversion events from the DR beta 2 or DX beta genes. In contrast, DR beta 2 molecules are identical in Dw15, Dw10, and Dw4 cell lines. DQ beta chains isolated from GM3103(Dw4), FS(Dw10), and BIN40(Dw14) are also identical. However, the DQ beta sequence from cell line KT3(Dw15) differs substantially from all other previously reported DQ beta alleles, consistent with its serological designation, DQ "blank." The first domain sequences of DQ alpha chains were identical in all four cell lines. The data suggest that relatively circumscribed amino acid changes in the DR beta 1 molecule are responsible for the HLA-D typing differences between some haplotypes. PMID:3458223

  18. Beyond clines: lineages and haplotype blocks in hybrid zones.

    PubMed

    Sedghifar, Alisa; Brandvain, Yaniv; Ralph, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid zones formed between recently diverged populations offer an opportunity to study the mechanisms underlying reproductive isolation and the process of speciation. Here, we use a combination of analytical theory and explicit forward simulations to describe how selection against hybrid genotypes impacts patterns of introgression across genomic and geographic space. By describing how lineages move across the hybrid zone, in a model without coalescence, we add to modern understanding of how clines form and how parental haplotypes are broken up during introgression. Working with lineages makes it easy to see that clines form in about 1/s generations, where s is the strength of selection against hybrids, and linked clines persist over a genomic scale of 1/T, where T is the age, in generations, of the hybrid zone. Locally disadvantageous alleles tend to exist as small families, whose lineages trace back to the side from which they originated at speed s dispersal distances per generation. The lengths of continuous tracts of ancestry provide an additional source of information: blocks of ancestry surrounding incompatibilities can be substantially longer than the genomewide average block length at the same spatial location, an observation that might be used to identify candidate targets of selection. PMID:27148805

  19. New data for AG haplotype frequencies in Caucasoid populations and selective neutrality of the AG polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Mazas, A; Bütler-Brunner, E; Excoffier, L; Ghanem, N; Ben Salem, M; Breguet, G; Dard, P; Pellegrini, B; Tikkanen, M J; Langaney, A

    1994-02-01

    We present the results of AG antigen typings of three Caucasoid population samples: Lebanese, Tunisians, and Finns. AG haplotype frequencies estimated by maximum-likelihood methods are compared with the frequencies observed in 13 world populations previously tested for AG specificities by computing a genetic distance matrix used in a multivariate analysis. A high degree of polymorphism characterizes the three samples, with 10 haplotypes detected in the Lebanese and 11 haplotypes detected in the Tunisians and Finns; high heterozygosity levels are also present in the three populations. The genetic distance analysis shows that the three populations possess a genetic structure intermediate between those observed in sub-Saharan Africans and in Caucasoids from the Near East and India. This tight correspondence between AG differentiation and geography is confirmed by a highly significant correlation coefficient found between genetic and geographic distances computed worldwide, suggesting that an isolation by distance model of evolution applies to the AG system. The Ewens-Watterson test for selective neutrality on all world populations tested for AG specificities also supports the hypothesis that the AG system behaves like a neutral polymorphism. Overall, the AG differentiation pattern appears to be close to the patterns observed for other serological polymorphisms, such as RH, GM, and HLA, whose evolutionary mechanisms are also discussed. PMID:8157263

  20. Autosomal Dominant Retinal Dystrophies Caused by a Founder Splice Site Mutation, c.828+3A>T, in PRPH2 and Protein Haplotypes in trans as Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Suma P.; Hughbanks-Wheaton, Dianna K.; Birch, David G.; Sullivan, Lori S.; Conneely, Karen N.; Bowne, Sara J.; Stone, Edwin M.; Daiger, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We determined the phenotypic variation, disease progression, and potential modifiers of autosomal dominant retinal dystrophies caused by a splice site founder mutation, c.828+3A>T, in the PRPH2 gene. Methods A total of 62 individuals (19 families) harboring the PRPH2 c.828+3A>T mutation, had phenotype analysis by fundus appearance, electrophysiology, and visual fields. The PRPH2 haplotypes in trans were sequenced for potential modifying variants and generalized estimating equations (GEE) used for statistical analysis. Results Several distinct phenotypes caused by the PRPH2 c.828+3A>T mutation were observed and fell into two clinical categories: Group I (N = 44) with mild pattern dystrophies (PD) and Group II (N = 18) with more severe cone-rod dystrophy (CRD), retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and central areolar chorioretinal dystrophy (CACD). The PRPH2 Gln304-Lys310-Asp338 protein haplotype in trans was found in Group I only (29.6% vs. 0%), whereas the Glu304-Lys310-Gly338 haplotype was predominant in Group II (94.4% vs. 70.4%). Generalized estimating equations analysis for PD versus the CRD/CACD/RP phenotypes in individuals over 43 years alone with the PRPH2 haplotypes in trans and age as predictors, adjusted for correlation within families, confirmed a significant effect of haplotype on severity (P = 0.03) with an estimated odds ratio of 7.16 (95% confidence interval [CI] = [2.8, 18.4]). Conclusions The PRPH2 c.828+3A>T mutation results in multiple distinct phenotypes likely modified by protein haplotypes in trans; the odds of having the CACD/RP-like phenotype (versus the PD phenotype) are 7.16 times greater with a Glu304-Lys310-Gly338 haplotype in trans. Further functional studies of the modifying haplotypes in trans and PRPH2 splice variants may offer therapeutic targets. PMID:26842753

  1. Re-analysis of survival data of cancer patients utilizing additive homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Gleiss, Andreas; Frass, Michael; Gaertner, Katharina

    2016-08-01

    In this short communication we present a re-analysis of homeopathic patient data in comparison to control patient data from the same Outpatient´s Unit "Homeopathy in malignant diseases" of the Medical University of Vienna. In this analysis we took account of a probable immortal time bias. For patients suffering from advanced stages of cancer and surviving the first 6 or 12 months after diagnosis, respectively, the results show that utilizing homeopathy gives a statistically significant (p<0.001) advantage over control patients regarding survival time. In conclusion, bearing in mind all limitations, the results of this retrospective study suggest that patients with advanced stages of cancer might benefit from additional homeopathic treatment until a survival time of up to 12 months after diagnosis. PMID:27515878

  2. Susceptible and protective associations of HLA DRB1*/DQB1* alleles and haplotypes with ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Murali, V; Rathika, C; Ramgopal, S; Padma Malini, R; Arun Kumar, M J; Neethi Arasu, V; Jeyaram Illiayaraja, K; Balakrishnan, K

    2016-06-01

    Stroke has emerged as the second commonest cause of mortality worldwide and is a major public health problem. For the first time, we present here the association of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*/DQB1* alleles and haplotypes with ischaemic stroke in South Indian patients. Ischaemic stroke (IS) cases and controls were genotyped for HLA-DRB1*/DQB1* alleles by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) method. The frequencies of HLA class II alleles such as DRB1*04, DRB1*07, DRB1*11, DRB1*12, DRB1*13, DQB1*02 and DQB1*07 were high in IS patients than in the age- and gender-matched controls, suggesting that the individuals with these alleles are susceptible to ischaemic stroke in South India. The frequencies of alleles such as DRB1*03, DRB1*10, DRB1*14, DQB1*04 and DQB1*05 were less in IS cases than in the controls, suggesting a protective association. Haplotypes DRB1*04-DQB1*0301, DRB1*07-DQB1*02, DRB1*07-DQB1*0301, DRB1*11-DQB1*0301 and DRB1*13-DQB1*06 were found to be high in IS patients conferring susceptibility. The frequency of haplotype DRB1*10-DQB1*05 was high in controls conferring protection. IS-LVD and gender-stratified analysis too confirmed these susceptible and protective associations. Thus, HLA-DRB1*/DQB1* alleles and haplotypes strongly predispose South Indian population to ischaemic stroke. Further studies in different populations with large sample size or the meta-analysis are needed to explain the exact mechanism of associations of HLA gene(s) with IS. PMID:27105925

  3. BDNF gene polymorphisms and haplotypes in relation to cognitive performance in Polish healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Wiłkość, Monika; Szałkowska, Agnieszka; Skibińska, Maria; Zając-Lamparska, Ludmiła; Maciukiewicz, Małgorzata; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    The brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin that plays an important role in the cell survival, axonal and dendritic growth, and synaptic plasticity. BDNF gene polymorphisms, 'functional Val66Met mainly, were shown to influence human brain structure and cognition. The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between twelve BDNF gene variants and their haplotypes and cognitive performance measured using the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), the Trail Making Test (TMT), the Stroop Test which are to a large extent connected with prefrontal cortex activity. Our sample consisted of 460 healthy participants from Polish population. We detected possible association between five BDNF polymorphisms (rs11030101, rs10835210, rs2049046, rs2030324, rs2883187) and TMT_A. Additionally, one haplotype block made from eleven BDNF variants (rs2883187, rs1401635, rs2049046, rs2030324, rs11030101, rs10835210, rs1013402, rs1401635, rs1013402), as significant linkage disequilibrium appeared. We discovered possible relationships of CACCGCGTACG and CACCGCGTACG haplotypes with TMT_A and TMT_B performance respectively. Our results confirmed the involvement of BDNF in the regulation of psychomotor speed, working memory and executive function in healthy subjects measured by a task engaging visuoperceptual abilities. PMID:27102917

  4. Insights into HLA-G Genetics Provided by Worldwide Haplotype Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Erick C.; Ramalho, Jaqueline; Porto, Iane O. P.; Lima, Thálitta H. A.; Felício, Leandro P.; Sabbagh, Audrey; Donadi, Eduardo A.; Mendes-Junior, Celso T.

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) belongs to the family of non-classical HLA class I genes, located within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). HLA-G has been the target of most recent research regarding the function of class I non-classical genes. The main features that distinguish HLA-G from classical class I genes are (a) limited protein variability, (b) alternative splicing generating several membrane bound and soluble isoforms, (c) short cytoplasmic tail, (d) modulation of immune response (immune tolerance), and (e) restricted expression to certain tissues. In the present work, we describe the HLA-G gene structure and address the HLA-G variability and haplotype diversity among several populations around the world, considering each of its major segments [promoter, coding, and 3′ untranslated region (UTR)]. For this purpose, we developed a pipeline to reevaluate the 1000Genomes data and recover miscalled or missing genotypes and haplotypes. It became clear that the overall structure of the HLA-G molecule has been maintained during the evolutionary process and that most of the variation sites found in the HLA-G coding region are either coding synonymous or intronic mutations. In addition, only a few frequent and divergent extended haplotypes are found when the promoter, coding, and 3′UTRs are evaluated together. The divergence is particularly evident for the regulatory regions. The population comparisons confirmed that most of the HLA-G variability has originated before human dispersion from Africa and that the allele and haplotype frequencies have probably been shaped by strong selective pressures. PMID:25339953

  5. Very long haplotype tracts characterized at high resolution from HLA homozygous cell lines.

    PubMed

    Norman, Paul J; Norberg, Steve J; Nemat-Gorgani, Neda; Royce, Thomas; Hollenbach, Jill A; Shults Won, Melissa; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Gunderson, Kevin L; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Parham, Peter

    2015-09-01

    The HLA region of chromosome 6 contains the most polymorphic genes in humans. Spanning ~5 Mbp the densely packed region encompasses approximately 175 expressed genes including the highly polymorphic HLA class I and II loci. Most of the other genes and functional elements are also polymorphic, and many of them are directly implicated in immune function or immune-related disease. For these reasons, this complex genomic region is subject to intense scrutiny by researchers with the common goal of aiding further understanding and diagnoses of multiple immune-related diseases and syndromes. To aid assay development and characterization of the classical loci, a panel of cell lines partially or fully homozygous for HLA class I and II was assembled over time by the International Histocompatibility Working Group (IHWG). Containing a minimum of 88 unique HLA haplotypes, we show that this panel represents a significant proportion of European HLA allelic and haplotype diversity (60-95 %). Using a high-density whole genome array that includes 13,331 HLA region SNPs, we analyzed 99 IHWG cells to map the coordinates of the homozygous tracts at a fine scale. The mean homozygous tract length within chromosome 6 from these individuals is 21 Mbp. Within HLA, the mean haplotype length is 4.3 Mbp, and 65 % of the cell lines were shown to be homozygous throughout the entire region. In addition, four cell lines are homozygous throughout the complex KIR region of chromosome 19 (~250 kbp). The data we describe will provide a valuable resource for characterizing haplotypes, designing and refining imputation algorithms and developing assay controls. PMID:26198775

  6. Whole-genome haplotyping by dilution, amplification, and sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kaper, Fiona; Swamy, Sajani; Klotzle, Brandy; Munchel, Sarah; Cottrell, Joseph; Bibikova, Marina; Chuang, Han-Yu; Kruglyak, Semyon; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Eberle, Michael A.; Fan, Jian-Bing

    2013-01-01

    Standard whole-genome genotyping technologies are unable to determine haplotypes. Here we describe a method for rapid and cost-effective long-range haplotyping. Genomic DNA is diluted and distributed into multiple aliquots such that each aliquot receives a fraction of a haploid copy. The DNA template in each aliquot is amplified by multiple displacement amplification, converted into barcoded sequencing libraries using Nextera technology, and sequenced in multiplexed pools. To assess the performance of our method, we combined two male genomic DNA samples at equal ratios, resulting in a sample with diploid X chromosomes with known haplotypes. Pools of the multiplexed sequencing libraries were subjected to targeted pull-down of a 1-Mb contiguous region of the X-chromosome Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene. We were able to phase the Duchenne muscular dystrophy region into two contiguous haplotype blocks with a mean length of 494 kb. The haplotypes showed 99% agreement with the consensus base calls made by sequencing the individual DNAs. We subsequently used the strategy to haplotype two human genomes. Standard genomic sequencing to identify all heterozygous SNPs in the sample was combined with dilution-amplification–based sequencing data to resolve the phase of identified heterozygous SNPs. Using this procedure, we were able to phase >95% of the heterozygous SNPs from the diploid sequence data. The N50 for a Yoruba male DNA was 702 kb whereas the N50 for a European female DNA was 358 kb. Therefore, the strategy described here is suitable for haplotyping of a set of targeted regions as well as of the entire genome. PMID:23509297

  7. Whole-genome haplotyping by dilution, amplification, and sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kaper, Fiona; Swamy, Sajani; Klotzle, Brandy; Munchel, Sarah; Cottrell, Joseph; Bibikova, Marina; Chuang, Han-Yu; Kruglyak, Semyon; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Eberle, Michael A; Fan, Jian-Bing

    2013-04-01

    Standard whole-genome genotyping technologies are unable to determine haplotypes. Here we describe a method for rapid and cost-effective long-range haplotyping. Genomic DNA is diluted and distributed into multiple aliquots such that each aliquot receives a fraction of a haploid copy. The DNA template in each aliquot is amplified by multiple displacement amplification, converted into barcoded sequencing libraries using Nextera technology, and sequenced in multiplexed pools. To assess the performance of our method, we combined two male genomic DNA samples at equal ratios, resulting in a sample with diploid X chromosomes with known haplotypes. Pools of the multiplexed sequencing libraries were subjected to targeted pull-down of a 1-Mb contiguous region of the X-chromosome Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene. We were able to phase the Duchenne muscular dystrophy region into two contiguous haplotype blocks with a mean length of 494 kb. The haplotypes showed 99% agreement with the consensus base calls made by sequencing the individual DNAs. We subsequently used the strategy to haplotype two human genomes. Standard genomic sequencing to identify all heterozygous SNPs in the sample was combined with dilution-amplification-based sequencing data to resolve the phase of identified heterozygous SNPs. Using this procedure, we were able to phase >95% of the heterozygous SNPs from the diploid sequence data. The N50 for a Yoruba male DNA was 702 kb whereas the N50 for a European female DNA was 358 kb. Therefore, the strategy described here is suitable for haplotyping of a set of targeted regions as well as of the entire genome. PMID:23509297

  8. Dimensional Anxiety Mediates Linkage of GABRA2 Haplotypes With Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Enoch, Mary-Anne; Schwartz, Lori; Albaugh, Bernard; Virkkunen, Matti; Goldman, David

    2015-01-01

    The GABAAα2 receptor gene (GABRA2) modulates anxiety and stress response. Three recent association studies implicate GABRA2 in alcoholism, however in these papers both common, opposite-configuration haplotypes in the region distal to intron3 predict risk. We have now replicated the GABRA2 association with alcoholism in 331 Plains Indian men and women and 461 Finnish Caucasian men. Using a dimensional measure of anxiety, harm avoidance (HA), we also found that the association with alcoholism is mediated, or moderated, by anxiety. Nine SNPs were genotyped revealing two haplotype blocks. Within the previously implicated block 2 region, we identified the two common, opposite-configuration risk haplotypes, A and B. Their frequencies differed markedly in Finns and Plains Indians. In both populations, most block 2 SNPs were significantly associated with alcoholism. The associations were due to increased frequencies of both homozygotes in alcoholics, indicating the possibility of alcoholic subtypes with opposite genotypes. Congruently, there was no significant haplotype association. Using HA as an indicator variable for anxiety, we found haplotype linkage to alcoholism with high and low dimensional anxiety, and to HA itself, in both populations. High HA alcoholics had the highest frequency of the more abundant haplotype (A in Finns, B in Plains Indians); low HA alcoholics had the highest frequency of the less abundant haplotype (B in Finns, A in Plains Indians) (Finns: P α0.007, OR α2.1, Plains Indians: P α0.040, OR α1.9). Non-alcoholics had intermediate frequencies. Our results suggest that within the distal GABRA2 region is a functional locus or loci that may differ between populations but that alters risk for alcoholism via the mediating action of anxiety. PMID:16874763

  9. Dimensional anxiety mediates linkage of GABRA2 haplotypes with alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Enoch, Mary-Anne; Schwartz, Lori; Albaugh, Bernard; Virkkunen, Matti; Goldman, David

    2006-09-01

    The GABAAalpha2 receptor gene (GABRA2) modulates anxiety and stress response. Three recent association studies implicate GABRA2 in alcoholism, however in these papers both common, opposite-configuration haplotypes in the region distal to intron3 predict risk. We have now replicated the GABRA2 association with alcoholism in 331 Plains Indian men and women and 461 Finnish Caucasian men. Using a dimensional measure of anxiety, harm avoidance (HA), we also found that the association with alcoholism is mediated, or moderated, by anxiety. Nine SNPs were genotyped revealing two haplotype blocks. Within the previously implicated block 2 region, we identified the two common, opposite-configuration risk haplotypes, A and B. Their frequencies differed markedly in Finns and Plains Indians. In both populations, most block 2 SNPs were significantly associated with alcoholism. The associations were due to increased frequencies of both homozygotes in alcoholics, indicating the possibility of alcoholic subtypes with opposite genotypes. Congruently, there was no significant haplotype association. Using HA as an indicator variable for anxiety, we found haplotype linkage to alcoholism with high and low dimensional anxiety, and to HA itself, in both populations. High HA alcoholics had the highest frequency of the more abundant haplotype (A in Finns, B in Plains Indians); low HA alcoholics had the highest frequency of the less abundant haplotype (B in Finns, A in Plains Indians) (Finns: P = 0.007, OR = 2.1, Plains Indians: P = 0.040, OR = 1.9). Non-alcoholics had intermediate frequencies. Our results suggest that within the distal GABRA2 region is a functional locus or loci that may differ between populations but that alters risk for alcoholism via the mediating action of anxiety. PMID:16874763

  10. A Fully Non-Metallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing Part I: System Analysis, Component Identification, Additive Manufacturing, and Testing of Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Joseph E.; Haller, William J.; Poinsatte, Philip E.; Halbig, Michael C.; Schnulo, Sydney L.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Weir, Don; Wali, Natalie; Vinup, Michael; Jones, Michael G.; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom; Mehl, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    The research and development activities reported in this publication were carried out under NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI) funded project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing." The objective of the project was to conduct evaluation of emerging materials and manufacturing technologies that will enable fully nonmetallic gas turbine engines. The results of the activities are described in three part report. The first part of the report contains the data and analysis of engine system trade studies, which were carried out to estimate reduction in engine emissions and fuel burn enabled due to advanced materials and manufacturing processes. A number of key engine components were identified in which advanced materials and additive manufacturing processes would provide the most significant benefits to engine operation. The technical scope of activities included an assessment of the feasibility of using additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate gas turbine engine components from polymer and ceramic matrix composites, which were accomplished by fabricating prototype engine components and testing them in simulated engine operating conditions. The manufacturing process parameters were developed and optimized for polymer and ceramic composites (described in detail in the second and third part of the report). A number of prototype components (inlet guide vane (IGV), acoustic liners, engine access door) were additively manufactured using high temperature polymer materials. Ceramic matrix composite components included turbine nozzle components. In addition, IGVs and acoustic liners were tested in simulated engine conditions in test rigs. The test results are reported and discussed in detail.

  11. The prognostic impact of germline 46/1 haplotype of Janus kinase 2 in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nahajevszky, Sarolta; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Batai, Arpad; Adam, Emma; Bors, Andras; Csomor, Judit; Gopcsa, Laszlo; Koszarska, Magdalena; Kozma, Andras; Lovas, Nora; Lueff, Sandor; Matrai, Zoltan; Meggyesi, Nora; Sinko, Janos; Sipos, Andrea; Varkonyi, Andrea; Fekete, Sandor; Tordai, Attila; Masszi, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Background Prognostic risk stratification according to acquired or inherited genetic alterations has received increasing attention in acute myeloid leukemia in recent years. A germline Janus kinase 2 haplotype designated as the 46/1 haplotype has been reported to be associated with an inherited predisposition to myeloproliferative neoplasms, and also to acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype. The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic impact of the 46/1 haplotype on disease characteristics and treatment outcome in acute myeloid leukemia. Design and Methods Janus kinase 2 rs12343867 single nucleotide polymorphism tagging the 46/1 haplotype was genotyped by LightCycler technology applying melting curve analysis with the hybridization probe detection format in 176 patients with acute myeloid leukemia under 60 years diagnosed consecutively and treated with curative intent. Results The morphological subtype of acute myeloid leukemia with maturation was less frequent among 46/1 carriers than among non-carriers (5.6% versus 17.2%, P=0.018, cytogenetically normal subgroup: 4.3% versus 20.6%, P=0.031), while the morphological distribution shifted towards the myelomonocytoid form in 46/1 haplotype carriers (28.1% versus 14.9%, P=0.044, cytogenetically normal subgroup: 34.0% versus 11.8%, P=0.035). In cytogenetically normal cases of acute myeloid leukemia, the 46/1 carriers had a considerably lower remission rate (78.7% versus 94.1%, P=0.064) and more deaths in remission or in aplasia caused by infections (46.8% versus 23.5%, P=0.038), resulting in the 46/1 carriers having shorter disease-free survival and overall survival compared to the 46/1 non-carriers. In multivariate analysis, the 46/1 haplotype was an independent adverse prognostic factor for disease-free survival (P=0.024) and overall survival (P=0.024) in patients with a normal karyotype. Janus kinase 2 46/1 haplotype had no impact on prognosis in the subgroup with abnormal karyotype. Conclusions Janus

  12. Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1: Strong association with haplotype 6 in French Canadians permits simple carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Demers, S.I.; Phaneuf, D.; Tanguay, R.M. )

    1994-08-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1), a severe inborn error of tyrosine catabolism, is caused by deficiency of the terminal enzyme, fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH). The highest reported frequency of HT1 is in the French Canadian population, especially in the Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean region. Using human FAH cDNA probes, the authors have identified 10 haplotypes with TaqI, KpnI, RsaI, BglII, and MspI RFLPs in 118 normal chromosomes from the French Canadian population. Interestingly, in 29 HT1 children, a prevalent haplotype, haplotype 6, was found to be strongly associated with the disease, at a frequency of 90% of alleles, as compared with [approximately] 18% in 35 control individuals. This increased to 96% in the 24 patients originating from Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean. These results suggest that one or only a few prevailing mutations are responsible for most of the HT1 cases in Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean. Since most patients were found to be homozygous for a specific haplotype in this population, FAH RFLPs have permitted simple carrier detection in nine different informative HT1 families, with a confidence level of 99.9%. Heterozygosity rate values obtained from 52 carriers indicated that [approximately] 88% of families at risk from Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean are fully or partially informative. Prenatal diagnosis was also achieved in an American family. Analysis of 24 HT1 patients from nine countries gave a frequency of [approximately] 52% for haplotype 6, suggesting a relatively high association, worldwide, of HT1 with this haplotype. 31 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Localization of Type 1 Diabetes susceptibility in the ancestral haplotype 18.2 by high density SNP mapping.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Jose Luis; Li, Wentian; Lee, Annette; Martinez, Alfonso; Chandrasekaran, Alamelu; Fernandez-Arquero, Miguel; Khalili, Houman; de la Concha, Emilio G; Urcelay, Elena; Gregersen, Peter K

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the ancestral haplotype 18.2 (AH18.2) carries additional susceptibility gene to Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) on the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC). We analyzed 10 DR3/TNFa1b5 homozygous subjects in order to establish the conservation of the AH18.2 and then compared this conserved region with other DR3 haplotype, the AH8.1. The Illumina's HumanHap550 Bead chip was used to perform an extensive genotyping of the MHC region. The AH18.2 was highly conserved between DDR1 and HLA-DQA1 genes; therefore most probably the second susceptibility gene is located within this region. We can exclude the region centromeric to HLA-DRA gene and telomeric to DDR1 gene. A comparison between the AH18.2 and AH8.1 haplotypes showed that 233 SNPs were different in the aforementioned conserved region. These data suggest that the 1.65 Mb MHC region between DDR1 and HLA-DRA genes is likely to carry additional susceptibility alleles for T1D on the AH18.2 haplotype. PMID:19591919

  14. Maori origins, Y-chromosome haplotypes and implications for human history in the Pacific.

    PubMed

    Underhill, P A; Passarino, G; Lin, A A; Marzuki, S; Oefner, P J; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Chambers, G K

    2001-04-01

    An assessment of 28 pertinent binary genetic markers on the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome (NRY) in New Zealand Maori and other relevant populations has revealed a diverse genetic paternal heritage of extant Maori. A maximum parsimony phylogeny was constructed in which nine of the 25 possible binary haplotypes were observed. Although approximately 40% of the samples have haplotypes of unequivocal European origin, an equivalent number of samples have a single binary haplotype that is also observed in Indonesia and New Guinea, indicative of common indigenous Melanesian ancestry. The balance of the lineages has either typical East Asian signatures or alternative compositions consistent with their affinity to Melanesia or New Guinea. Molecular analysis of mtDNA variation confirms the presence of a single predominant characteristic Southeast Asian (9-bp deletion in the Region V) lineage. The Y-chromosome results support a pattern of complex interrelationships between Southeast Asia, Melanesia, and Polynesia, in contrast to mtDNA and linguistic data, which uphold a rapid and homogeneous Austronesian expansion. The Y-chromosome data highlight a distinctive gender-modulated pattern of differential gene flow in the history of Polynesia. PMID:11295824

  15. A putative disease-associated haplotype within the SCN1A gene in Dravet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fendri-Kriaa, Nourhène; Boujilbene, Salma; Kammoun, Fatma; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Ben Mahmoud, Afif; Hsairi, Ines; Rebai, Ahmed; Triki, Chahnez; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2011-05-20

    Dravet syndrome (DS), previously known as severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy, is one of the most severe forms of childhood epilepsy. DS is caused by a mutation in the neuronal voltage-gated sodium-channel alpha-subunit gene (SCN1A). However, 25-30% of patients with DS are negative for the SCN1A mutation screening, suggesting that other molecular mechanisms may account for these disorders. Recently, the first case of DS caused by a mutation in the neuronal voltage-gated sodium-channel beta-subunit gene (SCN1B) was also reported. In this report we aim to make the molecular analysis of the SCN1A and SCN1B genes in two Tunisian patients affected with DS. The SCN1A and SCN1B genes were tested for mutations by direct sequencing. No mutation was revealed in the SCN1A and SCN1B genes by sequencing analyses. On the other hand, 11 known single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in the SCN1A gene and composed a putative disease-associated haplotype in patients with DS phenotype. One of the two patients with putative disease-associated haplotype in SCN1A had also one known single nucleotide polymorphism in the SCN1B gene. The sequencing analyses of the SCN1A gene revealed the presence of a putative disease-associated haplotype in two patients affected with Dravet syndrome. PMID:21531204

  16. Lack of haplotype structuring for two candidate genes for trypanotolerance in cattle.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, I; Pérez-Pardal, L; Traoré, A; Fernández, I; Goyache, F

    2016-04-01

    Bovine trypanotolerance is a heritable trait associated to the ability of the individuals to control parasitaemia and anaemia. The INHBA (BTA4) and TICAM1 (BTA7) genes are strong candidates for trypanotolerance-related traits. The coding sequence of both genes (3951 bp in total) were analysed in a panel including 79 Asian, African and European cattle (Bos taurus and B. indicus) to identify naturally occurring polymorphisms on both genes. In general, the genetic diversity was low. Nineteen of the 33 mutations identified were found just one time. Seventeen different haplotypes were defined for the TICAM1 gene, and 9 and 12 were defined for the exon 1 and the exon 2 of the INHBA gene, respectively. There was no clear separation between cattle groups. The most frequent haplotypes identified in West African taurine samples were also identified in other cattle groups including Asian zebu and European cattle. Phylogenetic trees and principal component analysis confirmed that divergence among the cattle groups analysed was poor, particularly for the INHBA sequences. The European cattle subset had the lowest values of haplotype diversity for both the exon1 (monomorphic) and the exon2 (0.077 ± 0.066) of the INHBA gene. Neutrality tests, in general, did not suggest that the analysed genes were under positive selection. The assessed scenario would be consistent with the identification of recent mutations in evolutionary terms. PMID:26365013

  17. Non‐invasive prenatal diagnosis of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies by relative haplotype dosage†

    PubMed Central

    Court, Samantha; Cleary, Siobhan; Clokie, Samuel; Hewitt, Julie; Williams, Denise; Cole, Trevor; MacDonald, Fiona; Griffiths, Mike; Allen, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective Development of an accurate and affordable test for the non‐invasive prenatal diagnosis of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD/BMD) to implement in clinical practice. Method Cell‐free DNA was extracted from maternal blood and prepared for massively parallel sequencing on an Illumina MiSeq by targeted capture enrichment of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the dystrophin gene on chromosome X. Sequencing data were analysed by relative haplotype dosage. Results Seven healthy pregnant donors and two pregnant DMD carriers all bearing a male fetus were recruited through the non‐invasive prenatal diagnosis for single gene disorders study. Non‐invasive prenatal diagnosis testing was conducted by relative haplotype dosage analysis for X‐linked disorders where the genomic DNA from the chorionic villus sampling (for healthy pregnant donors) or from the proband (for pregnant DMD carriers) was used to identify the reference haplotype. Results for all patients showed a test accuracy of 100%, when the calculated fetal fraction was >4% and correlated with known outcomes. A recombination event was also detected in a DMD patient. Conclusion Our new test for NIPD of DMD/BMD has been shown to be accurate and reliable during initial stages of validation. It is also feasible for implementation into clinical service. © 2016 The Authors. Prenatal Diagnosis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26824862

  18. Association of interleukin-1 gene cluster polymorphisms and haplotypes with multiple sclerosis in an Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Ayyoob; Javan, Bita; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Ebadi, Hamid; Fathi, Davood; Shahbazi, Majid

    2015-11-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multi-factorial autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. The exact etiology of MS is still unknown. Due to the important roles that cytokines play as mediators in immune and inflammatory responses, we have evaluated the association of IL-1 gene cluster polymorphisms and haplotypes with MS susceptibility in 306 unrelated MS patients and 312 healthy matched controls. A significant association was found for the IL-1β +3953 T allele [OR=1.43, 95% CI (1.14-1.79), P value=0.002, Pc=0.01] and for IL-1β +3953 T/T genotype and MS risk [OR=1.92, 95% CI (1.25-2.96), P value=0.005, Pc=0.01]. Interestingly, the genotypes of the polymorphisms remained significant under recessive, co-recessive and dominant models. However, no significant differences were found between MS patients and controls in the genotype and allele frequencies of the IL-1β -511, -31 and IL-1Ra polymorphisms. Haplotype analysis for IL-1β -31 and IL-1β -511, with moderate linkage disequilibrium (LD), using the EM algorithm revealed a significant global association of haplotype differences between the two groups. Lower presence of two haplotypes (H3: C-T and H4: T-C) was observed in the MS patients than healthy controls. However, after applying Bonferroni's correction the differences were not significant. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the association of the IL-1β +3953 gene polymorphism and MS susceptibility. PMID:26531703

  19. Possible Positive Selection for an Arsenic-Protective Haplotype in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Schlebusch, Carina M.; Lewis, Cecil M.; Vahter, Marie; Engström, Karin; Tito, Raúl Y.; Obregón-Tito, Alexandra J.; Huerta, Doris; Polo, Susan I.; Medina, Ángel C.; Brutsaert, Tom D.; Concha, Gabriela; Jakobsson, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    Background: Arsenic in drinking water causes severe health effects. Indigenous people in the South American Andes have likely lived with arsenic-contaminated drinking water for thousands of years. Inhabitants of San Antonio de los Cobres (SAC) in the Argentinean highlands generally carry an AS3MT (the major arsenic-metabolizing gene) haplotype associated with reduced health risks due to rapid arsenic excretion and lower urinary fraction of the monomethylated metabolite. Objectives: We hypothesized an adaptation to high-arsenic living conditions via a possible positive selection for protective AS3MT variants and compared AS3MT haplotype frequencies among different indigenous groups. Methods: Indigenous groups we evaluated were a) inhabitants of SAC and villages near Salta in northern Argentina (n = 346), b) three Native American populations from the Human Genome Diversity Project (HGDP; n = 25), and c) five Peruvian populations (n = 97). The last two groups have presumably lower historical exposure to arsenic. Results: We found a significantly higher frequency of the protective AS3MT haplotype in the SAC population (68.7%) compared with the HGDP (14.3%, p < 0.001, Fisher exact test) and Peruvian (50.5%, p < 0.001) populations. Genome-wide microsatellite (n = 671) analysis showed no detectable level of population structure between SAC and Peruvian populations (measure of population differentiation FST = 0.006) and low levels of structure between SAC and HGDP populations (FST < 0.055 for all pairs of populations compared). Conclusions: Because population stratification seems unlikely to explain the differences in AS3MT haplotype frequencies, our data raise the possibility that, during a few thousand years, natural selection for tolerance to the environmental stressor arsenic may have increased the frequency of protective variants of AS3MT. Further studies are needed to investigate this hypothesis. PMID:23070617

  20. Geostatistical inference of main Y-STR-haplotype groups in Europe.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Lacava, Amalia; Walier, Maja; Willuweit, Sascha; Wienker, Thomas F; Fimmers, Rolf; Baur, Max P; Roewer, Lutz

    2011-03-01

    We examined the multifarious genetic heterogeneity of Europe and neighboring regions from a geographical perspective. We created composite maps outlining the estimated geographical distribution of major groups of genetically similar individuals on the basis of forensic Y-chromosomal markers. We analyzed Y-chromosomal haplotypes composed of 7 highly polymorphic STR loci, genotyped for 33,010 samples, collected at 249 sites in Europe, Western Asia and North Africa, deposited in the YHRD database (www.yhrd.org). The data set comprised 4176 different haplotypes, which we grouped into 20 clusters. For each cluster, the frequency per site was calculated. All geostatistical analysis was performed with the geographic information system GRASS-GIS. We interpolated frequency values across the study area separately for each cluster. Juxtaposing all 20 interpolated surfaces, we point-wisely screened for the highest cluster frequencies and stored it in parallel with the respective cluster label. We combined these two types of data in a composite map. We repeated this procedure for the second highest frequencies in Europe. Major groups were assigned to Northern, Western and Eastern Europe. North Africa built a separate region, Southeastern Europe, Turkey and Near East were divided into several regions. The spatial distribution of the groups accounting for the second highest frequencies in Europe overlapped with the territories of the largest countries. The genetic structure presented in the composite maps fits major historical geopolitical regions and is in agreement with previous studies of genetic frequencies, validating our approach. Our genetic geostatistical approach provides, on the basis of two composite maps, detailed evidence of the geographical distribution and relative frequencies of the most predominant groups of the extant male European population, examined on the basis of forensic Y-STR haplotypes. The existence of considerable genetic differences among geographic

  1. The JAK2 46/1 haplotype predisposes to MPL-mutated myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Amy V.; Campbell, Peter J.; Beer, Philip A.; Schnittger, Susanne; Vannucchi, Alessandro M.; Zoi, Katerina; Percy, Melanie J.; McMullin, Mary Frances; Scott, Linda M.; Tapper, William; Silver, Richard T.; Oscier, David; Harrison, Claire N.; Grallert, Harald; Kisialiou, Aliaksei; Strike, Paul; Chase, Andrew J.; Green, Anthony R.

    2010-01-01

    The 46/1 JAK2 haplotype predisposes to V617F-positive myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the underlying mechanism is obscure. We analyzed essential thrombocythemia patients entered into the PT-1 studies and, as expected, found that 46/1 was overrepresented in V617F-positive cases (n = 404) versus controls (n = 1492, P = 3.9 × 10−11). The 46/1 haplotype was also overrepresented in cases without V617F (n = 347, P = .009), with an excess seen for both MPL exon 10 mutated and V617F, MPL exon 10 nonmutated cases. Analysis of further MPL-positive, V617F-negative cases confirmed an excess of 46/1 (n = 176, P = .002), but no association between MPL mutations and MPL haplotype was seen. An excess of 46/1 was also seen in JAK2 exon 12 mutated cases (n = 69, P = .002), and these mutations preferentially arose on the 46/1 chromosome (P = .029). No association between 46/1 and clinical or laboratory features was seen in the PT-1 cohort either with or without V617F. The excess of 46/1 in JAK2 exon 12 cases is compatible with both the “hypermutability” and “fertile ground” hypotheses, but the excess in MPL-mutated cases argues against the former. No difference in sequence, splicing, or expression of JAK2 was found on 46/1 compared with other haplotypes, suggesting that any functional difference of JAK2 on 46/1, if it exists, must be relatively subtle. PMID:20304805

  2. Worldwide patterns of haplotype diversity at 9p21.3, a locus associated with type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Silander, Kaisa; Tang, Hua; Myles, Sean; Jakkula, Eveliina; Timpson, Nicholas J; Cavalli-Sforza, Luigi; Peltonen, Leena

    2009-01-01

    A 100 kb region on 9p21.3 harbors two major disease susceptibility loci: one for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and one for coronary heart disease (CHD). The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with these two diseases in Europeans reside on two adjacent haplotype blocks with independent effects on disease. To help delimit the regions that likely harbor the disease-causing variants in populations of non-European origin, we studied the haplotype diversity and allelic history of the 9p21.3 region using 938 unrelated individuals from 51 populations (Human Genome Diversity Panel). We used SNP data from Illumina's 650Y SNP arrays supplemented with five additional SNPs within the region of interest. Haplotype frequencies were analyzed with the EM algorithm implemented in PLINK. For the T2D locus, the TT risk haplotype of SNPs rs10811661 and rs10757283 was present at similar frequencies in all global populations, while a shared 6-SNP haplotype that carries the protective C allele of rs10811661 was found at a frequency of 2.9% in Africans and 41.3% in East Asians and was associated with low haplotype diversity. For the CHD locus, all populations shared a core risk haplotype spanning >17.5 kb, which shows dramatic increase in frequency between African (11.5%) and Middle Eastern (63.7%) populations. Interestingly, two SNPs (rs2891168 and rs10757278) tagging this CHD risk haplotype are most strongly associated with CHD disease status according to independent clinical fine-mapping studies. The large variation in linkage disequilibrium patterns identified between the populations demonstrates the importance of allelic background data when selecting SNPs for replication in global populations. Intriguingly, the protective allele for T2D and the risk allele for CHD show an increase in frequency in non-Africans compared to Africans, implying different population histories for these two adjacent disease loci. PMID:19463184

  3. MHC microsatellite diversity and linkage disequilibrium among common HLA-A, HLA-B, DRB1 haplotypes: implications for unrelated donor hematopoietic transplantation and disease association studies.

    PubMed

    Malkki, M; Single, R; Carrington, M; Thomson, G; Petersdorf, E

    2005-08-01

    Twenty-two human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region microsatellite (Msat) markers were studied for diversity and linkage disequilibrium (LD) with HLA loci in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients and their HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1, and HLA-DQB1 allele-matched unrelated donors. These Msats showed highly significant LD over much of the MHC region. The Msat diversity of five common Caucasian haplotypes (HLA-A1-B8-DR3, A3-B7-DR15, A2-B44-DR4, A29-B44-DR7, and A2-B7-DR15) was examined using a new measure called 'haplotype specific heterozygosity' (HSH). Each of the five haplotypes had at least one Msat marker with an HSH value of zero indicating that only one Msat allele was observed for the particular HLA haplotype. In addition, the ability of Msats to predict HLA-A-B-DRB1 haplotypes was studied. Over 90% prediction probability of two common haplotypes (HLA-A1-B8-DR3 and HLA-A3-B7-DR15) was achieved with information from three Msats (D6S265/D6S2787/D6S2894 and D6S510/D6S2810/D6S2876, respectively). We demonstrate how the HSH index can be used in the selection of informative Msats for transplantation and disease association studies. Markers with low HSH values can be used to predict specific HLA haplotypes or multilocus genotypes to supplement the screening of HLA-matched donors for transplantation. Markers with high HSH values will be most informative in studies investigating MHC region disease-susceptibility genes where HLA haplotypic effects are known to exist. PMID:16029431

  4. [Genetic Variability and Structure of SNP Haplotypes in the DMPK Gene in Yakuts and Other Ethnic Groups of Northern Eurasia in Relation to Myotonic Dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Swarovskaya, M G; Stepanova, S K; Marussin, A V; Sukhomyasova, A L; Maximova, N R; Stepanov, V A

    2015-06-01

    The genetic variability of the DMPK locus has been studied in relation to six SNP markers (rs2070736, rs572634, rs1799894, rs527221, rs915915, and rs10415988) in Yakuts with myotonic dystrophy (MD) in the Yakut population and in populations of northern Eurasia. Significant differences were observed in the allele frequencies between patients and a population sample of Yakuts for three SNP loci (rs915915, rs1799894, and rs10415988) associated with a high chance of disease manifestation. The odds ratios (OR) of MD development in representatives of the Yakut population for these three loci were 2.59 (95% CI, p = 0,004), 4.99 (95% CI, p = 0.000), and 3.15 (95% CI, p = 0.01), respectively. Haplotype TTTCTC, which is associated with MD, and haplotype GTCCTT, which was observed only in Yakut MD patients (never in MD patients of non-Yakut origin), were revealed. A low level of variability in the locus of DMRK gene in Yakuts (H(e) = 0.283) compared with other examined populations was noted. An analysis of pairwise genetic relationships between populations revealed their significant differentiation for all the examined loci. In addition, a low level of differentiation in territorial groups of Yakut populations (F(ST) = 0.79%), which was related to the high subdivision of the northern Eurasian population (F(ST) = 11.83%), was observed. PMID:26310035

  5. Y chromosome haplotype diversity in Mongolic-speaking populations and gene conversion at the duplicated STR DYS385a,b in haplogroup C3-M407.

    PubMed

    Malyarchuk, Boris A; Derenko, Miroslava; Denisova, Galina; Woźniak, Marcin; Rogalla, Urszula; Dambueva, Irina; Grzybowski, Tomasz

    2016-06-01

    Y chromosome microsatellite (Y-STR) diversity has been studied in different Mongolic-speaking populations from South Siberia, Mongolia, North-East China and East Europe. The results obtained indicate that the Mongolic-speaking populations clustered into two groups, with one group including populations from eastern part of South Siberia and Central Asia (the Buryats, Barghuts and Khamnigans) and the other group including populations from western part of Central Asia and East Europe (the Mongols and Kalmyks). High frequency of haplogroup C3-M407 (>50%) is present in the Buryats, Barghuts and Khamnigans, whereas in the Mongols and Kalmyks its frequency is much lower. In addition, two allelic combinations in DYS385a,b loci of C3-M407 haplotypes have been observed: the combination 11,18 (as well as 11,17 and 11,19) is frequent in different Mongolic-speaking populations, but the 11,11 branch is present mainly in the Kalmyks and Mongols. Results of locus-specific sequencing suggest that the action of gene conversion is a more likely explanation for origin of homoallelic 11,11 combination. Moreover, analysis of median networks of Y-STR haplotypes demonstrates that at least two gene conversion events can be revealed-one of them has probably occurred among the Mongols, and the other event occurred in the Barghuts. These two events give an average gene conversion rate range of 0.24-7.1 × 10(-3) per generation. PMID:26911356

  6. Mitochondrial Haplotype Influences Mycelial Growth of Agaricus bisporus Heterokaryons

    PubMed Central

    De La Bastide, P. Y.; Sonnenberg, A.; Van Griensven, L.; Anderson, J. B.; Horgen, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of mitochondrial haplotype on growth of the common button mushroom Agaricus bisporus. Ten pairs of heterokaryon strains, each pair having the same nuclear genome but different mitochondrial genomes, were produced by controlled crosses among a group of homokaryons of both wild and commercial origins. Seven genetically distinct mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes were evaluated in different nuclear backgrounds. The growth of heterokaryon pairs differing only in their mtDNA haplotypes was compared by measuring mycelial radial growth rate on solid complete yeast medium (CYM) and compost extract medium and by measuring mycelial dry weight accumulation in liquid CYM. All A. bisporus strains were incubated at temperatures similar to those utilized in commercial production facilities (18, 22, and 26(deg)C). Statistically significant differences were detected in 8 of the 10 heterokaryon pairs evaluated for one or two of the three growth parameters measured. Some heterokaryon pairs showed differences in a single growth parameter at all three temperatures of incubation, suggesting a temperature-independent difference. Others showed differences at only a single temperature, suggesting a temperature-dependent difference. The influence of some mtDNA haplotypes on growth was dependent on the nuclear genetic background. Our results show that mtDNA haplotype can influence growth of A. bisporus heterokaryons in some nuclear backgrounds. These observations demonstrate the importance of including a number of mitochondrial genotypes and evaluating different nuclear-mitochondrial combinations of A. bisporus in strain improvement programs. PMID:16535683

  7. In Vivo Characterization of Human APOA5 Haplotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Ahituv, Nadav; Akiyama, Jennifer; Chapman-Helleboid, Audrey; Fruchart, Jamila; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2006-10-01

    Increased plasma triglycerides concentrations are an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Numerous studies support a reproducible genetic association between two minor haplotypes in the human apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) and increased plasma triglyceride concentrations. We thus sought to investigate the effect of these minor haplotypes (APOA5*2 and APOA5*3) on ApoAV plasma levels through the precise insertion of single-copy intact APOA5 haplotypes at a targeted location in the mouse genome. While we found no difference in the amount of human plasma ApoAV in mice containing the common APOA5*1 and minor APOA5*2 haplotype, the introduction of the single APOA5*3 defining allele (19W) resulted in 3-fold lower ApoAV plasma levels consistent with existing genetic association studies. These results indicate that S19W polymorphism is likely to be functional and explain the strong association of this variant with plasma triglycerides supporting the value of sensitive in vivo assays to define the functional nature of human haplotypes.

  8. HLA Haplotypes and Genotypes Frequencies in Brazilian Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sippert, Emília Ângela; Silva, Cléverson de Oliveira e; Ayo, Christiane Maria; Marques, Silvia Barbosa Dutra; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila; Sell, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) have a pivotal role in immune response and may be involved in antigen recognition of periodontal pathogens. However, the associations of HLA with chronic periodontitis (CP) have not been previously studied in the Brazilian population. In an attempt to clarify the issue of genetic predisposition to CP, we examined the distribution of HLA alleles, genotypes, and haplotypes in patients from Southern Brazil. One hundred and eight CP patients and 151 healthy and unrelated controls with age-, gender-, and ethnicity-matched were HLA investigated by polymerase chain reaction with sequence specific oligonucleotides. To exclude smoking as a predisposing factor, statistical analyses were performed in the total sample and in nonsmoking individuals. The significant results showed a positive association of the A∗02/HLA-B∗40 haplotype with CP (total samples: 4.2% versus 0%, Pc = 0.03; nonsmokers: 4.3% versus 0%, Pc = 0.23) and a lower frequency of HLA-B∗15/HLA-DRB1∗11 haplotype in CP compared to controls (total samples: 0.0% versus 4.3%, Pc = 0.04; nonsmokers: 0 versus 5.1%, Pc = 1.0). In conclusion, the HLA-A∗02/B∗40 haplotype may contribute to the development of CP, while HLA-B∗15/DRB1∗11 haplotype might indicate resistance to disease among Brazilians. PMID:26339134

  9. Maximum parsimony xor haplotyping by sparse dictionary selection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Xor-genotype is a cost-effective alternative to the genotype sequence of an individual. Recent methods developed for haplotype inference have aimed at finding the solution based on xor-genotype data. Given the xor-genotypes of a group of unrelated individuals, it is possible to infer the haplotype pairs for each individual with the aid of a small number of regular genotypes. Results We propose a framework of maximum parsimony inference of haplotypes based on the search of a sparse dictionary, and we present a greedy method that can effectively infer the haplotype pairs given a set of xor-genotypes augmented by a small number of regular genotypes. We test the performance of the proposed approach on synthetic data sets with different number of individuals and SNPs, and compare the performances with the state-of-the-art xor-haplotyping methods PPXH and XOR-HAPLOGEN. Conclusions Experimental results show good inference qualities for the proposed method under all circumstances, especially on large data sets. Results on a real database, CFTR, also demonstrate significantly better performance. The proposed algorithm is also capable of finding accurate solutions with missing data and/or typing errors. PMID:24059285

  10. High diversity of alpha-globin haplotypes in a Senegalese population, including many previously unreported variants.

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, J J; Excoffier, L; Swinburn, C; Boyce, A J; Harding, R M; Langaney, A; Clegg, J B

    1995-01-01

    RFLP haplotypes at the alpha-globin gene complex have been examined in 190 individuals from the Niokolo Mandenka population of Senegal: haplotypes were assigned unambiguously for 210 chromosomes. The Mandenka share with other African populations a sample size-independent haplotype diversity that is much greater than that in any non-African population: the number of haplotypes observed in the Mandenka is typically twice that seen in the non-African populations sampled to date. Of these haplotypes, 17.3% had not been observed in any previous surveys, and a further 19.1% have previously been reported only in African populations. The haplotype distribution shows clear differences between African and non-African peoples, but this is on the basis of population-specific haplotypes combined with haplotypes common to all. The relationship of the newly reported haplotypes to those previously recorded suggests that several mutation processes, particularly recombination as homologous exchange or gene conversion, have been involved in their production. A computer program based on the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm was used to obtain maximum-likelihood estimates of haplotype frequencies for the entire data set: good concordance between the unambiguous and EM-derived sets was seen for the overall haplotype frequencies. Some of the low-frequency haplotypes reported by the estimation algorithm differ greatly, in structure, from those haplotypes known to be present in human populations, and they may not represent haplotypes actually present in the sample. PMID:7485171

  11. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) haplotypes correlate with altered response to multiple antipsychotics in the CATIE trial.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Timothy L; Brennan, Mark D

    2014-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) signaling has been shown to have antipsychotic properties in animal models and to impact glucose-dependent insulin release, satiety, memory, and learning in man. Previous work has shown that two coding mutations (rs6923761 and rs1042044) are associated with altered insulin release and cortisol levels. We identified four frequently occurring haplotypes in Caucasians, haplotype 1 through haplotype 4, spanning exons 4-7 and containing the two coding variants. We analyzed response to antipsychotics, defined as predicted change in PANSS-Total (dPANSS) at 18 months, in Caucasian subjects from the Clinical Antipsychotic Trial of Intervention Effectiveness treated with olanzapine (n=139), perphenazine (n=78), quetiapine (n=14), risperidone (n=143), and ziprasidone (n=90). Haplotype trend regression analysis revealed significant associations with dPANSS for olanzapine (best p=0.002), perphenazine (best p=0.01), quetiapine (best p=0.008), risperidone (best p=0.02), and ziprasidone (best p=0.007). We also evaluated genetic models for the two most common haplotypes. Haplotype 1 (uniquely including the rs1042044 [Leu(260)] allele) was associated with better response to olanzapine (p=0.002), and risperidone (p=0.006), and worse response to perphenazine (p=.03), and ziprasidone (p=0.003), with a recessive genetic model providing the best fit. Haplotype 2 (uniquely including the rs6923761 [Ser(168)] allele) was associated with better response to perphenazine (p=0.001) and worse response to olanzapine (p=.02), with a dominant genetic model providing the best fit. However, GLP1R haplotypes were not associated with antipsychotic-induced weight gain. These results link functional genetic variants in GLP1R to antipsychotic response. PMID:25449714

  12. Glucogon-like Peptide 1 Receptor (GLP1R) haplotypes correlate with altered response to multiple antipsychotics in the CATIE trial

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Timothy; Brennan, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    Glucogon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) signaling has been shown to have antipsychotic properties in animal models and to impact glucose-dependent insulin release, satiety, memory, and learning in man. Previous work has shown that two coding mutations (rs6923761 and rs1042044) are associated with altered insulin release and cortisol levels. We identified four frequently occurring haplotypes in Caucasians, haplotype 1 through haplotype 4, spanning exons 4-7 and containing the two coding variants. We analyzed response to antiapsychotics, as defined as predicted change in PANSS-Total (dPANSS) at 18 months, in Caucasian subjects from Clinical Antipsychotic Trial of Intervention Effectiveness treated with (olanzapine, n=139; perphenazine, n=78; quetiapine, n=14; risperidone, n=143; and ziprasidone, n=90). Haplotype trend regression analysis revealed significant associations with dPANSS for olanzapine (best p=0.002), perphenazine (best p=0.01), quetiapine (best p=0.008), risperidone (best p=0.02), and ziprasidone (best p=0.007). We also evaluated genetic models for the two most common haplotypes. Haplotype 1 (uniquely including the rs1042044 [Leu260] allele) was associated with better response to olanzapine (p=0.002), and risperidone (p=0.006), and worse response to perphenazine (p=.03), and ziprasidone (p=0.003), with a recessive genetic model providing the best fit. Haplotype 2 (uniquely including the rs6923761 [Ser168] allele) was associated with better response to perphenazine (p=0.001) and worse response to olanzapine (p=.02), with a dominant genetic model providing the best fit. However, GLP1R haplotypes were not associated with antipsychotic-induced weight gain. These results link functional genetic variants in GLP1R to antipsychotic response. PMID:25449714

  13. Warming and drying of the eastern Mediterranean: Additional evidence from trend analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shohami, David; Dayan, Uri; Morin, Efrat

    2011-11-01

    The climate of the eastern Mediterranean (EM), at the transition zone between the Mediterranean climate and the semi-arid/arid climate, has been studied for a 39-year period to determine whether climate changes have taken place. A thorough trend analysis using the nonparametric Mann-Kendall test with Sen's slope estimator has been applied to ground station measurements, atmospheric reanalysis data, synoptic classification data and global data sets for the years 1964-2003. In addition, changes in atmospheric regional patterns between the first and last twenty years were determined by visual comparisons of their composite mean. The main findings of the analysis are: 1) changes of atmospheric conditions during summer and the transitional seasons (mainly autumn) support a warmer climate over the EM and this change is already statistically evident in surface temperatures having exhibited positive trends of 0.2-1°C/decade; 2) changes of atmospheric conditions during winter and the transitional seasons support drier conditions due to reduction in cyclogenesis and specific humidity over the EM, but this change is not yet statistically evident in surface station rain data, presumably because of the high natural precipitation variance masking such a change. The overall conclusion of this study is that the EM region is under climate change leading to warmer and drier conditions.

  14. Haplotyping the human leukocyte antigen system from single chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Nicholas M.; Burton, Matthew; Powell, David R.; Rossello, Fernando J.; Cooper, Don; Chopra, Abha; Hsieh, Ming Je; Sayer, David C.; Gordon, Lavinia; Pertile, Mark D; Tait, Brian D.; Irving, Helen R.; Pouton, Colin W.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a method for determining the parental HLA haplotypes of a single individual without recourse to conventional segregation genetics. Blood samples were cultured to identify and sort chromosome 6 by bivariate flow cytometry. Single chromosome 6 amplification products were confirmed with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and verified by deep sequencing to enable assignment of both alleles at the HLA loci, defining the two haplotypes. This study exemplifies a rapid and efficient method of haplotyping that can be applied to any chromosome pair, or indeed all chromosome pairs, using a single sorting operation. The method represents a cost-effective approach to complete phasing of SNPs, which will facilitate a deeper understanding of the links between SNPs, gene regulation and protein function. PMID:27461731

  15. Chloroquine-Resistant Haplotype Plasmodium falciparum Parasites, Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Londono, Berlin L.; Eisele, Thomas P.; Keating, Joseph; Bennett, Adam; Chattopadhyay, Chandon; Heyliger, Gaetan; Mack, Brian; Rawson, Ian; Vely, Jean-Francois; Désinor, Olbeg

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum parasites have been endemic to Haiti for >40 years without evidence of chloroquine (CQ) resistance. In 2006 and 2007, we obtained blood smears for rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and filter paper blots of blood from 821 persons by passive and active case detection. P. falciparum infections diagnosed for 79 persons by blood smear or RDT were confirmed by PCR for the small subunit rRNA gene of P. falciparum. Amplification of the P. falciparum CQ resistance transporter (pfcrt) gene yielded 10 samples with amplicons resistant to cleavage by ApoI. A total of 5 of 9 samples had threonine at position 76 of pfcrt, which is consistent with CQ resistance (haplotypes at positions 72–76 were CVIET [n = 4] and CVMNT [n = 1]); 4 had only the wild-type haplotype associated with CQ susceptibility (CVMNK). These results indicate that CQ-resistant haplotype P. falciparum malaria parasites are present in Haiti. PMID:19402959

  16. Haplotyping the human leukocyte antigen system from single chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Nicholas M; Burton, Matthew; Powell, David R; Rossello, Fernando J; Cooper, Don; Chopra, Abha; Hsieh, Ming Je; Sayer, David C; Gordon, Lavinia; Pertile, Mark D; Tait, Brian D; Irving, Helen R; Pouton, Colin W

    2016-01-01

    We describe a method for determining the parental HLA haplotypes of a single individual without recourse to conventional segregation genetics. Blood samples were cultured to identify and sort chromosome 6 by bivariate flow cytometry. Single chromosome 6 amplification products were confirmed with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and verified by deep sequencing to enable assignment of both alleles at the HLA loci, defining the two haplotypes. This study exemplifies a rapid and efficient method of haplotyping that can be applied to any chromosome pair, or indeed all chromosome pairs, using a single sorting operation. The method represents a cost-effective approach to complete phasing of SNPs, which will facilitate a deeper understanding of the links between SNPs, gene regulation and protein function. PMID:27461731

  17. Prion gene haplotypes of U.S. cattle

    PubMed Central

    Clawson, Michael L; Heaton, Michael P; Keele, John W; Smith, Timothy PL; Harhay, Gregory P; Laegreid, William W

    2006-01-01

    Background Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a fatal neurological disorder characterized by abnormal deposits of a protease-resistant isoform of the prion protein. Characterizing linkage disequilibrium (LD) and haplotype networks within the bovine prion gene (PRNP) is important for 1) testing rare or common PRNP variation for an association with BSE and 2) interpreting any association of PRNP alleles with BSE susceptibility. The objective of this study was to identify polymorphisms and haplotypes within PRNP from the promoter region through the 3'UTR in a diverse sample of U.S. cattle genomes. Results A 25.2-kb genomic region containing PRNP was sequenced from 192 diverse U.S. beef and dairy cattle. Sequence analyses identified 388 total polymorphisms, of which 287 have not previously been reported. The polymorphism alleles define PRNP by regions of high and low LD. High LD is present between alleles in the promoter region through exon 2 (6.7 kb). PRNP alleles within the majority of intron 2, the entire coding sequence and the untranslated region of exon 3 are in low LD (18.0 kb). Two haplotype networks, one representing the region of high LD and the other the region of low LD yielded nineteen different combinations that represent haplotypes spanning PRNP. The haplotype combinations are tagged by 19 polymorphisms (htSNPS) which characterize variation within and across PRNP. Conclusion The number of polymorphisms in the prion gene region of U.S. cattle is nearly four times greater than previously described. These polymorphisms define PRNP haplotypes that may influence BSE susceptibility in cattle. PMID:17092337

  18. Worldwide HLA-E nucleotide and haplotype variability reveals a conserved gene for coding and 3' untranslated regions.

    PubMed

    Felício, L P; Porto, I O P; Mendes-Junior, C T; Veiga-Castelli, L C; Santos, K E; Vianello-Brondani, R P; Sabbagh, A; Moreau, P; Donadi, E A; Castelli, E C

    2014-02-01

    The human leukocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) locus is a human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene associated with immune-modulation and suppression of the immune response by the interaction with specific natural killer (NK) and T cell receptors (TCRs). It is considered one of the most conserved genes of the human MHC; however, this low nucleotide variability seems to be a consequence of the scarce number of studies focusing on this subject. In this manuscript we assessed the nucleotide variability at the HLA-E coding and 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs) in Brazil and in the populations from the 1000Genomes Consortium. Twenty-eight variable sites arranged into 33 haplotypes were detected and most of these haplotypes (98.2%) are encoding one of the two HLA-E molecules found worldwide, E*01:01 and E*01:03. Moreover, three worldwide spread haplotypes, associated with the coding alleles E*01:01:01, E*01:03:01 and E*01:03:02, account for 85% of all HLA-E haplotypes, suggesting that they arose early before human speciation. In addition, the low nucleotide diversity found for the HLA-E coding and 3'UTR in worldwide populations suggests that the HLA-E gene is in fact a conserved gene, which might be a consequence of its key role in the modulation of the immune system. PMID:24400773

  19. Changes of pore systems and infiltration analysis in two degraded soils after rock fragment addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargiulo, Laura; Coppola, Antonio; De Mascellis, Roberto; Basile, Angelo; Mele, Giacomo; Terribile, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Many soils in arid and semi-arid environments contain high amounts of rock fragments as a result of both natural soil forming processes and human activities. The amount, dimension and shape of rock fragment strongly influence soil structure development and therefore many soil processes (e.g. infiltration, water storage, solute transport, etc.). The aim of this work was to test the effects on both infiltration process and soil pore formation following an addition of rock fragments. The test was performed on two different soils: a clayey soil (Alfisol) and a clay loamy soil (Entisol) showing both a natural compact structure and water stagnation problems in field. Three concentrations of 4-8mm rock fragments (15%, 25% and 35%) were added to air-dried soils and the repacked samples have been subject to nine wet/dry cycles in order to induce soil structure formation and its stabilization. The process of infiltration was monitored at -12 cm of pressure heads imposed at the soil surface and kept constant for a certain time by a tension infiltrometer. Moreover, k(h) was determined imposing -9, -6,-3 and -1 cm at soil surface and applying a steady-state solution. After the hydrological measurements the soil samples were resin-impregnated and images of vertical sections of the samples, acquired at 20µm resolution, were analyzed in order to quantify the pore size distribution. This latter was calculated using the "successive opening" approach. The Entisol samples showed similar infiltration curves I(t) among the 4 treatments, with higher percentage of stones (i.e. 25 and 35%) showing a faster rising in the early-time (< 2 min) infiltration; the Alfisol samples are spread, showing a higher variability: limiting the analysis to the first three, despite they show a similar shape, the higher the stones content the lower the cumulated infiltration. The behavior of the 35% sample diverges from the others: it shows a fast rising step at the very early time (< 2 min) followed by a

  20. Methane flux in non-wetland soils in response to nitrogen addition: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Aronson, E L; Helliker, B R

    2010-11-01

    The controls on methane (CH4) flux into and out of soils are not well understood. Environmental variables including temperature, precipitation, and nitrogen (N) status can have strong effects on the magnitude and direction (e.g., uptake vs. release) of CH4 flux. To better understand the interactions between CH4-cycling microorganisms and N in the non-wetland soil system, a meta-analysis was performed on published literature comparing CH4 flux in N amended and matched control plots. An appropriate study index was developed for this purpose. It was found that smaller amounts of N tended to stimulate CH4 uptake while larger amounts tended to inhibit uptake by the soil. When all other variables were accounted for, the switch occurred at 100 kg N x ha(-1) x yr(-1). Managed land and land with a longer duration of fertilization showed greater inhibition of CH4 uptake with added N. These results support the hypotheses that large amounts of available N can inhibit methanotrophy, but also that methanotrophs in upland soils can be N limited in their consumption of CH4 from the atmosphere. There were interactions between other variables and N addition on the CH4 flux response: lower temperature and, to a lesser extent, higher precipitation magnified the inhibition of CH4 uptake due to N addition. Several mechanisms that may cause these trends are discussed, but none could be conclusively supported with this approach. Further controlled and in situ study should be undertaken to isolate the correct mechanism(s) responsible and to model upland CH4 flux. PMID:21141185

  1. A comparative analysis of British and Taiwanese students' conceptual and procedural knowledge of fraction addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui-Chuan

    2014-10-01

    This study examines students' procedural and conceptual achievement in fraction addition in England and Taiwan. A total of 1209 participants (561 British students and 648 Taiwanese students) at ages 12 and 13 were recruited from England and Taiwan to take part in the study. A quantitative design by means of a self-designed written test is adopted as central to the methodological considerations. The test has two major parts: the concept part and the skill part. The former is concerned with students' conceptual knowledge of fraction addition and the latter is interested in students' procedural competence when adding fractions. There were statistically significant differences both in concept and skill parts between the British and Taiwanese groups with the latter having a higher score. The analysis of the students' responses to the skill section indicates that the superiority of Taiwanese students' procedural achievements over those of their British peers is because most of the former are able to apply algorithms to adding fractions far more successfully than the latter. Earlier, Hart [1] reported that around 30% of the British students in their study used an erroneous strategy (adding tops and bottoms, for example, 2/3 + 1/7 = 3/10) while adding fractions. This study also finds that nearly the same percentage of the British group remained using this erroneous strategy to add fractions as Hart found in 1981. The study also provides evidence to show that students' understanding of fractions is confused and incomplete, even those who are successfully able to perform operations. More research is needed to be done to help students make sense of the operations and eventually attain computational competence with meaningful grounding in the domain of fractions.

  2. In-cloud sulfate addition to single particles resolved with sulfur isotope analysis during HCCT-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, E.; Sinha, B.; van Pinxteren, D.; Schneider, J.; Poulain, L.; Collett, J.; D'Anna, B.; Fahlbusch, B.; Foley, S.; Fomba, K. W.; George, C.; Gnauk, T.; Henning, S.; Lee, T.; Mertes, S.; Roth, A.; Stratmann, F.; Borrmann, S.; Hoppe, P.; Herrmann, H.

    2014-01-01

    In-cloud production of sulfate modifies the aerosol size distribution, with important implications for the magnitude of indirect and direct aerosol cooling and the impact of SO2 emissions on the environment. We investigate which sulfate sources dominate the in-cloud addition of sulfate to different particle classes as an air parcel passes through an orographic cloud. Sulfate aerosol, SO2 and H2SO4 were collected upwind, in-cloud and downwind of an orographic cloud for three cloud measurement events during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia campaign in Autumn, 2010 (HCCT-2010). Combined SEM and NanoSIMS analysis of single particles allowed the δ34S of particulate sulfate to be resolved for particle size and type. The most important in-cloud SO2 oxidation pathway at HCCT-2010 was aqueous oxidation catalysed by transition metal ions (TMI catalysis), which was shown with single particle isotope analyses to occur primarily in cloud droplets nucleated on coarse mineral dust. In contrast, direct uptake of H2SO4(g) and ultrafine particulate were the most important sources modifying fine mineral dust, increasing its hygroscopicity and facilitating activation. Sulfate addition to "mixed" particles (secondary organic and inorganic aerosol) and coated soot was dominated by in-cloud aqueous SO2 oxidation by H2O2 and direct uptake of H2SO4(g) and ultrafine particle sulfate, depending on particle size mode and time of day. These results provide new insight into in-cloud sulfate production mechanisms, and show the importance of single particle measurements and models to accurately assess the environmental effects of cloud processing.

  3. In-cloud sulfate addition to single particles resolved with sulfur isotope analysis during HCCT-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, E.; Sinha, B.; van Pinxteren, D.; Schneider, J.; Poulain, L.; Collett, J.; D'Anna, B.; Fahlbusch, B.; Foley, S.; Fomba, K. W.; George, C.; Gnauk, T.; Henning, S.; Lee, T.; Mertes, S.; Roth, A.; Stratmann, F.; Borrmann, S.; Hoppe, P.; Herrmann, H.

    2014-04-01

    In-cloud production of sulfate modifies aerosol size distribution, with important implications for the magnitude of indirect and direct aerosol cooling and the impact of SO2 emissions on the environment. We investigate which sulfate sources dominate the in-cloud addition of sulfate to different particle classes as an air parcel passes through an orographic cloud. Sulfate aerosol, SO2 and H2SO4 were collected upwind, in-cloud and downwind of an orographic cloud for three cloud measurement events during the Hill Cap Cloud Thuringia campaign in autumn 2010 (HCCT-2010). Combined SEM and NanoSIMS analysis of single particles allowed the δ34S of particulate sulfate to be resolved for particle size and type. The most important in-cloud SO2 oxidation pathway at HCCT-2010 was aqueous oxidation catalysed by transition metal ions (TMI catalysis), which was shown with single particle isotope analyses to occur primarily in cloud droplets nucleated on coarse mineral dust. In contrast, direct uptake of H2SO4 (g) and ultrafine particulate were the most important sources modifying fine mineral dust, increasing its hygroscopicity and facilitating activation. Sulfate addition to "mixed" particles (secondary organic and inorganic aerosol) and coated soot was dominated by in-cloud aqueous SO2 oxidation by H2O2 and direct uptake of H2SO4 (g) and ultrafine particle sulfate, depending on particle size mode and time of day. These results provide new insight into in-cloud sulfate production mechanisms, and show the importance of single particle measurements and models to accurately assess the environmental effects of cloud processing.

  4. Analysis of Time to Event Outcomes in Randomized Controlled Trials by Generalized Additive Models

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Unruh, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Randomized Controlled Trials almost invariably utilize the hazard ratio calculated with a Cox proportional hazard model as a treatment efficacy measure. Despite the widespread adoption of HRs, these provide a limited understanding of the treatment effect and may even provide a biased estimate when the assumption of proportional hazards in the Cox model is not verified by the trial data. Additional treatment effect measures on the survival probability or the time scale may be used to supplement HRs but a framework for the simultaneous generation of these measures is lacking. Methods By splitting follow-up time at the nodes of a Gauss Lobatto numerical quadrature rule, techniques for Poisson Generalized Additive Models (PGAM) can be adopted for flexible hazard modeling. Straightforward simulation post-estimation transforms PGAM estimates for the log hazard into estimates of the survival function. These in turn were used to calculate relative and absolute risks or even differences in restricted mean survival time between treatment arms. We illustrate our approach with extensive simulations and in two trials: IPASS (in which the proportionality of hazards was violated) and HEMO a long duration study conducted under evolving standards of care on a heterogeneous patient population. Findings PGAM can generate estimates of the survival function and the hazard ratio that are essentially identical to those obtained by Kaplan Meier curve analysis and the Cox model. PGAMs can simultaneously provide multiple measures of treatment efficacy after a single data pass. Furthermore, supported unadjusted (overall treatment effect) but also subgroup and adjusted analyses, while incorporating multiple time scales and accounting for non-proportional hazards in survival data. Conclusions By augmenting the HR conventionally reported, PGAMs have the potential to support the inferential goals of multiple stakeholders involved in the evaluation and appraisal of clinical trial

  5. Can Additional Homeopathic Treatment Save Costs? A Retrospective Cost-Analysis Based on 44500 Insured Persons

    PubMed Central

    Ostermann, Julia K.; Reinhold, Thomas; Witt, Claudia M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the health care costs for patients using additional homeopathic treatment (homeopathy group) with the costs for those receiving usual care (control group). Methods Cost data provided by a large German statutory health insurance company were retrospectively analysed from the societal perspective (primary outcome) and from the statutory health insurance perspective. Patients in both groups were matched using a propensity score matching procedure based on socio-demographic variables as well as costs, number of hospital stays and sick leave days in the previous 12 months. Total cumulative costs over 18 months were compared between the groups with an analysis of covariance (adjusted for baseline costs) across diagnoses and for six specific diagnoses (depression, migraine, allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, and headache). Results Data from 44,550 patients (67.3% females) were available for analysis. From the societal perspective, total costs after 18 months were higher in the homeopathy group (adj. mean: EUR 7,207.72 [95% CI 7,001.14–7,414.29]) than in the control group (EUR 5,857.56 [5,650.98–6,064.13]; p<0.0001) with the largest differences between groups for productivity loss (homeopathy EUR 3,698.00 [3,586.48–3,809.53] vs. control EUR 3,092.84 [2,981.31–3,204.37]) and outpatient care costs (homeopathy EUR 1,088.25 [1,073.90–1,102.59] vs. control EUR 867.87 [853.52–882.21]). Group differences decreased over time. For all diagnoses, costs were higher in the homeopathy group than in the control group, although this difference was not always statistically significant. Conclusion Compared with usual care, additional homeopathic treatment was associated with significantly higher costs. These analyses did not confirm previously observed cost savings resulting from the use of homeopathy in the health care system. PMID:26230412

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes associated with feed efficiency in beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background General, breed- and diet-dependent associations between feed efficiency in beef cattle and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or haplotypes were identified on a population of 1321 steers using a 50 K SNP panel. Genomic associations with traditional two-step indicators of feed efficiency – residual feed intake (RFI), residual average daily gain (RADG), and residual intake gain (RIG) – were compared to associations with two complementary one-step indicators of feed efficiency: efficiency of intake (EI) and efficiency of gain (EG). Associations uncovered in a training data set were evaluated on independent validation data set. A multi-SNP model was developed to predict feed efficiency. Functional analysis of genes harboring SNPs significantly associated with feed efficiency and network visualization aided in the interpretation of the results. Results For the five feed efficiency indicators, the numbers of general, breed-dependent, and diet-dependent associations with SNPs (P-value < 0.0001) were 31, 40, and 25, and with haplotypes were six, ten, and nine, respectively. Of these, 20 SNP and six haplotype associations overlapped between RFI and EI, and five SNP and one haplotype associations overlapped between RADG and EG. This result confirms the complementary value of the one and two-step indicators. The multi-SNP models included 89 SNPs and offered a precise prediction of the five feed efficiency indicators. The associations of 17 SNPs and 7 haplotypes with feed efficiency were confirmed on the validation data set. Nine clusters of Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway categories (mean P-value < 0.001) including, 9nucleotide binding; ion transport, phosphorous metabolic process, and the MAPK signaling pathway were overrepresented among the genes harboring the SNPs associated with feed efficiency. Conclusions The general SNP associations suggest that a single panel of genomic variants can be used regardless of breed and diet. The breed- and diet

  7. Molecular characterization of a long range haplotype affecting protein yield and mastitis susceptibility in Norwegian Red cattle

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous fine mapping studies in Norwegian Red cattle (NRC) in the region 86-90.4 Mb on Bos taurus chromosome 6 (BTA6) has revealed a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for protein yield (PY) around 88 Mb and a QTL for clinical mastitis (CM) around 90 Mb. The close proximity of these QTLs may partly explain the unfavorable genetic correlation between these two traits in NRC. A long range haplotype covering this region was introduced into the NRC population through the importation of a Holstein-Friesian bull (1606 Frasse) from Sweden in the 1970s. It has been suggested that this haplotype has a favorable effect on milk protein content but an unfavorable effect on mastitis susceptibility. Selective breeding for milk production traits is likely to have increased the frequency of this haplotype in the NRC population. Results Association mapping for PY and CM in NRC was performed using genotypes from 556 SNPs throughout the region 86-97 Mb on BTA6 and daughter-yield-deviations (DYDs) from 2601 bulls made available from the Norwegian dairy herd recording system. Highest test scores for PY were found for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within and surrounding the genes CSN2 and CSN1S2, coding for the β-casein and αS2-casein proteins. High coverage re-sequencing by high throughput sequencing technology enabled molecular characterization of a long range haplotype from 1606 Frasse encompassing these two genes. Haplotype analysis of a large number of descendants from this bull indicated that the haplotype was not markedly disrupted by recombination in this region. The haplotype was associated with both increased milk protein content and increased susceptibility to mastitis, which might explain parts of the observed genetic correlation between PY and CM in NRC. Plausible causal polymorphisms affecting PY were detected in the promoter region and in the 5'-flanking UTR of CSN1S2. These polymorphisms could affect transcription or translation of CSN1S2 and thereby

  8. River catchment rainfall series analysis using additive Holt-Winters method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puah, Yan Jun; Huang, Yuk Feng; Chua, Kuan Chin; Lee, Teang Shui

    2016-03-01

    Climate change is receiving more attention from researchers as the frequency of occurrence of severe natural disasters is getting higher. Tropical countries like Malaysia have no distinct four seasons; rainfall has become the popular parameter to assess climate change. Conventional ways that determine rainfall trends can only provide a general result in single direction for the whole study period. In this study, rainfall series were modelled using additive Holt-Winters method to examine the rainfall pattern in Langat River Basin, Malaysia. Nine homogeneous series of more than 25 years data and less than 10% missing data were selected. Goodness of fit of the forecasted models was measured. It was found that seasonal rainfall model forecasts are generally better than the monthly rainfall model forecasts. Three stations in the western region exhibited increasing trend. Rainfall in southern region showed fluctuation. Increasing trends were discovered at stations in the south-eastern region except the seasonal analysis at station 45253. Decreasing trend was found at station 2818110 in the east, while increasing trend was shown at station 44320 that represents the north-eastern region. The accuracies of both rainfall model forecasts were tested using the recorded data of years 2010-2012. Most of the forecasts are acceptable.

  9. Characterization and analysis of surface notches on Ti-alloy plates fabricated by additive manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.

    2015-12-01

    Rectangular plates of Ti-6Al-4V with extra low interstitial (ELI) were fabricated by layer-by-layer deposition techniques that included electron beam melting (EBM) and laser beam melting (LBM). The surface conditions of these plates were characterized using x-ray micro-computed tomography. The depth and radius of surface notch-like features on the LBM and EBM plates were measured from sectional images of individual virtual slices of the rectangular plates. The stress concentration factors of individual surface notches were computed and analyzed statistically to determine the appropriate distributions for the notch depth, notch radius, and stress concentration factor. These results were correlated with the fatigue life of the Ti-6Al-4V ELI alloys from an earlier investigation. A surface notch analysis was performed to assess the debit in the fatigue strength due to the surface notches. The assessment revealed that the fatigue lives of the additively manufactured plates with rough surface topographies and notch-like features are dominated by the fatigue crack growth of large cracks for both the LBM and EBM materials. The fatigue strength reduction due to the surface notches can be as large as 60%-75%. It is concluded that for better fatigue performance, the surface notches on EBM and LBM materials need to be removed by machining and the surface roughness be improved to a surface finish of about 1 μm.

  10. Failure location prediction by finite element analysis for an additive manufactured mandible implant.

    PubMed

    Huo, Jinxing; Dérand, Per; Rännar, Lars-Erik; Hirsch, Jan-Michaél; Gamstedt, E Kristofer

    2015-09-01

    In order to reconstruct a patient with a bone defect in the mandible, a porous scaffold attached to a plate, both in a titanium alloy, was designed and manufactured using additive manufacturing. Regrettably, the implant fractured in vivo several months after surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the failure of the implant and show a way of predicting the mechanical properties of the implant before surgery. All computed tomography data of the patient were preprocessed to remove metallic artefacts with metal deletion technique before mandible geometry reconstruction. The three-dimensional geometry of the patient's mandible was also reconstructed, and the implant was fixed to the bone model with screws in Mimics medical imaging software. A finite element model was established from the assembly of the mandible and the implant to study stresses developed during mastication. The stress distribution in the load-bearing plate was computed, and the location of main stress concentration in the plate was determined. Comparison between the fracture region and the location of the stress concentration shows that finite element analysis could serve as a tool for optimizing the design of mandible implants. PMID:26227805

  11. Loophole-free Bell test using electron spins in diamond: second experiment and additional analysis.

    PubMed

    Hensen, B; Kalb, N; Blok, M S; Dréau, A E; Reiserer, A; Vermeulen, R F L; Schouten, R N; Markham, M; Twitchen, D J; Goodenough, K; Elkouss, D; Wehner, S; Taminiau, T H; Hanson, R

    2016-01-01

    The recently reported violation of a Bell inequality using entangled electronic spins in diamonds (Hensen et al., Nature 526, 682-686) provided the first loophole-free evidence against local-realist theories of nature. Here we report on data from a second Bell experiment using the same experimental setup with minor modifications. We find a violation of the CHSH-Bell inequality of 2.35 ± 0.18, in agreement with the first run, yielding an overall value of S = 2.38 ± 0.14. We calculate the resulting P-values of the second experiment and of the combined Bell tests. We provide an additional analysis of the distribution of settings choices recorded during the two tests, finding that the observed distributions are consistent with uniform settings for both tests. Finally, we analytically study the effect of particular models of random number generator (RNG) imperfection on our hypothesis test. We find that the winning probability per trial in the CHSH game can be bounded knowing only the mean of the RNG bias. This implies that our experimental result is robust for any model underlying the estimated average RNG bias, for random bits produced up to 690 ns too early by the random number generator. PMID:27509823

  12. Loophole-free Bell test using electron spins in diamond: second experiment and additional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hensen, B.; Kalb, N.; Blok, M. S.; Dréau, A. E.; Reiserer, A.; Vermeulen, R. F. L.; Schouten, R. N.; Markham, M.; Twitchen, D. J.; Goodenough, K.; Elkouss, D.; Wehner, S.; Taminiau, T. H.; Hanson, R.

    2016-01-01

    The recently reported violation of a Bell inequality using entangled electronic spins in diamonds (Hensen et al., Nature 526, 682–686) provided the first loophole-free evidence against local-realist theories of nature. Here we report on data from a second Bell experiment using the same experimental setup with minor modifications. We find a violation of the CHSH-Bell inequality of 2.35 ± 0.18, in agreement with the first run, yielding an overall value of S = 2.38 ± 0.14. We calculate the resulting P-values of the second experiment and of the combined Bell tests. We provide an additional analysis of the distribution of settings choices recorded during the two tests, finding that the observed distributions are consistent with uniform settings for both tests. Finally, we analytically study the effect of particular models of random number generator (RNG) imperfection on our hypothesis test. We find that the winning probability per trial in the CHSH game can be bounded knowing only the mean of the RNG bias. This implies that our experimental result is robust for any model underlying the estimated average RNG bias, for random bits produced up to 690 ns too early by the random number generator. PMID:27509823

  13. Haplotypes extending across ACE are associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, Patrick G; Katzov, Hagit; Feuk, Lars; Bennet, Anna M; Johansson, Boo; Wiman, Björn; de Faire, Ulf; Cairns, Nigel J; Wilcock, Gordon K; Brookes, Anthony J; Blennow, Kaj; Prince, Jonathan A

    2003-04-15

    Numerous genes have been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but, with the exception of a demonstrated association with the epsilon 4 allele of APOE, findings have not been consistently replicated across populations. One of the most widely studied is the gene for angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE ). A meta-analysis of published data on a common Alu indel polymorphism in ACE was performed which indicated highly significant association of the insertion allele with AD (OR 1.30; 95% CI 1.19 - 1.41; P=4 x 10(-8)). To further explore the influence of ACE on AD, several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in five independent populations represented by over 3100 individuals. Analyses based upon single markers and haplotypes revealed strong evidence of association in case-control models and also in a model examining the influence of variation in ACE upon cerebrospinal fluid levels of amyloid beta42 peptide (Abeta42). The most significant evidence for association with AD was found for an SNP, A-262T, located in the ACE promoter (OR 1.64; 95% CI 1.33 -1.94; P=2 x 10(-5)). Estimates of population attributable risk for the common allele of this SNP suggest that it, or an allele in tight linkage disequilibrium (LD) with it, may contribute to as much as 35% of AD in the general population. Results support a model whereby decreased ACE activity may influence AD susceptibility by a mechanism involving beta-amyloid metabolism. PMID:12668609

  14. Genetics of chloroquine-resistant malaria: a haplotypic view

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Gauri; Das, Aparup

    2013-01-01

    The development and rapid spread of chloroquine resistance (CQR) in Plasmodium falciparum have triggered the identification of several genetic target(s) in the P. falciparum genome. In particular, mutations in the Pfcrt gene, specifically, K76T and mutations in three other amino acids in the region adjoining K76 (residues 72, 74, 75 and 76), are considered to be highly related to CQR. These various mutations form several different haplotypes and Pfcrt gene polymorphisms and the global distribution of the different CQR- Pfcrt haplotypes in endemic and non-endemic regions of P. falciparum malaria have been the subject of extensive study. Despite the fact that the Pfcrt gene is considered to be the primary CQR gene in P. falciparum , several studies have suggested that this may not be the case. Furthermore, there is a poor correlation between the evolutionary implications of the Pfcrt haplotypes and the inferred migration of CQR P. falciparum based on CQR epidemiological surveillance data. The present paper aims to clarify the existing knowledge on the genetic basis of the different CQR- Pfcrt haplotypes that are prevalent in worldwide populations based on the published literature and to analyse the data to generate hypotheses on the genetics and evolution of CQR malaria. PMID:24402147

  15. Fast Sampling-Based Whole-Genome Haplotype Block Recognition.

    PubMed

    Taliun, Daniel; Gamper, Johann; Leser, Ulf; Pattaro, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Scaling linkage disequilibrium (LD) based haplotype block recognition to the entire human genome has always been a challenge. The best-known algorithm has quadratic runtime complexity and, even when sophisticated search space pruning is applied, still requires several days of computations. Here, we propose a novel sampling-based algorithm, called S-MIG (++), where the main idea is to estimate the area that most likely contains all haplotype blocks by sampling a very small number of SNP pairs. A subsequent refinement step computes the exact blocks by considering only the SNP pairs within the estimated area. This approach significantly reduces the number of computed LD statistics, making the recognition of haplotype blocks very fast. We theoretically and empirically prove that the area containing all haplotype blocks can be estimated with a very high degree of certainty. Through experiments on the 243,080 SNPs on chromosome 20 from the 1,000 Genomes Project, we compared our previous algorithm MIG (++) with the new S-MIG (++) and observed a runtime reduction from 2.8 weeks to 34.8 hours. In a parallelized version of the S-MIG (++) algorithm using 32 parallel processes, the runtime was further reduced to 5.1 hours. PMID:27045830

  16. Better ILP-Based Approaches to Haplotype Assembly.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Zhong; Deng, Fei; Shen, Chao; Wang, Yiji; Wang, Lusheng

    2016-07-01

    Haplotype assembly is to directly construct the haplotypes of an individual from sequence fragments (reads) of the individual. Although a number of programs have been designed for computing optimal or heuristic solutions to the haplotype assembly problem, computing an optimal solution may take days or even months while computing a heuristic solution usually requires a trade-off between speed and accuracy. This article refines a previously known integer linear programming-based (ILP-based) approach to the haplotype assembly problem in twofolds. First, the read-matrices of some datasets (such as NA12878) come with a quality for each base in the reads. We here propose to utilize the qualities in the ILP-based approach. Secondly, we propose to use the ILP-based approach to improve the output of any heuristic program for the problem. Experiments with both real and simulated datasets show that the qualities of read-matrices help us find more accurate solutions without significant loss of speed. Moreover, our experimental results show that the proposed hybrid approach improves the output of ReFHap (the current leading heuristic) significantly (say, by almost 25% of the QAN50 score) without significant loss of speed, and can even find optimal solutions in much shorter time than the original ILP-based approach. Our program is available upon request to the authors. PMID:27347882

  17. Nomenclature of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes for Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graziano, Sara L.; Brown, K.H.; Nielsen, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    Congruence of genetic data is critical for comparative and collaborative studies on natural fish populations. A comprehensive list of reported mitochrondrial DNA haplotypes for Oncorhynchus mykiss generated using the S-Phe/P2 primer set is presented as a resource for future investigations of this species.

  18. Ashkenazi levites' "Y modal haplotype" (LMH)-- an artificially created phenomenon?

    PubMed

    Zoossmann-Diskin, A

    2006-01-01

    The article on the Y chromosomes of Ashkenazi Levites (Behar et al., 2003. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 73, 768-779) is the fourth in a series on the Y chromosomes of the three Jewish male castes: Cohanim (priests), Levites (priests' helpers) and Israelites (lay people). It became apparent that there is a problem with omission of samples when the second article "Origins of Old Testament priests" (Thomas et al., 1998. Nature 394, 138-140) was published. In the fourth article a remarkable 55% of the Ashkenazi Levite samples from the earlier 1998 study are not included. This causes the "Levite modal haplotype" to double its frequency from 21% of the Ashkenazi Levite sample in 1998 to 42% of the Ashkenazi Levite sample in 2003. The authors offer three main explanations: (1) The studies are independent using different sample sets.(2) Typing errors and poor quality exclude samples from future studies.(3) Correction of typing errors means that some samples are classified under different haplotypes. The explanations offered to the problem of omitting samples from subsequent studies after their haplotypes or partial haplotypes are known, are not convincing. Consequently their sample sets cannot be considered random and non-biased. At the least, these laboratories have bad practices of sample handling and many typing errors, which are enough to invalidate their studies. PMID:16427053

  19. Reporting of haplotypes with recessive effects on fertility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic discovery of five haplotypes with recessive effects on fertility requires new automated tracking methods for QTL causing embryo loss in breeding programs. Most of the losses are early in gestation. Approximate locations of the five QTL were refined using crossovers detected within the pedigr...

  20. Nomenclature of mitochondrial DNA haplotypes for Oncorhynchus mykiss

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graziano, S.L.; Brown, K.H.; Nielsen, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Congruence of genetic data is critical for comparative and collaborative studies on natural fish populations. A comprehensive list of reported mitochrondrial DNA haplotypes for Oncorhynchus mykiss generated using the S-Phe/P2 primer set is presented as a resource for future investigations of this species. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  1. Polymorphisms and haplotype structure of bovine PRND (doppel) and PRNT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a fatal neurological disorder characterized by abnormal deposits of a protease-resistant isoform of the prion protein. In previous studies, we have characterized linkage disequilibrium (LD) and haplotype networks within the bovine prion gene (PRNP). Other ...

  2. Haplotypes of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' suggest long-standing separation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three haplotypes of the recently discovered bacterium species “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” are described and related to geographic ranges. The first two are associated with Zebra Chip/Psyllid Yellows of potatoes and other solanaceous plants, vectored by the tomato/potato psyllid Bacterice...

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphism and haplotype effects associated with somatic cell score in German Holstein cattle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To better understand the genetic determination of udder health, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on a population of 2354 German Holstein bulls for which daughter yield deviations (DYD) for somatic cell score (SCS) were available. For this study, we used genetic information of 44 576 informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 11 725 inferred haplotype blocks. Results When accounting for the sub-structure of the analyzed population, 16 SNPs and 10 haplotypes in six genomic regions were significant at the Bonferroni threshold of P ≤ 1.14 × 10-6. The size of the identified regions ranged from 0.05 to 5.62 Mb. Genomic regions on chromosomes 5, 6, 18 and 19 coincided with known QTL affecting SCS, while additional genomic regions were found on chromosomes 13 and X. Of particular interest is the region on chromosome 6 between 85 and 88 Mb, where QTL for mastitis traits and significant SNPs for SCS in different Holstein populations coincide with our results. In all identified regions, except for the region on chromosome X, significant SNPs were present in significant haplotypes. The minor alleles of identified SNPs on chromosomes 18 and 19, and the major alleles of SNPs on chromosomes 6 and X were favorable for a lower SCS. Differences in somatic cell count (SCC) between alternative SNP alleles reached 14 000 cells/mL. Conclusions The results support the polygenic nature of the genetic determination of SCS, confirm the importance of previously reported QTL, and provide evidence for the segregation of additional QTL for SCS in Holstein cattle. The small size of the regions identified here will facilitate the search for causal genetic variations that affect gene functions. PMID:24898131

  4. Analysis of chill-cast NiAl intermetallic compound with copper additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, J.; Gonzalez, C.; Herrera, R.; Juarez-Islas, J. A.

    2002-10-01

    This study carried out a characterization of chill-cast NiAl alloys with copper additions, which were added to NiAl, such that the resulting alloy composition occurred in the β-field of the ternary NiAlCu phase diagram. The alloys were vacuum induction melted and casted in copper chill molds to produce ingots 0.002 m thick, 0.020 m wide, and 0.050 m long. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) performed in chill-cast ingots identified mainly the presence of the β-(Ni,Cu)Al phase. As-cast ingots showed essentially no ductility at room temperature except for the Ni50Al40Cu10 alloy, which showed 1.79% of elongation at room temperature. Ingots with this alloy composition were then heat treated under a high-purity argon atmosphere at 550 °C (24 h) and cooled either in the furnace or in air, until room temperature was reached. β-(Ni,Cu)Al and γ'(Ni,Cu)3Al were present in specimens cooled in the furnace and β-(Ni,Cu)Al, γ'(Ni,Cu)3Al plus martensite-(Ni,Cu)Al were present in specimens cooled in air. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that martensite transformation was the result of a solid-state reaction with M s ˜ 470 and M f ˜ 430 °C. Tensile tests performed on bulk heat-treated ingots showed room-temperature ductility between 3 and 6%, depending on the cooling media.

  5. A new analysis of the WASP-3 system: no evidence for an additional companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, M.; Gregorio, J.; Boué, G.; Mortier, A.; Boisse, I.; Oshagh, M.; Maturi, M.; Figueira, P.; Sousa, S.; Santos, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we investigate the problem concerning the presence of additional bodies gravitationally bound with the WASP-3 system. We present eight new transits of this planet gathered between 2009 May and 2011 September by using the 30-cm telescope at the Crow Observatory-Portalegre, and analyse all the photometric and radial velocity data published so far. We did not observe significant periodicities in the Fourier spectrum of the observed minus calculated (O - C) transit timing and radial velocity diagrams (the highest peak having false-alarm probabilities of 56 and 31 per cent, respectively) or long-term trends. Combining all the available information, we conclude that the radial velocity and transit timing techniques exclude, at 99 per cent confidence limit, any perturber more massive than M ≳ 100 Mearth with periods up to 10 times the period of the inner planet. We also investigate the possible presence of an exomoon in this system and determine that considering the scatter of the O - C transit timing residuals a coplanar exomoon would likely produce detectable transits. This hypothesis is however apparently ruled out by observations conducted by other researchers. In the case where the orbit of the moon is not coplanar, the accuracy of our transit timing and transit duration measurements prevents any significant statement. Interestingly, on the basis of our reanalysis of SOPHIE data we noted that WASP-3 passed from a less active (logR HK '=-4.95) to a more active (logR HK '=-4.8) state during the 3 yr monitoring period spanned by the observations. Despite the fact that no clear spot crossing has been reported for this system, this analysis suggests a more intensive monitoring of the activity level of this star in order to understand its impact on photometric and radial velocity measurements.

  6. Analysis of synthetic motor oils for additive elements by ICP-AES

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.C.; Salmon, S.G.

    1995-12-31

    Standard motor oils are made by blending paraffinic or naphthenic mineral oil base stocks with additive packages containing anti-wear agents, dispersants, corrosion inhibitors, and viscosity index improvers. The blender can monitor the correct addition of the additives by determining the additive elements in samples dissolved in a solvent by ICP-AES. Internal standardization is required to control sample transport interferences due to differences in viscosity between samples and standards. Synthetic motor oils, made with poly-alpha-olefins and trimethylol propane esters, instead of mineral oils, pose an additional challenge since these compounds affect the plasma as well as having sample transport interference considerations. The synthetic lubricant base stocks add significant oxygen to the sample matrix, which makes the samples behave differently than standards prepared in mineral oil. Determination of additive elements in synthetic motor oils will be discussed.

  7. A recursive method for solving haplotype frequencies with application to genetics.

    PubMed

    Ng, Michael K; Fung, Eric S; Lee, Yiu-Fai; Ching, Wai-Ki

    2006-12-01

    Multiple loci analysis has become popular with the advanced developments in biological experiments. A lot of studies have been focused on the biological and the statistical properties of such multiple loci analysis. In this paper, we study one of the important computational problems: solving the probabilities of haplotype classes from a large linear system Ax = b derived from the recombination events in multiple loci analysis. Since the size of the recombination matrix A increases exponentially with respect to the number of loci, fast solvers are required to deal with a large number of loci in the analysis. By exploiting the nice structure of the matrix A, we develop an efficient recursive algorithm for solving such structured linear systems. In particular, the complexity of the proposed algorithm for the n loci problem is of O(n2(n)) operations and the memory requirement is of O(2(n)) locations for the 2(n)-by-2(n) matrix A. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of our efficient solver. Finally, we apply our proposed method to analyze the haplotype classes for a set of single nucleotides polymorphisms (SNPs) from Hapmap data. PMID:17245814

  8. Effects of Vitamin A and D Receptor Gene Polymorphisms/Haplotypes on Immune Responses to Measles Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Haralambieva, Iana H.; Vierkant, Robert A.; O’Byrne, Megan M.; Jacobson, Robert M.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Vitamin A and D, and their receptors, are important regulators of the immune system, including vaccine immune response. We assessed the association between polymorphisms in the vitamin A (RARA, RARB and RARG) and vitamin D receptor (VDR)/RXRA genes and inter-individual variations in immune responses after two doses of measles vaccine in 745 subjects. METHODS Using a tagSNP approach, we genotyped 745 healthy children for the 391 polymorphisms in vitamin A and D receptor genes. RESULTS The RARB haplotype (rs6800566/rs6550976/rs9834818) was significantly associated with variations in both measles antibody (global p=0.013) and cytokine secretion levels, such as IL-10 (global p=0.006), IFN-α (global p=0.008), and TNF-α (global p=0.039) in the Caucasian subgroup. Specifically, the RARB haplotype AAC was associated with higher (t-statistic 3.27, p=0.001) measles antibody levels. At the other end of the spectrum, haplotype GG for rs6550978/rs6777544 was associated with lower antibody levels (t-statistic −2.32, p=0.020) in the Caucasian subgroup. In a sensitivity analysis, the RARB haplotype CTGGGCAA remained marginally significant (p<0.02) when the single SNP rs12630816 was included in the model for IL-10 secretion levels. A significant association was found between lower measles-specific IFN-γ Elispot responses and haplotypes rs11102986/rs11103473/rs11103482/rs10776909/rs12004589/rs35780541/rs2266677/rs875444 (global p=0.004) and rs6537944/rs3118571 (global p<0.001) in the RXRA gene for Caucasians. We also found associations between multiple RARB, VDR and RXRA SNPs/haplotypes and measles-specific IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-α, IFN-γ, IFNλ-1, and TNF-α cytokine secretion. CONCLUSION Our results suggest that specific allelic variations and haplotypes in the vitamin A and D receptor genes may influence adaptive immune responses to measles vaccine. PMID:22082653

  9. A functional haplotype implicated in vulnerability to develop cocaine dependence is associated with reduced PDYN expression in human brain.

    PubMed

    Yuferov, Vadim; Ji, Fei; Nielsen, David A; Levran, Orna; Ho, Ann; Morgello, Susan; Shi, Ruijin; Ott, Jurg; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2009-04-01

    Dynorphin peptides and the kappa-opioid receptor are important in the rewarding properties of cocaine, heroin, and alcohol. We tested polymorphisms of the prodynorphin gene (PDYN) for association with cocaine dependence and cocaine/alcohol codependence. We genotyped six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), located in the promoter region, exon 4 coding, and 3' untranslated region, in 106 Caucasians and 204 African Americans who were cocaine dependent, cocaine/alcohol codependent, or controls. In Caucasians, we found point-wise significant associations of 3'UTR SNPs (rs910080, rs910079, and rs2235749) with cocaine dependence and cocaine/alcohol codependence. These SNPs are in high linkage disequilibrium, comprising a haplotype block. The haplotype CCT was significantly experiment-wise associated with cocaine dependence and with combined cocaine dependence and cocaine/alcohol codependence (false discovery rate, q=0.04 and 0.03, respectively). We investigated allele-specific gene expression of PDYN, using SNP rs910079 as a reporter, in postmortem human brains from eight heterozygous subjects, using SNaPshot assay. There was significantly lower expression for C allele (rs910079), with ratios ranging from 0.48 to 0.78, indicating lower expression of the CCT haplotype of PDYN in both the caudate and nucleus accumbens. Analysis of total PDYN expression in 43 postmortem brains also showed significantly lower levels of preprodynorphin mRNA in subjects having the risk CCT haplotype. This study provides evidence that a 3'UTR PDYN haplotype, implicated in vulnerability to develop cocaine addiction and/or cocaine/alcohol codependence, is related to lower mRNA expression of the PDYN gene in human dorsal and ventral striatum. PMID:18923396

  10. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA analysis revealed a cryptic species and genetic introgression in Littorina sitkana (Mollusca, Gastropoda).

    PubMed

    Azuma, Noriko; Yamazaki, Tomoyasu; Chiba, Susumu

    2011-12-01

    We investigated mitochondrial and nuclear DNA genotypes in nominal Littorina sitkana samples from 2 localities in Eastern Hokkaido, northern Japan. Our results indicated the existence of cryptic species. In the analysis of partial mitochondrial Cytchrome b gene sequences, haplotypes of L. sitkana samples were monophyletic in a phylogenetic tree with orthologous sequences from other Littorina species, but were apparently separated in 2 clades. One included typical L. sitkana (CBa clade) samples, which formed a clade with an allopatric species, L. horikawai. The other, CBb, was independent from CBa and L. horikawai. Haplotypes of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene also separated into 2 clades. We additionally examined intron sequence of the heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70) nuclear gene and identified 17 haplotypes. These were also separated into 2 clades, HSCa and HSCb. Among the examined Hokkaido samples, 60% of individuals were heterozygotes. However, each heterozygote consisted of haplotypes from the same clade, HSCa or HSCb, and no admixture of HSCa and HSCb haplotypes was observed. These results indicate reproductive isolation between the 2 clades. Among the genotyped Hokkaido samples, 93% of individuals had CBa + HSCa or CBb + HSCb genotypes, and 7% had CBb + HSCa genotypes. The discrepancy between the mtDNA and nuclear DNA haplotypes in a few individuals may have been caused by genetic introgression due to past hybridization. PMID:22374127

  11. Haplotypes in the APOA1-C3-A4-A5 gene cluster affect plasma lipids in both humans and baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qian-fei; Liu, Xin; O'Connell, Jeff; Peng, Ze; Krauss, Ronald M.; Rainwater, David L.; VandeBerg, John L.; Rubin, Edward M.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2003-09-15

    Genetic studies in non-human primates serve as a potential strategy for identifying genomic intervals where polymorphisms impact upon human disease-related phenotypes. It remains unclear, however, whether independently arising polymorphisms in orthologous regions of non-human primates leads to similar variation in a quantitative trait found in both species. To explore this paradigm, we studied a baboon apolipoprotein gene cluster (APOA1/C3/A4/A5) for which the human gene orthologs have well established roles in influencing plasma HDL-cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. Our extensive polymorphism analysis of this 68 kb gene cluster in 96 pedigreed baboons identified several haplotype blocks each with limited diversity, consistent with haplotype findings in humans. To determine whether baboons, like humans, also have particular haplotypes associated with lipid phenotypes, we genotyped 634 well characterized baboons using 16 haplotype tagging SNPs. Genetic analysis of single SNPs, as well as haplotypes, revealed an association of APOA5 and APOC3 variants with HDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, respectively. Thus, independent variation in orthologous genomic intervals does associate with similar quantitative lipid traits in both species, supporting the possibility of uncovering human QTL genes in a highly controlled non-human primate model.

  12. Association with Spontaneous Hepatitis C Viral Clearance and Genetic Differentiation of IL28B/IFNL4 Haplotypes in Populations from Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Aldaco, Karina; Rebello Pinho, João R.; Roman, Sonia; Gleyzer, Ketti; Fierro, Nora A.; Oyakawa, Leticia; Ramos-Lopez, Omar; Ferraz Santana, Rubia A.; Sitnik, Roberta; Panduro, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Aim To analyze the genetic heterogeneity of the Amerindian and admixed population (Mestizos) based on the IL28B (rs12979860, rs8099917) and IFNL4 (rs368234815) haplotypes, and their association with spontaneous clearance (SC) and liver damage in patients with hepatitis C infection from West Mexico. Methods A total of 711 subjects from West Mexico (181 Amerindians and 530 Mestizos) were studied for the prevalence of IL28B (rs12979860C/T, rs8099917G/T) and IFNL4 (rs368234815∆G/TT) genotypes. A case-control study was performed in 234 treatment-naïve HCV Mestizos (149 chronic hepatitis C and 85 with SC) for the association of haplotypes with SC and liver damage. A real-time PCR assay was used for genotyping, and transitional elastography staged liver damage. Results Significant Fst-values indicated differentiation between the studied populations. The frequencies of the protective C, T, TT alleles were significantly lower in the Amerindians than in Mestizos (p<0.05). The r2 measure of linkage disequilibrium was significant for all variants and the T/G/ΔG risk haplotype predominated in Amerindians and secondly in Mestizos. The protective C/T/TT haplotype was associated with SC (OR = 0.46, 95% IC 0.22–0.95, p = 0.03) and less liver damage (OR = 0.32, 95% IC 0.10–0.97, p = 0.04) in chronic patients. The Structure software analysis demonstrated no significant differences in ancestry among SC and chronic patients. Conclusions West Mexico´s population is genetically heterogeneous at the IL28B/IFNL4 polymorphisms. The T/G/ΔG high-risk haplotype predominated in Amerindians and the beneficial alternative haplotype in Mestizos. The C/T/TT haplotype was associated with SC and less liver damage in chronically infected Mestizo patients. PMID:26741362

  13. Multifractal analysis of the irregular set for almost-additive sequences via large deviations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomfim, Thiago; Varandas, Paulo

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we introduce a notion of free energy and large deviations rate function for asymptotically additive sequences of potentials via an approximation method by families of continuous potentials. We provide estimates for the topological pressure of the set of points whose non-additive sequences are far from the limit described through Kingman’s sub-additive ergodic theorem and give some applications in the context of Lyapunov exponents for diffeomorphisms and cocycles, and the Shannon-McMillan-Breiman theorem for Gibbs measures.

  14. How Have Self-Incompatibility Haplotypes Diversified? Generation of New Haplotypes during the Evolution of Self-Incompatibility from Self-Compatibility.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Satoki

    2016-08-01

    I developed a gametophytic self-incompatibility (SI) model to study the conditions leading to diversification in SI haplotypes. In the model, the SI system is assumed to be incomplete, and the pollen expressing a given specificity is not fully rejected by the pistils expressing the same specificity. I also assumed that mutations can occur that enhance the rejection of pollen by pistils with the same haplotype variant and reduce rejection by pistils with other variants in the same haplotype. I found that if such mutations occur, the new haplotypes (mutant variants) can stably coexist with the ancestral haplotype in which the mutant arose. This is because pollen bearing the new haplotype is most strongly rejected by pistils bearing the same new haplotype among the pistils in the population; hence, negative frequency-dependent selection prevents their fixation. I also performed simulations and found that the nearly complete SI system evolves from completely self-compatible populations and that SI haplotypes can increase to about 40-50 within a few thousand generations. On the basis of my findings, I propose that diversification of SI haplotypes occurred during the evolution of SI from self-compatibility. PMID:27420782

  15. A rapid method of haplotyping HFE mutations and linkage disequilibrium in a Caucasoid population

    PubMed Central

    Mullighan, C; Bunce, M; Fanning, G; Marshall, S; Welsh, K

    1998-01-01

    Background—HFE mutations are associated with hereditary haemochromatosis. However, a simple method capable of demonstrating the cis/trans arrangement of alleles is lacking, and linkage disequilibrium between HFE alleles and classic HLA loci is unknown. These are important issues as the pathogenic role of the mutations is not known. 
Aims—To develop a simple method of genotyping HFE mutations suitable for clinical use in addition to large disease studies. 
Patients—A total of 330 Caucasoid cadaveric organ donor controls were examined. Ten individuals previously HLA-H genotyped by polymerase chain reaction using restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) were also examined to validate the method. 
Methods—A simple polymerase chain reaction using sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) capable of haplotyping the mutations was developed. HFE allele and haplotype frequencies and linkage disequilibrium with eight HLA class I and II loci were examined in the control population. 
Results—27% and 19.7% of patients were positive for the 63D and 282Y alleles, respectively. No chromosome carried both 63D and 282Y. Linkage disequilibrium between 282Y and HLA-A*03 was confirmed, but was not straightforward: some A*03-associated alleles (DRB1*15, DQB1*06), but not all (B*07, Cw*0702), were associated with 282Y. 
Conclusions—Linkage disequilibrium data suggest that an HLA-B*07 containing haplotype contains an element affording protection from haemochromatosis and may suggest the timing of the founder 282Y mutation. 

 Keywords: HFE; haemochromatosis; PCR-SSP; linkage disequilibrium PMID:9616322

  16. RFLP analysis of mtDNA from six platyrrhine genera: phylogenetic inferences.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-García, M; Alvarez, D

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates the phylogenetic relationships of 10 species of platyrrhine primates using RFLP analysis of mtDNA. Three restriction enzymes were used to determine the restriction site haplotypes for a total of 276 individuals. Phylogenetic analysis using maximum parsimony was employed to construct phylogenetic trees. We found close phylogenetic relationships between Alouatta, Lagothrix and Ateles. We also found a close relationship between Cebus and Aotus, with Saimiri clustering with the atelines. Haplotype diversity was found in four of the species studied, in Cebus albifrons, Saimiri sciureus, Lagothrix lagotricha and Ateles fusciceps. These data provide additional information concerning the phylogenetic relationships between these platyrrhine genera and species. PMID:12759493

  17. Anonymous marker loci within 400 kb of HLA-A generate haplotypes in linkage disequilibrium with the hemochromatosis gene (HFE)

    SciTech Connect

    Yaouanq, J.; Perichon, M.; Treut, A.L.; Kahloun, A.E.; Mauvieux, V.; Blayau, M.; Jouanolle, A.M.; Chauvel, B.; Le Gall, J.Y.; David, V. )

    1994-02-01

    The hemochromatosis gene (HFE) maps to 6p21.3 and is less than 1 cM from the HLA class I gene; however, the precise physical location of the gene has remained elusive and controversial. The unambiguous identification of a crossover event within hemochromatosis families is very difficult; it is particularly hampered by the variability of the phenotypic expression as well as by the sex- and age-related penetrance of the disease. For these considerations, traditional linkage analysis could prove of limited value in further refining the extrapolated physical position of HFE. The authors therefore embarked upon a linkage-disequilibrium analysis of HFE and normal chromosomes for the Brittany population. In this report, 66 hemochromatosis families yielding 151 hemochromatosis chromosomes and 182 normal chromosomes were RFLP-typed with a battery of probes, including two newly derived polymorphic markers from the 6.7 and HLA-F loci located 150 and 250 kb telomeric to HLA-A, respectively. The results suggest a strong peak of existing linkage disequilibrium focused within the i82-to-6.7 interval (approximately 250 kb). The zone of linkage disequilibrium is flanked by the i97 locus, positioned 30 kb proximal to i82, and the HLA-F gene, found 250 kb distal to HLA-A, markers of which display no significant association with HFE. These data support the possibility that HFE resides within the 400-kb expanse of DNA between i97 and HLA-F. Alternatively, the very tight association of HLA-A3 and allele 1 of the 6.7 locus, both of which are comprised by the major ancestral or founder HFE haplotype in Brittany, supports the possibility that the disease gene may reside immediately telomeric to the 6.7 locus within the linkage-disequilibrium zone. Additionally, hemochromatosis haplotypes possessing HLA-A11 and the low-frequency HLA-F polymorphism (allele 2) are supportive of a separate founder chromosome containing a second, independently arising mutant allele. 69 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  18. Introduced and Native Haplotypes of Echinococcus multilocularis in Wildlife in Saskatchewan, Canada.

    PubMed

    Gesy, Karen M; Jenkins, Emily J

    2015-07-01

    Recent detection of a European-type haplotype of the cestode Echinococcus multilocularis in a newly enzootic region in British Columbia prompted efforts to determine if this haplotype was present elsewhere in wildlife in western Canada. In coyote (Canis latrans) definitive hosts in an urban region in central Saskatchewan (SK), we found a single haplotype of E. multilocularis that was most similar to a haplotype currently established in the core of this parasite's distribution in Europe and to the European-type haplotype found in coyotes and a dog (Canis lupus familiaris) in British Columbia. We found six haplotypes of E. multilocularis from deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) intermediate hosts in southwestern SK that were closely related to, and one haplotype indistinguishable from, a haplotype previously reported in the adjacent north-central US. This is a higher level of diversity than has previously been recognized for this parasite, which suggests that the population native to central North America is well established, rather than a recent introduction from the Arctic. These findings, in combination with recent cases of alveolar hydatid cysts in dogs in Canada, raise concerns that European haplotypes of E. multilocularis may be increasing in distribution within wildlife in Canada. European haplotypes may pose greater risks to veterinary and human health than native haplotypes long established in central North America. PMID:26020284

  19. Segregation of a haplotype encompassing FEB1 with genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus in a Colombian family.

    PubMed

    Caro-Gomez, Maria-Antonieta; Carrizosa, Jaime; Moreno, Johanna Tejada; Cabrera, Dagoberto; Bedoya, Gabriel; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Franco, Andres; Gomez-Castillo, Christhian; Cornejo, William; Pineda-Trujillo, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    Febrile seizures and epilepsy are believed to be linked and some forms of epilepsy are associated with a history of febrile seizures (FS). Linkage analysis to seven known loci for FS and/or genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS plus) was performed in a small Colombian family. Short tandem repeat (STR) markers were genotyped and two-point linkage analysis and haplotype reconstruction were conducted. A maximum LOD score of 0.75 at marker D8S533 for FEB1 at a recombination fraction (θ) of 0 and a segregating haplotype were identified. FEB1 was the first locus to be associated with FS and this is the second report to describe this association. Two genes in this region, CRH and DEPDC2, are good putative candidate genes that may play a role in FS and/or GEFS plus. PMID:23773973

  20. Effects of additives on the co-pyrolysis of municipal solid waste and paper sludge by using thermogravimetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shiwen; Yu, Zhaosheng; Lin, Yan; Lin, Yousheng; Fan, Yunlong; Liao, Yanfen; Ma, Xiaoqian

    2016-06-01

    By using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), the effects of different additives (MgO, Al2O3 and ZnO) on the pyrolysis characteristics and activation energy of municipal solid waste (MSW), paper sludge (PS) and their blends in N2 atmosphere had been investigated in this study. The experiments resulted that these additives were effective in reducing the initial temperature and activation energy. However, not all the additives were beneficial to reduce the residue mass and enhance the index D. For the different ratios of MSW and PS, the same additive even had the different influences. The catalytic effects of additives were not obvious and the pyrolysis became difficult with the increase of the proportion of PS. Based on all the contrast of the pyrolysis characteristics, MgO was the best additive and 70M30P was the best ratio, respectively. PMID:26985626

  1. HLA class I and class II haplotypes in admixed families from several regions of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Barquera, Rodrigo; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Hernández-Díaz, Raquel; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Montoya-Gama, Karla; Moscoso, Juan; Torres-García, Diana; García-Salas, Claudia; Silva, Beatriz; Cruz-Robles, David; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados, Julio

    2008-02-01

    We studied HLA class I and class II alleles in 191 Mexican families (381 non-related individuals) to directly obtain the HLA-A/B/DRB1/DQB1 haplotypes and their linkage disequilibrium (LD). The most frequent HLA haplotypes observed were: A*02-B*39-DRB1*04-DQB1*0302, A*02-B*35-DRB1*04-DQB1*0302, A*68-B*39-DRB1*04-DQB1*0302, A*02-B*35-DRB1*08-DQB1*04, A*33-B*1402-DRB1*01-DQB1*05, and A*24-B*35-DRB1*04-DQB1*0302. The four most common haplotypes found by our study involve those previously reported in Amerindian populations. LD analysis of HLA-A-B and HLA-B-DRB1 loci showed significant associations between A29(19)-B44(12), A33(19)-B65(14), A1-B8, A26(19)-B44(12), A24(9)-B61(40), B65(14)-DR1, B8-DR17(3), B44(12)-DR7, B7-DR15(2), and B39(16)-DR4. Also, all DRB1-DQB1 associations showed significant LD values. Admixture estimations using a trihybrid model showed that Mexicans from the State of Sinaloa (Northern Mexico) have a greater proportion of European genetic component compared with Mexicans from the Central area of Mexico, who have a greater percentage of Amerindian genes. Our results are important for future comparative genetic studies of different Mexican ethnic groups with special relevance to disease association and transplantation studies. PMID:17904223

  2. Analysis of economics of a TV broadcasting satellite for additional nationwide TV programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, D.; Mertens, G.; Rappold, A.; Seith, W.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of a TV broadcasting satellite, transmitting four additional TV networks was analyzed. It is assumed that the cost of the satellite systems will be financed by the cable TV system operators. The additional TV programs increase income by attracting additional subscribers. Two economic models were established: (1) each local network is regarded as an independent economic unit with individual fees (cost price model) and (2) all networks are part of one public cable TV company with uniform fees (uniform price model). Assumptions are made for penetration as a function of subscription rates. Main results of the study are: the installation of a TV broadcasting satellite improves the economics of CTV-networks in both models; the overall coverage achievable by the uniform price model is significantly higher than that achievable by the cost price model.

  3. Application of Translational Addition Theorems to Electrostatic and Magnetostatic Field Analysis for Systems of Circular Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machynia, Adam

    Analytic solutions to the static and stationary boundary value field problems relative to an arbitrary configuration of parallel cylinders are obtained by using translational addition theorems for scalar Laplacian polar functions, to express the field due to one cylinder in terms of the polar coordinates of the other cylinders such that the boundary conditions can be imposed at all the cylinder surfaces. The constants of integration in the field expressions of all the cylinders are obtained from a truncated infinite matrix equation. Translational addition theorems are available for scalar cylindrical and spherical wave functions but such theorems are not directly available for the general solution of the Laplace equation in polar coordinates. The purpose of deriving these addition theorems and applying them to field problems involving systems of cylinders is to obtain exact analytic solutions with controllable accuracies, thereby, yielding benchmark solutions to validate other approximate numerical methods.

  4. Analysis of Glass-Filled Nylon in Laser Powder Bed Fusion Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotwinski, John; LaBarre, Erin; Forrest, Ryan; Crane, Emily

    2016-03-01

    At the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), glass bead-filled polyamide (a.k.a. nylon) (GFN) is being used frequently for functional parts and systems, built using a laser-based powder bed fusion (PBF) additive manufacturing (AM) system. Since these parts have performance requirements, it is important to understand the mechanical properties of the additively-made GFN as a function of build orientation and build parameters. In addition, the performance of the AM system used to manufacture these parts must be evaluated in order to understand its capabilities, especially in order to determine the dimensional precision and repeatability of features built with this system. This paper summarizes recent APL efforts to characterize the GFN powder, the mechanical properties of parts made with GFN, and the performance of the laser PBF machine while running GFN using an AM test artifact.

  5. Use of in vitro OmniPlex libraries for high-throughput comparative genomics and molecular haplotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamberov, Emmanuel; Sleptsova, Irina; Suchyta, Stephen; Bruening, Eric D.; Ziehler, William; Seward Nagel, Julie; Langmore, John P.; Makarov, Vladimir

    2002-06-01

    OmniPlex Technology is a new approach to genome amplification and targeted analysis. Initially the entire genome is reformatted into small, amplifiable molecules called Plexisomes, which represent the entire genome as an OmniPlex Library. The whole genome can be amplified en masse using universal primers; using locus-specific primers, regions as large as 50 kb can be amplified. Amplified Plexisomes can be analyzed using conventional methods such as capillary sequencing and microarray hybridization. The advantages to using OmniPlex as the 'front-end' for conventional analytical instruments are that a) the initial copy number of the analytes can be increased to achieve better signal-to-noire ratio, b) only a single priming site is used and c) up to 20 times fewer biochemical reactions and oligonucleotides are necessary to amplify a large region, compared to conventional PCR. These factors make OmniPlex more flexible, faster, and less expensive than conventional technologies. OmniPlex has been applied to targeted sequencing of human, animal, plant, and microorganism genomes. In addition, OmniPlex is inherently able to haplotype large regions of human DNA to accelerate target discovery and pharmacogenomics. OmniPlex will be a key tool for delivery of improved crops and livestock, new pharmaceutical products, and personalized medicine.

  6. An MCMC algorithm for haplotype assembly from whole-genome sequence data

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Vikas; Halpern, Aaron L.; Axelrod, Nelson; Bafna, Vineet

    2008-01-01

    In comparison to genotypes, knowledge about haplotypes (the combination of alleles present on a single chromosome) is much more useful for whole-genome association studies and for making inferences about human evolutionary history. Haplotypes are typically inferred from population genotype data using computational methods. Whole-genome sequence data represent a promising resource for constructing haplotypes spanning hundreds of kilobases for an individual. In this article, we propose a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm, HASH (haplotype assembly for single human), for assembling haplotypes from sequenced DNA fragments that have been mapped to a reference genome assembly. The transitions of the Markov chain are generated using min-cut computations on graphs derived from the sequenced fragments. We have applied our method to infer haplotypes using whole-genome shotgun sequence data from a recently sequenced human individual. The high sequence coverage and presence of mate pairs result in fairly long haplotypes (N50 length ∼ 350 kb). Based on comparison of the sequenced fragments against the individual haplotypes, we demonstrate that the haplotypes for this individual inferred using HASH are significantly more accurate than the haplotypes estimated using a previously proposed greedy heuristic and a simple MCMC method. Using haplotypes from the HapMap project, we estimate the switch error rate of the haplotypes inferred using HASH to be quite low, ∼1.1%. Our Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm represents a general framework for haplotype assembly that can be applied to sequence data generated by other sequencing technologies. The code implementing the methods and the phased individual haplotypes can be downloaded from http://www.cse.ucsd.edu/users/vibansal/HASH/. PMID:18676820

  7. Heterotic Haplotype Capture: precision breeding for hybrid performance.

    PubMed

    Snowdon, Rod J; Abbadi, Amine; Kox, Tobias; Schmutzer, Thomas; Leckband, Gunhild

    2015-07-01

    The need to improve hybrid performance, abiotic stress tolerance, and disease resistance without compromising seed quality makes the targeted capture of untapped diversity a major objective for crop breeders. Here we introduce the concept of Heterotic Haplotype Capture (HHC), in which genome sequence imputation is used to trace novel heterozygous chromosome blocks contributing to hybrid performance in large, structured populations of interrelated F1 hybrids containing interesting new diversity for breeding. PMID:26027461

  8. MHC haplotype involvement in avian resistance to an ectoparasite.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jeb P; Delany, Mary E; Mullens, Bradley A

    2008-10-01

    Research on immune function in evolutionary ecology has frequently focused on avian ectoparasites (e.g., mites and lice). However, host immunogenetics involved with bird resistance to ectoparasites has not been determined. The critical role of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in adaptive immunity and high genetic variation found within the MHC make this gene complex useful for exploring the immunogenetic basis for bird resistance to ectoparasites. The objective of this study was to determine if the avian MHC influenced resistance to a blood-feeding ectoparasite. Four congenic lines of chickens, differing only at the MHC, were comparatively infested with a cosmopolitan ectoparasite of birds-northern fowl mite (NFM)-which is also a serious pest species of poultry. Mite infestations were monitored over time and mite densities (weekly and maximum) were compared among lines. Chickens with the MHC haplotype B21 were relatively resistant to NFM, compared with birds in the B15 congenic line (P < 0.02). To test for similar effects in an outbred genetic background, a separate experiment was performed with 107 commercial chickens (white leghorn, W-36 strain) infested with NFM. Hens were genotyped using a MHC microsatellite marker (LEI0258) and associations between MHC haplotype and NFM density were tested. The highest peak NFM populations occurred more often on hens with the B15 haplotype versus the B21 haplotype (P = 0.012), which supported the results of the congenic study. These data indicate the avian MHC influences ectoparasite resistance, which is relevant to disease ecology and avian-ectoparasite interaction. PMID:18626638

  9. Genotype-phenotype correlations in 5-fluorouracil metabolism: a candidate DPYD haplotype to improve toxicity prediction.

    PubMed

    Gentile, G; Botticelli, A; Lionetto, L; Mazzuca, F; Simmaco, M; Marchetti, P; Borro, M

    2016-08-01

    5-Fluorouracil is among the most widely used anticancer drug, but a fraction of treated patients develop severe toxicity, with potentially lethal injuries. The predictive power of the available pretreatment assays, used to identify patients at risk of severe toxicity, needs improvements. This study aimed to correlate a phenotypic marker of 5-fluorouracil metabolism (the individual degradation rate of 5-fluorouracil-5-FUDR) with 15 functional polymorphisms in the dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase gene (DPYD). Single SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) analysis revealed that the SNPs rs1801160, rs1801265, rs2297595 and rs3918290 (splice site variant IVS14+1G>A) were significantly associated with a decreased value of 5-FUDR, and the rs3918290 causing the larger decrease. Multi-SNP analysis showed that a three-SNP haplotype (Hap7) involving rs1801160, rs1801265 and rs2297595 causes a marked decrease in 5-FUDR, comparable to that caused by the splice site variant rs3918290, which is the main pharmacogenetic marker associated with severe fluorouracil toxicity. The similar effect played by Hap7 and by the splice site variant rs3918290 upon individual 5-FUDR suggests that Hap7 could also represent a similar determinant of fluorouracil toxicity. Haplotype assessment could improve the predictive value of DPYD genetic markers aimed at the pre-emptive identification of patients at risk of severe 5-fluorouracil toxicity.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 28 July 2015; doi:10.1038/tpj.2015.56. PMID:26216193

  10. Rapid DNA haplotyping using a multiplex heteroduplex approach: Application to Duchenne muscula dystrophy carrier detection

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, T.W.; Wenger, G.D.; Moore, J.

    1994-09-01

    A new strategy has been developed for rapid haplotype analysis. It is based on an initial multiplex amplification of several polymorphic sites, followed by heteroduplex detection. Heteroduplexes formed between two different alleles are detected because they migrate differently than the corresponding homoduplexes in Hydrolink-MDE gel. The method is simple, rapid, does not depend on specific sequences such as restriction enzyme sites or CA boxes and does not require the use of isotope. This approach has been tested using 12 commonly occurring polymorphisms spanning the dystrophin gene as a model. We describe the use of the method to assign the carrier status of females in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) pedigrees. As a result of expanding the number of detectable polymorphisms throughout the dystrophin gene, we show how the method can easily be combined with dinucleotide analysis to improve the accuracy of carrier detection in the nondeletion cases. The technique is also shown to be used as an effective screen for improving carrier detection in several families with deletions. The finding of heterozygosity within the deletion identifies the at-risk female as a noncarrier. Using this method, we have identified and incorporated 3 new dystrophin polymorphisms (one of which in exon 16 is unique to African Americans). The method may be used other genetic diseases when mutations are unknown, or there are few dinucleotide markers in the gene proximity, or for the identification of haplotype backgrounds of mutant alleles.

  11. MHC haplotype and susceptibility to experimental infections (Salmonella Enteritidis, Pasteurella multocida or Ascaridia galli) in a commercial and an indigenous chicken breed.

    PubMed

    Schou, T W; Labouriau, R; Permin, A; Christensen, J P; Sørensen, P; Cu, H P; Nguyen, V K; Juul-Madsen, H R

    2010-05-15

    In three independent experimental infection studies, the susceptibility and course of infection of three pathogens considered of importance in most poultry production systems, Ascaridia galli, Salmonella Enteritidis and Pasteurella multocida were compared in two chicken breeds, the indigenous Vietnamese Ri and the commercial Luong Phuong. Furthermore, the association of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) with disease-related parameters was evaluated, using alleles of the LEI0258 microsatellite as markers for MHC haplotypes. The Ri chickens were found to be more resistant to A. galli and S. Enteritidis than commercial Luong Phuong chickens. In contrast, the Ri chickens were more susceptible to P. multocida, although production parameters were more affected in the Luong Phuong chickens. Furthermore, it was shown that the individual variations observed in response to the infections were influenced by the MHC. Using marker alleles of the microsatellite LEI0258, which is located within the MHC region, several MHC haplotypes were identified as being associated with infection intensity of A. galli. An association of the MHC with the specific antibody response to S. Enteritidis was also found where four MHC haplotypes were shown to be associated with high specific antibody response. Finally, one MHC haplotype was identified as being associated with pathological lesions and mortality in the P. multocida experiment. Although not statistically significant, our analysis suggested that this haplotype might be associated with resistance. These results demonstrate the presence of local genetic resources in Vietnamese chickens, which could be utilized in breeding programmes aiming at improving disease resistance. PMID:19945754

  12. Novel Nucleotide Variations, Haplotypes Structure and Associations with Growth Related Traits of Goat AT Motif-Binding Factor (ATBF1) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Xianfeng; Jia, Wenchao; Pan, Chuanying; Li, Xiangcheng; Lei, Chuzhao; Chen, Hong; Lan, Xianyong

    2015-01-01

    The AT motif-binding factor (ATBF1) not only interacts with protein inhibitor of activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) (PIAS3) to suppress STAT3 signaling regulating embryo early development and cell differentiation, but is required for early activation of the pituitary specific transcription factor 1 (Pit1) gene (also known as POU1F1) critically affecting mammalian growth and development. The goal of this study was to detect novel nucleotide variations and haplotypes structure of the ATBF1 gene, as well as to test their associations with growth-related traits in goats. Herein, a total of seven novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (SNP 1-7) within this gene were found in two well-known Chinese native goat breeds. Haplotypes structure analysis demonstrated that there were four haplotypes in Hainan black goat while seventeen haplotypes in Xinong Saanen dairy goat, and both breeds only shared one haplotype (hap1). Association testing revealed that the SNP2, SNP5, SNP6, and SNP7 loci were also found to significantly associate with growth-related traits in goats, respectively. Moreover, one diplotype in Xinong Saanen dairy goats significantly linked to growth related traits. These preliminary findings not only would extend the spectrum of genetic variations of the goat ATBF1 gene, but also would contribute to implementing marker-assisted selection in genetics and breeding in goats. PMID:26323396

  13. Consequence analysis of an unmitigated NaOH solution spray release during addition to waste tank

    SciTech Connect

    Himes, D.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-21

    Toxicological consequences were calculated for a postulated maximum caustic soda (NaOH) solution spray leak during addition to a waste tank to adjust tank pH. Although onsite risk guidelines were exceeded for the unmitigated release, site boundary consequences were below the level of concern. Means of mitigating the release so as to greatly reduce the onsite consequences were recommended.

  14. HUMAN HEALTH DAMAGES FROM MOBILE SOURCE AIR POLLUTION: ADDITIONAL DELPHI DATA ANALYSIS. VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report contains the results of additional analyses of the data generated by a panel of medical experts for a study of Human Health Damages from Mobile Source Air Pollution (hereafter referred to as HHD) conducted by the California Air Resources Board in 1973-75 for the U.S. E...

  15. An Analysis of Word Problems in School Mathematics Texts: Operation of Addition and Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Parmjit

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the types of word problems represented in Malaysia's primary one, primary two and primary three mathematics texts based on Van De Walle's model (1998) in the operations of addition and subtraction. A test was constructed to measure students' success based on this model. The data from this study indicates that the Malaysian…

  16. Vector generalized additive models for extreme rainfall data analysis (study case rainfall data in Indramayu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utami, Eka Putri Nur; Wigena, Aji Hamim; Djuraidah, Anik

    2016-02-01

    Rainfall pattern are good indicators for potential disasters. Global Circulation Model (GCM) contains global scale information that can be used to predict the rainfall data. Statistical downscaling (SD) utilizes the global scale information to make inferences in the local scale. Essentially, SD can be used to predict local scale variables based on global scale variables. SD requires a method to accommodate non linear effects and extreme values. Extreme value Theory (EVT) can be used to analyze the extreme value. One of methods to identify the extreme events is peak over threshold that follows Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD). The vector generalized additive model (VGAM) is an extension of the generalized additive model. It is able to accommodate linear or nonlinear effects by involving more than one additive predictors. The advantage of VGAM is to handle multi response models. The key idea of VGAM are iteratively reweighted least square for maximum likelihood estimation, penalized smoothing, fisher scoring and additive models. This works aims to analyze extreme rainfall data in Indramayu using VGAM. The results show that the VGAM with GPD is able to predict extreme rainfall data accurately. The prediction in February is very close to the actual value at quantile 75.

  17. Complete MHC haplotype sequencing for common disease gene mapping.

    PubMed

    Stewart, C Andrew; Horton, Roger; Allcock, Richard J N; Ashurst, Jennifer L; Atrazhev, Alexey M; Coggill, Penny; Dunham, Ian; Forbes, Simon; Halls, Karen; Howson, Joanna M M; Humphray, Sean J; Hunt, Sarah; Mungall, Andrew J; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Palmer, Sophie; Roberts, Anne N; Rogers, Jane; Sims, Sarah; Wang, Yu; Wilming, Laurens G; Elliott, John F; de Jong, Pieter J; Sawcer, Stephen; Todd, John A; Trowsdale, John; Beck, Stephan

    2004-06-01

    The future systematic mapping of variants that confer susceptibility to common diseases requires the construction of a fully informative polymorphism map. Ideally, every base pair of the genome would be sequenced in many individuals. Here, we report 4.75 Mb of contiguous sequence for each of two common haplotypes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), to which susceptibility to >100 diseases has been mapped. The autoimmune disease-associated-haplotypes HLA-A3-B7-Cw7-DR15 and HLA-A1-B8-Cw7-DR3 were sequenced in their entirety through a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) cloning strategy using the consanguineous cell lines PGF and COX, respectively. The two sequences were annotated to encompass all described splice variants of expressed genes. We defined the complete variation content of the two haplotypes, revealing >18,000 variations between them. Average SNP densities ranged from less than one SNP per kilobase to >60. Acquisition of complete and accurate sequence data over polymorphic regions such as the MHC from large-insert cloned DNA provides a definitive resource for the construction of informative genetic maps, and avoids the limitation of chromosome regions that are refractory to PCR amplification. PMID:15140828

  18. EBSD analysis of magnesium addition on inclusion formation in SS400 structural steel

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Sin-Jie; Su, Yen-Hao Frank; Lu, Muh-Jung; Kuo, Jui-Chao

    2013-08-15

    In this study, the effect of magnesium addition on the inclusion formation in SS400 steel was investigated. The experimental specimens with and without Mg addition treatment were compared. The microstructure was observed using optical microscopy after etching with 3% nital. The morphology and chemical composition of the inclusions were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry. The lattice structure and orientation of the inclusions were identified by electron backscattering diffraction. The average size of inclusions in SS400 was between 0.67 and 0.75 μm, and between 0.65 and 0.68 μm in SS400 + Mg. The 2 ppm Mg addition resulted in the oxide formation change from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to MgO·Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and in the inclusion formation change from Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–MnS to MgO·Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–MnS. Moreover, a simple-phase MnS with an average grain size of 1 μm to 2 μm was observed in rod-like, globular, and polyhedron forms. - Highlights: • The effect of magnesium addition was investigated for SS400 steel. • 2 ppm Mg addition changes the inclusion formation from Al2O3-MnS to MgO·Al2O3-MnS. • MnS observed in inclusions exhibits rod-like, globular, and polyhedron forms.